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Sample records for stroke treatment academic

  1. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  2. Use of acupuncture therapy as a supplement to conventional medical treatments for acute ischaemic stroke patients in an academic medical centre in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyejung; Kwon, Young Dae; Yoon, Sung Sang

    2011-10-01

    Acupuncture has served as a major complementary and alternative therapy that supplements conventional medicine and is the subject of growing public interest. This study was conducted to estimate the usage rate of acupuncture as a supplemental treatment in acute ischaemic stroke patients and to identify factors associated with the choice to use this therapy. Using the registry of stroke patients admitted to an academic medical centre in Korea, the use of acupuncture therapy was recorded and analysed, along with the patients' socio-demographic characteristics, hospital access variables, risk factors for ischaemic stroke and clinical characteristics. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analyses. Of 2167 patients, 18% received acupuncture therapy. The choice of acupuncture therapy was significantly associated with stroke severity as well as gender, age, geographical residence and previous history of stroke. After controlling for other significant factors, there was an approximately 3.4-fold greater usage in patients with moderately severe strokes (95% confidence interval (CI)=2.5-4.6) and 4.1-fold greater usage in patients with severe strokes (95% CI=2.7-6.4). The findings provide a better understanding of patients' utilization of acupuncture therapy as a supplement to conventional medical treatments and of factors associated with the utilization of acupuncture in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Strategic implications of acupuncture therapy are suggested for both health-care providers and policy makers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Basics of acute stroke treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haass, A.

    2005-01-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O 2 delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [de

  4. The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich; Fassbender, Klaus; Hussain, M Shazam; Ebinger, Martin; Turc, Guillaume; Uchino, Ken; Davis, Stephen; Alexandrov, Anne; Grotta, James

    2017-12-01

    Background The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization was formed in 2016 as an international consortium of medical practitioners involved in pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute stroke. Aims PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization's mission is to improve stroke outcomes by supporting research and advocacy for pre-hospital stroke treatment in Mobile Stroke Units. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will provide a platform to enhance collaborative research across the spectrum of acute stroke management in the pre-hospital setting. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will also facilitate the appropriate proliferation and distribution of Mobile Stroke Units by providing a forum for professional communication, resource for public education, and stimulus for government, industry, and philanthropic support. Summary of review In this "white paper", we describe the evidence supporting pre-hospital stroke treatment, progress to date, practical issues such as application in various environments and staffing, planned research initiatives, and organizational structure. Conclusions PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization is not-for-profit, with membership open to anyone involved (or hoping to become involved) in pre-hospital stroke care. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization has a Steering Committee comprised of members from Europe, U.S., Canada, Australia, and other regions having a Mobile Stroke Unit in operation. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization convenes satellite meetings for membership at the International Stroke Conference and European Stroke Congress each year to address the PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization mission. The first research collaborations agreed upon are to: (1) develop a list of common data elements to be collected by all Mobile Stroke Unit programs and entered into a common research database, and (2) develop a protocol for investigating the natural history of hyper-acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

  5. Stroke treatment outcomes in hospitals with and without Stroke Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Ignacio García, E; Mira Solves, J J; Ollero Ortiz, A; Vidal de Francisco, D; López-Mesonero, L; Bestué, M; Albertí, O; Acebrón, F; Navarro Soler, I M

    2017-10-23

    Organisational capacity in terms of resources and care circuits to shorten response times in new stroke cases is key to obtaining positive outcomes. This study compares therapeutic approaches and treatment outcomes between traditional care centres (with stroke teams and no stroke unit) and centres with stroke units. We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental study (without randomisation of the units analysed) to draw comparisons between 2 centres with stroke units and 4 centres providing traditional care through the neurology department, analysing a selection of agreed indicators for monitoring quality of stroke care. A total of 225 patients participated in the study. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were used to collect patients' evaluations of the service and healthcare received. Centres with stroke units showed shorter response times after symptom onset, both in the time taken to arrive at the centre and in the time elapsed from patient's arrival at the hospital to diagnostic imaging. Hospitals with stroke units had greater capacity to respond through the application of intravenous thrombolysis than centres delivering traditional neurological care. Centres with stroke units showed a better fit to the reference standards for stroke response time, as calculated in the Quick study, than centres providing traditional care through the neurology department. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Academic-industry Collaborations in Translational Stroke Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Barthel, Henryk; Gounis, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    Academic-industry collaborations are an emerging format of translational stroke research. Next to classic contract research models, a multitude of collaboration models has been developed, some of which even allowing for multinational or intercontinental research programs. This development has recently been paralleled by first successful attempts to overcome the translational stroke research road block, such as the unprecedented success of novel endovascular approaches or the advent of the multicenter preclinical trial concept. While the first underlines the role of the industry as a major innovation driver in stroke research, the latter will require enrollment of industrial partners for optimal output. Moreover, academic-industry partnerships are invaluable to bridge the translational "valley of death" as well as funding gaps in times of dwindling public funding and declining high risk capital investments. However, these collaborations are also subject to relevant challenges because interests, values, and aims often significantly differ between cademia and industry. Here, we describe common academic-industry collaboration models as well as associated benefits and challenges in the stroke research arena. We also suggest strategies for improved planning, implementation, guidance, and utilization of academic-industry collaborations to the maximum mutual benefit.

  7. Case Study of physioterapy treatment of a patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Formánková, Dita

    2012-01-01

    Title: Case study of physioterapy treatment of a patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis. Objectives: The aim of the thesis is to obtain academic findings about stroke concerning anatomy, pathology, therapetuic approaches and methods which can be utilised in cases of stroke. The specific part focuses on the therapeutic care of a patient after hemorragic stroke which was taken during a month practice at Rehabilitation clinic Malvazinky, Medditera s.r.o. Summary: The theory of the ...

  8. Case study of physioterapy treatment of patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Waldmann, Tadeáš

    2014-01-01

    Title: Case study of physioterapy treatment of a patient after hemoragic stroke with left hemiparesis. Objectives: The aim of the thesis is to obtain academic findings about stroke concerning anatomy, pathology, therapetuic approaches and methods which can be utilised in cases of stroke. The specific part focuses on the therapeutic care of a patient after hemorragic stroke which was taken during a month practice at Regional hospital Kladno Spa Summary: The theory of the thesis discusses anato...

  9. Endovascular stroke treatment in a small-volume stroke center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Gry N; Fjetland, Lars; Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Martin W; Kurz, Kathinka D

    2017-04-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) of stroke caused by large vessel occlusions (LVO) performed by general interventional radiologists in cooperation with stroke neurologists and neuroradiologists at a center with a limited annual number of procedures. We aimed to compare our results with those previously reported from larger stroke centers. A total of 108 patients with acute stroke due to LVO treated with EVT were included. Outcome was measured using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days. Efficacy was classified according to the modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (mTICI) scoring system. Safety was evaluated according to the incidence of procedural complications and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Mean age of the patients was 67.5 years. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on hospital admission was 17. Successful revascularization was achieved in 76%. 39.4% experienced a good clinical outcome (mRS<3). Intraprocedural complications were seen in 7.4%. 7.4% suffered a sICH. 21.3% died within 3 months after EVT. The use of general interventional radiologists in EVT of LVO may be a possible approach for improving EVT coverage where availability of specialized neurointerventionalists is challenging. EVT for LVO stroke performed by general interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists can be safe and efficacious despite the low number of annual procedures.

  10. Rural versus urban academic hospital mortality following stroke in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Richard; Bussières, Sylvain; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Turcotte, Stéphane; Légaré, France; Plant, Jeff; Poitras, Julien; Archambault, Patrick M; Dupuis, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in Canada. While stroke care has improved dramatically over the last decade, outcomes following stroke among patients treated in rural hospitals have not yet been reported in Canada. To describe variation in 30-day post-stroke in-hospital mortality rates between rural and urban academic hospitals in Canada. We also examined 24/7 in-hospital access to CT scanners and selected services in rural hospitals. We included Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) data on adjusted 30-day in-hospital mortality following stroke from 2007 to 2011 for all acute care hospitals in Canada excluding Quebec and the Territories. We categorized rural hospitals as those located in rural small towns providing 24/7 emergency physician coverage with inpatient beds. Urban hospitals were academic centres designated as Level 1 or 2 trauma centres. We computed descriptive data on local access to a CT scanner and other services and compared mean 30-day adjusted post-stroke mortality rates for rural and urban hospitals to the overall Canadian rate. A total of 286 rural hospitals (3.4 million emergency department (ED) visits/year) and 24 urban hospitals (1.5 million ED visits/year) met inclusion criteria. From 2007 to 2011, 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke were significantly higher in rural than in urban hospitals and higher than the Canadian average for every year except 2008 (rural average range = 18.26 to 21.04 and urban average range = 14.11 to 16.78). Only 11% of rural hospitals had a CT-scanner, 1% had MRI, 21% had in-hospital ICU, 94% had laboratory and 92% had basic x-ray facilities. Rural hospitals in Canada had higher 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke than urban academic hospitals and the Canadian average. Rural hospitals also have very limited local access to CT scanners and ICUs. These rural/urban discrepancies are cause for concern in the context of Canada's universal health care system.

  11. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  12. Comparison of tissue plasminogen activator administration management between Telestroke Network hospitals and academic stroke centers: the Telemedical Pilot Project for Integrative Stroke Care in Bavaria/Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich J; Kukla, Christian; Vatankhah, Bijan; Gotzler, Berthold; Schenkel, Johannes; Hofer, Stephan; Fürst, Andrea; Haberl, Roman L

    2006-07-01

    Systemic thrombolysis is the only therapy proven to be effective for ischemic stroke. Telemedicine may help to extend its use. However, concerns remain whether management and safety of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration after telemedical consultation are equivalent in less experienced hospitals compared with tPA administration in academic stroke centers. During the second year of the ongoing Telemedical Pilot Project for Integrative Stroke Care, all systemic thrombolyses in stroke patients of the 12 regional clinics and the 2 stroke centers were recorded prospectively. Patients' demographics, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), frequency of administration, time management, protocol violations, and safety were included in the analysis. In 2004, 115 of 4727 stroke or transient ischemic attack patients (2.4%) in the community hospitals and 110 of 1889 patients in the stroke centers (5.8%) received systemic thrombolysis. Prehospital latencies were shorter in the regional hospitals despite longer distances. Door to needle times were shorter in the stroke centers. Although blood pressure was controlled more strictly in community hospitals, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage rate (7.8%) was higher (P=0.14) than in stroke centers (2.7%) but still within the range of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trial. In-hospital mortality rate was low in community hospitals (3.5%) and in stroke centers (4.5%). Although with a lower rate of systemic thrombolysis, there was no evidence of lower treatment quality in the remote hospitals. With increasing numbers of tPA administration and growing training effects, the telestroke concept promises better coverage of systemic thrombolysis in nonurban areas.

  13. Feasibility of progesterone treatment for ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Claire L; Bath, Philip M

    2016-03-01

    Two multi-centre phase III clinical trials examining the protective potential of progesterone following traumatic brain injury have recently failed to demonstrate any improvement in outcome. Thus, it is timely to consider how this impacts on the translational potential of progesterone treatment for ischaemic stroke. A wealth of experimental evidence supports the neuroprotective properties of progesterone, and associated metabolites, following various types of central nervous system injury. In particular, for ischaemic stroke, studies have also begun to reveal possible mechanisms of such neuroprotection. However, the results in traumatic brain injury now question whether further clinical development of progesterone for ischaemic stroke is relevant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Hypothermia for treatment of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Youl Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major cause of neurological disability and death in industrialized nations. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to protect the brain from ischemia, stroke, and other acute neurological insults at the laboratory level. It has been shown to improve neurological outcome in certain clinical settings including anoxic brain injury due to cardiac arrest and hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypothermia seems to affect multiple aspects of brain physiology and it is likely that multiple mechanisms underlie its protective effect. Understanding the events that occur in the ischemic brain during hypothermia might help lead to an understanding of how to protect the brain against acute injuries.

  15. Spasticity after stroke: Physiology, assessment and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut, Aurore; Chatelle, Camille; Ziegler, Erik; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Laureys, Steven; Gosseries, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses explaining its development after a stroke, give an overview of related neuroimaging studies as well as a description of the most common scales used to quantify the degree of spasticity and finally explore which treatments are currently being used to treat this disorder. The lack of consensus is high...

  16. [Acute surgical treatment of malignant stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Eskesen, Vagn; Hansen, Klaus; Kondziella, Daniel; Kelsen, Jesper

    2016-10-24

    Malignant stroke is an intracranial herniation syndrome caused by cerebral oedema after a large hemispheric or cerebellar stroke. Malignant middle cerebral artery infarction is a devastating disease with a mortality around 80% despite intensive medical treatment. Decompressive craniectomy reduces mortality and improves functional outcome - especially in younger patients (age ≤ 60 years). Decompression of the posterior fossa is a life-saving procedure in patients with malignant cerebellar infarctions and often leads to good neurological outcome.

  17. Intensive Treatment of Dysarthria Secondary to Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Leslie A.; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a well-defined behavioral dysarthria treatment on acoustic and perceptual measures of speech in four adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke. A single-subject A-B-A experimental design was used to measure the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) on the speech of individual…

  18. Neurodevelopmental treatment after stroke : a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. T.B. Hafsteinsdóttir; A Algra; M.H.F. Grypdonck; L.J. Kappelle

    2005-01-01

    Background: Neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) is a rehabilitation approach increasingly used in the care of stroke patients, although no evidence has been provided for its efficacy. Objective: To investigate the effects of NDT on the functional status and quality of life (QoL) of patients

  19. Thrombolytic treatment for stroke in the Scandinavian countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, K.B.; Murray, V.; Boysen, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective - We wanted to describe the use of thrombolytic treatment for stroke in Scandinavia, to assess stroke doctors' opinions on this treatment, to identify barriers against treatment, and to suggest improvements to overcome these barriers. Methods - We sent questionnaires to 493 Scandinavian...... treatment for stroke as beneficial, yet its implementation in clinical practice has so far been poor. Our survey identified important barriers and potential measures that could increase its future use Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...

  20. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  1. Who benefits from treatment and rehabilitation in a stroke Unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Houth, J

    2000-01-01

    The beneficial effects of treatment and rehabilitation of patients with acute stroke in a dedicated stroke unit (SU) are well established. We wanted to examine if these effects are limited to certain groups of patients or if they apply to all patients independent of age, sex, comorbidity......, and initial stroke severity....

  2. Challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, L. C.; Hillis, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The onset of stroke in children rarely owes to traditional stroke risk factors such as hypertension or diabetes. Rather, stroke in this patient group typically results from the simultaneous occurrence of multiple stroke risk factors, the presence of which necessitates a thorough evaluation. Several challenges exist in the care of children with stroke. Of note, recognition of pediatric stroke onset by parents and caregivers is often delayed, highlighting the need for increased awareness of and education regarding this condition. In terms of diagnostic challenges, various neurological conditions resemble stroke in pediatric patients and definite diagnosis of stroke will require MRI; adding to the challenge, young children may need to be sedated to undergo acute MRI. Perhaps the most significant challenge is the need for clinical research studies focusing on pediatric stroke treatment, so as to allow evidence-based treatment decision-making. A final challenge is standardizing outcome assessment after stroke across a wide range of ages and developmental levels. In this Review, we examine recent findings and diagnostic issues pertaining to both arterial ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in children. PMID:21386815

  3. Plasticity in the developing brain: intellectual, language and academic functions in children with ischaemic perinatal stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ballantyne, Angela O.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A.

    2008-01-01

    The developing brain has the capacity for a great deal of plasticity. A number of investigators have demonstrated that intellectual and language skills may be in the normal range in children following unilateral perinatal stroke. Questions have been raised, however, about whether these skills can be maintained at the same level as the brain matures. This study aimed to examine the stability of intellectual, academic and language functioning during development in children with perinatal stroke...

  4. Relevance of prehospital stroke code activation for acute treatment measures in stroke care: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldereschi, Marzia; Piccardi, Benedetta; Di Carlo, Antonio; Lucente, Giuseppe; Guidetti, Donata; Consoli, Domenico; Provinciali, Leandro; Toni, Danilo; Sacchetti, Maria Luisa; Polizzi, Bianca Maria; Inzitari, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The use of emergency services with prehospital stroke assessment and early notification to the treatment hospital (stroke code) is a crucial determinant of delay time for acute stroke treatment. We reviewed and summarized the literature on prehospital stroke code system implementation. Two databases were explored (last update June 20, 2011) with 3 key words (stroke code, stroke prehospital management and stroke prehospital services). Inclusion criteria were: randomized and quasirandomized controlled trials, cohort and case-control studies, and hospital- and emergency-based registers, with no year or language restrictions. We examined the reference lists of all included articles. All potentially relevant reports and abstracts were transcribed into a specifically designed data abstraction form. Only 19 of the 680 studies which were initially retrieved, published from 1999 to 2011, fulfilled our inclusion criteria. One clinical trial was identified. Large differences in stroke code procedures and study designs within and across countries prohibited the pooling of the data. Most studies were carried out in urban areas. Assuming the rate of tissue-plasminogen activator treatment as the performance measure, most studies report a significant increase in the rate of treatment (increase between 3.2 and 16%) with only 1 study not reporting any increase. Despite its limitations, this review suggests that the use of prehospital stroke code is an important intervention to improve the accessibility of the benefits of thrombolysis, especially when implemented together with educational campaigns to optimize the awareness and behavior of patients and bystanders. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Mechanical recanalization in acute stroke treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkefeld, J.; Rochemont, R. du Mesnil de; Zanella, F.E.; Sitzer, M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of endovascular techniques for the treatment of acute stroke began with the introduction of local intra-arterial fibrinolysis. In parallel to designing new systemic therapy approaches, catheter systems for loosening, disintegrating, or removing cerebral thrombi have undergone assessment in recent years to serve as alternatives or supplements to fibrinolytic treatment. Mechanical alteration of intracranial thrombi with balloon catheters, manipulations with the guide wire, or ultrasound waves transmitted into the vascular system as well as techniques for thrombus aspiration, snare extraction, or more complex hydrodynamic or laser-guided thrombectomy systems have been tested in feasibility studies, which evidenced basic functionality and relative safety. Broad clinical applications outside of the clinical trial setting cannot yet be recommended since the new catheter systems are still in early phase clinical testing. (orig.) [de

  6. Ischemic Stroke Treatment Trials: Neuroimaging Advancements and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek P; Heit, Jeremy J

    2017-06-01

    There have been significant advancements in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the last 2 decades. Recent trials have placed a significant emphasis on minimizing the time from symptom onset to stroke treatment by reperfusion therapies, which decreases the cerebral infarct volume and improves clinical outcomes. These clinical advances have paralleled and been aided by advances in neuroimaging. However, controversy remains regarding how much time should be spent on neuroimaging evaluation versus expediting patient treatment. In this review article, we examine the key endovascular stroke trials published in the past 25 years, and we briefly highlight the failures and successes of endovascular stroke trials performed in the past 4 years. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using time from symptom onset versus neuroimaging in determining endovascular stroke therapy candidacy.

  7. Who benefits from treatment and rehabilitation in a stroke Unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Houth, J

    2000-01-01

    The beneficial effects of treatment and rehabilitation of patients with acute stroke in a dedicated stroke unit (SU) are well established. We wanted to examine if these effects are limited to certain groups of patients or if they apply to all patients independent of age, sex, comorbidity, and ini...

  8. Sleep apnea in stroke: Diagnosis, consequences & treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder in stroke, but is often left unrecognized and untreated. When left untreated, OSA is thought to contribute to decreased recovery from stroke. The main objectives of this thesis were 1) to improve early recognition of sleep apnea in

  9. Stroke care in Galicia: telemedicine in the early, multidisciplinary treatment of all acute stroke cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castro, Emilio; Vázquez-Lima, Manuel José; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Verde, Luis; Castillo, José

    2018-02-01

    Stroke is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Spain and in Galicia in particular. Tissue viability after stroke depends on the time taken to restore circulation. The widely dispersed and aging population of this region challenges efforts to provide equal care for patients with time-sensitive emergencies such as stroke. Two regional hospitals (Hospital do Salnés and Hospital do Barbanza) and the reference Hospital Clínico de Santiago launched a telestroke pilot program in 2011 in which patients whose treatment was guided at a distance were discharged with lower levels of stroke severity and mortality. That outcome was probably attributable to more rapid diagnosis. Given those preliminary results and the characteristics of the population, the centrally coordinated Galician Stroke Care Plan was launched in 2016 to provide a telemedicine service that connects all hospitals in the health system of Galicia. This paper summarizes the experience of developing and implementing the program.

  10. Update on acute endovascular and surgical stroke treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, D; Cortsen, M; Eskesen, V

    2013-01-01

    Emergency stroke care has become a natural part of the emerging discipline of neurocritical care and demands close cooperation between the neurologist and neurointerventionists, neurosurgeons, and anesthesiologists. Endovascular treatment (EVT), including intra-arterial thrombolysis, mechanical...

  11. Does treatment with t-PA increase the risk of developing epilepsy after stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lena; Hobohm, Carsten; Zeynalova, Samira; Classen, Joseph; Baum, Petra

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering from ischemic stroke carry an enhanced risk of developing secondary epilepsy. We sought to clarify whether thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is independently associated with post-stroke epilepsy (PSE). In this observational study, data from 302 stroke patients treated at a single academic neurological department were analyzed retrospectively. Median follow-up was 42 months (maximum 80). Variables included presence of comorbidity, stroke severity, neurological presentation, complications, infarct characteristics, and treatment with t-PA. After univariate analyses, a multivariate analysis was performed to create a model of factors that were significantly associated with PSE, including treatment with t-PA. 13.9 % of patients developed PSE during follow-up. Multivariate analysis identified 5 independent factors for PSE: low Barthel Index at discharge; hemianopia; infection acquired during the hospital stay; involvement of the temporal lobe; involvement of the perirolandic cortex. While the incidence of PSE was higher in patients treated with t-PA (20.6 vs. 10.7 %, univariate analysis; p = 0.020), the effect was lost after adjusting for several factors associated with t-PA treatment [odds ratio for PSE after treatment with t-PA 1.3 (95 % CI 0.6-2.9), p = 0.489]. This study failed to identify treatment with t-PA as an independent risk factor for PSE.

  12. Balneotherapy in treatment of spastic upper limb after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-02-01

    After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval cryotherapy. The outcome was evaluated using Modified Ashworth scale for spasticity and VAS scale for pain. The significance value was sat at pspasticity and pain in affected upper limb. Reduction in tone of affected upper limb muscles was significant in Ex group (pspasticity and pain significantly and can help in treatment of post-stroke patients.

  13. CITICOLIN IN THE TREATMENT OF STROKE AND VASCULAR COGNITIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatol'evich Parfenov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Citicolin (ceraxon is used as a neuroprotector in the treatment of acute stroke and vascular cognitive disorders. Experimental animal studies have demonstrated that citicolin reduces the extent of cerebral infarct and increases the degree of functional recovery. A few clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of intravenous or oral citicolin used within the first 24 hours of ischemic stroke or cerebral hemorrhage in recovery of neurological functions. Citicolin is effective in memory and behavioral disorders in elderly patients with chronic cerebrovascular diseases. The use of citicolin has been found to be safe in stroke and vascular cognitive disorders

  14. Prevalence of risk factors for ischaemic stroke and their treatment among a cohort of stroke patients in Dublin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2000-10-01

    The majority of strokes are due to ischaemia. Risk factors include atrial fibrillation, hypertension and smoking. The incidence can be reduced by addressing these risk factors. This study examines the prevalence of risk factors and their treatment in a cohort of patients with ischaemic stroke registered on a Dublin stroke database.

  15. Gender, Social Networks, and Stroke Preparedness in the Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Tracy E; Roberts, Eric T; Kuczynski, Heather; Goldmann, Emily; Parikh, Nina S; Boden-Albala, Bernadette

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of gender on the association between social networks and stroke preparedness as measured by emergency department (ED) arrival within 3 hours of symptom onset. As part of the Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment study, baseline data on demographics, social networks, and time to ED arrival were collected from 1193 prospectively enrolled stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients at Columbia University Medical Center. Logistic regression was conducted with arrival to the ED ≤3 hours as the outcome, social network characteristics as explanatory variables, and gender as a potential effect modifier. Men who lived alone or were divorced were significantly less likely to arrive ≤3 hours than men who lived with a spouse (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: .31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: .15-0.64) or were married (aOR: .45, 95% CI: .23-0.86). Among women, those who lived alone or were divorced had similar odds of arriving ≤3 hours compared with those who lived with a spouse (aOR: 1.25, 95% CI: .63-2.49) or were married (aOR: .73, 95% CI: .4-1.35). In patients with stroke/TIA, living with someone or being married improved time to arrival in men only. Behavioral interventions to improve stroke preparedness should incorporate gender differences in how social networks affect arrival times. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stroke treatment in Stroke Unit: from scientific evidences to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Stornello

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In themanagement of stroke disease, evidences fromthe literature demonstrate that the introduction of stroke units, hospital wards with dedicated beds providing intensive care within 48 hours of symptoms’ onset, produced a real improvement in the outcome, reducing in-hospital fatality cases and increasing the proportion of patients independently living in long term follow-up. Discussion: The article focuses on stroke disease-management, suggesting a stroke integrated approach for the admission of patients on dedicated beds, in order to extend the ‘‘stroke care’’ approach outcomes to as many hospitals as possible in Italy. This approach implies the set up of a stroke network for an effective patients’ stratification according to the severity of the illness at debut; the set up of an integrated team of specialists in hospital management of the acute phase (first 48 hours and a timely rehabilitation treatment. Ultimately the hospital should be organized according to department’s semi-intensive areas in order to assure to the patients, in the early stage of the disease, a timely high intensity care aimed to improve the long term outcome.

  17. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study...... was observed. An explanation could be an increase in the prevalence of AF in the general population, leaving the proportion of patients admitted with ischemic stroke unchanged. Other risk factors have been sought reduced as well with the implementation of national guidelines regarding hypertension...... was set up to clarify whether this effort has resulted in a decreased proportion of patients with known AF experiencing an ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Department of Neurology, Vejle Hospital, Denmark, with ischemic stroke from January 1997 to December 2012 were included in the study...

  19. Hemorrhagic transformation in ischemic stroke and its treatment during thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Paciaroni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic transformation (HT of brain infarction or hemorrhagic infarction is a complication of acute ischemic stroke, especially in cardioembolic stroke, and represents the most feared complication of thrombolysis. HT is a multifocal secondary bleeding into brain infarcts with innumerable foci of capillary and venular extravasation either remaining as discrete petechiae or emerging to form confluent purpura. HT is evidenced as a parenchymal area of increased density within an area of low attenuation in a typical vascular distribution on non-contrasted CT scans and is subdivided into two major categories on the basis of standardised definition: haemorrhagic infarct (HI and parenchymal haematoma (PH. PH has been associated to poor outcome in ischemic stroke patients. Thus, its prevention, early detection and adequate treatment represent key points in the management of acute stroke.

  20. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M W; Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. METHODS:...

  1. Statin treatment and stroke outcome in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Zivin, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Laboratory experiments suggest statins reduce stroke severity and improve outcomes. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial was a placebo-controlled, randomized trial designed to determine whether treatment with atorvastatin reduces...... strokes in subjects with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (n=4731). We analyzed SPARCL trial data to determine whether treatment favorably shifts the distribution of severities of ischemic cerebrovascular outcomes. METHODS: Severity was assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke...... Scale, Barthel Index, and modified Rankin Scale score at enrollment (1 to 6 months after the index event) and 90 days poststroke in subjects having a stroke during the trial. RESULTS: Over 4.9 years, strokes occurred in 576 subjects. There were reductions in fatal, severe (modified Rankin Scale score 5...

  2. Basics of acute stroke treatment; Grundzuege der akuten Schlaganfalltherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haass, A. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O{sub 2} delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [German] Jeder akute Schlaganfall ist ein Notfall und muss sofort in einer spezialisierten Klinik, am besten einer Stroke Unit, behandelt werden. Die Stroke-Unit-Behandlung senkt den Behinderungsgrad und die Letalitaet um 30% staerker als die

  3. Effects of anti-inflammatory treatments on stroke outcome in animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiebosch, I.A.C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a devastating disease with over 5.5 million yearly casualties worldwide. Acute treatment strategies are limited. The acute inflammatory response following stroke has been demonstrated to be detrimental on stroke outcome, for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes.

  4. Effects of alteplase in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayan J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: For the last 15 years, alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator has been used widely throughout the world for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Although considered to be safe and effective, like all drugs, alteplase has side effects.Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in the intensive care unit of the department of internal medicine in a mid-size peripheral acute hospital in Germany. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent alteplase-induced thrombolysis were investigated.Results: Among the 1017 patients admitted for stroke investigation, 23 (2.26% received thrombolytic therapy consisting of intravenous alteplase. Of these, six patients (26.09% experienced complications, ie, four (17.39% had intracerebral hemorrhage, one (4.35% developed orolingual angioedema, and one (4.35% had a hematoma on the right arm. After treatment with alteplase, two (33.33% patients in the study group (n = 6 died because of intracerebral hemorrhage and one (16.67% died because of aspiration pneumonia. One (5.88% patient in the control group (n = 17 died of cerebral edema.Conclusion: The incidence of stroke and number of patients treated with alteplase in the examined hospital subunit has not increased in recent years. Also, in this study, no statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of various complications occurring during treatment for acute ischemic stroke with alteplase, but intracerebral hemorrhage was the most common complication.Keywords: alteplase, complications, acute ischemic stroke, safety, efficacy

  5. Treatment and partial recovery of ischemic stroke hemiplegy through acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a patient with hemiplegy and dysphonia due to an ischemic stroke in the pons who was treated through classical systemic and scalpean acupuncture and electroacupuncture, presenting considerable improvement in speaking, walking and moving her right arm after three months of treatment.

  6. Treatment of acute ischemic stroke: Awareness among general practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron S; Alexander M; Maya T; Mathew V; Goyal M

    2010-01-01

    For promptly referral of a patient with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) for possible thrombolysis, general practitioners (GPs) need to equipped with the advanced knowledge of AIS treatment. We assessed the knowledge regarding treatment of AIS among GPs practicing in and around a quaternary care teaching hospital in south India. A total of 109 GPs who attend to medical emergencies were interviewed using a standard questionnaire. Of the 109 GPs interviewed, 54% felt that tissue plasminogen a...

  7. Thrombolytic and anticoagulation treatment in a rat embolic stroke model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, K; Meden, P

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The effects of pentasaccharide (PENTA), given alone or combined with thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), on infarct size and clinical outcome were evaluated in a rat embolic stroke model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-two rats were embolized unilaterally...... group, 4% (P treatment. Compared with rt-PA treatment alone, 0.5 mg/kg PENTA...... alone or combined with rt-PA did not significantly increase mortality or tendency for hemorrhage....

  8. Pericyte: Potential Target for Hemorrhagic Stroke Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Xin; Ruan, Huaizhen; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2017-09-06

    Despite long-standing and worldwide efforts, hemorrhagic stroke remains a critical clinical syndrome that exerts a heavy toll on affected individuals and their families due to the lack of preventive and therapeutic targets. To clarify the pathogenesis of hemorrhagic stroke and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pericytes, the typical mural cells of microvessels, could serve as a way to modulate microvascular permeability, development, and maturation by regulating endothelial cell functions and modulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory responses. Pericytes in hemorrhagic stroke may exert the following functions: before bleeding, the morphological aberration and dysfunction of pericytes may lead to aneurysm formation, angiopsathyrosis, and hemodynamic disturbances, ultimately causing vasculature rupture. In the acute phase after hemorrhage, pericytes are faced with a complicated bleeding environment, which results in the death of pericytes, blood-brain barrier damage, pericyte-mediated inflammatory cascades, white matter impairment, and ultimately aggravated neural injury. In the recovery period post-hemorrhage, in situ pericytes are activated and differentiate into neurons, glia and endothelial cells to repair the neural vascular network. Moreover, many pericytes are recruited to the lesion and contribute to blood-brain barrier remodeling, thus facilitating neurovascular functional recovery after stroke. Due to the multiple functions of pericytes in the development of vascular rupture and hemorrhagic stroke pathophysiology, additional drugs and trials targeting pericytes and evaluations of their effectiveness are required in future investigations to develop new strategies for the prevention and treatment of hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Stroke awareness among inpatient nursing staff at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Eric E; Meurer, William J; Nance, Dorinda K; Kocan, Mary Jo; Maddox, Kate E; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Skolarus, Lesli E

    2014-01-01

    Because 10% of strokes occur in hospitalized patients, we sought to evaluate stroke knowledge and predictors of stroke knowledge among inpatient and emergency department nursing staff. Nursing staff completed an online stroke survey. The survey queried outcome expectations (the importance of rapid stroke identification), self-efficacy in recognizing stroke, and stroke knowledge (to name 3 stroke warning signs or symptoms). Adequate stroke knowledge was defined as the ability to name ≥2 stroke warning signs. Logistic regression was used to identify the association between stroke symptom knowledge and staff characteristics (education, clinical experience, and nursing unit), stroke self-efficacy, and outcome expectations. A total of 875 respondents (84% response rate) completed the survey and most of the respondents were nurses. More than 85% of respondents correctly reported ≥2 stroke warning signs or symptoms. Greater self-efficacy in identifying stroke symptoms (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.27) and higher ratings for the importance of rapid identification of stroke symptoms (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.002-1.51) were associated with stroke knowledge. Clinical experience, educational experience, nursing unit, and personal knowledge of a stroke patient were not associated with stroke knowledge. Stroke outcome expectations and self-efficacy are associated with stroke knowledge and should be included in nursing education about stroke.

  10. [Endovascular treatment in acute ischaemic stroke. A stroke care plan for the region of Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Díaz-Guzmán, J; Egido, J A; García Pastor, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Vivancos, J; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2013-09-01

    Endovascular therapies (intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy) after acute ischaemic stroke are being implemented in the clinical setting even as they are still being researched. Since we lack sufficient data to establish accurate evidence-based recommendations for use of these treatments, we must develop clinical protocols based on current knowledge and carefully monitor all procedures. After review of the literature and holding work sessions to reach a consensus among experts, we developed a clinical protocol including indications and contraindications for endovascular therapies use in acute ischaemic stroke. The protocol includes methodology recommendations for diagnosing and selecting patients, performing revascularisation procedures, and for subsequent patient management. Its objective is to increase the likelihood of efficacy and treatment benefit and minimise risk of complications and ineffective recanalisation. Based on an analysis of healthcare needs and available resources, a cooperative inter-hospital care system has been developed. This helps to ensure availability of endovascular therapies to all patients, a fast response time, and a good cost-to-efficacy ratio. It includes also a prospective register which serves to monitor procedures in order to identify any opportunities for improvement. Implementation of endovascular techniques for treating acute ischaemic stroke requires the elaboration of evidence-based clinical protocols and the establishment of appropriate cooperative healthcare networks guaranteeing both the availability and the quality of these actions. Such procedures must be monitored in order to improve methodology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of pre-hospital transport time of stroke patients to thrombolytic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sofie; Andresen, Morten; Michelsen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundEffective treatment of stroke is time dependent. Pre-hospital management is an important link in reducing the time from occurrence of stroke symptoms to effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate time used by emergency medical services (EMS) for stroke patients during...

  12. Neural function, injury, and stroke subtype predict treatment gains after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke Quinlan, Erin; Dodakian, Lucy; See, Jill; McKenzie, Alison; Le, Vu; Wojnowicz, Mike; Shahbaba, Babak; Cramer, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to better understand the high variability in response seen when treating human subjects with restorative therapies poststroke. Preclinical studies suggest that neural function, neural injury, and clinical status each influence treatment gains; therefore, the current study hypothesized that a multivariate approach incorporating these 3 measures would have the greatest predictive value. Patients 3 to 6 months poststroke underwent a battery of assessments before receiving 3 weeks of standardized upper extremity robotic therapy. Candidate predictors included measures of brain injury (including to gray and white matter), neural function (cortical function and cortical connectivity), and clinical status (demographics/medical history, cognitive/mood, and impairment). Among all 29 patients, predictors of treatment gains identified measures of brain injury (smaller corticospinal tract [CST] injury), cortical function (greater ipsilesional motor cortex [M1] activation), and cortical connectivity (greater interhemispheric M1-M1 connectivity). Multivariate modeling found that best prediction was achieved using both CST injury and M1-M1 connectivity (r(2) = 0.44, p = 0.002), a result confirmed using Lasso regression. A threshold was defined whereby no subject with >63% CST injury achieved clinically significant gains. Results differed according to stroke subtype; gains in patients with lacunar stroke were best predicted by a measure of intrahemispheric connectivity. Response to a restorative therapy after stroke is best predicted by a model that includes measures of both neural injury and function. Neuroimaging measures were the best predictors and may have an ascendant role in clinical decision making for poststroke rehabilitation, which remains largely reliant on behavioral assessments. Results differed across stroke subtypes, suggesting the utility of lesion-specific strategies. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  13. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) offer unique insight into acute ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These techniques may offer the ability to apply pathophysiology to accurately individualize acute stroke reperfusion treatment, including ...

  14. Facial nerve stimulation as a future treatment for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark K Borsody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the autonomic parasympathetic fibers of the facial nerve system (hereafter simply "facial nerve" rapidly dilates the cerebral arteries and increases cerebral blood flow whether that stimulation is delivered at the facial nerve trunk or at distal points such as the sphenopalatine ganglion. Facial nerve stimulation thus could be used as an emergency treatment of conditions of brain ischemia such as ischemic stroke. A rich history of scientific research has examined this property of the facial nerve, and various means of activating the facial nerve can be employed including noninvasive means. Herein, we review the anatomical and physiological research behind facial nerve stimulation and the facial nerve stimulation devices that are in development for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  15. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  16. Secondary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder following perinatal and childhood stroke: impact on cognitive and academic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tricia S; Roberts, Samantha D; Coppens, Andrea M; Crosbie, Jennifer; Dlamini, Nomazulu; Westmacott, Robyn

    2017-05-30

    This cross-sectional retrospective clinical research study examines a large group of children followed within a pediatric stroke program and a developmental attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children, between May 2004 and June 2016. All children with a history of stroke who participated in a neuropsychological assessment between the ages of 4 and 18 years were considered for inclusion. From a sample of 275 participants with a history of stroke, 36 children (13.1%) received a diagnosis of secondary ADHD. Children with secondary ADHD were younger at the time of stroke and more likely to be identified as having a presumed perinatal stroke and persistent seizures than children without secondary ADHD diagnoses. There were no differences in pattern of lesion, size, or laterality between children who developed secondary ADHD and those who did not. Children with secondary ADHD had the lowest scores across all cognitive and academic measures compared to children with stroke-only and developmental ADHD. Findings highlight the added risk of receiving a diagnosis of secondary ADHD following pediatric stroke. Implications for future research and directed intervention are discussed.

  17. Drug treatments in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Ursula G

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is an important cause of death and disability. However, about two thirds of cerebrovascular events are initially minor. They carry a high risk of potentially severe recurrent events, but they also offer an opportunity for secondary prevention to avoid such recurrences. As most recurrent events occur within a short time after the initial presentation, secondary prevention has to be started as soon as possible. Dramatic risk reduction can be achieved with well-established drugs if used in a timely manner. A standard secondary preventive regimen will address multiple vascular risk factors and will usually consist of an antiplatelet agent, a lipid lowering drug, and an antihypertensive agent. Depending on the risk factor profile of each patient, this will have to be adjusted individually, for example, taking into account the presence of cardioembolism or of stenotic disease of the brain-supplying arteries. In recent years, the approach to treating these risk factors has evolved. In addition to absolute blood pressure, blood pressure variability has emerged as an important contributing factor to stroke risk, which is affected differently by different antihypertensive agents. New oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of cerebral haemorrhage and the need for regular blood checks. The best antiplatelet regimen for stroke prevention is still uncertain, and treatment of dyslipidaemia may change if trials with cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors, which increase levels of HDL-cholesterol, are successful. This article reviews the current evidence for drug treatments in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravenous Thrombolysis in Unknown-Onset Stroke: Results From the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Laura; Ahmed, Niaz; Thomalla, Götz; Lozano, Manuel; Malojcic, Branko; Wani, Mushtaq; Millán, Mònica; Tomek, Ales; Dávalos, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Stroke patients with unknown onset (UKO) are excluded from thrombolytic therapy. We aim to study the safety and efficacy of intravenous alteplase in ischemic stroke patients with UKO of symptoms compared with those treated within 4.5 hours in a large cohort. Data were analyzed from 47 237 patients with acute ischemic stroke receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator in hospitals participating in the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry between 2010 and 2014. Two groups were defined: (1) patients with UKO (n=502) and (2) patients treated within 4.5 hours of stroke onset (n=44 875). Outcome measures were symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke on the 22 to 36 hours post-treatment neuroimaging and mortality and functional outcome assessed by the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Patients in UKO group were significantly older, had more severe stroke at baseline, and longer door-to-needle times than patients in the ≤4.5 hours group. Logistic regression showed similar risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-2.67) and no significant differences in functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2; adjusted odds ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-1.10), but higher mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.41) in the UKO group compared with the ≤4.5 hours group. Patients treated within 4.5 hours showed reduced disability over the entire range of modified Rankin Scale compared with the UKO group (common adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.65). Our data suggest no excess risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage but increased mortality and reduced favorable outcome in patients with UKO stroke compared with patients treated within the approved time window. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Balneotherapy in Treatment of Spastic Upper Limb after Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. Materials and methods: A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. Inclusion criteria: ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval

  20. DAWN of a New Era for Stroke Treatment: Implications of the DAWN Study for Acute Stroke Care and Stroke Systems of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J; Ollenschleger, Martin D; Nouh, Amre

    2018-01-18

    Until recently, the selection of patients with large artery occlusion and ischemic stroke for reperfusion therapy was based on time criteria (typically within 6 hours) and basic imaging protocols (head CT, CT angiogram, ASPECTS score). The recently published DAWN (DWI or CTP Assessment with Clinical Mismatch in the Triage of Wake-Up and Late Presenting Strokes Undergoing Neurointervention with Trevo) study has changed this paradigm by using a tissue-based selection criteria and a greatly expanded treatment time window (up to 24 hours). 1 This is a transformational change in acute stroke therapy and has implications for many healthcare providers and EMS systems.

  1. Advances in rapid cooling treatment for heat stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-jia ZHAO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat stroke is a life-threatening disease characterized clinically by central nervous system dysfunction and severe hyperthermia (core temperature rises to higher than 40℃. The unchecked rise of body core temperature overwhelms intrinsic or extrinsic heat generation mechanism, thus overwhelms homoeostatic thermoregulation. Hyperthermia causes cellular and organ dysfunction with progressive exacerbation resulting in multi-organ failure and death. Rapid cooling to reduce core temperature as quickly as possible is the primary and most effective treatment, as it has been shown that the major determinant of outcome in heatstroke is the degree and duration of hyperthermia. If suppression of body temperature is delayed, the fatality rate will be elevated. Several cooling methods are available, including physical cooling by conduction, convection and evaporation with ice/cold water immersion, internal cooling by invasive methods such as hemofiltration, intravascular cooling, cold water gastric and rectal lavage, and cooling with drugs. It is crucial to formulate a scientific and reasonable strategy for the subsequent treatment in accordance with the patient's physical condition, the condition of cooling equipment, and the manipulator's proficiency in cooling methods and equipment usage. This article reviews the domestic and international advances in study of rapid and efficient cooling measures for heat stroke. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.10.17

  2. Stroke care challenges in rural India: Awareness of causes, preventive measures and treatment options of stroke among the rural communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaga Lakshmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of stroke in the remote rural areas in India faces major challenges because of lack of awareness. Stroke care services can be optimally implemented only if the communities have an understanding of the disease. Method: A population based, cross sectional survey of an adult general population sample between the ages of 31-60 years in a rural block in Tamil Nadu, India was carried out to study their knowledge, attitude, beliefs about cause, signs and symptoms, preventive measures and treatment options of stroke. Results: Of the 174 subjects studied only 69% were aware of the term stroke and 63% were able to list the symptoms. Only a little more than half the participants (58% were aware that diabetes, smoking and hypertension are risk factors for stroke. None of the participants were aware of the endovascular thrombolysis injection for better recovery from stroke. About quarter (23% of the participants did not think that the stroke is an emergency condition and they need to take the patient urgently to the hospital. Only 56% of the participants had checked their blood pressure and 49% for diabetes. A history of having either hypertension or diabetes and stroke in the family was the only factor that was significantly associated with better awareness (p=<0.001 independent of other potential facilitating factors including age, occupation, education and gender. Conclusion: There is a need to educate the rural communities about the risk factors, how to recognize the onset, the preventive measures and optimum care of stroke to reduce the burden.

  3. Statin treatment and stroke outcome in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Zivin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Scale, Barthel Index, and modified Rankin Scale score at enrollment (1 to 6 months after the index event) and 90 days poststroke in subjects having a stroke during the trial. RESULTS: Over 4.9 years, strokes occurred in 576 subjects. There were reductions in fatal, severe (modified Rankin Scale score 5...... or no event), there was only a trend toward lesser severity with treatment based on the modified Rankin Scale score (P=0.0647) with no difference based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale or Barthel Index. CONCLUSIONS: The present exploratory analysis suggests that the outcome of recurrent...... or 4), moderate (modified Rankin Scale score 3 or 2), and mild (modified Rankin Scale score 1 or 0) outcome ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks and an increase in the proportion of event-free subjects randomized to atorvastatin (P

  4. Improvement of Endovascular Stroke Treatment: A 24-Hour Neuroradiological On-Site Service Is Not Enough

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoubashman, Omid; Schürmann, Kolja; Othman, Ahmed E.; Bach, Jan-Philipp; Wiesmann, Martin; Reich, Arno

    2018-01-01

    Background and Purpose. With the advent of endovascular stroke treatment (EST) with mechanical thrombectomy, stroke treatment has also become more challenging. Purpose of this study was to investigate whether a fulltime neuroradiological on-site service and workflow optimization with a structured documentation of the interdisciplinary stroke workflow resulted in improved procedural times. Material and Methods. Procedural times of 322 consecutive patients, who received EST (1) before (n=96) an...

  5. Intracranial atherosclerosis: Causes of ischemic stroke, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A Sorokoumov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature on the identification of the causes of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attacks in intracranial atherosclerosis. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis is the cause of an ischemic focus in not only the cortical and subcortical structures due to hypoperfusion or arterio-arterial embolism, but also in the deep structures of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem. Major artery dolichoectasia may make an accurate diagnosis and treatment choice difficult.Progress in the treatment of patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis depends on the availability of current brain and vessel imaging techniques and cranial artery angioplasty and stenting methods. The efficiency of aggressive medical prevention, primarily blood pressure reduction and different combinations of antiplatelet drugs, is being intensively investigated.

  6. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  7. Update on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Treatments in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Bonaventura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available After an acute ischemic stroke (AIS, inflammatory processes are able to concomitantly induce both beneficial and detrimental effects. In this narrative review, we updated evidence on the inflammatory pathways and mediators that are investigated as promising therapeutic targets. We searched for papers on PubMed and MEDLINE up to August 2016. The terms searched alone or in combination were: ischemic stroke, inflammation, oxidative stress, ischemia reperfusion, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, autoimmunity. Inflammation in AIS is characterized by a storm of cytokines, chemokines, and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs released by several cells contributing to exacerbate the tissue injury both in the acute and reparative phases. Interestingly, many biomarkers have been studied, but none of these reflected the complexity of systemic immune response. Reperfusion therapies showed a good efficacy in the recovery after an AIS. New therapies appear promising both in pre-clinical and clinical studies, but still need more detailed studies to be translated in the ordinary clinical practice. In spite of clinical progresses, no beneficial long-term interventions targeting inflammation are currently available. Our knowledge about cells, biomarkers, and inflammatory markers is growing and is hoped to better evaluate the impact of new treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies and cell-based therapies.

  8. Technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, J.P.

    1998-02-09

    From October 1994 to June 1997, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were funded through LDRD to develop and integrate technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. The project was summarized in a Science and Technology Review article `Brain Attack` that appeared in June 1997 and again in the Center for Healthcare Technologies Report (UCRL-LR-124761). This article is the best overview of the project, epidemiology of stroke and technical progress. Most of the technical progress has been documented in conference papers and presentations and refereed journal articles. Additional technical publication can be expected as our remaining patent applications progress through the US Patent and Trademark Office. The purpose of this report is to provide an appropriate introduction and organization to the numerous publications so that interested readers can quickly find information. Because there is no documentation for the history of this project, this report provides a summary. It also provides the final status report for the LDRD funding.

  9. Comparing withdrawal and not withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment among patients who died from stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helvig E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eirik Helvig,1 Lars Thomassen,2 Ulrike Waje-Andreassen,2 Halvor Naess3 1Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Liesgt, Bergen, 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, 3Centre for Age-related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, NorwayBackground: In severe stroke, a decision to withdraw life-sustaining treatment is sometimes made in cooperation with the family. The aim of this study was to study the time from withdrawing life-sustaining treatment to death in patients with severe ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.Methods: In total, 2,506 patients with stroke admitted to Haukeland University Hospital between 2006 and 2011 were prospectively registered in the Bergen NORSTROKE database. Risk factors, stroke severity, etiology, and blood analyses were registered. Retrospectively, the patients' records were examined to determine the number of days from withdrawing all life-sustaining treatment to death in patients who died from severe stroke during the hospital stay.Results: Life-sustaining treatment was withheld in 50 patients with severe stroke. Median time to death after withdrawing life-sustaining treatment was 4 days, and a quarter lived at least 1 week (range =1–11 days. Cox regression analyses showed that short time from withdrawing life-sustaining treatment to death was associated with high age (Hazard ratio [HR] =1.05, P=0.07, male sex (HR =2.9, P=0.01, high C-reactive protein on admission (HR =1.01, P=0.001, and hemorrhagic stroke (versus ischemic stroke, HR =1.5, P=0.03.Conclusion: One week after withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, a quarter of our patients with severe stroke remained alive. Short time to death was associated with high age, male sex, hemorrhagic stroke, and high C-reactive protein on admittance. Keywords: stroke, withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, prognosis

  10. A Community-Engaged Assessment of Barriers and Facilitators to Rapid Stroke Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Lynne S.; Jenkins, Carolyn; Jauch, Edward C.; Conway, Sharon; Pearlman, Adam; Spruill, Ida J.; Brown, Lynette J.; Linnen, Joyce; Linnen, Florene; Andrews, Jeannette O.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for acute ischemic stroke must be initiated within hours of stroke symptom onset, and the sooner it is administered, the better. In South Carolina, 76% of the population can access expert stroke care, and rural hospitals may provide specialized treatment using telemedicine, but many stroke sufferers seek care too late to achieve full benefit. Using a community-engaged approach in a southern rural community, we explored barriers and facilitators to early stroke care and implications for improvement. The Community-Engaged Assessment to facilitate Stroke Elimination (CEASE) study was guided by a community advisory group to ensure community centeredness and local relevance. In a qualitative descriptive study, eight focus groups were conducted including 52 individuals: recent stroke survivors, family members, emergency medical personnel, hospital emergency department staff, primary care providers, and community leaders. From analysis of focus group transcripts came six themes: lack of trust in healthcare system and providers; weak relationships fueled by poor communication; low health literacy; financial limitations related to health care; community-based education; and faith as a message of hope. A hierarchy model for improving early community-based stroke care was developed through consensus dialogue by community representatives and the research team. This model can be used to inform a community-partnered, stake-holder-informed intervention to improve stroke care in a rural southern community with the goal of improving stroke education, care, and outcome. PMID:27545591

  11. Rehabilitation Treatment In Aphasia Caused By Stroke(Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvane Rahimifar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia is a relatively common language disorder, occurring in about 25% of all stroke patients. The ultimate aim of aphasia treatment is to improve patients oral and written language abilities and to facilitate their participation in everyday communication. Over the last decades, a range of approaches in aphasia therapy have been introduced, based on cognitive neuropsychological models, psycholinguistic theories, and socio-pragmatic approaches. In view of the range of different approaches and findings of therapy studies, the challenge for therapists is to decide which approach is the most appropriate one for an aphasic individual at a specific stage of recovery. The Findings showed that, therapy plan for aphasic individuals involves selecting the therapeutic approach most appropriate for dealing with a particular type of disorder, degree of severity, stage of recovery and the extent of the patient's participation in social life. A framework of aphasia treatment is outlined which considers the rehabilitation process at the various stages of recovery, and Different approaches are combined into a comprehensive treatment regimen which differentiates three stages of recovery: the acute, post-acute, and chronic stage. Also ,The intensive therapy in the treatment of language disorders have a great effect, and Brain imaging studies have shown that the linguistic reorganization of a damaged brain is aided by intensive speech therapy even in the chronic phase.

  12. Risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment: a nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Shu-Wen; Liao, Chien-Chang; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ta-Liang; Lane, Hsin-Long; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Shih, Chun-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving and not receiving acupuncture treatment. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting This study was based on Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database that included information on stroke patients hospitalised between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004. Participants We identified 42?040 patients hospitalised with newly diagnosed stroke who were aged 20?years and above. Primary and secondary outcome measures W...

  13. Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment and clinical outcome among patients hospitalized with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2014-01-01

    Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been linked with less severe stroke and a better outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the existing studies have methodological limitations and have, with one exception, not included hemorrhagic strokes. We performed a nationwide...... historic follow-up study using data from population-based healthcare registries to assess the effect of preadmission OAT on stroke outcomes further....

  14. Increased stroke risk in Bell's palsy patients without steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C-C; Su, Y-C; Chien, S-H; Ho, H-C; Hung, S-K; Lee, M-S; Chou, P; Chiu, B C-H; Huang, Y-S

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the risk of stroke development following a diagnosis of Bell's palsy in a nationwide follow-up study. Information on Bell's palsy and other factors relevant for stroke was obtained for 433218 eligible subjects without previous stroke who had ambulatory visit in 2004. Of those, 897 patients with Bell's palsy were identified. Over a median 2.9 years of follow-up, 4581 incident strokes were identified. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI] with Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, co-morbidities, and important risk factors. Standardized incidence ratio of stroke amongst patients with Bell's palsy was analyzed. Compared with non-Bell's palsy patients, patients with Bell's palsy had a 2.02-times (95% CI, 1.42-2.86) higher risk of stroke. The adjusted HR of developing stroke for patients with Bell's palsy treated with and without systemic steroid were 1.67 (95% CI, 0.69-4) and 2.10 (95%, 1.40-3.07), respectively. Patients with Bell's palsy carry a higher risk of stroke than the general population. Our data suggest that these patients might benefit from a more intensive stroke prevention therapy and regular follow-up after initial diagnosis. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  15. Increased risk of treatment with antidepressants in stroke compared with other chronic illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik; Harhoff, Mette; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of depression and anxiety is higher in patients with stroke than in the general population but it is unclear whether patients with stroke are at an increased risk of being treated for depression and anxiety compared with patients with other chronic illness. The objective...... of the present study was to investigate whether the rate of treatment with antidepressants is increased in patients with stroke compared with patients with other chronic illness and compared with the general population. By linkage of nationwide case registers, all patients who received a main diagnosis of stroke...

  16. Music and Stroke Rehabilitation: A Narrative Synthesis of the Music-Based Treatments used to Rehabilitate Disorders of Speech and Language following Left-Hemispheric Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Draper

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability. A stroke can damage areas of the brain associated with communication, resulting in speech and language disorders. Such disorders are frequently acquired impairments from left-hemispheric stroke. Music-based treatments have been implemented, and researched in practice, for the past thirty years; however, the number of published reports reviewing these treatments is limited. This paper uses the four elements of the narrative synthesis framework...

  17. Treatment and rehabilitation on a stroke unit improves 5-year survival. A community-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported a marked reduction in mortality up to 1 year after treatment and rehabilitation on a stroke unit versus on general neurological and medical wards in unselected stroke patients. In the present study we wanted to test the hypothesis that this mortality-reducing effect...

  18. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Smits, P.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. Method of protocol development This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  19. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.; Smits, P; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. METHOD OF PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT: This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  20. Bringing the hospital to the patient: first treatment of stroke patients at the emergency site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Walter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy.We developed a "Mobile Stroke Unit", consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes.This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site.

  1. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Ding

    Full Text Available Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8 or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (n = 8 via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05 decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI.

  2. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to trea...

  3. Research progress of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke: Chinese scholars' reports published abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji LIU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke has become the leading common cause of disability and the second most common cause of death in China. Endovascular treatment emerged in recent years as a promising treatment method with a higher recanalization rate and better functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion. This paper selected 4 high-quality retrospective studies by Chinese scholars regarding endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke, which were published in foreign journals during past 3 years, and focused on study methods and results. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.11.003

  4. Endovascular treatment for acute ischaemic stroke with large vessel occlusion: the experience of a regional stroke service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCusker, M.W.; Robinson, S.; Looby, S.; Power, S.; Ti, J.P.; Grech, R.; Galvin, L.; O'Hare, A.; Brennan, P.; O'Kelly, P.; O'Brien, P.; Collins, R.; Dolan, E.; Williams, D.J.; Thornton, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report the experience of a regional stroke referral service with endovascular treatment for patients with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) and large vessel occlusion. Materials and methods: A prospective review was undertaken of 93 consecutive cases receiving endovascular treatment for AIS over a 42-month period (January 2010 to June 2013). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), location of large vessel occlusion, details of endovascular procedure, and degree of reperfusion achieved (Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction [TICI] score) were recorded. Mortality and functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS]) were measured at 90 days. Results: The mean patient age was 62 years (range 26–87 years). The mean NIHSS at presentation was 16 (range 6–29). All patients had confirmed proximal large-artery occlusion on computed tomography (CT) angiography: 87 in the anterior circulation, six in the posterior circulation. Of the 93 patients treated, 64 (69%) received intravenous thrombolysis. Successful reperfusion (TICI grade 2a to 3) was achieved in 80 (86%) cases. There were 13 (14%) cases of failed vessel recanalisation (TICI grade 0). Good functional outcome (mRS ≤2) was achieved in 51 (55%) cases. The 90-day mortality was 20 (22%) cases. Fifty-seven (61%) cases were transferred from outside centres. There was no significant increase in morbidity or mortality for transferred patients. Conclusion: Successful endovascular recanalisation can result in good functional outcomes for patients with AIS and large vessel occlusion. Our interventional neuroradiology service provides endovascular treatment as part of a regional stroke service without increase in morbidity or mortality for patients transferred from outside institutions. - Highlights: • Acute stoke patients may benefit from transfer to a specialist centre for endovascular treatment. • The authors offer endovascular treatment for suitable patients as part of a regional stroke service.

  5. Intra-Arterial Treatment in a Child with Embolic Stroke Due to Atrial Myxoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaard, Ido; Wermer, Marieke; van Walderveen, Marianne; Wiendels, Natalie; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arterial ischaemic stroke is an important cause of morbidity in children. Timely diagnosis is necessary for acute stroke treatment but can be challenging in clinical practice. Due to a paucity of data there are no specific recommendations regarding the use of mechanical thrombectomy devices in current paediatric stroke guidelines. A 14-year-old boy presented with a severe acute left hemisphere stroke due to a proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion caused by emboli from an atrial myxoma. No clinical improvement was seen after administration of intravenous thrombolysis. Subsequent mechanical thrombectomy with a second-generation stent-based thrombectomy device resulted in successful recanalization and clinical improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mechanical thrombectomy in a child with acute embolic stroke caused by atrial myxoma. PMID:24976098

  6. The effect of medical treatments on stroke risk in asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alice; Shipley, Martin; Markus, Hugh

    2013-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests current best medical treatment may be sufficient to prevent stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If this is the case, then it is important to determine risk reduction provided by treatments. Using Asymptomatic Carotid Emboli Study (ACES) prospective data, the effect of current treatment and risk factors on future stroke and transient ischemic attack risk were determined. Four-hundred seventy-seven patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis were followed-up every 6 months for 2 years. Changes in risk factors and stroke prevention therapies were reviewed at each visit. Using time-dependent Cox regression, the relationship between current treatment over time was determined and presented as hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for risk of stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cardiovascular death end points. On multivariate analysis, antiplatelets (P=0.001) and lower mean blood pressure (P=0.002) were independent predictors of reduced risk of ipsilateral stroke and transient ischemic attack. Antiplatelets (Pstroke or cardiovascular death. Antiplatelet therapy and blood pressure control are the most important factors in reducing short-term stroke and cardiovascular risk in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. More prospective data are required for medical treatments in asymptomatic carotid stenosis in particular for current statin usage.

  7. Regional Pediatric Acute Stroke Protocol: Initial Experience During 3 Years and 13 Recanalization Treatments in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Laurence; Mediamolle, Nicolas; Bellesme, Celine; Lesage, Fabrice; Grevent, David; Ozanne, Augustin; Naggara, Olivier; Husson, Beatrice; Desguerre, Isabelle; Lamy, Catherine; Denier, Christian; Kossorotoff, Manoelle

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate hyperacute management of pediatric arterial ischemic stroke, setting up dedicated management pathways is the first recommended step to prove the feasibility and safety of such treatments. A regional pediatric stroke alert protocol including 2 centers in the Paris-Ile-de-France area, France, was established. Consecutive pediatric patients (28 days-18 years) with confirmed arterial ischemic stroke who had acute recanalization treatment (intravenous r-tPA [recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator], endovascular procedure, or both) according to the regional pediatric stroke alert were retrospectively reviewed during a 40-month period. Thirteen children, aged 3.7 to 16.6 years, had recanalization treatment. Median time from onset to magnetic resonance imaging was 165 minutes (150-300); 9 out of 13 had large-vessel occlusion. Intravenous r-tPA was used in 11 out of 13 patients, with median time from onset to treatment of 240 minutes (178-270). Endovascular procedure was performed in patients time-out for intravenous r-tPA (n=2) or after intravenous r-tPA inefficiency (n=2). No intracranial or peripheral bleeding was reported. One patient died of malignant stroke; outcome was favorable in 11 out of 12 survivors (modified Rankin Scale score 0-2). Hyperacute recanalization treatment in pediatric stroke, relying on common protocols and adult/pediatric ward collaboration, is feasible. Larger systematic case collection is encouraged. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Challenges of antithrombotic treatment after embolic stroke- case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Stanescu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF represents one of the most common preventable causes of stroke, conferring a fivefold increased risk of stroke. The risk of stroke caused by AF is underestimated, many AF episodes being asymptomatic. Embolic strokes caused by AF can be prevented using anticoagulant therapy. The ESC (European Society of Cardiology guidelines for patients with AF recommend anticoagulant therapy if the risk for embolic stroke / systemic embolism, evaluated with the CHA2DS2-VASc score, is high. Bleeding is the major complication of anticoagulant therapy. For every patient taking anticoagulant medication, HAS-BLED score assessing the risk of bleeding needs to be performed. The priorities in treating patients with atrial fibrillation are protection against embolic events and minimal risk of hemorrhagic events. Vitamin K antagonists, despite their accessibility and long term use, have important limitations. New/direct oral anticoagulants are better options, with alt least identical efficacy and higher safety profile. In real life, the choice of the appropriate anticoagulant agent could be challenging.

  9. Risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment: a nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shu-Wen; Liao, Chien-Chang; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ta-Liang; Lane, Hsin-Long; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Shih, Chun-Chuan

    2016-07-13

    To investigate the risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving and not receiving acupuncture treatment. Retrospective cohort study. This study was based on Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database that included information on stroke patients hospitalised between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004. We identified 42 040 patients hospitalised with newly diagnosed stroke who were aged 20 years and above. We compared incident epilepsy during the follow-up period until the end of 2009 in stroke patients who were and were not receiving acupuncture. The adjusted HRs and 95% CIs of epilepsy associated with acupuncture were calculated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. Stroke patients who received acupuncture treatment (9.8 per 1000 person-years) experienced a reduced incidence of epilepsy compared to those who did not receive acupuncture treatment (11.5 per 1000 person-years), with an HR of 0.74 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.80) after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and coexisting medical conditions. Acupuncture treatment was associated with a decreased risk of epilepsy, particularly among stroke patients aged 20-69 years. The log-rank test probability curve indicated that stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment had a reduced probability of epilepsy compared with individuals who did not receive acupuncture treatment during the follow-up period (pacupuncture treatment had a reduced risk of epilepsy compared with those not receiving acupuncture treatment. However, the protective effects associated with acupuncture treatment require further validation in prospective cohort studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Growth hormone treatment for childhood short stature and risk of stroke in early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poidvin, Amélie; Touzé, Emmanuel; Ecosse, Emmanuel; Landier, Fabienne; Béjot, Yannick; Giroud, Maurice; Rothwell, Peter M; Carel, Jean-Claude; Coste, Joël

    2014-08-26

    We investigated the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in a population-based cohort of patients in France treated with growth hormone (GH) for short stature in childhood. Adult morbidity data were obtained in 2008-2010 for 6,874 children with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency or short stature who started GH treatment between 1985 and 1996. Cerebrovascular events were validated using medical reports and imaging data and classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. Case ascertainment completeness was estimated with capture-recapture methods. The incidence of stroke and of stroke subtypes was calculated and compared with population values extracted from registries in Dijon and Oxford, between 2000 and 2012. Using both Dijon and Oxford population-based registries as references, there was a significantly higher risk of stroke among patients treated with GH in childhood. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to a very substantially and significantly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (standardized incidence ratio from 3.5 to 7.0 according to the registry rates considered, and accounting or not accounting for missed cases), and particularly subarachnoid hemorrhage (standardized incidence ratio from 5.7 to 9.3). We report a strong relationship between hemorrhagic stroke and GH treatment in childhood for isolated growth hormone deficiency or childhood short stature. Patients treated with GH worldwide should be advised about this association and further studies should evaluate the potentially causal role of GH treatment in these findings. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Intellectual, Language and Academic Functions in Children with Ischaemic Perinatal Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Angela O.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A.

    2008-01-01

    The developing brain has the capacity for a great deal of plasticity. A number of investigators have demonstrated that intellectual and language skills may be in the normal range in children following unilateral perinatal stroke. Questions have been raised, however, about whether these skills can be maintained at the same level as the brain…

  12. Predictors for Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yonggang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Huaiming; Zi, Wenjie; Zhang, Meng; Geng, Yu; Zhou, Zhiming; Wang, Wei; Xu, Haowen; Tian, Xiguang; Lv, Penghua; Liu, Yuxiu; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Xinfeng; Xu, Gelin

    2017-05-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH) pose a major safety concern for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to evaluate the risk and related factors of SICH after endovascular treatment in a real-world practice. Patients with stroke treated with stent-like retrievers for recanalizing a blocked artery in anterior circulation were enrolled from 21 stroke centers in China. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as symptomatic and asymptomatic ones according to Heidelberg Bleeding Classification. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors for SICH. Of the 632 enrolled patients, 101 (16.0%) were diagnosed with SICH within 72 hours after endovascular treatment. Ninety-day mortality was higher in patients with SICH than in patients without SICH (65.3% versus 18.8%; P 0.83 (odds ratio [OR], 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-3.46), pretreatment Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score of stroke of cardioembolism type (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.13-3.25), poor collateral circulation (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.16-3.36), delay from symptoms onset to groin puncture >270 minutes (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.03-2.80), >3 passes with retriever (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.40-4.65) were associated with SICH after endovascular treatment. Incidence of SICH after thrombectomy is higher in Asian patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic stroke, poor collateral circulation, delayed endovascular treatment, multiple passes with stent retriever device, lower pretreatment Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score, higher baseline neutrophil ratio may increase the risk of SICH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. [The rehabilitation treatment of patients with motor and cognitive disorders after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, V Iu; Isanova, V A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the possibility of using the rehabilitative pneumatic suit "Atlant" in stroke outpatients. Material and methods. We studied 11 stroke patients who wore the pneumatic suit in the early rehabilitation period. A comparison group included 13 patients. The high effectiveness of complex treatment with using the suit "Atlant" was shown. The motor activity was improved in 71.4% of patients, the recovery of speech was found in 33.3% patients. Conclusion. Continuity of rehabilitation in outpatients with stroke promotes the recovery of functional activity, motor, cognitive and speech functions and positively impacts on the emotional state of the patient.

  14. Minocycline treatment in acute stroke: an open-label, evaluator-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, Y; Boaz, M; Gilad, R; Lorberboym, M; Dabby, R; Rapoport, A; Anca-Hershkowitz, M; Sadeh, M

    2007-10-02

    Ischemic animal model studies have shown a neuroprotective effect of minocycline. To analyze the effect of minocycline treatment in human acute ischemic stroke. We performed an open-label, evaluator-blinded study. Minocycline at a dosage of 200 mg was administered orally for 5 days. The therapeutic window of time was 6 to 24 hours after onset of stroke. Data from NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Barthel Index (BI) were evaluated. The primary objective was to compare changes from baseline to day 90 in NIHSS in the minocycline group vs placebo. One hundred fifty-two patients were included in the study. Seventy-four patients received minocycline treatment, and 77 received placebo. NIHSS and mRS were significantly lower and BI scores were significantly higher in minocycline-treated patients. This pattern was already apparent on day 7 and day 30 of follow-up. Deaths, myocardial infarctions, recurrent strokes, and hemorrhagic transformations during follow-up did not differ by treatment group. Patients with acute stroke had significantly better outcome with minocycline treatment compared with placebo. The findings suggest a potential benefit of minocycline in acute ischemic stroke.

  15. Mobile Interventional Stroke Teams Lead to Faster Treatment Times for Thrombectomy in Large Vessel Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Daniel; Oxley, Thomas J; Nistal, Dominic A; Mascitelli, Justin R; Wilson, Natalie; Stein, Laura; Liang, John; Turkheimer, Lena M; Morey, Jacob R; Schwegel, Claire; Awad, Ahmed J; Shoirah, Hazem; Kellner, Christopher P; De Leacy, Reade A; Mayer, Stephan A; Tuhrim, Stanley; Paramasivam, Srinivasan; Mocco, J; Fifi, Johanna T

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular recanalization treatment for acute ischemic stroke is a complex, time-sensitive intervention. Trip-and-treat is an interhospital service delivery model that has not previously been evaluated in the literature and consists of a shared mobile interventional stroke team that travels to primary stroke centers to provide on-site interventional capability. We compared treatment times between the trip-and-treat model and the traditional drip-and-ship model. We performed a retrospective analysis on 86 consecutive eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke secondary to large vessel occlusion who received endovascular treatment at 4 hospitals in Manhattan. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: trip-and-treat (n=39) and drip-and-ship (n=47). The primary outcome was initial door-to-puncture time, defined as the time between arrival at any hospital and arterial puncture. We also recorded and analyzed the times of last known well, IV-tPA (intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator) administration, transfer, and reperfusion. Mean initial door-to-puncture time was 143 minutes for trip-and-treat and 222 minutes for drip-and-ship ( P Stroke Scale for trip-and-treat compared with drip-and-ship ( P =0.0704). Compared with drip-and-ship, the trip-and-treat model demonstrated shorter treatment times for endovascular therapy in our series. The trip-and-treat model offers a valid alternative to current interhospital stroke transfers in urban environments. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Simple Techniques Can Help Memory after a Stroke Self-Esteem after Stroke Cognitive Challenges After Stroke Depression Trumps ... spasticity), fatigue and more. Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, recovery, ...

  17. Cerebrovascular recovery after stroke with individual and combined losartan and captopril treatment of SHRsp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeda, John S; Daneshtalab, Noriko

    2017-09-01

    We assessed whether the superior restoration of cerebrovascular function after hemorrhagic stroke by losartan versus captopril treatment was due to better BP, uremia, uricaemia, or aldosterone control in Kyoto Wistar stroke-prone-hypertensive rats and evaluated whether elevated angiotensin II (A2) levels enhanced the effectiveness of losartan treatment. Constriction was studied in the middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) using a pressure myograph. Post-stroke survival increased from 21 to 310 and 189days respectively with losartan and captopril treatment. Neither treatment reduced BP, both reversed uremia and hyperaldosteronism equally after 7days. Plasma uric acid remained low. At stroke, MCA constriction to pressure (PDC), protein kinase C (PKC) activation, depolarization, and sarcoplasmic Ca 2+ were attenuated. Endothelial-dependent-vasodilation by bradykinin and endogenous NO release were lost. Both treatments recovered these functions within 7days. These functions deteriorated after 116days of captopril but not losartan treatment. Inhibiting A2 formation during losartan treatment didn't alter BP or vascular recovery. The superior recovery of PDC by losartan over captopril was not produced by better BP, uremia or aldosterone control or elevated A2. PDC recovery was associated with improved PKC function and enhanced basal NO release. The re-establishment of PDC could reduce cerebrovascular over-perfusion and hematoma expansion after stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early identification and delay to treatment in myocardial infarction and stroke: differences and similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlitz Johan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two major complications of atherosclerosis are acute myocardial infarction (AMI and acute ischemic stroke. Both are life-threatening conditions characterised by the abrupt cessation of blood flow to respective organs, resulting in an infarction. Depending on the extent of the infarction, loss of organ function varies considerably. In both conditions, it is possible to limit the extent of infarction with early intervention. In both conditions, minutes count. This article aims to describe differences and similarities with regard to the way patients, bystanders and health care providers act in the acute phase of the two diseases with the emphasis on the pre-hospital phase. Method A literature search was performed on the PubMed, Embase (Ovid SP and Cochrane Library databases. Results In both conditions, symptoms vary considerably. Patients appear to suspect AMI more frequently than stroke and, in the former, there is a gender gap (men suspect AMI more frequently than women. With regard to detection of AMI and stroke at dispatch centre and in Emergency Medical Service (EMS there is room for improvement in both conditions. The use of EMS appears to be higher in stroke but the overall delay to hospital admission is shorter in AMI. In both conditions, the fast track concept has been shown to influence the delay to treatment considerably. In terms of diagnostic evaluation by the EMS, more supported instruments are available in AMI than in stroke. Knowledge of the importance of early treatment has been reported to influence delays in both AMI and stroke. Conclusion Both in AMI and stroke minutes count and therefore the fast track concept has been introduced. Time to treatment still appears to be longer in stroke than in AMI. In the future improvement in the early detection as well as further shortening to start of treatment will be in focus in both conditions. A collaboration between cardiologists and neurologists and also between

  19. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-03-04

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  20. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Caffes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1–transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1–Trpm4 channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1–Kir6.2 channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  1. Spasticity after stroke: an overview of prevalence, test instruments, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Disa K; Gripenstedt, Ullabritt; Welmer, Anna-Karin

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to present an overview of the prevalence of spasticity after stroke as well as of test instruments and treatments. Recent studies show that spasticity occurs in 20%-30% of all stroke victims and in less than half of those with pareses. Although spasticity may occur in paretic patients after stroke, muscle weakness is more likely to be the reason for the pareses. Spasticity after stroke is more common in the upper than the lower limbs, and it seems to be more common among younger than older people. To determine the nature of passive stretch, electromyographic equipment is needed. However, the Modified Ashworth Scale, which measures the sum of the biomechanical and neural components in passive stretch, is the most common instrument used to grade spasticity after stroke. Treatment of spasticity with physiotherapy is recommended, although its beneficial effect is uncertain. The treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin in combination with physiotherapy is suggested to improve functioning in patients with severe spasticity. A task-specific approach rather than a neurodevelopmental approach in assessing and treating a patient with spasticity after stroke seems to be preferred.

  2. Decision-tree model of treatment-seeking behaviors after detecting symptoms by Korean stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyo-Sook; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2006-06-01

    This study was performed to develop and test a decision-tree model of treatment-seeking behaviors about when Korean patients visit a doctor after experiencing stroke symptoms. The study used methodological triangulation. The model was developed based on qualitative data collected from in-depth interviews with 18 stroke patients. The model was tested using quantitative data collected from interviews and a structured questionnaire involving 150 stroke patients. The predictability of the decision-tree model was quantified as the proportion of participants who followed the pathway predicted by the model. Decision outcomes of the model were categorized into immediate and delayed treatment-seeking behavior. The model was influenced by lowered consciousness, social-group influences, perceived seriousness of symptoms, past history of hypertension or stroke, and barriers to hospital visits. The predictability of the model was found to be 90.7%. The results from this study can help healthcare personnel understand the education needs of stroke patients regarding treatment-seeking behaviors, and hence aid in the development of educational strategies for stroke patients.

  3. Role of Transporters in Central Nervous System Drug Delivery and Blood-Brain Barrier Protection: Relevance to Treatment of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Brzica

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The only approved pharmacologic treatment for ischemic stroke is thrombolysis via recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA. A short therapeutic window and serious adverse events (ie, hemorrhage, excitotoxicity greatly limit r-tPA therapy, which indicates an essential need to develop novel stroke treatment paradigms. Transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB provide a significant opportunity to advance stroke therapy via central nervous system delivery of drugs that have neuroprotective properties. Examples of such transporters include organic anion–transporting polypeptides (Oatps and organic cation transporters (Octs. In addition, multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps are transporter targets in brain microvascular endothelial cells that can be exploited to preserve BBB integrity in the setting of stroke. Here, we review current knowledge on stroke pharmacotherapy and demonstrate how endogenous BBB transporters can be targeted for improvement of ischemic stroke treatment.

  4. Supporting Treatment decision making to Optimise the Prevention of STROKE in Atrial Fibrillation: The STOP STROKE in AF study. Protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gattellari Melina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suboptimal uptake of anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has persisted for over 20 years, despite high-level evidence demonstrating its effectiveness in reducing the risk of fatal and disabling stroke. Methods The STOP STROKE in AF study is a national, cluster randomised controlled trial designed to improve the uptake of anticoagulation in primary care. General practitioners from around Australia enrolling in this ‘distance education’ program are mailed written educational materials, followed by an academic detailing session delivered via telephone by a medical peer, during which participants discuss patient de-identified cases. General practitioners are then randomised to receive written specialist feedback about the patient de-identified cases either before or after completing a three-month posttest audit. Specialist feedback is designed to provide participants with support and confidence to prescribe anticoagulation. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation receiving oral anticoagulation at the time of the posttest audit. Discussion The STOP STROKE in AF study aims to evaluate a feasible intervention via distance education to prevent avoidable stroke due to atrial fibrillation. It provides a systematic test of augmenting academic detailing with expert feedback about patient management. Trial registration Australian Clinical Trials Registry Registration Number: ACTRN12611000076976.

  5. Robotic upper limb rehabilitation after acute stroke by NeReBot: evaluation of treatment costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Masiero; Patrizia, Poli; Mario, Armani; Ferlini, Gregorio; Rizzello, Roberto; Rosati, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the first cause of disability. Several robotic devices have been developed for stroke rehabilitation. Robot therapy by NeReBot is demonstrated to be an effective tool for the treatment of poststroke paretic upper limbs, able to improve the activities of daily living of stroke survivors when used both as additional treatment and in partial substitution of conventional rehabilitation therapy in the acute and subacute phases poststroke. This study presents the evaluation of the costs related to delivering such therapy, in comparison with conventional rehabilitation treatment. By comparing several NeReBot treatment protocols, made of different combinations of robotic and nonrobotic exercises, we show that robotic technology can be a valuable and economically sustainable aid in the management of poststroke patient rehabilitation.

  6. Opening a New Time Window for Treatment of Stroke by Targeting HDAC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hui; Dong, Jian; Tang, Ying; Ni, Huan-Yu; Zhang, Yu; Su, Ping; Liang, Hai-Ying; Yao, Meng-Cheng; Yuan, Hong-Jin; Wang, Dong-Liang; Chang, Lei; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2017-07-12

    Narrow therapeutic window limits treatments with thrombolysis and neuroprotection for most stroke patients. Widening therapeutic window remains a critical challenge. Understanding the key mechanisms underlying the pathophysiological events in the peri-infarct area where secondary injury coexists with neuroplasticity over days to weeks may offer an opportunity for expanding the therapeutic window. Here we show that ischemia-induced histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) upregulation from 5 to 7 d after stroke plays a crucial role. In this window phase, suppressing HDAC2 in the peri-infarct cortex of rodents by HDAC inhibitors, knockdown or knock-out of Hdac2 promoted recovery of motor function from stroke via epigenetically enhancing cells survival and neuroplasticity of surviving neurons as well as reducing neuroinflammation, whereas overexpressing HDAC2 worsened stroke-induced functional impairment of both WT and Hdac2 conditional knock-out mice. More importantly, inhibiting other isoforms of HDACs had no effect. Thus, the intervention by precisely targeting HDAC2 in this window phase is a novel strategy for the functional recovery of stroke survivors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Narrow time window phase impedes current therapies for stroke patients. Understanding the key mechanisms underlying secondary injury may open a new window for pharmacological interventions to promote recovery from stroke. Our study indicates that ischemia-induced histone deacetylase 2 upregulation from 5 to 7 d after stroke mediates the secondary functional loss by reducing survival and neuroplasticity of peri-infarct neurons as well as augmenting neuroinflammation. Thus, precisely targeting histone deacetylase 2 in the window phase provides a novel therapeutic strategy for stroke recovery. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376712-17$15.00/0.

  7. The angiotensin-receptor blocker candesartan for treatment of acute stroke (SCAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Bath, Philip M W; Boysen, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    within 30 h of symptom onset. Patients were randomly allocated to candesartan or placebo (1:1) for 7 days, with doses increasing from 4 mg on day 1 to 16 mg on days 3 to 7. Randomisation was stratified by centre, with blocks of six packs of candesartan or placebo. Patients and investigators were masked...... to treatment allocation. There were two co-primary effect variables: the composite endpoint of vascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke during the first 6 months; and functional outcome at 6 months, as measured by the modified Rankin Scale. Analyses were by intention to treat. The study is registered...... significant at p≤0·025 level]). The observed effects were similar for all prespecified secondary endpoints (including death from any cause, vascular death, ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, myocardial infarction, stroke progression, symptomatic hypotension, and renal failure) and outcomes (Scandinavian...

  8. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod (FTY720 is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke

  9. Improvement of Endovascular Stroke Treatment: A 24-Hour Neuroradiological On-Site Service Is Not Enough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Nikoubashman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. With the advent of endovascular stroke treatment (EST with mechanical thrombectomy, stroke treatment has also become more challenging. Purpose of this study was to investigate whether a fulltime neuroradiological on-site service and workflow optimization with a structured documentation of the interdisciplinary stroke workflow resulted in improved procedural times. Material and Methods. Procedural times of 322 consecutive patients, who received EST (1 before (n=96 and (2 after (n=126 establishing a 24-hour neuroradiological on-site service as well as (3 after implementation of a structured interdisciplinary workflow documentation (“Stroke Check” (n=100, were analysed. Results. A fulltime neuroradiological on-site service resulted in a nonsignificant improvement of procedural times during out-of-hours admissions (p≥0.204. Working hours and out-of-hours procedural times improved significantly, if additional workflow optimization was realized (p≤0.026. Conclusions. A 24-hour interventional on-site service is a major prerequisite to adequately provide modern reperfusion therapies in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, simple measures like standardized and focused documentation that affect the entire interdisciplinary pre- and intrahospital stroke rescue chain seem to be important.

  10. Improvement of Endovascular Stroke Treatment: A 24-Hour Neuroradiological On-Site Service Is Not Enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoubashman, Omid; Schürmann, Kolja; Othman, Ahmed E; Bach, Jan-Philipp; Wiesmann, Martin; Reich, Arno

    2018-01-01

    With the advent of endovascular stroke treatment (EST) with mechanical thrombectomy, stroke treatment has also become more challenging. Purpose of this study was to investigate whether a fulltime neuroradiological on-site service and workflow optimization with a structured documentation of the interdisciplinary stroke workflow resulted in improved procedural times. Procedural times of 322 consecutive patients, who received EST (1) before ( n = 96) and (2) after ( n = 126) establishing a 24-hour neuroradiological on-site service as well as (3) after implementation of a structured interdisciplinary workflow documentation ("Stroke Check") ( n = 100), were analysed. A fulltime neuroradiological on-site service resulted in a nonsignificant improvement of procedural times during out-of-hours admissions ( p ≥ 0.204). Working hours and out-of-hours procedural times improved significantly, if additional workflow optimization was realized ( p ≤ 0.026). A 24-hour interventional on-site service is a major prerequisite to adequately provide modern reperfusion therapies in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, simple measures like standardized and focused documentation that affect the entire interdisciplinary pre- and intrahospital stroke rescue chain seem to be important.

  11. In-treatment stroke volume predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnebakken, Mai T; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    substudy. Results: During follow-up, a total of 91 primary endpoints occurred. At baseline, lower left ventricular stroke volume was associated with smaller body size, female sex, lower left ventricular mass and stress-corrected midwall shortening, higher relative wall thickness and total peripheral...... with higher risk of cardiovascular events {hazard ratio 1.69 per 1 SD (6 ml/m2.04) lower stroke volume [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35–2.11], P mass and concentric geometry and in a secondary model also independent of stress-corrected midwall shortening...... resistance, more concentric left ventricular geometry and impaired diastolic relaxation (all P indexed for height2.04 was associated...

  12. Efficacy of Surgical Treatment on the Recurrent Stroke Prevention for Adult Patients With Hemorrhagic Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Feng, Mengzhao; Liu, Xianzhi; Guo, Fuyou

    2017-11-01

    It remains controversial about the optimal treatment of adult hemorrhagic moyamoya disease (MMD). In this study, the authors performed a meta-analysis to determine whether surgical treatment of adult hemorrhagic MMD is superior to conservative treatment. A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central databases was performed for articles published until May 2017. Randomized-controlled trials and cohort studies about the efficacy of surgical treatment and conservative treatment in patients with hemorrhagic MMD at 16 years of age or older were selected. Recurrent stroke incidence including hemorrhagic and ischemic events at the end of the follow-up period was calculated between the 2 groups with a 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 3 articles (including 146 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant differences between the 2 groups when the authors compared the overall recurrent stroke rate at the end of the follow-up period. Surgical treatment significantly reduced the risk of stroke (risk ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.24-0.76; P = 0.004). The current meta-analysis suggests that surgical treatment is better for conservative treatment in adult hemorrhagic MMD with recurrent stroke rate. Future studies are required to confirm this conclusion.

  13. [Androgenic deficit and its treatment in stroke male patients with diabetes mellitus type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, L Iu; Denisova, I A; Rozhkova, T I; Stakhovskaia, L V; Skvortsova, V I

    2011-01-01

    We have studied 154 men (mean age 61,4+/-4,1 years) with the first hemispheric ischemic stroke. Clinical and laboratory studies have revealed the androgenic deficit in 66,3%, with its frequency higher in patients with diabetes mellitus type II (50 and 26,3%, respectively). Forty-two men with diabetes mellitus type II and acquired androgenic deficit received replacing treatment with testosterone undecanoate in dose 1000 mg intramuscular. The treatment was started one week after the development of stroke, the next injections were given after 6 weeks and then every 12 weeks during 2 years. The control group included 30 males who did not receive androgens. After 2 years from the beginning of treatment, there were the decrease in clinical severity of androgenic deficit, the increase of total and free testosterone levels, and muscle power in the main group compared to the controls. Body mass index, glicated hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins have decreased as well. Secondary stroke has developed in 3 (7,1%) patients of the main group and in 5 (16,6%) controls; 12 (28,6%) patients returned to work in the main group compared to 2 (6,6%) in the control group. The treatment with androgens has a positive effect on risk factors of secondary ischemic stroke. It is an effective method for improvement of social adaptation of men survived after the stroke.

  14. Relevance of Post-Stroke Circulating BDNF Levels as a Prognostic Biomarker of Stroke Outcome. Impact of rt-PA Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Marion; Quirié, Aurore; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant form of tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only curative treatment for ischemic stroke. Recently, t-PA has been linked to the metabolism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a major neurotrophin involved in post-stroke neuroplasticity. Thus, the objective of our study was to investigate the impact of rt-PA treatment on post-stroke circulating BDNF levels in humans and in animals. Serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were measured at hospital admission and at up to 90 days in stroke patients receiving (n = 24) or not (n = 14) rt-PA perfusion. We investigated the relationships between serum BDNF with concurrent t-PA/plasmin activity, neurological outcomes and cardiovascular scores at admission. In parallel, serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were assessed before and after (1, 4 and 24h) the induction of ischemic stroke in rats. Our study revealed higher serum BDNF levels and better neurological outcome in rt-PA-treated than non-treated patients. However, serum BDNF levels did not predict stroke outcome when the whole cohort of stroke patients was analyzed. By contrast, serum BDNF levels when measured at admission and at day 90 correlated with cardiovascular scores, and those at day 1 correlated with serum t-PA/plasmin activity in the whole cohort of patients whereas no association could be found in the rt-PA-treated group. In rats devoid of cardiovascular risk, no difference in post-stroke serum BDNF levels was detected between rt-PA- and vehicle-treated animals and no correlation was found between serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity. Overall, the data suggest that serum BDNF levels may not be useful as a prognostic biomarker of stroke outcome and that endothelial dysfunction could be a confounding factor when serum BDNF levels after stroke are used to reflect of brain BDNF levels.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke treatment, part 2: TreatmentRoles of Capillary Index Score, Revascularization and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas eAL-ALI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent results from clinical intra-arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke (IAT-AIS trials such as the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS III, IAT-AIS and the merit of revascularization have been contested. Even though intra-arterial treatment (IAT has been shown to improve revascularization rates, a corresponding increase in good outcomes has only recently been noted. Even though a significant percentage of patients achieve good revascularization in a timely manner, results do not translate into good clinical outcomes (GCOs. Based on a review of the literature, the authors suspect limited good clinical outcomes following timely and successful revascularization are due to poor patient selection that led to futile and possibly even harmful revascularization. The Capillary Index Score (CIS is a simple angiography-based scale that can potentially be used to improve patient selection to prevent revascularization being performed on patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment. The CIS characterizes presence of capillary blush related to collateral flow as a marker of residual viable tissue, with absence of blush indicating the tissue is no longer viable due to ischemia. By only selecting patients with a favorable CIS for IAT, the rate of GCOs should consistently approach 80-90%. Current methods of patient selection are primarily dependent on time from ischemia. Time from cerebral ischemia to irreversible tissue damage seems to vary from patient to patient, however, so focusing on viable tissue based on the CIS rather than relying on an artificial time window seems to be a more appropriate approach to patient selection.

  16. A novel classification method for aid decision of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yufeng; Liu, Bo; He, Liyun; Bai, Wenjing; Yu, Xueyun; Cao, Xinyu; Luo, Lin; Rong, Peijing; Zhao, Yuxue; Li, Guozheng; Liu, Baoyan

    2017-09-01

    Traditional Chinese patent medicines are widely used to treat stroke because it has good efficacy in the clinical environment. However, because of the lack of knowledge on traditional Chinese patent medicines, many Western physicians, who are accountable for the majority of clinical prescriptions for such medicine, are confused with the use of traditional Chinese patent medicines. Therefore, the aid-decision method is critical and necessary to help Western physicians rationally use traditional Chinese patent medicines. In this paper, Manifold Ranking is employed to develop the aid-decision model of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment. First, 115 stroke patients from three hospitals are recruited in the cross-sectional survey. Simultaneously, traditional Chinese physicians determine the traditional Chinese patent medicines appropriate for each patient. Second, particular indicators are explored to characterize the population feature of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment. Moreover, these particular indicators can be easily obtained byWestern physicians and are feasible for widespread clinical application in the future. Third, the aid-decision model of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment is constructed based on Manifold Ranking. Experimental results reveal that traditional Chinese patent medicines can be differentiated. Moreover, the proposed model can obtain high accuracy of aid decision.

  17. Safety and efficacy of alteplase in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micieli

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Micieli, Simona Marcheselli, Piera Angela TosiNeurology and Stroke Unit, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (MI, italyAbstract: After publication of the results of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke study, the application of intravenous thrombolysis for ischemic stroke was launched and has now been in use for more than 10 years. The approval of this drug represented only the first step of the therapeutic approach to this pathology. Despite proven efficacy, concerns remain regarding the safety of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke used in routine clinical practice. As a result, a small proportion of patients are currently treated with thrombolytic drugs. Several factors explain this situation: a limited therapeutic window, insufficient public knowledge of the warning signs for stroke, the small number of centers able to administer thrombolysis on a 24-hour basis and an excessive fear of hemorrhagic complications. The aim of this review is to explore the clinical efficacy of treatment with alteplase and consider the hemorrhagic risks.Keywords: rt-PA, acute ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage

  18. Reduced risk of poststroke pneumonia in thrombolyzed stroke patients with continued statin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitz, Jan F; Endres, Matthias; Heuschmann, Peter U; Audebert, Heinrich J; Nolte, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke with strong impact on clinical outcome. Statins have pleiotropic immunmodulatory properties and were recently shown to exert beneficial effects on the development and clinical course of pneumonia. We aimed to investigate whether statin use is associated with a reduced risk of poststroke pneumonia in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator within 4·5hours. Data was extracted from a local register including all consecutive stroke patients who received thrombolysis at our institution. Prior statin use was identified retrospectively from clinical records and had to be continued after hospital admission. Poststroke pneumonia was diagnosed according to standardized criteria of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mortality and functional outcome at three-months were further assessed. Overall, 481 ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Continued statin use was documented in 17% of the patients. Frequency of pneumonia was 11%. Patients with statin use were less likely to develop poststroke pneumonia (5% vs. 13%, P = 0·04). After multivariable adjustment for known risk factors for poststroke pneumonia (age, stroke severity, dysphagia, male sex and diabetes), statin treatment was negatively associated with pneumonia (OR 0·31; 95% CI 0·10-0·94). Occurrence of pneumonia independently predicted three-month mortality and functional outcome. Use of statins in acute ischemic stroke patients who receive thrombolysis might reduce the risk of poststroke pneumonia. Further studies are warranted to validate this finding. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  19. Postinterventional subarachnoid haemorrhage after endovascular stroke treatment with stent retrievers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoubashman, Omid; Reich, Arno; Jungbluth, Michael; Pjontek, Rastislav; Wiesmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical significance of postinterventional subarachnoid hyperdensities (PSH) after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke. We analysed clinical and radiological data of 113 consecutive patients who received postinterventional CT scans within 4.5 h after mechanical thrombectomy. PSH was present in 27 of 113 patients (24 %). Extravasation of contrast agent was observed during intervention in only 6 of 27 cases (22 %). There was consecutive haemorrhagic transformation in four patients with PSH (p = 0.209, Fisher's exact test). Preinterventional predictors for the occurrence of PSH in our series were a long interval between clinical onset and recanalization (p = 0.028), a long procedure time (p = 0.010), and a high number of recanalization attempts (p = 0.001). PSH had no significant impact on clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale) at discharge (p = 0.419) or at 3 months (p = 0.396). There were no significant correlations between PSH and thrombectomy devices (Solitaire: p = 0.433, Trevo Pro: p = 0.124). PSH after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke are likely to occur in complicated cases in which more than one revascularisation attempt is performed. PSH per se do not appear to be associated with an impaired clinical outcome or an elevated risk for consecutive haemorrhage. (orig.)

  20. Blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusufovic, Mirza; Sandset, Else C; Bath, Philip M W; Berge, Eivind

    2014-11-01

    Early and intensive blood pressure-lowering treatment seems to be beneficial in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke and high blood pressure. We wanted to see if similar benefits can be shown from a later and more gradual blood pressure lowering, using data from the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST). SCAST was a randomized- and placebo-controlled, double-masked trial of candesartan given for 7 days, in 2029 patients with acute stroke and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg. We assessed the effects of candesartan in the 274 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, using the trial's 2 coprimary effect variables: the composite vascular end point of vascular death, stroke or myocardial infarction, and functional outcome at 6 months, according to the modified Rankin Scale. We used Cox proportional hazards models and ordinal regression for analysis and adjusted for key, predefined prognostic variables. There was no association between treatment with candesartan and risk of vascular events (17 of 144 [11.8%] versus 13 of 130 [10.0%]; hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-2.83; P=0.41). For functional outcome we found evidence of a negative effect of candesartan (common odds ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.50; P=0.036). There was no evidence that blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan is beneficial during the first week of hemorrhagic stroke. Instead, there were signs that such treatment may be harmful, but this needs to be verified in larger studies. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00120003. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. A pilot study of rivastigmine in the treatment of delirium after stroke: A safe alternative

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    Jansen Ben PW

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium is a common disorder in the early phase of stroke. Given the presumed cholinergic deficiency in delirium, we tested treatment with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Methods This pilot study was performed within an epidemiological study. In 527 consecutive stroke patients presence of delirium was assessed during the first week with the confusion assessment method. Severity was scored with the delirium rating scale (DRS. Sixty-two patients developed a delirium in the acute phase of stroke. Only patients with a severe and persistent delirium (defined as a DRS of 12 or more for more than 24 hours were enrolled in the present study. In total 26 fulfilled these criteria of whom 17 were treated with orally administered rivastigmine with a total dose between 3 and 12 mg a day. Eight patients could not be treated because of dysphagia and one because of early discharge. Results No major side effects were recorded. In 16 patients there was a considerable decrease in severity of delirium. The mean DRS declined from 14.8 on day one to 8.5 after therapy and 5.6 after tapering. The mean duration of delirium was 6.7 days (range; 2–17. Conclusion Rivastigmine is safe in stroke patients with delirium even after rapid titration. In the majority of patients the delirium improved after treatment. A randomized controlled trial is needed to establish the usefulness of rivastigmine in delirium after stroke. Trial registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR1395

  2. Thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic cerebral stroke: intraarterial urokinase infusion vs. intravenous heparin and urokinase infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Jun Hyoung; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Lee, Myoung Chong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and limitation of intra-arterial urokinase (IAUK) infusion for treatment of acute cerebral stroke. Twenty-seven acute cerebral stroke patients treated with IAUK infusion within six hours of stroke onset were reviewed. All patients showed normal initial brain findings on CT. In 21 patients, urokinase(5-15 x 10 5 IU) was administered through a microcatheter placed into or proximal to occluded segment. Mechanical disruption of thrombus by guidewire was performed in 17 patients. Angiographic and clinical responses and complications after IAUK infusion, were evaluated and the results were compared with those of intravenous heparin(N=19) and urokinase infusion(N=19). Complete or partial angiographic recanalization of occluded segment was found in 18 patients (67%), and neurologic improvement was followed in 14 patients(52%). The degree of improvement on the stroke scale score after IAUK infusion was statistically more significant(p<0.05) than that shown after intravenous heparin and urokinase infusion. Complications after IAUK infusion were large(15%) and small amount intracerebral hemorrhage(15%), contrast leakage into brain parenchyma(11%), and gastrointestinal bleeding(4%). Between the IAVK and the intravenous urokinase infusion group, differences in extent and types of complications were statistically insignificant, but were significantly higher in those two groups than in the intravenous heparin infusion group. IAUK infusion may be effective for the treatment of acute cerebral stroke

  3. The Effect of Electromagnetic Field Treatment on Recovery from Ischemic Stroke in a Rat Stroke Model: Clinical, Imaging, and Pathological Findings

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    Y. Segal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability. Effects of stroke include significant deficits in sensory-motor skills and cognitive abilities. At present, there are limited effective interventions for postacute stroke patients. In this preliminary research we studied a new noninvasive, very low intensity, low frequency, electromagnetic field treatment (VLIFE, targeting a neural network, on an in vivo stroke rat model. Eighteen rats were divided into three groups: sham (M1 and two treatment groups which were exposed to VLIFE treatment for 4 weeks, one using theta waves (M2 and another using beta waves (M3; all groups were followed up for an additional month. Results indicate that the M2 and M3 treated groups showed recovery of sensorimotor functional deficits, as demonstrated by Modified Neurological Severity Score and forelimb placement tests. Brain MRI imaging results show a decrease in perilesional edema and lateral ventricle widening in the treated groups. Fiber tracts’ imaging, following VLIFE treatment, showed a higher white matter integrity compared to control. Histological findings support neural regeneration processes. Our data suggest that VLIFE treatment, targeting a specific functional neural network by frequency rather than location, promotes neuronal plasticity after stroke and, as a result, improves clinical recovery. Further studies will investigate the full potential of the treatment.

  4. Relationship Between Visceral Infarction and Ischemic Stroke Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Caitlin; Hung, Peter; Patel, Praneil; Gupta, Ajay; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-03-01

    Most cryptogenic strokes are thought to have an embolic source. We sought to determine whether cryptogenic strokes are associated with visceral infarcts, which are usually embolic. Among patients prospectively enrolled in CAESAR (Cornell Acute Stroke Academic Registry), we selected those with a contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic scan within 1 year of admission. Our exposure variable was adjudicated stroke subtype per the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Our outcome was renal or splenic infarction as assessed by a single radiologist blinded to stroke subtype. We used Fisher exact test and multiple logistic regression to compare the prevalence of visceral infarcts among cardioembolic strokes, strokes of undetermined etiology, and noncardioembolic strokes (large- or small-vessel strokes). Among 227 patients with ischemic stroke and a contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic scan, 59 had a visceral infarct (35 renal and 27 splenic). The prevalence of visceral infarction was significantly different among cardioembolic strokes (34.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23.7%-44.6%), strokes of undetermined etiology (23.9%; 95% CI, 15.0%-32.8%), and strokes from large-artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusion (12.5%; 95% CI, 1.8%-23.2%; P =0.03). In multiple logistic regression models adjusted for demographics and vascular comorbidities, we found significant associations with visceral infarction for both cardioembolic stroke (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-9.9) and stroke of undetermined source (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.1-10.5) as compared with noncardioembolic stroke. The prevalence of visceral infarction differed significantly across ischemic stroke subtypes. Cardioembolic and cryptogenic strokes were associated with a higher prevalence of visceral infarcts than noncardioembolic strokes. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

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    Jingxiao Zhang

    Full Text Available Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes.

  6. NURR1 involvement in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment complications after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Zamorano, Cristina; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Jullienne, Amandine; Le Béhot, Audrey; Bardou, Isabelle; Parés, Mireia; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Giralt, Dolors; Carrera, Caty; Ribó, Marc; Vivien, Denis; Ali, Carine; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2015-02-01

    Despite the effectiveness of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, the therapy remains limited by a narrow time window and the occurrence of occasional vascular side effects, particularly symptomatic hemorrhages. Our aim was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the endothelial damage resulting from r-tPA treatment in ischemic-like conditions. Microarray analyses were performed on cerebral endothelial cells submitted to r-tPA treatment during oxygen and glucose deprivation to identify novel biomarker candidates. Validation was then performed in vivo in a mouse model of thromboembolic stroke and culminated in an analysis in a clinical cohort of patients with ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis. The transcription factor NURR1 (NR4A2) was identified as a downstream target induced by r-tPA during oxygen and glucose deprivation. Silencing NURR1 expression reversed the endothelial-toxicity induced by the combined stimuli, a protective effect attributable to reduced levels of proinflammatory mediators, such as nuclear factor-kappa-beta 2 (NF-κ-B2), interleukin 1 alpha (IL1α), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), colony stimulating factor 2 (granulocyte-macrophage; CSF2). The detrimental effect of delayed thrombolysis, in conditions in which NURR1 gene expression was enhanced, was confirmed in the preclinical stroke model. Finally, we determined that patients with stroke who had a symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation after r-tPA treatment exhibited higher baseline serum NURR1 levels than did patients with an asymptomatic or absence of cerebral bleedings. Our results suggest that NURR1 upregulation by r-tPA during ischemic stroke is associated with endothelial dysfunction and inflammation and the enhancement of hemorrhagic complications associated to thrombolysis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Clinical research of the five needles combined with rehabilitation training treatment dysphagia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjie; Ren, Kun; Xing, Ruoxing; Peng, Junfeng; Zhang, Zhixin; Zhao, Jing

    2016-09-01

    To compare therapeutic effects of Five Needles of the Nape and routine acupuncture on treatment of pseudo bulbar paralysis dysphagia after Brain stroke. 60 patients were randomly divided into five key groups and routine acupuncture, and 30 cases in each group. The group of Five Needles of the Nape set points to take dumb door, Tianzhu, cure choke point with acupuncture treatment which cooperate with swallowing training . The group of routine acupuncture set points to take Lian Quan, Tong Li, Zhao Hai points with acupuncture treatment. Both groups were acupunctured once a day, 6 times a week and 2 weeks is a period of treatment, evaluating curative effect after two courses of treatment. The total effective rate of Five Needles of the Nape group was 93.3%, when the total effective rate of routine acupuncture group was 80.0%.as a consequence Five Needles of the Nape group is superior to routine acupuncture group (Pdysphagia after Brain stroke.

  8. [Early treatment and nursing role in the case of a haemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héraud-Carré, Séverine; Le Roy, Bruno; Prével, Gladys

    Paediatric stroke constitute a medical and/or surgical emergency. The speed and timeliness of the treatment have a significant impact on the prognosis. The nursing role, from carrying out continuous observation to specific procedures, is essential in the assessment, the care pathway and the short-, medium- and long-term outcome for the child. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  10. CT perfusion assessment of treatment response and complications in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, AD

    2016-01-01

    An acute ischemic stroke is caused by the sudden occlusion of a large blood vessel to a part of the brain. Current treatment options are to dissolve the clot with the injection of a solvent into a vein or to physically remove the clot with an interventional radiology procedure. A major complication

  11. Pitfalls in effectiveness research: a comparative analysis of treatment goals and outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, A.T.; Reynders, K.; Mulder, Th.; Mol, A.M.

    Problem: There is a great diversity of movement therapies in stroke rehabilitation, each of which is treated as a more or less independent system. Objective: To articulate pitfalls in effectiveness research that has been employed to reduce the number of different forms of treatment. Methods: The

  12. Pitfalls in effectiveness research : a comparative analysis of treatment goals and outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, Ant; Reynders, K; Mulder, T; Mol, A

    Problem: There is a great diversity of movement therapies in stroke rehabilitation, each of which is treated as a more or less independent system. Objective: To articulate pitfalls in effectiveness research that has been employed to reduce the number of different forms of treatment. Methods: The

  13. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine Treatment

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    Sriranjini Sitaram Jaideep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7 were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I or Ayurveda treatment (Group II for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS. Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F=8.16, P=0.007, F=9.73, P=0.004, F=13.51, and P=0.001, resp.. The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F=10.129, P=0.004. Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted.

  14. Stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: risk factors, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim, L C D; Maia, F M; Rodrigues, C E M

    2017-04-01

    Neurologic disorders are among the most common and important clinical manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), mainly those that affect the central nervous system (CNS). Risk of cerebrovascular events in both conditions is increased, and stroke represents one of the most severe complications, with an incidence rate between 3% and 20%, especially in the first five years of diagnosis. This article updates the data regarding the risk factors, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and treatment of stroke in SLE and APS.

  15. Late Thrombolytic Treatment In A Patient With Ischemic Stroke Caused By Biatrial Thrombus

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    Halit CINARKA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism is a preventable disease when necessary precautions are taken and it occurs along with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Mortality related to venous thromboembolism may be high in the acute phase of the disease and it may become chronic. Intracardiac thrombus may be detected in some venous thromboemboli cases. Cardiac embolism is responsible for most of the ischemic strokes which can be very mortal or may cause serious morbidity when they are not treated in time. In this report, we aimed to present the results of late antithrombolytic treatment in a 77-year old patient who developed deep vein thrombosis, biatrial thrombosis and ischemic stroke following hydrocephalus shunt operation.   Key words: Venous thromboembolism; ischemic stroke; thrombolytic therapy

  16. Generalized Safety and Efficacy of Simplified Intravenous Thrombolysis Treatment (SMART) Criteria in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sigrid B; Barazangi, Nobl; Chen, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) exclusion criteria may substantially limit the use of thrombolysis. Preliminary data have shown that the SMART (Simplified Management of Acute stroke using Revised Treatment) criteria greatly expand patient...... within a regional stroke network was performed. Patients were divided into those receiving thrombolysis locally versus at an outside hospital. The primary outcome was modified Rankin Scale score (≤1) at discharge and the main safety outcome was symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) rate. RESULTS...... eligibility by reducing thrombolysis exclusions, but they have not been assessed on a large scale. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of general adoption of SMART thrombolysis criteria to a large regional stroke network. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who received IV thrombolysis...

  17. Stroke in Switzerland: social determinants of treatment access and cost of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snozzi, Philippe; Blank, Patricia R; Szucs, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    Few useful empirical data on stroke are available for Switzerland. The aim of this study was to collect data on the use of medical resources and associated costs among stroke patients. Special attention was paid to possible correlations between epidemiologic indicators, sociodemographic variables, resource use, and costs. We carried out a representative population survey of 19,123 households in the German- and French-speaking parts of Switzerland with computer-assisted telephone interviews in 2005. Detailed sociodemographic data and information on the use of resources were collected from 509 individuals aged 15-75 years who had cared for a stroke patient in the past 1-2 years. In the last 1-2 years, a total of 7.8% of households were affected by stroke in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, whereas only 4.3% of households were affected in the French-speaking part of Switzerland (odds ratio [OR] = 1.89, P Switzerland. Patients with supplementary insurance were treated more frequently as inpatients than patients with statutory insurance (OR: 2.14, P = .014), and patients with a low household income were referred less frequently to an inpatient rehabilitation facility than those with medium or high household income (OR = .58, P Switzerland. Patients without supplementary insurance or with low household income were less likely to receive inpatient treatment. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proximal to distal approach in the treatment of tandem occlusions causing an acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Lena, Jonathan; Vargas, Jan; Hawk, Harris; Turner, Raymond D; Chaudry, M Imran; Turk, Aquilla S

    2015-03-01

    A tandem occlusion is a rare presentation of acute stroke that involves an occlusion of the internal carotid artery at the bifurcation with an intracranial middle cerebral artery occlusion. This study describes the experience at our institution in treating tandem occlusions with a proximal to distal approach in the acute stroke setting. A retrospective review of acute strokes caused by tandem occlusions requiring thrombectomy were performed. 16 cases were identified with a mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at presentation of 13.1 ± 3.9. The proximal occlusion was crossed initially with a microwire in all cases. All carotid occlusions were treated with stenting, and intracranial vessel thrombectomy was performed with a variety of devices. Procedure related complications occurred in two (12.5%) patients. Eight patients (50%) achieved a good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2). A tandem occlusion of the carotid artery at the bifurcation with a concomitant intracranial occlusion is a relatively rare and complex presentation of acute stroke. We have found that addressing the proximal lesion first and covering it with a stent prior to performing distal thrombectomy appears to be a safe and effective option in the treatment algorithm. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Venous thromboses and thromboembolism in acute stroke: risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke patients among all patients with somatic diseases are at one of the highest risks for venous thromboembolism (VTE. The proven risk factors for venous thrombosis in stroke are prolonged immobilization, elderly age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and inherited coagulopathies. If no drug prevention is done, the course of stroke is complicated by deep vein thrombosis (DVT in 75% of the immobilized patients and pulmonary thromboembolism develops in 20%. At present there are mechanical, pharmacological, and combined DVT prevention strategies that may considerably lower the rate of pulmonary embolism. In stroke patients, the use of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH reduces therisk of DVT, without increasing the risk of hemorrhagic complications. Novel oral anticoagulants used to treat venous thrombosis and VTE in stroke patients are an equivalent alternative to LMWH therapy. Treatment with novel oral anticoagulants to prevent recurrent VTE is effective and safe and may be continued up to 1–2 years.

  20. Modeling the Cost Effectiveness of Neuroimaging-Based Treatment of Acute Wake-Up Stroke.

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    Ankur Pandya

    Full Text Available Thrombolytic treatment (tissue-type plasminogen activator [tPA] is only recommended for acute ischemic stroke patients with stroke onset time 4.5 hours, 46.3% experienced a good stroke outcome. Lifetime discounted QALYs and costs were 5.312 and $88,247 for the no treatment strategy and 5.342 and $90,869 for the MRI-based strategy, resulting in an ICER of $88,000/QALY. Results were sensitive to variations in patient- and provider-specific factors such as sleep duration, hospital travel and door-to-needle times, as well as onset probability distribution, MRI specificity, and mRS utility values.Our model-based findings suggest that an MRI-based treatment strategy for this population could be cost-effective and quantifies the impact that patient- and provider-specific factors, such as sleep duration, hospital travel and door-to-needle times, could have on the optimal decision for wake-up stroke patients.

  1. Systematic review of long-term Xingnao Kaiqiao needling effcacy in ischemic stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-xin Yang

    2015-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The Xingnao Kaiqiao needling method has a better effect than control treatment in reducing disability rate. The long-term effect of Xingnao Kaiqiao needling against ischemic stroke is better than that of control treatment. However, the limitations of this study limit the strength of the conclusions. Randomized controlled trials with a strict, reasonable design, and multi-center, large-scale samples and follow-up are necessary to draw conclusions about Xingnao Kaiqiao needling.

  2. A review of post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuong, Nicole E; Klausner, Adam P; Hampton, Lance J

    2016-06-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents, or strokes, are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Urinary incontinence is a prevalent morbidity experienced by post-stroke patients that is associated with long term disability and institutionalization effects on these patients. An extensive literature review was conducted using multiple academic search engines using the keywords: 'stroke,' 'CVA,' 'urinary incontinence,' 'urodynamics,' 'pharmacologic treatments,' and 'conservative treatments.' Articles were reviewed and summarized to explain incidence, assessment, and treatments of urinary incontinence in post-stroke individuals. Twenty-eight percent to seventy-nine percent of stroke survivors experience urinary incontinence with detrusor overactivity being the most common type of incontinence assessed by urodynamic studies. There continues to be insufficient data studying the effects and benefits of non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments in post-stroke patients. Similarly, urinary incontinence remains an indicator of increased morbidity, disability, and institutionalization rates in the post-stroke patient. Stroke is a debilitating disease which causes urinary incontinence in many patients. As a result, patients have increased rates of hospitalization and disability compared to post-stroke patients without urinary incontinence. The history and physical exam are key in diagnosing the type of urinary incontinence with urodynamic studies being an adjunctive study. Non-pharmacologic treatment, such as behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic agents including antimuscarinics and beta adrenergic medications, are not well studied in the post-stroke patient. Urinary incontinence in stroke patients needs to be further studied to help decrease morbidity and mortality rates within this population.

  3. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  4. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kootker, Joyce A; Rasquin, Sascha M C; Smits, Peter; Geurts, Alexander C; van Heugten, Caroline M; Fasotti, Luciano

    2015-09-01

    Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was shown feasible in a pilot study. In order to meet the specific needs of stroke patients (concerning both sensori-motor, cognitive, and behavioural problems), we incorporated motivational interviewing, grief resolution, and psycho-education. We emphasised for each session to take into account the cognitive deficits of the patients (i.e. be concrete, accessible, structured, specific, and repeat information). Moreover, we augmented the psychologist-administered therapy with the contribution of an occupational or movement therapist aimed at facilitating patients' goal-setting and attainment. The intervention consisted of 12 one-hour sessions with a psychologist and three or four one-hour sessions with an occupational or movement therapist. Currently, the effectiveness of the intervention is evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. The proposed psychological treatment protocol is innovative, as it applies cognitive behavioural therapy in a stroke-specific manner; moreover, it supports goal attainment by incorporating occupational or movement therapy sessions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haowen; Song Bo; Guo Xinbin; Guan Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent-assisted mechanical recanalization technique in treating acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization procedure was carried out in 12 patients with acute ischemic stroke. The lesions were located at the anterior circulation in 10 cases and at posterior circulation in 2 cases. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The technical success rate, the vascular recanalization, the occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, the clinical improvement and mortality were observed and evaluated. Results: The stent was successfully deployed in 11 patients (92%). After the treatment, different degrees of vascular recanalization were obtained in all patients. The complete (TIMI 3), partial (TIMI 2) and minor (TIMI 1) recanalization rate was 58.3% (7/12), 25% (3/12) and 8.3% (1/12), respectively. Postoperative symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in one patient (8.3%). Stroke-related death occurred in one patient (8.3%) and eight patients had their modified Rankin Score ≤ 2. Conclusion: For the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, stent-assisted mechanical recanalization technique is clinically feasible and safe with high vascular recanalization rate although further studies with larger sample to clarify its clinical usefulness are still needed. (authors)

  6. Rehabilitation of stroke patients using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbritt, David; van der Riet, Pamela; Dedkhard, Saowapa; Srithong, Kannapatch

    2012-07-01

    To determine quantitatively if a unique rehabilitation program using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies could improve activities of daily living, mood and sleep patterns, and pain intensity of stroke patients over time. This was a prospective cohort study, conducted over a three-month period. Patients were recruited from a 42-bed rehabilitation centre in Northern Thailand, which admits mainly stroke, head injury and spinal patients for rehabilitation. There were 62 patients enrolled in the study, with 55% being male. The average age of patients was 59 years and 63% were married. The average time since the initial stroke was 15 months. At baseline, the average Barthel Index score was 50.7, and the average emotion, pain and sleep scores were 2.6, 3.1, and 3.2, respectively. After adjusting for age, gender and time since initial stroke in the longitudinal model, the Barthel Index significantly improved by 6.1 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 14.2 points after three months (P<0.01); emotion significantly improved by 0.7 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.9 points after three months (P<0.01); pain significantly improved by 0.5 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.5 points after three months (P<0.01); sleep significantly improved by 0.5 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.6 points after three months (P<0.01). This unique stroke rehabilitation program has produced significant improvements in activities of daily living, mood, pain and sleep patterns of stroke patients. These findings warrant the need for further research to compare patients undergoing this program of rehabilitation with patients undergoing more conventional rehabilitation programs.

  7. Process improvement to enhance existing stroke team activity toward more timely thrombolytic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Jin; Lee, Kyung Yul; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kim, Young Dae; Song, Tae-Jin; Jung, Yo Han; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2014-10-01

    Process improvement (PI) is an approach for enhancing the existing quality improvement process by making changes while keeping the existing process. We have shown that implementation of a stroke code program using a computerized physician order entry system is effective in reducing the in-hospital time delay to thrombolysis in acute stroke patients. We investigated whether implementation of this PI could further reduce the time delays by continuous improvement of the existing process. After determining a key indicator [time interval from emergency department (ED) arrival to intravenous (IV) thrombolysis] and conducting data analysis, the target time from ED arrival to IV thrombolysis in acute stroke patients was set at 40 min. The key indicator was monitored continuously at a weekly stroke conference. The possible reasons for the delay were determined in cases for which IV thrombolysis was not administered within the target time and, where possible, the problems were corrected. The time intervals from ED arrival to the various evaluation steps and treatment before and after implementation of the PI were compared. The median time interval from ED arrival to IV thrombolysis in acute stroke patients was significantly reduced after implementation of the PI (from 63.5 to 45 min, p=0.001). The variation in the time interval was also reduced. A reduction in the evaluation time intervals was achieved after the PI [from 23 to 17 min for computed tomography scanning (p=0.003) and from 35 to 29 min for complete blood counts (p=0.006)]. PI is effective for continuous improvement of the existing process by reducing the time delays between ED arrival and IV thrombolysis in acute stroke patients.

  8. Mirror neurons: action observation treatment as a tool in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, M; Agosti, M; Cantagallo, A; Sale, P; Mancuso, M; Buccino, G

    2010-12-01

    The observation of actions performed by others activate in an observer the same neural structures (including mirror neurons) as when he/she actually performs the same actions. The aim of the present study was to assess whether action observation treatment may improve upper limb motor impairment in chronic stroke patients. This was an observational study. Patients were recruited by three Italian Centres for Neurorehabilitation between 2006 and 2008. Twenty-eight chronic stroke patients with upper limb impairment have undergone for four weeks, five days a week, a rehabilitation treatment based on observation of video-clips presenting hand daily actions, followed by the imitation of those same actions with the affected limb. Functional evaluation by means of Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Frenchay Arm Test (FAT) and Fugl Meyer (FM) was carried out twice before treatment (BT1 and BT2), at an interval of 15 days, then after treatment (AT1) and finally at a two-month follow-up (AT2). Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was applied to test differences between scores obtained from functional scales before and after treatment (BT1 vs. BT2; BT2 vs. AT1; AT1 vs. AT2). In all scales, scores did not differ when comparing BT1 with BT2. Scores improved significantly in all scales at AT1 as compared to BT2 (MBI, P=0.026; FAT, P=0.005; FM, P=0.001). This improvement was still present at the two-month follow-up as testified by no score difference between AT1 and AT2. Action Observation Treatment may become a useful strategy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The present preliminary study suggests that stimulation of neural structures (including mirror neurons), activated when the patients actually perform the same actions as those observed could constitute a good alternative rehabilitative approach in chronic stroke patients.

  9. The impact of anger in adherence to treatment and beliefs about disease 1 year after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A Catarina; Ferro, José M

    2017-09-01

    Anger is a frequent neuropsychiatric symptom after stroke, which can disrupt treatment and recovery, in particular by affecting adherence behaviour to treatment and health care education. This study aimed to follow-up a cohort of stroke patients 12 months after their stroke to describe the presence of anger, compare levels and profile of acute and post-acute anger and analyse its impact on the adherence to treatment and beliefs about stroke. We followed (13.3 months mean follow-up) 91 stroke patients with a standardized protocol, using State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) to assess the frequency and profile of anger and its components and one questionnaire to measure adherence to treatment and health education (meaning on the treatment) (Adh-T). We used as explanatory variables socio-demographic, clinical, stroke type and location information collected during the acute phase. Anger-state was detected in 15 (17%) patients, while anger-trait was present in 7 (8%) patients. The best regression model revealed that trait-anger, stroke location (posterior infarcts), and impact of stroke sequels were independent predictive factors for anger (R 2  = 43%). Patients with higher levels of anger expression had lower adherence rates, independently of the adherence dimension. In the chronic phase after stroke anger was related with posterior lesions, the impact of stroke consequences and anger as a personality trait. The detection and monitoring of anger could eventually prevent the negative impact of anger in care, especially in adherence to rehabilitation and secondary prevention.

  10. Endovascular Acute Stroke Treatment Performed by Vascular Interventional Radiologists: Is It Safe and Efficacious?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fjetland, Lars; Roy, Sumit; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Larsen, Jan Petter; Kurz, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients performed by a team of vascular interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists and to compare the results with those of previous reports from centres with specialised interventional neuroradiologists. Material and Methods: A total of 39 patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion not responding to or not eligible for intravenous thrombolysis were treated with either intra-arterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy (Penumbra System or solitaire FR thrombectomy system, respectively) and included in our prospective study. Outcomes were measured using the modified Rankin scale after 90 days, and recanalization was assessed by thrombolysis using the myocardial infarction score. Results: Mean patient age was 68.3 ± 14.2 years; the average National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at hospital admission was 17.2 (SD = 6.2 [n = 38]). Successful recanalization was achieved in 74.4 % of patients. Median time from clinical onset to recanalization was 5 h 11 min. Procedure-related complications occurred in 5 % of patients, and 7.5 % had a symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Of the patients, 22.5 % died within the first 90 postprocedural days, 5 % of these from cerebral causes. Patients who were successfully recanalized had a clinical better outcome at follow-up than those in whom treatment failed. Of the patients, 35.9 % had an mRS score ≤2 after 90 days. Conclusion: Our results are in line with those in the published literature and show that a treatment strategy with general interventional radiologists performing neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusions can be achieved to the benefit of patients.

  11. Treatment of stroke with early imaging and revascularization: when to be aggressive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Danilo; Pieroni, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging has a key role in the assessment and treatment of acute stroke. Cerebral computer tomography is the first step to differentiate hemorragic from ischemic stroke and to detect, in the latter, early signs representative of the lesion severity and predicting a possible hemorrhagic infarction after thrombolytic treatment.Advanced neuroimaging techniques are relevant in the assessment of the ischemic and/or hypo-perfused area, being an essential tool in uncertain situations or when the time of symptoms onset is unavailable, increasing the efficacy and safety of endovenous thrombolysis by enlarging its therapeutic window and leading to more accurate selection of patients to be treated.Moreover, advanced neuroimaging may be of help in choosing the patients to be submitted to endovascular treatment when occlusion of an intracranial artery is documented, either after intravenous thrombolysis or as a primary approach.Here we describe the impact of neuroimaging in the decisional process in acute ischemic stroke, presenting the literature evidence on the topic, especially regarding the recent trials on endovascular treatment.

  12. Comparison of Bobath based and movement science based treatment for stroke: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, P M; Lincoln, N B; Foxall, A

    2005-04-01

    Bobath based (BB) and movement science based (MSB) physiotherapy interventions are widely used for patients after stroke. There is little evidence to suggest which is most effective. This single-blind randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of these treatments on movement abilities and functional independence. A total of 120 patients admitted to a stroke rehabilitation ward were randomised into two treatment groups to receive either BB or MSB treatment. Primary outcome measures were the Rivermead Motor Assessment and the Motor Assessment Scale. Secondary measures assessed functional independence, walking speed, arm function, muscle tone, and sensation. Measures were performed by a blinded assessor at baseline, and then at 1, 3, and 6 months after baseline. Analysis of serial measurements was performed to compare outcomes between the groups by calculating the area under the curve (AUC) and inserting AUC values into Mann-Whitney U tests. Comparison between groups showed no significant difference for any outcome measures. Significance values for the Rivermead Motor Assessment ranged from p = 0.23 to p = 0.97 and for the Motor Assessment Scale from p = 0.29 to p = 0.87. There were no significant differences in movement abilities or functional independence between patients receiving a BB or an MSB intervention. Therefore the study did not show that one approach was more effective than the other in the treatment of stroke patients.

  13. The Effect of Mannitol Treatment on Renal Functions in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Eşkut

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mannitol is an osmotic diuretic agent and reduces intracranial pressure. The most serious side effect of mannitol is kidney dysfunction. In this study, renal functions in acute stroke patients treated with mannitol were evaluated. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-two patients followed in the neurology intensive care unit with the diagnosis of stroke and treated with fractionated mannitol for 5 days were evaluated retrospectively. Ninety-six patients had ischemic and 26 had hemorrhagic stroke. Mean age was 69.9 ± 11.8 (18-91 years. Serum urea, creatinine and electrolyte levels measured before and on the second, third, fourth, fifth and tenth days of treatment were compared statistically with paired sample t test. RESULTS: The average urea and creatinine levels on the second, third, fourth and fifth days of treatment were significantly higher than the baseline (p< 0.05. On the other hand, mannitol treatment did not change average sodium, potassium and chlorine levels. The creatinine levels had returned to the normal range on the tenth day of treatment, but the urea levels, although decreased, did not fall to the normal range. CONCLUSION: Our results support the view that close monitoring of renal function is necessary in patients treated with mannitol

  14. Patient-Identified Factors That Influence Spasticity in People with Stroke and Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Botulinum Toxin Injection Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. Methods: After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. Results: A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (pspasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, pspasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS. PMID:25931667

  15. Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS): early clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Patrick D; Allgren, Robin L; Ng, Ken; Akins, Paul; Meyer, Brett; Al-Sanani, Fahmi; Lutsep, Helmi; Dobak, John; Matsubara, Bradley S; Zivin, Justin

    2005-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and feasibility of mild therapeutic hypothermia using an endovascular temperature management system in awake acute ischemic stroke patients. The Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS) study was an uncontrolled, multicenter development and feasibility study of conscious patients (n = 18) presenting within 12 hours of onset of an acute ischemic stroke at 5 clinical sites in the United States. Enrolled patients were to undergo core temperature management using an endovascular cooling system to induce and maintain mild, therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature of 33.0 degrees C) for a period of either 12 or 24 hours, followed by controlled rewarming to 36.5 degrees C over the subsequent 12-hour period. Nine patients underwent 12 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming, and 6 patients underwent 24 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming. Three patients underwent <1.5 hours of hypothermia due to clinical or technical issues. We also developed an antishivering regimen using buspirone and meperidine administered prophylactically to suppress shivering. The endovascular cooling catheter was well tolerated, with acceptable adverse event rates. Increasing the duration of hypothermia administration from 12 hours to 24 hours did not appear to increase the incidence or severity of adverse effects. Endovascular cooling with a proactive antishivering regimen can be accomplished in awake stroke patients. Further studies are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  16. Trends in mortality following mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villwock, Mark R; Padalino, David J; Deshaies, Eric M

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke has been growing in popularity while the therapeutic benefit of MT has been increasingly debated. Our objective was to examine national trends in mortality following MT. We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample (2012) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2008-2011) for patients with a primary diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke that received MT. Temporal trends in mortality were examined using Spearman's rank correlation. To account for confounding factors, mortality was further analyzed in binary logistic regression. Hospitals performing MT comprised 8% of all hospitals treating ischemic stroke. The percentage of stroke cases treated with MT increased from 0.6% of cases in 2008 to 1.1% in 2012, totaling 16 307 MT cases in a 5 year period. Inhospital mortality decreased over the study period from 25.4% in 2008 to 16.1% in 2012 (r=-0.081, ptrend is increasing. Mortality following MT has been showing a steady decline over the past 5 years. This may be a result of a learning curve, improved patient selection, and/or device improvements. Randomized trials remain essential to evaluate the potential benefit of endovascular devices and identify the most appropriate patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-10-01

    Induced hypothermia is a promising neuroprotective therapy. We studied the feasibility and safety of hypothermia and thrombolysis after acute ischemic stroke. Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke. Enrollment was stratified to the treatment time windows 0 to 3 and 3 to 6 hours. Patients presenting within 3 hours of symptom onset received standard dose intravenous alteplase and were randomized to undergo 24 hours of endovascular cooling to 33°C followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming or normothermia treatment. Patients presenting between 3 and 6 hours were randomized twice: to receive tissue plasminogen activator or not and to receive hypothermia or not. Results- In total, 59 patients were enrolled. One patient was enrolled but not treated when pneumonia was discovered just before treatment. All 44 patients enrolled within 3 hours and 4 of 14 patients enrolled between 3 to 6 hours received tissue plasminogen activator. Overall, 28 patients randomized to receive hypothermia (HY) and 30 to normothermia (NT). Baseline demographics and risk factors were similar between groups. Mean age was 65.5±12.1 years and baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 14.0±5.0; 32 (55%) were male. Cooling was achieved in all patients except 2 in whom there were technical difficulties. The median time to target temperature after catheter placement was 67 minutes (Quartile 1 57.3 to Quartile 3 99.4). At 3 months, 18% of patients treated with hypothermia had a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 versus 24% in the normothermia groups (nonsignificant). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 4 patients (68); all were treated with tissue plasminogen activator <3 hours (1 received hypothermia). Six patients in the hypothermia and 5 in the normothermia

  18. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Philip M; Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-06-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. © 2016 The Authors.

  19. Hemorrhagic risk of emergent endovascular treatment plus stenting in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Laura; Castaño, Carlos; Millán, Mònica; Aleu, Aitziber; de la Ossa, Natàlia Pérez; Gomis, Meritxell; López-Cancio, Elena; Vivas, Elio; Rodriguez-Campello, Ana; Castellanos, Mar; Dávalos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Several endovascular revascularization strategies have been described for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). One of them is stenting when a very narrow stenosis with high reocclusion risk remains after recanalization. This study describes the risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) after emergent stenting in patients with AIS treated with endovascular therapies. Consecutive patients who underwent endovascular treatment over a 37-month period were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were classified in 2 groups: (1) patients in whom a stent was deployed; and (2) patients without stenting. Double antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel was administered at the time of stenting. SICH was defined as any hemorrhagic transformation with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score worsening 4 points or more (European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study II criteria). A total of 143 patients were included (mean age: 66.1±11.7 years, median NIHSS score: 18). Acute phase stenting was performed in 24 subjects (16.8%): 4 intracranial (3 in basilar artery, 1 in middle cerebral artery) and 20 extracranial (internal carotid artery). SICH occurred in 11 patients, 5 of 24 (20.8%) in patients with stenting and in 3 of 119 (2.5%) without (P=.008). No differences were found with respect to baseline NIHSS score or intravenous tissue plasminogen activator administration. Acute phase stenting emerged as an independent predictor of SICH after adjustment for potential confounders and procedure duration: odds ratio 7.3 (confidence interval 1.4-36.8, P=.016). Our findings suggest that emergent stenting in endovascular treatment of AIS is associated with SICH. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of ischemic stroke with r-tPA: implementation challenges in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Dias Tosta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents the initial experience with thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke at Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal (HBDF, Brazil, and the difficulties associated with the implementation of this treatment. Method: A retrospective study was performed using the medical records of all patients with acute stroke who were treated with intravenous alteplase in our department, between May 2011 and April 2012. Results: The thrombolytic therapy was administered to 32 patients. The mean time between the ictus and the start of stroke therapy start was 195 (60-270 minutes. Sixteen patients demonstrated a significant clinical improvement (decrease in National Institute Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score≥4 points in 24 hours; 6 patients were discharged with an NIHSS score of 0 and 2 demonstrated haemorrhagic transformation. Conclusions: The results of our study are similar to those reported in the literature, although we have been dealing with difficulties, such as the lack of a stroke unit.

  1. Treatment and Outcome of Hemorrhagic Transformation After Intravenous Alteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Shadi; Willey, Joshua Z; Cucchiara, Brett; Goldstein, Joshua N; Gonzales, Nicole R; Khatri, Pooja; Kim, Louis J; Mayer, Stephan A; Sheth, Kevin N; Schwamm, Lee H

    2017-12-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) is the most feared complication of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. Treatment of sICH is based on expert opinion and small case series, with the efficacy of such treatments not well established. This document aims to provide an overview of sICH with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. A literature review was performed for randomized trials, prospective and retrospective studies, opinion papers, case series, and case reports on the definitions, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome of sICH. The document sections were divided among writing group members who performed the literature review, summarized the literature, and provided suggestions on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with sICH caused by systemic thrombolysis with alteplase. Several drafts were circulated among writing group members until a consensus was achieved. sICH is an uncommon but severe complication of systemic thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. Prompt diagnosis and early correction of the coagulopathy after alteplase have remained the mainstay of treatment. Further research is required to establish treatments aimed at maintaining integrity of the blood-brain barrier in acute ischemic stroke based on inhibition of the underlying biochemical processes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Predictors of the Aspiration Component Success of a Direct Aspiration First Pass Technique (ADAPT) for the Endovascular Treatment of Stroke Reperfusion Strategy in Anterior Circulation Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Raphaël; Redjem, Hocine; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Orng, Eliane; Taylor, Guillaume; Drumez, Elodie; Fahed, Robert; Labreuche, Julien; Mazighi, Mikael; Lapergue, Bertrand; Piotin, Michel

    2017-06-01

    A direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been reported to be fast, safe, and effective for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to determine the preoperative factors that affect success of the aspiration component of the technique in ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation. We enrolled all 347 consecutive patients with anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke admitted for mechanical thrombectomy at our institution from August 2013 to October 2015 and treated by ADAPT for the endovascular treatment of stroke. Baseline and procedural characteristics, modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale were captured and analyzed. Among the 347 patients (occlusion sites: middle cerebral artery=200, 58%; internal carotid artery Siphon=89, 25%; Tandem=58, 17%), aspiration component led to successful reperfusion (modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b/3 scores) in 55.6% (193/347 patients), stent retrievers were required in 40%, and a total successful final reperfusion rate of 83% (288/347) was achieved. Overall, procedural complications occurred in 13.3% of patients (48/347). Modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2 at 90 days was reported in 45% (144/323). Only 2 factors positively influenced the success of the aspiration component: an isolated middle cerebral artery occlusion ( P stroke onset to clot contact ( P =0.018). In this large retrospective study, ADAPT was shown to be safe and effective for anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke with a final successful reperfusion achieved in 83%. The site of arterial occlusion and delay of the procedure were predictors for reperfusion. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02523261, NCT02678169, and NCT02466893. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Understanding Life After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelmblink, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is an acute, neurological dysfunction of vascular origin with sudden occurrence and it influences physical, cognitive and psychological functions. Initial treatment aims at eliminating or reducing the brain damage. Soon, however, the influence of the stroke on the entire life of stroke survivors has to be considered. This thesis explores the meaning of life after stroke to 19 elderly stroke survivors during the first year post stroke. Survivors were interviewed twice and the interviews...

  4. [HE Xingwei's exploration and experience in the pathogenesis and treatment of motor impairment of the trunk after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hu, Songfeng; He, Fan; Fang, Jinying; Wang, Qiang; He, Xingwei

    2017-02-12

    In the paper, it is introduced professor HE Xingwei 's recognition on the pathogenesis and professor HE 's experience in the treatment of the motor impairment of the trunk after stroke. Professor He believes that the motor impairment of the trunk after stroke is the essential factor affecting the rehabilitation in stroke. The motor impairment of the trunk after stroke results from brain marrow damage and spiritual impairment. Hence, regaining the consciousness and promoting the circulation of the governor vessel are the basic principles of the treatment, named regulating the mind and controlling qi , benefiting qi and warming yang , tonifying the kidney and filling up the essence, and promoting the circulation of the governor vessel. Those four therapeutic methods are equally important. Acupuncture, moxibusiton and herbal medicine are applied in combination in the treatment. Additionally, the psychotherapy and rehabilitation are the accessory therapies.

  5. Type of Preadmission Antidiabetic Treatment and Outcome among Patients with Ischemic Stroke: A Nationwide Follow-up Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Mehnert, Frank; Rungby, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    computed mortality rates and rates of readmission recurrent ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction according to type of treatment and used the Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compute hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: We identified 4817 stroke patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We found...... hospitalized with ischemic stroke between 2003 and 2006 and who were registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. We obtained data on diabetes and type of antidiabetic treatment, patient characteristics, in-hospital quality of care, and mortality and readmissions by linking medical databases. We......, it did not reach statistical significance for all treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Preadmission use of sulfonylureas appeared not to be associated with an overall improved clinical outcome among type 2 diabetic patients admitted with ischemic stroke....

  6. Expanding the treatment window with mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Kennith F.; Cloft, Harry J.; Kallmes, David F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); White, J. Bradley [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN, (United States); Manno, Edward M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology, Rochester, MN, (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common disease associated with high mortality and significant long-term disability. Treatment options for acute ischemic stroke continue to evolve and include pharmaceutical and mechanical therapies. With the recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of a new device for mechanical thrombectomy, the options available for treatment of acute ischemic stroke have been expanded. Thrombolytic therapy is generally given intravenously in the first 3 h and up to 6 h via the intraarterial route for pharmacological clot disruption. The maximum time-frame for mechanical thrombectomy devices has yet to be determined. A 78-year-old female presented to the emergency room with a dense right hemiparesis, leftward gaze preference and dense global aphasia. Eight hours after symptom onset, left carotid angiography confirmed a left internal carotid artery terminus occlusion. A single pass was made through the clot with an X6 Merci Retriever device. After a single pass, the vessel was reopened and normal flow in the left internal carotid artery was demonstrated. At the time of discharge, her neurological deficits had improved significantly. Furthermore, the final infarct area, as demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging, was probably much smaller than it would have been if the vessel had not been recanalized. (orig.)

  7. A Successful Endovascular Treatment of an Ischemic Stroke following Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A. Al-Khawaldeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke following cardiac surgery is one of the devastating complications that surgeons may encounter, and may lead to serious disabilities for the patient. The clinical course of such a complication may be prolonged if it is not treated properly. Making a quick decision when choosing a revascularization method is very helpful in this matter. Effective treatment options are usually limited. Neurointerventional maneuvers have recently emerged as a possible therapeutic modality in this field. We present the case of a 52-year-old woman who had open heart surgery in Queen Alia Heart Institute, Jordan, to replace a severely stenotic rheumatic mitral valve and repair a leaking tricuspid valve. Her surgery went smoothly with no major event. However, she developed a massive ischemic stroke during her recovery period despite being on adequate anticoagulation therapy. Urgent radiological work-up confirmed the diagnosis of ischemic stroke in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. We chose a neuro-interventional method for her treatment, and mechanical thrombectomy was performed with a successful outcome and no apparent complications.

  8. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of intensive-dose and standard-dose statin treatment for stroke prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Chen, Dan; Li, Da-Bing; Yu, Xin; Shi, Guo-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous study indicated that high-dose statin treatment might increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke and adverse reactions. We aim to compare the efficacy and safety of intensive-dose and standard-dose statin treatment for preventing stroke in high-risk patients. Methods: A thorough search was performed of multiple databases for publications from 1990 to June 2015. We selected the randomized clinical trials comparing standard-dose statin with placebo and intensive-dose statin with standard-dose statin or placebo for the prevention of stroke events in patients. Duplicate independent data extraction and bias assessments were performed. Data were pooled using a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model if significant heterogeneity was present. Results: For the all stroke incidences, intensive-dose statin treatment compared with placebo treatment and standard-dose statin treatment compared with placebo treatment showed a significant 21% reduction in relative risk (RR) (RR 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.71, 0.87], P statin treatment compared with standard dose or placebo was effective reducing fatal stroke (RR 0.61, 95% CI [0.39, 0.96], P = 0.03) and the RR was 1.01 (95% CI [0.85, 1.20], P = 0.90) in standard-dose statin treatment compared with placebo. Conclusion: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that intensive-dose statin treatment might be more favorable for reducing the incidences of all strokes than standard-dose statin treatment, especially for patients older than 65 years in reducing the incidences of all stroke incidences. PMID:27684837

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

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    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  10. Treatment Modality and Quality Benchmarks of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at a Comprehensive Stroke Center

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    Wengui Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH is the most severe type of stroke. In 2012, the Joint Commission, in collaboration with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA, launched the Advanced Certification for Comprehensive Stroke Centers (CSCs. This new level of certification was designed to promote higher standard of care for patients with complex stroke.ObjectiveThe goal of this study was to examine the treatment modality and quality benchmarks of aSAH at one of the first five certified CSCs in the United States.MethodsConsecutive patients with aSAH at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center between April 1, 2012 and May 30, 2014 were included for this retrospective study. The ruptured aneurysm was treated with coiling or clipping within 24 h. All patients were managed per AHA guidelines. Discharge outcomes were assessed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS. The rate of aneurysm treatment, door-to-treatment time, rate of posttreatment rebleed, hospital length of stay (LOS, discharge outcome, and mortality rates were evaluated as quality indicators.ResultsThe median age (interquartile range of the 118 patients with aSAH was 55 (19. Among them, 84 (71.2% were females, 94 (79.7% were transfers from outside hospitals, and 74 (62.7% had Hunt and Hess grades 1–3. Sixty patients (50.8% were treated with coiling, 52 (44.1% with clipping, and 6 (5.1% untreated due to ictal cardiac arrest or severe comorbidities. The rate of aneurysm treatment was 95% (112/118 with median door-to-treatment time at 12.5 (8.5 h and 0.9% (1/112 posttreatment rebleed. The median ICU and hospital LOS were 12.5 (7 and 17.0 (14.5 days, respectively. Coiling was associated with significantly shorter LOS than clipping. There were 59 patients (50% with favorable outcome and 19 deaths (16.1% at hospital discharge. There was no significant difference in discharge outcome between coiling and clipping.ConclusionCare of aSAH at one of the early CSCs in the

  11. Spotlight on botulinum toxin and its potential in the treatment of stroke-related spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Michelle; Simpson, David M

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke spasticity affects up to one-half of stroke patients and has debilitating effects, contributing to diminished activities of daily living, quality of life, pain, and functional impairments. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is proven to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal poststroke spasticity. The aim of this review is to highlight BoNT and its potential in the treatment of upper and lower limb poststroke spasticity. We review evidence for the efficacy of BoNT type A and B formulations and address considerations of optimal injection technique, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and potential adverse effects of BoNT. PMID:27022247

  12. Results of the ICTuS 2 Trial (Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Patrick; Hemmen, Thomas; Grotta, James; Rapp, Karen; Ernstrom, Karin; Rzesiewicz, Teresa; Parker, Stephanie; Concha, Mauricio; Hussain, Syed; Agarwal, Sachin; Meyer, Brett; Jurf, Julie; Altafullah, Irfan; Raman, Rema

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a potent neuroprotectant approved for cerebral protection after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke is safe and feasible in pilot trials. We designed a study protocol to provide safer, faster therapeutic hypothermia in stroke patients. Safety procedures and 4°C saline infusions for faster cooling were added to the ICTuS trial (Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke) protocol. A femoral venous intravascular cooling catheter after intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator in eligible patients provided 24 hours cooling followed by a 12-hour rewarm. Serial safety assessments and imaging were performed. The primary end point was 3-month modified Rankin score 0,1. Of the intended 1600 subjects, 120 were enrolled before the study was stopped. Randomly, 63 were to receive hypothermia plus antishivering treatment and 57 normothermia. Compared with previous studies, cooling rates were improved with a cold saline bolus, without fluid overload. The intention-to-treat primary outcome of 90-day modified Rankin Score 0,1 occurred in 33% hypothermia and 38% normothermia subjects, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.81 (0.36-1.85). Serious adverse events occurred equally. Mortality was 15.9% hypothermia and 8.8% normothermia subjects, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.95 (0.56-7.79). Pneumonia occurred in 19% hypothermia versus 10.5% in normothermia subjects, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.99 (0.63-6.98). Intravascular therapeutic hypothermia was confirmed to be safe and feasible in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator-treated acute ischemic stroke patients. Protocol changes designed to reduce pneumonia risk appeared to fail, although the sample is small. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01123161. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 Hours after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Anne Murtha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental Middle Cerebral Artery occlusion (MCAo - 3 hour occlusion was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19-20 months. At one hour after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 hours hypothermia-treatment (32.5 °C or normothermia (37 °C. ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 hours post-occlusion, and at 24 hours post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03. Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 hours post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients.

  14. Therapeutic Strategies to Attenuate Hemorrhagic Transformation After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Masato; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-03-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms and emerging concepts of stroke and therapeutic strategies for attenuating hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The therapeutic time window for tPA treatment has been extended. However, the patients who are eligible for tPA treatment are still <5% of all patients with AIS. The risk of serious or fatal symptomatic hemorrhage increases with delayed initiation of treatment. HT is thought to be caused by 1) ischemia/reperfusion injury; 2) the toxicity of tPA itself; 3) inflammation; and/or 4) remodeling factor-mediated effects. Modulation of these pathophysiologies is the basis of direct therapeutic strategies to attenuate HT after tPA treatment. Several studies have revealed that matrix metalloproteinases and free radicals are potential therapeutic targets. In addition, we have demonstrated that the inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor-signaling pathway and supplemental treatment with a recombinant angiopoietin-1 protein might be a promising therapeutic strategy for attenuating HT after tPA treatment through vascular protection. Moreover, single-target therapies could be insufficient for attenuating HT after tPA treatment and improving the therapeutic outcome of patients with AIS. We recently identified progranulin, which is a growth factor and a novel target molecule with multiple therapeutic effects. Progranulin might be a therapeutic target that protects the brain through suppression of vascular remodeling (vascular protection), neuroinflammation, and/or neuronal death (neuroprotection). Clinical trials which evaluate the effects of anti-VEGF drugs or PGRN-based treatment with tPA will be might worthwhile.

  15. Academic career after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, A; Rammeloo, LAJ; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Rekers-Mombarg, L; Postma, A

    Aim-To evaluate academic career in long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), in comparison to their healthy siblings. Patients-Ninety four children treated for ALL with cranial irradiation 18 or 25 Gy and intrathecal methotrexate as CNS prophylaxis. Median age at

  16. Drip-and-ship thrombolytic treatment paradigm among acute ischemic stroke patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, Wondwossen G; Chaudhry, Saqib A; Hassan, Ameer E; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Suri, M Fareed K; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2012-07-01

    To provide a national assessment of thrombolytic administration using drip-and-ship treatment paradigm. Patients treated with the drip-and-ship paradigm among all acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombolytic treatment were identified within the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Thrombolytic utilization, patterns of referral, comparative in-hospital outcomes, and hospitalization charges related to drip-and-ship paradigm were determined. All the in-hospital outcomes were analyzed after adjusting for potential confounders using multivariate analysis. Of the 22 243 ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic treatment, 4474 patients (17%) were treated using drip-and-ship paradigm. Of these 4474 patients, 81% were referred to urban teaching hospitals for additional care, and 7% of them received follow-up endovascular treatment. States with a higher proportion of patients treated using the drip-and-ship paradigm had higher rates of overall thrombolytic utilization (5.4% versus 3.3%; Pcare was significantly higher in patients treated with drip-and-ship paradigm compared with those who received thrombolytics through primary emergency department arrival in the multivariate analysis (OR, 1.198; 95% CI, 1.019-1.409; P=0.0286). One of every 6 thrombolytic-treated patients in United States is treated using drip-and-ship paradigm. States with the highest proportion of drip-and-ship cases were also the states with the highest thrombolytic utilization.

  17. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-06

    Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Thrombolytic treatment in the oldest-old patient with acute ischemic stroke: an update on current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Maioli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke rises exponentially with age, with a steep increase in the age interval between 75 and 85 years. Thrombolytic therapy restores cerebral blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke of any etiology by using drugs that dissolve blood clots. Infusion for 1 h of alteplase at the dose of 0.9 mg/kg within 3 h of the start of the symptoms is associated to a 30% increase in the likelihood of gaining a favorable outcome with respect to placebo. There is strong evidence that selected patients with ischemic stroke may benefit from intravenous thrombolysis when treated within 3 h. The aim of the study was to evaluate available evidence for the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy in patients with ischemic stroke aged 80 years and over. Compared to younger stroke patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, those aged 80 years and over have higher acute mortality due to symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. However, functional outcome at six months is significantly better for over-80-year-olds than younger patients. There is a need for screening tools that take into account pre-stroke functional and cognitive status that are able to identify those over-80-year-old patients with ischemic stroke who can most benefit from thrombolytic treatment. Available evidence supports further recruitment of oldest-old patients into ongoing trials of thrombolysis.

  19. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  20. Dynamics of the recovery of autonomic nervous system in patients after surgical treatment of hemorrhagic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuftan Mohammed Nazmi Kuftan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We talking about the impact of tools and techniques of physical rehabilitation on the performance of the autonomic nervous system (parasympathetic activity and sympathetic tone and heart rate of patients after surgical treatment of hemorrhagic stroke. The experiment had involved 53 patients aged from 37 to 72 years. The survey was conducted on patients' clinical stage of rehabilitation in the second, third and sixth week after surgery. The analysis is based on the measurement of heart rate variability. A positive effect of the use of tools and techniques of physical rehabilitation program on the state of autonomic regulation.

  1. Current perspectives on the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA for treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman SN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sherita N Chapman,1 Prachi Mehndiratta,1 Michelle C Johansen,1 Timothy L McMurry,2 Karen C Johnston,1,2 Andrew M Southerland1,2 1Department of Neurology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: In 1995, the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke tPA (tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study Group published the results of a large multicenter clinical trial demonstrating efficacy of intravenous tPA by revealing a 30% relative risk reduction (absolute risk reduction 11%–15% compared with placebo at 90 days in the likelihood of having minimal or no disability. Since approval in 1996, tPA remains the only drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Over the years, an abundance of research and clinical data has supported the safe and efficacious use of intravenous tPA in all eligible patients. Despite such supporting data, it remains substantially underutilized. Challenges to the utilization of tPA include narrow eligibility and treatment windows, risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, perceived lack of efficacy in certain high-risk subgroups, and a limited pool of neurological and stroke expertise in the community. With recent US census data suggesting annual stroke incidence will more than double by 2050, better education and consensus among both the medical and lay public are necessary to optimize the use of tPA for all eligible stroke patients. Ongoing and future research should continue to improve upon the efficacy of tPA through more rapid stroke diagnosis and treatment, refinement of advanced neuroimaging and stroke biomarkers, and successful demonstration of alternative means of reperfusion. Keywords: IV tPA, rtPA, t-PA, rt-PA, cerebrovascular disease, cerebrovascular accident

  2. Combination of Thrombolysis and Statins in Acute Stroke Is Safe: Results of the STARS Randomized Trial (Stroke Treatment With Acute Reperfusion and Simvastatin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaner, Joan; Bustamante, Alejandro; García-Matas, Silvia; Martínez-Zabaleta, Maite; Jiménez, Carmen; de la Torre, Javier; Rubio, Francisco R; Segura, Tomás; Masjuán, Jaime; Cánovas, David; Freijo, Mar; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Tejada, Javier; Lago, Aida; Bravo, Yolanda; Corbeto, Natália; Giralt, Dolors; Vives-Pastor, Bárbara; de Arce, Anna; Moniche, Francisco; Delgado, Pilar; Ribó, Marc

    2016-11-01

    The STARS trial (Stroke Treatment With Acute Reperfusion and Simvastatin) was conducted to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of simvastatin treatment in acute stroke. STARS07 was a multicentre, phase IV, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with Acute ischemic stroke recruited within 12 hours from symptom onset were randomized to oral simvastatin 40 mg or placebo, once daily for 90 days. Primary outcome was proportion of independent patients (modified Rankin Scale score of ≤2) at 90 days. Safety end points were hemorrhagic transformation, hemorrhagic events, death, infections, and serious adverse events. From April 2009 to March 2014, 104 patients were included. Fifty-five patients received intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator. No differences were found between treatment arms regarding the primary outcome (adjusted odds ratio, 0.99 [0.35-2.78]; P=0.98). Concerning safety, no significant differences were found in the rate of hemorrhagic transformation of any type, nor symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. There were no differences in other predefined safety outcomes. In post hoc analyses, for patients receiving tissue-type plasminogen activator, a favorable effect for simvastatin treatment was noted with higher proportion of patients experiencing major neurological recovery (adjusted odds ratio, 4.14 [1.18-14.4]; P=0.02). Simvastatin plus tissue-type plasminogen activator combination seems safe in acute stroke, with low rates of bleeding complications. Because of the low recruitment, the STARS trial was underpowered to detect differences in simvastatin efficacy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01073007. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. [Acupuncture treatment programs for post-stroke motor rehabilitation in community hospitals: study protocol of a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qin-hui; Pei, Jian; Jia, Qi; Song, Yi; Gu, Yue-hua; You, Xiao-xin

    2012-05-01

    Stroke is responsible for increasingly high rates of mortality and disability worldwide. Approximately two million people suffer from stroke for the first time in China each year. The high incidence (50%) of post-stroke disability brings a heavy burden to patients and their caregivers. Acupuncture has been widely used in the communities for post-stroke rehabilitation in China. The objective of this trial is to apply our acupuncture research achievement to treatment and evaluation of post-stroke hemiplegic patients in community. A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial will be performed in Longhua Hospital and a number of community health service centers in Shanghai. A total of 124 patients (estimated sample size) with post-stroke hemiplegia will be randomly divided into an acupuncture group and a control group. The patients undergoing randomization should be stratified according to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at baseline. Within the acupuncture group, different acupuncture protocols are administered to patients with flaccid paralysis or spastic paralysis based on the Ashworth Scale. Patients in the acupuncture group will also be treated with comprehensive rehabilitation therapy. The control group will be treated with comprehensive rehabilitation therapy only. The primary outcome measures are the Simplified Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Burden of Stroke Scale. Secondary outcome measures are the modified Rankin Scale, the modified Ashworth Scale and the Stroke Scale of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Outcome measures will be performed after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. The patients will be followed up after 6 months. The results of this study are expected to demonstrate that our standardized acupuncture protocol for treating and evaluating post-stroke hemiplegic patients will improve motor function and lessen the burden of post-stroke patients within the communities. This will provide the evidence to support

  4. Effect of different combinations of physiotherapy treatment approaches on functional outcomes in stroke patients: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Ping Ho Chung, MSc in Health Care

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study compared the functional outcomes among stroke patients who had received rehabilitation based on different physiotherapy treatment approaches. The participants were divided into three groups according to the physiotherapist in charge of their treatment. The primary treatment approaches applied in Group A, Group B, and Group C were the functional approach, the Bobath approach, and the motor learning approach, respectively. For each participant, the Berg's Balance Scale score, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index were compared among these three groups prior to and after the stroke rehabilitation programme. Within-group analysis showed that Group A, Group B, and Group C participants had a statistically significant improvement in their Modified Barthel Index (p  0.05. In summary, this study showed that different combinations of treatment approaches may induce similar improvement in functional outcomes after stroke rehabilitation.

  5. Endovascular treatment versus medical care alone for ischaemic stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Neves, Joana Briosa; Caldeira, Daniel; Ferro, José M; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Costa, João

    2016-04-18

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment, particularly adjunctive intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy, in patients with ischaemic stroke. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, SciELO, LILACS, and clinical trial registries from inception to December 2015. Reference lists were crosschecked. Randomised controlled trials in adults aged 18 or more with ischaemic stroke comparing endovascular treatment, including thrombectomy, with medical care alone, including intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). Trial endpoints were functional outcome (modified Rankin scale scores of ≤2) and mortality at 90 days after onset of symptoms. No language or time restrictions applied. 10 randomised controlled trials (n=2925) were included. In pooled analysis endovascular treatment, including thrombectomy, was associated with a higher proportion of patients experiencing good (modified Rankin scale scores ≤2) and excellent (scores ≤1) outcomes 90 days after stroke, without differences in mortality or rates for symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage, compared with patients randomised to medical care alone, including intravenous rt-PA. Heterogeneity was high among studies. The more recent studies (seven randomised controlled trials, published or presented in 2015) proved better suited to evaluate the effect of adjunctive intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy on its index disease owing to more accurate patient selection, intravenous rt-PA being administered at a higher rate and earlier, and the use of more efficient thrombectomy devices. In most of these studies, more than 86% of the patients were treated with stent retrievers, and rates of recanalisation were higher (>58%) than previously reported. Subgroup analysis of these seven studies yielded a risk ratio of 1.56 (95% confidence interval 1.38 to 1.75) for good functional outcomes and 0.86 (0.69 to 1.06) for

  6. Recognized homonymous hemianopsia and delirium during the admission examination leading to diagnosis and appropriate treatment of a new stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsymbalov KS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Konstantin S Tsymbalov, Douglas R Fetkenhour Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: This case report describes the detection of homonymous hemianopsia and delirium during the admission physical examination of a patient with esophageal adenocarcinoma, resulting in the new diagnosis of subacute hemorrhagic stroke. The poststroke visual field defect can result in significant disability and reduction in quality of life. Patients with visual field cut show a severely reduced quality of life and require additional neuropsychological and visual rehabilitation. Only thorough physical examination is able to challenge prior negative positron emission tomography scan, leading to the diagnosis of subacute stroke and, following appropriate treatment, secondary stroke prophylaxis and rehabilitation, instead of brain radiation and chemotherapy. Keywords: physical examination, homonymous hemianopsia, stroke, esophageal tumor 

  7. The chain of care enabling tPA treatment in acute ischemic stroke : a comprehensive review of organisational models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, Maarten M. H.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Vroomen, Patrick; van der Zee, D.J.; Buskens, Erik

    Protracted and partial implementation of treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 h after acute stroke onset results in potentially eligible patients not receiving optimal treatment. The goal of this study was to review the performance of various organisational models

  8. Combining statins with tissue plasminogen activator treatment after experimental and human stroke: a safety study on hemorrhagic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Mireia; García-Bonilla, Lidia; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Barceló, Verónica; Morancho, Anna; Quintana, Manolo; Rubiera, Marta; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2013-11-01

    Statins may afford neuroprotection against ischemic injury, but it remains controversial whether combined treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) after stroke increases the risk of hemorrhagic transformation (HT), the major tPA-related complication. We evaluated the safety of combining statin with tPA administration during the acute phase of both experimental and human stroke. The occurrence and severity of HT, infarct volume, and neurological outcome were evaluated in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) subjected to embolic middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO), which received vehicle or simvastatin (20 mg/kg), 15 min after ischemia and tPA (9 mg/kg) 3 h after ischemia. Additionally, HT rate was evaluated in stroke patients who were treated with tPA (0.9 mg/kg) within 3 h after symptom onset, considering whether or not were under statins treatment when the stroke occurred. In the experimental study, no differences in HT rates and severity were found between treatment groups, neither regarding mortality, neurological deficit, infarct volume, or metalloproteinases (MMPs) brain content. In the clinical study, HT rates and hemorrhage type were similar in stroke patients who were or not under statins treatment. This study consistently confirms that the use of statins does not increase HT rates and severity when is combined with tPA administration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The design of a focused ultrasound transducer array for the treatment of stroke: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, Daniel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of mechanically disintegrating blood clots at high pressures. Safe thrombolysis may require frequencies higher than those currently utilized by transcranial HIFU. Since the attenuation and focal distortion of ultrasound in bone increases at higher frequencies, resulting focal pressures are diminished. This study investigated the feasibility of using transcranial HIFU for the non-invasive treatment of ischemic stroke. The use of large aperture, 1.1–1.5 MHz phased arrays in targeting four clinically relevant vessel locations was simulated. Resulting focal sizes decreased with frequency, producing a maximum –3 dB depth of field and lateral width of 2.0 and 1.2 mm, respectively. Mean focal gains above an order of magnitude were observed in three of four targets and transducer intensities required to achieve thrombolysis were determined. Required transducer element counts are about an order of magnitude higher than what currently exists and so, although technically feasible, new arrays would need to be developed to realize this as a treatment modality for stroke. (paper)

  10. Improving treatment times for patients with in-hospital stroke using a standardized protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koge, Junpei; Matsumoto, Shoji; Nakahara, Ichiro; Ishii, Akira; Hatano, Taketo; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Kai, Yasutoshi; Ando, Mitsushige; Saka, Makoto; Chihara, Hideo; Takita, Wataru; Tokunaga, Keisuke; Kamata, Takahiko; Nishi, Hidehisa; Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Tsujimoto, Atsushi; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nagata, Izumi

    2017-10-15

    Previous reports have shown significant delays in treatment of in-hospital stroke (IHS). We developed and implemented our IHS alert protocol in April 2014. We aimed to determine the influence of implementation of our IHS alert protocol. Our implementation processes comprise the following four main steps: IHS protocol development, workshops for hospital staff to learn about the protocol, preparation of standardized IHS treatment kits, and obtaining feedback in a monthly hospital staff conference. We retrospectively compared protocol metrics and clinical outcomes of patients with IHS treated with intravenous thrombolysis and/or endovascular therapy between before (January 2008-March 2014) and after implementation (April 2014-December 2016). Fifty-five patients were included (pre, 25; post, 30). After the implementation, significant reductions occurred in the median time from stroke recognition to evaluation by a neurologist (30 vs. 13.5min, pvs. 26.5min, pvs. 16min, p=0.02). The median time from first neuroimaging to endovascular therapy had a tendency to decrease (75 vs. 53min, p=0.08). There were no differences in the favorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale score of 0-2) at discharge or the incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage between the two periods. Our IHS alert protocol implementation saved time in treating patients with IHS without compromising safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation following botulinum toxin and other focal intramuscular treatment for post-stroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios, Marina; Khan, Fary; Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Brand, Caroline; McSweeney, Shane

    2013-06-05

    Spasticity may affect stroke survivors by contributing to activity limitations, caregiver burden, pain and reduced quality of life (QoL). Spasticity management guidelines recommend multidisciplinary (MD) rehabilitation programmes following botulinum toxin (BoNT) treatment for post-stroke spasticity. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of MD rehabilitation is unclear. To assess the effectiveness of MD rehabilitation, following BoNT and other focal intramuscular treatments such as phenol, in improving activity limitations and other outcomes in adults and children with post-stroke spasticity. To explore what settings, types and intensities of rehabilitation programmes are effective. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), AMED (1985 to January 2012), LILACS (1982 to September 2012), PEDro, REHABDATA and OpenGrey (September 2012). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched trials registries and reference lists, handsearched journals and contacted authors. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared MD rehabilitation (delivered by two or more disciplines in conjunction with medical input) following BoNT and other focal intramuscular treatments for post-stroke spasticity with placebo, routinely available local services, or lower levels of intervention; or studies that compared MD rehabilitation in different settings, of different types, or at different levels of intensity. We excluded RCTs that assessed the effectiveness of unidisciplinary therapy (for example physiotherapy only) or a single modality (for example stretching, casting, electrical stimulation or splinting only). The primary outcomes were validated measures of activity level (active and passive function

  12. Treatment-seeking college students with disabilities: Presenting concerns, protective factors, and academic distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Allison R; Edwin, Mary; Hayes, Jeffrey A; Locke, Benjamin D; Lockard, Allison J

    2018-02-01

    Students with disabilities are a growing population on college campuses and have unique challenges that put them at risk for early departure, creating complexity in efforts to address their personal and academic needs. The purpose was to explore academic and other sources of distress among college students with disabilities to identify possible areas where enhanced supports might benefit this population. Research Method and Design: Researchers analyzed cross-sectional data from the Center for Collegiate Mental Health to compare subsamples of students with (n = 1,774) and without disabilities (n = 1,774) on presenting concerns, and to determine significant predictors of academic distress among students with disabilities. Results indicated that students with disabilities have many similar treatment concerns with their peers, but showed greater concerns in depression and self-harm; academic performance; anxiety and obsessions/compulsions; and fewer concerns in relationship problems. Significant predictors of academic distress for students with disabilities included attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression and self-harm, trauma or victimization, stress and academic performance, and social support from family and peers. These results suggest the importance of several factors in understanding the presenting concerns of treatment-seeking students with disabilities and mitigating academic distress for this population. Additional areas for research are presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Neurointerventional Treatment in Acute Stroke. Whom to Treat? (Endovascular Treatment for Acute Stroke: Utility of THRIVE Score and HIAT Score for Patient Selection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fjetland, Lars; Roy, Sumit; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Solbakken, Tore; Larsen, Jan Petter; Kurz, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intra-arterial therapy (IAT) is used increasingly as a treatment option for acute stroke caused by central large vessel occlusions. Despite high rates of recanalization, the clinical outcome is highly variable. The authors evaluated the Houston IAT (HIAT) and the totaled health risks in vascular events (THRIVE) score, two predicting scores designed to identify patients likely to benefit from IAT. Methods: Fifty-two patients treated at the Stavanger University Hospital with IAT from May 2009 to June 2012 were included in this study. We combined the scores in an additional analysis. We also performed an additional analysis according to high age and evaluated the scores in respect of technical efficacy. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluated by the THRIVE score and 51 by the HIAT score. We found a strong correlation between the level of predicted risk and the actual clinical outcome (THRIVE p = 0.002, HIAT p = 0.003). The correlations were limited to patients successfully recanalized and to patients <80 years. By combining the scores additional 14.3 % of the patients could be identified as poor candidates for IAT. Both scores were insufficient to identify patients with a good clinical outcome. Conclusions: Both scores showed a strong correlation to poor clinical outcome in patients <80 years. The specificity of the scores could be enhanced by combining them. Both scores were insufficient to identify patients with a good clinical outcome and showed no association to clinical outcome in patients aged ≥80 years

  14. Emergency administration of abciximab for treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke: results of an international phase III trial: Abciximab in Emergency Treatment of Stroke Trial (AbESTT-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Harold P; Effron, Mark B; Torner, James; Dávalos, Antoni; Frayne, Judith; Teal, Philip; Leclerc, Jacques; Oemar, Barry; Padgett, Lakshmi; Barnathan, Elliot S; Hacke, Werner

    2008-01-01

    A previous randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study suggested that abciximab may be safe and effective in treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The current phase 3 study was planned to test the relative efficacy and safety of abciximab in patients with acute ischemic stroke with planned treatment within 5 hours since symptoms onset. An international, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase 3 trial tested intravenous administration of abciximab in 2 study cohorts using stratification variables of time since onset and stroke severity. The planned enrollment was 1800 patients. The primary cohort enrolled those patients who could be treated within 5 hours of onset of stroke. A companion cohort enrolled patients that were treated 5 to 6 hours after stroke as well as a smaller cohort of patients who could be treated within 3 hours of stroke present on awakening. The primary efficacy measure was the dichotomous modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months as adjusted to the baseline severity of stroke among subjects in the primary cohort. The primary safety outcome was the rate of symptomatic or fatal intracranial hemorrhage that occurred within 5 days of stroke. The trial was terminated prematurely after 808 patients in all cohorts were enrolled by recommendation of an independent safety and efficacy monitoring board due to an unfavorable benefit-risk profile. At 3 months, approximately 33% of patients assigned placebo (72/218) and 32% of patients assigned abciximab (71/221; P=0.944) in the primary cohort were judged to have a favorable response to treatment. The distributions of outcomes on the modified Rankin Scale were similar between the treated and control groups. Within 5 days of enrollment, approximately 5.5% of abciximab-treated and 0.5% of placebo-treated patients in the primary cohort had symptomatic or fatal intracranial hemorrhage (P=0.002). The trial also did not demonstrate an improvement in outcomes with abciximab among patients in the

  15. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  16. National survey on perioperative anaesthetic management in the endovascular treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Kräuchi, O; Valencia, L; Iturri, F; Mariscal Ortega, A; López Gómez, A; Valero, R

    2018-01-01

    To assess the anaesthetic management of treatment for endovascular acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) in Spain. A survey was designed by the SEDAR Neuroscience Section and sent to the Spanish anaesthesiology departments with a primary stroke centre between July and November 2016. Of the 47 hospitals where endovascular treatment of AIS is performed, 37 anaesthesiology departments participated. Thirty responses were obtained; three of which were eliminated due to duplication (response rate of 72.9%). Health coverage for AIS endovascular treatment was available 24hours a day in 63% of the hospitals. The anaesthesiologist in charge of the procedure was physically present in the hospital in 55.3%. There was large inter-hospital variability in non-standard monitoring and type of anaesthesia. The most important criterion for selecting type of anaesthesia was multidisciplinary choice made by the anaesthesiologist, neurologist and neuroradiologist (59.3%). The duration of time from arrival to arterial puncture was 10-15minutes in 59.2%. In 44.4%, systolic blood pressure was maintained between 140-180mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure<105mmHg. Glycaemic levels were taken in 81.5% of hospitals. Intravenous heparinisation was performed during the procedure in 66.7% with different patterns of action. In cases of moderate neurological deterioration with no added complications, 85.2% of the included hospitals awakened and extubated the patients. The wide variability observed in the anaesthetic management and the organization of the endovascular treatment of AIS demonstrates the need to create common guidelines for anaesthesiologists in Spain. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  18. Management of stenosis lesions during the period of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-xing HAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the management of stenosis lesions during endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 36 acute ischemic stroke patients combined with intracranial/extracranial arterial stenosis were treated with endovascular treatment or bridging treatment. Time from aggravation on admission or in hospital stay to femoral artery puncture, from femoral arterypuncture to recanalization were recorded. Modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (mTICI was usedto assess the recanalization immediately after operation. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to evaluate prognosis at 90 d after operation. Occurrence rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were recorded. Results Among 36 patients, 13 patients (36.11% underwent intravenous thrombolysis and then endovascular thrombectomy. In all patients, there were 21 (58.33% with intracranial stenosis and 15 (41.67% with extracranial stenosis, 16 (44.44% with anterior circulation stenosis and 20 (55.56% with posterior circulation stenosis. Stent thrombectomy was used in 25 patients (69.44% , while balloon dilatation and/or stent implantation was used in 11 patients (30.56% . For 21 patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, 4 were treated with balloon dilatation only, 9 with Wingspan self-expandable stents and 8 with Apollo balloon-expandable stents. Fifteen patients with extracranial arterial stenosis were treated with balloon dilatation and stent implantation. A total of 33 patients (91.67% achieved recanalization (mTICI 2b-3 grade, 21 patients (58.33% had good outcomes (mRS ≤ 2 score, while symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 2 patients (5.56% and 5 (13.89% died. There were no statistically significant differences in the rate of good prognosis, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality between intracranial and extracranial arterial stenosis, anterior and posterior circulation stenosis (Fisher exact probability: P > 0.05, for

  19. Treatment Patterns and Differences in Survival of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Between Academic and Non-Academic Hospitals in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Naomi; Bongers, Mathilda L; Coupé, Veerle M H; Smit, Egbert F; Groen, Harry J M; Welling, Alle; Schramel, Franz M N H; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to analyze differences in survival between academic and non-academic hospitals and to provide insight into treatment patterns for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results show the state of NSCLC survival and care in the Netherlands. The Netherlands Cancer Registry provided data on NSCLC survival for all Dutch hospitals. We used the Kaplan-Meier estimate to calculate median survival time by hospital type and a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the relative risk of mortality (expressed as hazard ratios) for patients diagnosed in academic versus non-academic hospitals, with adjustment for age, gender, and tumor histology, and stratifying for disease stage. Data on treatment patterns in Dutch hospitals was obtained from 4 hospitals (2 academic, 2 non-academic). A random sample of patients diagnosed with NSCLC from January 2009 until January 2011 was identified through hospital databases. Data was obtained on patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, and treatments. The Cox proportional hazards model shows a significantly decreased hazard ratio of mortality for patients diagnosed in academic hospitals, as opposed to patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals. This is specifically true for primary radiotherapy patients and patients who receive systemic treatment for non-metastasized NSCLC. Patients diagnosed in academic hospitals have better median overall survival than patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals, especially for patients treated with radiotherapy, systemic treatment, or combinations. This difference may be caused by residual confounding since the estimates were not adjusted for performance status. A wide variety of surgical, radiotherapeutic, and systemic treatments is prescribed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mobile platform for treatment of stroke: A case study of tele-assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Zenteno, Arturo Henry; Fernández, Francisco; Palomino-García, Alfredo; Moniche, Francisco; Escudero, Irene; Jiménez-Hernández, M Dolores; Caballero, Auxiliadora; Escobar-Rodriguez, Germán; Parra, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the technological solution of a tele-assistance process for stroke patients in acute phase in the Seville metropolitan area. The main objective of this process is to reduce time from symptom onset to treatment of acute phase stroke patients by means of telemedicine, regarding mobility between an intensive care unit ambulance and an expert center and activating the pre-hospital care phase. The technological platform covering the process has been defined following an interoperability model based on standards and with a focus on service-oriented architecture focus. Messaging definition has been designed according to the reference model of the CEN/ISO 13606, messages content follows the structure of archetypes. An XDS-b (Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing-b) transaction messaging has been designed according to Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise profile for archetype notifications and update enquiries.This research has been performed by a multidisciplinary group. The Virgen del Rocío University Hospital acts as Reference Hospital and the Public Company for Healthcare as mobility surroundings. PMID:25975806

  1. Wearable textile platform for assessing stroke patient treatment in daily life conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLorussi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring physical activities during post-stroke rehabilitation in daily life may help physicians to optimize and tailor the training program for patients. The European research project INTERACTION (FP7-ICT-2011-7-287351 evaluated motor capabilities in stroke patients during the recovery treatment period. We developed wearable sensing platform based on the sensor fusion among inertial, knitted piezoresistive sensors and textile EMG electrodes . The device was conceived in modular form and consists of a separate shirt, trousers, glove and shoe. Thanks to the novel fusion approach it has been possible to develop a model for the shoulder taking into account the scapulo-thoracic joint of the scapular girdle, considerably improving the estimation of the hand position in reaching activities. In order to minimize the sensor set used to monitor gait, a single inertial sensor fused with a textile goniometer proved to reconstruct the orientation of all the body segments of the leg. Finally, the sensing glove, endowed with three textile goniometers and three force sensors showed good capabilities in the reconstruction of grasping activities and evaluating the interaction of the hand with the environment, according to the project specifications. This paper reports on the design and the technical evaluation of the performance of the sensing platform, tested on healthy subjects.

  2. Factors associated with rapid neurological improvement 24 h following intra-arterial thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Gregorgy; Mohammad, Yousef M; Khadir, Mohammed; Yang, Ming; Slivka, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Significant 24 h improvement is the strongest indicator of functional recovery following thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke. This study sought to analyze factors contributing to rapid neurological improvement (RNI) following intra-arterial thrombolytic treatment (IATT). Angiograms and clinical information derived from consecutive patients receiving treatment initiated within 6 h of stroke onset were retrospectively reviewed. RNI was defined as at least 50% 24 h improvement on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with RNI. Variables tested included: age, gender, serum glucose, platelet count, pial collateral formation, presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, time to treatment, extent of reperfusion, site and location of occlusion, treatment agent and systolic blood pressure. Greater than 50% reperfusion of the involved territory, time to treatment within 270 min and good pial collateral formation (large penumbra zone) significantly predicted RNI. RNI occurred in 31% of the 112 patients studied. RNI occurred in 21/26 (80.8%) patients exhibiting all three favorable variables whereas patients with only one favorable variable had a 6.5% chance of RNI. 94% of patients displaying RNI had a modified Rankin Scale score of 2 or less at 3 months compared with 28.6% without RNI. RNI following IATT for stroke is more likely when at least two of the following are present: good reperfusion, good pial collateral formation and treatment within 4.5 h of symptom onset, and is strongly predictive of 3 month outcomes. Important to clinical management, IATT may need to be reconsidered in patients with poor pial collateral formation if time to treatment exceeds 4.5 h.

  3. Surgical treatment for central pain after stroke based on the neural mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akio; Watanabe, Katsushige; Kazama, Ken; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    Previous neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have suggested that functional changes might occur in the sensory thalamus, associated with reorganization of the thalamocortical system, in cases with central pain after stroke (thalamic pain). It might cause the misconduction of the sensory signal or a hyperactive response to peripheral natural stimulation on the thalamus, resulting in it playing an important roles in the genesis of central pain. Hyperactivity in the cerebral cortex adjacent to the central sulcus on the side ipsilateral to a cerebrovascular disease (CVD) lesion also might relate to central pain. We performed various kinds of surgical treatments in 29 cases with central pain after stroke based on the neural mechanism deserbed above. Epidural spinal cord stimulation was effective in 4 out of 7 cases with localized pain on the distal part of the leg and arm. We achieved pain control in these cases showing definite somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) originating in the sensory cortex before surgery. Stereotactic (Vim-Vcpc) thalamotomy with the aid of depth microrecording was effective in 4 out of 7 cases with diffuse pain. In good responders, we could find responses to natural peripheral stimulation and seldom encountered irregular burst discharges in the sensory thalamus during the operation. Preoperative positron emission tomography (PET) studies also revealed an increase of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the sensory cortex ipsilateral to the thalamic CVD lesion during contralateral thumb brushing. Gamma knife treatment was effective in 5 out of 7 cases after stereotactic thalamotomy. It became stable in 3 out of these 5 cases. Each case was treated with a maximum dose of 120-150 Gy using a 4 mm collimator. Precentral electrical cortical stimulation was performed in 8 cases. Sufficient pain relief was achieved in 3 out of 6 cases in which we could implant an importable pulse generator (IPG). In one of these cases, we found definite

  4. A population-based study of stimulant drug treatment of ADHD and academic progress in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoëga, Helga; Rothman, Kenneth J; Huybrechts, Krista F

    2012-01-01

    between their fourth- and seventh-grade tests were more likely to decline in test performance. The crude probability of academic decline was 72.9% in mathematics and 42.9% in language arts for children with a treatment start 25 to 36 months after the fourth-grade test. Compared with those starting......OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the hypothesis that later start of stimulant treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder adversely affects academic progress in mathematics and language arts among 9- to 12-year-old children. METHODS: We linked nationwide data from the Icelandic Medicines Registry...... and the Database of National Scholastic Examinations. The study population comprised 11,872 children born in 1994-1996 who took standardized tests in both fourth and seventh grade. We estimated the probability of academic decline (drop of ≥ 5.0 percentile points) according to drug exposure and timing of treatment...

  5. Post-stroke treatment with 17β-estradiol exerts neuroprotective effects in both normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Wendy; De Geyter, Deborah; Verachtert, Sofie; Brouwers, Sofie; Verdood, Peggy; De Keyser, Jacques; Kooijman, Ron

    2017-04-21

    Although ischemic stroke is a major cause of death worldwide and the predominant cause of acquired disability, the only effective drug therapy that has been developed thus far is reperfusion by tissue plasminogen activator. Since most patients do not qualify for this treatment, new methods have to be developed. It is well known that estradiol (E 2 ) exerts neuroprotective effects in different models of cerebral ischemia, but post-stroke treatment after an acute stroke has hardly been investigated. As many patients with an acute ischemic stroke have arterial hypertension, it is also of interest to evaluate the influence of this co-morbidity on the treatment efficacy of E 2 . The effects of E 2 administered 30min after a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) induced by an intracerebral injection of endothelin-1 were assessed in male normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Treatment with E 2 reduced infarct size in both WKY and SHRs and decreased the number of degenerating neurons, indicating that acute treatment with E 2 is indeed neuroprotective. To address the role of glia in neuroprotection, the effects of E 2 on the activation of microglia and astrocytes was determined. It appeared that E 2 had no effect on microglial activation, but reduced the activation of astrocytes in SHRs but not in the normotensive controls. We conclude that post-stroke E 2 treatment in both normotensive and hypertensive rats is neuroprotective. Although the presence of hypertension changed the astrocytic response to E 2 , it did not affect treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of atria and CHA2DS2-vasc risk stratification schemes for the prediction of stroke in the individual patient with atrial fibrillation and the impact on treatment decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Ham, Hendrika A.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Singer, Daniel E.; Leufkens, Hubert G.M.; Van Staa, Tjeerd P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of ischaemic stroke and treatment with anticoagulants should be prescribed according to stroke risk. Objectives: To compare the predictive ability of the currently recommended CHA2DS2-VASc ischaemic stroke risk score with the new ATRIA stroke

  7. The application of sonography in shoulder pain evaluation and injection treatment after stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wu; Fu, Yu; Hai-Xin, Song; Yan, Dong; Jian-Hua, Li

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This review article is designed to expose the application of sonography in shoulder pain after stroke. [Methods] A range of databases was searched to identify articles that address sonography examination, with or without ultrasound guided corticosteroid injection for hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP). The electronic databases of PubMed, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline were searched. [Results] According to the articles identified in our databases research, sonographic technique has potential to provide objective measurements in patients with HSP. The main sonography finding of HSP included subacromial subdeltoid (SASD) bursal effusion, tendinosis of the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendon, long head of biceps tendon sheath effusion, and shoulder subluxation. Our analysis also revealed significantly decreased pain score (VAS) and increased passive external rotation degree in the steroid injection group than control group. [Conclusion] The sonography examination is useful for HSP assessment and ultrasound guided technique is recommended for HSP injection treatment.

  8. Periprocedural Antithrombotic Treatment During Acute Mechanical Thrombectomy for Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob A. van de Graaf

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMore than one-third of the patients with ischemic stroke caused by an intracranial large vessel occlusion do not recover to functional independence despite fast and successful recanalization by acute mechanical thrombectomy (MT. This may partially be explained by incomplete microvascular reperfusion. Some antithrombotics, e.g., antiplatelet agents and heparin, may be able to restore microvascular reperfusion. However, antithrombotics may also increase the risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH. The aim of this review was to assess the potential safety and functional outcome of periprocedural antiplatelet or heparin use during acute MT for ischemic stroke.MethodsWe systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Medline, Web of Science, and Cochrane for studies investigating the safety and functional outcome of periprocedural antiplatelet or heparin treatment during acute MT for ischemic stroke. The primary outcome was the risk for sICH. Secondary outcomes were functional independence after 3–6 months (modified Rankin Scale 0–2 and mortality within 6 months.Results837 studies were identified through the search, of which 19 studies were included. The sICH risks of the periprocedural use of antiplatelets ranged from 6 to 17%, and for heparin from 5 to 12%. Two of four studies reporting relative effects of the use of antithrombotics are pointing toward an increased risk of sICH. Among patients treated with antiplatelet agents, functional independence varied from 23 to 60% and mortality from 18 to 33%. For heparin, this was, respectively, 19–54% and 19–33%. The three studies presenting relative effects of antiplatelets on functional independence showed neutral effects. Both studies reporting relative effects of heparin on functional independence found it to increase this chance.ConclusionRandomized controlled trials investigating the effect of periprocedural antithrombotic treatment in MT are lacking. Some observational

  9. Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED): Protocol for a Prospective Study of Stroke Risk and Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeste, Neelum D; Sánchez, Luisanna M; Urcuyo, Gabriela S; Bergés, Melissa E; Luden, Judy P; Stuber, Susan E; Latham, Teresa S; Mena, Rafael; Nieves, Rosa M; Ware, Russell E

    2017-06-02

    In the Dominican Republic, where the burden of sickle cell anemia (SCA) is high, many children lack access to routine screening and preventative care. Children with SCA are at risk for stroke, an event that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, screening via transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies children with SCA at highest stroke risk, allowing early intervention with blood transfusions. The need for indefinite transfusions for primary stroke prevention limits their practicality in limited-resource countries. Hydroxyurea has been shown to lower TCD velocities and to prevent conversion from conditional (170 to 199 cm/sec) to abnormal (greater than or equal to 200 cm/sec) velocities. In resource-limited settings, implementation of a TCD screening program, coupled with hydroxyurea therapy, could reduce the burden of SCA and stroke. The aims of the Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED) trial are (1) to screen children with SCA for stroke risk using TCD and to determine the prevalence of elevated velocities in a cross-sectional sample; (2) to identify clinical and laboratory correlates of elevated velocities; and (3) to obtain longitudinal data on the natural history of TCD velocities and to measure therapeutic effects of hydroxyurea. This prospective trial, designed and conducted by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and Hospital Infantil Robert Reid Cabral (HIRRC) with Centro de Obstetricia y Ginecología, includes a baseline cross-sectional epidemiological survey of the distribution of TCD velocities across a large cohort of children with SCA in the Dominican Republic. Children with conditional velocities are eligible to begin protocol-directed hydroxyurea if laboratory criteria are met. The treatment schedule begins with a fixed-dose of approximately 20 mg/kg/day for 6 months, after which it escalates to maximum tolerated dose (MTD). All participants undergo longitudinal annual TCD

  10. Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment Using Mechanical Thrombectomy: A Study of 137 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rakeshsingh K; Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lalla, Rakesh Shyam; Panchal, Keyurkumar Chandrakantbhai; Karapurkar, Anil Pandurang; Khadilkar, Satish Vasant; Ojha, Pawan K; Godge, Yogesh; Singh, Rakesh K; Benny, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) is the most effective treatment in large vessel occlusion (LVO). We have analyzed our initial experience of MT of 137 patients in anterior circulation (AC) and posterior circulation (PC) LVO using Solitaire stent retriever device. Retrospective cohort analysis of 112 AC and 25 PC acute ischemic strokes was done considering various baseline characteristics, risk factors, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) change, revascularization rate, complications, and functional outcome at 3 months using modified Rankin score. Out of 137 patients, occlusion was found in M1 segment (44.5%), carotid T occlusion (37.2%), and basilar artery (18.2%). Atrial fibrillation was important risk factor for Carotid T occlusion. 50.4% patients received intravenous thrombolysis. Baseline mean NIHSS in AC was 15.5 (±4.32), and PC was 19 (±5.5). Tandem lesions were noted in 14.6%. There was significant difference in mean door-to-needle time for AC and PC (220 ± 80.6 and 326 ± 191.8 min, respectively). Mean time to revascularization for AC (39.5 ± 14.1) and PC (42.2 ± 19.4) was similar. Procedural success (modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction ≥2b) observed in AC and PC was 92.9% and 84%, respectively ( P = 0.154). NIHSS at admission between 5 and 15 and immediate postprocedure NIHSS improvement >4 was associated with significant better clinical outcome at 3 months. Overall complication rate was about 15.3% including symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in 8.1% and 6.6% deaths. MT is safe treatment and equally effective for both AC and PC LVO. With careful patient selection, clinical outcome in PC was comparable to AC despite delayed presentation and higher baseline NIHSS.

  11. Value of Computed Tomographic Perfusion-Based Patient Selection for Intra-Arterial Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Jordi; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Bavel, Ed; van Zwam, Wim H.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Lingsma, Hester F.; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Yoo, Albert J.; Marquering, Henk A.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Fransen, Puck S. S.; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Emmer, Bart J.; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F.; van Dijk, Lukas C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Lo, Rob H.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L. M.; van den Berg, Jan S. P.; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A. A. M.; Aerden, Leo A. M.; Dallinga, René J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H. C. M. L.; Heijboer, Roel J. J.; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Gerrits, Dick G.; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.; Karas, Giorgos B.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Flach, H. Zwenneke; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Brown, Martin M.; Liebig, Thomas; Stijnen, Theo; Andersson, Tommy; Mattle, Heinrich; Wahlgren, Nils; van der Heijden, Esther; Ghannouti, Naziha; Fleitour, Nadine; Hooijenga, Imke; Puppels, Corina; Pellikaan, Wilma; Geerling, Annet; Lindl-Velema, Annemieke; van Vemde, Gina; de Ridder, Ans; Greebe, Paut; de Bont-Stikkelbroeck, José; de Meris, Joke; Janssen, Kirsten; Struijk, Willy; Simons, Tiny; Messchendorp, Gert; van der Minne, Friedus; Bongenaar, Hester; Licher, Silvan; Boodt, Nikki; Ros, Adriaan; Venema, Esmee; Slokkers, Ilse; Ganpat, Raymie-Jayce; Mulder, Maxim; Saiedie, Nawid; Heshmatollah, Alis; Schipperen, Stefanie; Vinken, Stefan; van Boxtel, Tiemen; Koets, Jeroen; Boers, Merel; Santos, Emilie; Jansen, Ivo; Kappelhof, Manon; Lucas, Marit; Geuskens, Ralph; Barros, Renan Sales; Dobbe, Roeland; Csizmadia, Marloes

    2015-01-01

    The utility of computed tomographic perfusion (CTP)-based patient selection for intra-arterial treatment of acute ischemic stroke has not been proven in randomized trials and requires further study in a cohort that was not selected based on CTP. Our objective was to study the relationship between

  12. Longitudinal Brain Functional Connectivity Changes of the Cortical Motor-Related Network in Subcortical Stroke Patients with Acupuncture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, the effectiveness of the rehabilitation therapy such as acupuncture combining conventional Western medicine (AG on stroke people’s motor-related brain network and their behaviors has not been systematically studied. In the present study, seventeen adult ischemic patients were collected and divided into two groups: the conventional Western medicine treatment group (CG and the AG. The neurological deficit scores (NDS and resting-state functional MRI data were collected before and after treatment. Compared with the CG patients, AG patients exhibited a significant enhancement of the percent changes of NDS from pre- to posttreatment intervention. All patients showed significant changes of functional connectivity (FC between the pair of cortical motor-related regions. After treatment, both patient groups showed a recovery of brain connectivity to the nearly normal level compared with the controls in these pairs. Moreover, a significant correlation between the percent changes of NDS and the pretreatment FC values of bilateral primary motor cortex (M1 in all patients was found. In conclusion, our results showed that AG therapy can be an effective means for ischemic stroke patients to recover their motor function ability. The FC strengths between bilateral M1 of stroke patients can predict stroke patients’ treatment outcome after rehabilitation therapy.

  13. Thrombolysis: Improving door-to-needle times for ischemic stroke treatment - A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Noreen; Smith, Eric E; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Hill, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of thrombolysis is highly time dependent. For this reason, short target times have been set to reduce time to treatment from hospital arrival, which is called door-to-needle time. Summary of review There has been considerable work done at single centers and across multiple hospitals to improve door-to-needle time. There have been reductions of 8 to 47 min when applying one or more improvement strategies at single centers, and there have been many multi-hospital initiatives. The delays to treatment have been attributed to both patient and hospital factors, and strategies to address these delays have been proven to reduce door-to-needle time. The most effective strategies include pre-notification of arrival by Emergency Medical Services (EMS), single-call activation of stroke team, rapid registration process, moving the patient to computed tomography on EMS stretcher, and administration of alteplase in the scanner. There are many exciting areas of future direction including reduction of door-to-needle time in developing countries, improving pre-hospital response times, and improving the efficiency of endovascular treatment. Conclusions There is now a broad understanding of the causes of delays to fast treatment and the strategies that can be employed to improve door-to-needle time such that most centers could achieve median door-to-needle time of 30 min.

  14. Guidelines for the preventive treatment of ischaemic stroke and TIA (I). Update on risk factors and life style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B; Gállego, J; Gil-Nuñez, A; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Roquer, J; Segura, T; Tejada, J; Lago, A; Díez-Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; García Pastor, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Nombela, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Rubio, F; Serena, J; Simal, P; Vivancos, J

    2012-01-01

    To update the ad hoc Committee of the Cerebrovascular Diseases Study Group of The Spanish Neurological Society guidelines on prevention of ischaemic stroke (IS) and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We reviewed available evidence on risk factors and means of modifying them to prevent ischaemic stroke and TIA. Levels of evidence and recommendation grades are based on the classification of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. This first section summarises the recommendations for action on the following factors: blood pressure, diabetes, lipids, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity, cardio-embolic diseases, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives, hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombotic states and sleep apnea syndrome. Changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia, according to criteria of primary and secondary prevention, are recommended for preventing ischemic stroke. © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Stem cell-based treatments against stroke: observations from human proof-of-concept studies and considerations regarding clinical applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Roland Doeppner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke remains a heavy burden for industrialized countries. The only causal therapy is the recanalization of occluded vessels via thrombolysis, which due to a narrow time window still can be offered only to a minority of patients. Since the majority of patients continues to exhibit neurological deficits even following successful thrombolysis, restorative therapies are urgently needed that promote brain remodeling and repair once stroke injury has occurred. Due to their unique properties of action, stem cell-based strategies gained increasing interest during recent years. Using various stroke models in both rodents and primates, the transplantation of stem cells, namely of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or neural progenitor cells (NPCs, has been shown to promote neurological recovery most likely via indirect bystander actions. In view of promising observations, clinical proof-of-concept studies are currently under way, in which effects of stem and precursor cells are evaluated in human stroke patients. In this review we summarize already published studies, which due to the broad experience in other medical contexts mostly employed bone marrow-derived MSCs by means of intravenous transplantation. With the overall number of clinical trials limited in number, only a fraction of these studies used non-treated control groups, and only single studies were adequately blinded. Despite these limitations, first promising results justify the need for more elaborate clinical trials in order to make stem cell transplantation a success for stroke treatment in the future.

  16. The effects of poststroke captopril and losartan treatment on cerebral blood flow autoregulation in SHRsp with hemorrhagic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeda, John S; Daneshtalab, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    The ability of captopril and losartan treatment to restore cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation after intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke (HS) was assessed in Kyoto–Wistar stroke-prone hypertensive rats (SHRsp). Laser Doppler techniques assessed CBF autoregulation in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) perfusion domain and a pressure myograph was used to measure pressure-dependent constriction (PDC) in isolated MCAs before and after stroke and after 13, 33, and 63 days of poststroke captopril or losartan treatment. The treatments did not lower blood pressure (BP) and equally suppressed plasma aldosterone after HS. The HS development was associated with the loss of CBF autoregulation, high CBF, increased CBF conductance to elevations in BP, and the loss of PDC in the MCAs. Both treatments restored these functions to prestroke levels within 13 days. The PDC and CBF autoregulation subsequently deteriorated after 63 days of captopril treatment while being maintained at prestroke levels over all durations of losartan treatment. The SHRsp subjected to 35 days of poststroke losartan treatment exhibited less blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption and brain herniation than captopril-treated SHRsp. The superior ability of losartan to restore CBF autoregulation and myogenic function may have contributed to the more effective attenuation of cerebral damage after HS. PMID:20648036

  17. Possibilities оf use of testosterone undecanoate in treatment in stroke male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Morgunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have studied 154 men with the first hemispheric ischemic stroke. Clinical and laboratory studies have revealed the androgen deficiency in 66.3 %, with its frequency higher in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (50 % and 26.3 %, respectively. Forty-two men with diabetes mellitus type 2 and acquired androgenic deficit received replacing treatment with testosterone undecanoate. After 2 years from the beginning of treatment, there were the decrease in clinical severity of androgenic deficit, the increase of total and free testosterone levels, and muscle power in the main group compared to the controls. Body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins have decreased as well. Secondary stroke has developed in 3 (7.1 % patients of the main group and in 5 (16.6 % controls. The treatment with androgens has a positive effect on risk factors of secondary ischemic stroke. It is an effective method for improvement of social adaptation of men survived after the stroke..

  18. Qualitative systematic reviews of treatment burden in stroke, heart failure and diabetes - Methodological challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment burden can be defined as the self-care practices that patients with chronic illness must perform to respond to the requirements of their healthcare providers, as well as the impact that these practices have on patient functioning and well being. Increasing levels of treatment burden may lead to suboptimal adherence and negative outcomes. Systematic review of the qualitative literature is a useful method for exploring the patient experience of care, in this case the experience of treatment burden. There is no consensus on methods for qualitative systematic review. This paper describes the methodology used for qualitative systematic reviews of the treatment burdens identified in three different common chronic conditions, using stroke as our exemplar. Methods Qualitative studies in peer reviewed journals seeking to understand the patient experience of stroke management were sought. Limitations of English language and year of publication 2000 onwards were set. An exhaustive search strategy was employed, consisting of a scoping search, database searches (Scopus, CINAHL, Embase, Medline & PsycINFO) and reference, footnote and citation searching. Papers were screened, data extracted, quality appraised and analysed by two individuals, with a third party for disagreements. Data analysis was carried out using a coding framework underpinned by Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Results A total of 4364 papers were identified, 54 were included in the review. Of these, 51 (94%) were retrieved from our database search. Methodological issues included: creating an appropriate search strategy; investigating a topic not previously conceptualised; sorting through irrelevant data within papers; the quality appraisal of qualitative research; and the use of NPT as a novel method of data analysis, shown to be a useful method for the purposes of this review. Conclusion The creation of our search strategy may be of particular interest to other researchers carrying out

  19. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation in Acute Stroke Treatment: The Importance of Head Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, H., E-mail: hendrik.janssen@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany); Buchholz, G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Germany); Killer, M. [Paracelsus Medical University, Neurology/Research Institute of Neurointervention (Austria); Ertl, L.; Brückmann, H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany); Lutz, J. [Ingolstadt Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    PurposeWhile today mechanical thrombectomy is an established treatment option for main branch occlusions in anterior circulation stroke, there is still an ongoing debate on the kind of anesthesia to be preferred. Introducing a simple method for head stabilization, we analyzed safety and duration of endovascular recanalization procedures under general anesthesia (GA) and conscious sedation (CS).MethodsWe retrospectively identified 84 consecutive patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy owing to acute anterior circulation stroke. Fifty-three were treated under GA and 31 under CS equipped with a standard cervical collar to reduce head movement. We evaluated recanalization results, in-house time to start recanalization, procedure times, technical and clinical complication rates, and conversion rates from CS to GA.ResultsRecanalization of mTICI ≥2b was achieved in 80 % under CS and in 81 % under GA. Median in-house time to start recanalization for CS was 60 min (IQR 28; 44–72) and 77 min (IQR 23; 68–91) for GA (P = 0.001). Median procedure time under CS was 35 min (IQR 43; 69–25) and 41 min (IQR 43; 66–23) for GA (P = 0.9). No major complications such as ICH occurred in either group, and no conversions from CS to GA were necessary.ConclusionMechanical thrombectomy can be performed faster and safely under CS in combination with simple head immobilization using a standard cervical collar.

  20. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation in Acute Stroke Treatment: The Importance of Head Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, H.; Buchholz, G.; Killer, M.; Ertl, L.; Brückmann, H.; Lutz, J.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWhile today mechanical thrombectomy is an established treatment option for main branch occlusions in anterior circulation stroke, there is still an ongoing debate on the kind of anesthesia to be preferred. Introducing a simple method for head stabilization, we analyzed safety and duration of endovascular recanalization procedures under general anesthesia (GA) and conscious sedation (CS).MethodsWe retrospectively identified 84 consecutive patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy owing to acute anterior circulation stroke. Fifty-three were treated under GA and 31 under CS equipped with a standard cervical collar to reduce head movement. We evaluated recanalization results, in-house time to start recanalization, procedure times, technical and clinical complication rates, and conversion rates from CS to GA.ResultsRecanalization of mTICI ≥2b was achieved in 80 % under CS and in 81 % under GA. Median in-house time to start recanalization for CS was 60 min (IQR 28; 44–72) and 77 min (IQR 23; 68–91) for GA (P = 0.001). Median procedure time under CS was 35 min (IQR 43; 69–25) and 41 min (IQR 43; 66–23) for GA (P = 0.9). No major complications such as ICH occurred in either group, and no conversions from CS to GA were necessary.ConclusionMechanical thrombectomy can be performed faster and safely under CS in combination with simple head immobilization using a standard cervical collar.

  1. Neuroprotective Functions Through Inhibition of ER Stress by Taurine or Taurine Combination Treatments in a Rat Stroke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Howard; Gharibani, Payam M; Ma, Zhiyuan; Alexandrescu, Anamaria; Genova, Rafaella; Chen, Po-Chih; Modi, Jigar; Menzie, Janet; Pan, Chunliu; Tao, Rui; Wu, Jang-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Taurine, as a free amino acid, is found at high levels in many tissues including brain, heart and skeletal muscle and is known to demonstrate neuroprotective effects in a range of disease conditions including stroke and neurodegenerative disease. Using in vitro culture systems we have demonstrated that taurine can elicit protection against endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) from glutamate excitotoxicity or from excessive reactive oxygen species in PC12 cells or rat neuronal cultures. In our current investigation we hypothesized that taurine treatment after stroke in the rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model would render protection against ER stress processes as reflected in decreased levels of expression of ER stress pathway components. We demonstrated that taurine elicited high level protection and inhibited both ATF-6 and IRE-1 ER stress pathway components. As ischemic stroke has a complex pathology it is likely that certain combination treatment approaches targeting multiple disease mechanisms may have excellent potential for efficacy. We have previously employed the partial NMDA antagonist DETC-MeSO to render protection against in vivo ischemic stroke using a rat cerebral ischemia model. Here we tested administration of subcutaneous administration of 0.56 mg/kg DETC-MeSO or 40 mg/kg of taurine separately or as combined treatment after a 120 min cerebral ischemia in the rat MCAO model. Neither drug alone demonstrated protection at the low doses employed. Remarkably however the combination of low dose DETC-MeSO plus low dose taurine conferred a diminished infarct size and an enhanced Neuroscore (reflecting decreased neurological deficit). Analysis of ER stress markers pPERK, peIF-2-alpha and cleaved ATF-6 all showed decreased expression demonstrating that all 3 ER stress pathways were inhibited concurrent with a synergistic protective effect by the post-stroke administration of this DETC-MeSO-taurine combination treatment.

  2. A new treatment in the rehabilitation of the paretic upper limb after stroke: the ARAMIS prototype and treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignolo, Loris; Lucca, Lucia F; Basta, Giuseppina; Serra, Sebastiano; Pugliese, Maria E; Sannita, Walter G; Dolce, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, as part of the rehabilitation of post stroke patients, the use of robotic technologies to improve recovery of upper limb has become more widespread. The Automatic Recovery Arm Motility Integrated System (ARAMIS) is a concept robot and prototype designed to promote the functional interaction of the arms in the neurorehabilitation of the paretic upper limb. Two computer-controlled, symmetric and interacting exoskeletons compensate for the inadequate strength and accuracy of the paretic arm and the effect of gravity during rehabilitation. Rehabilitation is possible in 3 different modalities; asynchronous, synchronous and active-assisted. To compare the effectiveness of robotic rehabilitation by an exoskeleton prototype system with traditional rehabilitation in motor and functional recovery of the upper limb after stroke. Case-control study, 52 patients enrolled in the study, 28 cases (women: 8, age: 65 ± 10 yrs) treated with ARAMIS and 24 controls (women: 11, age: 69 ± 7 yrs) with conventional rehabilitation. Motor impairment assessed before and after treatment with Fugl-Meyer scale and Motricity Index, level of disability assessed with the Functional Independence Measure. A questionnaire was also administered to assess the patient's tolerance to robotic therapy. After 28 ± 4 sessions over a 54 ± 3.6-day period, the patients treated by ARAMIS had an improvement on the Fugl-Meyer scale (global score from 43 ± 18 to 73 ± 29; p scale (p Fugl-Meyer global score of the control group improved from 41 ± 13 to 58 ± 16 (p < 0.006) and the motor function item from 9.4 ± 4.1 to 14.9 ± 5.8 (p < 0.023). Motor improvement was greater at the wrist and hand than at shoulder and elbow level in patients treated by ARAMIS and controls, but it was significantly greater in ARAMIS-treated patients than in controls. The results indicate a greater efficacy of ARAMIS compared to conventional rehabilitation.

  3. Sex-based differences in the effect of intra-arterial treatment of stroke: analysis of the PROACT-2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael D; Kent, David M; Hinchey, Judith; Rowley, Howard; Buchan, Alastair M; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Higashida, Randall T; Fischbein, Nancy J; Dillon, William P; Gent, Michael; Firszt, Carolyn M; Schulz, Gregory A; Furlan, Anthony J

    2006-09-01

    Sex influences outcome after intravenous thrombolysis. In a combined analysis of the tissue plasminogen activator clinical trials, a sex-by-treatment interaction was observed. We sought to confirm that observation in an independent data set. Data were from the Pro-Urokinase for Acute Cerebral Thromboembolism-2 (PROACT-2) trial. Baseline factors were compared by sex. The primary outcome was an assessment of a sex-by-treatment interaction term within a logistic regression model, using a modified Rankin Scale score treatment. In the PROACT-2 study of intra-arterial stroke thrombolysis, in both women and men, prourokinase resulted in better outcomes than control. A sex by prourokinase treatment interaction was observed, with women showing a larger treatment effect (20% absolute benefit) compared with men (10% absolute benefit). The reason for this interaction is that thrombolytic treatment nullifies the worse outcome for untreated women compared with men. The reasons for effect modification do not include improved recanalization at 2 hours among women. Women with middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke benefit more from intra-arterial therapy. Further study of how sex affects stroke outcome is needed.

  4. Apixaban for treatment of embolic stroke of undetermined source (ATTICUS randomized trial): Rationale and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Tobias; Poli, Sven; Meisner, Christoph; Schreieck, Juergen; Zuern, Christine S; Nägele, Thomas; Brachmann, Johannes; Jung, Werner; Gahn, Georg; Schmid, Elisabeth; Bäezner, Hansjörg; Keller, Timea; Petzold, Gabor C; Schrickel, Jan-Wilko; Liman, Jan; Wachter, Rolf; Schön, Frauke; Schabet, Martin; Lindner, Alfred; Ludolph, Albert C; Kimmig, Hubert; Jander, Sebastian; Schlegel, Uwe; Gawaz, Meinrad; Ziemann, Ulf

    2017-12-01

    Rationale Optimal secondary prevention of embolic stroke of undetermined source is not established. The current standard in these patients is acetylsalicylic acid, despite high prevalence of yet undetected paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Aim The ATTICUS randomized trial is designed to determine whether the factor Xa inhibitor apixaban administered within 7 days after embolic stroke of undetermined source, is superior to acetylsalicylic acid for prevention of new ischemic lesions documented by brain magnetic resonance imaging within 12 months after index stroke. Design Prospective, randomized, blinded, parallel-group, open-label, German multicenter phase III trial in approximately 500 patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source. A key inclusion criterion is the presence or the planned implantation of an insertable cardiac monitor. Patients are 1:1 randomized to apixaban or acetylsalicylic acid and treated for a 12-month period. It is an event-driven trial aiming for core-lab adjudicated primary outcome events. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the occurrence of at least one new ischemic lesion identified by axial T2-weighted FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging and/or axial DWI magnetic resonance imaging at 12 months when compared with the baseline magnetic resonance imaging. Key secondary outcomes are the combination of recurrent ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes, systemic embolism; combination of MACE including recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular death and combination of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding defined according to ISTH, and change of cognitive function and quality of life (EQ-5D, Stroke Impact Scale). Discussion Embolic stroke of undetermined source is caused by embolic disease and associated with a high risk of recurrent ischemic strokes and clinically silent cerebral ischemic lesions. ATTICUS will investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation detected by insertable cardiac monitor and the effects of

  5. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to treatment with i...

  6. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  7. Four evolving strategies in the emergent treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, R Jason; Jauch, Edward C; Panagos, Peter D; Reynolds, Matthew R; Mocco, J

    2012-07-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States and is the fourth leading cause of death, affecting nearly 800,000 patients each year. The physical, emotional, and financial toll stroke inflicts on patients and their families cannot be overstated. At the forefront of acute stroke care, emergency clinicians are positioned to have a major impact on the quality of care that stroke patients receive. This issue outlines and reviews the literature on 4 evolving strategies reflecting developing advancements in the care of acute ischemic stroke and their potential to impact patients in the emergency department setting: (1) the expanding window for intravenous rt-PA, (2) the use of multimodal computed tomographic scanning in emergent diagnostic imaging, (3) endovascular therapies for stroke, and (4) stroke systems of care. Whether practicing in a tertiary care environment or in a remote emergency department, emergency clinicians will benefit from familiarizing themselves with these advancements and should consider how these new approaches might influence their management of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  8. Statin Use and Functional Outcome after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    Background: Preliminary findings suggest that statins may have a neuroprotective effect in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This study investigated whether patients prior on statin therapy and treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischaemic stroke have a better functional

  9. Body Temperature and Inflammation in Acute Stroke: implications for prognosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. den Hertog (Heleen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSafe, cheap, and broadly applicable therapies for acute stroke are urgently needed. Stroke ranks second as a cause of death worldwide and is the main cause of disability in high-income countries. In the Netherlands alone, more than 37.000 patients are admitted to hospital for acute

  10. Statin treatment and the occurrence of hemorrhagic stroke in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; de Haan, Rob J.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose-The recently published Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) study showed that statins exert a marginally beneficial effect on stroke prevention in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease. Interestingly, the magnitude of the

  11. Discontinuation of antiplatelet treatment and risk of recurrent stroke and all-cause death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Kamilla; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We wished to examine the impact of antiplatelet drug discontinuation on recurrent stroke and all-cause mortality. METHODS: We identified a cohort of incident ischaemic stroke patients in a Danish stroke registry, 2007-2011. Using population-based registries we assessed subjects' drug...... experienced a second stroke and 600 died. Compared with current antiplatelet drug use, both recent use (1.3 (0.8-2.0)), and non-use (1.3 (0.8-1.9)) were associated with increased recurrent stroke risk. The corresponding HRs of death were 1.9 (1.4-2.5) for recent and 1.8 (1.4-2.3) for non-use of antiplatelet......-pharmacological biases, such as 'sick stopper', may threaten the validity of this risk estimate. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  12. Outcomes Associated With Resuming Warfarin Treatment After Hemorrhagic Stroke or Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Skjøth, Flemming; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-04-01

    The increase in the risk for bleeding associated with antithrombotic therapy causes a dilemma in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who sustain an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). A thrombotic risk is present; however, a risk for serious harm associated with resumption of anticoagulation therapy also exists. To investigate the prognosis associated with resuming warfarin treatment stratified by the type of ICH (hemorrhagic stroke or traumatic ICH). This nationwide observational cohort study included patients with AF who sustained an incident ICH event during warfarin treatment from January 1, 1998, through February 28, 2016. Follow-up was completed April 30, 2016. Resumption of warfarin treatment was evaluated after hospital discharge. No oral anticoagulant treatment or resumption of warfarin treatment, included as a time-dependent exposure. One-year observed event rates per 100 person-years were calculated, and treatment strategies were compared using time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression models with adjustment for age, sex, length of hospital stay, comorbidities, and concomitant medication use. A total of 2415 patients with AF in this cohort (1481 men [61.3%] and 934 women [38.7%]; mean [SD] age, 77.1 years [9.1 years]) sustained an ICH event. Of these events, 1325 were attributable to hemorrhagic stroke and 1090 were secondary to trauma. During the first year, 305 patients with a hemorrhagic stroke (23.0%) died, whereas 210 in the traumatic ICH group (19.3%) died. Among patients with hemorrhagic stroke, resuming warfarin therapy was associated with a lower rate of ischemic stroke or systemic embolism (SE) (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24-1.02) and an increased rate of recurrent ICH (AHR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.68-2.50) compared with not resuming warfarin therapy, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. For patients with traumatic ICH, resuming warfarin therapy also was associated with a lower rate of ischemic stroke

  13. Shared decision making after severe stroke-How can we improve patient and family involvement in treatment decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, Akila; Dennis, Martin; Mead, Gillian; Whiteley, William N; Lawton, Julia; Doubal, Fergus Neil

    2017-12-01

    People who are well may regard survival with disability as being worse than death. However, this is often not the case when those surviving with disability (e.g. stroke survivors) are asked the same question. Many routine treatments provided after an acute stroke (e.g. feeding via a tube) increase survival, but with disability. Therefore, clinicians need to support patients and families in making informed decisions about the use of these treatments, in a process termed shared decision making. This is challenging after acute stroke: there is prognostic uncertainty, patients are often too unwell to participate in decision making, and proxies may not know the patients' expressed wishes (i.e. values). Patients' values also change over time and in different situations. There is limited evidence on successful methods to facilitate this process. Changes targeted at components of shared decision making (e.g. decision aids to provide information and discussing patient values) increase patient satisfaction. How this influences decision making is unclear. Presumably, a "shared decision-making tool" that introduces effective changes at various stages in this process might be helpful after acute stroke. For example, by complementing professional judgement with predictions from prognostic models, clinicians could provide information that is more accurate. Decision aids that are personalized may be helpful. Further qualitative research can provide clinicians with a better understanding of patient values and factors influencing this at different time points after a stroke. The evaluation of this tool in its success to achieve outcomes consistent with patients' values may require more than one clinical trial.

  14. Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment, Part 1: Patient Selection “The 50% Barrier and the Capillary Index Score”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Firas; Elias, John J.; Filipkowski, Danielle E.; Faber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The current strategy for intra-arterial treatment (IAT) of acute ischemic stroke focuses on minimizing time from ictus to revascularization and maximizing revascularization. Employing this strategy has yet to lead to improved rates of successful outcomes. However, the collateral blood supply likely plays a significant role in maintaining viable brain tissue during ischemia. Based on our prior work, we believe that only approximately 50% of patients are genetically predisposed to have sufficient collaterals for a good outcome following treatment, a concept we call the 50% barrier. The Capillary Index Score (CIS) has been developed as a tool to identify patients with a sufficient collateral blood supply to maintain tissue viability prior to treatment. Patients with a favorable CIS (f CIS) may be able to achieve a good outcome with IAT beyond an arbitrary time window. The CIS is incorporated into a proposed patient treatment algorithm. For patients suffering from a large stroke without aphasia, a non-enhanced head CT should be followed by CT angiography (CTA). For patients without signs of stroke mimics or visible signs of structural changes due to large irreversible ischemia, CTA can help confirm the vascular occlusion and location. The CIS can be obtained from a diagnostic cerebral angiogram, with IAT offered to patients categorized as f CIS. PMID:25954243

  15. Treatment with intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with reduced bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need for hospi......Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need...... for hospital admissions during follow-up. Methods: We conducted a register-based nationwide propensity score-matched follow-up study among ischemic stroke patients in Denmark (2004-2011). IV-tPA-treated patients were propensity-score matched with IV-tPA eligible but non-treated ischemic stroke patients from...... stroke centers not offering tPA. The adjusted Hazard ratio (HR) for first readmission was estimated by multivariable Cox regression among patients who survived the initial stroke admission. Total all-cause bed day use in the first year after stroke admission was determined for patients with a potential...

  16. A review on assessment and treatment of the trunk in stroke: A need or luxury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikbabu, Suruliraj; Chakrapani, Mahabala; Ganeshan, Sailakshmi; Rakshith, Kedambadi C; Nafeez, Syed; Prem, Venkatesan

    2012-09-05

    Trunk function has been identified as an important early predictor of functional outcome after stroke and the same deteriorates on both contralateral and ipsilateral sides of the body following stroke. The primary contribution of the trunk muscles is to allow the body to remain upright, adjust weight shifts, and control movements against constant pull of gravity and is considered central key point of the body. Proximal stability of the trunk is a pre-requisite for distal limb mobility, balance, gait and functional activities and its positive correlation in hemiplegia has been demonstrated in a cross-sectional study. Both isokinetic and handheld dynamometer muscle strength testing demonstrated the weakness of bilateral trunk flexors, extensors and rotator muscles in both acute and chronic hemiplegic patients. This was confirmed by electromyography analysis which identified poor bilateral trunk muscles activity in patients with stroke. Trunk impairment scale is sensitive to evaluate the selective muscle control of upper and lower trunk, and it has been reported that lateral flexion of the trunk is easier than rotation of the trunk and the clinical observation concurs to the difficulty in lower trunk rotation of stroke patients. However, trunk exercises given early after stroke could produce enhanced balance performance post- stroke. This review attempts to report the evidence supporting the involvement of the trunk and its influence on balance and functional performance in post-stroke hemiplegia.

  17. Hospital treatment costs and length of stay associated with hypertension and multimorbidity after hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specogna, Adrian V; Turin, Tanvir C; Patten, Scott B; Hill, Michael D

    2017-08-10

    Previous studies have identified various treatment and patient characteristics that may be associated with higher hospital cost after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); a devastating type of stroke. Patient morbidity is perhaps the least understood of these cost-driving factors. We describe how hypertension and other patient morbidities affect length of stay, and hospital treatment costs after ICH using primary and simulated data. We also describe the relationship between cost and length of stay within these patients. We used a cohort design; evaluating 987 consecutive ICH patients across one decade in a Canadian center. Economic, treatment, and patient data were obtained from clinical and administrative sources. Multimorbidity was defined as the presence of one or more diagnoses at hospital admission in addition to a primary diagnosis of ICH. Hypertension was the most frequent (67%) morbidity within these patients, as well as the strongest predictor of longer stay (adjusted RR for >7 days: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.07-1.60), and was significantly associated with higher cost per visit when accounting for other morbidities (adjusted cost increase for hypertension $8123.51, 95% CI: $4088.47 to $12,856.72 USD). A Monte Carlo simulation drawing one million samples of patients estimated for a generation (100 years) assuming 0.94% population growth per year, and a hospitalization rate of 12 per 100,000 inhabitants, supported these findings (p = 0.516 for the difference in unadjusted cost: simulated vs primary). Using a restricted cubic spline, we observed that the rate of change in overall cost for all patients was greatest for the first 3 weeks (p < 0.001) compared to subsequent weeks. Patient multimorbidity, specifically hypertension, is a strong predictor of longer stay and cost after ICH. The non-linear relationship between cost and time should also be considered when forecasting healthcare spending in these patients.

  18. [The peculiarities of the application of transcranial magnetic therapy and electrical stimulation for the treatment of the patients presenting with various types of stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, E A

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the results of the authors' research, including analysis of the clinical and instrumental data concerning 203 patients with, stroke are presented. It is shown that the clinical effectiveness of the transcranial methods incorporated in the combined rehabilitation programs depends on the type of stroke and localization of the lesions. Specifically, the patients presenting with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization experienced a neurophysiologically confirmed significant clinical improvement that became apparent after the consistent application of transcranial magnetic therapy and micropolarization. In the patients with ischemic stroke of stem localization, the positive influence on psychomotor recovery was achieved with the application of transcranial magnetic therapy, but transcranial micropolarization did not have an appreciable effect on the recovery of such patients. The patients presenting with hemorrhagic stroke did not experience any significant improvement of psychomotor parameters from transcranial magnetic therapy and transcranial micropolarization. The likely mechanism underlying the recovery of psychomotor processes under effect of transcranial magnetic therapy in the patients with ischemic stroke is the normalization of the frequency of interaction between brain structures. In addition, in the patients with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization and in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke electrical myostimulation has a marked impact on the psychomotor recovery only in case of functional treatment. In the patients suffering from ischemic stroke of stem localization non-functional electromyostimulation significantly improves motor functions and cognitive motor control.

  19. [Edoxaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism: an expert position paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Thomas W; Rohla, Miklos; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Domanovits, Hans; Fries, Dietmar; Vosko, Milan R; Gary, Thomas; Ay, Cihan

    2018-04-01

    Edoxaban is the most recent available representative of the Non-Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC). The approval was based on the largest phase III trials of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, ENGAGE-AF), and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE, HOKUSAI-VTE). In both trials, edoxaban was associated with similar efficacy and a significant reduction in bleeding events with respect to the pre-defined primary safety endpoints, as compared to warfarin.Additionally, the once daily dosing of edoxaban, the clinically investigated strategy for dose-reduction based on clearly defined criteria and the favorable pharmacokinetic profile might further support the clinical applicability of the substance.In the light of recent data, this expert consensus document aims to summarize the latest clinical trial results while providing a concise overview of current guideline recommendations on the management of patients with non-valvular AF and VTE.

  20. Effectiveness of technologies in the treatment of post-stroke anomia: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lavoie

    2015-04-01

    Procedures and analyses: The PRISMA statement(1 for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses of studies that evaluate health care interventions was used as a guideline to conduct the present review. A systematic search of publications on PubMed and PsycInfo was conducted. Experimental studies designed to assess the effectiveness of an intervention delivered by a technology, namely computer, smart tablet or teletreatment, to specifically improve anomia in post-stroke participants were selected, without limitations as to the dates of publication. The main outcomes studied were improvement in naming skills and generalization to untreated items and daily communication. The Downs and Black checklist for randomised and non-randomised studies of health care interventions(2 was used by two reviewers (ML and JM to conduct the methodological quality assessment. Results: A total of 20 studies were included in this review. Up to now, computer is by far the most popular technology, whereas only a few studies aimed at exploring the effectiveness of smart tablet or teletreatment. In some studies, technology was used as a therapy tool in a clinical setting, in the presence of the clinician, while in others, therapy with technology was self-administered at home, without the clinician. All studies confirmed the effectiveness of therapy provided by technology to improve naming of trained items. However, generalization to untrained items is unclear and assessment of generalization to daily communication is scarce. Conclusions: The results of this systematic review confirm that technology is a promising avenue in the management of post-stroke anomia. Self-administered therapies are particularly interesting since they allow increasing significantly the intensity and frequency of therapeutic activities, a factor that has been explicitly recognized as a positive determinant of the efficacy of language treatment(3. In future studies, ecological tasks aiming to evaluate therapy

  1. Electrical stimulation of the motor cortex enhances treatment outcome in post-stroke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Darkow, Robert; Lindenberg, Robert; Flöel, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    = 0.71). Treatment effects for trained items were significantly better maintained in the anodal-transcranial direct current stimulation group 6 months later (d = 1.19). Transfer to untrained items was significantly larger in the anodal-transcranial direct current stimulation group after the training (d = 1.49) and during the 6 month follow-up assessment (d = 3.12). Transfer effects were only maintained in the anodal-transcranial direct current stimulation group. Functional communication was significantly more improved in the anodal-transcranial direct current stimulation group at both time points compared to patients treated with sham-transcranial direct current stimulation (d = 0.75-0.99). Our results provide the first evidence from a randomized, controlled trial that transcranial direct current stimulation can improve both function and activity-related outcomes in chronic aphasia, with medium to large effect sizes, and that these effects are maintained over extended periods of time. These effects were achieved with an easy-to-implement and thus clinically feasible motor-cortex montage that may represent a promising 'backdoor' approach to improve language recovery after stroke. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Choice of ANesthesia for EndoVAScular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Protocol for a randomized controlled (CANVAS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuming; Li, Yan; Jian, Minyu; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Sun, Jian; Jia, Bo; Dong, Jia; Zeng, Min; Lin, Nan; Zhang, Li; Gelb, Adrian W; Chan, Matthew Tv; Han, Ruquan

    2017-12-01

    Background Observational studies indicate that the type of anesthesia, local or general, may be associated with the post-procedural neurological function in patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing endovascular treatment. However, these results need further confirmation, and the causal relationship has not yet been established. Methods This is a randomized controlled equivalence trial. Permuted block randomization stratified by culprit vessels will be used. Six hundred and forty patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing endovascular recanalization will be randomized one to one to receive either general anesthesia or local anesthesia. The primary endpoint is the modified Rankin scale at 90 days after endovascular treatment. The secondary endpoints are the peri-procedural mortality and morbidity. Discussion The study aims to determine the effects of anesthetic choice on neurological outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing intra-arterial recanalization. If the results are positive, the study will indicate that the type of anesthesia does not affect neurological outcome after endovascular treatment. ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT02677415.

  3. The Nasal Route as a Potential Pathway for Delivery of Erythropoietin in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar García-Rodríguez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intranasal delivery provides a practical, noninvasive method of bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB in order to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain. This method allows drugs that do not cross the BBB to be delivered to the central nervous system in a few minutes. With this technology, it will be possible to eliminate systemic administration and its potential side effects. Using the intranasal delivery system, researchers have demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different animal models of stroke using erythropoietin (EPO as a neuroprotector or other different types of EPO without erythropoiesis-stimulating activity. These new molecules retain their ability to protect neural tissue against injury and they include Asialoerythropoietin (asialoEPO carbamylated EPO (CEPO, and rHu-EPO with low sialic acid content (Neuro-EPO. Contrary to the other EPO variants, Neuro-EPO is not chemically modified, making it biologically similar to endogenous EPO, with the advantage of less adverse reactions when this molecule is applied chronically. This constitutes a potential benefit of Neuro-EPO over other variants of EPO for the chronic treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses. Nasal administration of EPO is a potential, novel, neurotherapeutic approach. However, it will be necessary to initiate clinical trials in stroke patients using intranasal delivery in order to obtain the clinical evidence of its neuroprotectant capacity in the treatment of patients with acute stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders. This new therapeutic approach could revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders in the 21st century.

  4. What Are Some Common Outcomes of Stroke and Some Common Treatments for These Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Pediatric Injury Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... functions damaged by the stroke. These therapies include: Physical therapy A physical therapist uses training and exercises to ...

  5. What Are Some Common Outcomes of Stroke and Some Common Treatments for These Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Pelvic Floor Disorders Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... functions damaged by the stroke. These therapies include: Physical therapy A physical therapist uses training and exercises to ...

  6. Methylene blue treatment in experimental ischemic stroke: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is among the leading causes of death and long-term disability. Methylene blue (MB, a drug grandfathered by the Food and Drug Administration with a long history of safe usage in humans for treating methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning, has recently been shown to be neuroprotective in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. The goal of this paper is to review studies on MB in experimental stroke models.

  7. OPTIMIZING OVERALL FUNCTION OF THE UPPER LIMB IS EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR SHOULDER PAIN IN INDIVIDUALS WITH STROKE: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E Khallaf, PhD PT

    2014-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is frequent after stroke and interferes with the rehabilitative process and functional outcomes. Treatments used for post-stroke shoulder pain are limited and largely ineffective. Objectives: This randomized controlled study was conducted to study the effect of optimizing overall function of upper limb on the basis of pathomechanics and motor relearning as a treatment of hemiparetic shoulder pain. Subjects and methods: Thirty patients with first ever stro...

  8. [Clinical Trials for Treatment of Stroke Patients with Dysphagia by Vitalstim Electroacupuncture Combined with Swallowing Rehabilitation Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng-Yu; Liu, Shao-Bing; Wu, Wei; Chen, Yi-Min; Liao, Kang-Lin; Xiang, Yong; Pan, Dun

    2017-04-25

    To observe the clinical effect of vitalstim electroacupuncture (EA) combined with swallowing rehabilitation training in the treatment of stroke patients with dysphagia. A total of 80 stroke patients with dysphagia were randomized into treatment and control groups ( n =40 in each group). Patients of the control group were treated by regular medication for anti-platelet aggregation and anti-coagulation, lipid-lowering, neuroprotection, blood glucose control and blood pressure control, etc. and swallowing function rehabilitation training, and those of the treatment group treated by EA stimulation of Fengchi (GB 20), Jinjin (EX-HN 12) and Yuye (EX-HN 13) with a Vitalstim Electrostimulator and manual acupuncture stimulation of Lianquan (CV 23), Tiantu (CV 22) in combination with regular medication plus swallowing function training as those mentioned in the control group. The EA and manual acupuncture stimulation treatment was conducted once daily, 6 times a week and 4 weeks altogether. The therapeutic effect was assessed by using Kubota swallowing ability test (6 levels), dysphagia subscale (0-6 scores) of the neurological deficit degrees, videofluorography (VFG) assessment (markedly effective, effective and invalid, for evaluating the function and symmetry state of the swallowing movements), and the MOS Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36, 8 minor items of two major aspects in physiological function, mental health, emotional function, social function and overall health) for assessing the patients' daily-life quality. After the treatment, the dysphagia score of the treatment group was signi-ficantly lower than that of the control group ( P dysphagia (showed by dysphagia score and VFG outcomes) and life quality. EA treatment combined with swallowing function rehabilitation training is effective in improving swallowing ability and daily-life quality in stroke patients with dysphagia.

  9. Penumbra Stroke System as an ''add-on'' for the treatment of large vessel occlusive disease following thrombolysis: first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, Tobias; Engelhorn, Tobias; Richter, Gregor; Doerfler, Arnd; Koehrmann, Martin; Nowe, Tim; Schellinger, Peter D.; Schwab, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The Penumbra Stroke System (PSS) was cleared for use in patients with ischemic stroke by the FDA in January 2008. We describe our experience of using this new system in acute large vessel occlusive disease following thrombolysis. Fifteen consecutive patients (mean age 60 years) suffering from acute ischemic stroke were treated with the PSS after intravenous or intra-arterial standard treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (n = 14) or ReoPro (n = 1). All patients presented with TIMI 3 before use of the PSS. Carotid stenting (n = 3) and intracranial balloon angioplasty or stenting (n = 2) were performed if indicated. Neurological evaluation was performed using the NIHSS score and the mRS score. Initial median NIHSS score in 12 patients with occlusions in the anterior circulation was 15; three patients with basilar artery occlusion presented with coma. Median symptom to procedure start time was 151 min. In the anterior circulation, 9 of the 12 target vessels were recanalised successfully (TIMI 2 and 3). The rate of patients with independent clinical outcome (mRS ≤ 2) was 42%. One patient died 5 days after unsuccessful treatment, one after 28 days and one after 85 days owing to heart attack. Basilar artery occlusions could be recanalised in all cases to TIMI 3. The clinical result after 90 days was mRS 4 in two cases and mRS 5 in one case. Symptomatic haemorrhage did not occur. The PSS can safely be used for recanalisation in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion, who have already received thrombolysis treatment. The recanalisation rate was 80%. Symptomatic haemorrhage did not occur. Randomized trials may demonstrate that endovascular mechanical thrombectomy improves patient outcome. (orig.)

  10. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Treatments for Academic Procrastination: A Randomized Controlled Group Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Shi; Ran, Li-Wen; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Chen, Yu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), compared with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), in alleviating academic procrastination. Method: A total of 60 (53.3% male) undergraduates suffering from academic procrastination were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (ACT and CBT) and a control group.…

  11. Role of the MMP9 gene in hemorrhagic transformations after tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Del Río-Espínola, Alberto; Carrera, Caty; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Mendióroz, Maite; Delgado, Pilar; Rosell, Anna; Ribó, Marc; Giralt, Dolors; Quintana, Manolo; Castellanos, Mar; Obach, Victor; Martínez, Sergi; Freijo, Mari Mar; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Roquer, Jaume; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Molina, Carlos A; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Montaner, Joan

    2012-05-01

    Despite the benefits of tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment, some stroke patients experience adverse hemorrhagic transformations (HT). Plasma protein levels of MMP9 have been associated with HT occurrence. We aimed to analyze the association of the MMP9 gene with HT occurrence. We analyzed the MMP9 gene in blood samples from 885 stroke patients treated with tissue-type plasminogen activator by tag-SNP, imputed SNP, direct sequencing, and RNA expression. We did not observe any significant association between MMP9 genetic variations or MMP9 expression and HT occurrence. Moreover, no association was found between MMP9 expression and MMP9 polymorphisms. Genetic variations in the MMP9 gene are not associated with HT occurrence in tissue-type plasminogen activator-treated patients.

  12. Effect of Treatment Delay, Stroke Type, and Thrombolysis on the Effect of Glyceryl Trinitrate, a Nitric Oxide Donor, on Outcome after Acute Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient from Randomised Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Bath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nitric oxide (NO donors are a candidate treatment for acute stroke and two trials have suggested that they might improve outcome if administered within 4–6 hours of stroke onset. We assessed the safety and efficacy of NO donors using individual patient data (IPD from completed trials. Methods. Randomised controlled trials of NO donors in patients with acute or subacute stroke were identified and IPD sought from the trialists. The effect of NO donor versus control on functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRS and death, by time to randomisation. Secondary outcomes included measures of disability, mood, and quality of life. Results. Five trials (4,197 participants were identified, all involving glyceryl trinitrate (GTN. Compared with control, GTN lowered blood pressure by 7.4/3.3 mmHg. At day 90, GTN did not alter any clinical measures. However, in 312 patients randomised within 6 hours of stroke onset, GTN was associated with beneficial shifts in the mRS (odds ratio (OR 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.34–0.78 and reduced death (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14–0.78. Conclusions. NO donors do not alter outcome in patients with recent stroke. However, when administered within 6 hours, NO donors might improve outcomes in both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke.

  13. Results of the Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Acute Stroke 2 Trial (ICTuS-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Patrick; Hemmen, Thomas; Grotta, James; Rapp, Karen; Ernstrom, Karin; Rzesiewicz, Teresa; Parker, Stephanie; Concha, Mauricio; Syed, Hussain; Agarwal, Sachin; Meyer, Brett; Jurf, Julie; Altafullah, Irfan; Raman, Rema

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a potent neuroprotectant approved for cerebral protection after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and cardiac arrest. TH for acute ischemic stroke is safe and feasible in pilot trials. We designed a study protocol to provide safer, faster TH in stroke patients. Methods Safety procedures and 4°C saline infusions for faster cooling were added to the Intravascular Cooling Treatment in Acute Stroke (ICTuS) trial protocol. A femoral venous intravascular cooling catheter following intravenous rt-PA in eligible patients provided 24 hours cooling followed by a 12 hour re-warm. Serial safety assessments and imaging were performed. The primary endpoint was 3-month modified Rankin score 0,1. Results Of the intended 1600 subjects, 120 were enrolled before the study was stopped. Randomly, 63 were to receive hypothermia (HY) plus anti-shivering treatment and 57 normothermia (NT). Compared to prior studies, cooling rates were improved with a cold saline bolus, without fluid overload. The intention-to-treat primary outcome of 90-day mRS 0,1 occurred in 33% HY and 38% NT subjects, OR (95% CL) of 0.81 (0.36, 1.85). Serious adverse events occurred equally. Mortality was 15.9% HY and 8.8% NT subjects, OR (95% CL) of 1.95 (0.56, 7.79). Pneumonia occurred in 19% HY vs. 10.5% in NT subjects, OR (95% CL) of 1.99 (0.63, 6.98). Conclusion Intravascular TH was confirmed to be safe and feasible in rt-PA treated acute ischemic stroke patients. Protocol changes designed to reduce pneumonia risk appeared to fail, although the sample is small. Clinical trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT 01123161. PMID:27834742

  14. An investigation of the cost and benefit of mechanical thrombectomy for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Aquilla S; Campbell, John M; Spiotta, Alejandro; Vargas, Jan; Turner, Raymond D; Chaudry, M Imran; Battenhouse, Holly; Holmstedt, Christine A; Jauch, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The use of mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke has significantly advanced over the past 5 years, with few available data. The aim of this study was to analyze the cost and benefit of mechanical thrombectomy devices utilized during endovascular therapy of ischemic stroke patients. A retrospective chart review of patients that underwent intra-arterial stroke interventions was conducted. Clinical, angiographic, all devices used, procedural and postprocedural event and outcome data were collected. Thrombectomy devices were categorized as Penumbra aspiration system thrombectomy (group P) or stent retriever (group S). Statistical analysis of outcomes and costs for each group was performed. 171 patients underwent mechanical thrombectomy. The Penumbra aspiration system was able to primarily achieve recanalization in 41.7% and the stent retriever in 70.4% of the time (p=0.006). The average cost was $11 159 and $16 022 (p=0.0002) in groups P and S, respectively. Average time to recanalization for group P was 85.1 min and for group S, 51.6 min (p<0.0001). Procedural complications were more frequent with the stent retriever (11.1% vs 9.0%; p=0.72) as were periprocedural significant complications (14.8 v 3%; p=0.04). Successful recanalization rates (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score 2b-3) were the same in groups P and S (78.5 vs. 77.8%). Similar rates of good neurologic outcomes were seen in group P (36.4%) and group S (50.0%) (p=0.19). For the treatment of acute stroke patients, the use of aspiration appears to be the most cost effective method to achieve acceptable recanalization rates and low complication rates. Stent retriever with local aspiration, despite higher costs and complication rates, yielded better overall outcome.

  15. Neuronox versus BOTOX in the Treatment of Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gil Seo

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A is widely used for treating spasticity. Neuronox (Neu-BoNT/A, a newly manufactured botulinum toxin a, has not yet been investigated for its efficacy and safety in the treatment of post-stroke upper limb spasticity.We evaluated the efficacy and safety of Neuronox (Neu-BoNT/A compared with BOTOX (onabotulinum toxin A for treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity.In total, 196 stroke patients with moderate to severe upper limb spasticity were randomly assigned to either Neuronox or BOTOX intervention. The wrist flexors were mandatory and elbow, finger, and thumb flexors were optional muscles to be injected. Assessments were performed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the intervention. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS at the wrist flexors at week 4. Secondary outcome measures included the change of MAS at each visit, response rate, Disability Assessment Scale (DAS, Carer Burden Scale, and Global Assessment of treatment benefit.Primary outcome measures were -1.39±0.79 and -1.56±0.81 in the Neuronox and BOTOX groups, respectively. The difference was within the noninferiority margin of 0.45 (95% upper limit=0.40. There were no significant differences between the groups in the secondary outcome and safety measures, except the change of the MAS at the elbow flexors at week 12 (-0.88±0.75 in the Neuronox group, -0.65±0.74 in the BOTOX group; P=0.0429. Both groups showed significant improvements in the MAS, DAS, and Carer Burden Scale at weeks 4, 8, and 12.Neuronox showed equivalent efficacy and safety compared with BOTOX for treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01313767.

  16. What You Need to Know about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain. The other kind of stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks ... are very common among African Americans. The best treatment for stroke is prevention. You can reduce your ...

  17. Brazilian guidelines for endovascular treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octávio Marques Pontes-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT These guidelines are the result of a joint effort from writing groups of the Brazilian Stroke Society, the Scientific Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology, the Brazilian Stroke Network and the Brazilian Society of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology. Members from these groups participated in web-based discussion forums with predefined themes, followed by videoconference meetings in which controversies and position statements were discussed, leading to a consensus. This guidelines focuses on the implications of the recent clinical trials on endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusions, and the final text aims to guide health care providers, health care managers and public health authorities in managing patients with this condition in Brazil.

  18. Intravenous thrombolytic treatment experiences in patients with acute ischemic stroke at the University of Kocatepe, Neurology Clinics

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    Serdar Oruç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to discuss the results of the intravenous thrombolytic treatment (IV-tPA to acute ischemic stroke patients, in the light of the literature. METHODS: We performed our study with forty acute ischemic stroke patients who were receiving the IV-tPA in the intensive care unit of our neurology clinic between 2011 and 2015.. The demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected retrospectively. The intracranial hemorrhage detected within 3 months after discharge and neurological status at the end of the 3rd month were evaluated by using modified Rankin scale (MRS and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores. The symptom-to-needle time, Alberta stroke programe early computed tomography score (ASPECT and initial and follow-up scores of NIHSS were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were female, twenty-five were male, and the mean age was 66.45±10.56. The initial mean NIHSS score was 13±4.33, whereas it was 4,10±3,37at 3rd month. The initial mean ASPECT score was 8.23±1.20. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 1 patient and asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 6. The mean symptom-to-needle time was 139,0±48,1 minutes. The neurological disability of 13 patients ( %32.5 were fully recovered at the end of the 3rd month, while 7 patients were died. (% 17,5 The initial NIHSS and ASPECT scores were significantly different between group of patients with a MRS score between 0-2 and between 3-6 (p=0.03 and p=0.006; respectively, while the symptom-to-needle time was not different (p=0.79. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results of the current study are in accordance with previous studies in the literature. These results have shown that the IV-tPA treatment is efficient and safe treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke, and reduces disability at the end of the 3rd month.

  19. Early versus delayed rehabilitation treatment in hemiplegic patients with ischemic stroke: proprioceptive or cognitive approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Manuela; Marchione, Pasquale; Pili, Antonio; Lauta, Antonella; Castiglia, Stefano F; Spallone, Aldo; Pierelli, Francesco; Giacomini, Patrizia

    2016-02-01

    Early/intensive mobilization may improve functional recovery after stroke but it is not clear which kind of "mobilization" is more effective. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and cognitive therapeutic exercise (CTE) are widespread applied in post-stroke rehabilitation but their efficacy and safety have not been systematically investigated. To compare PNF and CTE methods in a two different time setting (early versus standard approach) in order to evaluate different role of time and techniques in functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke. We designed a prospectical multicenter blinded interventional study of early versus standard approach with two different methods by means of both PNF and CTE. A discrete stroke-dedicated area for out-of-thrombolysis patients, connected with two different comprehensive stroke centres in two different catchment areas. Three hundred and forty consecutive stroke patient with first ever sub-cortical ischemic stroke in the mean cerebral artery (MCA) territory and contralateral hemiplegia admitted within 6 and 24 hours from symptoms onset. All patients were randomly assigned by means of a computer generated randomization sequence in blocks of 4 to one to the 4 interventional groups: early versus delayed rehabilitation programs with Kabat's schemes or Perfetti's technique. Patients in both delayed group underwent to a standard protocol in the acute phase. disability at 3-12 months. Disability measures: modified Rankin Score and Barthel Index. Safety outcome: immobility-related adverse events. Six-Minute Walking Test, Motricity Index, Mini-Mental State Examination, Beck Depression Inventory. Disability was not different between groups at 3 months but Barthel Index significantly changed between early versus delayed groups at 12 months (P=0.01). Six-Minute Walking Test (P=0.01) and Motricity Index in both upper (P=0.01) and lower limbs (P=0.001) increased in early versus delayed groups regardless rehabilitation schedule. A

  20. Laser Therapy of Painful Shoulder and Shoulder-Hand Syndrome in Treatment of Patients after the Stroke

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    Azra Karabegović

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The common complication after stroke is pain and dysfunction of shoulder of paralyzed arm, as well as the swelling of the hand. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of LASER therapy and to correlate with electrotherapy (TENS, stabile galvanization in subjects after stroke. We analyzed 70 subjects after stroke with pain in shoulder and oedema of paralyzed hand. The examinees were divided in two groups of 35, and they were treated in the Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Tuzla during 2006 and 2007. Experimental group (EG had a treatment with LASER, while the control group (CG was treated with electrotherapy. Both groups had kinesis therapy and ice massage. All patients were examined on the admission and discharge by using the VAS, DASH, Barthel index and FIM. The pain intensity in shoulder was significantly reduced in EG (p<0,0001, swelling is lowered in EG (p=0,01. Barthel index in both groups was significant higher (p<0,01. DASH was significantly improved after LASER therapy in EG (p<0,01. EG had higher level of independency (p<0,01. LASER therapy used on EG shows significantly better results in reducing pain, swelling, disability and improvement of independency

  1. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  2. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to treatment with i...... with intravenous rt-PA (alteplase) on therapeutic benefit and clinical risk by adding recent trial data to the analysis....

  5. Effect of treatment delay, age, and stroke severity on the effects of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberson, Jonathan; Lees, Kennedy R; Lyden, Patrick; Blackwell, Lisa; Albers, Gregory; Bluhmki, Erich; Brott, Thomas; Cohen, Geoff; Davis, Stephen; Donnan, Geoffrey; Grotta, James; Howard, George; Kaste, Markku; Koga, Masatoshi; von Kummer, Ruediger; Lansberg, Maarten; Lindley, Richard I; Murray, Gordon; Olivot, Jean Marc; Parsons, Mark; Tilley, Barbara; Toni, Danilo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wahlgren, Nils; Wardlaw, Joanna; Whiteley, William; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Baigent, Colin; Sandercock, Peter; Hacke, Werner

    2014-11-29

    Alteplase is effective for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke but debate continues about its use after longer times since stroke onset, in older patients, and among patients who have had the least or most severe strokes. We assessed the role of these factors in affecting good stroke outcome in patients given alteplase. We did a pre-specified meta-analysis of individual patient data from 6756 patients in nine randomised trials comparing alteplase with placebo or open control. We included all completed randomised phase 3 trials of intravenous alteplase for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke for which data were available. Retrospective checks confirmed that no eligible trials had been omitted. We defined a good stroke outcome as no significant disability at 3-6 months, defined by a modified Rankin Score of 0 or 1. Additional outcomes included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (defined by type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage within 7 days and, separately, by the SITS-MOST definition of parenchymal type 2 haemorrhage within 36 h), fatal intracranial haemorrhage within 7 days, and 90-day mortality. Alteplase increased the odds of a good stroke outcome, with earlier treatment associated with bigger proportional benefit. Treatment within 3·0 h resulted in a good outcome for 259 (32·9%) of 787 patients who received alteplase versus 176 (23·1%) of 762 who received control (OR 1·75, 95% CI 1·35-2·27); delay of greater than 3·0 h, up to 4·5 h, resulted in good outcome for 485 (35·3%) of 1375 versus 432 (30·1%) of 1437 (OR 1·26, 95% CI 1·05-1·51); and delay of more than 4·5 h resulted in good outcome for 401 (32·6%) of 1229 versus 357 (30·6%) of 1166 (OR 1·15, 95% CI 0·95-1·40). Proportional treatment benefits were similar irrespective of age or stroke severity. Alteplase significantly increased the odds of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage definition 231 [6·8%] of 3391 vs 44 [1·3%] of 3365, OR 5·55, 95% CI 4·01-7·70

  6. Pain in stroke patients: characteristics and impact on the rehabilitation treatment. A multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, I; Briani, C; Pazzaglia, C; Cecchi, F; Negrini, S; Padua, L

    2015-12-01

    Post-stroke pain (PSP) is a common and disabling complication, difficult to treat, that often decreases patients' quality of life (QoL). The hypothesis is that PSP may negatively affect rehabilitation treatment. The aim of this paper was to quantify and characterize pain in a sample of post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation and to investigate the impact of pain in slowing down or discontinuing the rehabilitation program. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Inpatients and outpatients of rehabilitation department. One hundred and six subacute and chronic stroke patients. Pain intensity was measured with the NRS or the PAINAD (if cognitive/language impairment was present); pain characteristics were assessed with the DN4, and NPSI questionnaire. Qol was measured with the SF-36. A clinical assessment and a semi-structured questionnaire on pain occurrence, impact, and management was administered by the physiotherapist in charge of the patients and by the physician. Nearly 1/3 of the patients (32.9%) with normal cognitive functions and language reported pain occurrence after stroke; 81.8% of them had NRS≥3 and 31.8% DN4≥4 (meaning neuropathic origin of pain). In about 20% of the patients the PAINAD was used to measure pain; 17.4% of them presented a score ≥3. In 24.5% of our sample, pain influenced rehabilitation treatment. In 16% of the whole sample, pain influenced patients' attention during rehabilitation session. Patients with hypoesthesia presented significantly higher neuropathic pain scores than patients with normal sensory function. Regarding QoL, we found that patients with higher neuropathic pain showed more severe deterioration of mental aspects of QoL, where patients with higher nociceptive pain presented more severe deterioration of physical aspects of QoL. The results from this multicenter study showed that in about ¼ of the patients, pain negatively influenced the rehabilitation program delaying the recovery and likely increasing the cost of

  7. Etiology and treatment of perinatal stroke; a role for prothrombotic coagulation factors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, M. H.; van Ommen, C. H.; Appel, I. M.

    2009-01-01

    The detection rate of perinatal stroke is rising due to improved neuroradiological imaging techniques, increased survival of neonates with severe underlying diseases and an increased awareness of the diagnosis by pediatricians. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes a large variety of

  8. Surface ECG interatrial block-guided treatment for stroke prevention: rationale for an attractive hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés de Luna, Antoni; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; Elosua, Roberto; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2017-07-31

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with stroke, cognitive impairment, and cardiovascular death. Some predisposing factors - as aging, diabetes, hypertension - induce and maintain electrophysiological and ultrastructural remodeling that usually includes fibrosis. Interatrial conduction disturbances play a crucial role in the initiation of atrial fibrosis and in its associated complications. The diagnosis of interatrial blocks (IABs) is easy to perform using the surface ECG. IAB is classified as partial when the P wave duration is ≥120 ms, and advanced if the P wave also presents a biphasic pattern in II, III and aVF. IAB is very frequent in the elderly and, particularly in the case of the advanced type, is associated with AF, AF recurrences, stroke, and dementia. The anticoagulation in elderly patients at high risk of AF without documented arrhythmias is an open issue but recent data suggest that it might have a role, particularly in elderly patients with structural heart disease, high CHA 2 DS 2 VASc (Congestive heart failure/left ventricular dysfunction, Hypertension, Age ≥ 75 [doubled], Diabetes, Stroke [doubled] - Vascular disease, Age 65-74, and Sex category [female]), and advanced IAB. In this debate, we discuss the association of surface ECG IAB, a marker of atrial fibrosis, with AF and stroke. We also present the rationale that justifies further studies regarding anticoagulation in some of these patients.

  9. Acute but not delayed amphetamine treatment improves behavioral outcome in a rat embolic stroke model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Overgaard, Karsten; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of d-amphetamine (amph) upon recovery after embolic stroke in rats. METHODS: Ninety-three rats were embolized in the right middle cerebral artery and assigned to: (1) controls; (2) combination (acute amph and later amph-facilitate...

  10. Treatment Challenges of a Primary Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Causing Recurrent Ischemic Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Strambo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysms are a rare cause of embolic stroke; surgical and endovascular therapy options are debated and long-term complication may occur. Case Report. A 53-year-old man affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 came to our attention for recurrent vertebrobasilar embolic strokes, caused by a primary giant, partially thrombosed, fusiform aneurysm of the left extracranial vertebral artery. The aneurysm was treated by endovascular approach through deposition of Guglielmi Detachable Coils in the proximal segment of the left vertebral artery. Six years later the patient presented stroke recurrence. Cerebral angiography and Color Doppler Ultrasound well characterized the unique hemodynamic condition developed over the years responsible for the new embolic event: the aneurysm had been revascularized from its distal portion by reverse blood flow coming from the patent vertebrobasilar axis. A biphasic Doppler signal in the left vertebral artery revealed a peculiar behavior of the blood flow, alternately directed to the aneurysm and backwards to the basilar artery. Surgical ligation of the distal left vertebral artery and excision of the aneurysm were thus performed. Conclusion. This is the first described case of NF1-associated extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm presenting with recurrent embolic stroke. Complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the blood circulation is advisable to achieve full resolution of the embolic source.

  11. Argatroban versus aspirin plus clopidogrel in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: a pilot, randomised, open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-chan LIU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of argatroban versus aspirin plus clopidogrel in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Methods Seventy five patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48h of symptom onset were randomly divided into two groups: argatroban group (argatroban was used for 7 days according to the instructions, followed by aspirin 100mg per day plus clopidogrel 75mg per day until discharge, n=35, and combination antiplatelet group (300mg of clopidogrel for the first day, then 75mg daily plus aspirin 100mg daily until discharge, n=40. Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP classification was assessed in patients before treatment. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used for rating neurological deficit score of patients, and Barthel index for rating activities of daily life (ADL, and modified Rankin scale for handicap score. NIHSS was assessed one week after enrollment, while ADL and mRS assessment were recorded 3 months after onset. Brain imaging, liver and kidney function, blood routine tests and blood coagulation capacity of the patients were measured before and one week after enrollment to observe changes in hemorrhage and biochemical indicators. Drugs-related adverse events were recorded during treatment. All patients received TOAST analysis before leaving hospital. Results 1. In both groups, NIHSS was reduced after oneweek treatment, compared with that before treatment, while ADL was improved at three-month follow-up, compared with those at admission. The results showed statistically significant difference (P0.05 was found between two groups. The transient ischemic attacks (TIA disappeared in both groups. Brain imaging showed that in three patients the lesion advanced to infarction in argatroban group (total 6 patients, and two patients in the combined antiplatelet group (total 5 patients suffered from the same change. 2. The brain imaging and measuring of relevant laboratory indicators

  12. Potential of the Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) Telmisartan, Irbesartan, and Candesartan for Inhibiting the HMGB1/RAGE Axis in Prevention and Acute Treatment of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Ito, Takashi; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Miura, Naoki; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. The main cause of stroke is atherosclerosis, and the most common risk factor for atherosclerosis is hypertension. Therefore, antihypertensive treatments are recommended for the prevention of stroke. Three angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), telmisartan, irbesartan and candesartan, inhibit the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which is one of the pleiotropic effects of these drugs. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is the ligand of RAGE, and has been recently identified as a lethal mediator of severe sepsis. HMGB1 is an intracellular protein, which acts as an inflammatory cytokine when released into the extracellular milieu. Extracellular HMGB1 causes multiple organ failure and contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. This is the first review of the literature evaluating the potential of three ARBs for the HMGB1-RAGE axis on stroke therapy, including prevention and acute treatment. This review covers clinical and experimental studies conducted between 1976 and 2013. We propose that ARBs, which inhibit the HMGB1/RAGE axis, may offer a novel option for prevention and acute treatment of stroke. However, additional clinical studies are necessary to verify the efficacy of ARBs. PMID:24065095

  13. Treatment Effects of Ischemic Stroke by Berberine, Baicalin, and Jasminoidin from Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Decoction (HLJDD Explored by an Integrated Metabolomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine, baicalin, and jasminoidin were major active ingredients of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Decoction (HLJDD, a famous prescription of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, which has been used for the treatment of ischemic stroke. The aim of the present study was to classify their roles in the treatment effects of ischemic stroke. A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was constructed to mimic ischemic stroke and treatment effects of berberine, baicalin, and jasminoidin, and HLJDD was assessed by neurologic deficit scoring, infarct volume, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and Western blotting. In addition, the 1H NMR metabolomics approach was used to assess the metabolic profiles, which combined with correlation network analysis successfully revealed metabolic disorders in ischemic stroke concerning the treatment of the three principal compounds from HLJDD for the first time. The combined results suggested that berberine, baicalin, and jasminoidin are responsible for the effectiveness of HLJDD on the treatment of ischemic stroke by amelioration of abnormal metabolism and regulation of oxidative stress, neuron autophagy, and inflammatory response. This integrated metabolomics approach showed its potential in understanding the function of complex formulae and clarifying the role of its components in the overall treatment effects.

  14. The gender effect in stroke thrombolysis: of CASES, controls, and treatment-effect modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David M; Buchan, Alastair M; Hill, Michael D

    2008-09-30

    Large studies of patients with acute stroke not receiving thrombolytic therapy have repeatedly demonstrated poorer outcomes for women compared to men. An analysis of five pooled randomized controlled trials testing IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) demonstrated that rtPA benefits women more than men; the usual gender difference, apparent among controls, was totally nullified in the rtPA group. This nullification of the usual gender effect among rtPA-treated patients has not been confirmed. We analyzed baseline characteristics and functional outcomes in men vs women in the Canadian Alteplase for Stroke Effectiveness Study (CASES), a multicenter study that collected outcomes data for patients treated with rtPA in Canada to assess the safety and effectiveness of alteplase for stroke in the context of routine care. Among 1,110 patients, including 615 men and 505 women, a normal or near normal outcome at 90 days was found in 37.1% of men vs 36.0% of women (p = 0.71). This was essentially unchanged after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics, including age >70, glucose, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, hypercholesterolemia, baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Severity, and baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score (35.2% in men vs 38.2% in women, p = 0.332). Ninety-day mortality was similar between the sexes in both the adjusted and unadjusted analysis. There was no difference in 90-day outcomes in recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA)-treated men and rtPA-treated women. This is consistent with the pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials, showing greater benefit for thrombolysis in women and nullification of the usual gender difference in outcome.

  15. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  16. Prophylactic neuroprotection against stroke: low-dose, prolonged treatment with deferoxamine or deferasirox establishes prolonged neuroprotection independent of HIF-1 function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanxin; Rempe, David A

    2011-01-01

    Prophylactic neuroprotection against stroke could reduce stroke burden in thousands of patients at high risk of stroke, including those with recent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (PHIs), such as deferoxamine (DFO), reduce stroke volume when administered at high doses in the peristroke period, which is largely mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1). Yet, in vitro experiments suggest that PHIs may also induce neuroprotection independent of HIF-1. In this study, we examine chronic, prophylactic, low-dose treatment with DFO, or another iron chelator deferasirox (DFR), to determine whether they are neuroprotective with this paradigm and mediate their effects through a HIF-1-dependent mechanism. In fact, prophylactic administration of low-dose DFO or DFR significantly reduces stroke volume. Surprisingly, DFO remained neuroprotective in mice haploinsufficient for HIF-1 (HIF-1+/−) and transgenic mice with conditional loss of HIF-1 function in neurons and astrocytes. Similarly, DFR was neuroprotective in HIF-1+/− mice. Neither DFO nor DFR induced expression of HIF-1 targets. Thus, low-dose chronic administration of DFO or DFR induced a prolonged neuroprotective state independent of HIF-1 function. As DFR is an orally administered and well-tolerated medication in clinical use, it has promise for prophylaxis against stroke in patients at high risk of stroke. PMID:21245873

  17. The efficacy of cognitive interventions for improving cognitive performance and academic achievement in children after cancer treatment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Susan M; Hutchinson, Amanda D

    2018-01-01

    Academic decline has been reported in children after cancer treatment, believed to be as a result of cognitive impairment. Cognitive interventions may improve both the present and future outcomes for children after cancer treatment by improving cognitive and/or academic performance. This review aimed to examine the efficacy of cognitive interventions in children who had received cancer treatment. A systematic search of the PsycInfo and PubMed databases was conducted in May 2015 to identify studies in which cognitive interventions were conducted with children who had undergone cancer treatment and were under the age of 21. Cognitive or academic outcomes needed to be reported pre- and post-intervention to meet the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies were included in this review. Computerized and home-based cognitive interventions were found to be most successful at improving cognitive skills. However, few cognitive interventions assessed academic achievement specifically. Future cognitive intervention research studies should include measures of academic achievement outcomes, because academic achievement and cognitive outcomes may differ. Future research regarding the effectiveness of early, home-based and computerized intervention is warranted.

  18. Uric Acid Therapy Prevents Early Ischemic Stroke Progression: A Tertiary Analysis of the URICO-ICTUS Trial (Efficacy Study of Combined Treatment With Uric Acid and r-tPA in Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Sergio; Laredo, Carlos; Renú, Arturo; Llull, Laura; Rudilosso, Salvatore; Obach, Víctor; Urra, Xabier; Planas, Anna M; Chamorro, Ángel

    2016-11-01

    Identification of neuroprotective therapies in acute ischemic stroke is imperative. We report a predefined analysis of the URICO-ICTUS trial (Efficacy Study of Combined Treatment With Uric Acid and r-tPA in Acute Ischemic Stroke) assessing the efficacy of uric acid (UA) compared with placebo to prevent early ischemic worsening (EIW) and the relevance of collateral circulation. URICO-ICTUS was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial where a total of 411 patients treated with alteplase within 4.5 hours of stroke onset were randomized (1:1) to receive UA 1000 mg (n=211) or placebo (n=200) before the end of alteplase infusion. EIW defined an increment ≥4 points in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score within 72 hours of treatment in the absence of hemorrhage or recurrent stroke. Logistic regression models assessed the interaction between therapy and the collateral circulation in 112 patients who had a pretreatment computed tomographic angiography. EIW occurred in 2 of 149 (1%) patients with good outcome and 23 of 262 (9%) patients with poor outcome (χ 2 ; P=0.002). EIW occurred in 7 of 204 (3%) patients treated with UA and in 18 of 200 (9%) patients treated with placebo (χ 2 ; P=0.01). There was a significant interaction between the efficacy of UA to prevent EIW and collaterals (P=0.029), with lower incidence in patients with good collaterals treated with UA compared with placebo (2% versus 15%, respectively; P=0.048). UA therapy may prevent EIW after acute stroke in thrombolysed patients. Optimal access of UA to its molecular targets through appropriate collaterals may modify the magnitude of the neuroprotective effect. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00860366. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Access to expert stroke care with telemedicine: REACH MUSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Swanson Kazley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and rtPA can significantly reduce the long-term impact of acute ischemic stroke (AIS if given within 3 hours of symptom onset. South Carolina is located in the stroke belt and has a high rate of stroke and stroke mortality. Many small rural SC hospitals do not maintain the expertise needed to treat AIS patients with rtPA. MUSC is an academic medical center using REACH MUSC telemedicine to deliver stroke care to 15 hospitals in the state, increasing the likelihood of timely treatment with rtPA. The purpose of this study is to determine the increase in access to rtPA through the use of telemedicine for AIS in the general population and in specific segments of the population based on age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, urban/rural residence, poverty, and stroke mortality.We used a retrospective cross-sectional design examining Census data from 2000 and Geographic Information Systems (GIS analysis to identify South Carolina residents that live within 30 or 60 minutes of a Primary Stroke Center (PSC or a REACH MUSC site. We include all South Carolina citizens in our analysis and specifically examine the population’s age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, urban/rural residence, poverty, and stroke mortality. Our sample includes 4,012,012 South Carolinians. The main measure is access to expert stroke care at a Primary Stroke Center (PSC or a REACH MUSC hospital within 30 or 60 minutes. We find that without REACH MUSC, only 38% of the population has potential access to expert stroke care in SC within sixty minutes given that most PSCs will maintain expert stroke coverage. REACH MUSC allows 76% of the population to be within sixty minutes of expert stroke care, and 43% of the population to be within 30 minute drive time of expert stroke care. These increases in access are especially significant for groups that have faced disparities in care and high rates of AIS. The use of telemedicine can

  20. A Health Economic Evaluation of Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Guideline Adherence Versus the Observed Treatment Strategy Prior to 2012 in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne Sig; Ehlers, Lars Holger

    2015-09-01

    In 2012 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published new guidelines on pharmacological stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). The health economics of adhering to these guidelines in clinical practice remains to be elucidated. This paper offers a health economic evaluation of two stroke-prophylactic treatment strategies: complete national adherence to the ESC guidelines on stroke prophylaxis in AF versus stroke-prophylactic treatment prior to 2012 in Denmark. A cost-utility analysis was performed to compare two treatment strategies. The first strategy reflected national guideline adherence with the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (i.e. dabigatran etexilate), warfarin, and no treatment. The second strategy reflected observed stroke prophylaxis prior to 2012 with the utilization of warfarin, acetylsalicylic acid, and no treatment. A Danish health sector perspective was adopted. A Markov model was designed and populated with information on input parameters from the literature and local cost data reflecting 2014 values. A modeled patient cohort was constructed with a risk profile intended to reflect that of the Danish patient population with AF. The applied outcome was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio amounted to 3557 per QALY for the guideline-adherent treatment strategy (GTS) compared with the pre-2012 treatment strategy. This ratio is below a threshold of 25,000 (£20,000) per QALY. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the result was largely robust to changes in input parameters. All analyses found the GTS to be cost effective. Guideline adherence is a cost-effective treatment strategy compared with the strategy employed prior to 2012 for pharmacological stroke prophylaxis in AF.

  1. Intravenous Thrombolysis plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) – Final results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    Background Induced hypothermia is a promising neuroprotective therapy. We studied the feasibility and safety of hypothermia and thrombolysis after acute ischemic stroke. Methods ICTuS-L was a randomized, multi-center trial of hypothermia and intravenous t-PA in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke. Enrollment was stratified to the treatment time windows 0–3 and 3–6 hours. Patients presenting within 3 hours of symptom onset received standard dose intravenous alteplase (IV tPA) and were randomized to undergo 24 hours of endovascular cooling to 33°C followed by 12 hours of controlled re-warming or normothermia treatment. Patients presenting between 3 and 6 hours were randomized twice: to receive t-PA or not and to receive hypothermia or not. Results In total, 59 patients were enrolled. One patient was enrolled but not treated when pneumonia was discovered just prior to treatment. All 44 patients enrolled within 3 hours and 4 of 14 patients enrolled between 3–6 hours received t-PA. Overall, 28 patients randomized to receive hypothermia (HY) and 30 to normothermia (NT). Baseline demographics and risk factors were similar between groups. Mean age was 65.5±12.1 years and baseline NIHSS was 14.0±5.0; 32 (55%) were male. Cooling was achieved in all patients except 2 in whom there were technical difficulties. The median time to target temperature after catheter placement was 67min (Q1 57.3 –Q3 99.4). At 3 months, 18% of patients treated with HY had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 0 or 1, versus 24% in the NT groups (NS). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 4 patients (68), all were treated with tPA less than 3 hours (1 received HY). Six patients in the HY and 5 in the NT groups died within 90 days (NS). Pneumonia occurred in 14 patients in the HY and in 3 of the NT groups (p=0.001). The pneumonia rate did not significantly adversely affect 3 month mRS (p=0.32). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility and preliminary safety

  2. Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy for Treatment of Chronic Post-Stroke Aphasia: A Randomized, Blinded, Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Ball, Angel L; Vannest, Jennifer; Dietz, Aimee R; Allendorfer, Jane B; Martin, Amber N; Hart, Kimberly; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2015-09-24

    To provide a preliminary estimate of efficacy of constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) when compared to no-intervention in patients with chronic (>1 year) post-stroke aphasia in order to plan an appropriately powered randomized controlled trial (RCT). We conducted a pilot single-blinded RCT. 24 patients were randomized: 14 to CIAT and 10 to no-intervention. CIAT groups received up to 4 hours/day of intervention for 10 consecutive business days (40 hours or therapy). Outcomes were assessed within 1 week of intervention and at 1 and 12 weeks after intervention and included several linguistic measures and a measure of overall subjective communication abilities (mini-Communicative Abilities Log (mini-CAL)). Clinicians treating patients (CIAT group) did not communicate with other team members to maintain blinding and the testing team members were blinded to treatment group assignment. Overall, the results of this pilot RCT support the results of previous observational studies that CIAT may lead to improvements in linguistic abilities. At 12 weeks, the treatment group reported better subjective communication abilities (mini-CAL) than the no-intervention group (p=0.019). Other measures trended towards better performance in the CIAT group. In this pilot RCT intensive language therapy led to an improvement in subjective language abilities. The effects demonstrated allow the design of a definitive trial of CIAT in patients with a variety of post-stroke aphasia types. In addition, our experiences have identified important considerations for designing subsequent trial(s) of CIAT or other interventions for post-stroke aphasia.

  3. Intracranial angioplasty and stenting for cerebral atherosclerosis: new treatments for stroke are needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashida, Randall T.; Meyers, Philip M.

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a common cause of stroke. Recent technological developments offer improved methods for endovascular revascularization of symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebral artery stenosis. Identification of appropriate patients remains a diagnostic challenge, and our knowledge about the natural history of the disease remains limited. At this time, patients with significant intracranial stenosis should receive counseling on the benefits and risks of revascularization therapy. Ultimately, determination of which patients should undergo revascularization procedures will require carefully planned, randomized clinical trials. (orig.)

  4. The cerebral collateral circulation: Relevance to pathophysiology and treatment of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Myron D

    2017-08-09

    The brain's collateral circulation consists of arterial anastomotic channels capable of providing nutrient perfusion to brain regions whose normal sources of flow have become compromised, as occurs in acute ischemic stroke. Modern CT-based neuroimaging is capable of providing detailed information as to collateral extent and sufficiency and is complemented by magnetic resonance-based methods. In the present era of standard-of-care IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, and following the recent therapeutic successes of randomized clinical trials of acute endovascular intervention, the sufficiency of the collateral circulation has been convincingly established as a key factor influencing the likelihood of successful reperfusion and favorable clinical outcome. This article reviews the features of the brain's collateral circulation; methods for its evaluation in the acute clinical setting; the relevance of collateral circulation to prognosis in acute ischemic stroke; the specific insights into the collateral circulation learned from recent trials of endovascular intervention; and the major influence of genetic factors. Finally, we emphasize the need to develop therapeutic approaches to augment collateral perfusion as an adjunctive strategy to be employed along with, or prior to, thrombolysis and endovascular interventions, and we highlight the possible potential of inhaled nitric oxide, albumin, and other approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  6. Citicoline in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: an international, randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled study (ICTUS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Antoni; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Castillo, José; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo; Serena, Joaquín; Segura, Tomás; Cruz, Vitor T; Masjuan, Jaime; Cobo, Erik; Secades, Julio J

    2012-07-28

    Citicoline is approved in some countries for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke. The drug has shown some evidence of efficacy in a pooled analysis. We sought to confirm the efficacy of citicoline in a larger trial. We undertook a randomised, placebo-controlled, sequential trial in patients with moderate-to-severe acute ischaemic stroke admitted at university hospitals in Germany, Portugal, and Spain. Using a centralised minimisation process, patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive citicoline or placebo within 24 h after the onset of symptoms (1000 mg every 12 h intravenously during the first 3 days and orally thereafter for a total of 6 weeks [2×500 mg oral tablets given every 12 h]). All study participants were masked. The primary outcome was recovery at 90 days measured by a global test combining three measures of success: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤1, modified Rankin score ≤1, and Barthel Index ≥95. Safety endpoints included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage in patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, neurological deterioration, and mortality. This trial is registered, NCT00331890. 2298 patients were enrolled into the study from Nov 26, 2006, to Oct 27, 2011. 37 centres in Spain, 11 in Portugal, and 11 in Germany recruited patients. Of the 2298 patients who gave informed consent and underwent randomisation, 1148 were assigned to citicoline and 1150 to placebo. The trial was stopped for futility at the third interim analysis on the basis of complete data from 2078 patients. The final randomised analysis was based on data for 2298 patients: 1148 in citicoline group and 1150 in placebo group. Global recovery was similar in both groups (odds ratio 1·03, 95% CI 0·86-1·25; p=0·364). No significant differences were reported in the safety variables nor in the rate of adverse events. Under the circumstances of the ICTUS trial, citicoline is not efficacious in the treatment of moderate

  7. Multicenter Study of Adverse Events After Intravenous Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gotico, Hannah; Lightfoot, Tiffany; Meighan, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    The approved treatment by the Food and Drug Administration for acute ischemic stroke is intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV tPA). After IV tPA administration, patients are monitored for adverse events using an American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guideline instituted in 1996. There is limited evidence describing the safest and most efficient method to monitor patients during the first 24 hours after tPA administration. Although the overall rates of adverse events have been reported, the time when patients may be at most risk for an event has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to identify the time of adverse event occurrences in the first 24 hours after IV tPA administration. This was a descriptive, retrospective chart review study of patients admitted to an integrated health system and treated with IV tPA for acute stroke between July 2010 and July 2012. Charts were reviewed for adverse events using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Global Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Events. Possible chart indicators of adverse events or "triggers" included neurological decline, vital signs elevated above specified parameters, and emergent imaging. Adverse events included episodes of neurological decline, angioedema, allergic reactions, bleeding, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The timing of each detected event was determined, and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Fourteen adverse events (2.8%) were detected in a population of 498 patients. Reactions consisted of allergic reaction (n = 1), angioedema (n = 1), neurological decline without ICH (n = 1), gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 1), bleeding gums (n = 1), and high-risk ICH (n = 9). Thirteen of the 14 adverse events (92.9%) occurred within the first 12 hours after IV tPA administration. Close monitoring during the first 12 hours after IV tPA treatment may be essential. However, close monitoring after 12 hours may not contribute significantly to

  8. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroprotection for Stroke: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kleinschnitz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection aims to prevent salvageable neurons from dying. Despite showing efficacy in experimental stroke studies, the concept of neuroprotection has failed in clinical trials. Reasons for the translational difficulties include a lack of methodological agreement between preclinical and clinical studies and the heterogeneity of stroke in humans compared to homogeneous strokes in animal models. Even when the international recommendations for preclinical stroke research, the Stroke Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR criteria, were followed, we have still seen limited success in the clinic, examples being NXY-059 and haematopoietic growth factors which fulfilled nearly all the STAIR criteria. However, there are a number of neuroprotective treatments under investigation in clinical trials such as hypothermia and ebselen. Moreover, promising neuroprotective treatments based on a deeper understanding of the complex pathophysiology of ischemic stroke such as inhibitors of NADPH oxidases and PSD-95 are currently evaluated in preclinical studies. Further concepts to improve translation include the investigation of neuroprotectants in multicenter preclinical Phase III-type studies, improved animal models, and close alignment between clinical trial and preclinical methodologies. Future successful translation will require both new concepts for preclinical testing and innovative approaches based on mechanistic insights into the ischemic cascade.

  10. Improving post-stroke recovery: the role of the multidisciplinary health care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke DJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available David J Clarke, Anne Forster Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation, Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford, UK Abstract: Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability, the effects of which may be prolonged with physical, emotional, social, and financial consequences not only for those affected but also for their family and friends. Evidence for the effectiveness of stroke unit care and the benefits of thrombolysis have transformed treatment for people after stroke. Previously viewed nihilistically, stroke is now seen as a medical emergency with clear evidence-based care pathways from hospital admission to discharge. However, stroke remains a complex clinical condition that requires health professionals to work together to bring to bear their collective knowledge and specialist skills for the benefit of stroke survivors. Multidisciplinary team working is regarded as fundamental to delivering effective care across the stroke pathway. This paper discusses the contribution of team working in improving recovery at key points in the post-stroke pathway. Keywords: stroke care, rehabilitation, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, team working

  11. Incidence estimate and guideline-oriented treatment for post-stroke spasticity: an analysis based on German statutory health insurance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egen-Lappe V

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Veronika Egen-Lappe, Ingrid Köster, Ingrid SchubertPMV Research Group, Department of Child and Adolescence Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyBackground: Spasticity after stroke has been internationally recognized as an important health problem causing impairment of mobility, deformity, and pain. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of first-ever and recurrent stroke and of subsequent spastic and flaccid paresis. Factors influencing the development of spasticity were analyzed. A further major aim was to provide a "real-life" assessment of the treatment of spasticity in Germany and to discuss this in view of the treatment recommended by German and international clinical guidelines.Methods: The database used in this study comprised a cohort of 242,090 insurants from a large statutory health insurance fund in the federal state of Hesse, Germany. A first hospital discharge diagnosis in 2009 with any of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10 codes I60–I64 was used to identify patients with acute stroke (hemorrhage and ischemic. These patients were followed up six months after stroke to monitor whether they developed spastic or flaccid paresis (hospital or ambulatory care diagnoses ICD-10 code G81–G83 [excluding G82.6/G83.4/G83.8]. For patients with spastic paresis after stroke the spasticity treatment was analyzed for a six-month period (physiotherapy, oral muscle relaxants, intrathecal baclofen, and botulinum toxin.Results: Standardized to the population of Germany, 3.7 per 1000 persons suffered a stroke in 2009 (raw 5.2/1000. Of all surviving patients, 10.2% developed spasticity within 6 months. Cox regression revealed no significant influence of patient age, gender, morbidity (diabetes, hypertensive diseases, ischemic heart diseases or type of stroke on development of spasticity. 97% of surviving patients with spasticity received physiotherapy (inpatient care 89

  12. Assessment of stroke and concomitant cerebrovascular disease with heart disease requires invasive treatment: analysis of 249 consecutive patients with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Song, Hyun; Oh, Se-Yang; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Bum-Soo; Kang, Joonkyu; Shin, Yong Sam

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships of cerebrovascular disease (CVD), heart problems, and stroke in patients who required an invasive cardiac procedure. We enrolled 249 consecutive patients who required to or underwent invasive cardiac treatment and divided into a non-CVD group (n = 116) and a CVD group (n = 133). The latter group was divided into a coronary artery disease (CAD) group (n = 118) and a non-CAD group such as cardiac structural lesions (n = 15). No significant relationship with significant cerebrovascular stenosis was observed in either the CADs or non-CADs. The incidence of past stroke was significantly higher in the CVD group than that in the non-CVD group (12.8 vs. 3.4%; p = 0.017). Previous stroke event had increased odds of having significant cerebrovascular stenosis (odds ratio, 3.919, p = 0.006). In patients with both cardiac disease and the CVD, perioperative stroke was only one case (0.9%). The main source of stroke was cardiogenic in the immediate results and cerebrovascular lesions in the delayed results (1-12 months). The risk of perioperative stroke was very low in combined cardiac disease and the CVD. However, for preventing ischemic stroke due to the predetected cerebrovascular lesions, precautionary efforts could be needed for patients undergoing an invasive cardiac procedure, and concomitant cerebrovascular lesions should be considered as main source of delayed ischemic stroke. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Citation Classics in Stroke: The Top-100 Cited Articles on Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yerim; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Jee-Eun; Park, Kang Min; Lee, Ju-Hun; Song, Hong-Ki; Bae, Jong Seok

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is a disastrous disease and a major health burden worldwide, especially in Korea. Hemorrhagic stroke (HS) accounts for approximately 20% of all the types of strokes. It is important to be able to evaluate stroke diagnoses and evolving treatments. We aimed to identify the top-100 cited articles and assess a paradigm shift that occurred in the field of HS. We searched all articles that had been cited more than 100 times using the Web of Science citation search tool during January 2016. Among a total of 2,651 articles, we identified the top-100 cited articles on HS. The number of citations for the articles analyzed in this study ranged from 1,746 to 211, and the number of annual citations ranged from 125.6 to 5.5. Most of the articles that were published in Stroke (35%) and Journal of Neurosurgery (22%), originated in the United States (n = 56), were original articles (64%), and dealt with the natural history or etiology (n = 37) and vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 8). We analyzed the top-100 cited articles in the field of HS based on citation rates. The results provide a unique perspective on historical and academic developments in this field. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Academic Impairment and Impact of Treatments among Youth with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, Jennifer E.; Christofferson, Jennifer; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Drake, Kelly; Kendall, Philip C.; McCracken, James T.; Birmaher, Boris; Walkup, John T.; Compton, Scott N.; Keeton, Courtney; Sakolsky, Dara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Global academic difficulties have often been reported in youth with anxiety disorders, however, little is known about the specific academic deficits in this population. Objective: To (a) evaluate the prevalence of seven specific academic impairments in children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, (b) determine whether these…

  15. Intermediate uveitis: pattern of etiology, complications, treatment and outcome in a tertiary academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Thomas; Boehringer, Daniel; Heinzelmann, Sonja

    2017-04-27

    Patients with intermediate uveitis (IU) represent a heterogenous group characterized by a wide spectrum of etiologies and regional differences. Aim of the study was to analyze the characteristics of patients with IU examined in an academic center in Germany. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical records of all patients with intermediate uveitis referred to the Eye Center, University of Freiburg from 2007 to 2014. Diagnosis followed the Standardization in Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) criteria. Data analysis included: etiology of IU, demographics, complications, treatment and visual acuity. We identified 159 patients with intermediate uveitis during that period. Mean age at diagnosis was 35 years. Most are female (64%), and the mean duration of IU was 6.1 years (range 1 month - 35 years). Etiology of IU was idiopathic in 59%. Multiple sclerosis (MS) (20%) and sarcoidosis (10%) were frequent systemic causes of IU. Other etiologies including infectious diseases (tuberculosis, borreliosis) or immune-mediated conditions (eg, after vaccination) were present in 11%. The pattern of complications included macular edema (CME) (36%), cataract (24%), secondary glaucoma (7%), and epiretinal membrane formation (19%). Periphlebitis and optic neuritis were more frequent in conjunction with MS. Treatment comprised local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressive agents, biologics, and surgery. Best corrected visual acuity was better than 20/25 in 60% of the eyes after more than 10 years of follow-up. In our German academic center, most IU cases were idiopathic or associated with MS or sarcoidosis. In contrast to other countries, infectious cases were rare. Patients' overall visual prognosis is favorable even when the duration of IU has been long and and despite numerous complications.

  16. Anti-inflammatory treatment and risk for depression after first-time stroke in a cohort of 147 487 Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common complication after stroke, and inflammation may be a pathophysiological mechanism. This study examines whether anti-inflammatory treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or statins influence the risk of depression...... with a tendency toward a decreased risk. LIMITATIONS: The study used prescription of antidepressant medication as a proxy measure for depression and did not include anti-inflammatory drugs bought over the counter. CONCLUSION: Anti-inflammatory treatment is associated with a lower risk for depression shortly after...... after stroke. METHODS: A register-based cohort including all patients admitted to hospital with a first-time stroke from Jan. 1, 2001, through Dec. 31, 2011, and a nonstroke population with a similar age and sex distribution was followed for depression until Dec. 31, 2014. Depression was defined...

  17. Can multivariable risk-benefit profiling be used to select treatment-favorable patients for thrombolysis in stroke in the 3- to 6-hour time window?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David M; Selker, Harry P; Ruthazer, Robin; Bluhmki, Erich; Hacke, Werner

    2006-12-01

    The Stroke-Thrombolytic Predictive Instrument (Stroke-TPI) uses multivariate equations to predict outcomes with and without thrombolysis. We sought to examine whether such a multivariate predictive instrument might be useful in selecting patients with a favorable risk-benefit treatment profile for therapy after 3 hours. We explored outcomes in patients from 5 major randomized clinical trials testing intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) classified by the Stroke-TPI as "treatment-favorable" or "treatment-unfavorable." We used iterative bootstrap re-sampling to estimate how such a model would perform on independent test data. Among patients treated within the 3- to 6-hour window, 67% of patients were classified by Stroke-TPI predicted outcomes as "treatment-favorable" and 33% were classified as "treatment-unfavorable." Outcomes in the treatment-favorable group demonstrated benefit for thrombolysis (modified Rankin Scale score < or =1: 44.0% with rt-PA versus 34.2 with placebo, P=0.005), whereas harm was demonstrated in the treatment-unfavorable group (modified Rankin Scale score < or =1: 31.3% with rt-PA versus 38.3% with placebo; P=0.004). Bootstrap resampling with complete cross-validation showed that the absolute margin of benefit in the treatment-favorable group diminished on average by 36% between derivation and independent validation sets, but still represented a significant tripling of improvement in benefit compared with conventional inclusion criteria (5.2% [interquartile range, 1.7% to 8.6%] versus 1.8% [interquartile range, -0.5 to 4.1], P<0.0001). Such multivariable risk-benefit profiling may be useful in the selection of acute stroke patients for rt-PA therapy even more than 3 hours after symptom onset. Prospective testing is indicated.

  18. A treatment schedule of conventional physical therapy provided to enhance upper limb sensorimotor recovery after stroke: expert criterion validity and intra-rater reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Catherine; Tallis, Raymond C; Pomeroy, Valerie M

    2009-06-01

    Inadequate description of treatment hampers progress in stroke rehabilitation. To develop a valid, reliable, standardised treatment schedule of conventional physical therapy provided for the paretic upper limb after stroke. Eleven neurophysiotherapists participated in the established methodology: semi-structured interviews, focus groups and piloting a draft treatment schedule in clinical practice. Different physiotherapists (n=13) used the treatment schedule to record treatment given to stroke patients with mild, moderate and severe upper limb paresis. Rating of adequacy of the treatment schedule was made using a visual analogue scale (0 to 100mm). Mean (95% confidence interval) visual analogue scores were calculated (expert criterion validity). For intra-rater reliability, each physiotherapist observed a video tape of their treatment and immediately completed a treatment schedule recording form on two separate occasions, 4 to 6 weeks apart. The Kappa statistic was calculated for intra-rater reliability. The treatment schedule consists of a one-page A4 recording form and a user booklet, detailing 50 treatment activities. Expert criterion validity was 79 (95% confidence interval 74 to 84). Intra-rater Kappa was 0.81 (Pwork is needed to investigate generalisability beyond this geographical area.

  19. Safety and Efficacy of the Sofia (6F) PLUS Distal Access Reperfusion Catheter in the Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallwani, Hussain; Shakir, Hakeem J; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Davies, Jason M; Sonig, Ashish; Sattur, Mithun G; Bendok, Bernard R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I

    2018-03-01

    Neuroendovascular intervention has become a key treatment option for acute ischemic stroke. The Sofia (6F) PLUS catheter was designed for neurovascular access for diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. To report the first series describing use of the Sofia PLUS intermediate/distal access reperfusion catheter in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. In this retrospective study, 41 stroke cases were identified in which the catheter was utilized for thrombolysis/thrombectomy. Mean preprocedure National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 16.5 ± 5.2 (range 4-29). Occluded vessels included the M1 segment, M2 segment, internal carotid artery terminus, cervical internal carotid artery, and basilar artery. Successful positioning of the Sofia PLUS catheter near the occlusion site was achieved in 38 (92.7%) of 41 cases in which thrombectomy or thrombolysis was attempted using intraarterial tissue plasminogen activator, a direct aspiration first-pass technique, and/or stent retrieval. A postprocedure thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) score of 2b/3 was achieved in 37 of 41 cases. Of 15 cases where the Sofia PLUS was used for a direct aspiration first-pass technique, TICI 2b/3 was achieved in 11 (73.3%). In one case where intra-arterial tissue plasminogen activator was used as the only treatment modality, TICI 2a was achieved. No device-related or catheter-related complications were observed. The mean 7-d-postprocedure National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score among the 39 survivors was 8.5 ± 7.3 (range 0-23). Initial results with use of the Sofia (6F) PLUS for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke have been encouraging. Experience with a larger series is warranted to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of this device and compare it with other reperfusion catheters. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  20. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  1. Association between antithrombotic treatment and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation-a cohort study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wändell, Per; Carlsson, Axel C; Holzmann, Martin; Ärnlöv, Johan; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to study the association between antithrombotic treatment and risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) treated in primary health care. Study population included all adults (n = 12,215) 45 years and older diagnosed with AF at 75 primary care centers in Sweden 2001-2007. Outcome was defined as a first hospital episode with a discharge episode of HS after the AF diagnosis. Association between HS and persistent treatment with antithrombotic agents (warfarin, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel) was explored using Cox regression analysis, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % CIs. Adjustment was made for age, socioeconomic status, and co-morbid cardiovascular conditions. During a mean of 5.8 years (SD 2.4) of follow-up, 162 patients (1.3 %; 67 women and 95 men) with HS were recorded. The adjusted risk associated with persistent warfarin treatment compared to no antithrombotic treatment consistently showed no increased HS risk, HR for women 0.53 (95 % CI 0.23-1.27) and for men 0.55 (95 % CI 0.29-1.04); corresponding HRs for ASA were, for women, 0.45 (95 % CI 0.14-1.44) and, for men, 0.56 (95 % CI 0.24-1.29). In this clinical setting, we found no evidence pointing to an increased risk of HS with antithrombotic treatment.

  2. Intravenous Treatment with a Long-Chain Omega-3 Lipid Emulsion Provides Neuroprotection in a Murine Model of Ischemic Stroke - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Berressem

    Full Text Available Single long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. docosahexaenoic acid (DHA or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are known for their neuroprotective properties associated with ischemic stroke. This pilot study aimed to test the effectiveness of an acute treatment with a long-chain omega-3 lipid emulsion (Omegaven 10%®, OGV that contains fish oil (DHA 18 mg/ml; EPA 21 mg/ml and α-tocopherol (0.2 mg/ml in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model of ischemic stroke in mice. For this purpose, female CD-1 mice were anesthetized and subjected to 90 minutes of MCAO. To reflect a clinically relevant situation for an acute treatment, either after induction of stroke or after reperfusion, a single dose of OGV was injected intravenously into the tail vein (5 ml/kg b.w.. A neurological severity score was used to assess motor function and neurological outcome. Stroke-related parameters were determined 24 hours after MCAO. Microdialysis was used to collect samples from extracellular space of the striatum. Mitochondrial function was determined in isolated mitochondria or dissociated brain cells. Inflammation markers were measured in brain homogenate. According to control experiments, neuroprotective effects could be attributed to the long-chain omega-3 content of the emulsion. Intravenous injection of OGV reduced size and severity of stroke, restored mitochondrial function, and prevented excitotoxic glutamate release. Increases of pro-inflammatory markers (COX-2 and IL-6 were attenuated. Neurological severity scoring and neurochemical data demonstrated that acute OGV treatment shortly after induction of stroke was most efficient and able to improve short-term neurological outcome, reflecting the importance of an acute treatment to improve the outcome. Summarising, acute treatment of stroke with a single intravenous dose of OGV provided strong neuroprotective effects and was most effective when given immediately after onset of ischemia. As OGV is an

  3. Effect of treatment delay, age, and stroke severity on the effects of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberson, Jonathan; Lees, Kennedy R; Lyden, Patrick; Blackwell, Lisa; Albers, Gregory; Bluhmki, Erich; Brott, Thomas; Cohen, Geoff; Davis, Stephen; Donnan, Geoffrey; Grotta, James; Howard, George; Kaste, Markku; Koga, Masatoshi; von Kummer, Ruediger; Lansberg, Maarten; Lindley, Richard I; Murray, Gordon; Olivot, Jean Marc; Parsons, Mark; Tilley, Barbara; Toni, Danilo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wahlgren, Nils; Wardlaw, Joanna; Whiteley, William; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Baigent, Colin; Sandercock, Peter; Hacke, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Alteplase is effective for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke but debate continues about its use after longer times since stroke onset, in older patients, and among patients who have had the least or most severe strokes. We assessed the role of these factors in affecting good stroke outcome in patients given alteplase. Methods We did a pre-specified meta-analysis of individual patient data from 6756 patients in nine randomised trials comparing alteplase with placebo or open control. We included all completed randomised phase 3 trials of intravenous alteplase for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke for which data were available. Retrospective checks confirmed that no eligible trials had been omitted. We defined a good stroke outcome as no significant disability at 3–6 months, defined by a modified Rankin Score of 0 or 1. Additional outcomes included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (defined by type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage within 7 days and, separately, by the SITS-MOST definition of parenchymal type 2 haemorrhage within 36 h), fatal intracranial haemorrhage within 7 days, and 90-day mortality. Findings Alteplase increased the odds of a good stroke outcome, with earlier treatment associated with bigger proportional benefit. Treatment within 3·0 h resulted in a good outcome for 259 (32·9%) of 787 patients who received alteplase versus 176 (23·1%) of 762 who received control (OR 1·75, 95% CI 1·35–2·27); delay of greater than 3·0 h, up to 4·5 h, resulted in good outcome for 485 (35·3%) of 1375 versus 432 (30·1%) of 1437 (OR 1·26, 95% CI 1·05–1·51); and delay of more than 4·5 h resulted in good outcome for 401 (32·6%) of 1229 versus 357 (30·6%) of 1166 (OR 1·15, 95% CI 0·95–1·40). Proportional treatment benefits were similar irrespective of age or stroke severity. Alteplase significantly increased the odds of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage definition 231 [6·8%] of 3391 vs 44 [1·3

  4. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  5. Evidence to Maintain the Systolic Blood Pressure Treatment Threshold at 140 mm Hg for Stroke Prevention: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanhui; Della-Morte, David; Rundek, Tatjana; Wright, Clinton B; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, the Eighth Joint National Committee revised the target maximum systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 140 to 150 mm Hg in patients aged ≥60 years without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. The evidence from cohort studies supporting this change was sparse, particularly among US minority populations. In the Northern Manhattan Study, 1750 participants aged ≥60 years and free of stroke, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease had SBP measured at baseline and were annually followed up for incident stroke. Mean age at baseline was 72±8 years, 63% were women, 48% Hispanic, 25% non-Hispanic white, and 25% non-Hispanic black. Among all participants, 40% were on antihypertensive medications; 43% had SBP Hg, 20% had 140 to 149 mm Hg, and 37% had ≥150 mm Hg. Over a median follow-up of 13 years, 182 participants developed stroke. The crude stroke incidence was greater among individuals with SBP≥150 mm Hg (10.8 per 1000 person-years) and SBP 140 to 149 (12.3) than among those with SBPHg had an increased risk of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.6) compared with those with SBP Hg. The increased stroke risk was most notable among Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks. Raising the SBP threshold from 140 to 150 mm Hg as a new target for hypertension treatment in older individuals without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease could have a detrimental effect on stroke risk reduction, especially among minority US populations. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  7. Baseline Quality of Life and Risk of Stroke in the ALLHAT Study (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tanzila; Auchus, Alexander P; Oparil, Suzanne; Wright, Clinton B; Wright, Jackson; Furlan, Anthony J; Sila, Cathy A; Davis, Barry R; Pressel, Sara; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Einhorn, Paula T; Lerner, Alan J

    2017-11-01

    The visual analogue scale is a self-reported, validated tool to measure quality of life (QoL). Our purpose was to determine whether baseline QoL predicted strokes in the ALLHAT study (Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) and evaluate determinants of poststroke change in QoL. In the ALLHAT study, among the 33 357 patients randomized to treatment arms, 1525 experienced strokes; 1202 (79%) strokes were nonfatal. This study cohort includes 32 318 (97%) subjects who completed the baseline visual analogue scale QoL estimate. QoL was measured on a visual analogue scale and adjusted using a Torrance transformation (transformed QoL [TQoL]). Kaplan-Meier curves and adjusted proportional hazards analyses were used to estimate the effect of TQoL on the risk of stroke, on a continuous scale (0-1) and by quartiles (≤0.81, >0.81≤0.89, >0.89≤0.95, >0.95). We analyzed the change from baseline to first poststroke TQoL using adjusted linear regression. After adjusting for multiple stroke risk factors, the hazard ratio for stroke events for baseline TQoL was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) per 0.1 U increase. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% increased stroke risk (hazard ratio=1.20 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.44]) compared with the reference highest quartile TQoL. Poststroke TQoL change was significant within all treatment groups ( P ≤0.001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that baseline TQoL was the strongest predictor of poststroke TQoL with similar results for the untransformed QoL. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% higher stroke risk than the highest quartile. Baseline TQoL was the only factor that predicted poststroke change in TQoL. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000542. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Efficacy of nitric oxide, with or without continuing antihypertensive treatment, for management of high blood pressure in acute stroke (ENOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M W; Woodhouse, Lisa; Scutt, Polly

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High blood pressure is associated with poor outcome after stroke. Whether blood pressure should be lowered early after stroke, and whether to continue or temporarily withdraw existing antihypertensive drugs, is not known. We assessed outcomes after stroke in patients given drugs......·91-1·13; p=0·83), and with continue versus stop antihypertensive drugs OR was 1·05 (0·90-1·22; p=0·55). INTERPRETATION: In patients with acute stroke and high blood pressure, transdermal glyceryl trinitrate lowered blood pressure and had acceptable safety but did not improve functional outcome. We show...

  9. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: Findings from Hip Hop Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke is linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether “Child-Mediated Stroke Communication” (CMSC) could improve stroke literacy parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke (HHS). Methods Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from two public schools in Harlem, NYC, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child’s participation in HHS, a novel CMSC intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week following the intervention. Results Fifth and Sixth grade students (n =182) were enrolled into HHS. 102 parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program: before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the five cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911), compared to 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) post-intervention (pstroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that schoolchildren aged 9-12 may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their Parents. PMID:22033995

  10. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2012-01-01

    Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke. Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention. Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001). Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

  12. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  13. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  14. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  15. [Treatment choice for patients with hemorrhagic cerebral stroke expected to be in a disabled condition--An analysis of questionnaire responses of patients' families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Takahiro; Fukuhara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with cerebral stroke are successively treated with the latest advances in medical therapies. Surgical hematoma evacuation is a treatment option for patients with hemorrhagic cerebral stroke, however; it may result in a prolonged vegetative state. The difficult choice of whether or not such surgery should be performed is mostly made by the family, frequently in an urgent manner, and nurses need to understand the factors affecting this decision-making. We performed statistical analyses on the responses of 30 patients' families who answered our questionnaire, presuming disabilities after the surgery were expected. Multiple answers were obtained according to the severity of the expected disabilities after the surgery. The refusal of surgery increased as the expected disabilities worsened, and the statistically significant factor affecting the decision-making process was "what they would wish if they suffered a stroke themselves." The 18 nurses working in the neurological ward who responded to the same questionnaire wished surgery more in the case of the patient's cognition being preserved. Since it is rare for patients with stroke to have an advance directive, patients' families have to decide the treatment choice in most cases. In the clinical setting, such decisions frequently need to be made rapidly, however; the decision should be made by speculating on the patients' own will, and it is desirable for medical staff to explain the expected outcomes of the surgery in detail as far as possible.

  16. Stroke is not a treatment dilemma for early valve surgery in active infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Su; Sung, Kiick; Park, Pyo Won; Kim, Wook Sung; Lee, Young Tak; Jun, Tae-Gook; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jeong, Dong Seop; Cho, Yang Hyun

    2014-09-01

    While early valve surgery for active infective endocarditis (AIE) is recommended, surgeons have hesitated to operate on patients complicated by cerebral septic embolism resulting in cerebral bleeding when cardiopulmonary bypass is required intraoperatively. The study aim was to review the outcomes of operations for AIE, and to determine the risks of neurologic complications resulting from cerebral septic embolism. Between 1994 and June 2011, among 278 patients who underwent heart valve surgery for AIE at the authors' institution, 39 (14%) had cerebral septic embolisms. Cerebral lesions were verified by imaging, and were predominantly multiple embolic infarctions (34 patients; 87.2%). Five patients had brain abscess, and 10 had hemorrhage with or without infarction. The mean interval between the recent onset of a stroke and surgery was 10.1 ± 10.1 days (range: 0-43 days). One patient died postoperatively of septic shock. New neurologic complications occurred in five patients, including secondary hemorrhagic transformation in the previous lesions (n = 2), newly developed subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 2), and an increased degree of subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1). One patient needed a craniotomy, and the others were treated medically. There were five late deaths, including one cardiac death, and one redo valve surgery due to repaired valve failure during the follow up period of 46.3 ± 40.4 months (range: 1.9-127.4 months). The overall and event-free survival rates at five and 10 years were 84.3 ± 6.5% and 75.9 ± 9.9%, and 81.7 ± 6.8% and 73.6 ± 9.9%, respectively. Surgery for AIE with cerebral septic embolisms can be performed safely, with good early and mid-term follow-up results. When urgent or emergent surgery for AIE is needed, neurologic complications should not be a reason for delay.

  17. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  18. Stroke and recurrent haemorrhage associated with antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Lip, Gregory Y H; Olesen, Jonas B

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What are the risks of all cause mortality, thromboembolism, major bleeding, and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding associated with restarting antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation? METHODS: This Danish cohort study (1996......-2012) included all patients with atrial fibrillation discharged from hospital after gastrointestinal bleeding while receiving antithrombotic treatment. Restarted treatment regimens were single or combined antithrombotic drugs with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets. Follow-up started 90 days after discharge...... gastrointestinal bleeding. 27.1% (n=924) of patients did not resume antithrombotic treatment. Compared with non-resumption of treatment, a reduced risk of all cause mortality was found in association with restart of oral anticoagulation (hazard ratio 0.39, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 0.46), an antiplatelet...

  19. The Effects of Medical Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) on Children’s Academic Achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keilow, Maria; Holm, Anders; Fallesen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We use Danish register data to estimate the effect of medical treatment of ADHD on children’s academic achievement. Using a sample of 7,523 children who undergo medical treatment, we exploit plausibly exogenous variation in medical nonresponse to estimate the effect of medical treatment on school-leaving...... grades. Heckman two-stage sample selection models allow us to account for selection into the sample of children treated medically for ADHD. We find significant effects of treatment on ninth grade school-leaving grade point average (GPA). Compared to consistent treatment, part or full discontinuation...... of treatment has large significant negative effects on teacher evaluation and exam GPA, reducing grades with .18 to .19 standard deviations. A supplementary identification strategy and placebo regressions support our findings. The results demonstrate that ADHD treatment may mitigate the negative social...

  20. Intra-arterial thrombolysis vs. standard treatment or intravenous thrombolysis in adults with acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Julian; Jing, He; O'Reilly, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that intra-arterial thrombolysis may provide benefit beyond intravenous thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients. Previous meta-analyses have only compared intra-arterial thrombolysis with standard treatment without thrombolysis. The objective was to review the benefits and harms of intra-arterial thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients. We undertook a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial thrombolysis with either standard treatment or intravenous thrombolysis following acute ischemic stroke. Primary outcomes included poor functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 3-6), mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Study quality was assessed, and outcomes were stratified by comparison treatment received. Four trials (n = 351) comparing intra-arterial thrombolysis with standard treatment were identified. Intra-arterial thrombolysis reduced the risk of poor functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 3-6) [relative risk (RR) = 0·80; 95% confidence interval = 0·67-0·95; P = 0·01]. Mortality was not increased (RR = 0·82; 95% confidence interval = 0·56-1·21; P = 0·32); however, risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was nearly four times more likely (RR = 3·90; 95% confidence interval = 1·41-10·76; P = 0·006). Two trials (n = 81) comparing intra-arterial thrombolysis with intravenous thrombolysis were identified. Intra-arterial thrombolysis was not found to reduce poor functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 3-6) (RR = 0·68; 95% confidence interval = 0·46-1·00; P = 0·05). Mortality was not increased (RR = 1·12; 95% confidence interval = 0·47-2·68; P = 0·79); neither was symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (RR = 1·13; 95% confidence interval = 0·32-3·99; P = 0·85). Differences in time from symptom onset-to-treatment and type of thrombolytic administered were found

  1. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Frauenknecht

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192. Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each (i ischemic control (saline; (ii CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; (iii G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11; (iv combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF and (v combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively. After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective.

  2. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  3. Combination treatment of low-frequency rTMS and occupational therapy with levodopa administration: an intensive neurorehabilitative approach for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2011-07-01

    The combination treatment of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy was applied with concomitant oral administration of levodopa in five post-stroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis (age at treatment: 56-66 years; interval between onset of stroke and treatment: 18-143 months) as a 15-day inpatient protocol. Daily levodopa administration of 100 mg was initiated 1 week before admission and continued until 4 weeks after discharge. Low-frequency rTMS of 1 Hz was applied to the contralesional hemisphere for 40 min daily (two 20-min sessions) combined with intensive occupational therapy consisting of 60-min one-on-one training and 60-min self-exercise. Motor function of the affected upper limb was serially evaluated with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and the Wolf Motor Function Test. At the end of the treatment, all patients showed improved motor function in the affected upper limbs. In some patients, the improvement was maintained until 4 weeks after discharge. No patient showed any adverse effect from the intervention. Our proposed protocol featuring levodopa administration, low-frequency rTMS, and intensive occupational therapy could provide a safe and feasible intervention for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke.

  4. The relationship between interventionists' experience and clinical and radiological outcome in intra-arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A MR CLEAN pretrial survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Debbie; van Boxtel, Tiemen H; Schipperen, Stefanie; van Zwam, Wim H; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J; Brouwer, Patrick A; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F M; Schonewille, Wouter J; Vos, Jan Albert; van der Lugt, Aad; Roos, Yvo B; Majoie, Charles B; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2017-06-15

    Intra-arterial treatment in acute ischemic stroke is safe and effective as recently shown in several randomized clinical trials. The level of experience of the interventionist performing the IAT procedure has not been studied. The present study investigates effects of interventionists' experience on technical aspects of the procedure and clinical outcome of the patient. In this study of 313 patients with a proximal intracranial arterial anterior circulation occlusion, treated in the Netherlands from 2002 until participation in the Multicenter Randomized Clinical trial of Endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke (MR CLEAN), data were collected retrospectively. The association of the senior interventionists' experience with duration of the procedure, adverse events, recanalization, neurological outcome, and functional outcome at discharge was analyzed. Multiple regression models adjusted for age, sex, stroke severity, carotid terminus occlusion, use of a retrievable stent and onset to door time were used. No association between interventionists' experience and recanalization, neurological outcome, or functional outcome was observed in a strict selection of patients. This strict selection include a start of intra-arterial treatment within 6h, no coagulation disturbances, systolic blood pressureexperience and either serious neurologic adverse events or poor outcomes was observed in this study of treatments by interventionists with experience of experience with procedure times, results and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Internal fixation versus conservative treatment for elderly patients with a trochanteric hip fracture in conjunction with post-stroke hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kainan; Zheng, Yingjie

    2016-10-01

    To retrospectively evaluated Gamma nail internal fixation in the treatment of elderly patients with post-stroke hemiplegia experiencing trochanteric hip fracture. The patients were obtained consecutively from January 2005 to December 2010 with inclusion criteria. The total number was 138 and allocated to two groups: treated with the Gamma nail (n=72,group A) and continuous skin traction (n=66,group B). Preoperative variables including patient age, gender, duration of cerebrovascular accident, duration of hypertension, ASA risk score, Harris hip score and fracture type were recorded and compared. After treatment, time of patients activity on the bed, ambulation time, Harris hip score, mortality, complications were recorded and used to compare the outcomes. (1) Follow-up was undertaken from 3 to 10 years, with an average of 5.8 years. (2) No statistical difference in preoperative variables was found between the 2 groups. (3) two groups had statistical significance (P=0.000) in the time of patients activity on the bed and ambulation time and group A can activities on the bed and ambulates earlier. (4) There were significant differences between 2 groups in Harris hip score at 1 and 3 years and group A was significantly higher than group B. (5) there were statistically significant differences in mortality of 3 years, 5 years and 10 years and the group B was significantly higher than the group A. (6) There was a statistical significance in complications between 2 groups and group B was higher than group A. Major complications in group A were pain, lag screw cut out, implant infection and distal femoral fractures caused by fall after the surgery. On elderly patients with trochanteric hip fracture on the hemiplegic lower side, Gamma nail internal fixation treatment can achieve better effect, patients can be early activity, fewer complications, and less mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of imaging selection patterns in acute ischemic stroke patients and the influence on treatment and clinical trial enrollment decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven J; Albers, Gregory W; Baron, Jean-Claude; Cognard, Christophe; Dávalos, Antoni; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Fiebach, Jochen B; Fiehler, Jens; Hacke, Werner; Lansberg, Maarten G; Liebeskind, David S; Mattle, Heinrich P; Oppenheim, Catherine; Schellinger, Peter D; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wintermark, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to collect precise information on the typical imaging decisions given specific clinical acute stroke scenarios. Stroke centers worldwide were surveyed regarding typical imaging used to work up representative acute stroke patients, make treatment decisions, and willingness to enroll in clinical trials. Methods STroke Imaging Research and Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Imaging circulated an online survey of clinical case vignettes through its website, the websites of national professional societies from multiple countries as well as through email distribution lists from STroke Imaging Research and participating societies. Survey responders were asked to select the typical imaging work-up for each clinical vignette presented. Actual images were not presented to the survey responders. Instead, the survey then displayed several types of imaging findings offered by the imaging strategy, and the responders selected the appropriate therapy and whether to enroll into a clinical trial considering time from onset, clinical presentation, and imaging findings. A follow-up survey focusing on 6 h from onset was conducted after the release of the positive endovascular trials. Results We received 548 responses from 35 countries including 282 individual centers; 78% of the centers originating from Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, and United States. The specific onset windows presented influenced the type of imaging work-up selected more than the clinical scenario. Magnetic Resonance Imaging usage (27–28%) was substantial, in particular for wake-up stroke. Following the release of the positive trials, selection of perfusion imaging significantly increased for imaging strategy. Conclusions Usage of vascular or perfusion imaging by Computed Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging beyond just parenchymal imaging was the primary work-up (62–87%) across all clinical vignettes and time windows

  7. Systemic thrombolysis increases hemorrhagic stroke risk without survival benefit compared with catheter-directed intervention for the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nathan L; Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Singh, Michael J; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2017-03-01

    Systemic thrombolysis (ST) and catheter-directed intervention (CDI) are both used in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), but the comparative outcomes of these two therapies remain unclear. The objective of this study was to compare short-term mortality and safety outcomes between the two treatments using a large national database. Patients presenting with acute PE were identified in the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2009 to 2012. Comorbidities, clinical characteristics, and invasive procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD) codes and the Elixhauser comorbidity index. To adjust for anticipated baseline differences between the two treatment groups, propensity score matching was used to create a matched ST cohort with clinical and comorbid characteristics similar to those of the CDI cohort. Subgroups of patients with and without hemodynamic shock were analyzed separately. Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, overall bleeding risk, and hemorrhagic stroke risk. Of 263,955 subjects with acute PE, 1.63% (n = 4272) received ST and 0.55% (n = 1455) received CDI. ST subjects were older, had more chronic comorbidities, and had higher rates of respiratory failure (ST, 27.9% [n = 1192]; CDI, 21.2% [n = 308]; P hemorrhagic stroke rates (ST, 2.2% [n = 96]; CDI, 1.4% [n = 20]; P = .041). After propensity matching, 1430 patients remained in each cohort; baseline characteristics of the matched cohorts did not differ significantly using standardized difference comparisons. Analysis of the matched cohorts did not demonstrate a significant effect of CDI on in-hospital mortality or overall bleeding risk but did show a significant protective effect against hemorrhagic stroke compared with ST (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.82; P = .01). Subgroup analysis showed decreased odds of hemorrhagic stroke for CDI in the nonshock subgroup and increased procedural bleeding for CDI but no

  8. Stroke treatment with alteplase given 3.0-4.5 h after onset of acute ischaemic stroke (ECASS III): additional outcomes and subgroup analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhmki, Erich; Chamorro, Angel; Dávalos, Antoni; Machnig, Thomas; Sauce, Christophe; Wahlgren, Nils; Wardlaw, Joanna; Hacke, Werner

    2009-12-01

    In the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study III (ECASS III), alteplase administered 3.0-4.5 h after the onset of stroke symptoms resulted in a significant benefit in the primary endpoint (modified Rankin scale [mRS] score 0-1) versus placebo, with no difference in mortality between the treatment groups. Compared with the 0-3 h window, there was no excess risk of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage. We assessed the usefulness of additional endpoints and did subgroup and sensitivity analyses to further investigate the benefit of alteplase. In a double-blind, multicentre study in Europe, patients with acute ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned to intravenous alteplase (0.9 mg/kg bodyweight) or placebo. Additional outcome analyses included functional endpoints at day 90 or day 30 (mRS 0-1 [day 30], mRS 0-2, Barthel index > or =85, and global outcome statistic [day 30]) and treatment response (8-point improvement from baseline or 0-1 score on the National Institutes of Health stroke scale [NIHSS], and a stratified responder analysis by baseline NIHSS score). The subgroup analyses were based on the mRS 0-1 at day 90, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage, and death. Analyses were by intention to treat and per protocol. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00153036. 418 patients were assigned to alteplase and 403 to placebo. Although not significant in every case, all additional endpoints showed at least a clear trend in favour of alteplase. Alteplase was effective in various subgroups, including older patients ( or =65 years: 1.15, 0.80-1.64; p=0.230), and the effectiveness was independent of the severity of stroke at baseline (NIHSS 0-9: 1.28, 0.84-1.96; NIHSS 10-19: 1.16, 0.73-1.84; NIHSS > or =20: 2.32, 0.61-8.90; p=0.631). The incidence of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage seemed to be independent of previous antiplatelet drug use (no: 2.41, 1.09-5.33; yes: 2.33, 0.79-6.90; p=0.962) and time from onset of symptoms to treatment (181

  9. Stroke and recurrent haemorrhage associated with antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Lip, Gregory Y H; Olesen, Jonas B

    2015-01-01

    with better outcomes for all cause mortality and thromboembolism compared with patients who did not resume treatment. This was despite an increased longitudinal associated risk of bleeding. FUNDING, COMPETING INTERESTS, DATA SHARING: This study was supported by a grant from Boehringer-Ingelheim. Competing...

  10. Comparison of robotics, functional electrical stimulation, and motor learning methods for treatment of persistent upper extremity dysfunction after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Jessica; Monkiewicz, Michelle; Holcomb, John; Pundik, Svetlana; Daly, Janis J

    2015-06-01

    To compare response to upper-limb treatment using robotics plus motor learning (ML) versus functional electrical stimulation (FES) plus ML versus ML alone, according to a measure of complex functional everyday tasks for chronic, severely impaired stroke survivors. Single-blind, randomized trial. Medical center. Enrolled subjects (N=39) were >1 year postsingle stroke (attrition rate=10%; 35 completed the study). All groups received treatment 5d/wk for 5h/d (60 sessions), with unique treatment as follows: ML alone (n=11) (5h/d partial- and whole-task practice of complex functional tasks), robotics plus ML (n=12) (3.5h/d of ML and 1.5h/d of shoulder/elbow robotics), and FES plus ML (n=12) (3.5h/d of ML and 1.5h/d of FES wrist/hand coordination training). Primary measure: Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT), with 13 complex functional tasks; secondary measure: upper-limb Fugl-Meyer coordination scale (FM). There was no significant difference found in treatment response across groups (AMAT: P≥.584; FM coordination: P≥.590). All 3 treatment groups demonstrated clinically and statistically significant improvement in response to treatment (AMAT and FM coordination: P≤.009). A group treatment paradigm of 1:3 (therapist/patient) ratio proved feasible for provision of the intensive treatment. No adverse effects. Severely impaired stroke survivors with persistent (>1y) upper-extremity dysfunction can make clinically and statistically significant gains in coordination and functional task performance in response to robotics plus ML, FES plus ML, and ML alone in an intensive and long-duration intervention; no group differences were found. Additional studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of these methods in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic synergism in the treatment of post-stroke arm paresis utilizing botulinum toxin, robotic therapy, and constraint-induced movement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Takashi; Amano, Satoru; Hanada, Keisuke; Umeji, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kayoko; Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) injection, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and robotic therapy (RT) each represent promising approaches to enhance arm motor recovery after stroke. To provide more effective treatment for a 50-year-old man with severe left spastic hemiparesis, we attempted to facilitate CIMT with adaptive approaches to extend the wrist and fingers using RT for 10 consecutive weeks after BtxA injection. This combined treatment resulted in substantial improvements in arm function and the amount of arm use in activities of daily living, and may be effective for stroke patients with severe arm paresis. However, we were unable to sufficiently prove the efficacy of combined treatment based only on a single case. To fully elucidate the efficacy of the combined approach for patients with severe hemiparesis after stroke, future studies of a larger number of patients are needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment with B vitamins and incidence of cancer in patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack: results of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W; Yi, Qilong; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of B vitamin treatment on the incidence of cancer among patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with 1 tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B(6), 500 μg vitamin B(12)) and followed for a median of 3.4 years for any cancer as an adverse event. There was no significant difference in the incidence of any cancer among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (4.04% versus 4.59%; risk ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.07) and no difference in cancer mortality (2.35% versus 2.09%; risk ratio, 1.09; 0.81-1.46). Among 1899 patients with diabetes, the incidence of cancer was higher among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (5.35% versus 3.28%; adjusted risk ratio, 2.21; 1.31-3.73), whereas among 6168 patients without diabetes, the incidence of cancer was lower among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (3.66% versus 5.03%; adjusted risk ratio, 0.67; 0.51-0.87; P for interaction=0.0001). Daily administration of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) to 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack for a median of 3.4 years had no significant effect, compared with placebo, on cancer incidence or mortality. However, a post hoc subgroup analysis raises the hypothesis that folic acid treatment may increase the incidence of cancer among diabetics and reduce the incidence of cancer among nondiabetics with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack.

  13. Academic performance of students who underwent psychiatric treatment at the students’ mental health service of a Brazilian university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Ribeiro Franulovic Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: University students are generally at the typical age of onset of mental disorders that may affect their academic performance. We aimed to characterize the university students attended by psychiatrists at the students’ mental health service (SAPPE and to compare their academic performance with that of non-patient students. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study based on review of medical files and survey of academic data at a Brazilian public university. METHODS: Files of 1,237 students attended by psychiatrists at SAPPE from 2004 to 2011 were reviewed. Their academic performance coefficient (APC and status as of July 2015 were compared to those of a control group of 2,579 non-patient students matched by gender, course and year of enrolment. RESULTS: 37% of the patients had had psychiatric treatment and 4.5% had made suicide attempts before being attended at SAPPE. Depression (39.1% and anxiety disorders/phobias (33.2% were the most frequent diagnoses. Severe mental disorders such as psychotic disorders (3.7% and bipolar disorder (1.9% were less frequent. Compared with non-patients, the mean APC among the undergraduate patients was slightly lower (0.63; standard deviation, SD: 0.26; versus 0.64; SD: 0.28; P = 0.025, but their course completion rates were higher and course abandonment rates were lower. Regarding postgraduate students, patients and non-patients had similar completion rates, but patients had greater incidence of discharge for poor performance and lower dropout rates. CONCLUSION: Despite the inclusion of socially vulnerable people with severe mental disorders, the group of patients had similar academic performance, and in some aspects better, than, that of non-patients.

  14. Academic performance of students who underwent psychiatric treatment at the students' mental health service of a Brazilian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Cláudia Ribeiro Franulovic; Oliveira, Maria Lilian Coelho; Mello, Tânia Maron Vichi Freire de; Dantas, Clarissa de Rosalmeida

    2017-01-01

    University students are generally at the typical age of onset of mental disorders that may affect their academic performance. We aimed to characterize the university students attended by psychiatrists at the students' mental health service (SAPPE) and to compare their academic performance with that of non-patient students. Cross-sectional study based on review of medical files and survey of academic data at a Brazilian public university. Files of 1,237 students attended by psychiatrists at SAPPE from 2004 to 2011 were reviewed. Their academic performance coefficient (APC) and status as of July 2015 were compared to those of a control group of 2,579 non-patient students matched by gender, course and year of enrolment. 37% of the patients had had psychiatric treatment and 4.5% had made suicide attempts before being attended at SAPPE. Depression (39.1%) and anxiety disorders/phobias (33.2%) were the most frequent diagnoses. Severe mental disorders such as psychotic disorders (3.7%) and bipolar disorder (1.9%) were less frequent. Compared with non-patients, the mean APC among the undergraduate patients was slightly lower (0.63; standard deviation, SD: 0.26; versus 0.64; SD: 0.28; P = 0.025), but their course completion rates were higher and course abandonment rates were lower. Regarding postgraduate students, patients and non-patients had similar completion rates, but patients had greater incidence of discharge for poor performance and lower dropout rates. Despite the inclusion of socially vulnerable people with severe mental disorders, the group of patients had similar academic performance, and in some aspects better, than, that of non-patients.

  15. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Sex differences in stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haast, R.A.M.; Gustafson, D.R.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in

  17. The effects of early insulin treatment combined with thrombolysis in rat embolic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meden, Per; Andersen, Martin; Overgaard, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of insulin alone or insulin combined with 30 min delayed thrombolytic therapy was investigated in rats embolized in the right hemisphere with a fibrin clot made from autologous blood. Animals were killed seven days after embolization and the infarct volumes were measured...... in % of the affected hemisphere. Mortality was calculated as the number of animals dying spontaneously before the scheduled euthanasia. The median infarct volume in control animals (n = 12) was 24%. Insulin (3 IU kg(-1)) was given subcutaneously 15 min, 3 h, and 24 h after embolization (n = 12) and reduced median......% (n = 14). The infarct volumes in the treatment groups were not significantly different from controls (p = 0.62, Kruskal Wallis test). Mortality rates increased from 0% among controls to 47% (p = 0.01) in the insulin alone and 38% (p = 0.02) in the combination therapy group. In conclusion, insulin...

  18. Major Differences: Variations in Undergraduate and Graduate Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization across Academic Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Zhou, Sasha; Wagner, Blake, III; Beck, Katie; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores variations in mental health and service utilization across academic disciplines using a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students (N = 64,519) at 81 colleges and universities. We report prevalence of depression, anxiety, suicidality, and self-injury, and rates of help-seeking across disciplines, including results…

  19. Stroke in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients. New evidence for repeated screening and early treatment of pulmonary vascular malformations: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viader Fausto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paradoxical embolism due to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is the main mechanism of brain infarction in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. International Guidelines have recently been published to clarify the performance of screening tests and the effectiveness of treatment for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Case Presentation We present two cases of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients of our hospital who experienced an acute stroke secondary to paradoxical embolism. Conclusions These two cases show that the guidelines must be followed to prevent the occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and that although they may be adequate in most cases, there are some patients who need a more personalized approach.

  20. Progesterone attenuates hemorrhagic transformation after delayed tPA treatment in an experimental model of stroke in rats: involvement of the VEGF-MMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Soonmi; Lee, Jin Hwan; Wali, Bushra; Stein, Donald G; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only FDA-approved treatment for acute stroke, but its use remains limited. Progesterone (PROG) has shown neuroprotection in ischemia, but before clinical testing, we must determine how it affects hemorrhagic transformation in tPA-treated ischemic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion at 4.5 hours and tPA treatment at 4.5 hours, or PROG treatment intraperitoneally at 2 hours followed by subcutaneous injection at 6 hours post occlusion. Rats were killed at 24 hours and brains evaluated for cerebral hemorrhage, swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor level (VEGF), and tight junction (TJ) proteins. We also evaluated PROG's efficacy in preventing tPA-induced impairment of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and TJ proteins under hypoxia/reoxygenation in the endothelial cells. Delayed tPA treatment induced significant hemorrhagic conversion and brain swelling. Treatment with PROG plus tPA ameliorated hemorrhage, hemispheric swelling, BBB permeability, MMP-9 induction, and VEGF levels compared with controls. Progesterone treatment significantly prevented tPA-induced decrease in TEER and expression of occludin and claudin-5, and attenuated VEGF levels in culture media subjected to hypoxia. The study concluded that PROG may extend the time window for tPA administration in ischemic stroke and reduce hemorrhagic conversion.

  1. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  2. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Brott, Thomas G; Toni, Danilo; Grotta, James C; Albers, Gregory W; Kaste, Markku; Marler, John R; Hamilton, Scott A; Tilley, Barbara C; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Hacke, Werner; Allen, Kathryn; Mau, Jochen; Meier, Dieter; del Zoppo, Gregory; De Silva, D A; Butcher, K S; Parsons, M W; Barber, P A; Levi, C; Bladin, C; Byrnes, G

    2010-05-15

    Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to treatment with intravenous rt-PA (alteplase) on therapeutic benefit and clinical risk by adding recent trial data to the analysis. We added data from ECASS III (821 patients) and EPITHET (100 patients) to a pool of common data elements from six other trials of alteplase for acute stroke (2775 patients). We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the relation of stroke onset to start of treatment (OTT) with treatment on favourable 3-month outcome (defined as modified Rankin score 0-1), mortality, and occurrence and outcome of clinically relevant parenchymal haemorrhage. The presence of an arterial occlusion was inferred from the patient's symptoms and absence of haemorrhage or other causes of ischaemic stroke. Vascular imaging was not a requirement in the trials. All patients with confirmed OTT within 360 min were included in the analysis. Treatment was started within 360 min of stroke onset in 3670 patients randomly allocated to alteplase (n=1850) or to placebo (n=1820). Odds of a favourable 3-month outcome increased as OTT decreased (p=0.0269) and no benefit of alteplase treatment was seen after around 270 min. Adjusted odds of a favourable 3-month outcome were 2.55 (95% CI 1.44-4.52) for 0-90 min, 1.64 (1.12-2.40) for 91-180 min, 1.34 (1.06-1.68) for 181-270 min, and 1.22 (0.92-1.61) for 271-360 min in favour of the alteplase group. Large parenchymal haemorrhage was seen in 96 (5.2%) of 1850 patients assigned to alteplase and 18 (1.0%) of 1820 controls, with no clear relation to OTT (p=0.4140). Adjusted odds of mortality increased with OTT (p=0.0444) and were 0.78 (0.41-1.48) for 0-90 min, 1.13 (0.70-1.82) for 91-180 min, 1.22 (0.87-1.71) for 181-270 min, and 1.49 (1.00-2.21) for

  3. Analysis of Workflow and Time to Treatment and the Effects on Outcome in Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results from the SWIFT PRIME Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Mayank; Jadhav, Ashutosh P; Bonafe, Alain; Diener, Hans; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Levy, Elad; Baxter, Blaise; Jovin, Tudor; Jahan, Reza; Menon, Bijoy K; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To study the relationship between functional independence and time to reperfusion in the Solitaire with the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke (SWIFT PRIME) trial in patients with disabling acute ischemic stroke who underwent endovascular therapy plus intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration versus tPA administration alone and to investigate variables that affect time spent during discrete steps. Materials and Methods Data were analyzed from the SWIFT PRIME trial, a global, multicenter, prospective study in which outcomes were compared in patients treated with intravenous tPA alone or in combination with the Solitaire device (Covidien, Irvine, Calif). Between December 2012 and November 2014, 196 patients were enrolled. The relation between time from (a) symptom onset to reperfusion and (b) imaging to reperfusion and clinical outcome was analyzed, along with patient and health system characteristics that affect discrete steps in patient workflow. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess relationships between time and outcome; negative binomial regression was used to evaluate effects on workflow. The institutional review board at each site approved the trial. Patients provided written informed consent, or, at select sites, there was an exception from having to acquire explicit informed consent in emergency circumstances. Results In the stent retriever arm of the study, symptom onset to reperfusion time of 150 minutes led to 91% estimated probability of functional independence, which decreased by 10% over the next hour and by 20% with every subsequent hour of delay. Time from arrival at the emergency department to arterial access was 90 minutes (interquartile range, 69-120 minutes), and time to reperfusion was 129 minutes (interquartile range, 108-169 minutes). Patients who initially arrived at a referring facility had longer symptom onset to groin puncture times compared with

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  5. Acupuncture for acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mangmang; Li, Dan; Zhang, Shihong

    2018-03-30

    Sensory stimulation via acupuncture has been reported to alter activities of numerous neural systems by activating multiple efferent pathways. Acupuncture, one of the main physical therapies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been widely used to treat patients with stroke for over hundreds of years. This is the first update of the Cochrane Review originally published in 2005. To assess whether acupuncture could reduce the proportion of people with death or dependency, while improving quality of life, after acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group trials register (last searched on February 2, 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Ovid (CENTRAL Ovid; 2017, Issue 2) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to February 2017), Embase Ovid (1974 to February 2017), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) EBSCO (1982 to February 2017), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED; 1985 to February 2017), China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (1998 to February 2017), and the VIP database (VIP Chinese Science Journal Evaluation Reports; 1989 to February 2017). We also identified relevant trials in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (last searched on Feburuary 20, 2017), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (last searched on April 30, 2017), and Clinicaltrials.gov (last searched on April 30, 2017). In addition, we handsearched the reference lists of systematic reviews and relevant clinical trials. We sought randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture started within 30 days from stroke onset compared with placebo or sham acupuncture or open control (no placebo) in people with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, or both. Needling into the skin was required for acupuncture. Comparisons were made versus (1) all controls (open control or sham acupuncture), and (2) sham acupuncture controls. Two review authors applied

  6. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakawah MO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Obadah Nakawah, Eugene C Lai Stanely H. Appel Department of Neurology, Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months. Keywords: vascular dyskinesia, stroke, movement disorders

  7. WARFARIN IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOEMBOLIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Dankovtseva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the current literature data on the use of warfarin in patients with cardioembolic stroke is presented. Cardioembolic stroke pathology and particularities of this condition therapywith antithrombotic medications are shown in details. Possibility to apply thrombolysis during warfarin treatment and the use of anticoagulants after cardioembolic stroke is discussed.

  8. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  9. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  10. Comparison study of the curative effect between interventional ultrasound and microwave in the treatment of post-stroke shoulder-hand syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang LI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of interventional ultrasound and microwave in the treatment of post-stroke shoulder-hand syndrome (SHS.  Methods A total of 42 cases of post-stroke SHS (stage Ⅰ were randomized to receive microwave combined with routine rehabilitation training (control group, N = 19 and interventional ultrasound combined with routine rehabilitation training (treatment group, N = 23, respectively. Before and 3 d, 10 d after treatment, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate shoulder joint pain, and measure the swelling degree of dorsum of hand and metacarpophalangeal joints. Before and 10 d after treatment, Fugl - Meyer Assessment Scale for Upper Extremity (FMA-UE and Barthel Index (BI were used to assess upper limb motor function and activities of daily living (ADL.  Results There was statistically significant difference between 2 groups at different time points on VAS score (P = 0.000 and swelling degree of dorsum of hand and metacarpophalangeal joints (P = 0.000. VAS score (control group: P = 0.000, 0.000; treatment group: P = 0.000, 0.000 and swelling degree of dorsum of hand and metacarpophalangeal joints (control group: P = 0.042, 0.000; treatment group: P = 0.000, 0.000 at 3 and 10 d after treatment were significantly lower than before treatment. VAS score (P = 0.000, 0.000 and swelling degree of dorsum of hand and metacarpophalangeal joints (P = 0.000, 0.000 10 d after treatment were significantly lower than 3 d after treatment. Compared with before treatment, both VAS score (P = 0.031 and swelling degree of dorsum of hand and metacarpophalangeal joints (P = 0.000 in 2 groups were significantly lower, while FMA-UE (P = 0.000 and BI (P = 0.000 scores were significantly higher after treatment.  Conclusions Both interventional ultrasound and microwave combined with routine rehabilitation training can improve shoulder joint pain, swelling degree of dorsum of hand and metacarpophalangeal joints

  11. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  13. Long-term safety of repeated high doses of incobotulinumtoxinA injections for the treatment of upper and lower limb spasticity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Panza, Francesco; Intiso, Domenico; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Smania, Nicola; Fortunato, Francesca; Seripa, Davide; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2017-07-15

    Current guidelines suggested a dosage up to 600units (U) of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) (onabotulinumtoxinA or incobotulinumtoxinA) in reducing spastic hypertonia with low prevalence of complications, although a growing body of evidence showed efficacy with the use of high doses (>800U). The available evidence mainly referred to a single set of injections evaluating the efficacy and safety of the neurotoxin 30days after the treatment. In a prospective, non-randomized, open-label study, we studied the safety of repeated higher doses of incobotulinumtoxinA in post-stroke upper and lower limb spasticity. Two years after the first set of injections, we evaluated in 20 stroke survivors with upper and lower limb spasticity the long-term safety of repeated high doses of incobotulinumtoxinA (up to 840U) for a total of eight sets of injections. Patients reported an improvement of their clinical picture concerning a reduction of spasticity measured with the Asworth Scale (AS) for elbow, wrist, fingers and ankle flexor muscles and disability measured with the Disability Assessment Scale (DAS) 30days after the last set of injections (eighth set) compared to the baseline (pspasticity after stroke without general adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. MRI versus CT-based thrombolysis treatment within and beyond the 3 h time window after stroke onset: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhrmann, Martin; Jüttler, Eric; Fiebach, Jochen B; Huttner, Hagen B; Siebert, Stefan; Schwark, Christian; Ringleb, Peter A; Schellinger, Peter D; Hacke, Werner

    2006-08-01

    Thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is approved for use within 3 h after stroke onset. Thus only a small percentage of patients can benefit. Meta-analyses and more recent studies suggest a benefit for a subset of patients beyond 3 h. We assessed the safety and efficacy of an MRI-based selection protocol for stroke treatment within and beyond 3 h compared with standard CT-based treatment. We assessed clinical outcome and incidence of symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in 400 consecutive patients treated with intravenous rtPA. Patients eligible for thrombolysis within 3 h were selected by CT or MRI and beyond 3 h only by MRI. 18 patients were excluded from analysis because of violation of that algorithm. The remaining 382 patients were divided into three groups: CT-based treatment within 3 h (n=209); MRI-based treatment within 3 h (n=103); and MRI-based treatment beyond 3 h (n=70). Patients in group 3 (MRI > 3 h) had a similar 90 day outcome to those in the other two groups (48% were independent in the CT < or = 3 h group, 51% in the MRI < or = 3 h group, and 56% in group 3), but without an increased risk for symptomatic ICH (9%, 1%, 6%) or mortality (21%, 13%, 11%). MRI-selected patients overall had a significantly lower risk than CT-selected patients for symptomatic ICH (3% vs 9%; p=0.013) and mortality (12% vs 21%; p=0.021). Time to treatment did not affect outcomes in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our data suggest that beyond 3 h and maybe even within 3 h, patient selection is more important than time to treatment for a good outcome. Furthermore, MRI-based thrombolysis, irrespective of the time window, shows an improved safety profile while being at least as effective as standard CT-based treatment within 3 h.

  15. Suprascapular nerve block for the treatment of hemiplegic shoulder pain in patients with long-term chronic stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Bonazza, Sara; Lobba, Davide; Parolini, Massimo; Martini, Alvise; Chemello, Elena; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Polati, Enrico; Smania, Nicola; Schweiger, Vittorio

    2017-09-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain is the most common pain condition after stroke. Suprascapular nerve block is an effective treatment for shoulder pain. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of suprascapular nerve block on pain intensity, spasticity, shoulder passive range of motion, and quality of life in long-term chronic stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain. Ten chronic stroke patients (over 2 years from onset) with hemiplegic shoulder pain graded ≥30 mm on the Visual Analogue Scale underwent suprascapular nerve block injection with 1 mL of 40 mg/mL methylprednisolone and 10 mL 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride. Main outcome was the Visual Analogue Scale evaluated before and after nerve block at 1 h, 1 week, and 1 month. Secondary outcomes were the modified Ashworth scale and the shoulder elevation, abduction, and external rotation passive range of motion evaluated before the nerve block and after 1 h as well as the American Chronic Pain Association Quality of Life Scale evaluated before and after nerve block at 1 month. The Visual Analogue Scale significantly improved after nerve block at 1 h (P = 0.005) and 1 week (P = 0.011). Significant improvements were found at 1 h after nerve block in the modified Ashworth scale (P = 0.014) and the passive range of motion of shoulder abduction (P = 0.026), flexion (P = 0.007), and external rotation (P = 0.017). The American Chronic Pain Association Quality of Life Scale significantly improved at 1 month after nerve block (P = 0.046). Our findings support the use of suprascapular nerve block for treating hemiplegic shoulder pain in long-term chronic stroke patients.

  16. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  17. Short-term effect of local muscle vibration treatment versus sham therapy on upper limb in chronic post-stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Cosimo; Galuppo, Laura; Romiti, Davide

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, local muscle vibration received considerable attention as a useful method for muscle stimulation in clinical therapy. Some studies described specific vibration training protocol, and few of them were conducted on post-stroke patients. Therefore there is a general uncertainty regarding the vibrations protocol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of local muscle high frequency mechano-acoustic vibratory treatment on grip muscle strength, muscle tonus, disability and pain in post-stroke individuals with upper limb spasticity. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Outpatient rehabilitation center. Thirty-two chronic poststroke patients with upper-limb spasticity: 21 males, 11 females, mean age 61.59 years ±15.50, time passed from stroke 37.78±17.72 months. The protocol treatment consisted of the application of local muscle vibration, set to a frequency of 300 Hz, for 30 minutes 3 times per week, for 12 sessions, applied to the skin covering the venter of triceps brachii and extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles during voluntary isometric contraction. All participants were randomized in two groups: group A treated with vibration protocol; group B with sham therapy. All participants were evaluated before and after 4-week treatment with Hand Grip Strength Test, Modified Ashworth Scale, QuickDASH score, FIM scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test and Verbal Numerical Rating Scale of pain. Outcomes between groups was compared using a repeated-measures ANOVA. Over 4 weeks, the values recorded in group A when compared to group B demonstrated statistically significant improvement in grip muscle strength, pain and quality of life and decrease of spasticity; P-values were <0.05 in all tested parameters. Rehabilitation treatment with local muscle high frequency (300 Hz) vibration for 30 minutes, 3 times a week for 4 weeks, could significantly improve muscle strength and decrease muscle tonus, disability and

  18. Assessment and Treatment of Short-Term and Working Memory Impairments in Stroke Aphasia: A Practical Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, Christos; Kelly, Helen; Code, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aphasia following stroke refers to impairments that affect the comprehension and expression of spoken and/or written language, and co-occurring cognitive deficits are common. In this paper we focus on short-term and working memory impairments that impact on the ability to retain and manipulate auditory-verbal information. Evidence from…

  19. Factors influencing outcome in acute ischaemic stroke : outcome scales, the role of blood glucose and rtPA treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects that influence outcome in acute ischaemic strok. In the first part, two frequently used outcome scales - the Barthel index and modified Rankin scale - are studied and for both scales, optimal endpoints for stroke trials are proposed. In the second part, the

  20. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  1. Stroke as a late treatment effect of Hodgkin's disease : A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, DC; McNeil, DE; Liu, Y; Yasui, Y; Stovall, M; Gurney, JG; Hudson, MM; Donaldson, SS; Packer, RJ; Mitby, PA; Kasper, CE; Robison, LL; Oeffinger, KC

    2005-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this report are to examine the incidence of and risk factors for stroke among childhood Hodgkin's disease (HD) survivors. Patients and Methods The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional cohort study of more than 5-year cancer survivors diagnosed between

  2. The current status of prevention and treatment of exertional heat stroke at home and abroad: from the scene to the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-qiang LUO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Exertional heat stroke (EHS is an emergency with a high mortality rate, characterized by acute onset and identification difficulties. EHS prevention focuses on evaluating the environment by professionals, making preventive measures in advance, identifying internal and external risk factors for the onset of disease, carrying out prior heat adaptation and endurance training, monitoring the status of high risk persons in real time. After occurrence of EHS, the key to success treatment is on-site accurate identification and diagnosis and rapid implementation of effective cooling measures, thus winning time of EHS patients transferred to the hospital for the treatment. This article reviews the current status of EHS prevention and treatment in domestic and foreign from the scene to the hospital. Summarizing the recognition, diagnosis, cooling measures, treatment concepts and principles of EHS, we hope to provide a reference for the rescue of EHS in hospital and outside. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.08.15

  3. The association between high on-treatment platelet reactivity and early recurrence of ischemic events after minor stroke or TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zilong; Zheng, Huaguang; Wang, Fei; Wang, Anxin; Liu, Liping; Dong, Kehui; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yilong; Cao, Yibin

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of HTPR in predicting early recurrence of ischemic events in patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. From January 2014 to September 2014, a single center continuously enrolled patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA and gave them antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin with clopidogrel. HTPR was assessed by TEG after 7 days of antiplatelet therapy and detected CYP2C19 genotype. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was assessed 3 months after onset. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was compared between the HTPR and NTPR groups with the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic events. We enrolled 278 eligible patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. Through TEG testing, patients with HTPR were 22.7%, and carriers were not associated with HTPR to ADP by TEG-ADP(%) (p = 0.193). A total of 265 patients completed 3 months of follow-up, and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with HTPR had a higher percentage of recurrent ischemic events compared with patients with NTPR (p = 0.002). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, history of ischemic stroke or TIA (HR 4.45, 95% CI 1.77-11.16, p = 0.001) and HTPR (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.41-7.91, p = 0.006) was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events. In patients with minor stroke or TIA, the prevalence of HTPR was 22.7%, and HTPR was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events.

  4. Differentiating intraparenchymal hemorrhage from contrast extravasation on post-procedural noncontrast CT scan in acute ischemic stroke patients undergoing endovascular treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Khan, Shayaan M.; Khan, Mahnoor; Majidi, Shahram; Pawar, Swaroop; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the imaging characteristics that can help differentiate intraparenchymal hemorrhage from benign contrast extravasation on post-procedural noncontrast CT scan in acute ischemic stroke patients after endovascular treatment. We reviewed the clinical and imaging records of all acute ischemic stroke patients who underwent endovascular treatment in two hospitals over a 3.5-year period. The immediate post-procedural CT scan was evaluated for the presence of hyperdense lesion(s). The average attenuation of the lesion(s) was measured. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage was defined as a persistent hyperdensity visualized on follow-up CT scan, 24 h or greater after the procedure. Of the 135 patients studied, 74 (55 %) patients had hyperdense lesion(s) on immediate post-procedural CT scan. Follow-up scans confirmed the diagnosis of intraparenchymal hemorrhage in 20 of these 74 patients. A receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the average attenuation of the most hyperdense lesion can differentiate intraparenchymal hemorrhage from contrast extravasation with an area under the curve of 0.78 (p = 0.001). An average attenuation of <50 Hounsfield units (HU) in the most visually hyperattenuating hyperdense lesion had 100 % specificity and 56 % sensitivity for identification of contrast extravasations. Petechial hyperdensity was seen in 46/54 (85 %) patients with contrast extravasation versus 9/20 (45 %) patients with intraparenchymal hemorrhage on the immediate post-procedural CT scan (p < 0.001). An average attenuation <50 HU of the most hyperattenuating hyperdense parenchymal lesion on immediate post-procedural CT scan was very specific for differentiating contrast extravasation from intraparenchymal hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke patients after endovascular treatment. (orig.)

  5. Differentiating intraparenchymal hemorrhage from contrast extravasation on post-procedural noncontrast CT scan in acute ischemic stroke patients undergoing endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payabvash, Seyedmehdi [Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute, Minneapolis, MN (United States); University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Khan, Shayaan M.; Khan, Mahnoor; Majidi, Shahram; Pawar, Swaroop; Qureshi, Adnan I. [Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This study aimed to identify the imaging characteristics that can help differentiate intraparenchymal hemorrhage from benign contrast extravasation on post-procedural noncontrast CT scan in acute ischemic stroke patients after endovascular treatment. We reviewed the clinical and imaging records of all acute ischemic stroke patients who underwent endovascular treatment in two hospitals over a 3.5-year period. The immediate post-procedural CT scan was evaluated for the presence of hyperdense lesion(s). The average attenuation of the lesion(s) was measured. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage was defined as a persistent hyperdensity visualized on follow-up CT scan, 24 h or greater after the procedure. Of the 135 patients studied, 74 (55 %) patients had hyperdense lesion(s) on immediate post-procedural CT scan. Follow-up scans confirmed the diagnosis of intraparenchymal hemorrhage in 20 of these 74 patients. A receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the average attenuation of the most hyperdense lesion can differentiate intraparenchymal hemorrhage from contrast extravasation with an area under the curve of 0.78 (p = 0.001). An average attenuation of <50 Hounsfield units (HU) in the most visually hyperattenuating hyperdense lesion had 100 % specificity and 56 % sensitivity for identification of contrast extravasations. Petechial hyperdensity was seen in 46/54 (85 %) patients with contrast extravasation versus 9/20 (45 %) patients with intraparenchymal hemorrhage on the immediate post-procedural CT scan (p < 0.001). An average attenuation <50 HU of the most hyperattenuating hyperdense parenchymal lesion on immediate post-procedural CT scan was very specific for differentiating contrast extravasation from intraparenchymal hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke patients after endovascular treatment. (orig.)

  6. Pathophysiology and Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke – A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability, including ischemic stroke, which accounts for 85 - 87 % of cases. Currently, there are few treatment options available for minimizing tissue death following a stroke. Emerging data suggest that biomarkers may help improve current clinical outcome of stroke. As such ...

  7. Understanding clinicians' decisions to offer intravenous thrombolytic treatment to patients with acute ischaemic stroke: a protocol for a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brún, Aoife; Flynn, Darren; Joyce, Kerry; Ternent, Laura; Price, Christopher; Rodgers, Helen; Ford, Gary A; Lancsar, Emily; Rudd, Matthew; Thomson, Richard G

    2014-07-09

    Intravenous thrombolysis is an effective emergency treatment for acute ischaemic stroke for patients meeting specific criteria. Approximately 12% of eligible patients in England, Wales and Northern Ireland received thrombolysis in the first quarter of 2013, yet as many as 15% are eligible to receive treatment. Suboptimal use of thrombolysis may have been largely attributable to structural factors; however, with the widespread implementation of 24/7 hyper acute stroke services, continuing variation is likely to reflect differences in clinical decision-making, in particular the influence of ambiguous areas within the guidelines, licensing criteria and research evidence. Clinicians' perceptions about thrombolysis may now exert a greater influence on treatment rates than structural/service factors. This research seeks to elucidate factors influencing thrombolysis decision-making by using patient vignettes to identify (1) patient-related and clinician-related factors that may help to explain variation in treatment and (2) associated trade-offs in decision-making based on the interplay of critical factors. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) will be conducted to better understand how clinicians make decisions about whether or not to offer thrombolysis to patients with acute ischaemic stroke. To inform the design, exploratory work will be undertaken to ensure that (1) all potentially influential factors are considered for inclusion; and (2) to gain insights into the 'grey areas' of patient factors. A fractional factorial design will be used to combine levels of patient factors in vignettes, which will be presented to clinicians to allow estimation of the variable effects on decisions to offer thrombolysis. Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Newcastle University Research Ethics Committee. The results will be disseminated in peer review publications and at national conferences. Findings will be translated into continuing professional development activities

  8. The ThRombolysis in UnconTrolled Hypertension (TRUTH) protocol: an observational study on treatment strategy of elevated blood pressure in stroke patients eligible for IVT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, T P; Algra, A; Dippel, D W J; Kappelle, L J; van Oostenbrugge, R J; Roos, Y B W E M; Wermer, M J; van der Worp, H B; Nederkoorn, P J; Kruyt, N D

    2015-11-23

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with (recombinant) tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment in acute ischemic stroke. However, IVT is contraindicated when blood pressure is above 185/110 mmHg, because of an increased risk on symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. In current Dutch clinical practice, two distinct strategies are used in this situation. The active strategy comprises lowering blood pressure with antihypertensive agents below these thresholds to allow start of IVT. In the conservative strategy, IVT is administered only when blood pressure drops spontaneously below protocolled thresholds. A retrospective analysis in two recent stroke trials showed a non-significant signal towards better functional outcome in the active group; robust evidence for either strategy, however, is lacking. We hypothesize that (I) the active strategy leads to a better functional outcome three months after acute ischemic stroke. Secondary hypotheses are that this effect occurs despite (II) increasing the number of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhages, and could be attributable to (III) a higher rate of IVT treatments and (IV) a shorter door-to-needle time. The TRUTH is a prospective, observational, cluster-based, parallel group follow-up study; in which participating centers continue their current local treatment guidelines. Outcomes of patients admitted to centers with an active will be compared to those admitted to centers with a conservative strategy. The primary outcome is functional outcome on the modified Rankin Scale at three months. Secondary outcomes are symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, IVT treatment and door-to-needle time. We based our sample size estimate on an ordinal analysis of the mRS with the "proportional odds" model. With the aforementioned signal observed in a recent retrospective study in these patients as an estimate of the effect size and with alpha 0 · 05, this analysis would have an 80 % power with a total number of 600 patients

  9. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... much better chance for a complete recovery. Effective treatment is available for strokes caused by a blood ... And the blood starts flowing again." Announcer: New treatments can limit the disability caused by a stroke, ...

  10. REDUCTION DEGREE OF LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS CHOLESTEROL LEVELS ACCORDING TO DIFFERENT DOSES OF STATINS; ITS EFFECT ON THE RISK OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE ACUTE EPISODES DEPENDING ON TREATMENT DURATION; AND RISK OF ISCHEMIC AND THROMBOEMBOLIC STROKE. COMMENT ON THE PAPER OF LAW M.R., WALD N.J., RUDNICKA A.R. QUANTIFYING EFFECT OF STATINS ON LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL, ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE, AND STROKE: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. BMJ 2003; 326:1423-1427

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Perova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative dose-dependent ability of different statins to lower serum low-density lipoproteins (LDL cholesterol was determined in three large meta-analysis. Besides, it was found that standardized decrease in LDL cholesterol levels on 1.0 or 1.8 mmol/l leads to rate reduction in ischemic heart disease acute episodes as well as stroke depending on treatment duration. Effect of LDL cholesterol reduction on stroke occurrence was more significant in studies, which included a major share of patients with vascular disease, because these patients have a higher risk of thromboembolic stroke (rather than haemorrhagic stroke in comparison with the general population.

  11. Rehabilitation of the Upper Extremity after Stroke: Current Practice As a Guide for Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylene Schriner PhD, OTR/L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States and a top diagnosis for occupational therapy (OT services among neurological conditions. Academic programs teach OT students neurological frames of reference (FORs to provide a foundation for future practice. To meet accreditation standards, entry-level curricula must reflect current practice and evidence-based interventions. A survey of OT practitioners working in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation was conducted to investigate current clinical practice in a variety of treatment settings. Survey questions probed the use of motor rehabilitation techniques exclusive to one of six neurological FORs: Brunnstrom, Constraint-induced Movement Therapy, Neurodevelopmental Treatment, Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation, Rood, and Task-Oriented. Responses from 167 OT professionals indicated interventions representing all six FORs are currently being utilized in stroke rehabilitation. Techniques from the Task-Oriented and Neurodevelopmental Treatment approaches were used most frequently; however, the Rood–based techniques were used much less than interventions from the other FORs. No single neurological approach was found to dominate practice regardless of the number of years of experience in stroke rehabilitation or years since graduation from an entry-level program. A majority of participants appear to employ techniques from multiple approaches frequently, suggesting contemporary OT practice in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation is eclectic in nature.

  12. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  13. Interhospital Transfer Before Thrombectomy Is Associated With Delayed Treatment and Worse Outcome in the STRATIS Registry (Systematic Evaluation of Patients Treated With Neurothrombectomy Devices for Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehler, Michael T; Saver, Jeffrey L; Zaidat, Osama O; Jahan, Reza; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Klucznik, Richard P; Haussen, Diogo C; Hellinger, Frank R; Yavagal, Dileep R; Yao, Tom L; Liebeskind, David S; Jadhav, Ashutosh P; Gupta, Rishi; Hassan, Ameer E; Martin, Coleman O; Bozorgchami, Hormozd; Kaushal, Ritesh; Nogueira, Raul G; Gandhi, Ravi H; Peterson, Eric C; Dashti, Shervin R; Given, Curtis A; Mehta, Brijesh P; Deshmukh, Vivek; Starkman, Sidney; Linfante, Italo; McPherson, Scott H; Kvamme, Peter; Grobelny, Thomas J; Hussain, Muhammad S; Thacker, Ike; Vora, Nirav; Chen, Peng Roc; Monteith, Stephen J; Ecker, Robert D; Schirmer, Clemens M; Sauvageau, Eric; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Derdeyn, Colin P; Maidan, Lucian; Badruddin, Aamir; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Dumont, Travis M; Alhajeri, Abdulnasser; Taqi, M Asif; Asi, Khaled; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Boulos, Alan; Jindal, Gaurav; Puri, Ajit S; Chitale, Rohan; Deshaies, Eric M; Robinson, David H; Kallmes, David F; Baxter, Blaise W; Jumaa, Mouhammad A; Sunenshine, Peter; Majjhoo, Aniel; English, Joey D; Suzuki, Shuichi; Fessler, Richard D; Delgado Almandoz, Josser E; Martin, Jerry C; Mueller-Kronast, Nils H

    2017-12-12

    Endovascular treatment with mechanical thrombectomy (MT) is beneficial for patients with acute stroke suffering a large-vessel occlusion, although treatment efficacy is highly time-dependent. We hypothesized that interhospital transfer to endovascular-capable centers would result in treatment delays and worse clinical outcomes compared with direct presentation. STRATIS (Systematic Evaluation of Patients Treated With Neurothrombectomy Devices for Acute Ischemic Stroke) was a prospective, multicenter, observational, single-arm study of real-world MT for acute stroke because of anterior-circulation large-vessel occlusion performed at 55 sites over 2 years, including 1000 patients with severe stroke and treated within 8 hours. Patients underwent MT with or without intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and were admitted to endovascular-capable centers via either interhospital transfer or direct presentation. The primary clinical outcome was functional independence (modified Rankin Score 0-2) at 90 days. We assessed (1) real-world time metrics of stroke care delivery, (2) outcome differences between direct and transfer patients undergoing MT, and (3) the potential impact of local hospital bypass. A total of 984 patients were analyzed. Median onset-to-revascularization time was 202.0 minutes for direct versus 311.5 minutes for transfer patients ( P <0.001). Clinical outcomes were better in the direct group, with 60.0% (299/498) achieving functional independence compared with 52.2% (213/408) in the transfer group (odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.79; P =0.02). Likewise, excellent outcome (modified Rankin Score 0-1) was achieved in 47.4% (236/498) of direct patients versus 38.0% (155/408) of transfer patients (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.92; P =0.005). Mortality did not differ between the 2 groups (15.1% for direct, 13.7% for transfer; P =0.55). Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator did not impact outcomes. Hypothetical bypass

  14. Depressive symptoms following stroke and transient ischemic attack: is it time for a more intensive treatment approach? results from the TABASCO cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tene, Oren; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Korczyn, Amos D; Kliper, Efrat; Hallevi, Hen; Shopin, Ludmila; Auriel, Eitan; Mike, Anat; Bornstein, Natan M; Assayag, Einor Ben

    2016-05-01

    To examine whether depressive symptoms after a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA) increase the risk of cognitive impairment and functional deterioration at 2-year follow-up. Participants were survivors of first-ever, mild-to-moderate ischemic stroke or TIA from the TABASCO prospective cohort study who underwent 3T magnetic resonance imaging and were examined by a multiprofessional team 6, 12, and 24 months after the event using direct interviews, depression scales, and neurologic, neuropsychological, and functional evaluations. The main outcome was the development of cognitive impairment, either mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. MCI was diagnosed by a decline on at least 1 cognitive domain (≥ 1.5 SD) of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment score and/or on the computerized neuropsychological battery, as compared with age- and education-matched published norms. Dementia was diagnosed by a consensus forum that included senior neurologists specializing in memory disorders and a neuropsychologist. Data were obtained from 306 consecutive eligible patients (mean age: 67.1 ± 10.0 years) who were admitted to the department of emergency medicine at the Tel Aviv Medical Center from April 1, 2008, to December 1, 2011, within 72 hours from onset of symptoms of TIA or stroke. Of these patients, 51 (16.7%) developed cognitive impairment during a 2-year follow-up. Multivariate regression analysis showed that a Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) score ≥ 6 at admission and at 6 months after the event was a significant independent marker of cognitive impairment 2 years after the stroke/TIA (OR = 3.62, 95% CI, 1.01-13.00; OR = 3.68, 95% CI, 1.03-13.21, respectively). A higher GDS score at 6 months was also related to a worse functional outcome (P depression screening among stroke and TIA survivors as a tool to identify patients who are prone to have a worse cognitive and functional outcome. These patients may benefit from closer medical surveillance and a more

  15. Selection of Patients and Anesthetic Types for Endovascular Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fubing Ouyang

    Full Text Available and Purpose Recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated consistent effectiveness of endovascular treatment (EVT for acute ischemic stroke, leading to update on stroke management guidelines. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of EVT overall and in subgroups stratified by age, baseline stroke severity, brain imaging feature, and anesthetic type.Published randomized controlled trials comparing EVT and standard medical care alone were evaluated. The measured outcomes were 90-day functional independence (modified Rankin Scale ≤2, all-cause mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage.Nine trials enrolling 2476 patients were included (1338 EVT, 1138 standard medical care alone. For patients with large vessel occlusions confirmed by noninvasive vessel imaging, EVT yielded improved functional outcome (pooled odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-2.50, lower mortality (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97, and similar symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.72-1.76 compared with standard medical care. A higher proportion of functional independence was seen in patients with terminus intracranial artery occlusion (±M1 (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.64-6.06, baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score of 8-10 (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.25-3.57 and age ≤70 years (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.73-5.24. EVT performed under conscious sedation had better functional outcomes (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.47-2.96 without increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or short-term mortality compared with general anesthesia.Vessel-imaging proven large vessel occlusion, a favorable scan, and younger age are useful predictors to identify anterior circulation stroke patients who may benefit from EVT. Conscious sedation is feasible and safe in EVT based on available data. However, firm conclusion on the choice of anesthetic types should be drawn from more appropriate randomized controlled trials.

  16. EuroHYP-1: European multicenter, randomized, phase III clinical trial of therapeutic hypothermia plus best medical treatment vs. best medical treatment alone for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, H Bart; Macleod, Malcolm R; Bath, Philip M W; Demotes, Jacques; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Gebhardt, Bernd; Gluud, Christian; Kollmar, Rainer; Krieger, Derk W; Lees, Kennedy R; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Roine, Risto O; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Szabo, Istvan; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Schwab, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Cooling reduced infarct size and improved neurological outcomes in animal studies modeling ischemic stroke, and also improved outcome in randomized clinical trials in patients with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury after cardiac arrest. Cooling awake patients with ischemic stroke has been shown feasible in phase II clinical trials. To determine whether systemic cooling to a target body temperature between 34·0 and 35·0°C, started within six-hours of symptom onset and maintained for 24 h, improves functional outcome at three-months in patients with acute ischemic stroke. International, multicenter, phase III, randomized, open-label clinical trial with blinded outcome assessment in 1500 patients aged 18 years or older with acute ischemic stroke and a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 6 up to and including 18. In patients randomized to hypothermia, cooling to a target body temperature of 34-35°C will be started within six-hours after symptom onset with rapid intravenous infusion of refrigerated normal saline or a surface cooling technique and maintained for 24 h with a surface or endovascular technique. Patients randomized to hypothermia will receive pethidine and buspirone to prevent shivering and discomfort. Score on the modified Rankin Scale at 91 days, as analyzed with ordinal logistic regression and expressed as a common odds ratio. With 750 patients per intervention group, this trial has 90% power to detect 7% absolute improvement at the 5% significance level. The full trial protocol is available at http://www.eurohyp1.eu. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01833312. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  18. Understanding academic clinicians' varying attitudes toward the treatment of childhood obesity in Canada: a descriptive qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Karen; Pemberton, Julia; Frankfurter, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    This qualitative study aims to understand academic physicians' attitudes towards the treatment of pediatric obesity in Canada. A stratified sample of 24 participants (surgeons, pediatricians, family practitioners) were recruited from 4 Canadian regions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and transcribed. A codebook was developed through iterative data reduction and conceptual saturation ensured. Validity was ensured through triangulation, audit trail, and member-checking. This study revealed 45 themes with regional, specialty, and experiential differences. Quebec and Ontario emphasized education of physicians and parents to improve treatment and favored surgical intervention. Half of surgeons felt surgery was the only successful treatment option, while non-surgeons favored behavioral interventions. Experienced physicians in Western Canada desired more evidence to improve patient care, while inexperienced physicians focused on early detection and home environments. Across Canada participants advocated for program development and system change. Respondents expressed family involvement as integral to treatment success and shifting away from blame and moving towards a healthy lifestyles approach. Canadian regional differences in physicians' attitudes towards pediatric obesity treatment exist, influenced by experience and specialty. We will understand how themes identified in this study influence real life clinical decision making by applying these results to create a discrete choice-based conjoint survey. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Impact on the gait time cycle of ischemic stroke in the treatment with yin-yang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Tian, Fu-Ling; Liu, Guo-Rong; Zheng, De-Song; Chen, Jin-Ming; Ma, Shu-Riang; Cui, Jian-Mei; Wang, Hong-Bin; Li, Xue-Qing

    2014-03-01

    To compare the difference in the efficacy on gait time cycle of ischemic stroke between yin-yang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique (yin-yang needling) and the conventional acupuncture. Sixty cases of ischemic stroke were randomized into a conventional acupuncture group and a yin-yang needling group, 30 cases in each one. The basic treatment (the control of blood pressure, blood sugar and blood lipid, the intravenous drops of ginkgo leaf extract and dipyridamole injection and vinpocetine injection) were applied in the two groups. Additionally, in the conventional acupuncture group, the acupoints of the Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming [Biguan (ST 31), Liangqiu (ST 34), Zusanli (ST 36), Shangjuxu (ST 37), Xiajuxu (ST 39), etc.] were selected and stimulated with the even needling technique. In the yin-yang needling group, the acupoints of yin meridians such as Zuwuli (LR 10), Xuehai (SP 10), Yinlingquan (SP 9) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6), etc. and the acupoints of yang meridians such as Biguan (ST 31), Liangqiu (ST 34) and Yanglingquan (GB 34), etc. were selected. The reducing manipulation of respiratory reinforcing and reducing technique was applied to the acupoints of yin meridians and the reinforcing manipulation was applied to the acupoints of yang meridians. The kinematics time parameters were determined and compared before and 4 weeks after treatment. After treatment, the differences in the gait cycle, the phase time of standing (%), the phase time of single support (%), the phase time of unilateral sway (%) on the affected (healthy) foot and phase time of double support (%) were significant as compared with those before treatment in the patients of the two groups (all P yin-yang needling group were improved much obviously after treatment as compared with those in the conventional acupuncture group. The differences in support phase time (%), single support phase time (%) and sway phase time (%) were significant between the affected limb and

  20. Identification of stroke mimics among clinically diagnosed acute strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiyatorn, Lojana; Saksornchai, Pichaya; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch

    2013-09-01

    Stroke is a clinically syndrome of a sudden onset of neurological deficit in a vascular cause. Stroke mimics is the non-vascular disorders with stroke-like clinical symptoms. It is important to distinguish true stroke from mimics since treatment plan may differ To determine the incidence of the stroke mimics and identify their etiologies. All non-contrast head CT of the patients with clinically diagnosed stroke who immediately received imaging upon arrival at the emergency department of the university hospital were retrospectively reviewed in 12-month period between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Medical records, laboratory results, MRI, and 6-month clinical follow-up records were reviewed for final diagnosis. Seven hundred four patients were included in this study, including 363 (51.5%) men and 341 (48.5%) women with range in age from 24 to 108 years. Amongst those, 417 (59.2%) were ischemic stroke, 80 (11.40%) were hemorrhagic stroke, 186 (26.4%) were stroke-mimics, and 21 (3%) were inconclusive. The etiologies among stroke-mimics were metabolic/intoxication (35, 18.8%), sepsis (28, 15.0%), seizure (21, 11.3%), syncope (20, 10.8%), subdural hemorrhage (14, 7.5%), vertigo (11, 6.0%), brain tumor (10, 5.30%), central nervous system infection (5, 2.7%), others (26, 14.0%), and unspecified (16, 8.6%). Incidence rates and etiologies of the stroke mimics were similar to the western reports. However the frequency of each mimic was not.

  1. The URICO-ICTUS study, a phase 3 study of combined treatment with uric acid and rtPA administered intravenously in acute ischaemic stroke patients within the first 4.5 h of onset of symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Sergio; Cánovas, David; Castellanos, Mar; Gállego, Jaime; Martí-Fèbregas, Joan; Segura, Tomás; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a major contributor to brain damage in patients with ischaemic stroke. Uric acid (UA) is a potent endogenous antioxidant molecule. In experimental ischaemia in rats, the exogenous administration of uric acid is neuroprotective and enhances the effect of rtPA. Moreover, in acute stroke patients receiving rtPA within 3 h of stroke onset, the intravenous administration of uric acid is safe, prevents an early decline in uric acid levels and reduces an early increase in oxidative stress markers and in active matrix metalloproteinase nine levels. To determine whether the combined treatment with uric acid and rtPA is superior to rtPA alone in terms of clinical efficacy in acute ischaemic stroke patients treated within the first 4.5 h of onset of symptoms. Multicentre, interventional, randomised, double-blind and vehicle-controlled efficacy study with parallel assignment (1 : 1). Estimated enrolment: 420 patients over 3 years, starting in January 2010. Treatment arms included patients will receive a single intravenous infusion of 1 g of UA dissolved in a vehicle (500 ml of 0.1% lithium carbonate and 5% mannitol) (n=210) or vehicle alone (n=210). the study will include patients older than 18 years, treated with rtPA within the first 4.5 h of clinical onset and with a baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score >6 and or =4 points of increase in the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score).

  2. Risk of acute kidney injury associated with neuroimaging obtained during triage and treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Shelby L; Munich, Stephan A; Cress, Marshall C; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Levy, Elad I; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-02-04

    Combining non-contrast CT (NCCT), CT angiography (CTA), and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging (referred to as a CT stroke study, CTSS) provides a rapid evaluation of the cerebrovascular axis during acute ischemic stroke. Iodinated contrast-enhanced CT imaging is not without risk, which includes renal injury. If a patient's CTSS identifies vascular pathology, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is often performed within 24-48 h. Such patients may receive multiple administrations of iodinated contrast material over a short time period. We aimed to evaluate the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients who underwent a CTSS and DSA for evaluation of acute ischemic symptoms or for stroke intervention within a 48 h period between August 2012 and December 2014. We identified 84 patients for inclusion in the analysis. Patients fell into one of two cohorts: AKI, defined as a rise in the serum creatinine level of ≥0.5 mg/dL from baseline, or non-AKI. Clinical parameters included pre- and post-imaging serum creatinine level, time between CTSS and DSA, and type of angiographic procedure (diagnostic vs intervention) performed. Four patients (4.7%) experienced AKI, one of whom had baseline renal dysfunction (defined as baseline serum creatinine level ≥1.5 mg/dL). The mean difference between baseline and peak creatinine values was found to be significantly greater in patients with AKI than in non-AKI patients (1.65 vs -0.09, respectively; p=0.0008). This study provides preliminary evidence of the safety and feasibility of obtaining CTSS with additional DSA imaging, whether for diagnosis or intervention, to identify possible acute ischemic stroke. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Studying post-stroke functional impairment after treatment with neural progenitor cells – an analysis of behavioral tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten R. Doeppner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs in rodents reduces functional impairment after cerebral ischemia. In light of upcoming stroke trials regarding safety and feasibility of NPC transplantation, experimental studies have to successfully analyze the extent of NPC-induced neurorestoration on the functional level. However, appropriate behavioral tests for analysis of post-stroke motor coordination deficits and cognitive impairment after NPC grafting are not fully established. We therefore exposed male C57BL6 mice to either 45 min (mild or 90 min (severe of cerebral ischemia, using the thread occlusion model followed by intravenous injection of PBS or NPCs 6 h post-stroke with an observation period of three months. Post-stroke motor coordination was assessed by means of the rota rod, tight rope, corner turn, inclined plane, grip strength, foot fault, adhesive removal, pole test and balance beam test, whereas cognitive impairment was analyzed using the water maze, the open field and the passive avoidance test. Significant motor coordination differences after both mild and severe cerebral ischemia in favor of NPC-treated mice were observed for each motor coordination test except for the inclined plane and the grip strength test, which only showed significant differences after severe cerebral ischemia. Cognitive impairment after mild cerebral ischemia was successfully assessed using the water maze test, the open field and the passive avoidance test. On the contrary, the water maze test was not suitable in the severe cerebral ischemia paradigm, as it too much depends on motor coordination capabilities of test mice. In terms of both reliability and cost-effectiveness considerations, we thus recommend the corner turn, foot fault, balance beam, and open field test, which do not depend on durations of cerebral ischemia.

  4. Hip Hop Stroke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Stroke Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; Leighton-Herrmann, Ellyn; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Hecht, Mindy; Hedmann, Monique; Huq, Saima; Gerin, William; Chinchilli, Vernon; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Noble, James

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious long-term adult disability in the US. Acute stroke treatments with intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy are proven to reduce disability, however a critical limitation on their effectiveness is the narrow time window for administration, which is 4.5 hours and 6 hours respectively from the onset of symptoms. Our overarching goal is to reduce pre-hospital delays to acute stroke treatments in economically disadvantaged minority communities where the greatest delays exist, using Hip Hop Stroke. Hip Hop Stroke (HHS) is a school-based, child-mediated, culturally-tailored stroke communication multimedia intervention developed using validated models of behavior change and designed to improve stroke literacy (knowledge of stroke symptoms, the urgent need to call 911, and prevention measures) of 4 th , 5 th and 6 th grade students and their parents residing in poor urban communities. Children in the intervention arm will receive the HHS intervention, while those in the attentional control arm will receive standardized nutrition education based on the USDA's MyPyramid program. Children will be trained and motivated to share stroke information with their parents or other adult caregiver. Both children and parents will complete a stroke knowledge assessment at baseline, immediately following the program, and at 3-months post-program. The primary outcome is the effect of the child mediation on parental stroke literacy. Stroke literate children, a captive audience in school systems, may represent a viable channel for spreading stroke information into households of poor urban communities where mass media stroke campaigns have shown the lowest penetration. These children may also call 911 when witnessing a stroke in their homes or communities. The HHS program may highlight the potential role of children in the chain of stroke recovery as a strategy for reducing prehospital delays to acute stroke

  5. Results of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial by stroke subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Benavente, Oscar; Goldstein, Larry B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The SPARCL trial showed that atorvastatin 80 mg/d reduces the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We tested the hypothesis that the benefit of treatment varies according to index event stroke sub...

  6. Effect of baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on safety and efficacy of intra-arterial treatment: a subgroup analysis of a randomised phase 3 trial (MR CLEAN)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, Albert J.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Fransen, Puck S. S.; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Beumer, Debbie; Lingsma, Hester F.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van den Berg, René; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama À; Boiten, Jelis; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Boers, Anna M. M.; Marquering, Henk A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Zwam, Wim H.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether infarct size modifies intra-arterial treatment effect is not certain, particularly in patients with large infarcts. We examined the effect of the baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial treatment in a subgroup analysis of the

  7. Effect of baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on safety and efficacy of intra-arterial treatment: a subgroup analysis of a randomised phase 3 trial (MR CLEAN)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, A.J.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Fransen, P.S.; Berg, L.A. van den; Beumer, D.; Lingsma, H.F.; Schonewille, W.J.; Sprengers, M.E.; Berg, R. van den; Walderveen, M.A. van; Beenen, L.F.; Wermer, M.J.; Nijeholt, G.J.; Boiten, J.; Jenniskens, S.F.M.; Bot, J.C.; Boers, A.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Roos, Y.B.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Dippel, D.W.; Lugt, A. van der; Zwam, W.H. van; Majoie, C.B.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether infarct size modifies intra-arterial treatment effect is not certain, particularly in patients with large infarcts. We examined the effect of the baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial treatment in a subgroup analysis

  8. Stroke prevention: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2012-03-01

    Stroke is a personal, familial, and social disaster. It is the third cause of death worldwide, the first cause of acquired disability, the second cause of dementia, and its cost is astronomic. The burden of stroke is likely to increase given the aging of the population and the growing incidence of many vascular risk factors. Prevention of stroke includes--as for all other diseases--a "mass approach" aiming at decreasing the risk at the society level and an individual approach, aiming at reducing the risk in a given subject. The mass approach is primarily based on the identification and treatment of vascular risk factors and, if possible, in the implementation of protective factors. These measures are the basis of primary prevention but most of them have now been shown to be also effective in secondary prevention. The individual approach combines a vascular risk factor modification and various treatments addressing the specific subtypes of stroke, such as antiplatelet drugs for the prevention of cerebral infarction in large and small artery diseases of the brain, carotid endarterectomy or stenting for tight carotid artery stenosis, and oral anticoagulants for the prevention of cardiac emboli. There is a growing awareness of the huge evidence-to-practice gap that exists in stroke prevention largely due to socio-economic factors. Recent approaches include low cost intervention packages to reduce blood pressure and cheap "polypills" combining in a single tablet aspirin and several drugs to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Polypill intake should however not lead to abandon the healthy life-style measures which remain the mainstay of stroke prevention.

  9. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  10. Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Lampl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.

  11. The imaging of ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoggard, Nigel; Wilkinson, Iain D.; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    Stroke is a clinical syndrome of a rapidly developing focal neurological deficit that may be classified for practical purposes into ischaemic and haemorrhagic. The role of imaging is to exclude mimics of ischaemic stroke or intracranial haemorrhage and confirm the presence of an ischaemic stroke. Computed tomography (CT) remains the investigation of choice to exclude acute intracranial haemorrhage but diffusion weighted magnetic resonance (MR) has proved to be a sensitive method of detecting early ischaemic infarction. Perfusion weighted MR allows further assessment at the same examination that could help guide the clinician in the risk/benefit analysis of treatment with thrombolytics or neuroprotective agents under evaluation. This can also be achieved with CT. This review article discusses the imaging of ischaemic stroke, relating the pathophysiology of stroke to it. It deals separately in more detail with these newer MR techniques. Hoggard, N. et al. (2001)

  12. Implementation of evidence-based treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke (QASC): a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; McElduff, Patrick; Ward, Jeanette; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dale, Simeon; D'Este, Catherine; Drury, Peta; Griffiths, Rhonda; Cheung, N Wah; Quinn, Clare; Evans, Malcolm; Cadilhac, Dominique; Levi, Christopher

    2011-11-12

    We assessed patient outcomes 90 days after hospital admission for stroke following a multidisciplinary intervention targeting evidence-based management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke units (ASUs). In the Quality in Acute Stroke Care (QASC) study, a single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial, we randomised ASUs (clusters) in New South Wales, Australia, with immediate access to CT and on-site high dependency units, to intervention or control group. Patients were eligible if they spoke English, were aged 18 years or older, had had an ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage, and presented within 48 h of onset of symptoms. Intervention ASUs received treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction with multidisciplinary team building workshops to address implementation barriers. Control ASUs received only an abridged version of existing guidelines. We recruited pre-intervention and post-intervention patient cohorts to compare 90-day death or dependency (modified Rankin scale [mRS] ≥2), functional dependency (Barthel index), and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. Research assistants, the statistician, and patients were masked to trial groups. All analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered at the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), number ACTRN12608000563369. 19 ASUs were randomly assigned to intervention (n=10) or control (n=9). Of 6564 assessed for eligibility, 1696 patients' data were obtained (687 pre-intervention; 1009 post-intervention). Results showed that, irrespective of stroke severity, intervention ASU patients were significantly less likely to be dead or dependent (mRS ≥2) at 90 days than control ASU patients (236 [42%] of 558 patients in the intervention group vs 259 [58%] of 449 in the control group, p=0·002; number needed to treat 6·4; adjusted absolute difference 15·7% [95% CI 5·8-25·4]). They also had a

  13. Diagnosis in stroke - an uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aichner, F.T.

    2003-01-01

    In practical day-to-day terms, most patients have one of the common causes of stroke: ischemic stroke caused by the complications of atherothrombosis, intracranial small vessel disease, embolism from the heart, primary intracerebral hemorrhage caused by hypertension, or subarachnoid hemorrhage as a result of a ruptured saccular aneurysm. There are three issues to be considered in assessing the reliability of the clinical diagnosis of stroke: the diagnosis of stroke itself: is it a stroke or not; whether the stroke is caused by an infarct or a hemorrhage and particular in ischemic stroke the site and size of the lesion (anterior vs. posterior circulation, lacunar vs. cortical, etc.). No clinical scoring method can differentiate with absolute reliability ischemic stroke from primary intracerebral hemorrhage. To do this brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is required. For vascular diagnosis ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography are ideal and complementary non-invasive techniques. Both have no risks and are reasonably sensitive. Catheterangiography is only reserved for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage with a view to surgical or endovascular treatment or in exceptional cases to establish a more firm prognosis. The diagnosis of ischemic stroke caused by embolism from the heart can only be considered at all if there is an identifiable cardioembolic source which is the case in about 30 % of ischemic stroke, a higher proportion in recent studies using transoesophageal echocardiography. It is not clear that transoesophageal echocardiography provides much more information for clinical decision-making than transthoracic echocardiography, although it certainly provides more anatomical information in selected patients. This article summarizes the diagnostic armamentarium which is used for the diagnosis of stroke and gives an overview of clinically reliable and relevant measures. Refs. 23 (author)

  14. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  15. Effect of Prior Atorvastatin Treatment on the Frequency of Hospital Acquired Pneumonia and Evolution of Biomarkers in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuetian Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate whether prior treatment of atorvastatin reduces the frequency of hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP. Methods. Totally, 492 patients with acute ischemic stroke and Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 8 were enrolled in this study. Subjects were assigned to prior atorvastatin treatment group (n=268, PG and no prior treatment group (n=224, NG. All the patients were given 20 mg atorvastatin every night during their hospital stay. HAP frequency and 28-day mortality were measured. Levels of inflammatory biomarkers [white blood cell (WBC, procalcitonin (PCT, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6] were tested. Results. There was no significant difference in the incidence of HAP between PG and NG (25.74% versus. 24.55%, p>0.05 and 28-day mortality (50.72% versus 58.18%, p>0.05. However, prior statin treatment did modify the mortality of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP (36.54% versus 58.14%, p=0.041 and proved to be a protective factor (HR, 0.564; 95% CI, 0.310~0.825, p=0.038. Concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in PG VAP cases were lower than those in NG VAP cases (p<0.01. Conclusions. Prior atorvastatin treatment in patients with ischemic stroke was associated with a lower concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α and improved the outcome of VAP. This clinical study has been registered with ChiCTR-ROC-17010633 in Chinese Clinical Trial Registry.

  16. Baseline Blood Pressure Effect on the Benefit and Safety of Intra-Arterial Treatment in MR CLEAN (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Maxim J H L; Ergezen, Saliha; Lingsma, Hester F; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Fransen, Puck S S; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert; Emmer, Bart J; van der Worp, H Bart; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Roos, Yvo B W E M; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Zwam, Wim H; Majoie, Charles B L M; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2017-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is associated with poor outcome and the occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke. Whether BP influences the benefit or safety of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) is not known. We aimed to assess the relation of BP with functional outcome, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and effect of IAT. This is a post hoc analysis of the MR CLEAN (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands). BP was measured at baseline, before IAT or stroke unit admission. We estimated the association of baseline BP with the score on the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days and safety parameters with ordinal and logistic regression analysis. Effect of BP on the effect of IAT was tested with multiplicative interaction terms. Systolic BP (SBP) had the best correlation with functional outcome. This correlation was U-shaped; both low and high baseline SBP were associated with poor functional outcome. Higher SBP was associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.25 for every 10 mm Hg higher SBP [95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.44]). Between SBP and IAT, there was no interaction for functional outcome, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, or other safety parameters; the absolute benefit of IAT was evident for the whole SBP range. The same was found for diastolic BP. BP does not affect the benefit or safety of IAT in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by proximal intracranial vessel occlusion. Our data provide no arguments to withhold or delay IAT based on BP. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. A review of decision support, risk communication and patient information tools for thrombolytic treatment in acute stroke: lessons for tool developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Darren; Ford, Gary A; Stobbart, Lynne; Rodgers, Helen; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Thomson, Richard G

    2013-06-18

    Tools to support clinical or patient decision-making in the treatment/management of a health condition are used in a range of clinical settings for numerous preference-sensitive healthcare decisions. Their impact in clinical practice is largely dependent on their quality across a range of domains. We critically analysed currently available tools to support decision making or patient understanding in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke with intravenous thrombolysis, as an exemplar to provide clinicians/researchers with practical guidance on development, evaluation and implementation of such tools for other preference-sensitive treatment options/decisions in different clinical contexts. Tools were identified from bibliographic databases, Internet searches and a survey of UK and North American stroke networks. Two reviewers critically analysed tools to establish: information on benefits/risks of thrombolysis included in tools, and the methods used to convey probabilistic information (verbal descriptors, numerical and graphical); adherence to guidance on presenting outcome probabilities (IPDASi probabilities items) and information content (Picker Institute Checklist); readability (Fog Index); and the extent that tools had comprehensive development processes. Nine tools of 26 identified included information on a full range of benefits/risks of thrombolysis. Verbal descriptors, frequencies and percentages were used to convey probabilistic information in 20, 19 and 18 tools respectively, whilst nine used graphical methods. Shortcomings in presentation of outcome probabilities (e.g. omitting outcomes without treatment) were identified. Patient information tools had an aggregate median Fog index score of 10. None of the tools had comprehensive development processes. Tools to support decision making or patient understanding in the treatment of acute stroke with thrombolysis have been sub-optimally developed. Development of tools should utilise mixed methods and

  18. Combined neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and traditional swallowing rehabilitation in the treatment of stroke-related dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Sun, Hsien-Pin; Chang, Ping-Hsin; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jue-Long

    2013-12-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) for the treatment of dysphagia have gained in popularity, but the combined application of these promising modalities has rarely been studied. We aimed to evaluate whether combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation can improve swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate to severe dysphagia. Thirty-two patients with moderate to severe dysphagia poststroke (≥3 weeks) were recruited. Patients received 12 sessions of NMES for 1 h/day, 5 days/week within a period of 2-3 weeks. FEES was done before and after NMES for evaluation and to guide dysphagic therapy. All patients subsequently received 12 sessions of traditional swallowing rehabilitation (50 min/day, 3 days/week) for 4 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS). Secondary outcome measures included clinical degree of dysphagia, the patient's self-perception of swallowing ability, and the patient's global satisfaction with therapy. Patients were assessed at baseline, after NMES, at 6-month follow-up, and at 2-year follow-up. Twenty-nine patients completed the study. FOIS, degree of dysphagia, and patient's self-perception of swallowing improved significantly after NMES, at the 6-month follow-up, and at the 2-year follow-up (p rehabilitation showed promise for improving swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate-to-severe dysphagia. The benefits were maintained for up to 2 years. The results are promising enough to justify further studies.

  19. International Practice in Care Provision for Post-stroke Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J

    2017-09-01

    This study sought to explore the practice of orthoptists internationally in care provision for poststroke visual impairment. Survey questions were developed and piloted with clinicians, academics, and users. Questions addressed types of visual problems, how these were identified, treated, and followed up, care pathways in use, links with other professions, and referral options. The survey was approved by the institutional ethical committee. The survey was accessed via a web link that was circulated through the International Orthoptic Association member professional organisations to orthoptists. Completed electronic surveys were obtained from 299 individuals. About one-third (35.5%) of orthoptists saw patients within 2 weeks of stroke onset and over half (55.5%) by 1 month post stroke. Stroke survivors were routinely assessed by 87%; over three-quarters in eye clinics. Screening tools were used by 11%. Validated tests were used for assessment of visual acuity (76.5%), visual field (68.2%), eye movement (80.9%), binocular vision (77.9%), and visual function (55.8%). Visual problems suspected by family or professionals were high (86.6%). Typical overall follow-up period of vision care was less than 3 months. Designated care pathways for stroke survivors with visual problems were used by 56.9% of orthoptists. Information on visual impairment was provided by 85.9% of orthoptists. In international orthoptic practice, there is general agreement on assessment and management of visual impairment in stroke populations. More than half of orthoptists reported seeing stroke survivors within 1 month of the stroke onset, typically in eye clinics. There was a high use of validated tests of visual acuity, visual fields, ocular motility, and binocular vision. Similarly there was high use of established treatment options including prisms, occlusion, compensatory strategies, and oculomotor training, appropriately targeted at specific types of visual conditions/symptoms. This

  20. Predictors of Good Outcome After Endovascular Therapy for Vertebrobasilar Occlusion Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslama, Mehdi; Haussen, Diogo C; Aghaebrahim, Amin; Grossberg, Jonathan A; Walker, Gregory; Rangaraju, Srikant; Horev, Anat; Frankel, Michael R; Nogueira, Raul G; Jovin, Tudor G; Jadhav, Ashutosh P

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular therapy is increasingly used in acute ischemic stroke treatment and is now considered the gold standard approach for selected patient populations. Prior studies have demonstrated that eventual patient outcomes depend on both patient-specific factors and procedural considerations. However, these factors remain unclear for acute basilar artery occlusion stroke. We sought to determine prognostic factors of good outcome in acute posterior circulation large vessel occlusion strokes treated with endovascular therapy. We reviewed our prospectively collected endovascular databases at 2 US tertiary care academic institutions for patients with acute posterior circulation strokes from September 2005 to September 2015 who had 3-month modified Rankin Scale documented. Baseline characteristics, procedural data, and outcomes were evaluated. A good outcome was defined as a 90-day modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2. The association between clinical and procedural parameters and functional outcome was assessed. A total of 214 patients qualified for the study. Smoking status, creatinine levels, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, anesthesia modality (conscious sedation versus general anesthesia), procedural length, and reperfusion status were significantly associated with good outcomes in the univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that only smoking (odds ratio=2.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-5.56; P =0.013), low baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (odds ratio=1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.13; P Stroke Scale score, and successful reperfusion status were associated with good outcome in patients with posterior circulation stroke treated with endovascular therapy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Neurology Concepts: Young Women and Ischemic Stroke-Evaluation and Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bernard P; Wira, Charles; Miller, Joseph; Akhter, Murtaza; Barth, Bradley E; Willey, Joshua; Nentwich, Lauren; Madsen, Tracy

    2018-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the incidence of ischemic stroke is highest in older populations, incidence of ischemic stroke in adults has been rising particularly rapidly among young (e.g., premenopausal) women. The evaluation and timely diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young women presents a challenging situation in the emergency department, due to a range of sex-specific risk factors and to broad differentials. The goals of this concepts paper are to summarize existing knowledge regarding the evaluation and management of young women with ischemic stroke in the acute setting. A panel of six board-certified emergency physicians, one with fellowship training in stroke and one with training in sex- and sex-based medicine, along with one vascular neurologist were coauthors involved in the paper. Each author used various search strategies (e.g., PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar) for primary research and reviewed articles related to their section. The references were reviewed and evaluated for relevancy and included based on review by the lead authors. Estimates on the incidence of ischemic stroke in premenopausal women range from 3.65 to 8.9 per 100,000 in the United States. Several risk factors for ischemic stroke exist for young women including oral contraceptive (OCP) use and migraine with aura. Pregnancy and the postpartum period (up to 12 weeks) is also an important transient state during which risks for both ischemic stroke and cerebral hemorrhage are elevated, accounting for 18% of strokes in women under 35. Current evidence regarding the management of acute ischemic stroke in young women is also summarized including use of thrombolytic agents (e.g., tissue plasminogen activator) in both pregnant and nonpregnant individuals. Unique challenges exist in the evaluation and diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young women. There are still many opportunities for future research aimed at improving detection and treatment

  2. High-density lipoprotein-based therapy reduces the hemorrhagic complications associated with tissue plasminogen activator treatment in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapergue, Bertrand; Dang, Bao Quoc; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Ortiz-Munoz, Guadalupe; Delbosc, Sandrine; Loyau, Stéphane; Louedec, Liliane; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Mazighi, Mikael; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that intravenous injection of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) was neuroprotective in an embolic stroke model. We hypothesized that HDL vasculoprotective actions on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may decrease hemorrhagic transformation-associated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration in acute stroke. We used tPA alone or in combination with HDLs in vivo in 2 models of focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (embolic and 4-hour monofilament MCAO) and in vitro in a model of BBB. Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to MCAO, n=12 per group. The rats were then randomly injected with tPA (10 mg/kg) or saline with or without human plasma purified-HDL (10 mg/kg). The therapeutic effects of HDL and BBB integrity were assessed blindly 24 hours later. The integrity of the BBB was also tested using an in vitro model of human cerebral endothelial cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation. tPA-treated groups had significantly higher mortality and rate of hemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours in both MCAO models. Cotreatment with HDL significantly reduced stroke-induced mortality versus tPA alone (by 42% in filament MCAO, P=0.009; by 73% in embolic MCAO, P=0.05) and tPA-induced intracerebral parenchymal hematoma (by 92% in filament MCAO, by 100% in embolic MCAO; Phemorrhagic transformation in rat models of MCAO. Both in vivo and in vitro results support the vasculoprotective action of HDLs on BBB under ischemic conditions.

  3. Relevance of blood-brain barrier disruption after endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke: dual-energy computed tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renú, Arturo; Amaro, Sergio; Laredo, Carlos; Román, Luis San; Llull, Laura; Lopez, Antonio; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Ángel

    2015-03-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) high attenuation (HA) areas after endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke are a common finding indicative of blood-brain barrier disruption. Dual-energy CT allows an accurate differentiation between HA areas related to contrast staining (CS) or to brain hemorrhage (BH). We sought to evaluate the prognostic significance of the presence of CS and BH after endovascular therapy. A prospective cohort of 132 patients treated with endovascular therapy was analyzed. According to dual-energy CT findings, patients were classified into 3 groups: no HA areas (n=53), CS (n=32), and BH (n=47). The rate of new hemorrhagic transformations was recorded at follow-up neuroimaging. Clinical outcome was evaluated at 90 days with the modified Rankin Scale (poor outcome, 3-6). Poor outcome was associated with the presence of CS (odds ratio [OR], 11.3; 95% confidence interval, 3.34-38.95) and BH (OR, 10.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.42-31.68). The rate of poor outcome despite complete recanalization was also significantly higher in CS (OR, 9.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.55-37.18) and BH (OR, 15.1; 95% confidence interval, 3.85-59.35) groups, compared with the no-HA group. Patients with CS disclosed a higher incidence of delayed hemorrhagic transformation at follow-up (OR, 4.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-16.37) compared with no-HA patients. Blood-brain barrier disruption, defined as CS and BH on dual-energy CT, was associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with stroke treated with endovascular therapies. Moreover, isolated CS was associated with delayed hemorrhagic transformation. These results support the clinical relevance of blood-brain barrier disruption in acute stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. The need for emergency surgical treatment in carotid-related stroke in evolution and crescendo transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoccia, Laura; Sbarigia, Enrico; Speziale, Francesco; Toni, Danilo; Biello, Antonella; Montelione, Nunzio; Fiorani, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety of emergency carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with carotid stenosis and unstable neurological symptoms. This prospective, single-center study involved patients with stroke in evolution (SIE) or fluctuating stroke or crescendo transient ischemic attack (cTIA) related to a carotid stenosis ≥ 50% who underwent emergency surgery. Preoperative workup included National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) neurological assessment on admission, immediately before surgery and at discharge, carotid duplex scan, brain contrast-enhanced head computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). End points were perioperative (30-day) neurological mortality, NIHSS score variation, and hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke recurrence. Patients were evaluated according to clinical presentation (SIE or cTIA), timing of surgery, and presence of brain infarction on neuroimaging. Between January 2005 and December 2009, 48 patients were submitted to emergency surgery. CEAs were performed from 1 to 24 hours from onset of symptoms (mean, 10.16 ± 7.75). Twenty-six patients presented an SIE with a worsening NIHSS score between admission and surgery, and 22 presented ≥ 3 cTIAs with a normal NIHSS score (= 0) immediately before surgery. An ischemic brain lesion was detected in four patients with SIE and eight patients with cTIA. All patients with cTIA presented a persistent NIHSS normal score before and after surgery. Twenty-five patients with SIE presented an NIHSS score improvement after surgery. Mean NIHSS score was 5.30 ± 2.81 before surgery and 0.54 ± 0.77 at discharge in the SIE group (P hemorrhagic transformation of an undetected brain ischemic lesion after surgery, with progressive neurological deterioration and death (2%). Due to the absence of randomized controlled trials of CEA for neurologically unstable patients, data currently available do not support a policy of emergency CEA in those patients. Our results

  5. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: rationale, design and methods of the TOROS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with stroke severity and poor functional outcome. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to improve functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation. To date, the effect of continuous positive

  6. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: rationale, design and methods of the TOROS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.; van Bennekom, C.A.M.; Hofman, W.F.; van Bezeij, T.; van den Aardweg, J.G.; Groet, E.; Kylstra, W.A.; Schmand, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with stroke severity and poor functional outcome. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to improve functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation. To date, the effect of

  7. Risk profiles and antithrombotic treatment of patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: perspectives from the international, observational, prospective GARFIELD registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay K Kakkar

    Full Text Available Limited data are available on the characteristics, clinical management, and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke, from a worldwide perspective. The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics and initial therapeutic management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation across the spectrum of sites at which these patients are treated.The Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD is an observational study of patients newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Enrollment into Cohort 1 (of 5 took place between December 2009 and October 2011 at 540 sites in 19 countries in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Central/South America, and Canada. Investigator sites are representative of the distribution of atrial fibrillation care settings in each country. Cohort 1 comprised 10,614 adults (≥18 years diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation within the previous 6 weeks, with ≥1 investigator-defined stroke risk factor (not limited to those in existing risk-stratification schemes, and regardless of therapy. Data collected at baseline included demographics, medical history, care setting, nature of atrial fibrillation, and treatments initiated at diagnosis. The mean (SD age of the population was 70.2 (11.2 years; 43.2% were women. Mean±SD CHADS2 score was 1.9±1.2, and 57.2% had a score ≥2. Mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.2±1.6, and 8,957 (84.4% had a score ≥2. Overall, 38.0% of patients with a CHADS2 score ≥2 did not receive anticoagulant therapy, whereas 42.5% of those at low risk (score 0 received anticoagulant therapy.These contemporary observational worldwide data on non-valvular atrial fibrillation, collected at the end of the vitamin K antagonist-only era, indicate that these drugs are frequently not being used according to stroke risk scores and guidelines, with overuse in patients at low risk and underuse in those at high risk of stroke.ClinicalTrials.gov TRI08888.

  8. Risk Profiles and Antithrombotic Treatment of Patients Newly Diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation at Risk of Stroke: Perspectives from the International, Observational, Prospective GARFIELD Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Ajay K.; Mueller, Iris; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Fitzmaurice, David A.; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Goto, Shinya; Haas, Sylvia; Hacke, Werner; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Mantovani, Lorenzo G.; Turpie, Alexander G. G.; van Eickels, Martin; Misselwitz, Frank; Rushton-Smith, Sophie; Kayani, Gloria; Wilkinson, Peter; Verheugt, Freek W. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on the characteristics, clinical management, and outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke, from a worldwide perspective. The aim of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics and initial therapeutic management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation across the spectrum of sites at which these patients are treated. Methods and Findings The Global Anticoagulant Registry in the FIELD (GARFIELD) is an observational study of patients newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Enrollment into Cohort 1 (of 5) took place between December 2009 and October 2011 at 540 sites in 19 countries in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Central/South America, and Canada. Investigator sites are representative of the distribution of atrial fibrillation care settings in each country. Cohort 1 comprised 10,614 adults (≥18 years) diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation within the previous 6 weeks, with ≥1 investigator-defined stroke risk factor (not limited to those in existing risk-stratification schemes), and regardless of therapy. Data collected at baseline included demographics, medical history, care setting, nature of atrial fibrillation, and treatments initiated at diagnosis. The mean (SD) age of the population was 70.2 (11.2) years; 43.2% were women. Mean±SD CHADS2 score was 1.9±1.2, and 57.2% had a score ≥2. Mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.2±1.6, and 8,957 (84.4%) had a score ≥2. Overall, 38.0% of patients with a CHADS2 score ≥2 did not receive anticoagulant therapy, whereas 42.5% of those at low risk (score 0) received anticoagulant therapy. Conclusions These contemporary observational worldwide data on non-valvular atrial fibrillation, collected at the end of the vitamin K antagonist-only era, indicate that these drugs are frequently not being used according to stroke risk scores and guidelines, with overuse in patients at low risk and underuse in those at high risk of stroke

  9. Wen Dan Decoction for hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Hua; Huang, Yan-Mei; Ling, Wei; Li, Yang; Wang, Min; Chen, Xiang-Yan; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2015-04-01

    The use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in stroke is increasing worldwide. Here we report the existing clinical evidence of the Pinellia Ternata containing formula Wen Dan Decoction (WDD) for the treatment of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. PubMed, CNKI, Wan Fang database, Cochrane Library and online Clinical Trial Registry were searched up to 26 February 2013 for randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCTs) using WDD as intervention versus Western conventional medicine as control to treat stroke. Clinical outcomes were improvement of the Neurological Functional Deficit Scores (NFDS) and overall therapeutic efficacy rates including rate of cure. Meta-regression analysis using Hedges'g was performed for RCTs with significant heterogeneity. A total of 22 RCTs of ischemic stroke and 4 RCTs of hemorrhagic stroke, involving 2214 patients (1167 used WDD), met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the 13 RCTs reporting NFDS improvement favored WDD over the control (mean difference=-3.40, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=[-4.64, -2.15]). Rate of overall therapeutic efficacy (odds ratio [OR]=3.39, 95%CI=[1.81, 6.37]) for hemorrhagic stroke were significantly higher in WDD treated patients than the control subjects. In the 1898 patients with ischemic stroke, WDD medication also achieved higher rates of cure (OR=2.22, 95%CI=[1.66, 2.97]) and overall therapeutic efficacy (OR=3.31, 95%CI=[2.54, 4.31]) than the conventional treatment. WDD displays benefits on improvement of neurological function and overall therapeutic efficacy in post-stroke patients. TCM such as WDD may serve as a therapeutic tool of dual actions to explore the common mechanisms underlying cerebral hemorrhage and ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Does Prior Antiplatelet Treatment Increase the Risk of Hemorrhagic Transformation and Unfavorable Outcome on Day 90 after Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyan; Lu, Xia; Zhang, Wanli; Han, Zhao; Yang, Wen; Huang, Xuerong; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhimin; Liang, Haiyan; Qiu, Weiwen; Cheng, Jianhua; Shao, Bei

    2016-06-01

    The effect of prior antiplatelet (AP) therapy on the risk of hemorrhagic transformation (HT), and on functional outcomes of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) after intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), is not known. We performed a retrospective analysis to determine whether history of AP therapy is associated with post-thrombolysis HT and poor prognosis in AIS patients. Data pertaining to 145 patients with AIS, who underwent IVT between October 2008 and January 2015, were analyzed. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether or not they had received prior AP therapy. Neurological outcomes at 24 hours and 3 months after IVT therapy were assessed. Intergroup difference in cost of treatment was also evaluated. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify independent predictors of post-thrombolysis HT. Among 145 patients, 23 (15.8%) had received prior AP therapy. On multivariate analyses, older age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.084; confidence interval [CI], 1.028-1.144) and prior AP therapy (OR: 3.318; CI, 1.172-9.398) were found to be independent predictors of HT. In this study, prior AP therapy was independently associated with post-thrombolysis HT in AIS. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Invited commentary on comparison of robotics, functional electrical stimulation, and motor learning methods for treatment of persistent upper extremity dysfunction after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E; Meskers, Carel M

    2015-06-01

    In this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Jessica McCabe and colleagues report findings from their methodologically sound, dose-matched clinical trial in 39 patients beyond 6 months poststroke. In this phase II trial, the effects of 60 treatment sessions, each involving 3.5 hours of intensive practice plus either 1.5 hours of functional electrical stimulation (FES) or a shoulder-arm robotic therapy, were compared with 5 hours of intensive daily practice alone. Although no significant between-group differences were found on the primary outcome measure of Arm Motor Ability Test and the secondary outcome measure of Fugl-Meyer Arm motor score, 10% to 15% within-group therapeutic gains were on the Arm Motor Ability Test and Fugl-Meyer Arm. These gains are clinically meaningful for patients with stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms that drive these improvements remain poorly understood. The approximately $1000 cost reduction per patient calculated for the use of motor learning (ML) methods alone or combined with FES, compared with the combination of ML and shoulder-arm robotics, further emphasizes the need for cost considerations when making clinical decisions about selecting the most appropriate therapy for the upper paretic limb in patients with chronic stroke. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biocatalytic pre-treatment processes of cotton : Industrial application of academic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, G.H. (Gerrit); Bouwhuis, G.H. (Gerrit); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Warmoeskerken, van M.M.C.G. (Marijn); Warmoeskerken, van M.M.C.G. (Marijn)

    2011-01-01

    Much research effort is invested in developing enzymatic treatments of textiles by focusing on the performance of enzymes at the laboratory scale. Despite all of this work, upgrading these developments from the laboratory scale to an industrial scale has not been very successful.Nowadays,companies

  13. Organization of industrial application of academic research on biocatalytic pre-treatment processes of cotton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, G.H. (Gerrit); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Warmoeskerken, M.M.C.G. (Marijn)

    2011-01-01

    A lot of research effort is put in developing enzymatic treatment of textiles by focusing on the performance of enzymes on lab-scale. Despite all this work upgrading of these developments from lab-scale to industrial scale has not been really successful. Companies are nowadays confronted with rapid

  14. [Stroke health care plan (ICTUS II. 2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Alvarez-Sabín, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díez Tejedor, E; Freijo, M; Gil-Núñez, A; Fernández, J C López; Maestre, J F; Martínez-Vila, E; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Ramírez, J M; Segura, T; Serena, J; Tejada, J; Tejero, C

    2011-09-01

    The Spanish Stroke Group published the "Plan for stroke healthcare delivery" in 2006 with the aim that all stroke patients could receive the same degree of specialised healthcare according to the stage of their disease, independently of where they live, their age, gender or ethnicity. This Plan needs to be updated in order to introduce new developments in acute stroke. A committee of 19 neurologists specialised in neurovascular diseases representing different regions of Spain evaluated previous experience with this Plan and the available scientific evidence according to published literature. The new organised healthcare system must place emphasis on the characteristics of the different care levels with promotion of Reference Stroke Hospitals, set up less restrictive Stroke Code activation criteria that include new therapeutic options, establish new standard measures for endovascular treatment and develop tele-medicine stroke networks. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Large Animal Stroke Models vs. Rodent Stroke Models, Pros and Cons, and Combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability worldwide and the second leading cause of death in many countries. Long-time attempts to salvage dying neurons via various neuroprotective agents have failed in stroke translational research, owing in part to the huge gap between animal stroke models and stroke patients, which also suggests that rodent models have limited predictive value and that alternate large animal models are likely to become important in future translational research. The genetic background, physiological characteristics, behavioral characteristics, and brain structure of large animals, especially nonhuman primates, are analogous to humans, and resemble humans in stroke. Moreover, relatively new regional imaging techniques, measurements of regional cerebral blood flow, and sophisticated physiological monitoring can be more easily performed on the same animal at multiple time points. As a result, we can use large animal stroke models to decrease the gap and promote translation of basic science stroke research. At the same time, we should not neglect the disadvantages of the large animal stroke model such as the significant expense and ethical considerations, which can be overcome by rodent models. Rodents should be selected as stroke models for initial testing and primates or cats are desirable as a second species, which was recommended by the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) group in 2009.

  16. Solitaire™ with the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke (SWIFT PRIME) trial: protocol for a randomized, controlled, multicenter study comparing the Solitaire revascularization device with IV tPA with IV tPA alone in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Bonafe, Alain; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Levy, Elad I; Pereira, Vitor M; Albers, Gregory W; Cognard, Christophe; Cohen, David J; Hacke, Werner; Jansen, Olav; Jovin, Tudor G; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nogueira, Raul G; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Yavagal, Dileep R; Devlin, Thomas G; Lopes, Demetrius K; Reddy, Vivek; du Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard; Jahan, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Early reperfusion in patients experiencing acute ischemic stroke is critical, especially for patients with large vessel occlusion who have poor prognosis without revascularization. Solitaire™ stent retriever devices have been shown to immediately restore vascular perfusion safely, rapidly, and effectively in acute ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusions. The aim of the study was to demonstrate that, among patients with large vessel, anterior circulation occlusion who have received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, treatment with Solitaire revascularization devices reduces degree of disability 3 months post stroke. The study is a global multicenter, two-arm, prospective, randomized, open, blinded end-point trial comparing functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients who are treated with either intravenous tissue plasminogen activator alone or intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in combination with the Solitaire device. Up to 833 patients will be enrolled. Patients who have received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator are randomized to either continue with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator alone or additionally proceed to neurothrombectomy using the Solitaire device within six-hours of symptom onset. The primary end-point is 90-day global disability, assessed with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Secondary outcomes include mortality at 90 days, functional independence (mRS ≤ 2) at 90 days, change in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at 27 h, reperfusion at 27 h, and thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b/3 flow at the end of the procedure. Statistical analysis will be conducted using simultaneous success criteria on the overall distribution of modified Rankin Scale (Rankin shift) and proportions of subjects achieving functional independence (mRS 0-2). © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Stroke Organization.

  17. Effects of the Treatment with ‍Nigella sativa Oil on Brain Injury and Edema in Experimental Model of Stroke in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Panahpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Stroke is third leading cause of death and disability in the most of human communities. The use of herbs and medicinal plants in different countries is increasing. Today, herbal medicine is used as alternative or complementary therapies with a fewer side effects. Nigella sativa has a rich medical and religious history. Oxidative stress has important role in the pathophysiology of stroke. As Nigella sativa has antioxidant effects, its administration may produce a protective effect against complications of this disease. We examined the effects of the treatment with Nigella sativa oil on the cerebral infarction and edema. Methods: 48 Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, sham, control ischemic and Nigella sativa oil treated (2 ml/kg ischemic groups. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by 90-min-long occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery followed by 24-h-long reperfusion. Neurological deficit score was evaluated at the end of the reperfusion period. Thereafter, the animals were randomly selected and used for two projects: (i Measurement of the infarct volumes and neurological outcome (ii investigation of ischemic brain edema formation using a wet/dry method. Results: Induction of cerebral ischemia in the control group produced considerable brain infarction in conjunction with impaired motor functions and severely brain edema. Treatment with Nigella sativa oil significantly reduced the infarct volume and improved the motor functions. The water content in the left (lesioned hemisphere was considerably elevated in the control ischemic group. Administration of the Nigella sativa oil significantly lowered the water content in the ischemic lesioned hemisphere. Conclusion: Treatment with Nigella sativa oil can noticeably decrease the ischemic brain injury, attenuate edema formation and improve motor disabilities.

  18. Low-dose ketamine for treatment resistant depression in an academic clinical practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifel, David; Malcolm, Benjamin; Boggie, Danielle; Lee, Kelly

    2017-10-15

    Recent studies demonstrating a rapid, robust improvement in treatment resistant depression (TRD) following a single sub-anesthetic infusion of ketamine have generated much excitement. However, these studies are limited in their generalizability to the broader TRD population due to their subject exclusion criteria which typically limit psychiatric comorbidity, concurrent medication, and level of suicide risk. This paper describes the safety and efficacy of sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions in a naturalistic TRD patient sample participating in a real-world TRD treatment program within a major university health system. The effects of a sub-anesthetic dose (0.5mg/kg) of ketamine infused IV over forty minutes on TRD patients participating in a treatment program at the University of California, San Diego was investigated by retrospectively analyzing the medical charts of 41 adult TRD patients with a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or Bipolar Disorder (BD). Subjects were aged 48.6, 78% white, 36.6% female, and 82.9% had MDD. Significant psychiatric comorbidity existed in 73%. Average pre-infusion BDI score was 32.6 ± 8.4 (S.D) and dropped to 16.8 ± 3.1 at 24-h post-infusion (p Ketamine infusions were well tolerated with occasional nausea or anxiety and mild hemodynamic effects during the infusion. Retrospective nature of this study, lack of control group and use of self-report depression ratings scales. This is the first published study of sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions in a real-world TRD population. The results suggest that this treatment is effective and well tolerated in this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  20. Using MMPI-A Profiles to Predict Success in a Military-Style Residential Treatment Program for Adolescents with Academic and Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Robert; Crockett, Thomas E.; Vieth, Sasha

    2004-01-01

    Military-style residential treatment for adolescents with academic and conduct problems is an increasingly popular alternative to traditional school-based services. However, dropout from "boot camp" programs is a primary reason for their high cost. Social-emotional functioning before referral may differentiate adolescents who…

  1. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... alert family member or bystander can be a real hero. [Man on a cell phone]: "An elderly ... about stroke prevention and treatment through the compelling, real-life stories of three Hispanic stroke survivors, supported ...

  2. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atrial fibrillation can double your risk of stroke. Smoking, your risk also increases if you smoke Or ... minute Spanish video provides critical information about stroke prevention and treatment through the compelling, real-life stories ...

  3. Know Stroke. Know the Signs. Act in Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strokes are ischemic. The second, known as a hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel in the ... within 60 minutes. What is the benefit of treatment? A five-year study by the National Institute ...

  4. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the National Institutes of Health For more information about stroke, please call 1-800-352-9424 ... Merino. This 13 minute Spanish video provides critical information about stroke prevention and treatment through the compelling, ...

  5. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... past, people often struggled to live with serious disabilities after a stroke. But they don't have ... flowing again." Announcer: New treatments can limit the disability caused by a stroke, but you need to ...

  6. Hypothermia for Stroke: call to action 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Malcolm R; Petersson, Jesper; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Wagner, Markus; Schwab, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    The European Hypothermia Stroke Research Workshop was held in January 2010, in response to the alarming prospects of a significant increase of stroke expected in the coming years globally. Considering that a minority of patients (around 10%) are currently eligible for thrombolytic treatment, there is a need for an efficacious, cost-effective novel therapy that can be implemented broadly within European health care systems. Accordingly, the primary objective of the workshop was the definition of a research agenda aiming to assess the therapeutic benefits of hypothermia in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. The meeting was organised by the European Stroke Research Network for Hypothermia (EuroHyp) and attended by the representatives of World Stroke Organisation, European Stroke Organisation, Stroke Alliance for Europe, Society for Cryobiology and other organisations--specifically the European Space Agency, and small- and medium-sized enterprises based in EU member states. The participants adopted the 'Hypothermia for Stroke--Call to Action 2010', a declaration specifying the priorities for hypothermia research in acute ischaemic stroke. The research programme outlined--a clinical study programme designed to identify and validate therapeutic cooling as a novel treatment providing benefit to a large number of stroke patients--contains a well-integrated series of Phase II studies aiming to refine the intervention (depth, duration, and mode of cooling; antishivering strategy; patient selection) and a pivotal Phase III clinical trial. The proposed integrated Phase II and III clinical study programme would test the effectiveness of this optimised intervention, and would allow the development of evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines describing the optimal use of therapeutic hypothermia as a treatment strategy for stroke. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2010 World Stroke Organization.

  7. Molecular and Physiological Factors of Neuroprotection in Hypoxia-tolerant Models: Pharmacological Clues for the Treatment of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas I. Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The naked mole-rat possesses several unique physiological and molecular features that underlie their remarkably and exceptional resistance to tissue hypoxia. Elevated pattern of Epo, an erythropoietin (Epo factor; c-fos; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α contribute to the adaptive strategy to cope with hypoxic stress. Moreover, the naked mole-rat has a lower metabolic rate than any other eutherian mammal of comparable size that has been studied. The ability to actively reduce metabolic rate represents a strategy widely used in the face of decreased tissue oxygen availability. Understanding the different molecular and physiological factors that induce metabolic suppression could guide the development of pharmacological agents for the clinical management of stroke patient.

  8. Stroke etiology and collaterals: atheroembolic strokes have greater collateral recruitment than cardioembolic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, L C; Bouslama, M; Haussen, D C; Grossberg, J A; Dehkharghani, S; Anderson, A; Belagaje, S R; Bianchi, N A; Grigoryan, M; Frankel, M R; Nogueira, R G

    2017-06-01

    Chronic hypoperfusion from athero-stenotic lesions is thought to lead to better collateral recruitment compared to cardioembolic strokes. It was sought to compare collateral flow in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) versus stroke patients with cervical atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease (CASOD). This was a retrospective review of a prospectively collected endovascular database. Patients with (i) anterior circulation large vessel occlusion stroke, (ii) pre-treatment computed tomography angiography (CTA) and (iii) intracranial embolism from AF or CASOD were included. CTA collateral patterns were evaluated and categorized into two groups: absent/poor collaterals (CTA collateral score 0-1) versus moderate/good collaterals (CTA collateral score 2-4). CT perfusion was also utilized for baseline core volume and evaluation of infarct growth. A total of 122 patients fitted the inclusion criteria, of whom 88 (72%) had AF and 34 (27%) CASOD. Patients with AF were older (P Collateral scores were lower in the AF group (P = 0.01) with patients having poor collaterals in 28% of cases versus 9% in the CASOD group (P = 0.03). Mortality rates (20% vs. 0%; P = 0.02) were higher in the AF patients whilst rates of any parenchymal hemorrhage (6% vs. 26%; P collaterals (odds ratio 4.70; 95% confidence interval 1.17-18.79; P = 0.03). Atheroembolic strokes seem to be associated with better collateral flow compared to cardioembolic strokes. This may in part explain the worse outcomes of AF-related stroke. © 2017 EAN.

  9. Dysphagia in Stroke: A New Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Langdon, Claire; Blacker, David

    2010-01-01

    Dysphagia is extremely common following stroke, affecting 13%–94% of acute stroke sufferers. It is associated with respiratory complications, increased risk of aspiration pneumonia, nutritional compromise and dehydration, and detracts from quality of life. While many stroke survivors experience a rapid return to normal swallowing function, this does not always happen. Current dysphagia treatment in Australia focuses upon prevention of aspiration via diet and fluid modifications, compensato...

  10. Prinsip Umum Penatalaksanaan Cedera Olahraga Heat Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ade Tobing, Saharun Iso

    2016-01-01

    Exercises that are conducted in an extreme heat environment can cause heat injury. Heatinjury is associated with disturbance to temperature regulation and cardiovascular systems. Heatstroke is the most severe type of heat injury. Heat stroke is associated with high morbidity andmortality numbers, particularly if therapy treatment is delayed. In general, heat stroke is caused bytwo things, namely increase in heat production and decrease in heat loss.Heat stroke signs include: (1) rectal temper...

  11. Metformin treatment in diabetes and heart failure: when academic equipoise meets clinical reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAlister Finlay A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Metformin has had a 'black box' contraindication in diabetic patients with heart failure (HF, but many believe it to be the treatment of choice in this setting. Therefore, we attempted to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of undertaking a large randomized controlled trial with clinical endpoints. Study Design The pilot study was a randomized double blinded placebo controlled trial. Patients with HF and type 2 diabetes were screened in hospitals and HF clinics in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (population ~1 million. Major exclusion criteria included the current use of insulin or high dose metformin, decreased renal function, or a glycosylated hemoglobin Results Fifty-eight patients were screened over a six month period and all were excluded. Because of futility with respect to enrollment, the pilot study was abandoned. The mean age of screened patients was 77 (SD 9 years and 57% were male. The main reasons for exclusion were: use of insulin therapy (n = 23; 40%, glycosylated hemoglobin Conclusion Despite uncertainty in the scientific literature, there does not appear to be clinical uncertainty with regards to the safety or effectiveness of metformin in HF making a definitive randomized trial virtually impossible. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00325910

  12. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  13. Ischemic Stroke Profile, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in India: The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylaja, P N; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Kaul, Subhash; Srivastava, M V Padma; Khurana, Dheeraj; Schwamm, Lee H; Kesav, Praveen; Arora, Deepti; Pannu, Aman; Thankachan, Tijy K; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2018-01-01

    The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project was designed to characterize ischemic stroke across 5 high-volume academic tertiary hospitals in India. From January 2012 to August 2014, research coordinators and physician coinvestigators prospectively collected data on 2066 patients with ischemic stroke admitted Stroke Scale score was 10 (interquartile range, 5-15) and 24.5% had National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16. Hypertension (60.8%), diabetes mellitus (35.7%), and tobacco use (32.2%, including bidi/smokeless tobacco) were common risk factors. Only 4% had atrial fibrillation. All patients underwent computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; 81% had cerebrovascular imaging. Stroke etiologic subtypes were large artery (29.9%), cardiac (24.9%), small artery (14.2%), other definite (3.4%), and undetermined (27.6%, including 6.7% with incomplete evaluation). Intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was administered in 13%. In-hospital mortality was 7.9%, and 48% achieved modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 90 days. On multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus predicted poor 3-month outcome and younger age, lower admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and small-artery etiology predicted excellent 3-month outcome. These comprehensive and novel clinical imaging data will prove useful in refining stroke guidelines and advancing stroke care in India. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  15. Clinical Profile, Predictors of Mortality, and Treatment of Patients after Myocardial Infarction, in an Academic Medical Center Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornoff Leonardo A. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical profiles, predictors of 30-day mortality, and the adherence to international recommendations for the treatment of myocardial infarction in an academic medical center hospital. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 172 patients with acute myocardial infarction, admitted in the intensive care unit from January 1992 to December 1997. RESULTS: Most patients were male (68%, white (97%, and over 60 years old (59%. The main risk factor for coronary atherosclerotic disease was systemic blood hypertension (63%. Among all the variables studied, reperfusion therapy, smoking, hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and age were the predictors of 30-day mortality. Most commonly used medications were: acetylsalicylic acid (71%, nitrates (61%, diuretics (51%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (46%, thrombolytic therapy (39%, and beta-blockers (35%. CONCLUSION: The absence of reperfusion therapy, smoking status, hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and advanced age are predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. In addition, some medications that are undoubtedly beneficial have been under-used after acute myocardial infarction.

  16. Etiologic diagnosis and clinical treatment of multiple drug-resistant bacteria infection in elderly patients with stroke-associated pneumonia after neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liu; Qing, Ye; Xingyi, Jin; Hongbo, Qiao

    2015-03-01

    Our objective is to analyze the etiology and antibiotics resistance rate of multiple drug-resistant bacteria infection in elderly patients with stroke-associated pneumonia from Neurosurgery Department, providing a reference for clinical treatment. Sputum of 372 elderly patients with stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP) from Neurosurgery Department was collected for sputum culture and drug sensitivity test, and pathogenic bacteria distribution and drug resistance rate of antibiotics were discussed. Among 372 pathogenic bacteria, there were 95 cases with Gram-positive cocci, the percentage was 15.32 %; there were 277 cases with Gram-negative bacilli, the percentage was 59.95 %; there were 54 cases with fungus, the percentage was 14.51 %; the common Gram-positive cocci included Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with percentages of 15.32 %, 2.96 % and 4.30 % respectively; the common Gram-negative bacilli included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, with percentages of 23.92 %, 14.25 % and 9.95 % respectively; the highest drug resistance rates of Staphylococcus aureus were 100.00 % to penicillin, erythrocin and oxacillin, the highest drug resistance rate of Staphylococcus epidermidis was 87.50 % to erythrocin, the highest drug resistance rate of Staphylococcus haemolyticus was 100.00 % to penicillin and erythrocin, the lowest drug resistance rates of three Gram-negative bacilli were 0 % to teicoplanin and vancomycin; the highest drug resistance rates of Escherichia coli were 100.00 % to ceftriaxone and ticarcillin, and the lowest drug resistance rate was 11.32 % to ciprofloxacin; the highest drug resistance rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was 100.00 % to ceftriaxone, and the lowest drug resistance rate was 22.47 % to imipenem; the highest drug resistance rate of Klebsiella pneumoniae was 81.08 % to aztreonam, and the lowest drug resistance rate was 0.00 % to imipenem. Stroke

  17. Daily repetitive sensory stimulation of the paretic hand for the treatment of sensorimotor deficits in patients with subacute stroke: RESET, a randomized, sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenstroth, Jan C; Kalisch, Tobias; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Greulich, Wolfgang; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert R

    2018-01-09

    Repetitive sensory stimulation (RSS) adapts the timing of stimulation protocols used in cellular studies to induce synaptic plasticity. In healthy subjects, RSS leads to widespread sensorimotor cortical reorganization paralleled by improved sensorimotor behavior. Here, we investigated whether RSS reduces sensorimotor upper limb impairment in patients with subacute stroke more effectively than conventional therapy. A single-blinded sham-controlled clinical trial assessed the effectiveness of RSS in treating sensorimotor deficits of the upper limbs. Patients with subacute unilateral ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to receive standard therapy in combination with RSS or with sham RSS. Patients were masked to treatment allocation. RSS consisted of intermittent 20 Hz electrical stimulation applied on the affected hand for 45 min/day, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks, and was transmitted using custom-made stimulation-gloves with built-in electrodes contacting each fingertip separately. Before and after the intervention, we assessed light-touch and tactile discrimination, proprioception, dexterity, grip force, and subtasks of the Jebsen Taylor hand-function test for the non-affected and the affected hand. Data from these quantitative tests were combined into a total performance index serving as primary outcome measure. In addition, tolerability and side effects of RSS intervention were recorded. Seventy one eligible patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive RSS treatment (n = 35) or sham RSS (n = 36). Data of 25 patients were not completed because they were transferred to another hospital, resulting in n = 23 for each group. Before treatment, sensorimotor performance between groups was balanced (p = 0.237). After 2 weeks of the intervention, patients in the group receiving standard therapy with RSS showed significantly better restored sensorimotor function than the control group (standardized mean difference 0.57; 95% CI -0

  18. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die within minutes. Strokes happen more in some populations and geographic areas. Stroke death declines have stalled in 3 out of every 4 states. Blacks have the highest stroke death rates among all ...

  19. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  20. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  1. Safety and efficacy of letibotulinumtoxinA(BOTULAX®) in treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity: a randomized, double blind, multi-center, phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kyung Hee; Chun, Min Ho; Paik, Nam-Jong; Park, Yoon Ghil; Lee, Shi-Uk; Kim, Min-Wook; Kim, Don-Kyu

    2017-09-01

    To investigate a new botulinum neurotoxin type A, termed letibotulinumtoxinA(Botulax ® ) and compare its efficacy and safety for post-stroke upper limb spasticity with that of onabotulinumtoxinA(Botox ® ). A prospective, double-blinded, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical study. Six university hospitals in Korea. A total of 187 stroke participants with upper limb spasticity. Two kinds of botulinum neurotoxin type A were used. One set of injection was performed and total injected doses were 309.21±62.48U(Botulax) and 312.64±49.99U(Botox)( P>0.05). Primary outcome was measured using the modified Ashworth scale for wrist flexors at week 4 and secondary outcome was measured using modified Ashworth scale for wrist flexors, elbow flexors, finger flexors, and thumb flexors as well as Global Assessment in spasticity, Disability Assessment Scale, and Caregiver Burden Scale. Safety measures including adverse events, vital signs and physical examination, and laboratory tests were also monitored. The mean ages for the Botulax group were 56.81±9.49 and which for the Botox group were 56.93±11.93( P>0.05). In primary outcome, the change in modified Ashworth scale for wrist flexors was -1.45±0.61 in the Botulax group and -1.40±0.57 in the Botox group, and the difference between the two groups was -0.06(95% CI:-0.23-0.12, P>0.05). In secondary outcome, both groups demonstrated significant improvements with respect to modified Ashworth scale, Global Assessment in spasticity, Disability Assessment Scale, and Caregiver Burden Scale ( P0.05). In addition, safety measures showed no significant differences between the two groups ( P>0.05). The efficacy and safety of Botulax were comparable with those of Botox in treatment of post-stoke upper limb spasticity.

  2. Recording of corticospinal evoked potential for optimum placement of motor cortex stimulation electrodes in the treatment of post-stroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Katayama, Yoichi; Obuchi, Toshiki; Kano, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Kazutaka; Oshima, Hideki; Fukaya, Chikashi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2007-09-01

    The corticospinal motor evoked potential (MEP) evoked by motor cortex stimulation was investigated as an intraoperative index for the placement of stimulation electrodes in the epidural space over the motor cortex for the treatment of post-stroke pain. A grid of plate electrodes was placed in the epidural space to cover the motor cortex, sensory cortex, and premotor cortex employing a magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation system in two patients with severe post-stroke pain in the right extremities, a 66-year-old man with dysesthesia manifesting as burning and aching sensation, and a 67-year-old woman with dysesthesia manifesting as pricking sensation. The D-wave of the corticospinal MEP was recorded with a flexible wire electrode placed in the epidural space of the spinal cord during anodal monopolar stimulation of each plate electrode under general anesthesia. The grid electrode was fixed in position with dural sutures and the craniotomy closed. The effect of pain reduction induced by anodal monopolar stimulation of the same plate electrodes was examined using the visual analogue scale (VAS) on a separate day in the awake state without anesthesia. Comparison of the percentage VAS reduction and the recorded amplitude of the D-wave employing the same stimulation electrode revealed significant correlations in Case 1 (r = 0.828, p r = 0.807, p < 0.01). The grid electrode was then replaced with two RESUME electrodes over the hand and foot areas, and the optimum positions were identified by D-wave recording before electrode fixation. Both patients reported satisfactory pain alleviation with lower stimulation voltages than usually required for patients with similar symptoms. These results indicate the potential of D-wave recording as an intraoperative indicator for the placement of stimulating electrodes over the motor cortex for pain relief.

  3. Long-term motor improvement after stroke is enhanced by short-term treatment with the alpha-2 antagonist, atipamezole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Erik J; Papadopoulos, Catherine M; Tsai, Shih-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn L; Wolf, William A

    2010-07-30

    Drugs that increase central noradrenergic activity have been shown to enhance the rate of recovery of motor function in pre-clinical models of brain damage. Less is known about whether noradrenergic agents can improve the extent of motor recovery and whether such improvement can be sustained over time. This study was designed to determine if increasing central noradrenergic tone using atipamezole, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist, could induce a long-term improvement in motor performance in rats subjected to ischemic brain damage caused by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The importance of pairing physical "rehabilitation" with enhanced noradrenergic activity was also investigated. Atipamezole (1 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle (sterile saline) was administered once daily on Days 2-8 post-operatively. Half of each drug group was housed under enriched environment conditions supplemented with daily focused activity sessions while the other half received standard housing with no focused activity. Skilled motor performance in forelimb reaching and ladder rung walking was assessed for 8 weeks post-operatively. Animals receiving atipamezole plus rehabilitation exhibited significantly greater motor improvement in both behavioral tests as compared to vehicle-treated animals receiving rehabilitation. Interestingly, animals receiving atipamezole without rehabilitation exhibited a significant motor improvement in the ladder rung walk test but not the forelimb reaching test. These results suggest that a short-term increase in noradrenergic activity can lead to sustained motor improvement following stroke, especially when paired with rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godecke, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions. Trials in this early time window are few. Although the seminal AVERT trial suggests that a cautious approach is necessary immediately (stroke, early mobility training and mobilization appear well tolerated, with few reasons to delay initiating some rehabilitation within the first week. The results of large clinical trials of early aphasia therapy are on the horizon, and examples of targeted upper limb treatments with better patient selection are emerging. Early rehabilitation trials are complex, particularly those that intervene across acute and rehabilitation care settings, but these trials are important if we are to optimize recovery potential in the critical window for repair. Concerted efforts to standardize 'early' recruitment, appropriately stratify participants and implement longer term follow-up is needed. Trial standards are improving. New recommendations from a recent Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable will help drive new research.

  5. Do Stroke Patients Know Their Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomann, Maarja; Vibo, Riina; Kõrv, Janika

    2016-03-01

    Risk factor management is the key to stroke prevention. Although several studies have assessed the awareness of different risk factors in the general public, there are limited data available on how well acute stroke patients know their own risk factors. The aim of this study was to assess stroke patients' informedness of their own stroke risk factors. All consecutive eligible acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients hospitalized at the Tartu University Hospital, Department of Neurology, during 9 months in 2010 were interviewed about different stroke risk factors within 72 hours from hospitalization. The respective information was also retrieved from medical records. Of the 341 patients admitted during the study period, 195 were eligible for the interview. Diabetes was the best known risk factor (89%) followed by hypertension (80%), atrial fibrillation (78%), previous stroke (77%), and heart failure and/or ischemic heart disease (66%). We found that acute stroke patients are best informed of their diabetes and worst informed of their ischemic heart disease and/or heart failure. There is, however, room for amelioration in the awareness of all of the studied risk factors. More attention should be addressed to explaining the risks and treatment options to patients at risk of stroke and the general population. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk Factors, Subtypes, and Outcome of Ischemic Stroke in Kuwait: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Al-Sabah, Al-Alya; Ahmed, Samar F; Al-Enezi, Maha; Al-Tawheid, Nour; Al Mesailekh, Zainab; Eliwa, Jasmine; Alroughani, Raed

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies of stroke burden in Kuwait are scarce. We aimed to identify the risk factors, subtypes, and outcome of ischemic stroke in the 6 major hospitals in Kuwait between 2008 and 2013. A cross-sectional survey was carried out using randomly selected ischemic stroke patients. It included data of sociodemographic status, stroke risk factors, stroke subtypes, treatment, and outcomes. A total of 1257 ischemic stroke patients (811 men and 446 women; mean age 60.2 ± 13.1) were included. Small-artery ischemic stroke was the most common stroke subgroup (69.8%) whereas hypertension was the most prevalent risk factor (80.9%). History of heart disease was significantly associated (P strokes (58.3%) compared to large-artery stroke (37.5%) and small-artery stroke (32.5%). Atrial fibrillation was significantly prevalent (P stroke (54.2%) compared to large-artery stroke (13%) and small-artery stroke (7.6%). Presentation at ages less than 45 years was significantly (P stroke was significantly associated with higher mortality rates (25% versus 12.4% and 6.8%; P strokes, respectively. Small-artery ischemic stroke was the most common stroke subgroup, and hypertension was the most common risk factor. The outcome was better in younger patients. Cardioembolic stroke was associated with worse outcome. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment at high-volume facilities and academic centers is independently associated with improved survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, John M; Ho, Allen S; Luu, Michael; Yoshida, Emi J; Kim, Sungjin; Mita, Alain C; Scher, Kevin S; Shiao, Stephen L; Tighiouart, Mourad; Zumsteg, Zachary S

    2017-10-15

    The treatment of head and neck cancers is complex and associated with significant morbidity, requiring multidisciplinary care and physician expertise. Thus, facility characteristics, such as clinical volume and academic status, may influence outcomes. The current study included 46,567 patients taken from the National Cancer Data Base who were diagnosed with locally advanced invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx and were undergoing definitive radiotherapy. High-volume facilities (HVFs) were defined as the top 1% of centers by the number of patients treated from 2004 through 2012. Multivariable Cox regression and propensity score matching were performed to account for imbalances in covariates. The median follow-up was 55.1 months. Treatment at a HVF (hazard ratio, 0.798; 95% confidence interval, 0.753-0.845 [Ppatients treated at an HVF versus lower-volume facilities, respectively (Ppatients treated at academic versus nonacademic facilities (Pnumber of patients treated. The impact of facility volume and academic designation on survival was observed when using a variety of thresholds to define HVF, and across the vast majority of subgroups, including both oropharyngeal and nonoropharyngeal subsites. Patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who are undergoing curative radiotherapy at HVFs and academic centers appear to have improved survival. Cancer 2017;123:3933-42. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Stroke Risk Perception in Atrial Fibrillation Patients is not Associated with Clinical Stroke Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournaise, Anders; Skov, Jane; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Leppin, Anja

    2015-11-01

    Clinical risk stratification models, such as the CHA2DS2-VASc, are used to assess stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. No study has yet investigated whether and to which extent these patients have a realistic perception of their personal stroke risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the association between AF patients' stroke risk perception and clinical stroke risk. In an observational cross-sectional study design, we surveyed 178 AF patients with a mean age of 70.6 years (SD 8.3) in stable anticoagulant treatment (65% treatment duration >12 months). Clinical stroke risk was scored through the CHA2DS2-VASc, and patients rated their perceived personal stroke risk on a 7-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between clinical stroke risk assessment and patients' stroke risk perception (rho = .025; P = .741). Approximately 60% of the high-risk patients had an unrealistic perception of their own stroke risk, and there was no significant increase in risk perception from those with a lower compared with a higher risk factor load (χ(2) = .010; P = .522). Considering possible negative implications in terms of lack of motivation for lifestyle behavior change and adequate adherence to the treatment and monitoring of vitamin K antagonist, the apparent underestimation of risk by large subgroups warrants attention and needs further investigation with regard to possible behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschia, James F.; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A.; Eckel, Robert H.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Horvath, Susanna E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C.; Moore, Wesley S.; Wilson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  10. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  11. Evaluation of the Implementation of a Rapid Response Treatment Protocol for Patients with Acute Onset Stroke: Can We Increase the Number of Patients Treated and Shorten the Time Needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Advani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to evaluate the implementation of a rapid response treatment protocol for patients presenting with acute onset ischemic stroke. Improvements of routines surrounding the admission and treatment of patients with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT, such as door-to-needle (DTN times, and increasing the numbers of patients treated are discussed. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients (n = 320 treated with IVT for acute onset ischemic stroke at the Stavanger University Hospital, Norway, between 2003 and 2012. In 2009, a succession of changes to pre- and intra-hospital routines were made as well as an improvement in the education of primary health care physicians, nurses and paramedics involved in the treatment of acute onset stroke patients (rapid response treatment protocol. Analyses of DTN times, onset-to-needle times and the number of patients treated per year were carried out to ascertain the effect of the changes made. The primary aim was to analyze DTN times to look for any changes, and the secondary aim was to analyze changes in the number of patients treated per year. Results: In the years after the implementation of the rapid treatment protocol, we saw an improvement in the median DTN time with a decrease from 73 to 50 min in the first year (p = 0.03, a decrease of 45 min in the second year (p = 0.01 and a decrease of 31 min in the third year (p Conclusions: The implementation of the rapid treatment protocol for acute onset ischemic stroke patients led to a significant decrease in the DTN time at our center. These improvements also produced an increase in the number of patients treated per year. The extension of the therapeutic window from 3 to 4.5 h for the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator also played a role in the increased treatment numbers.

  12. Preferences and flexibility in decision-making among dental clinicians regarding the treatment of multirooted teeth: an interactive communication device-based survey at two academic conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Decision-making by dental and medical experts can be influenced by their biases, interests, and experiences, and academic arguments about controversial issues may additionally be considered indirect experiences capable of affecting decision-making. This study reports on the use of interactive communication devices to evaluate preferences and flexibility in decision-making among dental care providers who attended two distinct academic conferences. Methods Two debates were presented by a team of two lecturers at two academic conferences (focusing on periodontology and implant dentistry, respectively) and the audience members of each session were surveyed. Before each lecture, two case modules about the diagnosis and treatment of multirooted molar lesions were provided, and interactive communication devices were used to collect responses about decision-making preferences in treatment planning immediately before and after a debate about treatment strategies. Results In total, 81 and 84 completed answers from both conferences were obtained for the first and second case modules, respectively. The preferred treatment plan differed significantly according to the focus of the conference, and a tendency emerged for the clinicians participating in each conference to express uniform preferences. However, attending the debates resulted in significant changes in decision-making preferences regardless of the conference focus or the characteristics of the participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that providing continuing education via debates on controversial issues may be effective in widening conceptual knowledge and reducing biases among experts in the dental and medical fields. PMID:27382505

  13. Hypothermia for Stroke: call to action 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macleod, Malcolm R; Petersson, Jesper; Norrving, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The European Hypothermia Stroke Research Workshop was held in January 2010, in response to the alarming prospects of a significant increase of stroke expected in the coming years globally. Considering that a minority of patients (around 10%) are currently eligible for thrombolytic treatment, ther...

  14. MALDI IMS of Intraperitoneally Injected Danegaptide (ZP1609) for Treatment of Stroke-Reperfusion Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jasmine S H; Freitas-Andrade, Moises; Bechberger, John F; Naus, Christian; Yeung, Ken K-C; Whitehead, Shawn N

    2018-03-25

    This work focuses on direct matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) detection of intraperitoneally (IP) injected dipeptide ZP1609 in mouse brain tissue. Direct analysis of drug detection in intact tissue sections provides distribution information that can provide information to impact drug development. MALDI IMS capabilities of uncovering drug transport across the blood-brain barrier are demonstrated. Successful peptide detection using MALDI IMS was achieved using a MALDI TOF TOF system. Upon optimization of sample preparation procedures for dipeptide ZP1609, an additional tissue acidification procedure was found to greatly enhance signal detection. The imaging data acquired was able to determine successful transport of ZP1609 across the blood-brain barrier. Data obtained from MALDI IMS can help shape our understanding of biological functions, disease progression, and effects of drug delivery. Direct detection of ZP1609 throughout the brain tissue sections were observed from MALDI MS images. However, in cases where there was induction of stroke, a peak of lower signal intensity was also detected in the target m/z region. Although distinct differences in signal intensity can be seen between control and experimental groups, fragments and adducts of ZP1609 were investigated using MALDI IMS to verify detection of the target analyte. Overall, the data reveals successful penetration of ZP1609 across the blood-brain barrier. The benefits of tissue acidification in the enhancement of detection sensitivity for low abundance peptides were demonstrated. MALDI IMS has shown to be a useful technique in the direct detection of drugs within intact brain tissue sections. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Time to treatment with intravenous alteplase and outcome in stroke: an updated pooled analysis of ECASS, ATLANTIS, NINDS, and EPITHET trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, Kennedy R.; Bluhmki, Erich; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Brott, Thomas G.; Toni, Danilo; Grotta, James C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Kaste, Markku; Marler, John R.; Hamilton, Scott A.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Hacke, Werner; Allen, Kathryn; Mau, Jochen; Meier, Dieter; del Zoppo, Gregory; de Silva, D. A.; Butcher, K. S.; Parsons, M. W.; Barber, P. A.; Levi, C.; Bladin, C.; Byrnes, G.; Klingelhöfer, J.; Krauseneck, P.; Schneider, D.; Hielscher, A.N.; Büttner, Th; Hennen, G.; Marx, P.; Lücking, C. H.; Felgenhaner, K.; Hacke, W.; Müllges, W.; Krieter, G.; Schwartz, A.; Krämer, G.; Diener, H. C.; Busse, O.; Wiersbitzky, M.; Ferbert, A.; Druschky, K.-F.; Lechner, H.; Ladurner, G.; Schmutzhard, W.; Rogousslavsky, J.; Vignolo, A.; Regesta, G.; Re, G.; Pecorari, L.; Lagi, A.; Argentino, C.; Ferrari, G.; Mamoli, A.; Mironi, F.; Erilä, T.; Sivenius, I.; Murros, K.; Liukkonen, H.; Hedman, Ch; Muuronen, A.; Sotaniemi, K.; Thomassen, L.; Rosjo, O.; Brautaset, N.; Indredavik, B.; Sandset, P. M.; Petersson, J.; Radberg, H.; Térent, A.; Carlström, Ch; Kjällman, Lena; Overgaard, K.; Boysen, G.; Enevoldsen, E.; Munck, O.; St Jensen, T.; Campbell, M.; Hawkins, S. A.; Franke, C. L.; Vos, J.; Frenken, W. G. M.; Op de Coul, A. A. W.; Verslegers, W.; Cras, P.; Laloux, P.; Blecic, A.N.; Marchau, M.; Féve, J. -R.; Rancurel, G.; Weber, M.; Mahagne, M.-H.; Larrue, A.N.; Trouillas, A.N.; Blard, J. M.; Caussanel, A.N.; Chollet, A.N.; Orgogozo, J. M.; Arnoud, A.N.; Cunha, L.; Castillo, J.; Tejedor, D.; Chomorro, A.; Sancho, H.; Davalos, A.; Fieschi, Cesare; Verstraete, Marc; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Feuerer, Werner; Sanset, P. M.; Wahlgren, N. G.; Boysen, Gudrun; Hijdra, Albert H. J.; Bes, André; Hennerici, Michael; Bozzao, Luigi; Manelfe, Calude; Peock, Klaus; Zeumer, Hermann; Lenzi, Gian-Luigi; Crimmins, D.; Donnan, G.; Davis, S.; Gerraty, R.; Hankey, G.; Niederkorn, K.; Brainin, M.; Deisenhammer, E.; Baumhackl, U.; Grisold, W.; Podreka, I.; Alf, C.; Sluga, E.; Brücke, B.; Kristoferitsch, W.; Magnussen, I.; Vorstrup, S.; Olesen, J.; Kaste, M.; Rissanen, A.; Sivenius, J.; Hedman, C.; Numminen, H.; Liukkonen, J.; Kolvisto, K.; Erila, T.; Caussanel, J. P.; Dumas, R.; Trouillas, P.; Feve, J.-R.; Amarenco, P.; Zuber, M.; Chollet, F.; Larrue, V.; Saudeau, D.; Villringer, A.; Buttner, T.; Heiss, W. D.; Gond, M.; Reichmann, H.; Klotz, J.; Prange, H.; Steiner, T.; Kaps, M.; Lowitzsch, K.; Tettenborn, B.; Hamann, G.; Klingelhofer, J.; Bogdahn, U.; Mullgers, W.; Bottacchi, E.; Cappelletti, C.; Solime, F.; Toso, V.; Ricevuti, G.; Stam, J.; de Keijzer, J. H. A.; Koudstaal, P.; de Kort, P. L. M.; Hammond-Tooke, G. D.; Timmings, P.; Thomassen, I.; Rygh, J.; Cunha, I.; Correia, C.; Rubio, F.; Chamorro, A.; Sabin, J. Alvarez; Vilata, J. L. Marti; Zarranz, J. J.; Diez-Tejedor, E.; Egido, A.; Mora, J. Vivancos; Delgado, G.; Gil-Peralta, A.; Lainez, J. M.; Mostacero, E.; Radberg, J.; Prantare, H.; Carlstrom, C.; Costulas, V.; Wahlgren, N.-G.; Malm, J.; Terent, A.; Lyrer, P.; Bogousslavsky, J.; Hawkins, S.; Campbell, M. J.; Ford, G. A.; Mendelow, A. D.; Davalos, Antoni; Donnan, Geoffrey; Larrue, Vincent; Poeck, Klaus; Asplund, Kjell; Lenzi, Gian Luigi; Marler, John; Martinez-Vila, Eduardo; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Dávalos, A.; von Kummer, R.; Toni, D.; Wahlgren, N.; Lees, K. 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H.; Libman, R.; Kanner, R.; Silverman, R.; LaMantia, J.; Mealie, C.; Duarte, R.; Donnarumma, R.; Okola, M.; Cullin, V.; Mitchell, E.; Levine, S. R.; Lewandowski, C. A.; Tokarski, G.; Ramadan, N. M.; Mitsias, P.; Gorman, M.; Zarowitz, B.; Kokkinos, J.; Dayno, J.; Verro, P.; Gymnopoulos, C.; Dafer, R.; D'Olhaberriague, L.; Sawaya, K.; Daley, S.; Mitchell, M.; Frankel, M.; Mackay, B.; Barch, C.; Braimah, J.; Faherty, B.; MacDonald, J.; Sailor, S.; Cook, A.; Karp, H.; Nguyen, B.; Washington, J.; Weissman, J.; Williams, M.; Williamson, T.; Kozinn, M.; Hellwick, L.; Haley, E. C.; Bleck, T. P.; Cail, W. S.; Lindbeck, G. H.; Granner, M. A.; Wolf, S. S.; Gwynn, M. W.; Mettetal, R. W.; Chang, C. W. J.; Solenski, N. J.; Brock, D. G.; Ford, G. F.; Kongable, G. L.; Parks, K. N.; Wilkinson, S. S.; Davis, M. K.; Sheppard, G. L.; Zontine, D. W.; Gustin, K. H.; Crowe, N. M.; Massey, S. L.; Meyer, M.; Gaines, K.; Payne, A.; Bales, C.; Malcolm, J.; Barlow, R.; Wilson, M.; Cape, C.; Bertorini, T.; Misulis, K.; Paulsen, W.; Shepard, D.; Tilley, B. C.; Welch, K. M. A.; Fagan, S. C.; Lu, M.; Patel, S.; Masha, E.; Verter, J.; Boura, J.; Main, J.; Gordon, L.; Maddy, N.; Chociemski, T.; Windham, J.; Zadeh, H. Soltanian; Alves, W.; Keller, M. F.; Wenzel, J. R.; Raman, N.; Cantwell, L.; Warren, A.; Smith, K.; Bailey, E.; Welch, C.; Marler, J. R.; Froehlich, J.; Breed, J.; Easton, J. D.; Hallenbeck, J. F.; Lan, G.; Marsh, J. D.; Walker, M. D.; Davis, S. M.; Donnan, G. A.; Butcher, K.; Peeters, A.; Chalk, J. B.; Fink, J. N.; Kimber, T. E.; Schultz, D.; Hand, P. J.; Frayne, J.; Muir, K.; Tress, B. M.; Attia, J.; D'Este, C.; McNeil, J.; Burns, R.; Johnston, C.; Stark, R.; Desmond, P. M.; Christensen, S.; Ebinger, M.; Jackson, D.; Kimber, T.; Peeteis, A.; Fink, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early administration of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) after ischaemic stroke improves outcome. Previous analysis of combined data from individual patients suggested potential benefit beyond 3 h from stroke onset. We re-examined the effect of time to

  16. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  17. Quality of Life of Nigerian Stroke Survivors and Its Determinants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The disability caused by stroke could lead to significant decline in the level of functioning and deterioration of quality of life (QoL). QoL assessment could be used to evaluate the impact of stroke, assist in planning effective treatment, appraise efficacy of stroke rehabilitation, and evaluate cost effectiveness in order to justify ...

  18. Evaluation of Motor Recovery in Adult Patients with Hemiplegic stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Assessment of treatment efficacy through outcomes evaluation is an established practice in stroke rehabilitation. The evaluation of motor recovery is a cornerstone of the assessment of patients with stroke; and an integral component of stroke rehabilitation. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ...

  19. Quality of Life of Nigerian Stroke Survivors and its Determinants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. The disability caused by stroke could lead to significant decline in the level of functioning and deterioration of quality of life. (QoL). QoL assessment could be used to evaluate the impact of stroke, assist in planning effective treatment, appraise efficacy of stroke rehabilitation, and evaluate cost effectiveness in ...

  20. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  1. Treatment of patients with a history of penicillin allergy in a large tertiary-care academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Matthieu; Bégin, Philippe; Bouchard, Hugues; Cloutier, Jonathan; Lacombe-Barrios, Jonathan; Paradis, Jean; Des Roches, Anne; Laufer, Brian; Paradis, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing antibiotics to patients with a history of penicillin allergy is common in clinical practice. Opting for non-beta-lactam antibiotics has its inconveniences and is often unnecessary, because most of these patients are