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Sample records for stroke scale barthel

  1. Use of the Barthel Index and Modified Rankin Scale in acute stroke trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, C; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    Background and Purpose-The Barthel Index (BI) and the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) are commonly used scales that: measure disability or dependence in activities of daily living in stroke victims. The objective of this study was to investigate how these scales were used and interpreted in acute stroke

  2. Measuring disability in stroke : relationship between the modified Rankin scale and the Barthel index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, M; Luijckx, G-J; Vroomen, P C A J; Stewart, R E; De Keyser, J

    The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in acute stroke trials is traditionally measured with the modified Rankin scale (mRs) and the Barthel index (BI). The mRs is a global disability scale divided into six steps from total independence to total dependence. The BI assesses ten basal

  3. Optimizing cutoff scores for the Barthel Index and the modified Rankin Scale for defining outcome in acute stroke trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    Background and Purpose - There is little agreement on how to assess outcome in acute stroke trials. Cutoff scores for the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) are frequently arbitrarily chosen to dichotomize favorable and unfavorable outcome. We investigated sensitivity and specificity

  4. Development of two Barthel Index-based Supplementary Scales for patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Chen; Chen, Sheng-Shiung; Koh, Chia-Lin; Hsueh, I-Ping; Yao, Kai-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The Barthel Index (BI) assesses actual performance of activities of daily living (ADL). However, comprehensive assessment of ADL functions should include two other constructs: self-perceived difficulty and ability. The aims of this study were to develop two BI-based Supplementary Scales (BI-SS), namely, the Self-perceived Difficulty Scale and the Ability Scale, and to examine the construct validity of the BI-SS in patients with stroke. The BI-SS was first developed by consultation with experts and then tested on patients to confirm the clarity and feasibility of administration. A total of 306 participants participated in the construct validity study. Construct validity was investigated using Mokken scale analysis and analyzing associations between scales. The agreement between each pair of the scales' scores was further examined. The Self-perceived Difficulty Scale consisted of 10 items, and the Ability Scale included 8 items (excluding both bladder and bowel control items). Items in each individual scale were unidimensional (H ≥ 0.5). The scores of the Self-perceived Difficulty and Ability Scales were highly correlated with those of the BI (rho = 0.78 and 0.90, respectively). The scores of the two BI-SS scales and BI were significantly different from each other (pscales assessed unique constructs. The BI-SS had overall good construct validity in patients with stroke. The BI-SS can be used as supplementary scales for the BI to comprehensively assess patients' ADL functions in order to identify patients' difficulties in performing ADL tasks, plan intervention strategies, and assess outcomes.

  5. Comparative interrater reliability of Asian Stroke Disability Scale, modified Rankin Scale and Barthel Index in patients with brain infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Kavian; Ghandehari, Kosar; Saffarian-Toosi, Ghazaleh; Masoudinezhad, Shahram; Yazdani, Siamak; Nooraddin, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed; Ahmadi, Fahimeh; Abrishamchi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study tried to develop an Asian Stroke Disability Scale (ASDS) and compared its interrater reliability with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI). Three items including self-care, mobility, and daily activities were selected as variables for development of the ASDS. The variables were provisionally graded on a 2- to 4-point scale based on the importance of each item. Each of the variables was categorized into 3 categories. Afterward, 125 rater-patient assessments for each scale (mRS, BI, and ASDS) were performed on 25 stroke patients by 5 raters. For categorization of functional impairment as minor or major, the scores of mRS, BI and ASDS were categorized as ≤ 2 and > 2, 0.05). The ASDS is easy to use, requires less than 1 minute to complete and is as valid as mRS and BI in assessment of functional impairment of patients with stroke.

  6. Measuring disability in stroke: relationship between the modified Rankin scale and the Barthel index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenboogaart, M; Luijckx, G-J; Vroomen, P C A J; Stewart, R E; De Keyser, J

    2007-08-01

    The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in acute stroke trials is traditionally measured with the modified Rankin scale (mRs) and the Barthel index (BI). The mRs is a global disability scale divided into six steps from total independence to total dependence. The BI assesses ten basal activities of daily living, of which eight assess level of dependence (bathing, grooming, using stairs, dressing, feeding, toilet use, transfers and walking). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mRs and the total scores and item-scores of the BI. During a period of 3 months mRs and BI scores were collected from two multicentre randomised, placebo-controlled trials with lubeluzole (515 and 519 patients). In each patient we compared the mRs grades with the total BI score and the scores on the ten subitems. For both trials there was extensive overlap of BI scores between mRs grades and a wide range in BI scores among patients with mRs grades 3 and 4. We also found discrepancies between the BI item-scores and mRs grades. About 40% of patients with mRs grades 1 (able to carry out all usual activities) and 2 (able to look after own affairs without assistance) were not independent on at least one activity of the BI. In both studies, about 30% of the patients needed help or supervision for walking, although they were classified as mRs 3 (requiring some help but able to walk without assistance). Investigators in stroke trials use the mRs as a subjective global disability scale, and they do not strictly take into account limitations in performing specific basal activities of daily living, as assessed by the BI, to assign mRs grades.

  7. Post-stroke motor and functional evaluations: a clinical correlation using Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Roberta de; Cacho,Enio Walker Azevedo; Borges,Guilherme

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. Objective: To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral strok...

  8. Post-stroke motor and functional evaluations: a clinical correlation using Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Roberta; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Borges, Guilherme

    2006-09-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral stroke in chronic phase (>6 months post ictus) were evaluated for about one hour. Barthel scale was statistically related to the total motor score of Fugl-Meyer assessment (r=0.597, p=0.005). The lower limb section at Fugl-Meyer had positive correlation with Berg scale (r=0.653, p=0.002) and with the balance section of Fugl-Meyer own scale (r=0.449, p=0.047). Both balance scales were correlated one with other (r=0.555, p=0.011). Statistical divergence appeared when Barthel's Index was correlated with Berg's Scale (r=0.425, p=0.062), and it is not statistically significant. The use of both quantitative and qualitative scales was shown to be a good measuring instrument for the classification of the general clinical performance of the patient, especially when positively related joint evaluations are applied.

  9. Relationship between the modified Rankin Scale and the Barthel Index in the process of functional recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioncoloni, D; Piu, P; Tassi, R; Acampa, M; Guideri, F; Taddei, S; Bielli, S; Martini, G; Mazzocchio, R

    2012-01-01

    The modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and the Barthel Index (BI) are the most common clinimetrical instruments for measuring disability after stroke. This study investigated the relationship between the BI and the mRS at multiple time points after stroke. The BI, which is a widely used instrument for longitudinal follow-up post-stroke, was used as reference to determine the effect of time on the sensitivity of the mRS in differentiating functional recovery. Ninety-two patients with first stroke and hemispheric brain lesion were evaluated using the BI and mRS at 10 days, 3 and 6 months. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to examine median differences in BI among the mRS levels at 10 days, 3 and 6 months with Dunn's correction for multigroup comparison. The Mann and Whitney test was used to compare median differences in BI scores between two aggregations of mRS grades (mRS=0-2, mRS=3-5) at the same time periods after stroke. BI score distribution amongst mRS grades overlapped at 10 days, differentiating only between extreme grades (no disability vs severe disability). At 3 months, independent patients with slight disability could be distinguished from dependent patients with marked disability. At 6 months, grade 2 and 3 overlapped no more, differentiating independence (class 0-2) from dependence (class 3-5). The largest transition to an independent functional status occurred from grade 4, at 3 months. Maximum sensitivity of mRS in differentiating functional recovery is reached at six months post-stroke.

  10. Activity Index - a complementary ADL scale to the Barthel Index in the acute stage in patients with severe stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, Louise; Eksborg, Staffan

    2006-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to compare the Barthel Index (BI) and the activities of daily living (ADL) component of the Activity Index [AI(ADL)] regarding floor and ceiling effects, responsiveness and the predictive value for survival during the first week until 3 months after stroke onset. Basic ADL were assessed in 75 patients with ischaemic stroke. There was a strong concordance between BI and AI(ADL) scores at all time points (Kendall's taub = 0.7878, p scales had a substantial ceiling effect at 3 months. At 1 week, the baseline BI score was significantly higher in patients being alive as compared with those who had died, while their AI(ADL) score did not differ significantly. At 3 months, baseline BI and AI(ADL) scores were significantly higher in patients being alive as compared with those who had died. The predictive value of being alive at 1 week and 3 months did not differ between BI and AI(ADL). AI(ADL) is recommended to be used in addition as a complement to BI in patients with severe stroke since the floor effect with BI in the acute stage is significantly more pronounced than with AI(ADL), thus hampering the responsiveness. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Optimizing cutoff scores for the Barthel index and the modified Rankin scale for defining outcome in acute stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2005-09-01

    There is little agreement on how to assess outcome in acute stroke trials. Cutoff scores for the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) are frequently arbitrarily chosen to dichotomize favorable and unfavorable outcome. We investigated sensitivity and specificity of BI cutoff scores in relation to the mRS to obtain the optimal corresponding BI and mRS scores. BI and mRS scores were collected from 1034 ischemic stroke patients. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for BI cutoff scores from 45 to 100 in mRS score 1, 2, and 3 and were plotted in receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. The cutoff scores for the BI with the highest sum of sensitivity and specificity were 95 (sensitivity 85.6%; specificity 91.7%), 90 (sensitivity 90.7%; specificity 88.1%), and 75 (sensitivity 95.7%; specificity, 88.5%) for, respectively, mRS 1, 2, and 3. The area under the ROC curve was 0.933 in mRS 1, 0.960 in mRS 2, and 0.979 in mRS 3. The optimal cutoff scores for the BI were 95 for mRS 1, 90 for mRS 2, and 75 for mRS 3. For future acute stroke trials that assess stroke outcome with the BI and mRS, we recommend the use of these BI cutoff score(s) with the corresponding mRS cutoff score(s), to ensure the use of consistent and uniform end points.

  12. Disability measures in stroke: relationship among the Barthel Index, the Functional Independence Measure, and the Modified Rankin Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooyeon; Hartzema, Abraham G; Duncan, Pamela W; Min-Lai, Sue

    2004-04-01

    Residual disability after stroke presents a major economic and humanistic burden. To quantify disability in patients, activities of daily living (ADL; Barthel Index [BI], and motor component of Functional Independence Measure [M-FIM]) and categorical disability measures (Modified Rankin Scale [MRS]) are used. The purpose of this study is to examine the predicting ability of ADL measures to global disability scale. Kansas City Stroke Study data were used for the present study. Correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis test, and polytomous logistic regression analysis were applied to examine the relationship between the ADL measure and global disability scale. Model fit statistics were examined to verify logistic regression appropriateness. A categorization scheme, which minimized the false-positive response rate, was selected as the optimal categorizing system. The 3 measures were highly correlated. Both BI and M-FIM differentiated disability better in lower than higher disability. In logistic regression, BI differentiated 4 disability levels; M-FIM differentiated 3 levels in MRS. However, on the basis of results of the Kruskal-Wallis and multiple comparison tests, we suspect that M-FIM may have the potential to predict MRS categories better with a different model. The proposed categorization scheme can serve as a translation between measures. However, because of the ceiling effect of BI and M-FIM, the translation could not be completed for all 6 levels of MRS. No apparent variation over time in the categorization scheme was observed. Further research needs to be conducted to develop better prediction models explaining the relationship between M-FIM and MRS.

  13. Differences in psychometric properties, cut-off scores, and outcomes between the Barthel Index and Modified Rankin Scale in pharmacotherapy-based stroke trials: systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Sanjeev

    2009-06-01

    Review published clinical trial studies on pharmacological treatment of stroke using both the Barthel Index (BI) and Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) as outcome measures, and to highlight the differences in psychometric properties and cut-off scores through a systematic review. A systematic literature search on stroke studies involving a pharmacological treatment was conducted between 1955-2008. Key words included Barthel index, Rankin, modified Rankin, pharmacotherapy, validity, reliability, responsiveness, sensitivity, specificity, outcomes, psychometrics, prediction, randomized clinical trials, analysis, and stroke. All search terms were limited to Medical Subjects Headings (MESH) terms, English-language abstracts, and human subjects. Overall, 44 studies were identified, six studies comparing the psychometric properties of the BI and the MRS, 24 studies on use of both the BI and the MRS in clinical stroke trials involving a pharmacological treatment, and 14 studies reviewed the cut-off scores and statistical issues related to scale selection. Most studies measured outcomes at 90 days after initiating therapy although differences were observed in this lag time. There was inconsistency in cut-off points used for both scales in the studies. There was no apparent relation between time to initiation of stroke therapy and outcomes measured by the BI and the MRS. The time window ranged from 3 hours to 72 hours although most of the studies reported outcomes after therapy initiation within 3-6 hours of stroke onset. BI may not be an appropriate scale to measure treatment effects due to the inherent ceiling and floor effects. Use of total distribution scores on the scales rather that dichotomizing or trichotomizing the scales has been favored recently. In mild to moderate stroke patients, the MRS seems to detect small and significant treatment effect changes as compared to the BI. Since most stroke studies try to exhibit the effects of treatment within 3 hours after symptom

  14. Validation of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin Scale and Barthel Index in Brazil: the role of cultural adaptation and structured interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincura, Carolina; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M; Neville, Iuri S; Mendes, Henrique F; Menezes, Daniela F; Mariano, Débora C; Pereira, Issana F; Teixeira, Larissa A; Jesus, Pedro A P; de Queiroz, Danilo C L; Pereira, Davidson F; Pinto, Elen; Leite, João P; Lopes, Antonio A; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to validate three widely used scales in stroke research in a multiethnic Brazilian population. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI) were translated, culturally adapted and applied by two independent investigators. The mRS was applied with or without a previously validated structured interview. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. 84 patients underwent mRS (56 with and 28 without a structured interview), 57 BI and 62 NIHSS scoring. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.902 for NIHSS and 0.967 for BI. For BI, interobserver agreement was good (kappa = 0.70). For mRS, the structured interview improved interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.34 without a structured interview; 0.75 with a structured interview). The NIHSS, BI and mRS show good validity when translated and culturally adapted. Using a structured interview for the mRS improves interobserver concordance rates. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the Barthel Index-based Supplementary Scales in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Chen; Yu, Wan-Hui; Hsueh, I-Ping; Chen, Sheng-Shiung; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2017-10-01

    A lack of evidence on the test-retest reliability and responsiveness limits the utility of the BI-based Supplementary Scales (BI-SS) in both clinical and research settings. To examine the test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the BI-based Supplementary Scales (BI-SS) in patients with stroke. A repeated-assessments design (1 week apart) was used to examine the test-retest reliability of the BI-SS. For the responsiveness study, the participants were assessed with the BI-SS and BI (treated as an external criterion) at admission to and discharge from rehabilitation wards. Seven outpatient rehabilitation units and one inpatient rehabilitation unit. Outpatients with chronic stroke. Eighty-four outpatients with chronic stroke participated in the test-retest reliability study. Fifty-seven inpatients completed baseline and follow-up assessments in the responsiveness study. For the test-retest reliability study, the values of the intra-class correlation coefficient and the overall percentage of minimal detectable change for the Ability Scale and Self-perceived Difficulty Scale were 0.97, 12.8%, and 0.78, 35.8%, respectively. For the responsiveness study, the standardized effect size and standardized response mean (representing internal responsiveness) of the Ability Scale and Self-perceived Difficulty Scale were 1.17 and 1.56, and 0.78 and 0.89, respectively. Regarding external responsiveness, the change in score of the Ability Scale had significant and moderate association with that of the BI (r=0.61, Preliability and sufficient responsiveness for patients with stroke. However, the Self-perceived Difficulty Scale of the BI-SS has substantial random measurement error and insufficient external responsiveness, which may affect its utility in clinical settings. The findings of this study provide empirical evidence of psychometric properties of the BI-SS for assessing ability and self-perceived difficulty of ADL in patients with stroke.

  16. Improved interpretation of stroke trial results using empirical Barthel item weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hartingsveld, Frank; Lucas, Cees; Kwakkel, Gert; Lindeboom, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Attempts have been made to provide guidelines for interpreting Barthel scores. We used a Rasch analysis to improve the measurement properties and clinical interpretability of the Barthel index score. A specific extension of Rasch model was used to identify items that preclude the summation of items and to improve the item rating scale by examining the scores on the Barthel of 559 stroke patients scored 3 weeks (n=89) and 6 months (n=470) after stroke. The clinical interpretation of the revised Rasch modeled Barthel was illustrated by re-examining the results of a previously published trial on the effectiveness of leg and arm training after stroke. Most rating scales could be improved by collapsing nondiscriminating rating categories. Two items showed misfit: Bladder and Bowel. The remaining Barthel showed an excellent fit to the extended Rasch model (R1c Goodness-of-Fit P=0.35). Both items and patients could be placed on a common logit unit scale, allowing a clearer interpretation of the trial effect. Using the modeled activities of daily living difficulty/ability scale, we could express the differences between treatment arms in modeled probabilities of a positive score to each Barthel item for the treatment arms not conveyed by the original ordinal Barthel sum scores. We improved the psychometric properties and clinical interpretation of the Barthel index.

  17. Barthel index for stroke trials: development, properties, and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence J; Langhorne, Peter; Stott, David J

    2011-04-01

    Robust measures of functional outcome are required to determine treatment effects in stroke trials. Of the various measures available, the Barthel index (BI) is one of the more prevalent. We aimed to describe validity, reliability, and responsiveness (clinimetric properties) of the BI in stroke trials. Narrative review of published articles describing clinimetric properties or use of the BI as a stroke trial end point. Definitive statements on properties of BI are limited by heterogeneity in methodology of assessment and in the content of "BI" scales. Accepting these caveats, evidence suggests that BI is a valid measure of activities of daily living; sensitivity to change is limited at extremes of disability (floor and ceiling effects), and reliability of standard BI assessment is acceptable. However, these data may not be applicable to contemporary multicenter stroke trials. Substantial literature describing BI clinimetrics in stroke is available; however, questions remain regarding certain properties. The "BI" label is used for a number of instruments and we urge greater consistency in methods, content, and scoring. A 10-item scale, scoring 0 to 100 with 5-point increments, has been used in several multicenter stroke trials and it seems reasonable that this should become the uniform stroke trial BI.

  18. Comparison of 2 extended activities of daily living scales with the Barthel Index and predictors of their outcomes: cohort study within the South London Stroke Register (SLSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Shah-Jalal; Rudd, Anthony G; Douiri, Abdel; Wolfe, Charles D A

    2012-05-01

    Basic activities of daily living measures are often supplemented by extended activities of daily living. We compared the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) with the Barthel Index (BI) in terms of distribution of scores, concurrent validity, reliability, and their agreement and investigated the predictors of scales outcomes. Two hundred thirty-eight patients from the population-based South London Stroke Register were assessed with the BI, FAI, and NEADL 3 months after a first-ever stroke. The pairwise relationship was studied using correlations, fractional polynomial regression, and Bland and Altman plot; the baseline predictors, for example, sociodemography, case severity: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and 7-day Abbreviated Memory Test, comorbidities, and acute treatments by negative binomial regression. The BI was highly affected by a ceiling effect (33% had the highest score), FAI was only affected by floor effect (19%), but NEADL was symmetrical with only 4% highest and lowest score. Despite high concurrent validity of the scales (r ≥0.80, PScale >13) had 28% lower BI (79% lower FAI and 62% lower NEADL) score than nonsevere patients (P≤0.001). Cognitively intact patients (Abbreviated Memory Test: 8-10) had 2.3 times greater FAI values (65% higher NEADL) compared with impaired patients (Pscale was symmetrical, concurrently valid with no floor and ceiling effects. It corresponded better with BI than FAI did confirming its basic activities of daily living properties, yet it is a more sensitive tool for extended activities of daily living without the floor and ceiling effects. Future functional status could be predicted by the acute stage National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, whereas only extended activities of daily living status could be predicted by the Abbreviated Memory Test score. Predicting future functional status at the acute stage may decrease unnecessary length of stay

  19. The Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale as prognostic tools for long-term outcomes after stroke: a qualitative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Krista F; Caro, J Jaime

    2007-07-01

    Providing a quantitative prognosis after a stroke is important to clinicians and patients as well as to researchers interested in projecting the results of clinical trials and other studies. Thus, we critically reviewed the evidence supporting the prognostic value of two frequently-used measures, the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for long-term outcomes. A narrative review of the peer-reviewed medical literature obtained by searching Medline 1966 to January 2004--using the phrase '[stroke] AND [Barthel OR Rankin]'--was conducted to assess the strength of the evidence for these measures and answer three main questions: How good are the BI and mRS at predicting (1) the level of care required, (2) the time-course of recovery, and (3) mortality. Abstracts were screened for the presence of actual data on the prognostic impact of BI and mRS on these endpoints, and selected articles were fully reviewed and abstracted. Additional articles were identified from bibliographies of the retrieved papers. Of 753 abstracts screened, 89 articles were selected for detailed assessment. Early disability and global outcome (< or = 7 days) were shown in 21 studies to be strong predictors of care needs. This relation appears to be mainly biological, not country-specific. Recovery was shown in 18 studies to be strongly related to early BI. In contrast, the 11 studies examining mortality provided insufficient information to directly support the prognostic value of either measure. Key limitations of this review include heterogeneity of available studies (e.g., time-points, outcome, parameterization) and relative lack of information on the mRS. Despite the lack of uniformity in existing studies, the evidence overall is quite strong, supporting the use of BI and mRS as prognostic tools. External non-treatment modifiable factors which also determine long-term outcome (e.g., social support) have to be taken into account.

  20. The Barthel index as predictor of handicap in stroke survivors: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: One hundred and twelve participants with a diagnosis of stroke were prospectively enrolled. Fifteen clinical variables, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission, and the barthel index at 7th day were the independent variables. The modified Rankin scale at 6 weeks was the outcome ...

  1. A comparison of the Barthel Index and the Functional Independence Measure as outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation: patterns of disability scale usage in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Harpreet; Lipson, David; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Bhogal, Sanjit; Pohani, Gina; Teasell, Robert W

    2005-06-01

    In order to compare the frequency and patterns of use of the Barthel Index (BI) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) in stroke rehabilitation trials, all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of stroke rehabilitation published between 1968 and 2002 were identified and reviewed to determine the frequency with which the BI and FIM measures were used relative to other measures of disability. The date and location of each study citing either the FIM or the BI were also recorded. Studies were assigned ratings of methodological quality based on the physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scoring system. Comparisons of the age, frequency and continents of origin and methodological quality of the studies were explored. Results indicate that the BI and FIM were the most common measures of disability used in RCTs examining stroke rehabilitation. However, the BI was used more often than the FIM (n=86, Pscale use in stroke rehabilitation research.

  2. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually...... predicted was the need for special living facilities and support at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital, as well as six months later; 53 stroke patients with age median 68 years were included in this prospective study. It was shown that a combination of Barthel Index and CT50 had a stronger predictive...

  3. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually ...

  4. Is the Barthel Scale appropriate in non-industrialized countries? A view of rural Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S M; Mulley, G P

    1998-05-01

    To determine if the Barthel Index, a conventional scale for assessing disability, is appropriate for stroke patients in rural Pakistan, rather than an observational study by visiting stroke patients in their homes. Stroke patients attending hospital out patient clinics in Islamabad, together with others identified in local villages, were assessed to test the validity of the Barthel Activities of Daily Living Scale. For each item on the disability scale, differences in local customs, lifestyle and architecture meant that the Barthel Scale was not appropriate in rural Pakistan. There is unlikely to be a disability scale which can be applicable universally. Care must be taken when standard scales are used for international comparisons of stroke disability.

  5. Relationship between Barthel Index (BI and the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS Score in Assessing Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated that stroke functional outcome can be predicted from the baseline BI and mRS scales. It is concluded thatBI and mRS Stroke scale can be used to prognosticate functional outcome at admission and at follow up.

  6. An evaluation of the Extended Barthel Index with acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansa, Jelka; Pogacnik, Tomaz; Gompertz, Patrick

    2004-03-01

    To evaluate the Extended Barthel Index with acute ischemic stroke patients. This prospective 1- to 6-week poststroke follow-up study was carried out using 33 newly diagnosed acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to the University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Neurology. Measures used were Barthel Index (BI), Extended Barthel Index (EBI), Fugl-Meyer Motor Impairment Scale, 1-5 Self-Assessment scale, Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test. The EBI is a reliable scale in terms of internal consistency. The cognitive part is less reliable than the physical part of the EBI. It is a 3-dimensional scale as calculated by factor analysis (factor 1 with eigen value 8.2, factor 2 with eigen value 2.7 and factor 3 with eigen value 0.9). Criterion validity to the BI and the Fugl-Meyer Motor Impairment Scale was supported (P=0.1-0.001). External validity to the Self-Assessment scale was also supported (P<0.001). It is more sensitive to the changes in functional status that occur in the 1st 6 weeks poststroke than the original BI, although the ceiling effect was not really explained in this follow-up period. The EBI is a valid, reliable, 2- to 3-dimensional outcome measure of disability/activity for stroke patients. To some extent, it also reveals the level of patients' perception of their functional status.

  7. Walking recovery after an acute stroke: assessment with a new functional classification and the Barthel Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viosca, Enrique; Lafuente, Rubén; Martínez, José L; Almagro, Pedro L; Gracia, Antonio; González, Carmen

    2005-06-01

    To investigate walking recovery after an acute stroke by using both a new functional classification and the Barthel Index, and to identify factors associated with good recovery. A 1-year inception cohort study. In- and outpatient setting in a district hospital. Twenty-six patients with a prognosis of intermediate walking recovery. Conventional physical rehabilitation under professional supervision. Walking capacity was assessed with a new classification scale and the Barthel Index during 5 patient evolution stages (admission to the hospital, hospital and physiotherapy discharge, clinical review, end of study). We also assessed the severity of the paresis of the affected lower limb, the time lapse between the stroke until the recovery of the weight-bearing capacity of the affected leg, and finally the time until standing balance was regained. We detected improvement in walking capacity throughout the follow-up process with our new classification scale, but not with the Barthel Index. Significant improvements were observed from the initial assessment, from 1 month onward, and from 3 to 12 months. The functional level of the final ambulation correlated negatively and significantly with the initial time to achieve weight-bearing capacity on the affected leg and also with the standing balance. There was also a significant correlation with the severity of lower-extremity paresis. Patients experienced an improvement in walking recovery throughout the first year after their stroke. The early weight-bearing capacity of the affected leg and standing balance were associated with higher walking levels 1 year after the stroke.

  8. A test-retest reliability study of the Barthel Index, the Rivermead Mobility Index, the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale and the Frenchay Activities Index in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J; Forster, A; Young, J

    2001-10-15

    To assess the test-retest reliability of a range of outcome measures in stroke patients. Twenty-two patients > 1 year post-stroke were tested twice at an interval of 1 week using the Barthel Index (BI); the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI); the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL); and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI). The mean difference (bias) and reliability coefficient (random error) were calculated for the total scores. Percentage agreement and the kappa coefficient were used to analyse individual items. The mean differences and reliability coefficients were BI 0.4 +/- 2.0, RMI 0.3 +/- 2.2, the NEADL 0.6 +/- 5.6, FAI -0.6 +/- 7.1. There was little bias between assessments. The performance of the BI and RMI were better with lower random error. The NEADL and FAI did not perform as well having larger random error components. Percentage agreements were generally high especially for the BI (>75%) and RMI (>85%), but there was considerable variation in the kappa coefficients. Measurement of basic activities of daily living and mobility as measured by the BI and RMI is reliable post-stroke. Measurements used to assess extended activities of daily living were less reliable in this study.

  9. Is Barthel index a relevant measure for measuring prevalence of urinary incontinence in stroke patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2012-01-01

    distinguished between types of UI (38% urge UI, 28% stress UI, and 14% other UI). There were significantly fewer stroke patients who reported UI by the Barthel Index compared to the DAN‐PSS questionnaire in term of urge UI (P stress UI (P PSS......To compare the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) measured by Barthel Index and the Danish Prostate Symptom Score (DAN‐PSS‐1) questionnaire in stroke patients. A cross‐sectional, hospital based survey was initiated whereby 407 stroke patients, average age 67 (SD 12) years with a mean interval...... of 101 days since onset of last stroke at inclusion. The stroke patients self‐reported the prevalence of UI by Barthel Index and the DAN‐PSS‐1 questionnaire. The prevalence of UI was 10.5% measured by the Barthel Index and 49% by the DAN‐PSS‐1 questionnaire. Furthermore, the DAN‐PSS‐1 questionnaire...

  10. Post-stroke motor and functional evaluations: a clinical correlation using Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index Avaliações motoras e funcionais pós-AVC: correlação clínica usando a escala de desempenho físico de Fugl-Meyer, a escala de equilíbrio de Berg e o índice de Barthel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta de Oliveira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral stroke in chronic phase (>6 months post ictus were evaluated for about one hour. RESULTS: Barthel scale was statistically related to the total motor score of Fugl-Meyer assessment (r=0.597, p=0.005. The lower limb section at Fugl-Meyer had positive correlation with Berg scale (r=0.653, p=0.002 and with the balance section of Fugl-Meyer own scale (r=0.449, p=0.047. Both balance scales were correlated one with other (r=0.555, p=0.011. Statistical divergence appeared when Barthel's Index was correlated with Berg's Scale (r=0.425, p=0.062, and it is not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The use of both quantitative and qualitative scales was shown to be a good measuring instrument for the classification of the general clinical performance of the patient, especially when positively related joint evaluations are applied.O acidente vascular cerebral (AVC é reconhecido como uma das maiores causas de morbidade e mortalidade. Seqüelas decorrentes deste evento podem levar a inabilidade motora e déficits leves a graves. Para classificar melhor a disfunção sensitivo-motora, o equilíbrio e as habilidades para as atividades de vida diária, escalas de avaliações quantitativas e qualitativas estão sendo utilizadas. OBJETIVO: Correlacionar a escala de desempenho físico de Fugl-Meyer, a escala de equilíbrio de Berg e o índice de Barthel. MÉTODO: Foram selecionados 20 sujeitos com sequela de um único e unilateral AVC em fase crônica (>6 meses pós ictal, que

  11. Establishing the minimal clinically important difference of the Barthel Index in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Wang, Chun-Hou; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chen, Pau-Chung; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the change scores of the Barthel Index (BI) in follow-up or outcome studies has been hampered by the fact that its minimal clinically important difference (MCID) has not been determined. This article was written to establish the MCID of the BI in stroke patients. Both anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to establish the MCID. In the anchor-based method, 43 stroke inpatients participated in a follow-up study designed to determine the MCID of the BI using patients' global ratings of the activities of daily living function on a 15-point Likert-type scale. The mean change scores on the 20-point scale of the BI of the MCID group, based on the patients' ratings on the Likert-type scale, served as the first estimate of the MCID. In the distribution-based method, 56 chronic stroke patients participated in the test-retest reliability study to determine the MCID of the BI. One standard error of measurement (SEM) served as the second estimate for the MCID. The larger MCID value of the 2 estimates was chosen as the MCID of the BI. In the anchor-based study, there were 20 patients in the MCID group, with a mean change score of 1.85 points (ie, the first MCID estimate). In the distribution-based study, the SEM based on test-retest agreement was 1.45 points (ie, the second MCID estimate). The MCID of the BI in stroke patients was estimated to be 1.85 points. The authors' results, within the limitations of their design, suggest that if the mean BI change score within a stroke group has reached 1.85 points in a study, the change score on the BI can be perceived by patients as important and beyond measurement error (ie, such a change score is clinically important).

  12. Challenging comparison of stroke scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke scales can be classified as clinicometric scales and functional impairment, handicap scales. All studies describing stroke scales were reviewed by internet searching engines with the final search performed on January 1, 2013. The following string of keywords was entered into search engines; stroke, scale, score and disability. Despite advantages of modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Scandinavian stroke scale comparing to the NIHSS, including their simplification and less inter-rater variability; most of the stroke neurologists around the world continue using the NIHSS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI are widely used functional impairment and disability scales. Distinction between grades of mRS is poorly defined. The Asian stroke disability scale is a simplified functional impairment, handicap scale which is as valid as mRS and BI. At the present time, the NIHSS, mRS and BI are routine stroke scales because physicians have used to work with these scales for more than two decades, although it could not be an acceptable reason. On the other side, results of previous stroke trials, which are the basis of stroke management guidelines are driven using these scales.

  13. Establishing score equivalence of the Functional Independence Measure motor scale and the Barthel Index, utilising the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Rasch measurement theory

    OpenAIRE

    Prodinger, B; O'Connor, RJ; Stucki, G; Tennant, A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Two widely used outcome measures to assess functioning in neurological rehabilitation are the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) and the Barthel Index. The current study aims to establish the equivalence of the total score of the FIM™ motor scale and the Barthel Index through the application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and Rasch measurement theory. Methods: Secondary analysis of a large sample of patients with stroke, spinal cor...

  14. Can the Northwick Park Dependency Scale be translated to a Barthel Index?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Williams, Heather; Howley, Deirdre; Jackson, Diana

    2010-12-01

    to develop and test an algorithm for conversion of the Northwick Park Dependency Scale (NPDS) to a Barthel Index. conversion criteria were developed to derive a Barthel Index from NPDS data. The criteria were then applied in two community-based datasets of NPDS and Barthel scores, gathered from carers/patients via postal questionnaires. A retrospective exploratory analysis (dataset A) was followed by prospective confirmatory analysis (dataset B). patients with neurological disabilities, mainly following acquired brain injury: dataset A (n = 225) and dataset B (n = 96). comparison of NPDS-derived Barthel scores with parallel directly rated Barthel scores. the exploratory analysis identified that one Barthel item ('Stairs') could not be derived from the NPDS items alone, and required minor adaptation of one of the five additional questions that are included to translate the NPDS into an assessment of community care needs (Northwick Park Care Needs Assessment, NPCNA). For the prospective confirmatory analysis, the NPCNA 'Stairs' question was adjusted to support full conversion. Very strong intraclass correlations were observed between the total 'direct' and 'derived' Barthel scores (0.97 (dataset A), 0.95 (dataset B), PBarthel Index can be reliably derived from NPDS and NPCNA data through a conversion algorithm which has now been built into the supporting software package.

  15. Comparison of the responsiveness of the Care Dependency Scale for rehabilitation and the Barthel Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn-Kissel, Juliane; Dassen, Theo; Lohrmann, Christa

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the responsiveness of the Care Dependency Scale for Rehabilitation (CDS-R) and the Barthel Index in rehabilitation. A longitudinal study was performed over six months (2007-8) where patients were assessed using the scales after admission and before discharge. A convenience sample of 1,542 patients was recruited in an Austrian rehabilitation centre. The CDS-R and the Barthel Index. Responsiveness was determined by descriptive analysis, significance tests and calculation of effect sizes. For the 1,542 patients, the calculation according to Kazis yielded values of 0.10 for both instruments. For the group of patients who showed clinically relevant changes, values of 0.50 were obtained for the CDS-R and 1.06 for the Barthel Index. For the group 1,542 patients, the calculation according to Liang yielded values of 0.42 for the CDS-R and 0.34 for the Barthel Index. For the group of patients who showed clinically relevant changes, values of 1.47 were obtained for the CDS-R and 1.92 for the Barthel Index. The Barthel Index seems to be slightly more responsive than the CDS-R, and both instruments seem to be appropriate for the assessment of patients' changes over time. Nevertheless, the exact level of responsiveness could not be clearly identified for both instruments. To confirm the level of responsiveness, further research is recommended.

  16. Establishing score equivalence of the Functional Independence Measure motor scale and the Barthel Index, utilising the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Rasch measurement theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, Birgit; O'Connor, Rory J; Stucki, Gerold; Tennant, Alan

    2017-05-16

    Two widely used outcome measures to assess functioning in neurological rehabilitation are the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) and the Barthel Index. The current study aims to establish the equivalence of the total score of the FIM™ motor scale and the Barthel Index through the application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and Rasch measurement theory. Secondary analysis of a large sample of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis, undergoing rehabilitation was conducted. All patients were assessed at the same time on both the FIM™ and the Barthel Index. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linking Rules were used to establish conceptual coherency between the 2 scales, and the Rasch measurement model to establish an exchange of the total scores. Using the FIM™ motor scale, items from both scales linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health d4 Mobility or d5 Self-care chapters. Their co-calibration satisfied the assumptions of the Rasch model for each of 3 diagnostic groups. A ceiling effect was observed for the Barthel Index when contrasted against the FIM™ motor scale. Having a Rasch interval metric to transform scores between the FIM™ motor scale and Barthel Index is valuable for monitoring functioning, meta-analysis, quality audits and hospital benchmarking.

  17. Stroke scale score and early prediction of outcome after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Zuberi, F.Z.; Afsar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as a predictor of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Subjects and Methods: The study included 50 patients who presented to Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the study period with acute stroke and were evaluated with CT scan of brain. Only those patients were enrolled in the study that had acute ischemic stroke. The enrolled subjects were then evaluated for the neurological impairment using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The subjects were followed-up and their functional outcome was assessed using Barthel index (BI) on the 7th day of their admission. Results: Of the fifty patients enrolled in the study, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) were females, with age ranging from 45 years to 95 years and a mean age of 59.9 years. Neurological impairment at presentation was assessed by NIHSS. The score ranged between 2 and 28. The functional outcome was evaluated on the 7th day using Barthel index (BI), which ranged from 0 to 80. NIHSS score was found to be a good predictor of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke (p<0.001). Other factors like gender, hypertension and heart disease did not affect the functional recovery in such patients. Various factors were found to be significant for early prediction of stroke recovery. The NIHSS score was the strongest predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke. Age at the time of the event was also found to be an important predictor for stroke recovery. Conclusion: The NIHSS score is a good predictor of patient's recovery after stroke. Assessing the patient's neurological impairment at first presentation of ischemic stroke can guide the physician regarding the prognosis and management plan. (author)

  18. Improved interpretation of stroke trial results using empirical Barthel item weights.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartingsveld, F. van; Lucas, C.; Kwakkel, G.; Lindeboom, R.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Attempts have been made to provide guidelines for interpreting Barthel scores. We used a Rasch analysis to improve the measurement properties and clinical interpretability of the Barthel index score. METHODS: A specific extension of Rasch model was used to identify items that

  19. Improved interpretation of stroke trial results using empirical Barthel item weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hartingsveld, Frank; Lucas, Cees; Kwakkel, Gert; Lindeboom, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Attempts have been made to provide guidelines for interpreting Barthel scores. We used a Rasch analysis to improve the measurement properties and clinical interpretability of the Barthel index score. A specific extension of Rasch model was used to identify items that preclude the summation of items

  20. Relationship between risk factors and activities of daily living using modified Shah Barthel Index in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningsih, W.; Rachmayanti, S.; Werdhani, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors of stroke. The study aimed to determine the relationship between hypertension and diabetes mellitus risk factors and dependence on assistance with activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. The study used an analytical observational cross-sectional design. The study’s sample included 44 stroke patients selected using the quota sampling method. The relationship between the variables was analyzed using the bivariate chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression. Based on the chi-squared test, the relationship between the Modified Shah Barthel Index (MSBI) score and hypertension and diabetes mellitus as stroke risk factors, were p = 0.122 and p = 0.002, respectively. The logistic regression results suggest that hypertension and diabetes mellitus are stroke risk factors related to the MSBI score: p = 0.076 (OR 4.076; CI 95% 0.861-19.297) and p = 0.007 (OR 22.690; CI 95% 2.332-220.722), respectively. Diabetes mellitus is the most prominent risk factor of severe dependency on assistance with activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients.

  1. Measuring the outcomes of day hospital attendance: a comparison of the Barthel Index and London Handicap Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, R H; Ebrahim, S

    2000-10-01

    To assess the ability of two scales to measure the effects of attendance at a geriatric day hospital. 'Before-and-after' measurements. Day hospital serving a defined, urban, catchment area. One hundred and three consecutive new patients over a three-month period. Day hospital attendance for as long as the multidisciplinary team thought warranted. Barthel Index and London Handicap Scale. Seventy-six patients (74%) attended for broadly defined 'rehabilitation'. Measurements on the Barthel Index and London Handicap Scale were completed on 54 of these. Repeat measurements after discharge from the day hospital were achieved on 37 patients. Patients attended between two and 57 times, with a median of eight. Mean Barthel Index did not change over the period of attendance. There was a small improvement in mean handicap score. Eight patients were identified post hoc who attended for 10 or more sessions, and they experienced a large mean reduction in handicap. Overall, neither the Barthel Index nor the London Handicap Scale changed much during attendance at the day hospital. Generally very short lengths of attendance may have explained this. For patients with more prolonged attendance, who might be expected to change more, the London Handicap Scale proved more responsive than the Barthel Index.

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Barthel Index for Measuring Activities of Daily Living Outcome After Ischemic Hemispheric Stroke Does Early Poststroke Timing of Assessment Matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, Gert; Veerbeek, Janne M.; Harmeling-van der Wel, Barbara C.; van Wegen, Erwin; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Harmeling-van der Wel, BC

    Background and Purpose-This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of the Barthel Index (BI) in 206 stroke patients, measured within 72 hours, for activities of daily living at 6 months and determined whether the timing of BI assessment during the first days affects the accuracy of predicting

  3. Validity and reliability of a performance evaluation tool based on the modified Barthel Index for stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Ohura

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barthel Index (BI is a measure of independence in activities of daily living (ADL. In the modified Barthel Index (MBI, a five-point system replaced the original two or three or four point rating system. Based on this modified measure, the performance evaluation tool MBI (PET-MBI was developed in Japan. Although the reliability and validity of PET-MBI have been verified for older people, the use of this tool in stroke patients has not been evaluated. This study investigated the validity and reliability of PET-MBI for stroke patients. Methods Ten raters independently determined the BI and PET-MBI scores of stroke patients by direct observation. These patients’ ADL were videotaped, and 10 other raters then evaluated the videos privately and assigned PET-MBI scores twice, one month apart. The criterion-related validity of the PET-MBI against the BI was evaluated using the correlation coefficients for their total scores. Furthermore, to assess inter- and intra-rater reliabilities from the results of the first and second sessions, Fleiss’ intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs were calculated for the total scores, with the lower limits of the 95% confidence interval (95%CI, along with weighted kappa (κw coefficients for agreement in individual tasks of this evaluation tool. ICC and κw coefficients of 0.81–1.00 were considered to be “almost perfect” agreement. Results The mean age of the 30 patients (23 men, 7 women was 71.9 (standard deviation 10.5 years. One patient had diplegia, 14 had right hemiplegia, and 15 had left hemiplegia. For the total scores obtained by direct evaluation, Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation coefficients of the BI versus the PET-MBI were both 0.95 (lower limit of the 95%CI, 0.90. The ICC representing inter-rater reliability for the first session was 0.99 (lower limit of the 95%CI, 0.98]. For intra-rater reliability, the mean value of the ICCs was 0.99 (range, 0.99–1.00. For

  4. Assessment scales in stroke: clinimetric and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison JK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer K Harrison,1 Katherine S McArthur,2 Terence J Quinn21Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: As stroke care has developed, there has been a need to robustly assess the efficacy of interventions both at the level of the individual stroke survivor and in the context of clinical trials. To describe stroke-survivor recovery meaningfully, more sophisticated measures are required than simple dichotomous end points, such as mortality or stroke recurrence. As stroke is an exemplar disabling long-term condition, measures of function are well suited as outcome assessment. In this review, we will describe functional assessment scales in stroke, concentrating on three of the more commonly used tools: the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index. We will discuss the strengths, limitations, and application of these scales and use the scales to highlight important properties that are relevant to all assessment tools. We will frame much of this discussion in the context of "clinimetric" analysis. As they are increasingly used to inform stroke-survivor assessments, we will also discuss some of the commonly used quality-of-life measures. A recurring theme when considering functional assessment is that no tool suits all situations. Clinicians and researchers should chose their assessment tool based on the question of interest and the evidence base around clinimetric properties.Keywords: Barthel Index, clinimetrics, clinical trial, disability, methodology, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes Health Stroke Scale, scales, stroke, outcomes

  5. Use of a 3-Item Short-Form Version of the Barthel Index for Use in Stroke: Systematic Review and External Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIsaac, Rachael L; Ali, Myzoon; Taylor-Rowan, Martin; Rodgers, Helen; Lees, Kennedy R; Quinn, Terence J

    2017-03-01

    There may be a potential to reduce the number of items assessed in the Barthel Index (BI), and shortened versions of the BI have been described. We sought to collate all existing short-form BI (SF-BI) and perform a comparative validation using clinical trial data. We performed a systematic review across multidisciplinary electronic databases to find all published SF-BI. Our validation used the VISTA (Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive) resource. We describe concurrent validity (agreement of each SF-BI with BI), convergent and divergent validity (agreement of each SF-BI with other outcome measures available in the data set), predictive validity (association of prognostic factors with SF-BI outcomes), and content validity (item correlation and exploratory factor analyses). From 3546 titles, we found 8 articles describing 6 differing SF-BI. Using acute trial data (n=8852), internal reliability suggested redundancy in BI (Cronbach α, 0.96). Each SF-BI demonstrated a strong correlation with BI, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (all ρ≥0.83; P Scale and 5 domain EuroQOL (ρ≥0.50, P <0.001). Prespecified prognostic factors were associated with SF-BI outcomes (all P <0.001). Our factor analysis described a 3 factor structure, and item reduction suggested an optimal 3-item SF-BI comprising bladder control, transfer, and mobility items in keeping with 1 of the 3-item SF-BI previously described in the literature. There is redundancy in the original BI; we have demonstrated internal and external validity of a 3-item SF-BI that should be simple to use. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Validating and comparing stroke prognosis scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence J; Singh, Sarjit; Lees, Kennedy R; Bath, Philip M; Myint, Phyo K

    2017-09-05

    To compare the prognostic accuracy of various acute stroke prognostic scales using a large, independent, clinical trials dataset. We directly compared 8 stroke prognostic scales, chosen based on focused literature review (Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne [ASTRAL]; iSCORE; iSCORE-revised; preadmission comorbidities, level of consciousness, age, and neurologic deficit [PLAN]; stroke subtype, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project, age, and prestroke modified Rankin Scale [mRS] [SOAR]; modified SOAR; Stroke Prognosis Instrument 2 [SPI2]; and Totaled Health Risks in Vascular Events [THRIVE]) using individual patient-level data from a clinical trials archive (Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive [VISTA]). We calculated area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) for each scale against 90-day outcomes of mRS (dichotomized at mRS >2), Barthel Index (>85), and mortality. We performed 2 complementary analyses: the first limited to patients with complete data for all components of all scales (simultaneous) and the second using as many patients as possible for each individual scale (separate). We compared AUROCs and performed sensitivity analyses substituting extreme outcome values for missing data. In total, 10,777 patients contributed to the analyses. Our simultaneous analyses suggested that ASTRAL had greatest prognostic accuracy for mRS, AUROC 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-0.82), and SPI2 had poorest AUROC, 0.61 (95% CI 0.57-0.66). Our separate analyses confirmed these results: ASTRAL AUROC 0.79 (95% CI 0.78-0.80 and SPI2 AUROC 0.60 (95% CI 0.59-0.61). On formal comparative testing, there was a significant difference in modified Rankin Scale AUROC between ASTRAL and all other scales. Sensitivity analysis identified no evidence of systematic bias from missing data. Our comparative analyses confirm differences in the prognostic accuracy of stroke scales. However, even the best performing scale had prognostic accuracy that may not

  7. Functional abilities after stroke: measurement, natural history and prognosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, D T; Hewer, R L

    1987-01-01

    Actual functional performance of 976 acute stroke patients was assessed using the Barthel index: the data were analysed to determine the frequency of disability after stroke, the validity of the Barthel index, and the recovery seen. At 6 months, over 45% of survivors were functionally independent. Validity of the Barthel index was confirmed: it related as expected with motor loss and factor analysis showed a single major factor. The items of the Barthel index form an hierarchical scale. There...

  8. The Responsiveness of the Lucerne ICF-Based Multidisciplinary Observation Scale: A Comparison with the Functional Independence Measure and the Barthel Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbellingen, Tim; Ottiger, Beatrice; Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Mehrholz, Jan; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Nef, Tobias; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Good responsive functional outcome measures are important to measure change in stroke patients. The aim of study was to compare the internal and external responsiveness, floor and ceiling effects of the motor, cognition, and communication subscales of the Lucerne ICF-based Multidisciplinary Observation Scale (LIMOS) with the motor and cognition subscales of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and the Barthel Index (BI), in a large cohort of stroke patients. One hundred eighteen stroke patients participated in this study. Admission and discharge score distributions of the LIMOS motor, LIMOS cognition and communication, FIM motor and FIM cognition, and BI were analyzed based on skewness and kurtosis. Floor and ceiling effects of the scales were determined. Internal responsiveness was assessed with t -tests, effect sizes (ESs), and standardized response means (SRMs). External responsiveness was investigated with linear regression analyses. The LIMOS motor and LIMOS cognition and communication subscales were more responsive, expressed by higher ESs (ES = 0.65, SRM = 1.17 and ES = 0.52, SRM = 1.17, respectively) as compared with FIM motor (ES = 0.54, SRM = 0.96) and FIM cognition (ES = 0.41, SRM = 0.88) and the BI (ES = 0.41, SRM = 0.65). The LIMOS subscales showed neither floor nor ceiling effects at admission and discharge (all scales, might have the potential to better detect changes in functional outcome of stroke patients, compared with the FIM motor and FIM cognition and the BI.

  9. The responsiveness of the Lucerne ICF-based Multidisciplinary Observation Scale (LIMOS: a comparison with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM and the Barthel Index (BI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Vanbellingen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good responsive functional outcome measures are important to measure change in stroke patients. The aim of study was to compare the internal and external responsiveness, floor and ceiling effects of the motor, cognition & communication subscales of the Lucerne ICF-based Multidisciplinary Observation Scale (LIMOS with the motor and cognition subscales of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM, and the Barthel Index (BI, in a large cohort of stroke patients.Methods: One hundred and eighteen stroke patients participated in this study. Admission and discharge score distributions of the LIMOS motor, LIMOS cognition & communication, FIM motor and FIM cognition, and BI were analyzed based on skewness and kurtosis. Floor and ceiling effects of the scales were determined. Internal responsiveness was assessed with t-tests, effect sizes (ES and standardized response means (SRMs. External responsiveness was investigated with linear regression analyses.Results: The LIMOS motor and LIMOS cognition & communication subscales were more responsive, expressed by higher effect sizes (ES = 0.65, SRM = 1.17 and ES = 0.52, SRM = 1.17 respectively as compared with FIM motor (ES = 0.54, SRM = 0.96 and FIM cognition (ES = 0.41, SRM = 0.88, and the BI (ES = 0.41, SRM = 0.65. The LIMOS subscales showed neither floor nor ceiling effects at admission and discharge (all < 15%. In contrast, ceiling effects were found for the FIM motor (16%, FIM cognition (15% at discharge and the BI (at admission (22% and discharge (43%. LIMOS motor and LIMOS cognition & communication subscales significantly correlated (p < 0.0001 with a change in the FIM motor and FIM cognition subscales, suggesting good external responsiveness.Conclusions: We found that the LIMOS motor and LIMOS cognition & communication, which are ICF-based multidisciplinary standardized observation scales, might have the potential to better detect changes in functional outcome of stroke patients, compared to

  10. Functional changes in vascular amputee patients: evaluation by Barthel Index, PULSES profile and ESCROW scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, D M; Goldberg, R T; Ryan, B

    1985-08-01

    This study evaluated the changes made by 60 peripheral vascular amputees from one month prior to admission to six months after attending a rehabilitation hospital. The Barthel index, PULSES profile, and ESCROW profile were used to measure functional status, social support, and rehabilitation progress. Statistical analysis consisted of t-tests to determine significant differences between the means of scores at varying intervals, and analysis of variance was added to determine interactions between amputation level, age, and sex as related to functional change. Amputees showed significant gains in Barthel scores from admission to discharge; this was attributed to rehabilitation intervention. They showed a significant decrease by the PULSES profile over the study period, indicating a decrease in independence from their premorbid function. Changes in ESCROW scores showed patients to have a greater need for social supports as they moved from admission to discharge. Age was a significant factor in mobility at discharge as measured by the Barthel index. As measured by the PULSES profile, men did better than women at six months follow-up. Unexpected results were that neither amputation level nor the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus had a significant impact on functional status as measured. The lack of significant differences by amputation level may be due to factors of age and sex, as well as to more depression in the below-knee group.

  11. Factors influencing outcome in acute ischaemic stroke : outcome scales, the role of blood glucose and rtPA treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects that influence outcome in acute ischaemic strok. In the first part, two frequently used outcome scales - the Barthel index and modified Rankin scale - are studied and for both scales, optimal endpoints for stroke trials are proposed. In the second part, the

  12. Clinical utility of the modified trunk impairment scale for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, YunBok; An, SeungHeon; Lee, GyuChang

    2018-05-01

    The present study aimed to determine the discriminant power of the modified Trunk Impairment Scale (mTIS) in stroke survivors versus healthy adults. Cross-sectional. Inpatient rehabilitation center. Fifty-five subjects with stroke and 29 healthy adults. Subjects were examined using the mTIS, Berg Balance Scale, and Timed Up and Go test for balance; 5-m Walk Test and Functional Ambulation Category for gait; Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke-Trunk Control and Trunk Control Test for trunk control; and Modified Barthel Index for activities of daily living performance. The mTIS results differed significantly between stroke survivors and healthy adults (p Scale (r = 0.82), Timed Up and Go test (r = -0.70), 5-m Walk Test (r = 0.73), Functional Ambulation Category (r = 0.54), Fugl-Meyer Assessment (r = 0.37-0.80), Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke-Trunk Control and Trunk Control Test (r = 0.55-0.63), and Modified Barthel Index score (r = 0.56) results (p Scale, 49% on the Timed Up and Go test, 53% on the 5-m Walk Test, 28% on the Functional Ambulation Category, 12% on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-upper extremity, 64% on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-lower extremity, and 30% on the Modified Barthel Index. The cutoff value of the mTIS for the Modified Barthel Index classification was >10.5 points, while the area under the curve had a moderate accuracy of 73%. The mTIS can be used to examine the degree of trunk control or the level of trunk impairment, which is seen as a prerequisite for balance, gait, motor function, and activities of daily living performance in stroke survivors. Implications for Rehabilitation The modified Trunk Impairment Scale can be used as an assessment tool to classify the degree of trunk control or its level of impairment in stroke survivors. The modified Trunk Impairment Scale may have a favorable correlation with assessing physical functions such as balance, gait, motor

  13. The Barthel index-dyspnea: a new two-dimensional dyspnea scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang ML

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Lung Chuang1–3 1Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, 3School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China Clinical evaluation tools have been widely used in assessing the baseline status, treatment response, and prognosis for patients with chronic respiratory diseases and mostly for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.1 By factor analysis, multiple domains of disease entities involve dyspnea, psychological status, health-related quality of life, and sensation or perception of dyspnea,2 wherein dyspnea is commonly evaluated by dyspnea scales such as Medical Research Council (MRC, Baseline Dyspnea Index, Oxygen-Cost Diagram, St George Respiratory Questionnaire activity domain, and Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire dyspnea domain (CRQ-dyspnea.2 These scales describe the subjects’ capability to perform at various levels of motor activity or functional status influenced or even limited by dyspnea. Indeed, exercise capacity is quantified; however, dyspnea is not. In our experience, the exertional dyspnea scales had better correlations with exercise performances (|r|=0.29–0.65 than dyspnea sensation intensity (|r|=0.06–0.55 and better correlation with walking (|r|=0.5–0.65 than peak exercise (|r|=0.29–0.39.  View the original paper by Vitacca et al.  

  14. Deriving a Barthel Index from the Northwick Park Dependency Scale and the Functional Independence Measure: are they equivalent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Williams, Heather; Rose, Hilary; Harris, Sarah; Jackson, Diana

    2010-12-01

    to examine the extent of agreement between Barthel Index scores derived from Northwick Park Dependency Scores (NPDS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) ratings, in an inpatient setting. previously described conversion criteria were applied in a secondary analysis of a large existing dataset, gathered in a tertiary specialist inpatient neurorehabilitation unit. patients with neurological disabilities (N = 1347), mainly following acquired brain injury. comparison of Barthel scores derived from the NPDS (rated by nursing staff) and from parallel FIM scores (rated by the therapy team). very strong intraclass correlations were observed between the total scores (0.93, PBarthel Index ratings derived from NPDS and FIM scores. However, scores may be affected by differential performance with nursing and therapy staff, and should not automatically be regarded as equivalent.

  15. Correlation of perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI with Japan stroke scale in acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Naoki; Murakami, Masato; Mikami, Taishi; Kamoshita, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-imaging (PI) MRI are powerful new techniques for the assessment of early ischemic changes in acute stroke patients. We aimed to determine whether the results of these acute phase DWI and PI MRI are useful to predict their neurological outcomes. DWI, PI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging (FLAIR) MRI lesion volumes were compared with neurological deficit as determined by Japan Stroke Scale (JSS) and Barthel index in 12 patients with acute stroke at two time points. Patients were scanned and their clinical severity was measured first at their admission and two weeks after the initial scan. We could perform MRI within 5 days (mean: 2.6 days), and detect the latest ischemic lesions with initial DWI in all cases. Most patients showed decreased DWI lesion volumes, increased FLAIR volumes and decreased JSS scores reflecting their neurological improvements. Initial DWI volumes correlated with follow-up FLAIR volumes (p=0.0047, r 2 =0.976). The results seem to indicate that lesion volumes determined by DWI in the acute phase may be predictive of irreversible ischemic lesion, although the initial MRI study did not correlate with JSS, BI and patients' age. (author)

  16. Assessment of test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Wisconsin Gait Scale in hemiparetic post-stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzik Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A proper assessment of gait pattern is a significant aspect in planning the process of teaching gait in hemiparetic post-stroke patients. The Wisconsin Gait Scale (WGS is an observational tool for assessing post-stroke patients’ gait. The aim of the study was to assess test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the WGS and examine correlations between gait assessment made with the WGS and gait speed, Brunnström scale, Ashworth’s scale and the Barthel Index.

  17. Barthel index in a Middle-East country: translation, validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveisgharan, Shahram; Shirani, Shahin; Ghorbani, Askar; Soltanzade, Akbar; Baghaei, Abdolmehdi; Hosseini, Shindokht; Sarrafzadegan, Nizzal

    2006-01-01

    In Iran, a Middle-East country, no disability scale has been translated and validated for use in stroke clinical trials. This study was designed to translate the Barthel Index and make its Persian translated form valid and reliable. All items of the Barthel Index were translated into Persian. Also, the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) was also translated to Persian. Telephone interview was used as the method of data acquisition. Two interviewers were chosen for this means in order to accelerate data gathering and measure interrater agreement. Samples were selected from Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center's Stroke Registry Unit, a WHO collaborating center in the center of Iran. All the patients were registered as stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). These patients were inhabitants of Isfahan Province who had suffered from stroke or ICH between 12 and 24 months before data acquisition. Chronbach's alpha, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with MRS, interrater agreement and item analysis were done for the translated questionnaire. Translated questionnaires were filled by interview from 459 stroke patients. Their mean age was 68.11 +/- 11.59 years. 243 of them were male (52.9%). Cronbach's alpha was 0.9354. Spearman's correlation coefficient between translated Barthel Index scores and MRS scores was -0.912. Spearman's correlation coefficient between 2 scores, to determine test-retest reliability was 0.989. Concordance correlation to determine interrater agreement was 0.994. All corrected item-total correlations were greater than 0.5. The Persian translated version of the Barthel Index is a reliable and valid questionnaire for use in stroke clinical trials. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Statistical methods for analysing Barthel scores in trials of poststroke interventions: a review and computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fujian; Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Holland, Richard; Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Mares, Kath; Harvey, Ian

    2006-04-01

    Arguments persist as to whether parametric or non-parametric methods should be used to analyse ordinal data in trials. This paper aims to assess methods used for presenting and analysing an ordinal scale, the Barthel Index, in trials of poststroke interventions. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of poststroke interventions published from 1995 to 2004 in two journals (Stroke and Clinical Rehabilitation) were scrutinized for methods used to present and analyse Barthel scores. Computer simulations were used to compare the type I errors and the statistical power of different statistical methods under a range of assumed circumstances. One hundred and fifty-six RCTs were identified within the two journals. The central tendency of Barthel scores was measured by the median in 47 trials and by the mean in 35 trials. Non-parametric analyses of Barthel scores were conducted in 47 trials and parametric methods used in 18 trials. The results of computer simulations demonstrate that the t-test has a similar type I error rate and statistical power when compared with the rank sum test. However, when a zero final Barthel score is assigned to patients who have died, the statistical power of the t-test is much reduced. The possible maximal statistical power of dichotomization and ordinal regression is usually much lower than that of the rank sum test. To facilitate comparison and meta-analysis, we recommend that mean values (with standard deviations or standard errors) of Barthel scores should be routinely reported in trials of poststroke interventions. The rank sum test appears the most powerful inferential technique for detecting differences in Barthel scores.

  19. ACUTE STROKE: FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME PREDICTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha; Ramalingam; Vinodkumar; Vasumathi; Valarmathi; Anu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic strokes account for >80% of total stroke events. Biochemical modalities like serum uric acid, ESR, CRP, Serum Fibrinogen will be a low cost and useful way to predict functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The Barthel ADL index it is an ordinal scale helping us to measure performances in ADL-activities in daily living. The present study aims to study the Biochemical parameters Uric Acid, CRP, ESR and Fibrinogen in Ischemic Stroke patients and to assess fu...

  20. Validation of international stroke scales for use by nurses in Greek settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofanidis, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Improving stroke outcomes by educating nurses in state-of-the-art stroke nursing skills is essential, but unfortunately, to date, there are limited validated stroke assessment scales for routine clinical and research use in Greece. The aim of this paper is to validate and culturally adapt three internationally recognised stroke scales for use in Greece. A critical appraisal of the international literature was undertaken to identify suitable scales to assess stroke impact: neurological, functional status and level of dependence. We identified: Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS), Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS). They were formally translated and culturally adapted from English to Greek. Their validity was tested using Cronbach's alpha and Median Discrimination Index, while construct validity was checked by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). These were used on 57 consecutively selected patients with stroke from a Greek hospital, mean age 67.7 (±6.7 SD) years, range 54-85 years, length of stay, 8.5 (±2.7 SD) days. All three scales show high internal consistency. The Cronbach's α on admission/ discharge for the SSS ranged from 0.86 to 0.88. The BI's reliability ranged from 0.95 to 0.93. The Median Discrimination Index was 0.70 (SSS) and 0.83 (BI). PCA showed that although a significant general factor (F1) explains most of the variance (57.0% on admission and 56.4% on discharge) a second factor (F2) of less significance was also highlighted. The convergent validity of the three scales was confirmed. The stroke tools selected showed high reliability and validity, thus making these suitable for use in Greek clinical/academic environments. All three scales used are almost routinely undertaken in stroke studies internationally and form a backdrop for bio-statistical, functional and social outcome post-stroke. The Greek version of the stroke tools show that both SSS and BI have high internal consistency and reliability and together with the mRS could be

  1. Responsiveness of the Berg Balance Scale in patients early after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, Adam; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Gunnes, Mari; Askim, Torunn

    2016-05-01

    The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) has previously shown good measurement properties. However, its ability to detect important change in patients early after stroke is still unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the minimal important change (MIC) and its relation to the minimal detectable change (MDC) for BBS in patients early after stroke. This prospective follow-up study included patients within the first 2 weeks after onset of stroke. The BBS, Barthel Index, and Scandinavian Stroke Scale were obtained at inclusion and 1 month later. At the follow-up assessment, the Patient Global Impression of Change was obtained. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to calculate the cut-off value for the MIC. Fifty-two patients (mean age of 78.7, SD 8.5 years) were included. All measures showed a significant improvement from baseline to follow-up. The ROC analysis identified a MIC of ≥6 BBS points, while the MDC was 5.97 BBS points at the 80% confidence level. This study shows that a change of 6 BBS point or more can be considered an important change for patients in the sub-acute phase after stroke, which also represents an 80% probability of exceeding the measurement error. A total of 80% of unchanged patients would display random fluctuations within the bounds of MDC80, while 20% of unchanged patients would exceed MDC80.

  2. Derivation and Validation of a Modified Short Form of the Stroke Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIsaac, Rachael; Ali, Myzoon; Peters, Michele; English, Coralie; Rodgers, Helen; Jenkinson, Crispin; Lees, Kennedy R; Quinn, Terence J

    2016-05-20

    The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) is a stroke-specific, quality of life measure recommended for research and clinical practice. Completion rates are suboptimal and could relate to test burden. We derived and validated a short form SIS (SF-SIS). We examined data from the Virtual International Stroke Trial Archive, generating derivation and validation populations. We derived an SF-SIS by selecting 1 item per domain of SIS, choosing items most highly correlated with total domain score. Our validation described agreement of SF-SIS with original SIS and the SIS-16 and correlation with Barthel Index, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and Euro-QoL 5 dimensions visual analog scales. We assessed discriminative validity (associations between SF-SIS and factors known to influence outcome [age, physiological parameters, and comorbidity]). We assessed face validity and acceptability by sharing the SF-SIS with a focus group of stroke survivors and multidisciplinary stroke healthcare staff. From 5549 acute study patients (mean age 68.5 [SD 13] years, mean SIS 64 [SD 32]) and 332 rehabilitation patients (mean age 65.7 [SD 11] years, mean SIS 61 [SD 11]), we derived an 8-item SF-SIS that demonstrated good agreement with original SIS and good correlation with our chosen functional and quality of life measures (all ρ>0.70, P<0.0001). Significant associations were seen with our chosen predictors of stroke outcome in the acute group (P<0.0001). The focus group agreed with the choice of items for SF-SIS across 7 of 8 domains. Using multiple, complementary methods, we have derived an SF-SIS and demonstrated content, convergent, and discriminant validity. This shortened SIS should allow collection of robust quality of life data with less associated test burden. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Comparison Between the Original and Shortened Versions of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in Ischemic Stroke Patients of Intermediate Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Fan; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Wong, K S Lawrence; Chen, Christopher L H

    2016-01-01

    The 15-item National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) has been critiqued for its complexity and variability, and shortened versions have been proposed. This study aimed to compare the measurement properties of the original version with 3 shortened versions with 11, 8, and 5 items, respectively. Analyses were performed using data from an international, double-blind randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of MLC601 on stroke recovery in patients with ischemic stroke of intermediate severity (Chinese Medicine Neuroaid Efficacy on Stroke recovery [CHIMES]). To compare discriminative ability and responsiveness to change, the effect sizes of the NIHSS scores in relation to modified Rankin Scale, mini-mental status examination, and Barthel index were estimated using regression analysis. For both discriminative ability and responsiveness to change, the original version exhibited a larger effect size (0.55 and 0.84) in relation to modified Rankin Scale than the other 3 shortened versions (0.35-0.46 and 0.74-0.78). The original 15-item NIHSS retained information that made it more discriminative and responsive to change than the shortened versions. We recommend future clinical researchers to use the full version NIHSS to evaluate patients' stroke severity. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00554723. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Stroke Impact Scale 3.0: Reliability and Validity Evaluation of the Korean Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Uk; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Joon Ho; Ho, Seung Hee; Koo, Mi Jung; Park, Kyoung Hae; Yoon, Jeong Ah; Kim, Dong Min; Oh, Jung Eun; Yu, Se Hwa; Kim, Dong A

    2017-06-01

    To establish the reliability and validity the Korean version of the Stroke Impact Scale (K-SIS) 3.0. A total of 70 post-stroke patients were enrolled. All subjects were evaluated for general characteristics, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Modified Barthel Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The SF-36 and K-SIS 3.0 assessed their health-related quality of life. Statistical analysis after evaluation, determined the reliability and validity of the K-SIS 3.0. A total of 70 patients (mean age, 54.97 years) participated in this study. Internal consistency of the SIS 3.0 (Cronbach's alpha) was obtained, and all domains had good co-efficiency, with threshold above 0.70. Test-retest reliability of SIS 3.0 required correlation (Spearman's rho) of the same domain scores obtained on the first and second assessments. Results were above 0.5, with the exception of social participation and mobility. Concurrent validity of K-SIS 3.0 was assessed using the SF-36, and other scales with the same or similar domains. Each domain of K-SIS 3.0 had a positive correlation with corresponding similar domain of SF-36 and other scales (HADS, MMSE, and NIHSS). The newly developed K-SIS 3.0 showed high inter-intra reliability and test-retest reliabilities, together with high concurrent validity with the original and various other scales, for patients with stroke. K-SIS 3.0 can therefore be used for stroke patients, to assess their health-related quality of life and treatment efficacy.

  5. Comparison of the measurement properties of the Functional Independence and Difficulty Scale with the Barthel Index in community-dwelling elderly people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takashi; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Matsui, Nobuko; Arai, Kenji; Ando, Makoto; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Naoki; Takahashi, Yuki; Kawazoe, Moe; Watanabe, Shuichiro

    2017-04-01

    The new Functional Independence and Difficulty Scale (FIDS) is a tool for assessing the performance of basic activities of daily living (BADL). Because many BADL measures already exist, it is important to know whether FIDS can offer added benefit over the existing measures. This study compared measurement properties between the FIDS and a representative BADL assessment tool, the Barthel Index (BI). Recruitment of the participants was done on the basis of convenience sampling. Participants were community-dwelling elderly Japanese subjects (n = 314; age ≥65 years) divided into a healthy elderly group [n = 225; subjects not using long-term care insurance (LTCI) services] and frail elderly group (n = 89; subjects using LTCI services). For each group, ceiling effect (percent participation with the maximum score) was calculated, and it was compared between the two scales. Associations between the FIDS, BI and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 8 Health Survey (SF-8) were evaluated by Spearman correlation coefficient and partial correlations. Partial correlations coefficients to SF-8 were compared between the two scales. FIDS showed a relatively small ceiling effect compared to the BI. Compared to the BI, FIDS showed a significant positive partial correlation with the broader aspect of the SF-8 subscales, but the strength of correlation between FIDS and SF-8 was weak to negligible. The FIDS might be less affected by ceiling effect than the BI. Additional studies using a sufficient number of probability samples are needed to clarify whether FIDS has any benefit over BI in terms of correlations with the SF-8.

  6. Concordance of Barthel Index, ECOG-PS, and Palliative Performance Scale in the assessment of functional status in patients with advanced medical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Quiles, C; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Pérez-Belmonte, L M; Macías-Mir, P; Camacho-González, D; Massa, B; Maiz-Jiménez, M; Ollero-Baturone, M

    2017-09-01

    Analysing most relevant clinical features and concordance between different functional scales in patients with advanced medical diseases (PAMD). Cross-sectional multicentre study that included PAMD (heart, lung, kidney, liver, and neurological diseases) in hospital settings from February 2009 to October 2010. We analysed clinical, biological and functional features in performing activities of daily living (ADL) by medians of Barthel Index (BI); additionally we assessed their performance status by medians of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-Performance Status (ECOG-PS) and Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) scores. We evaluated the concordance of these instruments in assessing functional impairment by κ and intraclass correlation coefficient tests. 1847 patients were included (average age 79 years, 50.1% men). Most common symptoms were dyspnoea (62.31%), asthenia (23%) and delirium (20.14%). Functional assessment showed a high prevalence of severe or total impairment in performing basic ADL by medians of used instruments (BI median=35 (IQR=70), and 52.1% of patients with severe-total impairment; ECOG-PS median=2 (IQR 30), and 44% of patients with severe-total impairment; and PPS median=50 (IQR 30), and 32% of patients with severe-total impairment). Concordance among these instruments was acceptably good ( κ indexes ranging from 0.653 to 0.745 (p<0.0001)). PAMD represent a population with severe functional impairment, which requires a multidisciplinary approach for proper management. Assessment of functional ability in this population by BI, ECOG-PS, and PPS showed good concordance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Validation of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale in a multicultural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiting Emily; Togher, Leanne; Power, Emma; Koh, Gerald C H

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and validity of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39 g) and its Mandarin adaptation SAQOL-CSg in Singaporean stroke patients. First-time stroke survivors were recruited at three months post-stroke and underwent a series of questionnaires in their dominant language (English/Mandarin). This included: SAQOL-39 g/CSg, National University Hospital System (NUHS) Aphasia Screening Test, Barthel Index, Modified Rankin Scale, Mini Mental State Examination, Frontal Assessment Battery, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Eurol-Qol Health Questionnaire (EQ-5D). The SAQOL-39 g/SAQOL-CSg was repeated within 1 week (± 6 days). Ninety-four participants (96.9%) were able to self-report and their results presented here. Both the SAQOL-39 g/SAQOL-CSg showed good internal consistency (α = 0.96/0.97), test-retest reliability (ICC= 0.99/0.98), convergent (rs  =0.64-0.81 and 0.66-0.88, respectively) and discriminant (rs = 0.35-0.53 and 0.48-0.62, respectively) validity. The correlation between the SAQOL-39 g and the EQ-5D Visual Analogue Scale was 0.27. Further inspection of the EQ-5DVAS scores revealed correlations in different directions for Malay versus Chinese participants. Both the SAQOL-39 g and SAQOL-CSg demonstrated good reliability and validity. Our results suggested some influence of ethnicity in self-rating of health status in relation to SAQOL-39 g scores. Further research is warranted to examine its use with stroke survivors with greater stroke severity and over time. Implications for Rehabilitation Validation of SAQOL in Singapore: Both the SAQOL-39g and the SAQOL-CSg may be used to measure the HRQoL of stroke survivors with and without aphasia in Singapore. Further investigation is required to examine use with stroke survivors with greater stroke severity and over time.

  8. Validation of the Hindi version of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Dash, Deepa; Kumar, Amit

    2012-01-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) with the Hindi and Indian adaptation of items 9 and 10. NIHSS items 9 and 10 were modified and culturally adapted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) and the resulting version was termed as Hindi version (HV-NIHSS). HV-NIHSS was applied by two independent investigators on 107 patients with stroke. Inter-observer agreement and intra-class correlation coefficients were calculated. The predictive validity of the HV-NIHSS was calculated using functional outcome after three months in the form of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI). The study included 107 patients of stroke recruited from a tertiary referral hospital at Delhi between November 1, 2009, and October 1, 2010; the mean age of these patients was 56.26±13.84 years and 65.4% of them had suffered ischemic stroke. Inter-rater reliability was high between the two examiners, with Pearson's r ranging from 0.72 to 0.99 for the 15 items on the Scale. Intra-class correlation coefficient for the total score was 0.995 (95% CI-0.993-0.997). Concurrent construct validity was established between HV-NIHSS and baseline Glasgow Coma Scale, with a high correlation (Spearman coefficient = -0.863, P<.001). Predictive validity was also established with BI at three months (Spearman's rho: -0.829, P<.001) and with mRS at three months (Spearman's rho: 0.851, P<0.001). This study shows that a Hindi language version of the NIHSS developed at AIIMS appears reliable and valid when applied to a Hindi-speaking population.

  9. Developing a short form of the Berg Balance Scale for people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Yeh; Chien, Chi-Wen; Hsueh, I-Ping; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2006-02-01

    To improve the utility of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the aim of this study was to develop a short form of the BBS (SFBBS) that was psychometrically similar (including test reliability, validity, and responsiveness) to the original BBS for people with stroke. A total of 226 subjects with stroke participated in this prospective study at 14 days after their stroke; 167 of these subjects also were examined at 90 days after their stroke. The BBS, Barthel Index, and Fugl-Meyer Motor Test were administered at these 2 time points. By reducing the number of tested items by more than half the number of items in the original BBS (ie, making 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-item tests) and simplifying the scoring system of the original BBS (ie, collapsing the 5-level scale into a 3-level scale [BBS-3P]), we generated a total of 8 SFBBSs. The distributions of scores for all 8 SFBBSs were acceptable but featured notable floor effects. The 4-item BBS, 5-item BBS, 5-item BBS-3P, and 7-item BBS-3P demonstrated good reliability. The subjects' scores on the 6-item BBS, 6-item BBS-3P, 7-item BBS, and 7-item BBS-3P showed excellent agreement with those on the original BBS. The 6-item BBS-3P and 7-item BBS-3P exhibited great responsiveness. Only the 7-item BBS-3P demonstrated both satisfactory and psychometric properties similar to those of the original BBS. The 7-item BBS-3P was found to be psychometrically similar to the original BBS. The 7-item BBS-3P, compared with the original BBS, is simpler and faster to complete in either a clinical or a research setting and is recommended.

  10. French validation of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QoL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Nicolas; Devilliers, Hervé; Daumas, Anaïs; Carnet, Didier; Charpy, Jean-Pierre; Bastable, Philip; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    To adapt the SS-QoL into French and test its psychometric properties. Seventy-seven patients from a population-based registry were enrolled 3 months after their stroke. SS-QoL, NIHSS score, Barthel index, HAD, FSS, SF-36 scales, and MMSE were administered at enrolment. SS-QoL was re-administered at 15 days and 2 months. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's α coefficients, factorial validity by an exploratory factor analysis and external validity by Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's correlations (ρ), comparing SS-QoL scores with those obtained from established scales. Reliability was assessed by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and responsiveness by standardized effect sizes (ES). Test-retest and inter-observer reliabilities were excellent (ICC> 0.88). Internal consistency was acceptable (α= 0.65-0.91), except for the Personality domain (α= 0.58). Factor analysis individualized eight homogenous axes. SS-QoL scores were different between groups opposed by their modified Rankin score at enrolment or their overall quality of life compared with pre-stroke status (p  0.35) to strongly (ρ> 0.5) with established measures. Nine domains were mildly to moderately responsive to change (ES> 0.3). The French version of the SS-QoL is a valid, reliable and moderately responsive instrument.

  11. Statin treatment and stroke outcome in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Zivin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Scale, Barthel Index, and modified Rankin Scale score at enrollment (1 to 6 months after the index event) and 90 days poststroke in subjects having a stroke during the trial. RESULTS: Over 4.9 years, strokes occurred in 576 subjects. There were reductions in fatal, severe (modified Rankin Scale score 5...... or no event), there was only a trend toward lesser severity with treatment based on the modified Rankin Scale score (P=0.0647) with no difference based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale or Barthel Index. CONCLUSIONS: The present exploratory analysis suggests that the outcome of recurrent...... or 4), moderate (modified Rankin Scale score 3 or 2), and mild (modified Rankin Scale score 1 or 0) outcome ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks and an increase in the proportion of event-free subjects randomized to atorvastatin (P

  12. Psychometric evaluation of the Signs of Depression Scale with a revised scoring mechanism in stroke patients with communicative impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Mariska J; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-12-01

    To investigate (1) the diagnostic value of the Signs of Depression Scale (SODS) in a Likert scale format and (2) whether the Likert scale improves the diagnostic value compared with the original dichotomous scale. Cross-sectional multicentre study. One general and one university hospital in the Netherlands. A total of 116 consecutive hospitalized stroke patients, of whom 53 were patients with communicative impairment. Depression was diagnosed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) administered to the patients' relatives. The Barthel Index (BI) was used as an external validator. The correlation between the CIDI and the SODS-Likert or the SODS was small ( r b  = 0.18), and the correlation between the Barthel Index and the SODS-Likert ( r s  = -0.30) or the SODS ( r s  = -0.33) was moderate. For both instruments, the discriminatory power for diagnosing depression when compared with the CIDI was best at a cut-off score of ⩾2. The internal consistency of the SODS-Likert was acceptable (α = 0.69) and slightly higher than that of the SODS (α = 0.57). The inter-rater reliability of the SODS-Likert and the SODS was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.66 and ICC 0.80, respectively). The clinical utility was rated good. The diagnostic value of the SODS did not improve using a Likert scale format. However, the diagnostic value of the original dichotomous SODS is reasonable for the initial mood assessment of stroke patients with communicative impairment.

  13. Prospective study to assess national institutes of health stroke scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability and predicting functional outcome early at presentation would guide treatment and rehabilitation plans. The aim of this study was to assess baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as predictor of functional outcome. Methods: Ninety consecutive ...

  14. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). METHODS: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  15. Comparison of Effects of Botulinum Toxin Injection Between Subacute and Chronic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effects of botulinum toxin injection between subacute and chronic stroke patients. Eighteen stroke patients (9 subacute and 9 chronic) with spasticity of 1+ or higher in the hemiplegic elbow or wrist joint, based on the modified Ashworth scale were recruited. Modified Ashworth scale, modified Tardieu scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, Brunnstrom stage, modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer scale evaluations of the hemipleg...

  16. Validity and reliability of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale among stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Hui-Lin; Fang, Liang; Bi, Rui-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Qun; Hu, Min

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale (DLSES) in stroke patients. In total, 172 participants were recruited from a local hospital in China. The internal consistent reliability and convergent validity of the total scale and activities of daily living (ADL) and psychosocial functioning subscales were examined and factor analysis was carried out. Cronbach's αs for the Chinese version of the DLSES, ADL subscale, and psychosocial subscale were 0.96, 0.90, and 0.95, respectively. In the factor analysis, two factors (ADL and psychosocial functioning) were extracted, explaining 84.4% of the total variance in self-efficacy (χ/d.f.=2.19, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, normed fit index=0.95, comparative fit index=0.98, incremental fit index=0.98). Convergent validity was confirmed by positive relationships between the Chinese version of the DLSES and the Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (r=0.87). The ADL subscale was associated positively with the Barthel Index (r=0.74) and the psychosocial functioning subscale was associated negatively with the Functional Activities Questionnaire (r=-0.73) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (r=-0.44). The Chinese version of the DLSES was shown to be a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy in stroke patients.

  17. Responsiveness of the rehabilitation activities profile and the Barthel index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bennekom, C. A.; Jelles, F.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the responsiveness for clinically meaningful change over time of a newly designed functional status scale, the Rehabilitation Activities Profile (RAP), with more frequently used Barthel Index (BI). Four techniques for the quantification of responsiveness were

  18. Avaliações motoras e funcionais pós-AVC: correlação clínica usando a escala de desempenho físico de Fugl-Meyer, a escala de equilíbrio de Berg e o índice de Barthel

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Roberta de; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Borges, Guilherme

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. OBJECTIVE: To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral strok...

  19. The psychometric properties of the Turkish Stroke and Aphasia Quality Of Life Scale-39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamaz Calis, Funda; Celik, Serpil; Demir, Orcun; Aykanat, Dilek; Yagiz On, Arzu

    2016-06-01

    The Stroke and Aphasia Quality Of Life Scale (SAQOL-39) is a widely used instrument in assessing the quality of life in aphasic patients. Our purpose was to translate the SAQOL-39 into the Turkish language (SAQOL-39/TR) and assess its reliability and validity in patients who had aphasia. SAQOL-39/TR was obtained using the 'translation-backward translation' method and administered to 40 patients with aphasia. The reliability studies were performed by means of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The validation studies were carried out by means of construct validity using within-scale analyses and analyses against the external criteria. Correlation analysis was performed between scales and the Ege Aphasia Test, the Barthel index, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Brunnstrom recovery stages (BRS) of the arm, hand, and lower extremity. In the results, the scores of the SAQOL-39 were not different between groups. Cronbach's α variables were good for all domains (0.80, 0.88, 0.89, 0.82, and 0.83). Test-retest reliability was also high (0.96, 0.97, 0.91, 0.70, and 0.96). There were significant correlations with coefficients ranging from 0.36 to 0.60 among the domains of scale and other measures. Moderate-high correlations were also seen with BRS-arm, BRS-hand, and BRS-lower extremity (r, 0.27-0.58). It was found that all domains were highly related with all domains of Ege aphasia test, except praxia (Pscale in patients with dysarthria suggest that the SAQOL-39 may not be specific to only aphasic patients.

  20. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale Danish version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muus, Ingrid; Christensen, Doris; Petzold, Max

    2011-01-01

    To test responsiveness and sensitivity to change of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale Danish version (SSQOL-DK) scores in patients following stroke.......To test responsiveness and sensitivity to change of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale Danish version (SSQOL-DK) scores in patients following stroke....

  1. Statin treatment and stroke outcome in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Zivin, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Laboratory experiments suggest statins reduce stroke severity and improve outcomes. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial was a placebo-controlled, randomized trial designed to determine whether treatment with atorvastatin reduces...... strokes in subjects with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (n=4731). We analyzed SPARCL trial data to determine whether treatment favorably shifts the distribution of severities of ischemic cerebrovascular outcomes. METHODS: Severity was assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke...... Scale, Barthel Index, and modified Rankin Scale score at enrollment (1 to 6 months after the index event) and 90 days poststroke in subjects having a stroke during the trial. RESULTS: Over 4.9 years, strokes occurred in 576 subjects. There were reductions in fatal, severe (modified Rankin Scale score 5...

  2. Association between nih stroke scale score and functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, S.; Fazal, N.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between baseline national institutes of health stroke scale score and functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical unit-IV, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, from May 2009 to October 2009. Patients and Methods: Patients who presented with stroke within 24 hours of onset of symptom and had a developing infarct on the CT- scan were further evaluated for neurological impairment using NIH stroke scale. The baseline NIHSS score was calculated using a proforma. Age of the patient, gender and time of presentation to the hospital was recorded. Follow-up was done on the 7th day of admission using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Results: Total number of subjects was 150. Good outcome (GOS=1-2) was noticed in those subjects who had a low baseline NIHSS score (0-6) while poor outcome (GOS=3-5) was noticed in those subjects who had a higher baseline NIHSS score (>16)( p value< 0.05). In cases who had a moderate score (7-15); the ratio of good outcome to bad outcome was almost 70:30. Likewise good outcome (GOS=1-2) was noticed in those subjects who were younger (less than 45 years) while poor outcome (GOS=3-5) was noticed in the elderly (more than 45 years)( p value< 0.05). Similarly patients who presented within 12 hrs of symptom onset had a good outcome compared to those who presented after 12 hrs( p value< 0.05). Conclusion: Baseline NIH Stroke Scale score is strongly associated with functional outcome after 1 week of acute ischemic stroke. (author)

  3. Psychometric comparisons of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 and Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keh-Chung; Fu, Tiffany; Wu, Ching-Yi; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lee, Pei-Chin

    2010-04-01

    This study compared the responsiveness and criterion-related validity of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QOL) for patients after stroke rehabilitation. The SIS and SS-QOL, along with five criterion measures-the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Motor Activity Log, the Functional Independence Measure, the Frenchay Activities Index, and the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale-were administered to 74 patients with stroke before and after a 3-week intervention. Responsiveness was examined using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and standardized response mean (SRM). Criterion-related validity was investigated using the Spearman correlation coefficient (rho). Whereas the SS-QOL subscales were nonresponsive to changes, the SIS hand function showed medium responsiveness (SRM = .52, Wilcoxon Z = 4.24, P < .05). Responsiveness of the SIS total also was significantly larger than that of the SS-QOL total (SRM difference, .36; 95% confidence interval, .02-.71). Criterion validity of the SIS hand function was good (rho = .51-.68; P < .01), but that of the SS-QOL was only fair (rho = .25-.31; P < .05). Because the SIS had better overall responsiveness and the SIS hand function showed medium responsiveness and good criterion validity, the SIS appears to be more suited for assessing changes after stroke rehabilitation.

  4. Outcome measurement in stroke: a scale selection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karen; Cano, Stefan J; Playford, E Diane

    2011-06-01

    Evaluating the impact of new treatments requires the use of reliable, valid, and responsive outcome measures. However, given the wide range of instruments currently available, it is not always straightforward for healthcare professionals to select the most appropriate tool. In this review, we propose a potential approach to scale selection. In designing a new study of the impact of a robotic device in stroke rehabilitation, we developed a three-stage scale selection strategy. First, two guidance documents (Medical Outcome Trust and Food and Drug Administration PRO Guidance) were reviewed to identify key scale assessment criteria. Second, consideration was given at a theoretical level of the concepts and domains relevant to the goals our study. Third, a comprehensive literature search strategy and review were developed in conjunction with healthcare professionals and psychometricians. Identified scales were appraised regarding their psychometric properties and clinical content. Forty-five measures were initially identified and appraised. From a clinical content perspective, none of the measures were considered to be sufficient on their own to capture all the important outcome domains in this study. However, 3 measures were identified that best met our review criteria: Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement, Chedoke Arm and Hand Inventory, and ABILHAND. After the final stage of scale appraisal, two further upper limb scales (Fugl-Meyer and Action Research Arm Test) were included based on clinical content and study design issues. Our three-stage review process appears to be a potentially useful approach for evidence-based scale selection in stroke rehabilitation studies.

  5. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...... as a permanent decrease of >or=3 Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) points for speech or >or=2 SSS points for consciousness or >or=2 SSS points for limb strength, when assessed at baseline compared to the day after admission and daily during the following week. Patients were followed up on day 90 and assessed using...

  6. Post-stroke depression: Main phenomenological clusters and their relationships with clinical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Davide; Marra, Camillo; Gainotti, Guido

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the principal psychopathological dimensions of post-stroke depression (PSD) through the assessment of the factorial structure of the Post-Stroke Depression Rating Scale (PSDRS). We enrolled ninety-eight subjects with PSD, who underwent the PSDRS, MMSE and Barthel Index. Information about demographic, clinical, and neuroanatomical factors was collected. The factor analysis extracted three factors accounting for 63.4% of the total variance, and identified as: 1) "Depressive and Anxious Symptoms" (DAS); 2) "Lack of Emotional Control" (LEC); 3) "Reduced Motivation" (RM). On multivariate statistics, DAS severity was predicted by previous history of mood disorders and Barthel Index; LEC severity was predicted by Barthel Index; RM severity was predicted by age. The PSDRS displayed a reliable factor structure that agreed with previous interpretation of PSD. In particular, core depressive symptoms seem to be related to premorbid personality and functional status, whereas apathy/anhedonia may be connected to brain aging.

  7. Development of the Italian version of the trunk impairment scale in subjects with acute and chronic stroke. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, validity and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ambrosini, Emilia; Verheyden, Geert; Brivio, Flavia; Brunati, Roberto; Longoni, Luca; Mauri, Gaia; Molteni, Alessandro; Nava, Claudia; Rocca, Barbara; Ferrante, Simona

    2017-09-10

    To cross-culturally adapt and psychometrically analyse the Italian version of the Trunk Impairment Scale on acute (cohort 1) and chronic stroke patients (cohort 2). The Trunk Impairment Scale was culturally adapted in accordance with international standards. The psychometric testing included: internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), inter- and intra-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient; standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change), construct validity by comparing Trunk Impairment Scale score with Barthel Index, motor subscale of Functional Independence Measure, and Trunk Control Test (Pearson's correlation), and responsiveness (Effect Size, Effect Size with Guyatt approach, standardized response mean, and Receiver Operating Characteristics curves). The Trunk Impairment Scale was administered to 125 and 116 acute and chronic stroke patients, respectively. Internal consistency was acceptable (α > 0.7), inter- and intra-rater reliability (ICC > 0.9, Minimal Detectable Change for total score  0.4) with all scales but the motor Functional Independence Measure in cohort 2. Distribution-based methods showed large effects in cohort 1 and moderate to large effects in cohort 2. The Minimal Important Difference was 3.5 both from patient's and therapist's perspective in cohort 1 and 2.5 and 1.5 from patient's and therapist's perspective, respectively, in cohort 2. The Trunk Impairment Scale was successfully translated into Italian and proved to be reliable, valid, and responsive. Its use is recommended for clinical and research purposes. Implications for Rehabilitation Trunk control is an essential part of balance and postural control, constituting an important prerequisite for daily activities and function. The TIS administered in subjects with subacute and chronic stroke was reliable, valid and responsive. The TIS is expected to help clinicians and researchers by identifying key functional processes related to disability in people

  8. [Impacts of eye acupuncture on neurological deficit and Barthel index in patients of infarction hemiplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Junjie; Guo, Hongliang; He, Youdi; Dong, Qian; Yuan, Junliang; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli

    2016-06-12

    To observe the impacts of eye acupuncture on neurological deficit and Barthel index in the patients of infarction hemiplegia and explore its function mechanism. Ninety-six patients of infarction hemiplegia were randomized into an observation group and a control group, 48 cases in each one. In the control group, the routine western medicines such as thrombolysis and antiplatelet aggregation were used. In the observation group, on the basis of the treatment as the control group, eye acupuncture was added at Shangjiao and Xiajiao areas bilaterally, once a day, 5 times a week. Separately, before treatment and after 2 weeks' treatment the score changes of the modified Edinburgh Scandinavia stroke scale (MESSS) and the activity of daily life scale (ADL, Barthel index, BI) were observed and the efficacy was compared between the two groups. The plasma endothelin was determined and compared before and after treatment in the two groups. After treatment, the effective rate was 93.8% (45/48) in the observation group and was 79.2% (38/48) in the control group. The effective rate in the observation group was higher apparently than that in the control group ( P Barthel index were (82.33±1.56) and (63.34±2.14) in the observation group and control group respectively, which all higher apparently than (38.53±1.54) and (38.14±2.56) before treatment (both P <0.05), and the difference was significant between the two groups after treatment ( P <0.05). The levels of plasma endothelin were (54.55±11.48)ng/L and (62.44±9.88)ng/L in the observation group and the control group after treatment respectively, which were all lower apparently than (78.24±9.25)ng/L and (78.14±10.78)ng/L before treatment (both P <0.05). Additionally, the difference was significant between the two groups after treatment ( P <0.05). Eye acupuncture effectively improves the neurological deficit and Brathel index in the patients of infarction hemiplegia and comprehensively improves the efficacy. The effect

  9. Consequences of neurologic lesions assessed by Barthel Index after Botox® injection may be underestimated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionyssiotis Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Y Dionyssiotis,1,2 D Kiourtidis,3 A Karvouni,3 A Kaliontzoglou,3 I Kliafas31Medical Department, Rehabilitation Center Amyntaio, General Hospital of Florina, Amyntaio, Florina, 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, Dodecanese, 3Neurologic Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, Dodecanese, GreecePurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the consequences of neurologic lesions are underestimated when the Barthel Index (BI is used to assess the clinical outcome of botulinum toxin injection.Patients and methods: The records for all in- and outpatients with various neurologic lesions (stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and so forth who had been referred to the authors’ departments and who had received botulinum toxin type A (Botox® for spasticity within a 4-year period (2008–2011 were examined retrospectively. BI data were collected and analyzed.Results: The BI score was found to have increased in follow-up assessments (P = 0.048. No correlation was found between the degree of spasticity and the BI score.Conclusion: The specific injection of Botox in patients with neurologic lesions was not strongly correlated with a significant functional outcome according to the BI. The results of this study suggest that clinicians need to look at other measurement scales for the assessment of significant outcomes of Botox in the rehabilitation process after neurologic lesions.Keywords: botulinum toxin type A, spasticity, stroke, multiple sclerosis

  10. VISTA-Rehab: a resource for stroke rehabilitation trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Ashburn, Ann; Bowen, Audrey; Brodie, Eric; Corr, Susan; Drummond, Avril; Edmans, Judi; Gladman, John; Kalra, Lalit; Langhorne, Peter; Lees, Kennedy R; Lincoln, Nadina; Logan, Pip; Mead, Gillian; Patchick, Emma; Pollock, Alex; Pomeroy, Val; Sackley, Catherine; Sunnerhagen, Katherina S; van Vliet, Paulette; Walker, Marion; Brady, Marian

    2010-12-01

    Stroke rehabilitation is a complex intervention. Many factors influence the interaction between the patient and the elements of the intervention. Rehabilitation interventions are aimed at altering different domains of patient outcome including body functions, activity and participation. As a consequence, randomised clinical trials in this area are difficult to design. We developed an archive of stroke rehabilitation trials (VISTA-Rehab) to act as a resource to help trialists model and design future rehabilitation studies. We developed specific eligibility criteria for the entry of stroke rehabilitation trials into the archive. We established a Steering Committee to oversee projects and publications and commenced the recruitment of rehabilitation trials into this resource. As of August 2009, VISTA-Rehab contains data from 23 stroke rehabilitation trials (>3400 patients). Demographic data, including age [median=73, interquartile range (63,79)], gender (male=53%) and initial dependency [median baseline Barthel index score=6, interquartile range (9,19)], are available for all patients. Outcome measures include the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index, Rivermead Motor Assessment, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, General Health Questionnaire and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale. VISTA-Rehab expands the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive to include rehabilitation trials. Anonymised data can be used to examine questions specific to stroke rehabilitation and to generate novel hypotheses. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2010 World Stroke Organization.

  11. Pilot assessment of a comfort scale in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogeau, Caroline; Beaucamp, Franck; Allart, Etienne; Daveluy, Walter; Rousseaux, Marc

    2014-04-15

    Comfort/discomfort (C/D) is an important factor of quality of life (QoL). Brain damage is a major source of discomfort. We developed a questionnaire for assessing C/D in daily living situations and for identifying the main causes of any discomfort and presented its pilot assessment in a population of stroke patients. The scale is a questionnaire of the patient or caregiver that addresses (i) comfort/discomfort in 15 situations of daily living (including getting dressed, washing, lying in bed and sitting in a chair) and (ii) the roles of physical difficulties, psychological problems and a poorly adapted environment. We analysed its metrological qualities in a group of 62 stroke patients. For the patients, the most uncomfortable activities were eating, dressing the lower body, urine and faeces elimination and walking, and the most significant factors of discomfort were motor impairments, fatigue, limb stiffness, joint pain, depression and anxiety. The reliability was fair for the overall score and for each C/D item and moderate for the impact of impairments on comfort/discomfort. We also found fair internal consistency and convergent validity against measures of functional status, QoL and burden of care. Sensitivity to change over a 6-week period was modest. The scale can help to define difficulties in daily living situations and identify opportunities for intervention in stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Are the hierarchical properties of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale the same in acute stroke and chronic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, J Lesley; Kwakkel, Gert; Bussmann, Johannes B J; Goos, Jos A G; Harmeling-van der Wel, Barbara C

    2014-07-01

    The motor function section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale (FM motor scale) is a robust scale of motor ability in people after stroke, with high predictive validity for outcome. However, the FM motor scale is time-consuming. The hierarchical properties of the upper extremity (UE) and lower extremity (LE) sections of the FM motor scale have been established in people with chronic stroke. These data support the use of a more concise method of administration and confirm scores can be legitimately summed. The aim of this study was to establish that a similar hierarchy exists in people within 72 hours after stroke onset. A prospective, cross-sectional design was used. Data were obtained from 75 eligible people in a nationwide prospective study (the Early Prediction of Functional Outcome After Stroke). The full version of both sections of the FM motor scale was administered within 72 hours after stroke onset. The hierarchy of item difficulty was investigated by applying Guttman scaling procedures within each stage and each subsection of the UE and LE sections of the scale. The scaling procedures then were applied to item difficulty between stages and subsections and finally across all scale items (stage divisions ignored) of the FM motor scale. For all analyses, the results exceeded acceptable levels for the coefficient of reproducibility and the coefficient of scalability. The sample was a population of people with stroke of moderate severity. The unidimensional hierarchy of the UE and LE sections of the FM motor scale (already established for chronic stroke) within 72 hours after stroke onset was confirmed. A legitimate total summed score can indicate a person's level of motor ability. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  13. Outcome and Risk Factors Presented in Old Patients Above 80 Years of Age Versus Younger Patients After Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Line; Christensen, Louisa; Christensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    patients received stroke unit care in accordance with the guidelines. The population was dichotomized into patients aged less than 80 years and 80 years of age or older. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score and Barthel Index (BI) were used to assess 3-month and 1-year outcome. RESULTS: Patients 80 years...... of age or older presented with significantly more severe strokes than younger patients, median Scandinavian Stroke Scale score 39 vs 42 (P = .003). Median mRS score before stroke was significantly higher in patients aged 80 years or older (P

  14. Reliability and validity of telephonic Barthel Index: an experience from multi-centric randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Kumar, Amit; Misra, Shubham; Yadav, Arun K; Johri, Sarat; Sarkar, R S; Gorthi, S P; Hassan, K M; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Misra, Usha Kant; Kumar, Pradeep

    2018-03-01

    Telephonic Barthel Index (BI) assessment is less time-consuming and more feasible than a face-to-face interview. The aim of this study was to test the validity as well as reliability of the BI administered by telephone in comparison with face-to-face assessment in a multi-centric study. The study was conducted during the course of a randomized controlled trial in which 120 patients with subacute strokes from five teaching hospitals from different parts of India were recruited. Central telephonic follow-up and face-to-face assessment of BI and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 and 6 months were done by trained and certified blinded researchers. Kappa or weighted kappa (wK) was estimated. Sensitivity and specificity at various cutoff levels of telephonic BI were calculated. Concurrent validity of the telephonic BI was assessed by correlating it with the mRS and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scales (NIHSS) at 3 and 6 months. We observed high sensitivity and specificity at various cutoff levels of BI. Moderate to substantial agreement was observed between the two methods at 6 months wK 0.72 (95% CI 0.70-0.77). Item-wise and center-wise kappa also reflected substantial agreement. The study shows that telephonic assessment of activities of daily living with the BI in moderate to severely disabled stroke patients is valid and reliable compared to face-to-face assessment. Our study shows that telephonic assessment requires smaller sample size compared to face-to-face assessment of BI.

  15. The relationship between stroke survivors' perceived identity and mood, self-esteem and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapadatu, Irina; Morris, Reg

    2017-01-11

    To examine change in identity after stroke and to elucidate its relationship with mood and quality of life. To test Higgins' theory of the impact of identity (self-discrepancy) on anxiety and depression. To examine the role of self-esteem in mediating the relationship between identity and outcomes. Sixty-five community-living first-time stroke survivors, mean age 61.58 and time since stroke 5.60 years, were recruited from stroke charities. A cross-sectional study used the Head Injury Semantic Differential Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (adapted) and the Barthel Index. Identity was rated more negatively after stroke than before (t(64) = 6.46, p self-esteem (r = -.48, p self-esteem (β = .30, p self-esteem are associated with important outcomes for stroke survivors.

  16. Are the Hierarchical Properties of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale the Same in Acute Stroke and Chronic Stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crow, J.L.; Kwakkel, G.; Bussmann, J.B.J.; Goos, J.A.G.; Harmeling-van d Wel, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The motor function section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale (FM motor scale) is a robust scale of motor ability in people after stroke, with high predictive validity for outcome. However, the FM motor scale is time-consuming. The hierarchical properties of the upper extremity (UE) and

  17. Design and validation of a clinical scale for prehospital stroke recognition, severity grading and prediction of large vessel occlusion: the shortened NIH Stroke Scale for emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrucker, Jan Christoph; Härtig, Florian; Richter, Hardy; Engelbrecht, Andreas; Hartmann, Johannes; Auer, Jonas; Hametner, Christian; Popp, Erik; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Nagel, Simon; Poli, Sven

    2017-09-01

    To develop an NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS)-compatible, all-in-one scale for rapid and comprehensive prehospital stroke assessment including stroke recognition, severity grading and progression monitoring as well as prediction of large vessel occlusion (LVO). Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and stroke physicians (n=326) rated each item of the NIHSS regarding suitability for prehospital use; best rated items were included. Stroke recognition was evaluated retrospectively in 689 consecutive patients with acute stroke or stroke mimics, prediction of LVO in 741 consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke with acute vessel imaging independent of admission NIHSS score. Nine of the NIHSS items were rated as 'suitable for prehospital use.' After excluding two items in order to increase specificity, the final scale (termed shortened NIHSS for EMS, sNIHSS-EMS) consists of 'level of consciousness', 'facial palsy', 'motor arm/leg', 'sensory', 'language' and 'dysarthria'. Sensitivity for stroke recognition of the sNIHSS-EMS is 91% (95% CI 86 to 94), specificity 52% (95% CI 47 to 56). Receiver operating curve analysis revealed an optimal cut-off point for LVO prediction of ≥6 (sensitivity 70% (95% CI 65 to 76), specificity 81% (95% CI 76 to 84), positive predictive value 70 (95% CI 65 to 75), area under the curve 0.81 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.84)). Test characteristics were non-inferior to non-comprehensive scales. The sNIHSS-EMS may overcome the sequential use of multiple emergency stroke scales by permitting parallel stroke recognition, severity grading and LVO prediction. Full NIHSS-item compatibility allows for evaluation of stroke progression starting at the prehospital phase. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Prehospital Acute Stroke Severity Scale to Predict Large Artery Occlusion: Design and Comparison With Other Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Sidsel; Damgaard, Dorte; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Andersen, Grethe

    2016-07-01

    We designed and validated a simple prehospital stroke scale to identify emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) in patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared the scale to other published scales for prediction of ELVO. A national historical test cohort of 3127 patients with information on intracranial vessel status (angiography) before reperfusion therapy was identified. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) items with the highest predictive value of occlusion of a large intracranial artery were identified, and the most optimal combination meeting predefined criteria to ensure usefulness in the prehospital phase was determined. The predictive performance of Prehospital Acute Stroke Severity (PASS) scale was compared with other published scales for ELVO. The PASS scale was composed of 3 NIHSS scores: level of consciousness (month/age), gaze palsy/deviation, and arm weakness. In derivation of PASS 2/3 of the test cohort was used and showed accuracy (area under the curve) of 0.76 for detecting large arterial occlusion. Optimal cut point ≥2 abnormal scores showed: sensitivity=0.66 (95% CI, 0.62-0.69), specificity=0.83 (0.81-0.85), and area under the curve=0.74 (0.72-0.76). Validation on 1/3 of the test cohort showed similar performance. Patients with a large artery occlusion on angiography with PASS ≥2 had a median NIHSS score of 17 (interquartile range=6) as opposed to PASS <2 with a median NIHSS score of 6 (interquartile range=5). The PASS scale showed equal performance although more simple when compared with other scales predicting ELVO. The PASS scale is simple and has promising accuracy for prediction of ELVO in the field. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Proposal for a New Predictive Scale for Recurrent Risk of Fall in a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Patients with Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Elen Beatriz; Nascimento, Carla; Monteiro, Maiana; Castro, Mayra; Maso, Iara; Campos, Adriana; Marinho, Camila; Barreto-Neto, Nestor J; Lopes, Antônio A; Jesus, Pedro A P; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine risk factors related to the occurrence of falls in stroke patients and to propose a new predictive scale for falls. Demographic and clinical data were collected and the following scales were applied: Barthel Index, Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Subjects were followed prospectively for 2 years for the occurrence of recurrent (≥2) falls. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed and univariable associations were tested using log-rank test. Two separate multivariable models were then used: the first used Cox proportional hazards regression and the second used Poisson regression. In each model, significant associations were considered present with a P value less than .05. We evaluated 150 individuals and the final analysis included 131 patients; the average age of the patients was 55.8 ± 13 years, 52% were women, and the median NIHSS score was 2 (interquartile range = 1-5). Falls occurred in 17% of patients, with a median of 23 months of follow-up (interquartile range = 16-26 months). In the multivariable Cox regression model, only TUG quartile, female gender, and posterior circulation territory involvement remained significant predictors of recurrent falls. We used the predictors from the Cox regression model to propose a new recurrent fall risk scale. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 73%, 95% confidence interval = 62%-83%, P = .001, with 81.3% sensitivity and 41.8% specificity. The new predictive scale for recurrent risk (including TUG, posterior circulation territory involvement, and female gender) is presented as an instrument for monitoring the risk of recurrent falls. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Angiotensin receptor blockade in acute stroke. The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Murray, Gordon; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    -European countries: Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Estonia and Finland. STUDY OUTCOMES: There are two co-primary effect variables: • Functional status at 6-months, measured by the modified Rankin Scale, and • vascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke during the first 6-months....... Secondary outcome variables: Secondary effect variables include • the Barthel index (functional status) • EuroQol (quality of life) and • Mini-mental state examination (cognition) at 6-months • Health economic costs during the first 6-months FUNDING: The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial receives...

  1. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paanalahti, Markku; Berzina, Guna; Lundgren-Nilsson, Åsa; Arndt, Toni; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2018-03-05

    To examine if the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) core set for stoke contains problems that are relevant for the persons living with stroke as expressed in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Cross-sectional study of 242 persons with previous stroke. The agreement between the perceived problems in the SIS items and problems in the categories of Comprehensive ICF Core Set for stroke were analyzed using percent of agreement and Kappa statistic. The analyses between 57 items of the SIS and 31 second-level categories of the ICF were conducted. The problems in domains of "Mobility", "Activities of daily living", "Hand function", "Strength" in the SIS had moderate agreement when compared to ICF categories. The SIS domains of "Emotion" and "Communication", as well as some aspects of the "Memory" had slight or fair agreement with corresponding ICF categories. The results of the study suggest that there is acceptable agreement between persons after stroke and health professionals in the physical aspects, but rather poor agreement in the cognitive and emotional aspects of functioning. Health professionals do not fully capture the magnitude of emotional or social problems experienced by persons after stroke when using the ICF Core Set as a framework for evaluation. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF Core Set for Stroke provides comprehensive list of possible health and health related outcomes for persons after stroke. Problems reported in condition-specific patient-reported outcome scales can be important in decision making in rehabilitation. Patients and health professionals tend to agree more on physical than cognitive problems. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

  2. The Early Rehabilitation Barthel Index (ERBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollnik, J D

    2011-12-01

    An extended version of the Barthel index, the so-called "Early Rehabilitation Barthel Index", or ERBI, is widely used in German early neurological rehabilitation centres and even was used in defining early rehabilitation procedures in the German DRG system. It contains highly relevant items like mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy, or dysphagia. This study presents an English version of the ERBI and examines its validity and reliability. Two samples of early neurological rehabilitation patients have been analyzed. In one sample (n=1,669), measures of morbidity and length of stay (LOS) have been compared between certain ERBI categories. In a second sample (n=273), inter-rater reliability (nurses vs. physicians) has been examined. Patients with low ERBI had a significantly longer LOS than those with high ERBI values (pscale to assess early neurological rehabilitation patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. A validation study using a modified version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients: Postural Stroke Study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsson Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS was created with some changes in the description of the items and clarifications in the manual (e.g. much help was defined as support from 2 persons. The aim of this validation study was to assess intrarater and interrater reliability using this modified version of PASS, at a stroke unit, for patients in the acute phase after their first event of stroke. Methods In the intrarater reliability study 114 patients and in the interrater reliability study 15 patients were examined twice with the test within one to 24 hours in the first week after stroke. Spearman's rank correlation, Kappa coefficients, Percentage Agreement and the newer rank-invariant methods; Relative Position, Relative Concentration and Relative rank Variance were used for the statistical analysis. Results For the intrarater reliability Spearman's rank correlations were 0.88-0.98 and k were 0.70-0.93 for the individual items. Small, statistically significant, differences were found for two items regarding Relative Position and for one item regarding Relative Concentration. There was no Relative rank Variance for any single item. For the interrater reliability, Spearman's rank correlations were 0.77-0.99 for individual items. For some items there was a possible, even if not proved, reliability problem regarding Relative Position and Relative Concentration. There was no Relative rank Variance for the single items, except for a small Relative rank Variance for one item. Conclusions The high intrarater and interrater reliability shown for the modified Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, the Swedish version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, with traditional and newer statistical analyses, particularly for assessments performed by the same rater, support the use of the Swedish version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, in the acute stage after stroke both

  4. Development, expansion, and use of a stroke clinical trials resource for novel exploratory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Bath, Philip; Brady, Marian; Davis, Stephen; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Donnan, Geoffrey; Fisher, Marc; Hacke, Werner; Hanley, Daniel F; Luby, Marie; Tsivgoulis, G; Wahlgren, Nils; Warach, Steven; Lees, Kennedy R

    2012-02-01

    Analysis of reliable registry data can direct future research to influence clinical care. Data from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive have been used to test hypotheses and inform trial design. We sought to expand Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into a broader stroke resource with new opportunities for research and international collaboration. Using procedures initially developed for an acute stroke trial archive, we invited trialists to lodge data on rehabilitation, secondary prevention, intracerebral haemorrhage, imaging, and observational stroke studies. We have extended Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into six subsections: Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Acute (n = 28 190 patients' data), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab (n = 10 194), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 1829), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Imaging (n = 1300), and Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus (n = 6573). Enrollment continues, with commitments for the contribution of six further trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, 13 trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab, and one registry to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus. Data on age, type of stroke, medical history, outcomes by modified Rankin scale and Barthel Index (BI), mortality, and adverse events are available for analyses. The Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive network encourages the development of young investigators and provides opportunities for international peer review and collaboration. Application of the original Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive concepts beyond acute stroke trials can extend the value of clinical research at low cost, without threatening commercial or intellectual property interests. This delivers valuable research output to inform

  5. The relationship between pneumonia and Glasgow coma scale assessment on acute stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.; Batubara, C. A.; Dhanu, R.

    2018-03-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most frequent medical complications of a stroke. Despite the well-documented association of a stroke associated infections with increased mortality and worse long-term outcome, on the other hand, the limited data available on independent predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke patients in an emergency unit. To determine the independentrelationship between pneumonia and Glasgow Coma Scale assessment on acute stroke patients. The cohort retrospective study observed 55 acute stroke patients who stayed in intensive care unit Adam Malik General Hospital from January until August 2017. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with Ischemic stroke (OR 5.40; 95% CI: 1.28 – 6.40, p=0.003), higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (p=0.014) and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (p=0.0001). Analysis multivariate logistic regression identified NIHSS as an independent of predictors of pneumonia (95% CI : 1.047 – 1.326, p=0.001). Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficits evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  6. Effect of different combinations of physiotherapy treatment approaches on functional outcomes in stroke patients: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Ping Ho Chung, MSc in Health Care

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study compared the functional outcomes among stroke patients who had received rehabilitation based on different physiotherapy treatment approaches. The participants were divided into three groups according to the physiotherapist in charge of their treatment. The primary treatment approaches applied in Group A, Group B, and Group C were the functional approach, the Bobath approach, and the motor learning approach, respectively. For each participant, the Berg's Balance Scale score, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index were compared among these three groups prior to and after the stroke rehabilitation programme. Within-group analysis showed that Group A, Group B, and Group C participants had a statistically significant improvement in their Modified Barthel Index (p  0.05. In summary, this study showed that different combinations of treatment approaches may induce similar improvement in functional outcomes after stroke rehabilitation.

  7. A comparison of five stroke scales with measures of disability, handicap, and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, R.; Horn, J.; Limburg, M.; van der Meulen, J.; Bossuyt, P.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recently much debate has arisen on the appropriateness of assessing stroke outcomes with stroke impairment scales. Our purpose was to study the relationship between long-term impairments and functional outcomes in terms of disability, handicap, and quality of life. METHODS:

  8. Development and validation of a short version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Marcel W. M.; Boosman, Hileen; van Zandvoort, Martine M.; Passier, Patricia E. C. A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.

    Background and purpose The Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QoL) is a well validated measure of health related quality of life in patients with stroke, but with 49 items its length is a disadvantage. A short version of the SS-QoL was developed and tested here. Methods Secondary analyses of

  9. Combined pharmacological and motor training interventions for recovery of upper limb function in subacute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Stanescu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor deficit, especially in the upper limb, is the primary contributor in post-stroke disability. Recovery of motor function relies on neural plasticity – cortical plastic reorganization – a spontaneous process, which could be enhanced from early phases by rehabilitative strategies. The subacute stage after stroke is the critical period during which the brain is most receptive to rehabilitation strategies. Based on the recent results of 2 trials in stroke rehabilitation using pharmacological intervention with Cerebrolysin in combination with standardized kinesitherapy, we conducted a pilot study of 4 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, treated with Cerebrolysin for 28 days after stroke, and with intensive task-specific kinesitherapy from day 7 to day 28 after stroke. We assessed stroke severity with NIHSS score, upper limb function with ARAT (Action Research Arm Test score, disability with modified Rankin scale and patient’s autonomy with Barthel Index, at day 0 and day 30 after stroke. After 28 days of combined therapy all 4 patients improved, most significant improvement was seen in upper limb function, measured by ARAT score and in autonomy measured by Barthel Index.

  10. Aspects correlates with Scandinavian Stroke Scale for predicting early neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gabriel, Maicon Gonçalves; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Fernandes, Thiago Dias; Resende, Luiz Antônio de Lima; Pontes Neto, Octávio Marques; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the correlation between the Alberta Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) for the evaluation of neurological impairment in patients with acute stroke. 59 patients with a first acute ischemic stroke were evaluated. The ASPECTS were evaluated by 2 neurologists at admission and by another neurologist after 48 hours. The NIHSS and SSS was applied to determinate stroke severity. Correlations and agreements were analysed statistically by Spearman and Kappa tests. ASPECTS was correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission (r = -0.52; p motor power, and speech (r = 0.51; p < 0.001). The SSS of 25.5 shows sensitivity (68%) and specificity (72%) when associated with ASPECTS ≤ 7. The SSS can predict worst neurological impairment when associated with lower values of ASPECTS.

  11. Quantifying Selection Bias in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Data Documented in an Acute Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael P; Luo, Zhehui; Gardiner, Joseph; Burke, James F; Nickles, Adrienne; Reeves, Mathew J

    2016-05-01

    As a measure of stroke severity, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is an important predictor of patient- and hospital-level outcomes, yet is often undocumented. The purpose of this study is to quantify and correct for potential selection bias in observed NIHSS data. Data were obtained from the Michigan Stroke Registry and included 10 262 patients with ischemic stroke aged ≥65 years discharged from 23 hospitals from 2009 to 2012, of which 74.6% of patients had documented NIHSS. We estimated models predicting NIHSS documentation and NIHSS score and used the Heckman selection model to estimate a correlation coefficient (ρ) between the 2 model error terms, which quantifies the degree of selection bias in the documentation of NIHSS. The Heckman model found modest, but significant, selection bias (ρ=0.19; 95% confidence interval: 0.09, 0.29; P2 points, which could significantly alter the risk profile of hospitals treating patients with ischemic stroke and subsequent hospital risk-adjusted outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Stroke Survivors Scoring Zero on the NIH Stroke Scale Score Still Exhibit Significant Motor Impairment and Functional Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brittany; Page, Stephen J; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale's (NIHSS's) association with upper extremity (UE) impairment and functional outcomes. Design. Secondary, retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial data. Setting. Not applicable. Participants. 146 subjects with stable, chronic stroke-induced hemiparesis. Intervention. The NIHSS, the UE Fugl-Meyer (FM), and the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT) were administered prior to their participation in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Main Outcome Measures. The NIHSS, FM, and AMAT. Results. The association between the NIHSS and UE impairment was statistically significant (P = -0.204; p = 0.014) but explained less than 4% of the variance among UE FM scores. The association between NIHSS total score and function as measured by the AMAT was not statistically significant (P = -0.141; p = 0.089). Subjects scoring a "zero" on the NIHSS exhibited discernible UE motor deficits and varied scores on the UE FM and AMAT. Conclusion. While being used in stroke trials, the NIHSS may have limited ability to discriminate between treatment responses, even when only a relatively narrow array of impairment levels exists among patients. Given these findings, NIHSS use should be restricted to acute stroke studies and clinical settings with the goal of reporting stroke severity.

  13. The stroke impact scale: performance as a quality of life measure in a community-based stroke rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Marina; Campbell, Nerissa; Allen, Laura; Meyer, Matthew; Teasell, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Data was derived from a study assessing a community-based stroke rehabilitation program. Patients were administered the SIS and Euroqol-5D (EQ-5D-5L) on admission to the study, and at six month and 12 month follow-up. The psychometric performance of each domain of the SIS was assessed at each time point. A total of 164 patients completed outcome measures at baseline, 108 patients at six months and 37 patients at 12 months. Correlation of the SIS domains with the EQ-5D-5L suggested that the dimensions of health contributing to a patient's perception of health-related quality of life changes over time. The SIS performed well in a sample of patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation in the community. Our findings suggest that the multidimensionality of the SIS may allow health professionals to track patient progress and tailor rehabilitation interventions to target the dimensions of health that are most important to a patient's overall health and perceived quality of life over time. Implications for Rehabilitation There is an increased need for valid and reliable measures to evaluate the outcomes of patients recovering from stroke in the community. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) measures multiple domains of health and is well-suited for use in patients recovering from stroke in the community. There is a high level of internal consistency in the eight SIS domains with no evidence of floor effects; ceiling effects were noted for several domains. Correlation of the SIS with the Euroqol-5D suggested that the dimensions of health contributing to a patient's perception of health related quality of life changes over time.

  14. Validation of the Scandinavian Stroke Scale in a Multicultural Population in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the consistency, coherence, and interobserver reliability of the Portuguese version of the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS in a multicultural population of stroke. Methods: The SSS was translated, culturally adapted, and applied by two independent investigators. This was a randomized transverse study involving two groups: group 1 included 20 patients in the acute phase and group 2 included 20 patients in the subacute phase after stroke was confirmed by computed tomography with a pre-stroke modified Rankin Scale score of 0. Each patient also underwent National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS evaluation at hospital entry and at the time of the SSS evaluation for correlation with our current standard hospital practice. Consistency and coherence were analyzed by Cronbach’s α and interobserver reliability by ĸ. Results: Forty patients were evaluated with 0.88 consistency and coherence in both stroke phases. Mean interobserver ĸ was 0.76, with reliability considered excellent and good for most scale items, and moderate for only the facial palsy item. Conclusion: The SSS is adequate and validated to study post-stroke patients in a multicultural Brazilian population and in the Portuguese language.

  15. Rasch analysis in the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Garde, B; Kreiner, S

    1995-01-01

    The study describes the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke. It was based on 74 first-stroke patients, 40 men and 34 women, each assessed three times during rehabilitation. Their median age was 69 years, and they represented all degrees of severity of paresis....... Content, construct, criterion and convergent validity were examined, as well as the inter-rater reliability. The final rating scale has three special characteristics: 1) it reflects the regularity in the recovery of mobility after stroke; 2) the sum of item scores comprises the information contained...

  16. Automatic detection of ischemic stroke based on scaling exponent electroencephalogram using extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhi, H. A.; Wijaya, S. K.; Prawito; Badri, C.; Rezal, M.

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is one of cerebrovascular diseases caused by the obstruction of blood flow to the brain. Stroke becomes the leading cause of death in Indonesia and the second in the world. Stroke also causes of the disability. Ischemic stroke accounts for most of all stroke cases. Obstruction of blood flow can cause tissue damage which results the electrical changes in the brain that can be observed through the electroencephalogram (EEG). In this study, we presented the results of automatic detection of ischemic stroke and normal subjects based on the scaling exponent EEG obtained through detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) using extreme learning machine (ELM) as the classifier. The signal processing was performed with 18 channels of EEG in the range of 0-30 Hz. Scaling exponents of the subjects were used as the input for ELM to classify the ischemic stroke. The performance of detection was observed by the value of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The result showed, performance of the proposed method to classify the ischemic stroke was 84 % for accuracy, 82 % for sensitivity and 87 % for specificity with 120 hidden neurons and sine as the activation function of ELM.

  17. External Validation of the Prestroke Independence, Sex, Age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale Score for Predicting Pneumonia After Stroke Using Data From the China National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runhua; Ji, Ruijun; Pan, Yuesong; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-05-01

    Pneumonia is an important risk factor for mortality and morbidity after stroke. The Prestroke Independence, Sex, Age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (ISAN) score was shown to be a useful tool for predicting stroke-associated pneumonia based on UK multicenter cohort study. We aimed to externally validate the score using data from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR). Eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the CNSR from 2007 to 2008 were included. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curve was used to evaluate discrimination. The Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test and Pearson correlation coefficient were performed to assess calibration of the model. A total of 19,333 patients (AIS = 14400; ICH = 4933) were included and the overall pneumonia rate was 12.7%. The AUC was .76 (95% confidence interval [CI]: .75-.78) for the subgroup of AIS and .70 (95% CI: .68-.72) for the subgroup of ICH. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed the ISAN score with the good calibration for AIS and ICH (P = .177 and .405, respectively). The plot of observed versus predicted pneumonia rates suggested higher correlation for patients with AIS than with ICH (Pearson correlation coefficient = .99 and .83, respectively). The ISAN score was a useful tool for predicting in-hospital pneumonia after acute stroke, especially for patients with AIS. Further validations need to be done in different populations. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-01-01

    telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. METHODS: Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER......-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed...... of 2.4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically...

  19. Manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke, frequency and influence on functional outcome: The Copenhagen Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, P M; Jørgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Nakayama, H; Raaschou, H O; Olsen, T S

    2001-09-01

    To determine the frequency of manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke and to examine the influence of these symptoms on functional outcome. Seven hundred seventy six unselected, acute stroke patients who were admitted within seven days of stroke onset with unimpaired consciousness were included. If possible, the patients were assessed for manual and oral apraxia on acute admission. Neurologic stroke severity including aphasia was assessed with the Scandinavian Stroke Scale, and activities of daily living function was assessed with the Barthel Index. All patients completed their rehabilitation in the same large stroke unit. Six hundred eighteen patients could cooperate with the apraxia assessments. Manual apraxia was found in 7% of subjects (10% in left and 4% in right hemispheric stroke; chi2 = 9.0; P = 0.003). Oral apraxia was found in 6% (9% in left and 4% in right hemispheric stroke; chi2 = 5.4; P = 0.02). Both manual and oral apraxia were related to increasing stroke severity, and manual, but not oral, apraxia was associated with increasing age. There was no gender difference in frequency of apraxia. Patients with either type of apraxia had temporal lobe involvement more often than patients without. When analyzed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses, neither manual nor oral apraxia had any independent influence on functional outcome. Apraxia is significantly less frequent in unselected patients with acute stroke than has previously been assumed and has no independent negative influence on functional outcome.

  20. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  1. The Reliability and Validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale with Japanese Patients After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    篠原, 純子; 児玉, 和紀; 迫田, 勝則; 金久, 重子; 百本, 文子

    2002-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale with Japanese patients after stroke was examined. Subjects were outpatients between 6 months and 3 years post stroke of cerebral infarction. Two kinds of Self-Esteem were examined. One was that of the present time. The other was that of the past time (Respondents recalled their Self-Esteem before having a stroke). The respondents were 38 people who consisted of 26 males and 12 females. Twenty-eight of thirty-eight respondents ans...

  2. Relationship between the Berg Balance Scale and Static Balance Test in Hemiplegic Patients with Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Makoto; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Machida, Yooichiro; Minakata, Shin

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between results of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Static Balance Test (SBT) in hemiplegic patients with stroke. [Subjects] The subjects were 39 hemiplegic patients (25 men, 14 women; mean age, 69.4 ? 11.0?years) with stroke that had occurred within the preceding 6 months and who had good understanding of verbal instructions. [Methods] The SBT consists of five posture-holding tasks (sitting, stride standing, close standing, ...

  3. Stroke in a resource-constrained hospital in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenumgård, Pål Sigurd; Rakotondranaivo, Miadana Joshua; Sletvold, Olav; Follestad, Turid; Ellekjær, Hanne

    2017-07-24

    Stroke is reported as the most frequent cause of in-hospital death in Madagascar. However, no descriptive data on hospitalized stroke patients in the country have been published. In the present study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of collecting data on stroke patients in a resource-constrained hospital in Madagascar. We also aimed to characterize patients hospitalized with stroke. We registered socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, and early outcomes of patients admitted for stroke between 23 September 2014 and 3 December 2014. We used several validated scales for the evaluation. Stroke severity was measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), disability by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and function by the Barthel Index (BI). We studied 30 patients. Sixteen were males. The median age was 62.5 years (IQR 58-67). The NIHSS and mRS were completed for all of the patients, and BI was used for the survivors. Three patients received a computed tomography (CT) brain scan. The access to laboratory investigations was limited. Electrocardiographs (ECGs) were not performed. The median NIHSS score was 16.5 (IQR 10-35). The in-hospital stroke mortality was 30%. At discharge, the median mRS score was 5 (IQR 4-6), and the median BI score was 45 (IQR 0-72.5). Although the access to brain imaging and supporting investigations was deficient, this small-scale study suggests that it is feasible to collect essential data on stroke patients in a resource-constrained hospital in Madagascar. Such data should be useful for improving stroke services and planning further research. The hospitalized stroke patients had severe symptoms. The in-hospital stroke mortality was high. At discharge, the disability category was high, and functional status low.

  4. Rasch analysis of the London Handicap Scale in stroke patients: a cross-sectional study.

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    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Yoo-Im

    2014-07-31

    Although activity and participation are the target domains in stroke rehabilitation interventions, there is insufficient evidence available regarding the validity of participation measurement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale in community-dwelling stroke patients, using Rasch analysis. Participants were 170 community-dwelling stroke survivors. The data were analyzed using Winsteps (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to determine the unidimensionality of item fit, the distribution of item difficulty, and the reliability and suitability of the rating process for the London Handicap Scale. Data of 16 participants did not fit the Rasch model and there were no misfitting items. The person separation value was 2.42, and the reliability was .85; furthermore, the rating process for the London Handicap Scale was found to be suitable for use with stroke patients. This was the first trial to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale using Rasch analysis; the results supported the suitability of this scale for use with stroke patients.

  5. Reliability and validity of a new post-stroke depression scale in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yingying; Liu, Rui; Lu, Jian; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Shining; Wu, Aiqin; Wang, Qiao; Yuan, Yonggui

    2015-03-15

    Nowadays there is still a lack of effective method to evaluate post-stroke depression. To distinguish patients with and without depression after stroke reliably, this study proposes a new Post-Stroke Depression Scale (PSDS). PSDS was developed based on various depression scales and clinician experiences. 158 stroke patients who were able to finish PSDS and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) were recruited. Cronbach α, Spearman rank coefficient and Kruskal-Wallis test were respectively used to examine reliability, internal consistency and discriminate validity. Then the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the ability of scale and categorized scales to the range of depression. Finally, the factors of the PSDS were classified by average clustering analysis. The Cronbach α of PSDS was 0.797 (95% CI) indicted a good reliability. The Spearman correlation coefficient between PSDS and HDRS was 0.822 (Psize maybe the main limitation, the larger sample used in different fields according sex, age and side-lesion was needed to verity the results. The cut off value calculated by ROC curve maybe react the severity of the disease to some extent, but it is not absolute. PSDS is a valid, reliable and specific tool for evaluating post-stroke depression patients and can be conveniently utilized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic value of single-photon emission tomography in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, C.J.; Bolster, A.A.; Tytler, S.; Murray, G.D.; Corrigall, R.S.; Adams, F.G.; Lees, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in the investigation of acute stroke. We investigated the relationship between SPET data and functional outcome in a large group of acute stroke patients. One hundred and eight patients underwent cerebral computed tomography (CT) and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime SPET after acute ischaemic stroke. We categorised the clinical presentation according to the Oxford classification of acute stroke. Outcome was measured 1 year after stroke using mortality and the Barthel Index for survivors. SPET scans were interpreted without reference to the clinical data using a semi-automatic technique. Three experienced observers determined the presence of luxury perfusion using suitably scaled SPET images in conjunction with the CT scan. Both SPET volume and severity of deficit were significantly negatively correlated with Barthel Index at 1 year (r s =-0.310, P s =-0.316, P s =-0.606, P s =-0.492, P 2 =0.073, df=1, P=0.79) with good functional outcome (Barthel score ≥60). Stepwise logistic regression identified Oxford classification, total deficit volume and patient's age as significant predictors of functional outcome. Overall predictive accuracy was 72%. Predictive accuracy was better in patients who received SPET within 16 h of stroke onset. SPET provides useful information about the functional outcome of acute stroke at 1 year. However, the accuracy of prediction decreases the longer SPET is delayed. Prognostication using SPET in combination with clinical assessment and other investigations may also be considered. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  7. THE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF BLOOD IN THE MOST ACUTE STAGE OF ISCHEMIC STROKE AND THEIR RELATION TO THE SEVERITY OF NEUROLOGICAL IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Azhermacheva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the rheological parameters of blood: blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation and deformability. The severity of the patients was assessed by clinical scales:Glasgowcoma scale, the scale NIHSS, Barthel index. The study found that in the acute phase of ischemic stroke increased blood viscosity by increasing red blood cell aggregation and reduced erythrocyte deformability. The increase in the viscosity of the blood in acute ischemic stroke is accompanied by increased severity of neurological disorders.

  8. Risk factors for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients

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    Anna Flávia Ferraz Barros Baroni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Stroke is a frequent cause of dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a tertiary care hospital the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients, to analyze factors associated with the dysfunction and to relate swallowing dysfunction to mortality 3 months after the stroke. METHODS: Clinical evaluation of deglutition was performed in 212 consecutive patients with a medical and radiologic diagnosis of stroke. The occurrence of death was determined 3 months after the stroke. RESULTS: It was observed that 63% of the patients had swallowing dysfunction. The variables gender and specific location of the lesion were not associated with the presence or absence of swallowing dysfunction. The patients with swallowing dysfunction had more frequently a previous stroke, had a stroke in the left hemisphere, motor and/or sensitivity alterations, difficulty in oral comprehension, alteration of oral expression, alteration of the level of consciousness, complications such as fever and pneumonia, high indexes on the Rankin scale, and low indexes on the Barthel scale. These patients had a higher mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Swallowing evaluation should be done in all patients with stroke, since swallowing dysfunction is associated with complications and an increased risk of death.

  9. Outcome after femoral neck fractures: a comparison of Harris Hip Score, Eq-5d and Barthel Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frihagen, Frede; Grotle, Margreth; Madsen, Jan Erik; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Mowinckel, Petter; Nordsletten, Lars

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the discriminatory ability and responsiveness of the Harris Hips Score, the Barthel Index and the Eq-5d (Euroqol) in an unselected population of patients with displaced femoral neck fracture. Data were collected at 4 and 12 months after surgery from a population of 222 patients. Patients with complete data sets who suffered a serious complication (n=23) were compared with patients with no complication (n=56). The assessment scales' ability to discriminate between the groups was calculated, as was the change score and the standardised response mean. All scales were able to discriminate between the complications group and the non-complications group at 4 months, but only Harris Hip Score had independent explanatory ability in a logistic regression analysis. All scales showed a positive change score for the complications group from 4 to 12 months. The standardised response mean was 0.75 for Harris Hip Score, 0.40 for Barthel Index, 0.46 for the Eq-5d index score, and 0.57 for the Eq-5d visual analogue scale. Barthel Index had a marked ceiling effect with 51/79 (65%) scoring 19 or 20 at 4 months. The response rate was 71-87% for Eq-5d and 96-98% for Harris Hip Score and Barthel Index. All the scales may be used for this patient group, but Harris Hip Score performed better than the other scales.

  10. Post-stroke depression: Prevalence and relationship with disability in chronic stroke survivors

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    Srivastava Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate (1 the prevalence of operationally defined depressive disorder (ICD-10 in chronic stroke subjects and (2 the relationship of post-stroke depression (PSD with disability. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting: Neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care university research center. Materials and Methods: Participants were those with first episode of supratentorial stroke of more than 3 months′ duration with impaired balance and gait who had been referred for rehabilitation. Data were collected on demographic data, stroke data (side and type of lesion and post-stroke duration, cognition (mini mental state examination, depressive ideation (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - HRDS, impairment (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, balance (Berg Balance Scale, ambulatory status (Functional Ambulation Category, walking ability (speed, and independence in activities of daily living (Barthel Index. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 13.0. We carried out the chi-square test for ordinal variables and the independent t test for continuous variables. Results: Fifty-one patients (M:F: 41:10 of mean age 46.06 ± 11.19 years and mean post-stroke duration of 467.33 ± 436.39 days were included in the study. Eighteen of the 51 participants (35.29% met the criteria for depression. Demographic variables like male gender, being married, living in a nuclear family, urban background, and higher HRDS score were significantly correlated with PSD (P < 0.05. Depression was related to functional disability after stroke but to a statistically insignificant level (P > 0.05 and was unrelated to lesion-related parameters. Conclusion: Depression occurs in one-third of chronic stroke survivors and is prevalent in subjects referred for rehabilitation. PSD is related primarily to demographic variables and only to a lesser extent to functional disability following stroke.

  11. Associations between results of post-stroke NDT-Bobath rehabilitation in gait parameters, ADL and hand functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikołajewska, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    In patients after a stroke there are variable disorders. These patients often need rehabilitation in more than one area beceause of multiple limitations of the ability to perform everyday activities. The aim of the study was to assess correlations - statistical relationships between observed gait parameters, ADL and hand functions - results of rehabilitation of patients after ischaemic stroke according to the NDTBobath method for adults. The investigated group consisted of 60 patients after ischaemic stroke, who participated in the rehabilitation programme. 10 sessions of the NDT-Bobath therapy were provided in 2 weeks (10 days of the therapy). The calculation of correlations was made based on changes of parameters: Bobath Scale (to assess hand functions), Barthel Index (to assess ADL), gait velocity, cadence and stride lenght. Measurements were performed in every patient twice: on admission (before the therapy) and after last session of the therapy to assess rehabilitation effects. The main statistically relevant corellations observed in the study were as follows: in the whole group of patients: poor and moderate (negative) correlation between changes of gait parameters and Bobath Scale and Barthel Index, moderate and severe (negative) correlation between changes of gait parameters and Bobath Scale and Barthel Index in the group of women, correlation between changes in Bobath Scale and Barthel Index in the group of patients with left side of paresis, (negative) correlation between changes of gait parameters and Bobath Scale in group of patients younger than 68 years, moderate, high and very high correlations between changes in gait parameters in groups of women, men, younger than 68 years and older than 68 years. There have been observed statistically significant and favourable changes in the health status of patients, described by gait parameters, changes in hand functions and ADL. Based on the presented correlations there is an assumption that it is hard to

  12. Psychometric properties of the Caregiver Preparedness Scale in caregivers of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, Gianluca; Savini, Serenella; Byun, Eeeseung; Simeone, Silvio; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Vela, Raúl Juárez; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Caregiver Preparedness Scale (CPS) in caregivers of stroke survivors. Caregiver preparedness can have an important impact on both the caregiver and the stroke survivor. The validity and reliability of the CPS has not been tested for the stroke-caregiver population. We used a cross-sectional design to study a sample of 156 caregivers of stroke survivors. Construct validity of the CPS was evaluated by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were also evaluated. Caregivers were, on average, 54 year old (SD = 13.2) and most were women (64.7%). CFA supported the unidimensionality of the scale (comparative fit index = 0.98). Reliability was also supported: item-reliability index and item-total correlations above 0.30; composite reliability index = 0.93; Cronbach's alpha = 0.94; factor score determinacy = 0.97; and test-retest reliability = 0.92. The CPS is valid and reliable in caregivers of stroke survivors. Scores on this scale may assist health-care providers in identifying caregivers with less preparedness to provide specific interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Large-Scale Phase Synchrony Reflects Clinical Status After Stroke: An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Teiji; Hattori, Noriaki; Uno, Yutaka; Kitajo, Keiichi; Hatakenaka, Megumi; Yagura, Hajime; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Tomomi; Nagasako, Michiko; Otomune, Hironori; Miyai, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Stroke-induced focal brain lesions often exert remote effects via residual neural network activity. Electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques can assess neural network modifications after brain damage. Recently, EEG phase synchrony analyses have shown associations between the level of large-scale phase synchrony of brain activity and clinical symptoms; however, few reports have assessed such associations in stroke patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of hemispheric phase synchrony in stroke patients by calculating its correlation with clinical status. This cross-sectional study included 19 patients with post-acute ischemic stroke admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Interhemispheric phase synchrony indices (IH-PSIs) were computed in 2 frequency bands (alpha [α], and beta [β]), and associations between indices and scores of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA) were analyzed. For further assessments of IH-PSIs, ipsilesional intrahemispheric PSIs (IntraH-PSIs) as well as IH- and IntraH-phase lag indices (PLIs) were also evaluated. IH-PSIs correlated significantly with FIM scores and NIHSS scores. In contrast, IH-PSIs did not correlate with FMA scores. IntraH-PSIs correlate with FIM scores after removal of the outlier. The results of analysis with PLIs were consistent with IH-PSIs. The PSIs correlated with performance on the activities of daily living scale but not with scores on a pure motor impairment scale. These results suggest that large-scale phase synchrony represented by IH-PSIs provides a novel surrogate marker for clinical status after stroke.

  14. Cigarette smoking is an independent risk factor for post-stroke delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae Sung; Lee, Jin Soo; Yoon, Jung Han; Moon, So Young; Joo, In Soo; Huh, Kyoon; Hong, Ji Man

    2017-03-23

    Post-stroke delirium is a common problem in the care of stroke patients, and is associated with longer hospitalization, high short-term mortality, and an increased need for long-term care. Although post-stroke delirium occurs in approximately 10 ~ 30% of patients, little is known about the risk factors for post-stroke delirium in patients who experience acute stroke. A total of 576 consecutive patients who experienced ischemic stroke (mean age, 65.2 years; range, 23-93 years) were screened for delirium over a 2-year period in an acute stroke care unit of a tertiary referral hospital. We screened for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method. Once delirium was suspected, we evaluated the symptoms using the Korean Version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98. Neurological deficits were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at admission and discharge, and functional ability was assessed using the Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale at discharge and 3 months after discharge. Thirty-eight (6.7%) patients with stroke developed delirium during admission to the acute stroke care unit. Patients with delirium were significantly older (70.6 vs. 64.9 years of age, P = .001) and smoked cigarettes more frequently (40% vs. 24%, P = .033) than patients without delirium. In terms of clinical features, the delirium group experienced a significantly higher rate of major hemispheric stroke (55% vs. 26%, P delirium were older age, history of cigarette smoking, and major hemispheric stroke. Abrupt cessation of cigarette smoking may be a risk factor for post-stroke delirium in ischemic stroke patients. The development of delirium after stroke is associated with worse outcome and longer hospitalization.

  15. Communication activity in stroke patients with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaux, Jean-Michel; Lagadec, Tiphaine; de Sèze, Mathieu Panchoa; Zongo, Drissa; Asselineau, Julien; Douce, Emmanuelle; Trias, Joel; Delair, Marie-France; Darrigrand, Bénédicte

    2013-04-01

    To study communication disability in stroke patients with aphasia. Prospective, multicentric cohort study of patients with aphasia, consecutively included after a first stroke, and examined 1 year later at home. Assessment included a stroke severity scale, the Barthel Index, the boston diagnostic aphasia examination, a communication questionnaire, and the aphasia depression rating scale. A total of 164 patients were included. Among the 100 survivors assessed at follow-up, 24% had severe aphasia, 12% moderate aphasia and 64% mild aphasia according to the Boston diagnostic aphasia examination severity score. Patients mainly reported difficulties in conversation with strangers and/or on abstract topics, using a phone, reading and writing administrative documents, dealing with money and outdoor communication activities. Communication was strongly related to aphasia severity. Age, gender, education level, residence status and type of stroke had no influence on communication activity. On multivariate analysis, severity of stroke and severity of aphasia on inclusion were found to account for 58% of variance and were independent predictors of the communication questionnaire score at follow-up. Documenting the most impaired communication skills may help to set priority goals for speech and language therapy in aphasia.

  16. Reliability of a new scale for measurement of spasticity in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Wu, Yuedi; Xiong, Li

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability of a new scale, the Triple Spasticity Scale (TSS), for assessing spasticity in stroke, through measurement of affected elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors of hemiplegic patients with stroke, and to compare the new scale with commonly used scales. Cross-sectional study. Inpatients at a rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-one inpatients with hemiplegic stroke. TSS, Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). Test-retest reliability for TSS total score was good (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.905~0.918). Inter- rater reliability for TSS total score was also good (ICC =  0.778~0.885). Spearman's correlation coefficient demonstrated significant correlation between the TSS and MAS, in both elbow flexors and plantar flexors (r = 0.840~0.946, p = 0.000), and between the TSS and MTS, in both elbow flexors and plantar flexors (r = 0.715~0.795, p = 0.000). There were small, but significant, correlations between the scores for increased resistance and dynamic muscle length in these 2 muscles (r = 0.307~0.564, p = 0.000~0.009). The TSS has good test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability in measurement of muscle tone. This new scale provides an alternative for measuring spasticity, which avoids some of the shortcomings of previous scales.

  17. Life satisfaction in spouses of stroke survivors and control subjects: A 7-year follow-up of participants in the Sahlgrenska Academy study on ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzhandadze, Tamar; Forsberg-Wärleby, Gunilla; Holmegaard, Lukas; Redfors, Petra; Jern, Christina; Blomstrand, Christian; Jood, Katarina

    2017-07-07

    To investigate life satisfaction in spouses of middle-aged stroke survivors from the long-term perspective and to identify factors that explain their life satisfaction. Cross-sectional, case-control study. Cohabitant spouses of survivors of ischaemic stroke aged life satisfaction was assessed with the Fugl-Meyer's Life Satisfaction Check-List (LiSAT 11). Stroke-related factors were examined with the National Institutes of Health stroke scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale. Spouses of stroke survivors had significantly lower satisfaction with general life, leisure, sexual life, partner relationship, family life, and poorer somatic and psychological health than spouses of controls. Caregiving spouses had significantly lower scores on all life domains except vocation and own activities of daily living than non-caregiving spouses. Spouses' satisfaction on different life domains was explained mainly by their age, sex, support given to the partner, and the survivor's level of global disability, to which both physical and cognitive impairments contributed. Seven years after stroke, spouses of stroke survivors reported lower life satisfaction compared with spouses of controls. Life satisfaction in stroke survivors' spouses was associated with spouses' age, sex, giving support, and the stroke survivors' level of global disability.

  18. Aspects correlates with Scandinavian Stroke Scale for predicting early neurological impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation between the Alberta Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS and the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS for the evaluation of neurological impairment in patients with acute stroke. Method 59 patients with a first acute ischemic stroke were evaluated. The ASPECTS were evaluated by 2 neurologists at admission and by another neurologist after 48 hours. The NIHSS and SSS was applied to determinate stroke severity. Correlations and agreements were analysed statistically by Spearman and Kappa tests. Results ASPECTS was correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS at admission (r = -0.52; p < 0.001 and SSS (r = 0.50; p < 0.001. The ASPECTS and SSS items were most correlated with arm (r = 0.52; p < 0.001 and hand (r = 0.49; p < 0.001 motor power, and speech (r = 0.51; p < 0.001. The SSS of 25.5 shows sensitivity (68% and specificity (72% when associated with ASPECTS ≤ 7. Conclusion The SSS can predict worst neurological impairment when associated with lower values of ASPECTS.

  19. Psychometric properties of the sensory scale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jau-Hong; Hsueh, I-Ping; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2004-06-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the sensory scale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-S) in stroke patients with a broad range of neurological and functional impairment at times from 14 to 180 days after stroke. A total of 176 first stroke patients consecutively admitted to a university-based medical centre. This prospective, longitudinal investigation was based on data collected at 14, 30, 90 and 180 days after stroke. Reliability (inter-rater reliability and internal consistency), validity (convergent and predictive validity) and responsiveness of the FMA-S were examined. The inter-rater agreement of the total score of the FMA-S was excellent, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.93. The Cronbach's alphas of the FMA-S at four time points after stroke ranged from 0.94 to 0.98, indicating excellent internal consistency. However, the FMA-S showed a significant ceiling effect (more than 44.4% of the subjects achieving the highest score), poor to moderate inter-rater reliability for light touch items (weighted kappa ranging from 0.30 to 0.55), low to moderate validity (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.29 to 0.53), and low to moderate responsiveness (standardized response mean ranging from 0.27 to 0.67) at different post-stroke stages of recovery. The psychometric properties of the FMA-S in measuring sensory function do not support its clinical use in stroke patients. Further studies on methods to improve the psychometric properties of the FMA-S are needed.

  20. Evaluation of the Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale in Chinese patients in Hong Kong.

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    Hui-lin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the performance of the Recognition Of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale in risk-stratifying Chinese patients with suspected stroke in Hong Kong. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study in an urban academic emergency department (ED over a 7-month period. Patients over 18 years of age with suspected stroke were recruited between June 2011 and December 2011. ROSIER scale assessment was performed in the ED triage area. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the impacts of diagnostic variables, including ROSIER scale, past history and ED characteristics. FINDINGS: 715 suspected stroke patients were recruited for assessment, of whom 371 (52% had acute cerebrovascular disease (302 ischaemic strokes, 24 transient ischaemic attacks (TIA, 45 intracerebral haemorrhages, and 344 (48% had other illnesses i.e. stroke mimics. Common stroke mimics were spinal neuropathy, dementia, labyrinthitis and sepsis. The suggested cut-off score of>0 for the ROSIER scale for stroke diagnosis gave a sensitivity of 87% (95%CI 83-90, a specificity of 41% (95%CI 36-47, a positive predictive value of 62% (95%CI 57-66, and a negative predictive value of 75% (95%CI 68-81, and the AUC was 0.723. The overall accuracy at cut off>0 was 65% i.e. (323+141/715. INTERPRETATION: The ROSIER scale was not as effective at differentiating acute stroke from stroke mimics in Chinese patients in Hong Kong as it was in the original studies, primarily due to a much lower specificity. If the ROSIER scale is to be clinically useful in Chinese suspected stroke patients, it requires further refinement.

  1. Occurrence and temporal evolution of upper limb spasticity in stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Keng H; Lee, Jeanette; Chua, Karen S

    2012-01-01

    To document the temporal development and evolution of upper limb spasticity, and to establish clinical correlates and predictors of upper limb spasticity in a cohort of stroke patients. Prospective cohort study. A rehabilitation unit. Patients (N=163) with a first-ever ischemic stroke. Not applicable. Ashworth Scale for measuring upper limb spasticity, Motor Assessment Scale for upper limb activity, Motricity Index for upper limb strength, and Modified Barthel Index for self-care. Upper limb spasticity was defined as an Ashworth Scale score of 1 or greater. Upper limb spasticity occurred in 54 patients (33%) at 3 months after stroke. Development of spasticity at later stages of the stroke was infrequent, occurring in only 28 patients (17%). In patients with mild spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 1) at 3 months after stroke, worsening of spasticity occurred in only 1 patient. On the other hand, almost half of the patients with moderate spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 2) at 3 months progressed to severe spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 3). Poor upper limb activity was the most important correlate of "moderate to severe spasticity" (Ashworth Scale score ≥2) (PAshworth Scale score of 2 or greater at 3 months after stroke, and in patients with severe upper limb weakness on admission to rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Postural alignment is altered in people with chronic stroke and related to motor and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Geert; Ruesen, Carolien; Gorissen, Monique; Brumby, Victoria; Moran, Rachel; Burnett, Malcolm; Ashburn, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Trunk control is impaired after stroke but little is known about how changes in posture relate to other deficits. We examined spinal postural alignment in people with chronic stroke and explored the relationship between postural alignment and clinical measures. Twenty-one subjects with stroke and 22 age-matched healthy comparison subjects participated in this observational, cross-sectional study. Data collection included measurements of thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and overall postural alignment in the sagittal plane in both sitting and standing. Measurements were made in different postures, including: upright, flexed forward, and extended backward. Clinical outcome measures included the Trunk Impairment Scale and its subscales, Fugl-Meyer Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Barthel Index, and Stroke Impact Scale. Significant deviations in postural alignment for participants with stroke compared with comparison subjects were apparent in sacral alignment (P Scale (r = -0.61) and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.64). Participants with greater anterior pelvic tilt when flexed forward and more overall inclination when flexed forward and extended backward scored better on the Trunk Impairment Scale, its subscales, and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.6-0.7). People with chronic stroke have altered postural alignment in standing compared with subjects without neurological deficits. Investigating interventions focusing on increasing anterior and posterior pelvic tilt seem warranted.Video Abstract available. See video (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A76) for more insights from the authors.

  3. Clinical and laboratory predictors of deep vein thrombosis after acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Ibrahim O; Roberts, Lara N; Patel, Raj; Pathansali, Rohan; Kalra, Lalit; Arya, Roopen

    2016-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication of acute stroke, but the new incidence in the era of improved specialist input in stroke care is yet unknown. The models for VTE diagnosis is well established, but prediction models to target at-risk patients for pharmacological prophylaxis is lacking and requires further research, particularly in the aftermath of acute stroke. To predict DVT after acute stroke using markers of haemostatic activation and stroke severity scores. We examined the clinical utility of laboratory factors such as thrombin generation, D-dimer, fibrinogen alongside clinical factors (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Barthel Index) in the prediction of asymptomatic DVT, among 92 consecutively admitted patients. One in five patients (19.6%) had objectively confirmed DVT (6 proximal, 12 distal). Thrombolytic therapy did not protect against DVT, with 21% (6/29) of patients treated with r-tPA went on to develop DVT. Thrombin generation and fibrinogen had no clinical utility, but D-dimer at baseline and week 2 had high clinical potential in the prediction of asymptomatic DVT (2425ng/mL versus 1010ng/mL; p=0.001) and (2240 Vs 970ng/mL; pstroke severity, and are functionally less able, with lower Barthel index (p=0.05), and high National Institute of Health Stroke Score (p=0.07). Thrombolytic therapy and specialist stroke intervention does not protect against DVT risk. D-dimer concentration within 48h of acute stroke is independently associated with development of DVT. This observation would require confirmation in a large study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Effects of Botulinum Toxin Injection Between Subacute and Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of botulinum toxin injection between subacute and chronic stroke patients. Eighteen stroke patients (9 subacute and 9 chronic) with spasticity of 1+ or higher in the hemiplegic elbow or wrist joint, based on the modified Ashworth scale were recruited. Modified Ashworth scale, modified Tardieu scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, Brunnstrom stage, modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer scale evaluations of the hemiplegic upper extremity were performed just before the injection and 4 weeks later. A total dose of 200 U of botulinum toxin type A was injected into each patient. One or more of the elbow flexor muscles and one or more of the wrist flexor or finger flexor muscles were included. Modified Ashworth scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, and modified Barthel index results were improved in subacute patients only. However, modified Tardieu scale for the elbow and Fugl-Meyer scale results were improved in both groups, and the improvement was comparable. In conclusion, botulinum toxin injection in subacute patients was more helpful for spasticity, contracture, and function than in chronic patients. However, beneficial effects of botulinum toxin injection on spasticity and function in chronic patients were found in the assessments of the modified Tardieu scale and Fugl-Meyer scale.

  5. Hemiplegic limb synergies in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2006-02-01

    To describe the extent to which the voluntary movements of hemiparetic stroke patients are restricted to the hemiplegic limb synergies (which are marked by the inability to master individual joint movements) described by Brunnström. The study also aimed to describe the extent to which the synergies are related to functioning. In a prospective observational study design, 64 consecutive hemiparetic stroke patients were assessed with Brunnström's hemiplegic limb synergies, the modified Ashworth scale for spasticity, the Rivermead mobility index, and the Barthel ADL index. Three months after stroke, 8 of the 64 patients were moving completely or partly within the synergies. All patients whose movements were restricted to the synergies also exhibited spasticity. Hemiparetic patients whose movements were restricted to the synergies had significantly worse functioning scores than hemiparetic patients whose movements were not restricted to the synergies although severe disabilities were seen in both groups. Three months after stroke, the voluntary movements of only 13% of hemiparetic stroke patients were restricted to the synergies. The synergies were associated with spasticity and activity limitations. The use of the synergies might only be suitable for a small fraction of hemiparetic patients-namely, those displaying spasticity.

  6. Effects of Normobaric Hyperoxia in Severe Acute Stroke:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    s seifirad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen therapy might increase damaged tissue oxygenation, turn on the aerobic pathway, and save neurons from death and could improve clinical outcome of the patients with stroke and head trauma. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is accompanied by some unfavorable effects. Results of normobaric oxygen therapy on clinical outcomes of patients with stroke were controversial up till now.  This study was therefore designed to evaluate effects of normobaric hyperoxia on clinical outcomes of patients with severe acute stroke. A total of 52 consecutive patients with stroke with the inclusion criteria of the study were entered into this randomized controlled clinical trial. The patients in the case group underwent oxygen therapy with Venturi mask for first 12 hours of admission. The patients were examined for neurologic defects at the time of discharge and after six months using both Barthel and modified Rankin Scale (mRS neurologic disability scoring systems. There was no significant sex difference between the two groups (P=0.5. There was no statistically significant difference between ischemic-hemorrhagic stroke constitutions of two groups (P=0.2. There were no significant difference in Barthel index scores of both groups at the time of discharge as well as the follow-up examination (P=0.7 According to the mRS scoring system, there was no difference between the patients of both groups at the time of admission (P= 0.8, however after treatment there was a significant difference between mRS scores of the treated group compared to the controls (P=0.04. According to the results of this study, normobaric oxygen therapy in the first 12 hours of accident could improve long time outcome of the patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.

  7. Correlations of Egen Klassifikation and Barthel Index scores with pulmonary function parameters in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunherotti, Marisa Afonso; Sobreira, Claudia; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antônio Luiz; de Assis, Marcos Renato; Terra Filho, João; Baddini Martinez, José Antônio

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the correlations obtained by using the Egen Klassifikation (EK) and Barthel Index (BI) functional scales and respiratory function parameters in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Spirometry, maximal respiratory pressures, and arterial blood gases were analyzed and graded according to the EK and BI scales in 26 patients. They were classified as high or low risk for introduction of noninvasive ventilation according to the respiratory function. The EK and BI scales significantly correlated with forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and maximal respiratory pressures. The worse the functional performance, the worse the respiratory measurements. The degree of correlation between the functional scales and each respiratory parameter was similar. An EK of 21 or higher predicted high risk for the introduction of noninvasive ventilation. EK and BI scales similarly correlated with the degree of respiratory involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The EK scale was superior in detecting subjects with a higher risk for introduction of noninvasive ventilation.

  8. PROMIS GH (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health) Scale in Stroke: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzan, Irene L; Lapin, Brittany

    2018-01-01

    The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement recently included the 10-item PROMIS GH (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health) scale as part of their recommended Standard Set of Stroke Outcome Measures. Before collection of PROMIS GH is broadly implemented, it is necessary to assess its performance in the stroke population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of PROMIS GH in patients with ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage. PROMIS GH and 6 PROMIS domain scales measuring same/similar constructs were electronically collected on 1102 patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes at various stages of recovery from their stroke who were seen in a cerebrovascular clinic from October 12, 2015, through June 2, 2017. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to evaluate the adequacy of 2-factor structure of component scores. Test-retest reliability and convergent validity of PROMIS GH items and component scores were assessed. Discriminant validity and responsiveness were compared between PROMIS GH and PROMIS domain scales measuring the same or related constructs. Analyses were repeated stratified by stroke subtype and modified Rankin Scale score component scores (root mean square error of approximation, 0.11). Convergent validity was good with significant correlations between all PROMIS GH items and PROMIS domain scales ( P component scores across modified Rankin Scale levels. Good responsiveness (effect size, >0.5) was demonstrated for 8 of the 10 PROMIS GH items. Reliability and validity remained consistent across stroke subtype and disability level (modified Rankin Scale, <2 versus ≥2). PROMIS GH exhibits acceptable performance in patients with stroke. Our findings support International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement recommendation to use PROMIS GH as part of the standard set of outcome measures in stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  10. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

  11. Lower limb SSEP changes in stroke-predictive values regarding functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetanov, Pl; Rousseff, R T; Milanov, Iv

    2003-04-01

    To assess the predictive value of lower limbs somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in the acute phase of stroke. 94 stroke patients (mean age: 61.2; S.D.: 11.8; 43 women) were included. Computed tomography confirmed diagnosis was cortical middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction in 35, subcortical MCA in 11, and mixed in 25. By size, infarctions were large (29), limited (33), and lacunar (9). Thalamic haemorrhage was found in eight patients, putaminal in seven, small capsular in two, massive in two and lobar in four patients. All patients presented with hemiparesis (54) or hemiplegia (40), pure in five and combined with hemihypesthesia in 89. Tibial nerve SSEPs were recorded early in the course of the disease (up to third day). SSEP parameters (presence/absence of SSEP, absolute P40 latency, amplitude and amplitude ratio-affected/healthy side of P40-N50) were evaluated and compared with motor ability using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale, and daily living activities using Barthel index (ADLB) followed for 3 months after stroke. Disability was assessed after the Rankin scale. The absolute amplitude of P40 has moderately strong correlation with Barthel index (r=0.63) and nearly moderate (r=-0.46) with Rankin scale at 3 months. P40 ratio exhibits weaker correlations with clinical outcome parameters. The combination of SSEP abnormalities and MRC has stronger predictive value than MRC alone (Pvs Pstroke, independently or combined with muscle power assessment, significantly increases prognostic capability.

  12. Which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xibo; Gao, Qian; Dou, Honglei; Tang, Shujie

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants with hemiplegia were recruited in the Department of Neurology of Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang between January 2014 and February 2015 and randomly divided into either an experimental or control group. The patients in the control group performed conventional exercises for six weeks, and those in the experiment group performed core stability exercises for six weeks. The outcomes were evaluated using Modified Barthel Index and Berg Balance Scale. [Results] After treatment, the Modified Barthel Index and Berg Balance Scale were significantly increased in both groups when compared with the baseline. The Modified Barthel Index was significantly lower in the control group compared with the experimental group. The Berg Balance Scale scores in the control group were relatively lower than those in the experimental group, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. [Conclusion] Core stability exercises have a better effect on patients with hemiplegia than conventional exercises.

  13. Development of the Italian version of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale: It-NIHSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzella, Francesca Romana; Picconi, Orietta; De Luca, Assunta; Lyden, Patrick D; Fiorelli, Marco

    2009-07-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a basic component of the assessment of patients with acute stroke. To foster and standardize the use of the NIHSS among Italian health professionals, we translated the scale, dubbed into Italian the training and test videotapes devised by the National Institutes of Health researchers, and conducted a series of certification courses using the translated videos. Translation, text adaptation, video dubbing, and editing of the Italian NIHSS videotapes relied on a team of bilingual stroke neurologists. Three waves of training courses were organized for mixed classes of medical and nonmedical health professionals. The certification test was based on the usual set of 5 videotaped patients. Scoring rules were those provided by the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Reliability of the Italian NIHSS was assessed using kappa statistics and compared with that of the original NIHSS. During 3 years, 850 nurses, 460 nonneurologist physicians, and 246 neurologists were trained. Pass rates were respectively 44%, 75%, and 87%, respectively. Overall, 80% of scale items showed moderate to excellent reliability. Independent significant predictors of test failure at multivariate logistic regression were nurse profession (OR, 5.41; 95% CI, 4.07 to 7.20), older age (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.05), and first edition of the course (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 2.43 to 4.05). The agreement across all items between NIHSS and the Italian NIHSS was 80% (kappa=0.70+/-0.18, z<0.001). The Italian translation, supervised by experienced vascular neurologists, did not influence the clinimetric characteristics of the NIHSS. Our findings support the implementation of NIHSS video training in languages other than English.

  14. Angiotensin receptor blockade in acute stroke. The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial: rationale, methods and design of a multicentre, randomised- and placebo-controlled clinical trial (NCT00120003)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Murray, Gordon; Boysen, Gudrun Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    , Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Estonia and Finland. STUDY OUTCOMES: There are two co-primary effect variables: • Functional status at 6-months, measured by the modified Rankin Scale, and • vascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke during the first 6-months. Secondary outcome...... variables: Secondary effect variables include • the Barthel index (functional status) • EuroQol (quality of life) and • Mini-mental state examination (cognition) at 6-months • Health economic costs during the first 6-months...

  15. Participation in everyday life and life satisfaction in persons with stroke and their caregivers 3-6 months after onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Aileen L; von Koch, Lena; Andersson, Magnus; Tham, Kerstin; Eriksson, Gunilla

    2015-06-01

    To explore and describe persons with stroke and their caregivers' restrictions in participation in everyday occupations, i.e. occupational gaps, 3-6 months post-stroke, in relation to life satisfaction, combined life satisfaction, care-giver burden, perceived impact of stroke, and activities of daily living. Cross-sectional study. Persons with stroke and their caregivers (105 dyads). The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, Caregiver Burden Scale, Stroke Impact Scale and Barthel Index were used. Correlations were analysed with Spearman's rank, and regression analyses used life satisfaction as the dependent variable. At least one person in 86% of the dyads perceived restrictions in participation, with the most common gap in travelling for pleasure. Correlations were low between the numbers of occupational gaps and life satisfaction (R = -0.33, R = -0.31); however, life satisfaction accounted for occupational gaps both for persons with stroke and for caregivers. A greater number of occupational gaps were perceived in the dyads with combined low levels of life satisfaction compared with those with combined high levels of life satisfaction. Participation in everyday occupations is related to life satisfaction even for caregivers of persons with stroke. The results of this study add to our knowledge about the stroke-caregiver dyad and will help to inform family-centred approaches within stroke rehabilitation.

  16. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) as An Early Predictor of Poststroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaseelan, Rebecca D; Vargo, Mary M; Chae, John

    2015-06-01

    Despite the availability of multiple comprehensive screening methods to detect dysphagia during acute stroke care, consensus is lacking as to the best practice. Our previous study demonstrated favorable sensitivity of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) compared with a bedside 3-sip test. However, the FIM is challenging to administer during acute stroke care. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is administered routinely in the emergency department. To evaluate the utility of the NIHSS as a predictor of clinically relevant poststroke dysphagia compared with FIM data in the same cohort. Retrospective analysis. Academic medical center. Individuals with acute stroke who were admitted for acute care and later transferred to acute rehabilitation within the same institution. Clinically relevant dysphagia was defined as aspiration on modified barium swallow or laryngeal penetration on modified barium swallow requiring diet change, or aspiration pneumonia. NIHSS and FIM scores were compiled for all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for NIHSS and FIM. Sensitivity and specificity of different values of NIHSS and FIM were analyzed via receiver operator characteristic curves. Of 290 patients admitted to acute stroke rehabilitation, 88 (30%) manifested clinically relevant dysphagia during their rehabilitation stay. Sensitivity analyses suggested cut-off values for the NIHSS and the FIM of >9 and 9 and FIM dysphagia. Although the NIHSS clinical test characteristics are not as favorable as the FIM, NIHSS appears to be more sensitive than some other reported methods such as a 3-sip water test. Further study into development of paradigms that incorporate NIHSS into initial assessment of dysphagia risk may be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The correlation of nitrite concentration with lesion size in initial phase of stroke; It is not correlated with National Institute Health Stroke Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nematbakhsh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The role of Nitric Oxide (NO and its metabolites in stroke has been examined clinically and experimentally. The relationship between plasma NO level and Lesion Size (LS or clinical severity of stroke is still under investigation. In this clinical study, the serum level of Nitrite (NI; the last metabolite of NO was measured in first and fifth days of onset of the stroke, and its correlation with LS was determined.
    • METHOD: 37 Cerebrovascular Attack (CVA patients were considered. The National Institute Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was assessed to determined neurological impairment within 24 hours of onset. On the basis of NIHSS, the patients were divided into mild, moderate and severe groups. CT Scan for all patients were obtained in the first day, and based on CT Scan results, the patients were also divided into hemorrhagic, ischemic and normal groups. The serum level of NI and the LS were determined.
    • RESULTS: The mean serum levels of NI in 37 patients in the first and fifth days of stroke were 8.43± 1.23 and 7.46±0.72 7mole/liter with no significance difference. The analyses of data indicated no significant correlation between NI concentration and NIHSS, but in patients with abnormal CT Scan, statistical correlation was existed between NI concentration and LS (r=0.521, p=0.022.
    • CONCLUSION: The NI concentration is not correlated with NIHSS, but it is correlated with LS. The sources of NO metabolite sources are different; neuronal, endothelial or inducible. Therefore the concentration of NO or NI is not exactly the endothelial NO reprehensive which is beneficial in stroke, and it seems that the relationship between NO precursor subtypes and NIHSS or LS is needed to investigate.
    • KEYWORDS: Nitric Oxide, Stroke>

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the appraisal of health scale in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth A; Bakas, Tamilyn; Williams, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive appraisal process influencing poststroke depressive symptoms. Based on a framework derived from Lazarus and Folkman (1984), psychometric properties of the Appraisal of Health Scale (AHS) were tested. Secondary analysis of data from 394 stroke survivors tested internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the AHS, consisting of 3 subscales (threat, benign, benefit). Cronbach's alphas were satisfactory (threat .92, benign .85, benefit .73). After principal axis factoring, two factors emerged (threat, benefit). Sequential multiple regression accounted for 43% of the variance in depressive symptoms (p < .001), partly explained by the threat and benefit subscales after controlling for depression history, disability, age, social support, self-esteem, and optimism. Threat and benefit AHS subscales demonstrated satisfactory evidence of internal consistency reliability and construct validity in stroke survivors.

  19. Preliminary Reliability and Validity of an Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention Scale in an African American Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Dawn M; Clark, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    African Americans are at heightened risk of first stroke, and regular exercise can reduce stroke risk. Benefits and barriers to exercise subscales from 2 instruments were combined to create the Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention (EBBSP) scale. Reliability and validity of the EBBSP scale were examined in a nonrandom sample of 66 African Americans who were primarily female, average age 43.3 ± 9.4 years, and high school graduates. Both subscales had adequate internal consistency reliability. Factor analysis revealed two factors for each subscale. More benefits and fewer perceived barriers were significantly related to current exercise and future intentions to exercise. The EBBSP scale may be useful in research focused on understanding, predicting, and promoting exercise for stroke prevention in adults.

  20. The post-stroke depression and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients of a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaricai, Elena; Poenaru, Dan V

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and a major public health problem. To determine frequency and degree of post-stroke depression (PSD) and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit. The study included 72 stroke patients (aged 29-59 years) who were attending rehabilitation. The patients were assessed for depressive symptoms by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and their functioning by using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Forty-eight patients had different degrees of depression: borderline clinical depression (13.8%), moderate depression (34.7%), severe depression (15.2%) or extreme depression (2.9%). There were no significant differences of BDI scores in 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years groups. Statistically significant correlations were between BDI score and SIS score, between BDI score and ADL index, and between SIS score and ADL index in men, women and total study patients. More than half of the PSD patients had a moderate degree of depression. Significant correlations were noticed between depressive symptoms and functional status evaluated both by an instrument of assessing stroke impact upon general health and an instrument for assessing the everyday activities.

  1. Effects of Navigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervyakov, Alexander V; Poydasheva, Alexandra G; Lyukmanov, Roman H; Suponeva, Natalia A; Chernikova, Ludmila A; Piradov, Michael A; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effects of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, delivered in different modes, on motor impairments and functional limitations after stroke. The study sample included 42 patients (58.5 ± 10.7 years; 26 males) who experienced a single unilateral stroke (1-12 months previously) in the area of the middle cerebral artery. Patients completed a course of conventional rehabilitation, together with 10 sessions of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or sham stimulation. Stimulation was scheduled five times a week over two consecutive weeks in an inpatient clinical setting. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four groups and received sham stimulation (n = 10), low-frequency (1-Hz) stimulation of the nonaffected hemisphere (n = 11), high-frequency (10-Hz) stimulation of the affected hemisphere (n = 13), or sequential combination of low- and high-frequency stimulations (n = 8). Participants were evaluated before and after stimulation with clinical tests, including the arm and hand section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale, modified Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity, and Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Participants in the three groups receiving navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation showed improvements in arm and hand functions on the Fugl-Meyer Stroke Assessment Scale. Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity and Barthel Index scores were significantly reduced in groups receiving low- or high-frequency stimulation alone. Including navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a conventional rehabilitation program positively influenced motor and functional recovery in study participants, demonstrating the clinical potential of the method. The results of this study will be used for designing a large-scale clinical trial.

  2. Study of association of severity of sleep disordered breathing and functional outcome in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Suri, J C; Manocha, Rajesh

    2017-06-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a prevalent yet underrecognized condition that may have major adverse consequences for those affected by it. We performed a prospective observational study to seek a correlation of severity of SDB with the severity of stroke and its functional outcome. Patients with history of recent-onset stroke were recruited and underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG) after the acute phase of the stroke was over; for defining hypopneas, 3% and 4% desaturation limits were used, and the apnea-hypopnea index was respectively calculated as AHI 3% and AHI 4% . Stroke severity was graded using the Scandinavian Stroke Scale. Functional disability and neurological impairment was evaluated six weeks after the PSG using the Barthel Index (2 = poor outcome; ≤2 = good outcome). A total of 50 patients were enrolled, 30 (60%) with ischemic stroke and 20 (40%) with hemorrhagic strokes. Of the patients, 39 (78%) had an AHI 4% of >5/h, 23 (46%) had an AHI 4% of >15/h, and 9 (18%) had an AHI 4% of >30/h. Multivariate analysis showed that body mass index (odds ratio [OR] = 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-1.54, p = 0.019) and Scandinavian Stroke Scale score (stroke severity) (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.76-0.96, p = 0.009) were significant risk factors for predicting SDB (AHI 4%  > 15) in patients of stroke. When we looked for factors predicting outcomes, only AHI 4% (OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.01-1.43, p value 0.041) was predictive of the functional dependence (based on Barthel Index) of the patient and AHI 4% (OR = 1.14; 95% CI 1.03-1.25, p = 0.008) and body mass index (OR = 0.75; 95% CI 0.59-0.96, p = 0.024) were found to be predictive of poor outcome (based on modified Rankins Scale). We obtained similar results, regardless of the hypopnea definition used. In conclusion, given the high frequency of SDB in stroke patients and its correlation with poor outcome, screening for obstructive sleep apnea in all stroke and transient

  3. [Application of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-min; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jie; Luo, Dan-hong; Shen, Wang-ming

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction. 77 acute cerebral infarction patients were randomly assigned to stroke rehabilitation unit group and 73 to ordinary group. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), activities of daily living (ADL) Barthel index and average hospitalized time were compared in two groups before and after the treatment. The average NIHSS in two groups before treatment were 9.26 and 9.12 respectively (P > 0.05) but became 2.62 and 7.64 after treatment (P 0.05) but 87.26 and 64.20 after the treatment (P rehabilitation unit being applied in the acute phase of cerebral infarction, it showed positive results in the following aspects as: improving the neurological function, capabilities of managing daily life, and also shortening the days of hospitalization.

  4. Selected acute phase CSF factors in ischemic stroke: findings and prognostic value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intskirveli Nino

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study aimed at investigation of pathogenic role and prognostic value of several selected cerebrospinal fluid acute phase factors that can reflect the severity of ischemic brain damage. Methods Ninety five acute ischemic stroke patients were investigated. Ischemic region visualized at the twenty fourth hour by conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Stroke severity evaluated by National Institute Health Stroke Scale. One month outcome of disease was assessed by Barthel Index. Cerebrospinal fluid was taken at the sixth hour of stroke onset. CSF pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were studied by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nitric Oxide and Lipoperoxide radical were measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. CSF Nitrate levels were detected using the Griess reagent. Statistics performed by SPSS-11.0. Results At the sixth hour of stroke onset, cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels were elevated in patients against controls. Severe stroke patients had increased interleukin-6 content compared to less severe strokes (P Conclusion According to present study the cerebrospinal fluid contents of interleukin-6 and nitrates seem to be the most reliable prognostic factors in acute phase of ischemic stroke.

  5. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in Plain English Is Reliable for Novice Nurse Users with Minimal Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, Sandy; Brown, Allen J; Yanase, Lisa Rietz

    2017-05-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is commonly used in Comprehensive Stroke Centers, but it has not been easily implemented in smaller centers. The aim of this study was to assess whether nurse providers who were naive to stroke assessment scales could obtain accurate stroke severity scores using our previously validated NIH Stroke Scale in Plain English (NIHSS-PE) with minimal or no training. We randomly assigned 122 nursing students who were naive to stroke assessment scales to 1 of 4 groups: trained on the NIHSS, untrained on the NIHSS, trained on the NIHSS-PE, or untrained on the NIHSS-PE. The Trained/NIHSS and Trained/NIHSS-PE groups watched assessment scale-specific training DVDs. All 4 study groups scored the same 3 patients from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke certification DVD, in randomly assigned order. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare group scores with those obtained by a consensus panel of NIHSS-certified expert users, and with each other. NIHSS-PE users had scores significantly closer to the expert scores compared with NIHSS users (F (1,118) = 4.656, P = .033). Trained users had scores significantly closer to the expert scores than untrained users (F (1,118) = 6.607, P = .011). Scores from untrained users of the NIHSS-PE did not differ from those of trained users of the NIHSS (F (1,59) = 0.08, P = .780). With minimal or no training, novice nurse users of the NIHSS-PE can do as well as, if not better than, novice users of the NIHSS, making this tool useful for facilities pursuing Acute Stroke-Ready certification. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Randomized controlled trial of early rehabilitation after intracerebral hemorrhage stroke: difference in outcomes within 6 months of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Andrew, Nadine E; Zeng, Lingxia; Li, Zongfang; Li, Jin; Li, Yan; Yu, Xuewen; Mi, Baibing; Li, Zhe; Xu, Honghai; Chen, Yangjing; Wang, Juan; Yao, Wanxia; Li, Kuo; Yan, Feng; Wang, Jue

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms, acute management, and outcomes for patients who experience intracerebral hemorrhage may differ from patients with ischemic stroke. Studies of very early rehabilitation have been mainly undertaken in patients with ischemic stroke, and it is unknown if benefits apply to those with intracerebral hemorrhage. We hypothesized that early rehabilitation, within 48 hours of stroke, would improve survival and functional outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. This was a multicenter, randomized controlled study, with blinded assessment of outcome at 3 and 6 months. Eligible patients were randomized to receive standard care or standard care plus early rehabilitation. Primary outcome includes survival. Secondary outcomes includes health-related quality of life using the 36-item Short Form Questionnaire, function measured with the modified Barthel Index, and anxiety measured with the Zung Self-Rated Anxiety Scale. Two hundred forty-three of 326 patients were randomized (mean age, 59 years; 56% men). At 6 months, patients receiving standard care were more likely to have died (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-15.87); for morbidity outcomes, a 6-point difference in the Physical Component Summary score of the 36-item Short Form Questionnaire (95% CI, 4.2-8.7), a 7-point difference for the Mental Component Summary score (95% CI, 4.5-9.5), a 13-point difference in Modified Barthel Index scores (95% CI, 6.8-18.3), and a 6-point difference in Self-Rating Anxiety Scale scores (95% CI, 4.4-8.3) was reported in favor of the intervention groups. For the first time, we have shown that commencing rehabilitation within 48 hours of intracerebral hemorrhage improves survival and functional outcomes at 6 months after stroke in hospitalized patients in China. http://www.chictr.org/en. Unique identifier: ChiCTR-TRC-13004039. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Refining 3 Measures to Construct an Efficient Functional Assessment of Stroke.

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    Wang, Yu-Lin; Lin, Gong-Hong; Huang, Yi-Jing; Chen, Mei-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2017-06-01

    The Fugl-Meyer Assessment motor scale, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke patients, and Barthel Index are widely used to assess patients' upper extremity and lower extremity motor function, balance, and basic activities of daily living after stroke, respectively. However, these 3 measures (72 items) require a great amount of time for assessment. Therefore, we aimed to develop an efficient test, the Functional Assessment of Stroke (FAS). The FAS was constructed from 4 short-form tests of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-upper extremity, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-lower extremity, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke patients, and Barthel Index based on the results of Rasch analyses and the items' content. We examined the psychometric properties of the FAS, including Rasch reliability, concurrent validity, convergent validity, known-group validity, and responsiveness. The FAS contained 29 items (10, 6, 8, and 5 items for the 4 short-form tests, respectively). The FAS demonstrated high Rasch reliability (0.92-0.94), concurrent validity ( r =0.90-0.97 with the original tests), convergent validity ( r =0.62-0.94 with the 5-scale Fugl-Meyer Assessment), and known-group validity (significant difference in the FAS scores among 3 groups of disability levels; P <0.001). In addition, the responsiveness of the FAS (standardized response mean=0.55-1.93) was similar or significantly superior to those of the original tests (standardized response mean=0.46-1.39). The FAS contains 29 items and has sufficient Rasch reliability, validities, and responsiveness. These findings support that the FAS is efficient for reliably and validly assessing upper extremity/lower extremity motor function, balance, and basic activities of daily living and for sensitively detecting change in those functions in patients with stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Comparison of two approaches to screen for dysphagia among acute ischemic stroke patients: nursing admission screening tool versus National Institutes of Health stroke scale.

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    Bravata, Dawn M; Daggett, Virginia S; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Damush, Teresa; Plue, Laurie; Russell, Scott; Allen, George; Williams, Linda S; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Chumbler, Neale R

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the positive and negative predictive values and the sensitivity and specificity of a nursing dysphagia screening tool and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) for the identification of dysphagia for veterans hospitalized with ischemic stroke.A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the speech-language pathology consult rate before and after the nursing admission dysphagia screening tool. This retrospective cohort study evaluated veterans admitted to one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center with ischemic stroke during the 6 months both before and after the implementation of a nursing dysphagia screening tool, which was part of the admission nursing template. Stroke severity was measured with the use of the retrospective NIHSS. Dysphagia diagnosis was based on speech-language pathology evaluations.Dysphagia was present in 38 of 101 patients (38%) with ischemic stroke. The nursing dysphagia screening tool had a positive predictive value of 50% and a negative predictive value of 68%, with a sensitivity of 29% and specificity of 84%. The use of the NIHSS to identify dysphagia risk had a positive predictive value of 60% and a negative predictive value of 84%.The NIHSS had better test characteristics in predicting dysphagia than the nursing dysphagia screening tool. Future research should evaluate the use of the NIHSS as a screening tool for dysphagia.

  9. Stroke rehabilitation at home before and after discharge reduced disability and improved quality of life: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Østergaard, Ann; Kjær, Pia; Skerris, Anja; Skou, Christina; Christoffersen, Jane; Seest, Line Skou; Poulsen, Mai Bang; Rønholt, Finn; Overgaard, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate if home-based rehabilitation of inpatients improved outcome compared to standard care. Interventional, randomised, safety/efficacy open-label trial. University hospital stroke unit in collaboration with three municipalities. Seventy-one eligible stroke patients (41 women) with focal neurological deficits hospitalised in a stroke unit for more than three days and in need of rehabilitation. Thirty-eight patients were randomised to home-based rehabilitation during hospitalization and for up to four weeks after discharge to replace part of usual treatment and rehabilitation services. Thirty-three control patients received treatment and rehabilitation following usual guidelines for the treatment of stroke patients. Ninety days post-stroke the modified Rankin Scale score was the primary endpoint. Other outcome measures were the modified Barthel-100 Index, Motor Assessment Scale, CT-50 Cognitive Test, EuroQol-5D, Body Mass Index and treatment-associated economy. Thirty-one intervention and 30 control patients completed the study. Patients in the intervention group achieved better modified Rankin Scale score (Intervention median = 2, IQR = 2-3; Control median = 3, IQR = 2-4; P=0.04). EuroQol-5D quality of life median scores were improved in intervention patients (Intervention median = 0.77, IQR = 0.66-0.79; Control median = 0.66, IQR = 0.56 - 0.72; P=0.03). The total amount of home-based training in minutes highly correlated with mRS, Barthel, Motor Assessment Scale and EuroQol-5D™ scores (P-values ranging from Prehabilitation reduced disability and increased quality of life. Compared to standard care, home-based stroke rehabilitation was more cost-effective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Adaptation and validation of stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39 scale to Malayalam

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    Ria Raju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aphasia, an acquired inability to understand and/or speak language, is a common repercussion of stroke that denigrates the quality of life (QOL in the affected persons. Several languages in India experience the dearth of instruments to measure the QOL of persons with aphasia. Malayalam, the language spoken by more than 33 million people in Kerala, the southern state of India, is not an exception to this. Objective: This study aimed to adapt and validate the widely-used stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39 scale to Malayalam. Materials and Methods: We required seven Malayalam-speaking Speech Language Pathologists (SLPs, hailing from different regions of Kerala, to examine the socio-cultural suitability of the original items in SAQOL-39 and indicate modifications, wherever necessary. Subsequently, the linguistic adaptation was performed through a forward-backward translation scheme. The socio-culturally and linguistically adapted Malayalam version was then administered on a group of 48 Malayalam-speaking persons with aphasia to examine the test-retest reliability, acceptability, as well as the internal consistency of the instrument. Results: The Malayalam SAQOL-39 scale showed high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.91 as well as acceptability with minimal missing data (0.52%. Further, it yielded high internal consistency (Chronbach′s ∝ = 0.98 as well as item-to-total and inter-domain correlations. Conclusions: The Malayalam version of SAQOL-39 is the first socio-culturally and linguistically adapted tool to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia speaking this language. It may serve as a potential tool to measure the QOL of this population in both clinical practice and future research endeavors.

  11. Hyponatremia And Disability, Prevalence And Prognosis In Babol Stroke Patients.

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    Alijan Ahmadi Ahangar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is the leading cause of serious long-term disability. In recent studies hyponatremia as a risk factor for stroke. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was to evaluate serum zinc level in serum sodium over the first 24 hours after the onset of stroke. Different intensities were determined on Stroke Scale NIH (National Institute of Health (mild 4-1 and (average moderate 15-5 and (moderate to severe 20-16 and (extreme severe 42- 21. Determination intensity of stroke after admission and discharge with Modified Rankin Scale and Barthel index. Blood serum concentrations of sodium 0.5 mL of venous blood were taken and sodium serum level was performed with Latex particle agglutination test in Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital. That normal range was defined 136-146 meq / L Findings: 125 patients were entered into this study; the prevalence of hyponatremia in female was 70% vs 60% in male. Of stroke patients included in this study 66% of them had hyponatremia and the frequency of hyponatremia in ischemic and hemorrhagic was 82% and 63%, respectively. Increase in hyponatremia with disability period of admission had statistically significant (10(12 mild vs 40(32 moderate, 32(25.6 severe, p=0.01 also with disability before discharge (24(19.2 mild, 26(20.8 moderate, 32(25.6 severe, p=0.03. Conclusions: Hyponatremia can effect on severity of the stroke and can be considered as a predictor of increased stroke severity and disability at admission and discharge.

  12. Risk factors associated with falls in adult patients after stroke living in the community: baseline data from a stroke cohort in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Elen Beatriz; Nascimento, Carla; Marinho, Camila; Oliveira, Ilana; Monteiro, Maiana; Castro, Mayra; Myllane-Fernandes, Paula; Ventura, Laís M G B; Maso, Iara; Lopes, Antonio Alberto; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with stroke have a high risk of falling, and their fall predictors may differ from those of other populations. To estimate fall frequency and identify factors related to fall occurrence in a sample of patients with stroke residing in the community. Clinical data were collected from 150 consecutive stroke patients with independent gait, and the following scales were applied: modified Barthel Index (mBI), Timed Up & Go Test (TUG), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Univariate analysis was performed; variables with possible association (P stroke onset (OR, 1.012 for every month increase; 95% CI, 1.002-1.021; P = .015) remained predictors. When we grouped individuals according to affected cerebral hemisphere, both hemispheres had similar accuracy, but TUG cutoff point was lower in individuals with right- versus left-hemisphere lesions. Patients with poor TUG performance, longer times since stroke onset, and right-hemisphere injury have particularly high fall rates, and TUG cutoff points for fall prediction vary according to cerebral hemisphere.

  13. [The Determinants of Dysphagia in Patients With Stroke During Hospitalized Rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Li-Yun; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Tseng, Su-Mei; Huang, Tzu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    Stroke was the third leading cause of death in Taiwan in 2014. A study found that 53.61% of stroke patients suffered from dysphagia disorder during the rehabilitation phase, which may result in lung aspiration and death. The determinants of dysphagia among nationally hospitalized-rehabilitation stroke patients have not been explored comprehensively. To explore the incidence of dysphagia among hospitalized-rehabilitation stroke patients and the related determinants of dysphagia. This descriptive and correlational research design employed a convenience sample of 130 hospitalized stroke patients from rehabilitation wards at a northern regional hospital in Taiwan. A questionnaire and functional assessment were used to collect data. Instruments used included personal and clinical characteristics data questionnaire, the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Standardization Swallowing Assessment (SSA), and Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screening (ASDS). Data analyses contained descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The incidence of stroke dysphagia was 63.8% (SSA) and 64.6% (ASDS), respectively. Age, marital status, stroke site, stroke severity (NIHSS), and cognitive status (MMSE) were identified as significant determinants of dysphagia in bivariate logistic regression, whereas stroke severity and cognitive status were identified as significant independent determinants of dysphagia in multivariate logistic regression. Two-thirds of the participant sample were affected by dysphagia, for which NIHSS and cognitive status were identified as significant determinants. Thus, nurses may conduct early screening for high risk populations based on patients' clinical characteristics in order to reduce aspiration pneumonia problems and to improve the quality of clinical care for dysphagia patients.

  14. Stroke Survivors Scoring Zero on the NIH Stroke Scale Score Still Exhibit Significant Motor Impairment and Functional Limitation

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    Brittany Hand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale’s (NIHSS’s association with upper extremity (UE impairment and functional outcomes. Design. Secondary, retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial data. Setting. Not applicable. Participants. 146 subjects with stable, chronic stroke-induced hemiparesis. Intervention. The NIHSS, the UE Fugl-Meyer (FM, and the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT were administered prior to their participation in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Main Outcome Measures. The NIHSS, FM, and AMAT. Results. The association between the NIHSS and UE impairment was statistically significant (P=-0.204;p=0.014 but explained less than 4% of the variance among UE FM scores. The association between NIHSS total score and function as measured by the AMAT was not statistically significant (P=-0.141;p=0.089. Subjects scoring a “zero” on the NIHSS exhibited discernible UE motor deficits and varied scores on the UE FM and AMAT. Conclusion. While being used in stroke trials, the NIHSS may have limited ability to discriminate between treatment responses, even when only a relatively narrow array of impairment levels exists among patients. Given these findings, NIHSS use should be restricted to acute stroke studies and clinical settings with the goal of reporting stroke severity.

  15. Age-related rehabilitation outcome in stroke patients.

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    Manimmanakorn, Nuttaset; Arrayawichanon, Preeda; Wattanapun, Pattra; Nuntharuksa, Chompilai; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2008-03-01

    Patients who survive a stroke usually have residual neurological deficits. Consequently, a rehabilitation program is valuable for improving their quality of life (QOL). However, age is a known factor that needs qualification vis-à-vis rehabilitation outcomes among Thai patients. To study the functional and psychological outcomes and the QOL before and after rehabilitation program among three age groups of Thai stroke patients ( or = 65 years of age). Prospective, analytical study. Three hundred and twenty seven stroke patients were measured using the Barthel index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the WHO QOL BREF questionnaire before and after undergoing an in-patient rehabilitation program. Data were collected from nine sites around Thailand. Functional and psychological outcomes and the quality of life score improved after the rehabilitation program. The youngest group of stroke victims showed the greatest improvement in functional outcome and QOL score in both the physical and social domains. No significant difference was found regarding anxiety and depression among the three groups. An in-patient rehabilitation program was of benefit to Thai stroke patients but age significantly determined rehabilitation outcomes.

  16. Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy in Large-Vessel Occlusion Ischemic Stroke Presenting with Low National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; Medin, Caroline; Maingard, Julian; Chandra, Ronil V; Ng, Wyatt; Brooks, Duncan Mark; Asadi, Hamed; Killer-Oberpfalzer, Monika; Schirmer, Clemens M; Moore, Justin M; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J; Phan, Kevin

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy has become the standard of care for management of most large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes. When patients with LVO present with minor stroke symptomatology, no consensus on the role of mechanical thrombectomy exists. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to identify studies that focused on mechanical thrombectomy, either as a standalone treatment or with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA), in patients with mild strokes with LVO, defined as a baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤5 at presentation. Data on methodology, quality criteria, and outcome measures were extracted, and outcomes were compared using odds ratio as a summary statistic. Five studies met the selection criteria and were included. When compared with medical therapy without IV tPA, mechanical thrombectomy and medical therapy with IV tPA were associated with improved 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Among medical patients who were not eligible for IV tPA, those who underwent mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to experience good 90-day mRS than those who were not. There was no significant difference in functional outcome between mechanical thrombectomy and medical therapy with IV tPA, and no treatment subgroup was associated with intracranial hemorrhage or death. In patients with mild strokes due to LVO, mechanical thrombectomy and medical therapy with IV tPA led to better 90-day functional outcome. Mechanical thrombectomy plays an important role in the management of these patients, particularly in those not eligible for IV tPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Normobaric Hyperoxia in Severe Acute Stroke: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazdeh, Mehrdokht; Taher, Abbas; Torabian, Saadat; Seifirad, Soroush

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen therapy might increase damaged tissue oxygenation, turn on the aerobic pathway, and save neurons from death and could improve clinical outcome of the patients with stroke and head trauma. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is accompanied by some unfavorable effects. Results of normobaric oxygen therapy on clinical outcomes of patients with stroke were controversial up till now.  This study was therefore designed to evaluate effects of normobaric hyperoxia on clinical outcomes of patients with severe acute stroke. A total of 52 consecutive patients with stroke who meet the inclusion criteria of the study were entered into this randomized controlled clinical trial. The patients in the case group underwent oxygen therapy with Venturi mask for first 12 hours of admission. The patients were examined for neurologic defects at the time of discharge and after six months using both Barthel and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) neurologic disability scoring systems. There was no significant sex difference between the two groups (P=0.5). There was no statistically significant difference between ischemic-hemorrhagic stroke constitutions of two groups (P=0.2). There were no significant difference in Barthel index scores of both groups at the time of discharge as well as the follow-up examination (P=0.7) According to the mRS scoring system, there was no difference between the patients of both groups at the time of admission (P= 0.8), however after treatment there was a significant difference between mRS scores of the treated group compared to the controls (P=0.04). According to the results of this study, normobaric oxygen therapy in the first 12 hours of accident could improve long time outcome of the patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.

  18. Quality of Life during the First Two Years Post Stroke: The Restore4Stroke Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Maria L; van Heugten, Caroline M; Post, Marcel W M; Hajós, Tibor R S; Kappelle, L Jaap; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2016-01-01

    Little information is available about the course of quality of life (QoL) post stroke and how dependency on activities of daily living (ADL) influences this course. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the course of QoL from 2 months up to 2 years post stroke and to study the influence of ADL dependency in the first week post stroke. This is a multicenter prospective longitudinal cohort study in which 368 stroke patients were included and data were collected at 1 week, 2 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months post stroke. QoL assessment included measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (short stroke-specific Quality of Life Scale), emotional functioning (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), participation (Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation), and life satisfaction (2LS). Dependency on ADL was defined as having a Barthel Index score ≤ 17 four days post stroke. Generalized Estimating Equations analyses were performed to examine the course of the 4 domains of QoL. Furthermore, the possible confounding effect of age, gender, marital status, level of education and discharge destination was examined. Results showed that HRQoL, participation and life satisfaction improved during the first year post stroke, with most changes occurring in the first 6 months. Furthermore, patients dependent in ADL scored consistently lower on all 4 QoL domains and test occasions compared to ADL-independent patients. In both patient groups separately, no changes over time were found in emotional functioning. ADL-independent patients improved in HRQoL (p = 0.002), participation (p post stroke and showed different patterns for specific domains of QoL and for patients with and without dependency in ADL in the first week post stroke. It is therefore important to differentiate between these different domains of QoL when the long-term perspective is considered. Furthermore, patients dependent in ADL consistently scored lower on all QoL domains

  19. Reliability of measurements obtained with the modified Ashworth scale in the lower extremities of people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Marjan; van Vliet, Paulette; Mockett, Simon P

    2002-01-01

    Abnormal muscle tone is a common motor disorder following stroke, which may require rehabilitation. The Modified Ashworth Scale is a 6-point rating scale that is used to measure muscle tone. The interrater and intrarater reliability of measurements obtained with the scale remain equivocal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of measurements obtained with the scale in the lower limb of patients with stroke. Twenty patients were tested 2 weeks after their stroke, and 12 patients were tested 12 weeks after their stroke. Gastrocnemius, soleus, and quadriceps femoris muscles on the hemiplegic side were tested. Interrater reliability for 2 raters was poor, with a Kendall tau-b correlation for the combined muscle group of.062 (P=.461). For intrarater reliability, the Kendall tau-b correlation was.567 (PAshworth Scale yielded reliable measurements in the lower limb for a single examiner, and agreement was best on the grade of 0. The reliability between examiners was not good, which may bring into question the validity of measurements obtained with the scale.

  20. Evaluating motor recovery early after stroke: comparison of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and the Motor Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouin, F; Pichard, L; Bonneau, C; Durand, A; Corriveau, D

    1994-11-01

    This study compared the measurements of the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) to that of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), a reliable and valid test for motor function in stroke patients. Thirty-two patients (20 men, 12 women) with a mean age of 60 years, and a mean time since stroke of 64.5 days, were tested with the FMA and MAS on two consecutive days. The Spearman correlation coefficient for total FMA and total MAS scores was 0.96. For selected items, significant (p scale can better discriminate the level of motor recovery than the MAS in the early stage of recovery or in the more disabled subjects.

  1. Feasibility of the cognitive assessment scale for stroke patients (CASP) vs. MMSE and MoCA in aphasic left hemispheric stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay, J-L; Wauquiez, G; Bonnin-Koang, H Y; Anquetil, C; Pérennou, D; Piscicelli, C; Lucas-Pineau, B; Muja, L; le Stunff, E; de Boissezon, X; Terracol, C; Rousseaux, M; Bejot, Y; Binquet, C; Antoine, D; Devilliers, H; Benaim, C

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke aphasia makes it difficult to assess cognitive deficiencies. We thus developed the CASP, which can be administered without using language. Our objective was to compare the feasibility of the CASP, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in aphasic stroke patients. All aphasic patients consecutively admitted to seven French rehabilitation units during a 4-month period after a recent first left hemispheric stroke were assessed with CASP, MMSE and MoCA. We determined the proportion of patients in whom it was impossible to administer at least one item from these 3 scales, and compared their administration times. Forty-four patients were included (age 64±15, 26 males). The CASP was impossible to administer in eight of them (18%), compared with 16 for the MMSE (36%, P=0.05) and 13 for the MoCA (30%, P=0.21, NS). It was possible to administer the CASP in all of the patients with expressive aphasia, whereas the MMSE and the MoCA could not be administered. Administration times were longer for the CASP (13±4min) than for the MMSE (8±3min, P<10(-6)) and the MoCA (11±5min, P=0.23, NS). The CASP is more feasible than the MMSE and the MoCA in aphasic stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Bobath or motor relearning programme? A comparison of two different approaches of physiotherapy in stroke rehabilitation: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhammer, B; Stanghelle, J K

    2000-08-01

    To examine whether two different physiotherapy regimes caused any differences in outcome in rehabilitation after acute stroke. A double-blind study of patients with acute first-ever stroke. Sixty-one patients were consecutively included, block randomized into two groups, and stratified according to gender and hemiplegic site. Group 1 (33 patients) and group 2 (28 patients) had physiotherapy according to Motor Relearning Programme (MRP) and Bobath, respectively. The supplemental treatment did not differ in the two groups. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), the Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale (SMES), the Barthel ADL Index and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) were used. The following parameters were also registered: length of stay in the hospital, use of assistive devices for mobility, and the patient's accommodation after discharge from the hospital. Patients treated according to MRP stayed fewer days in hospital than those treated according to Bobath (mean 21 days versus 34 days, p = 0.008). Both groups improved in MAS and SMES, but the improvement in motor function was significantly better in the MRP group. The two groups improved in Barthel ADL Index without significant differences between the groups. However, women treated by MRP improved more in ADL than women treated by Bobath. There were no differences between the groups in the life quality test (NHP), use of assistive devices or accommodation after discharge from the hospital. The present study indicates that physiotherapy treatment using the MRP is preferable to that using the Bobath programme in the acute rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Individualized Coaching After Stroke: the LAST Study (Life After Stroke): A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askim, Torunn; Langhammer, Birgitta; Ihle-Hansen, Hege; Gunnes, Mari; Lydersen, Stian; Indredavik, Bent

    2018-02-01

    The evidence for interventions to prevent functional decline in the long term after stroke is lacking. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an 18-month follow-up program of individualized regular coaching on physical activity and exercise. This was a multicentre, pragmatic, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Adults (age ≥18 years) with first-ever or recurrent stroke, community dwelling, with modified Rankin Scale Stroke Impact Scale. Other outcomes were adverse events and compliance to the intervention assessed by training diaries and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Three hundred and eighty consenting participants were randomly assigned to individualized coaching (n=186) or standard care (n=194). The mean estimated difference on Motor Assessment Scale in favor of control group was -0.70 points (95% confidence interval, -2.80, 1.39), P =0.512. There were no differences between the groups on Barthel index, modified Rankin Scale, or Berg Balance Scale. The frequency of adverse events was low in both groups. Results from International Physical Activity Questionnaire and training diaries showed increased activity levels but low intensity of the exercise in the intervention group. The regular individualized coaching did not improve maintenance of motor function or the secondary outcomes compared with standard care. The intervention should be regarded as safe. Despite the neutral results, the health costs related to the intervention should be investigated. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01467206. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Minocycline treatment in acute stroke: an open-label, evaluator-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, Y; Boaz, M; Gilad, R; Lorberboym, M; Dabby, R; Rapoport, A; Anca-Hershkowitz, M; Sadeh, M

    2007-10-02

    Ischemic animal model studies have shown a neuroprotective effect of minocycline. To analyze the effect of minocycline treatment in human acute ischemic stroke. We performed an open-label, evaluator-blinded study. Minocycline at a dosage of 200 mg was administered orally for 5 days. The therapeutic window of time was 6 to 24 hours after onset of stroke. Data from NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Barthel Index (BI) were evaluated. The primary objective was to compare changes from baseline to day 90 in NIHSS in the minocycline group vs placebo. One hundred fifty-two patients were included in the study. Seventy-four patients received minocycline treatment, and 77 received placebo. NIHSS and mRS were significantly lower and BI scores were significantly higher in minocycline-treated patients. This pattern was already apparent on day 7 and day 30 of follow-up. Deaths, myocardial infarctions, recurrent strokes, and hemorrhagic transformations during follow-up did not differ by treatment group. Patients with acute stroke had significantly better outcome with minocycline treatment compared with placebo. The findings suggest a potential benefit of minocycline in acute ischemic stroke.

  5. A First Step for the Automation of Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale for Stroke Subjects in Upper Limb Physical Neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villán-Villán, Mailin A; Pérez-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Gómez, Cristina; Opisso, Eloy; Tormos, Jose; Medina, Josep; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a first approach for the automation of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale used in physical neurorehabilitation. The main goal of this research is to automatically estimate an objective measurement for five Fugl-Meyer scale items related to the assessment of the upper limb motion. An objective score has been calculated for 7 patients. Obtained results indicate that the automation of the scale can be a useful tool for the objective assessment of upper limb motion of stroke survivors.

  6. Acupuncture intervention in ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peng-Fei; Kong, Li; Ni, Li-Wei; Guo, Hai-Long; Yang, Sha; Zhang, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Long; Guo, Jia-Kui; Xiong, Jie; Zhen, Zhong; Shi, Xue-Min

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of death and few pharmacological therapies show benefits in ischemic stroke. In this study, 290 patients aged 40-75 years old with first onset of acute ischemic stroke (more than 24 hours but within 14 days) were treated with standard treatments, and then were randomly allocated into an intervention group (treated with resuscitating acupuncture) and a control group (treated using sham-acupoints). Primary outcome measures included Barthel Index (BI), relapse and death up to six months. For the 290 patients in both groups, one case in the intervention group died, and two cases in the control group died from the disease (p = 0.558). Six patients of the 144 cases in the intervention group had relapse, whereas 34 of 143 patients had relapse in the control group (p two groups, respectively (p two groups for the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), not at two weeks (7.03 ± 3.201 vs. 8.13 ± 3.634; p = 0.067), but at four weeks (4.15 ± 2.032 vs. 6.35 ± 3.131, p Stroke Scale (CSS) at four weeks showed more improvement in the intervention group than that in the control group (9.40 ± 4.51 vs. 13.09 ± 5.80, p Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QOL) at six months was higher in the intervention group (166.63 ± 45.70) than the control group (143.60 ± 50.24; p < 0.01). The results of this clinical trial showed a clinically relevant decrease of relapse in patients treated with resuscitating acupuncture intervention by the end of six months, compared with needling at the sham-acupoints. The resuscitating acupuncture intervention could also improve self-care ability and quality of life, evaluated with BI, NIHSS, CSS, Oxford Handicap Scale (OHS), and SS-QOL.

  7. Effects of professional rehabilitation training on the recovery of neurological function in young stroke patients

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    Chao-jin-zi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Young stroke patients have a strong desire to return to the society, but few studies have been conducted on their rehabilitation training items, intensity, and prognosis. We analyzed clinical data of young and middle-aged/older stroke patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Capital Medical University, China from February 2014 to May 2015. Results demonstrated that hemorrhagic stroke (59.6% was the primary stroke type found in the young group, while ischemic stroke (60.0% was the main type detected in the middle-aged/older group. Compared with older stroke patients, education level and incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia were higher in younger stroke patients, whereas, incidences of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease were lower. The average length of hospital stay was longer in the young group than in the middle-aged/older group. The main risk factors observed in the young stroke patients were hypertension, drinking, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, diabetes, previous history of stroke, and heart disease. The most accepted rehabilitation program consisted of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, acupuncture and moxibustion. Average rehabilitation training time was 2.5 hours/day. Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale scores were increased at discharge. Six months after discharge, the degree of occupational and economic satisfaction declined, and there were no changes in family life satisfaction. The degrees of other life satisfaction (such as friendship improved. The degree of disability and functional status improved significantly in young stroke patients after professional rehabilitation, but the number of patients who returned to society within 6 months after stroke was still small.

  8. Development and Assessment of a Computer Algorithm for Stroke Vascular Localization Using Components of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, David P; Tseng, Bertrand P; Goldstein, Larry B

    2016-02-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was not intended to be used to determine the stroke's vascular distribution. The aim of this study was to develop, assess the reliability, and validate a computer algorithm based on the NIHSS for this purpose. Two cohorts of patients with ischemic stroke having similar distributions of Oxfordshire localizations (total anterior, partial anterior, lacunar, and posterior circulation) based on neuroimaging were identified. The first cohort (n = 40) was used to develop a computer algorithm for vascular localization using a modified version of the NIHSS (NIHSS-Localization [NIHSS-Loc]) that included the laterality of selected deficits; the second (n = 20) was used to assess the reliability of algorithm-based localizations compared to those of 2 vascular neurologists. The validity of the algorithm-based localizations was assessed in comparison to neuroimaging. Agreement was assessed using the unweighted kappa (κ) statistic. Agreement between the 2 raters using the standard NIHSS was slight to moderate (κ = .36, 95% confidence interval [CI] .10-.61). Inter-rater agreement significantly improved to the substantial to almost perfect range using the NIHSS-Loc (κ = .88, 95% CI .73-1.00). Agreement was perfect when the 2 raters entered the data into the NIHSS-Loc computer algorithm (κ = 1.00, 95% CI 1.00-1.00). Agreement between the algorithm localization and neuroimaging results was fair to moderate (κ = .59, 95% CI .35-.84) and not significantly different from the localizations of either rater using the NIHSS-Loc. A computerized, modified version of the standard NIHSS can be used to reliably and validly assign the vascular distribution of an acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes of motor recovery in chronic stroke patients

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    Rodríguez-Lázaro, Álvaro Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few studies have evaluated changes in motor recovery during the chronic phase of stroke. Objective: To determine changes in motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Materials and methods: A retrospective-descriptive analysis was done of the records of 47 patients with motor sequelae of stroke with clinical evolution longer than 6 months (average: 8 months. Functional changes obtained between two consecutive records (average time between assessments: 6 months in scores of Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale (FM, Box and Block Test, PASS, Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, Barthel Index, Composite Functional Index, Modified Ashworth Scale were analyzed. Results: The whole group had significant changes toward functional motor recovery in all scales (p < 0.01, except for the FM in the lower limb. However, the sizes of the effect were small. In patients with evolution longer than 12 months, both the size of effects and statistical significance diminished. Conclusion: After six months of evolution, patients with motor sequelae of CVA show small changes toward functional motor recovery, which are statistically significant until twelve months.

  10. Validity of Modified Ashworth Scale as a Measure of Wrist Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are some controversies about the value of modified Ashworth Scale (MAS for assessing spasticity. The goal of this study was to investigate if there is any correlation between scores obtained from MAS for wrist spasticity and electrophysiological recordings as the objective measure of spasticity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 34 stroke patients were employed. Wrist spasticity was clinically measured by means of MAS. Also, an electromyogram (EMG machine was used to elicit Hmax and Mmax from the flexor carpi radialis muscle. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used to investigate potential correlation between clinically and electrophysiologically measures of spasticity. Results: The observed relation between MAS and EMG recordings was not statistically significant (rho=0.183, P>0.05. Discussion: Our findings suggest that MAS may be a useful tool for grading hypertonia, but it is not a valid measure of spasticity in selected patients.

  11. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

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    Maristela C. X. Pelicioni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS or functional (FS rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1 and immediately after (P2, 1 month after (P3, and three months after (P4 the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS.

  12. Does the addition of specific acupuncture to standard swallowing training improve outcomes in patients with dysphagia after stroke? a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenguang; Zheng, Chanjuan; Zhu, Suiqiang; Tang, Zhouping

    2016-03-01

    To assess the effect of adding acupuncture to standard swallowing training for patients with dysphagia after stroke. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Inpatient and outpatient clinics. A total of 124 patients with dysphagia after stroke were randomly divided into two groups: acupuncture and control. The acupuncture group received standard swallowing training and acupuncture treatment. In comparison, the control group only received standard swallowing training. Participants in both groups received six days of therapy per week for a four-week period. The primary outcome measures included the Standardized Swallowing Assessment and the Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale. The secondary outcome measures included the Modified Barthel Index and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life, which were assessed before and after the four-week therapy period. A total of 120 dysphagic subjects completed the study (60 in acupuncture group and 60 in control group). Significant differences existed in the Standardized Swallowing Assessment, Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale, Modified Barthel Index, and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life scores of each group after the treatment (P Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale (mean difference 2.3; 95% CI 0.7 to 1.2; P Quality of Life scores (mean difference 31.4; 95% CI 3.2 to 11.4; P < 0.01) showed more significant improvement in the acupuncture group than the control group. Acupuncture combined with the standard swallowing training may be beneficial for dysphagic patients after stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Establishment of Electronic Chart-based Stroke Registry System in a Medical System in Taiwan

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    Tsong-Hai Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To establish a prospective, real-time, self-sustainable stroke registry system, we incorporated a registry with an electronic chart to create an electronic chart-based stroke registry system in November 2006. The International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision code (430–437 was used to auto-enroll stroke patients admitted to neurology departments. Clinical information was written by doctors, nursing information was recorded by nurses, and basic patient information was entered by administrative departments. Numerical data and the date and time of any studies were auto-downloaded from the hospital computer. In total, 212 items were auto-downloaded, including basic patient information, laboratory blood test and examination results, and the date and time of imaging and special intervention. The stroke scales (121 items, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel index, and modified Rankin scale were designed to be auto-adjusted to reduce incompatibility. The 95 items with pull-down options were used to specify the contents. This registry system can be time-, labor- and money-saving with secured data accuracy.

  14. The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J H; Beckerman, H; Lankhorst, G J; Bouter, L M

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort

  15. The responsiveness of the action research arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J.H.; Beckerman, H.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bouter, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort

  16. The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J. H.; Beckerman, H.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort

  17. Community-Based Adaptive Physical Activity Program for Chronic Stroke: Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy of the Empoli Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Benvenuti, Francesco; Macko, Richard; Taviani, Antonio; Segenni, Lucianna; Mayer, Federico; Sorkin, John D.; Stanhope, Steven J.; Macellari, Velio; Weinrich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Adaptive Physical Activity (APA-stroke), a community-based exercise program for participants with hemiparetic stroke, improves function in the community. Methods Nonrandomized controlled study in Tuscany, Italy, of participants with mild to moderate hemiparesis at least 9 months after stroke. Forty-nine participants in a geographic health authority (Empoli) were offered APA-stroke (40 completed the study). Forty-four control participants in neighboring health authorities (Florence and Pisa) received usual care (38 completed the study). The APA intervention was a community-based progressive group exercise regimen that included walking, strength, and balance training for 1 hour, thrice a week, in local gyms, supervised by gym instructors. No serious adverse clinical events occurred during the exercise intervention. Outcome measures included the following: 6-month change in gait velocity (6-Minute Timed Walk), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale, Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), Barthel Index, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Index of Caregivers Strain. Results After 6 months, the intervention group improved whereas controls declined in gait velocity, balance, SPPB, and SIS social participation domains. These between-group comparisons were statistically significant at P < .00015. Individuals with depressive symptoms at baseline improved whereas controls were unchanged (P < .003). Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on a subset of participants in the intervention group. For these individuals, insulin secretion declined 29% after 6 months (P = .01). Conclusion APA-stroke appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in a community setting. PMID:19318465

  18. Predictors of Poststroke Health-Related Quality of Life in Nigerian Stroke Survivors: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiru Mohammad Hamza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the predictors in the different aspects of the health-related quality of life (HRQoL and to measure the changes of functional status over time in a cohort of Nigerian stroke survivors. A prospective observational study was conducted in three hospitals of Kano state of Nigeria where stroke survivors receive rehabilitation. The linguistic-validated Hausa versions of the stroke impact scale 3.0, modified Rankin scale, Barthel index and Beck depression inventory scales were used. Paired samples t-test was used to calculate the amount of changes that occur over time and the forward stepwise linear regression model was used to identify the predictors. A total of 233 stroke survivors were surveyed at 6 months, and 93% (217/233 were followed at 1 year after stroke. Functional disabilities were significantly reduced during the recovery phase. Motor impairment, disability, and level of depression were independent predictors of HRQoL in the multivariate regression analysis. The involvement of family members as caregivers is the key factor for those survivors with improved functional status. Thus, to enhance the quality of poststroke life, it is proposed that a holistic stroke rehabilitation service and an active involvement of family members are established at every possible level.

  19. Rasch Analysis of a New Hierarchical Scoring System for Evaluating Hand Function on the Motor Assessment Scale for Stroke

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    Joyce S. Sabari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 To develop two independent measurement scales for use as items assessing hand movements and hand activities within the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS, an existing instrument used for clinical assessment of motor performance in stroke survivors; (2 To examine the psychometric properties of these new measurement scales. Design. Scale development, followed by a multicenter observational study. Setting. Inpatient and outpatient occupational therapy programs in eight hospital and rehabilitation facilities in the United States and Canada. Participants. Patients (N=332 receiving stroke rehabilitation following left (52% or right (48% cerebrovascular accident; mean age 64.2 years (sd 15; median 1 month since stroke onset. Intervention. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. Data were tested for unidimensionality and reliability, and behavioral criteria were ordered according to difficulty level with Rasch analysis. Results. The new scales assessing hand movements and hand activities met Rasch expectations of unidimensionality and reliability. Conclusion. Following a multistep process of test development, analysis, and refinement, we have redesigned the two scales that comprise the hand function items on the MAS. The hand movement scale contains an empirically validated 10-behavior hierarchy and the hand activities item contains an empirically validated 8-behavior hierarchy.

  20. Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Joshua Z; Disla, Norbelina; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee C; Sacco, Ralph L; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B

    2010-09-01

    Depression is highly prevalent after stroke and may influence recovery. We aimed to determine whether depressed mood acutely after stroke predicts subsequent disability and mortality. As part of the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study, a population-based incident stroke case follow-up study performed in a multiethnic urban population, participants were asked about depressed mood within 7 to 10 days after stroke. Participants were followed every 6 months the first 2 years and yearly thereafter for 5 years for death and disability measured by the Barthel Index. We fitted polytomous logistic regression models using a canonical link to examine the association between depressed mood after stroke and disability comparing moderate (Barthel Index 60 to 95) and severe (Barthel Index or=95). Cox proportional hazards models were created to examine the association between depressed mood and mortality. A question about depressed mood within 7 to 10 days after stroke was asked in 340 of 655 patients with ischemic stroke enrolled, and 139 reported that they felt depressed. In multivariate analyses controlling for sociodemographic factors, stroke severity, and medical conditions, depressed mood was associated with a greater odds of severe disability compared with no disability at 1 (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.07 to 7.91) and 2 years (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29 to 10.71) after stroke. Depressed mood was not associated with all-cause mortality or vascular death. Depressed mood after stroke is associated with disability but not mortality after stroke. Early screening and intervention for mood disorders after stroke may improve outcomes and requires further research.

  1. Traditional manual acupuncture combined with rehabilitation therapy for shoulder hand syndrome after stroke within the Chinese healthcare system: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Le; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Lan; Zuo, Hong-Xia; He, Xiao-Kuo; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of traditional manual acupuncture combined with rehabilitation therapy versus rehabilitation therapy alone for shoulder hand syndrome after stroke. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Information Database, Wan Fang Database and reference lists of the eligible studies were searched up to July 2017 for relevant studies. Randomized controlled trials that compared the combined effects of traditional manual acupuncture and rehabilitation therapy to rehabilitation therapy alone for shoulder hand syndrome after stroke were included. Two reviewers independently screened the searched records, extracted the data and assessed risk of bias of the included studies. The treatment effect sizes were pooled in a meta-analysis using RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 20 studies involving 1918 participants were included in this study. Compared to rehabilitation therapy alone, the combined therapy significantly reduced pain on the visual analogue scale and improved limb movement on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale and the performance of activities of daily living (ADL) on the Barthel Index scale or Modified Barthel Index scale. Of these, the visual analogue scale score changes were significantly higher (mean difference = 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.15-1.82, P rehabilitation therapy is more effective in alleviating pain, improving limb movement and ADL. However, considering the relatively low quality of available evidence, further rigorously designed and large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the results.

  2. Does the addition of specific acupuncture to standard swallowing training improve outcomes in patients with dysphagia after stroke? a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenguang; Zheng, Chanjuan; Zhu, Suiqiang; Tang, Zhouping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of adding acupuncture to standard swallowing training for patients with dysphagia after stroke. Design: Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient and outpatient clinics. Subjects: A total of 124 patients with dysphagia after stroke were randomly divided into two groups: acupuncture and control. Interventions: The acupuncture group received standard swallowing training and acupuncture treatment. In comparison, the control group only received standard swallowing training. Participants in both groups received six days of therapy per week for a four-week period. Main measures: The primary outcome measures included the Standardized Swallowing Assessment and the Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale. The secondary outcome measures included the Modified Barthel Index and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life, which were assessed before and after the four-week therapy period. Results: A total of 120 dysphagic subjects completed the study (60 in acupuncture group and 60 in control group). Significant differences existed in the Standardized Swallowing Assessment, Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale, Modified Barthel Index, and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life scores of each group after the treatment (P Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale (mean difference 2.3; 95% CI 0.7 to 1.2; P < 0.01), Modified Barthel Index (mean difference 17.2; 95% CI 2.6 to 9.3; P < 0.05) and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life scores (mean difference 31.4; 95% CI 3.2 to 11.4; P < 0.01) showed more significant improvement in the acupuncture group than the control group. Conclusions: Acupuncture combined with the standard swallowing training may be beneficial for dysphagic patients after stroke. PMID:25819076

  3. Assessing functional status after intensive care unit stay: the Barthel Index and the Katz Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Leda Tomiko Yamada da; Silva, Janete Maria da; Soler, Júlia Maria Pavan; Sun, Carolina Yea Ling; Tanaka, Clarice; Fu, Carolina

    2018-01-27

    To assess the functional status of post-ICU patients using the Barthel Index (BI) and the Katz Index (KI) and to assess which is more suitable for this population. Retrospective longitudinal study. Public tertiary hospital in São Paulo (Brazil). Patients aged ≥18 years old, admitted to ICU, who were treated with mechanical ventilation (MV) ≥ 24 h and were discharged to ward. Inability to answer the BI and the KI; limiting neurological or orthopaedic conditions; ICU stay ≥90 days. Patients transferred to or from other hospitals or who died in the wards were not analysed. BI and KI were scored pre-ICU and post-ICU and the variation was calculated. BI and KI scores were compared using analysis based on item response theory (IRT), using degree of difficulty and discriminating items as parameters. Median age was 52 years old, median APACHE II score was 15. Median ICU stay was 11 days and median MV duration was 4 days. BI variation was 44% and KI variation was 55%. In IRT analysis, BI considered a larger number of items with different levels of difficulty. Both the BI and the KI revealed significant deterioration of functional status after ICU discharge. The IRT analysis suggested that the Barthel Index might be a better scale than the Katz Index for the assessment of functional status of patients discharged from ICU, since it presented better discrimination of the ability to carry out the tasks. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Cervicocranial fibromuscular dysplasia in Taiwanese ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi-Hung; Wu, Dean; Chin, Shy-Chyi; Fu, Ser-Chen; Wu, Tai-Cheng; Chang, Chien-Hung; Peng, Tsung-I; Chang, Yeu-Jhy; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research of cervicocranial fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is rare in Asian populations. Our study reviewed Taiwanese ischemic stroke patients with cervicocranial FMD and compared them with previous reports. Between 2000 and 2011, we collected 19 consecutive cervicocranial FMD patients who received demographic registration, a blood test for excluding vasculitis, and comprehensive angiography. Cerebral ultrasound, vascular images and clinical outcomes (Barthel index, modified Rankin scale, recurrent stroke, or death) were monitored during follow-up. Of the 19 patients, 16 (84%) had carotid FMD, while 7 (37%) had vertebral FMD. Only 2 investigated patients (13%) had renal FMD and 1 (5%) had cerebral aneurysm. 14 (74%) presented acute arterial dissection. All patients received medical treatment and had neither recurrent stroke nor dissection during follow-up. In the literature review of 225 FMD patients, 3.6% had recurrent stroke during follow-up, and some reported surgical procedure or angioplasty could give a good clinical outcome in progressing ischemia irrelevant to the cause of stenosis. In Taiwanese cervicocranial FMD patients, arterial dissection was one of the most common clinical presentations. Most of our patients had isolated involvement of the cervicocranial artery and carried a favorable outcome under medical treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Poor concurrence between disabilities as described by patients and established assessment tools three months after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tistad, Malin; Ytterberg, Charlotte; Tham, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disability/problems, one phenomenon underlying people's need for health care services, can be viewed both from the perspectives of people with stroke (felt problems), and the health professionals (assessed problems). OBJECTIVE: The aim was to describe felt problems three months after...... Extended Index of ADL (KI); Barthel Index (BI) and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) represented assessed problems. Items/domains in the assessment tools that corresponded to the categories of felt problems were identified and comparisons performed. RESULT: The category Fatigue had the largest number of felt...... indicate that the use of standardized instruments should be complemented by a dialog if health services are to be based on problems experienced by the patients....

  6. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scale evaluation of multimodal computed tomography in predicting clinical outcomes of stroke patients treated with aspiration thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychogios, Marios-Nikos; Schramm, Peter; Frölich, Andreas Maximilian; Kallenberg, Kai; Wasser, Katrin; Reinhardt, Lars; Kreusch, Andreas S; Jung, Klaus; Knauth, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Patient selection is crucial in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients. Baseline computed tomographic (CT) images, evaluated with the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scale (ASPECTS), are considered significant predictors of outcome. In this study, we evaluated CT images and perfusion parameters, analyzed with ASPECTS, as final outcome predictors after endovascular stroke treatment. We analyzed a cohort of patients with acute ischemic stroke and endovascular treatment. Patients with an occlusion of the M1 segment and multimodal CT imaging were included. CT perfusion data were reconstructed using commercial software. Two experienced neuroradiologists separately reviewed and scored CT and CT perfusion images with the ASPECTS score. Parameters were compared between patients with poor and with favorable follow-up outcome. Significantly different variables were further analyzed by forward stepwise logistic regression. Fifty-one patients were included in our study. Baseline characteristics did not differ between patients with favorable and poor outcomes. No significant difference in recanalization status, the various times, or CT ASPECTS was demonstrated between these 2 groups. Significant differences were demonstrated for age (P=0.0049), cerebral blood volume ASPECTS (P=0.0007), and between cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow ASPECTS (P=0.0045). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS>7 demonstrated the highest sensitivity and specificity for favorable outcome with 84% and 79%, respectively. CT perfusion parameters, evaluated with ASPECTS, are optimal predictors of outcome and are more sensitive and specific than CT ASPECTS in the prediction of favorable outcome. Use of these parameters in treatment decisions could reduce futile recanalizations.

  7. C-Reactive Protein Can Be an Early Predictor of Poststroke Apathy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liping; Xiong, Siqing; Liu, Yi; Lin, Meiqing; Wang, Jirui; Zhong, Renjia; Zhao, Jiuhan; Liu, Wenjing; Zhu, Lu; Shang, Xiuli

    2018-03-13

    Apathy is a multidimensional syndrome referring to a primary lack of motivation that occurs frequently in survivors of stroke. Higher C-reactive protein (CRP) level was associated with higher apathy scores among Alzheimer disease cases. However, data on the relationship between CRP levels and apathy in patients with stroke are lacking. So, we hypothesized an association between CRP and poststroke apathy (PSA). Two hundred ninety-two consecutive patients with stroke were recruited within 7 days after stroke. Apathy symptoms were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after stoke using the Apathy Evaluation Scale-Clinical (AES-C). Demographic and clinical information were obtained using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, Barthel Index (BI) scores, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) scores. CRP was measured at baseline. The presence and the location of infarcts were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Apathy at baseline was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI), NIHSS, BI, MMSE, HAMD, and CRP (P < .05) upon admission. PSA at 6 months was significantly associated with elevated CRP concentrations, high AES-C score, and low BI score (P < .05) upon admission. The AES-C scores peaked 3 months after stroke, but then abated over 6 months. CRP, BMI, MMSE, depression, and disability are closely related to apathy during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Lower BI scores, higher CRP concentrations, and apathy in acute stroke phase increased the risk of PSA at 6 months. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aquatic Therapy Improves Outcomes for Subacute Stroke Patients by Enhancing Muscular Strength of Paretic Lower Limbs Without Increasing Spasticity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yi-Zhao; Huang, Li-Ping; Bai, Bei; Zhou, Shi; Yin, Miao-Miao; Zhao, Hua; Zhou, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hong-Tu

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an aquatic exercise program designed to enhance muscular strength in paretic lower limbs in subacute stroke patients. Thirty-six subacute stroke patients were randomly divided to a conventional or an aquatic group (n = 18 each). Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and after 8 wks of training. For the paretic lower limbs, maximum isometric voluntary contraction strength of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris caput longus and the tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius was measured. Cocontraction ratios during knee extension and flexion and ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion were calculated respectively. In addition, Modified Ashworth Scale, Functional Ambulation Category, and Barthel Index were assessed. Compared with the conventional intervention, the aquatic intervention resulted in significantly higher knee extension (P = 0.002) and ankle plantarflexion torque (P = 0.002), accompanied with a significantly lower knee extension cocontraction ratio in the paretic limb (P = 0.000). Functional Ambulation Category (P = 0.009) and Barthel Index (P = 0.024) were greater in aquatic group than conventional group posttreatment. Modified Ashworth Scale scores did not show any differences between groups. Aquatic exercise enhanced muscle strength in paretic lower limbs and improved muscle cocontraction without increasing spasticity in subacute stroke patients.

  9. Evaluation of a sequential global test of improved recovery following stroke as applied to the ICTUS trial of citicoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Kim; Whitehead, John; Cobo, Erik; Secades, Julio J

    2009-01-01

    The International Citicoline Trial in acUte Stroke is a sequential phase III study of the use of the drug citicoline in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, which was initiated in 2006 in 56 treatment centres. The primary objective of the trial is to demonstrate improved recovery of patients randomized to citicoline relative to those randomized to placebo after 12 weeks of follow-up. The primary analysis will take the form of a global test combining the dichotomized results of assessments on three well-established scales: the Barthel Index, the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. This approach was previously used in the analysis of the influential National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trial of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in stroke.The purpose of this paper is to describe how this trial was designed, and in particular how the simultaneous objectives of taking into account three assessment scales, performing a series of interim analyses and conducting treatment allocation and adjusting the analyses to account for prognostic factors, including more than 50 treatment centres, were addressed. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Reliability and validity of the Nigerian (Hausa) version of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0 index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashiru Hamza; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Siew Yim, Loh; Chinna, Karuthan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to test the translated Hausa version of the stroke impact scale SIS (3.0) and further evaluate its psychometric properties. The SIS 3.0 was translated from English into Hausa and was tested for its reliability and validity on a stratified random sample adult stroke survivors attending rehabilitation services at stroke referral hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Psychometric analysis of the Hausa-SIS 3.0 involved face, content, criterion, and construct validity tests as well as internal and test-retest reliability. In reliability analyses, the Cronbach's alpha values for the items in Strength, Hand function, Mobility, ADL/IADL, Memory and thinking, Communication, Emotion, and Social participation domains were 0.80, 0.92, 0.90, 0.78, 0.84, 0.89, 0.58, and 0.74, respectively. There are 8 domains in stroke impact scale 3.0 in confirmatory factory analysis; some of the items in the Hausa-SIS questionnaire have to be dropped due to lack of discriminate validity. In the final analysis, a parsimonious model was obtained with two items per construct for the 8 constructs (Chi-square/df 0.9, and RMSEA SIS seems to measure adequately the QOL outcomes in the 8 domains.

  11. Pattern of complementary and alternative medicine use among Malaysian stroke survivors: A hospital-based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azidah Abdul Kadir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; 補充與替代醫學 bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué is widely practiced among stroke patients globally. We conducted a study to determine the pattern of CAM use and its associated factors in stroke survivors attending a tertiary hospital in Malaysia within 6 months after the stroke. This was a prospective cohort study that included all stroke patients who were admitted to a tertiary center in Malaysia from December 2009 to December 2010. Patients were interviewed and examined within 72 hours of admission. The sociodemographic data and medical history were collected. Clinical examinations were done to assess the stroke severity using the Scandinavian Stroke Scale and functional status based on modified Barthel index (MBI. Patients were reassessed at 6 months after the stroke on the CAM use and functional status (MBI. The response rate was 92%. The study population consisted of 52 men and 41 women with a mean age of 63.7 ± 10.3 years. Sixty-seven percent practiced CAM. Massage was the most frequently used method (63.4%, followed by vitamins (7.5%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, functional status (MBI score on discharge (p = 0.004, odds ratio 1.034, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.06 and Scandinavian Stroke Scale score (p = 0.045, odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.01–3.43 were significant predictors for use of CAM. In conclusion, the use of CAM among stroke survivors is high. Patients who have better functional status on discharge and less severe stroke are more likely to use CAM.

  12. Validation of the Caregivers' Satisfaction with Stroke Care Questionnaire: C-SASC hospital scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTo date, researchers have lacked a validated instrument to measure stroke caregivers' satisfaction with hospital care. We adjusted a validated patient version of satisfaction with hospital care for stroke caregivers and tested the 11-item caregivers' satisfaction with hospital care

  13. Evaluation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in screening stroke patients for symptoms: Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayis, Salma A; Ayerbe, Luis; Ashworth, Mark; DA Wolfe, Charles

    2018-03-01

    Variations have been reported in the number of underlying constructs and choice of thresholds that determine caseness of anxiety and /or depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS). This study examined the properties of each item of HADS as perceived by stroke patients, and assessed the information these items convey about anxiety and depression between 3 months to 5 years after stroke. The study included 1443 stroke patients from the South London Stroke Register (SLSR). The dimensionality of HADS was examined using factor analysis methods, and items' properties up to 5 years after stroke were tested using Item Response Theory (IRT) methods, including graded response models (GRMs). The presence of two dimensions of HADS (anxiety and depression) for stroke patients was confirmed. Items that accurately inferred about the severity of anxiety and depression, and offered good discrimination of caseness were identified as "I can laugh and see the funny side of things" (Q4) and "I get sudden feelings of panic" (Q13), discrimination 2.44 (se = 0.26), and 3.34 (se = 0.35), respectively. Items that shared properties, hence replicate inference were: "I get a sort of frightened feeling as if something awful is about to happen" (Q3), "I get a sort of frightened feeling like butterflies in my stomach" (Q6), and "Worrying thoughts go through my mind" (Q9). Item properties were maintained over time. Approximately 20% of patients were lost to follow up. A more concise selection of items based on their properties, would provide a precise approach for screening patients and for an optimal allocation of patients into clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of early National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improvement with vessel recanalization and functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharitonova, Tatiana; Mikulik, Robert; Roine, Risto O; Soinne, Lauri; Ahmed, Niaz; Wahlgren, Nils

    2011-06-01

    Early neurological improvement (ENI) after thrombolytic therapy of acute stroke has been linked with recanalization and favorable outcome, although its definition shows considerable variation. We tested the ability of ENI, as defined in previous publications, to predict vessel recanalization and 3-month functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis recorded in an extensive patient cohort in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register (SITS-ISTR). Of 21,534 patients registered between December 2002 and December 2008, 798 patients (3.7%) had CT- or MR angiography-documented baseline vessel occlusion and also angiography data at 22 to 36 hours post-treatment. ENI definitions assessed at 2 hours and 24 hours post-treatment were (1) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score improvement ≥4 points from baseline; (2) NIHSS 0, 1, or improvement ≥8; (3) NIHSS ≤3 or improvement ≥10; (4) improvement by 20%; (5) 40% from baseline; or (6) NIHSS score 0 to 1. Receiver operating curve analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed to evaluate the association of ENI with vessel recanalization and favorable functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 3 months). ENI at 2 hours had fair accuracy to diagnose recanalization as derived from receiver operating curve analysis. Definitions of improvement based on percent of NIHSS score change from baseline demonstrate better accuracy to diagnose recanalization at 2 hours and 24 hours than the definitions based on NIHSS cutoffs (the best performance at 2 hours was area under the curve 0.633, sensitivity 58%, specificity 69%, positive predictive value 68%, and negative predictive value 59% for 20% improvement; and area under the curve 0.692, sensitivity 69%, specificity 70%, positive predictive value 70%, and negative predictive value 62% for 40% improvement at 24 hours). ENI-predicted functional outcome with OR 2.8 to 6.0 independently from

  15. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial: a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-10-01

    The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score at 4 weeks after randomisation and at the penultimate visit. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00153062. 20,332 patients (mean age 66 years) were randomised and followed-up for a median of 2.4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically different in patients with recurrent stroke who were treated with ASA and ER-DP versus clopidogrel (p=0.38), or with telmisartan versus placebo (p=0.61). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with recurrent stroke with a good outcome, as measured with the Barthel index, across all treatment groups. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the median MMSE scores, the percentage of patients with an MMSE score of 24 points or less, the percentage of patients with a drop in MMSE

  16. Development and Validation of the Standard Chinese Version of the CARE Item Set (CARE-C) for Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Kao, Chien-Wei; Tan, Fuk-Tang; Gage, Barbara; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Han, Der-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation (CARE) item set is a standardized, integrative scale for evaluation of functional status across acute and postacute care (PAC) providers. The aim of this study was to develop a Chinese version of the CARE (CARE-C) item set and to examine its reliability and validity for assessment of functional outcomes among stroke patients.The CARE-C was administered in two samples. Sample 1 included 30 stroke patients in the outpatient clinic setting for the purpose of examining interrater and test-retest reliabilities and internal consistency. Sample 2 included 138 stroke patients admitted to rehabilitation units for the purpose of investigating criterion-related validity with the Barthel index, Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, EuroQOL five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).The CARE-C was categorized into 11 subscales, 52 items of which were analyzed. At the subscale level, the interrater reliability and test-retest reliability expressed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.72 to 0.99 and 0.60 to 1.00, respectively. Six of the 11 subscales met acceptable levels of internal consistency (Cronbach alpha > 0.7). The criterion-related validity of the CARE-C showed moderate to high correlations of its subscales of cognition and basic and instrumental activities of daily living with the Barthel index, IADL scale, and MMSE.The CARE-C is a useful instrument for evaluating functional quality metrics in the Chinese stroke population. The development of the CARE-C also facilitates the assessment of the PAC program in Taiwan and future research is warranted for validating the capability of CARE-C to identify patients' functional change over time and its generalizability for nonstroke populations.

  17. Scaling of swim speed and stroke frequency in geometrically similar penguins: they swim optimally to minimize cost of transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Watanabe, Yuuki; Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been predicted that geometrically similar animals would swim at the same speed with stroke frequency scaling with mass−1/3. In the present study, morphological and behavioural data obtained from free-ranging penguins (seven species) were compared. Morphological measurements support the geometrical similarity. However, cruising speeds of 1.8–2.3 m s−1 were significantly related to mass0.08 and stroke frequencies were proportional to mass−0.29. These scaling relationships do not agree with the previous predictions for geometrically similar animals. We propose a theoretical model, considering metabolic cost, work against mechanical forces (drag and buoyancy), pitch angle and dive depth. This new model predicts that: (i) the optimal swim speed, which minimizes the energy cost of transport, is proportional to (basal metabolic rate/drag)1/3 independent of buoyancy, pitch angle and dive depth; (ii) the optimal speed is related to mass0.05; and (iii) stroke frequency is proportional to mass−0.28. The observed scaling relationships of penguins support these predictions, which suggest that breath-hold divers swam optimally to minimize the cost of transport, including mechanical and metabolic energy during dive. PMID:19906666

  18. Development of a computerized adaptive testing system of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Shih, Ching-Lin; Chou, Yeh-Tai; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Lin, Jau-Hong; Wu, Hung-Chia; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2012-06-01

    To develop a computerized adaptive testing system of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale (CAT-FM) to efficiently and reliably assess motor function in patients with stroke. First, a simulation study was used to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the CAT-FM. Second, a field study was employed to determine the administration efficiency of the CAT-FM. One medical center and 1 teaching hospital. Patients' responses (n=301) were used for the simulation study; 49 patients participated in the field study. Not applicable. The 2 CAT-FM item banks (upper extremity and lower extremity) include 37 items from the original Fugl-Meyer scale. The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the CAT-FM were determined by the simulation study. Two stopping rules (reliability ≥0.9 or an increase of reliability scale). The responsiveness was moderate (standardized response mean for the upper extremity=.67, lower extremity=.79, and motor=.77) for the 226 patients who completed both assessments at 14 and 90 days after stroke. The field study found that, on average, the time needed to administer the CAT-FM was 242 seconds with 4.7 items. The CAT-FM is an efficient, reliable, valid, and responsive clinical tool for assessing motor function in patients with stroke. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Statins and clinical outcome of acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statin therapy is considered an effective measure for the prevention of ischemic stroke. Several recent studies have indicated that treatment with statins, prior to the onset of acute ischemic stroke, may also substantially reduce the severity of stroke and the degree of patient disability. The purpose of the present review is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of statin pretreatment on functional outcome of acute ischemic stroke and to assess potential adverse events associated with statin use. Methods Relevant articles on the role of statins in acute ischemic stroke were identified via MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and by manual searches of the references of identified papers. Clinical studies (most were prospective cohort studies assessing statin therapy for acute ischemic stroke were selected for the review. Only two randomized controlled clinical trials met the criteria to be included in the analysis. Clinical outcome was assessed based on the degree of disability determined with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to measure stroke severity. Recurrence of stroke in patients who had suffered from a previous stroke was analyzed with and without statin therapy. Incidence and severity of adverse reactions was reviewed. Because there were too many differences in study outcome measures, a quantitative analysis of data was deemed inappropriate. A qualitative summary of the data was consequently completed. Results Thirteen reports were systematically reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of statins in the pretreatment of acute ischemic stroke. Pretreatment with statins was found to reduce the recurrence of stroke and to result in more favorable outcomes for patients. The beneficial effects of prior statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke were shown to be especially profound in whites, diabetics, elderly patients with

  20. Effects of integrating rhythmic arm swing into robot-assisted walking in patients with subacute stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae-Woo; Oh, Duck-Won; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to identify the effects of rhythmic arm swing during robot-assisted walking training on balance, gait, motor function, and activities of daily living among patients with subacute stroke. Twenty patients with subacute stroke were recruited, and thereafter randomly allocated to either the experimental group that performed the robot-assisted walking training with rhythmic arm swing, or the control group that performed the training in arm fixation. In total, 30 training sessions were carried out. The outcome measures included the 10-m walk test, Berg balance scale, timed up-and-go test, fall index that was measured using the Tetrax system, motor function test of Fugl-Meyer assessment, and modified Barthel index. The patients of both groups showed significant improvement in all parameters after the intervention (Pscale, Fugl-Meyer assessment, and modified Barthel index scores at post-test appeared to be significantly higher for the experimental group than for the control group (P<0.05). These findings indicate that more favorable effects from robot-assisted walking training in patients with subacute stroke may be obtained by the use of rhythmic arm swing.

  1. [Evaluation of patient satisfaction after stroke rehabilitation program. Validation study for the Spanish version of the Satisfaction Pound Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirrezabal Juaristi, Aizpea; Ferrer Fores, Montse; Marco Navarro, Ester; Mojal García, Sergi; Vilagut Saiz, Gemma; Duarte Oller, Esther

    2016-11-18

    The Satisfaction Pound Scale is a specific questionnaire to evaluate satisfaction with the rehabilitation program after a stroke. The aim of this study was to adapt this scale to Spanish and to evaluate its metric characteristics. The adaptation included translation and back-translation methods. Metric characteristics were evaluated in 74 patients, all of whom were administered the Satisfaction Pound Scale and the Short Form 36 (SF-36). The statistical model was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Reliability was determined through Cronbach alpha coefficient and a test-retest procedure. Construct validity was assessed by means of correlations between the satisfaction scale and the SF-36. Adjustment indicators in the CFA were very good. Reproducibility test showed correlations higher than 0.85, and all correlations between SF-36 dimensions and the satisfaction scale were lower than 0.2, in accordance with the hypotheses raised. The Spanish version of the Satisfaction Pounds Scale is reliable and valid, therefore it is a useful tool to assess satisfaction with the post-stroke rehabilitation program in our area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of truncal motor imagery practice on trunk performance, functional balance, and daily activities in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor imagery is beneficial to treat upper and lower limbs motor impairments in stroke patients, but the effects of imagery in the trunk recovery have not been reported. Hence, the aim is to test the effects of truncal motor imagery practice on trunk performance, functional balance, and daily activities in acute stroke patients. Methods: This pilot randomized clinical trial was conducted in acute stroke unit. Acute stroke patients with hemodynamic stability, aged between 30 and 70 years, first time stroke, and scoring <20 on trunk impairment scale (TIS were included in the study. Patients in the experimental group practiced trunk motor imagery in addition to physical training. Control group was given conventional physical therapy. The treatment intensity was 90 min/day, 6 days a week for 3 weeks duration. Trunk control test, TIS, brunel balance assessment (BBA, and Barthel index (BI were considered as the outcome measures. Results: Among 23 patients included in the study, 12 and 11 patients, respectively, in the control and experimental groups completed the intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA, i.e., timeFNx01 group factor analysis and effect size showed statistically significant improvements (P = 0.001 in the scores of TIS (1.64, BBA (1.83, and BI (0.67. Conclusion: Motor imagery of trunk in addition to the physical practice showed benefits in improving trunk performance, functional balance, and daily living in acute stroke.

  3. Botulinum toxin in post-stroke patients: stiffness modifications and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miscio, Giacinta; Del Conte, Carmen; Pianca, Danilo; Colombo, Roberto; Panizza, Marcela; Schieppati, Marco; Pisano, Fabrizio

    2004-02-01

    To objectively quantify stiffness and clinical changes in the upper limb of poststroke patients following botulinum toxin (BT) injection. Eighteen consecutive chronic post-stroke spastic patients were injected Botulinum toxin A in the forearm flexor spastic muscles. Spasticity was clinically evaluated with the Ashworth scale. Stiffness was measured with indices (passive stiffness index (ISI) and total stiffness index (TSI) obtained by mechanical wrist displacements induced by a torque motor,which could also provide the stretch reflex threshold speed (SRTS) from flexor muscles. Functional status was measured with the Barthel index and a specific hand ability scale, pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The ranges of voluntary wrist extension (EROM) and flexion (FROM) and wrist isometric extension and flexion (IE-IF) strength were also calculated. IE and EROM significantly increased, being respectively p < 0.01 and p < 0.05; also SRTS was augmented (p < 0.001),while TSI showed lower values (p < 0.001); the Ashworth score decreased at least one point. Hand function for selected tasks improved in 50% of patients, the Barthel index only in 4 (22 %), forearm pain was completely relieved in 3 patients (17 %). BT can be considered a valid therapeutic tool in all spastic patients, because of immediate advantages: reduction of muscle hypertonia, pain relief, improvement in selected motor performances.

  4. The self-report Barthel Index: preliminary validation in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, D; Selai, C; Thompson, A

    2012-06-01

      To make a preliminary assessment of the reliability and validity of the self-report Barthel Index (SRBI) in people with Parkinson's (PWP) disease. Thirty-nine PWP completed the SRBI, the self-report Schwab & England (S & E) scale and the PDQ-39. Standard statistical procedures were incorporated to assess the reliability and validity of the SRBI. A Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.69 was calculated, indicating adequate internal consistency. Reliability was further demonstrated through a Guttman split-half reliability coefficient of 0.74. Validity was demonstrated through highly significant correlations between the SRBI and the S & E scale (r = 0.64, P < 0.00), the activities of daily living dimension of the PDQ-39 (r = -0.60, P < 0.00) and mobility dimension of the PDQ-39 (r = -0.49, P < 0.01). Results suggest that the SRBI has the potential to be a reliable and valid indicator of ADL in PWP and utilized in studies that make comparisons across conditions. Further validation is required in a larger sample and through assessment of additional psychometric properties. © 2011 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2011 EFNS.

  5. Effectiveness of thermal stimulation for the moderately to severely paretic leg after stroke: serial changes at one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chung-Chao; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Hsiang; Wei, Yu-Chun; Hsiao, Jung; Chen, Jia-Ching

    2012-11-01

    Liang C-C, Hsieh T-C, Lin C-H, Wei Y-C, Hsiao J, Chen J-C. Effectiveness of thermal stimulation for the moderately to severely paretic leg after stroke: serial changes at one-year follow-up. To evaluate the serial changes of long-term effects of thermal stimulation (TS) on acute stroke patients. A prospective study with follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months after TS to assess motor and balance function of the paretic leg of acute stroke patients. A general hospital rehabilitation department. Poststroke patients (N=30) with moderate to severe impairment of leg function. In addition to receiving standard rehabilitation, eligible patients were randomly assigned to a TS group (5 thermal stimulations per week for 6wk) or a control group (3 consultations per week for 6wk). Fugl-Meyer lower extremity score, Medical Research Council Scale for the Lower Extremity, Berg Balance Scale, Modified Motor Assessment Scale, Functional Ambulation Classification, and Barthel Index were administered at baseline, after 4 and 6 weeks of treatment, and at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups at baseline. After TS, the Fugl-Meyer lower extremity score, Medical Research Council Scale for the Lower Extremity, Modified Motor Assessment Scale, and Functional Ambulation Classification were significantly better in the TS group, and the effects persisted for 3 months (PScale and Barthel Index only at the 3-month follow-up (PFugl-Meyer lower extremity score had disappeared at the 6-month follow-up (P>.05). The long-term benefits of TS for patients with acute stroke may be sustained for 3 months but disappear by the 6-month and 1-year follow-up. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electromyography characterization of stretch responses in hemiparetic stroke patients and their relationship with the Modified Ashworth scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A; Musa, I M; van Deursen, R; Wiles, C M

    2005-10-01

    To determine the validity of the Modified Ashworth Scale as a measure of spasticity by determining its relationship to surface electromyography activity and contracture. A controlled study of hemiparetic stroke patients with spasticity. A physiotherapy department in a secondary care hospital. Thirty-one stroke patients and 20 healthy volunteers. The resistance to passive movement around the knee and ankle of the affected and unaffected legs was rated using the Modified Ashworth Scale. Passive range of movement was measured with a goniometer. Surface electromyography recordings of four lower limb muscles were taken during passive stretches of the knee and ankle. Hemiparetic patients produced surface electromyography responses to stretch that were of greater amplitude (unaffected limbs: mean = 25.82 mV (43.85), affected limbs: mean = 24.77 mV (35.46)) than those of healthy volunteers (mean = 15.85 (29.96)). The affected muscles of hemiparetic patients were more likely to produce surface electromyography responses to stretch of a sustained duration (45% of cases) compared with unaffected limbs (24% of cases) and those of healthy volunteers (16% of cases). The Modified Ashworth Scale showed a positive correlation with the magnitude (p Ashworth Scale were associated with contracture (p Ashworth Scale reflects spasticity in terms of surface electromyography stretch responses produced by passive movement, but the relationship of spasticity to contracture remains unclear.

  7. [Acupuncture treatment programs for post-stroke motor rehabilitation in community hospitals: study protocol of a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qin-hui; Pei, Jian; Jia, Qi; Song, Yi; Gu, Yue-hua; You, Xiao-xin

    2012-05-01

    Stroke is responsible for increasingly high rates of mortality and disability worldwide. Approximately two million people suffer from stroke for the first time in China each year. The high incidence (50%) of post-stroke disability brings a heavy burden to patients and their caregivers. Acupuncture has been widely used in the communities for post-stroke rehabilitation in China. The objective of this trial is to apply our acupuncture research achievement to treatment and evaluation of post-stroke hemiplegic patients in community. A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial will be performed in Longhua Hospital and a number of community health service centers in Shanghai. A total of 124 patients (estimated sample size) with post-stroke hemiplegia will be randomly divided into an acupuncture group and a control group. The patients undergoing randomization should be stratified according to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at baseline. Within the acupuncture group, different acupuncture protocols are administered to patients with flaccid paralysis or spastic paralysis based on the Ashworth Scale. Patients in the acupuncture group will also be treated with comprehensive rehabilitation therapy. The control group will be treated with comprehensive rehabilitation therapy only. The primary outcome measures are the Simplified Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Burden of Stroke Scale. Secondary outcome measures are the modified Rankin Scale, the modified Ashworth Scale and the Stroke Scale of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Outcome measures will be performed after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. The patients will be followed up after 6 months. The results of this study are expected to demonstrate that our standardized acupuncture protocol for treating and evaluating post-stroke hemiplegic patients will improve motor function and lessen the burden of post-stroke patients within the communities. This will provide the evidence to support

  8. A Comparison of the Relation of Depression, and Cognitive, Motor and Functional Deficits in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

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    Amin Ghaffari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim and background: One of the most important psychological disorders after stroke is depression, which leads to reduced quality of life, optimal rehabilitation failure, loss of cognitive tasks and decrease in the recovery process. In this research, relation between patterns of depression and cognitive, motor and function deficits in people with chronic stroke was studied. Methods and materials: In a pilot cross-sectional study, 40 patients with chronic stroke (more than 6 months were enrolled. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory, cognition (attention test TMT-A & B and Wechsler memory, motor (Motorcity index, basic activities of daily living (Barthel scale and instrumental activities of daily living (Lawton scale were evaluated. Results: The results of the study revealed a significant positive correlation between post stroke depression and verbal memory (r=0.440،P<.05, attention (r=0.615،P<.05, motor function(r-0.368،P<.05, independence in basic activities of daily living (r=0.781،P<.05 and instrumental activities of daily living (r=0.741, P<.05. Conclusion: According to the findings, further studies of factors affecting post stroke depression (PSD clinical and practical aspects are necessary. Cognitive rehabilitation programs with motor rehabilitation can decrease depression and gain independence in activities of daily living and more participation in society activities.

  9. Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the Modified Tardieu Scale and the Modified Ashworth Scale in hemiplegic patients with stroke.

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    Li, F; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2014-02-01

    The most commonly used tools for the assessment of spasticity are the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Tardieu Scale, but the results on the reliability of both scales keep equivocal. To evaluate the test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in hemiplegic patients with stroke. Cross-sectional study. Inpatients referred to a rehabilitation hospital. Fifty-one inpatients with hemiplegic stroke. MTS and MAS were collected from the affected elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors by: 1) two raters who were blinded to the results of the other assessment. 2) one rater one day apart. In the MAS measurement, the inter-rater and intra-rater Kappa values were 0.66 and 0.69 for the elbow flexors, 0.48 and 0.48 for the plantar flexors, respectively. In the angle measurement of the MTS, the inter-rater and intra-rater ICCs were between 0.58-0.89 for the R1 and R2, and between 0.62-0.70 for the R1-R2. The MAS provided moderate to substantial test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability in the spasticity/tone measurement. The agreement of MAS elbow flexors scores was higher than that of plantar flexors scores. The reliability of angle measurement in the MTS was insufficient. Further work should avoid observing error when taking advantage of angle difference on measuring spasticity.

  10. The associations between insomnia and health-related quality of life in rehabilitation units at 1month after stroke.

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    Kim, Won-Hyoung; Jung, Han-Young; Choi, Ha-Yoon; Park, Chan-Hyuk; Kim, Eun-Suk; Lee, Sook-Joung; Ko, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Joa, Kyung-Lim

    2017-05-01

    The principal objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between insomnia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the early stage of stroke rehabilitation. The subjects were 214 first-time stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit at one of three Korean hospitals. Within 7days after stroke, functions were evaluated using; the Berg Balance Scale, the Modified Barthel Index, the Mini Mental State Examination, the Frontal Assessment Battery, Screening Tests for Aphasia and Neurologic-Communication Disorders, and the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Insomnia, depression, anxiety, and HRQoL were investigated at one month after stroke. Insomnia was defined as presence of at least one of the four following; difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and non-restorative sleep. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form Health survey SF-8. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between insomnia and HRQoL. The prevalence of insomnia at one month after stroke was 59.5%. Patients with insomnia were more likely to be older and female and to have depression and anxiety. Patients with insomnia had poorer physical and mental HRQoL. By multivariate analyses, physical HRQoL was significantly associated with type of stroke, hypnotic usage, balancing function, and insomnia. Mental HRQoL was significantly associated with balancing function, depression, and insomnia. Insomnia was found to be negatively associated with physical and mental HRQoL in stroke patients during the early stage of rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Occurrence of Depressive Symptoms Among Older Adults after a Stroke in the Nursing Home Facility.

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    Kowalska, Joanna; Bojko, Ewa; Szczepańska-Gieracha, Joanna; Rymaszewska, Joanna; Rożek-Piechura, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of depressive symptoms among older adults after stroke in a nursing home (NH). The study was conducted in a NH and included 50 patients after stroke with a mean age of 74.62 (±8.2). The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Acceptance Illness Scale (AIS) and Barthel Index (BI) were used. Mean GDS was 7.60 (±2.75); 74% of patients had depressive symptoms. The study showed a significant relationship between GDS and marital status (p = .043). A negative correlations between GDS and MMSE (p = .029), GDS and BI (p = .049), and GDS and AIS (p stroke depends on their mental and functional status, degree of acceptance of illness, and marital status. Early detection of depressive symptoms in stroke patients allows rehabilitation nurses to optimize the therapeutic effects. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  12. Effects of Mirror Therapy Using a Tablet PC on Central Facial Paresis in Stroke Patients.

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    Kang, Jung-A; Chun, Min Ho; Choi, Su Jin; Chang, Min Cheol; Yi, You Gyoung

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of mirror therapy using a tablet PC for post-stroke central facial paresis. A prospective, randomized controlled study was performed. Twenty-one post-stroke patients were enrolled. All patients performed 15 minutes of orofacial exercise twice daily for 14 days. The mirror group (n=10) underwent mirror therapy using a tablet PC while exercising, whereas the control group (n=11) did not. All patients were evaluated using the Regional House-Brackmann Grading Scale (R-HBGS), and the length between the corner of the mouth and the ipsilateral earlobe during rest and smiling before and after therapy were measured bilaterally. We calculated facial movement by subtracting the smile length from resting length. Differences and ratios between bilateral sides of facial movement were evaluated as the final outcome measure. Baseline characteristics were similar for the two groups. There were no differences in the scores for the basal Modified Barthel Index, the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, R-HBGS, and bilateral differences and ratios of facial movements. The R-HBGS as well as the bilateral differences and ratios of facial movement showed significant improvement after therapy in both groups. The degree of improvement of facial movement was significantly larger in the mirror group than in the control group. Mirror therapy using a tablet PC might be an effective tool for treating central facial paresis after stroke.

  13. [Interpersonal psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for post-stroke depression. Feasibility and effectiveness].

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    Finkenzeller, W; Zobel, I; Rietz, S; Schramm, E; Berger, M

    2009-07-01

    Only few studies investigated the effectiveness of psychotherapy in post-stroke depression (PSD). The aim of this feasibility study was to compare interpersonal psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and their combination regarding depression and rehabilitation outcome. Post-stroke depression was found in 35% of 485 stroke patients examined. Seventy-four PSD patients were randomised to one of three treatment conditions. Severity of depression was measured by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The Barthel Index and a questionnaire for health-related quality of life were used as measurements of rehabilitation outcome. There were no significant differences between the three groups in patient mood or rehabilitation outcome. Concerning the severity of depression, quality of life, and social support, all patients showed benefits from antidepressive treatment. In addition a correlation was found between rehabilitation outcome and depression. In this feasibility study all antidepressive treatments were successfully implemented in the rehabilitation of post-stroke depressed patients. Combination therapy (interpersonal psychotherapy plus medication) was as effective as one of those elements alone. Because of the small sample size however, further randomized trials are required.

  14. Five-year outcome of a stroke cohort in Martinique, French West Indies: Etude Réalisée en Martinique et Centrée sur l'Incidence des Accidents vasculaires cérebraux, Part 2.

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    Chausson, Nicolas; Olindo, Stéphane; Cabre, Philippe; Saint-Vil, Martine; Smadja, Didier

    2010-04-01

    Limited information exists on stroke among black populations outside the United States and United Kingdom. Part 1 of the Etude Réalisée en Martinique et Centrée sur l'Incidence des Accidents vasculaires cérebraux (ERMANCIA) provided strong epidemiologic data on the incidence of first-ever stroke in a black Caribbean population and showed a 40% greater incidence of stroke in Martinique than in continental France. In ERMANCIA part 2, we evaluated the long-term outcomes of our cohort. Survivors of a first stroke from this prospective, community-based, stroke incidence study were reassessed at 5 years according to standardized procedures and criteria, including the modified Rankin scale, Barthel Index, Montgomery-Asberg Depression-Rating Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, treatment compliance, and blood pressure control. Of the 293 survivors of the original 580 (50.5%) patients who were still alive 5 years after stroke, 262 (89.4%) were assessed. Among these survivors, 66.4% were functionally independent and 43% were completely autonomous for activities of daily living, but 25.8% were depressed and 58.9% were cognitively impaired. Only 50 of 170 (29.4%) of the hypertensive patients achieved their target blood pressure. These results highlight the very poor blood pressure control and the very high rate of cognitive impairment in Martinican patients after stroke. As a consequence, a poststroke prevention network was established in Martinique.

  15. The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients.

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    van der Lee, J H; Beckerman, H; Lankhorst, G J; Bouter, L M

    2001-03-01

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort consisted of 13 men and 9 women, median age 58.5 years, median time since stroke 3.6 years. Responsiveness was defined as the sensitivity of an instrument to real change. Two baseline measurements were performed with a 2-week interval before the intervention, and a follow-up measurement after 2 weeks of intensive forced use treatment. The limits of agreement, according to the Bland-Altman method, were computed as a measure of the test-retest reliability. Two different measures of responsiveness were compared: (i) the number of patients who improved more than the upper limit of agreement during the intervention; (ii) the responsiveness ratio. The limits of agreement, designating the interval comprising 95% of the differences between two measurements in a stable individual, were -5.7 to 6.2 and -5.0 to 6.6 for the ARA test and the FMA scale, respectively. The possible sum scores range from 0 to 57 (ARA) and from 0 to 66 (FMA). The number of patients who improved more than the upper limit were 12 (54.5%) and 2 (9.1%); and the responsiveness ratios were 2.03 and 0.41 for the ARA test and the FMA scale, respectively. These results strongly suggest that the ARA test is more responsive to improvement in upper extremity function than the FMA scale in chronic stroke patients undergoing forced use treatment.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale in patients with stroke

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    Dong XF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-fang Dong,1 Yan-jin Liu,2 Ai-xia Wang,1 Pei-hua Lv1 1Neurology Department, 2Nursing Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: It has been reported that stroke has a higher incidence and mortality rate in the People’s Republic of China compared to the global average. These conditions can be managed by proper medication use, but ensuring medication adherence is challenging.Objective: To translate the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale into Chinese and test its validity and reliability in patients with stroke.Methods: Instrument performances were measured from January 15, 2015 to April 28, 2015 on a convenience sample of 400 patients with stroke recruited at four neurology departments of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Questionnaires included the Chinese versions of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale (C-SEAMS and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (C-GSE. Construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency, and test–retest reliability were measured.Results: Item analysis showed that item-to-total correlations were in the range of 0.362–0.672. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors (which accounted for 60.862% of total variance, with factor loading ranging from 0.534 to 0.756. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to support the results, with an acceptable fit (χ2=73.716; df=64; P<0.01; goodness-of-fit index =0.902; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.897; comparative fit index =0.865; root-mean-square error of approximation =0.058. The convergent validity of the C-SEAMS correlated well with the validated measure of the C-GSE in measuring self-efficacy (r=0.531, P<0.01. Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.826 to 0.915 and test–retest reliability (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r=0.642, P<0.01 were found.Conclusion: The C-SEAMS is a brief and

  17. Lower Barthel Index scores predict less prescription of pharmacological therapy in elderly patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Francesc; Fort, Isabel; Robles, Maria Jose; Rodriguez, Daniel; Regalado, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with receiving specific treatment (cholinesterase inhibitors or/and memantine) for Alzheimer disease (AD) in elderly patients. An observational study carried out in 289 consecutive outpatients aged >64 years with dementia. We collected data on specific AD therapy, sociodemographic variables, Barthel Index (BI), Lawton and Brody Index (LI), Mini Mental State Examination, Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), Charlson Index and the total number of drugs chronically prescribed. Patients receiving specific therapy for dementia were compared with the rest. Two hundred and thirty-three (80.6%) patients were receiving specific treatment for dementia, with 197 (84.5%) receiving monotherapy and the rest (15.4%) combined therapy. The bivariate analysis showed that age, marital status, place of residence, BI and LI, cognitive status and disease severity (GDS) were factors associated with receiving specific dementia therapy. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that a lower BI (beta = -0.25; odds ratio 0.976, 95% confidence interval = 0.966-0.986; p < 0.0001) was the only factor independently associated with not receiving specific therapy for AD. Of the possible factors related to elderly patients receiving specific therapy for AD, a poor BI score was the most important factor associated with not receiving treatment. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Adaptation and validation of stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39 scale to Hindi

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    Ishita H Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a major detriment to the quality of life (QOL in its victims. Several functional limitations following stroke contribute to the denigrated QOL in this population. Aphasia, a disturbance in the comprehension, processing, and/or expression of language, is a common consequence of stroke. Yet, in most Indian languages, including the national language (Hindi, there are no published tools to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. Objective: The current study was carried out to adapt and validate a well-known tool to measure the QOL (i.e., Stroke-Aphasia Quality of Life-39; SAQOL-39 to Hindi. Materials and Methods: We presented the original (English version of the SAQOL-39 to a group of six Hindi-speaking Speech Language Pathologists hailing from the central and northern regions of India to examine the sociocultural suitability of items and indicate modifications, if any. The linguistic adaptation was performed through a forward-backward translation scheme. The socioculturally and linguistically adapted (to Hindi version was then administered on a group of 84 Hindi-speaking persons with aphasia to examine the acceptability, test-retest reliability as well as the internal consistency of the instrument. Results: The SAQOL-39 in Hindi exhibited high test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.9 as well as acceptability with minimal missing data. This instrument exhibited high internal consistency (Chronbach′s ∝ = 0.98 as well as the both item-to-total and inter-domain correlations. Conclusions: The socioculturally and linguistically adapted Hindi version of SAQOL-39 is a robust tool to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. It may serve as an essential tool to measure the QOL in this population for both clinical and research purposes.

  19. Motor function recovery of people of mature years after stroke by means of physical rehabilitation

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    T.E. Khristova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of applying the complex technology of physical rehabilitation are described for patients with cerebral ischemic stroke during the phase of in-patient rehabilitation. The experiment involved 36 male patients aged 45-50 years. The rehabilitation program included treatment by changing position, complex of therapeutic gymnastics (based on sanogenetic approach to the problem of motor function recovery in accordance with the stages of postnatal ontogenesis, magnetic therapy, thermotherapy of large joints of the affected extremities. Findings show that the use of the mentioned methods of treatment leads to increase of the range of motion in the hip and shoulder joints: passive of 15-20%, and active of 10-30%, muscle strength of 10-30%, improvement of motor activity indices (scale of Bobaht and quality of life (scale of Barthel.

  20. Gait outcome following outpatient physiotherapy based on the Bobath concept in people post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Sheila; Ashburn, Ann; Baxter, David

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the gait cycle of patients with hemiplegia before and after a period of outpatient physiotherapy based on the Bobath concept. Nine patients, at least 6 weeks post stroke and recently discharged from a stroke unit, were measured before and after a period of outpatient physiotherapy (mean duration = 17.4 weeks). Therapy was documented using a treatment checklist for each patient. The primary outcome measures were a number of gait variables related to the therapists' treatment hypothesis, recorded during the gait cycle using the CODA motion analysis system. Other secondary outcome measures were the Motor Assessment Scale, Modified Ashworth Scale, subtests of the Sodring Motor Evaluation Scale, the Step test, a 10-m walk test, the Barthel Index and the London Handicap Score. Recovery of more normal gait patterns in the gait cycle (using motion analysis) did not occur. Significant changes in temporal parameters (loading response, single support time) for both legs, in one kinematic (dorsiflexion during stance) and one kinetic variable on the unaffected side (hip flexor moment), and most of the clinical measures of impairment, activity and participation (with the exception of the Modified Ashworth Scale and the 10-m walk) were noted. Study findings did not support the hypothesis that the Bobath approach restored more normal movement patterns to the gait cycle. Further research is required to investigate the treatment techniques that are effective at improving walking ability in people after stroke.

  1. Reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the Stroke Impact Scale 2.0 (SIS 2.0).

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    Gonçalves, Rui Soles; Gil, João Neves; Cavalheiro, Luís Manuel; Costa, Rui Dias; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2012-05-01

    To test the reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the Stroke Impact Scale 2.0 (SIS 2.0). Two samples (N = 448 and N = 50) of stroke patients attending physical therapy were evaluated. The Portuguese versions of the SIS 2.0 and Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), and a set of individual patient characteristics were the measures used. Reliability was good with Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranging from 0.83 to 0.96, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between 0.70 and 0.95 for the SIS 2.0 domains. Construct validity was supported by 6 predefined hypotheses involving expected correlations between SIS 2.0 domains, CMSA dimensions and age. An additional predefined hypothesis was also confirmed, with subjects without complications during hospitalization obtaining significantly higher scores in 7 of the 8 SIS 2.0 domains (P SIS 2.0 evidenced suitable psychometric characteristics in terms of reliability and validity.

  2. Neurophysiological examination of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) in patients with wrist flexor spasticity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, S; Ansari, N N; Mansouri, K; Asgari, A; Olyaei, G R; Kazemnejad, A

    2008-01-01

    The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) is a clinical test for the measurement of spasticity. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of the MMAS in patients with wrist flexor spasticity after stroke. 27 adult patients (14 women and 13 men) with first ever stroke resulting in hemiplegia with a mean (SD, range) age of 57.9 (11.6, 37-75) were included in the study. The outcome measures were the MMAS for the clinical assessment of spasticity, the Hslope/Mslope (Hslp/Mslp), and the H(max)/M(max) ratio for the neurophysiological evaluation. The mean of the Hslp/Mslp and the H(max)/M(max) were higher in patients with worse MMAS grades but the differences were not statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the MMAS scores and Hslp/Mslp ratio as the new index of alpha motoneurone excitability or traditional index of H(max)/M(max) ratio (r = 0.39, p = 0.04). It is concluded that the MMAS to be a valid measure of spasticity after stroke.

  3. Can we derive an 'exchange rate' between descriptive and preference-based outcome measures for stroke? Results from the transfer to utility (TTU) technique.

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    Mortimer, Duncan; Segal, Leonie; Sturm, Jonathan

    2009-04-17

    -based Barthel algorithm were neither clinically nor statistically significant when 'low severity' SF-36 transformations were used to predict AQoL scores for patients in the NIHSS = 0 and NIHSS = 1-5 subgroups and when 'moderate to severe severity' transformations were used to predict AQoL scores for patients in the NIHSS > or = 6 subgroup. In contrast, the difference between mean predicted and mean observed AQoL scores from the NIHSS algorithms and from the 'low severity' Barthel algorithms reached levels that could mask minimally important differences on the AQoL scale. While our NIHSS to AQoL transformations proved unsuitable for most applications, our findings demonstrate that stroke-relevant outcome measures such as the SF-36 and Barthel Index can be adequately transformed to preference-based measures for the purposes of economic evaluation.

  4. Urinary incontinence in Alzheimer's disease is associated with Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes and Barthel Activities of Daily Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hae Ri; Park, Moon Ho; Cho, Sung Tae; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Suyeol; Kim, Khae Hawn; Choi, Jong Bo

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are common in the elderly population and have increased rapidly in recent decades. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of UI and determine the neuropsychological characteristics of patients with AD and UI. A total of 464 patients with probable AD were recruited, and the prevalence and type of UI were evaluated. Neuropsychological evaluation was assessed using the Mini-Mental Status Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating, Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes, Global Deterioration Scale, Barthel Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The prevalence of UI in patients with AD was 24.8% (men 29.6%, women 23.0%). The two most common types of UI were urge incontinence (44.3%) and functional incontinence (25.3%). UI in patients with Alzheimer's disease was statistically significantly associated with Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.21-2.01) and Barthel Activities of Daily Living (OR 1.34, 95%CI 1.22-1.47) after adjustment for different covariates. UI commonly occurred in patients with AD. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes and Barthel Activities of Daily Living could be potential predictors for UI in patients with AD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Clinical application of ICF key codes to evaluate patients with dysphagia following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Zhang, Chang-Jie; Shi, Jie; Deng, Jinggui; Lan, Chun-Na

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to identify and evaluate the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) key codes for dysphagia in stroke patients. Thirty patients with dysphagia after stroke were enrolled in our study. To evaluate the ICF dysphagia scale, 6 scales were used as comparisons, namely the Barthel Index (BI), Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test (RSST), Kubota Water Swallowing Test (KWST), Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Multiple regression analysis was performed to quantitate the relationship between the ICF scale and the other 7 scales. In addition, 60 ICF scales were analyzed by the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. A total of 21 ICF codes were identified, which were closely related with the other scales. These included 13 codes from Body Function, 1 from Body Structure, 3 from Activities and Participation, and 4 from Environmental Factors. A topographic network map with 30 ICF key codes was also generated to visualize their relationships. The number of ICF codes identified is in line with other well-established evaluation methods. The network topographic map generated here could be used as an instruction tool in future evaluations. We also found that attention functions and biting were critical codes of these scales, and could be used as treatment targets.

  6. Psychometric comparisons of 2 versions of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale and 2 versions of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Lee, Su; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong

    2008-01-01

    To provide empirical justification for selecting motor scales for stroke patients, the authors compared the psychometric properties (validity, responsiveness, test-retest reliability, and smallest real difference [SRD]) of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale (FM), the simplified FM (S-FM), the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement instrument (STREAM), and the simplified STREAM (S-STREAM). For the validity and responsiveness study, 50 inpatients were assessed with the FM and the STREAM at admission and discharge to a rehabilitation department. The scores of the S-FM and the S-STREAM were retrieved from their corresponding scales. For the test-retest reliability study, a therapist administered both scales on a different sample of 60 chronic patients on 2 occasions. Only the S-STREAM had no notable floor or ceiling effects at admission and discharge. The 4 motor scales had good concurrent validity (rho >or= .91) and satisfactory predictive validity (rho = .72-.77). The scales showed responsiveness (effect size d >or= 0.34; standardized response mean >or= 0.95; P scales were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients >or= .96). The SRD of the 4 scales was 10% of their corresponding highest score, indicating acceptable level of measurement error. The upper extremity and the lower extremity subscales of the 4 showed similar results. The 4 motor scales showed acceptable levels of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in stroke patients. The S-STREAM is recommended because it is short, responsive to change, and able to discriminate patients with severe or mild stroke.

  7. Acute-phase predictors of 6-month functional outcome in Italian stroke patients eligible for In-Hospital Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Marco; Fugazzaro, Stefania; Agosti, Maurizio; Sola, Carlotta; Di Carlo, Antonio; Cecconi, Lorenzo; Ferro, Salvatore

    2018-01-23

    to assess early post-stroke prognostic factors in patients admitted for post-acute phase rehabilitation. a one-year multicenter prospective project was conducted in four Italian regions on 352 patients who were hospitalized after a first stroke and were eligible for post-acute rehabilitation. Clinical data were collected in the Stroke or Acute Care Units (acute phase), then in Rehabilitation Units (post-acute phase) and, subsequently, after a 6-month post-stroke period (follow-up). Clinical outcome measures were represented using the Barthel Index (BI) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the most important prognostic index. mRS score, minor neurologic impairment and early out-of-bed mobilization (within 2 days after the stroke) proved to be important factors related to a better recovery according to BI (power of prediction = 37%). Similarly, age, pre-morbid mRS score and early out-of-bed mobilization were seen to be significant factors in achieving better overall participation and activity according to the mRS (power of prediction = 48%). BI at admission and certain comorbidities were also significant prognostic factors correlated with a better outcome. according to the BI and mRS, early mobilization is an early predictor of favorable outcome.

  8. Evaluation of a Home-Based Physical Therapy Program in Ischemic Stroke Patients

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    Elena Sîrbu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation therapy should begin in the acute-care hospital as soon as possible after the stroke and continued after discharging patients from the hospital to their home environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a home-based physical therapy program in the improvement of motor function, balance and activities of daily living. Material and methods. Fourteen ischemic first stroke patients (8 women and 6 men, aged from 49 to 84 (mean 69 were recruited from the Neurology Department of the Emergency County Hospital Timişoara. After hospital discharge, they were assigned to a 12-week home physical therapy program in order to improve motor function, balance and activities of daily living (ADL. All patients were assessed before and after the training program with the following tests: (1 Barthel index; (2 Berg Balance Scale; (3 Motricity index; (4 Functional Independence Measure. Results. After 12 weeks of physical therapy, the motricity index showed a significant improvement in the study group which means a better motor outcome (p= 0,08. The mean score of the Barthel index was significantly increased (p=0.02, showing improvement in ADL ability. There was a benefit in reducing disability suggesting a better functional capacity and a higher level of independence (p= 0.03. Finally, our results showed that hemiplegic patients presented a better balance function after completing the rehabilitation program (p= 0,05.Conclusions.The intervention of a 12-week home physical therapy program in stroke survivors provided significantly better outcomes in motor function, balance function and activities of daily living.

  9. Community Integration and Quality of Life in Aphasia after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejin; Lee, Yuna; Choi, Hyunsoo; Pyun, Sung-Bom

    2015-11-01

    To examine community integration and contributing factors in people with aphasia (PWA) following stroke and to investigate the relationship between community integration and quality of life (QOL). Thirty PWA and 42 age-and education-matched control subjects were involved. Main variables were as follows: socioeconomic status, mobility, and activity of daily living (ADL) (Modified Barthel Index), language function [Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test (FAST)], depression [Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)], Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) and Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39). Differences between aphasia and control groups and factors affecting community integration and QOL were analyzed. Home and social integration and productive activity were significantly decreased in the aphasia group compared to the control group; 8.5 and 18.3 points in total CIQ score, respectively. Amount of time spent outside the home and frequency of social contact were also significantly reduced in the aphasia group. Total mean score on the SAQOL-39 was 2.75±0.80 points and was significantly correlated with economic status, gait performance, ADL, depressive mood, and social domain score on the CIQ. Depression score measured by GDS was the single most important factor for the prediction of QOL, but the FAST score was significantly correlated only with the communication domain of the SAQOL-39. Community activities of PWA were very limited, and depression was highly associated with decreased community integration and QOL. Enhancing social participation and reducing emotional distress should be emphasized for rehabilitation of PWA.

  10. Development and validation of the first robotic scale for the clinical assessment of upper extremity motor impairments in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Omer; Geva, Diklah; Yoeli, Doron; Kerzhner, Marina; Mauritz, Karl-Heinz

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to develop and validate the first robotic-based instrument and procedure for assessing upper extremity motor impairments in patients with stroke and to test its discriminative power. The ReoGo robotic rehabilitation platform was used to design a novel, upper limb functionality assessment tool, the Reo Scale Assessment (RSA). We used the RSA to evaluate 100 patients with stroke. The RSA items were tested for internal consistency and submitted to factor analysis. The Fugl-Meyer (FM) motor test, the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to examine the validity of the RSA. RSA scores were compared and correlated with the scores of the 3 scales. The discriminative power of the RSA was tested against the FM impairment levels by analysis of variance. The total RSA score correlated closely with the upper extremity scores of the FM, WMFT, and ARAT (r = 0.95, 0.93, and 0.90, respectively). The RSA was able to discriminate between low, moderate, and high functioning patients (86% agreement with FM). Principal component analysis revealed that the RSA coefficients loaded on 3 tested components: proximal, distal, and force. Our results provide strong evidence that the validity of the RSA is comparable with that of the FM, WMFT, and ARAT. The objective measuring and scoring systems of the robotic RSA make it an efficient tool for assessing motor function of stroke patients in clinical and research settings. Additional studies are needed to test the reliability and sensitivity of the RSA.

  11. Measuring Scaling Effects in Small Two-Stroke Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-20

    manufacturer. Being two-stroke engines, the crankcases are void of an oil sump, so needle roller bearings are used on both ends of the connecting...This energy is dispersed among several different paths including to the engine’s cooling medium, surface friction (piston- cylinder, bearings , etc...linked to the dynamometer driveshaft with a one-way bearing in order to start the engine and not dissipate power unnecessarily during testing. The

  12. The correlation between Modified Ashworth Scale scores and the new index of alpha motoneurones excitability in post-stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, S; Ansari, N N; Mansouri, K; Olyaei, G R; Asgari, A; Kazemnejad, A

    2008-03-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is currently a widely used clinical scale to evaluate muscle spasticity. However, it lacks reliability and the validity, of the MAS as a clinical measure of muscle spasticity has been challenged. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of the MAS in patients with wrist flexor spasticity after stroke by using the Hslope/Mslope (Hslp/Mslp) ratio as the new index of alpha motoneuron excitability. Twenty-seven adult patients (14 women and 13 men) with first ever stroke resulting in hemiplegia with a mean (SD, range) age of 57.9 (11.6, 37-75) were included in the study. The main outcome measures were the MAS for the clinical assessment of spasticity, and the Hslp/Mslp for the neurophysiological evaluation. There was not a significant correlation between the MAS scores and Hslp/Mslp ratio (r = 0.38, p > 0.05). The mean of the Hslp/Mslp did not show a hierarchical increase with the MAS scores. The findings indicate that the MAS is not a valid and ordinal level measure of muscle spasticity.

  13. Development and validation of a short form of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Hsueh, I-Ping; Chou, Yeh-Tai; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Kwakkel, Gert

    2007-11-01

    The 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale (FM) is commonly used in outcome studies. However, the lengthy administration time of the FM keeps it from being widely accepted for routine clinical use. We aimed to develop a short form of the FM (the S-FM) with sound psychometric properties for stroke patients. The FM was administered to 279 patients. It was then simplified based on expert opinions and the results of Rasch analysis. The psychometric properties (including Rasch reliability, concurrent validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness) of the S-FM were examined and were compared with those of the FM. The concurrent validity and responsiveness of the S-FM were further validated in a sample from the Netherlands. We selected 6 items for each subscale to construct a 12-item S-FM. The S-FM demonstrated high Rasch reliability, high concurrent validity with the original scale, moderate responsiveness, and moderate predictive validity with the comprehensive activities of daily living function. The S-FM also showed sufficient concurrent validity and responsiveness on the Dutch sample. Our results provide strong evidence that the psychometric properties of the S-FM are comparable with those of the FM. The S-FM contains only 12 items, making it a very efficient measure for assessing the motor function of stroke patients in both clinical and research settings.

  14. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Rebecca; Grant, Ian; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age), we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage), determining the optimum codes for case identification. Methods We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2). To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV) and—where available—on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV). Results 37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6–97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes) consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources. Conclusions Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90%) for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should

  15. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Woodfield

    Full Text Available Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age, we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, determining the optimum codes for case identification.We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2. To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV and-where available-on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV.37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6-97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources.Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90% for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should improve accuracy in large

  16. Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinases in Patients With Stroke During Intensive Rehabilitation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feifei; Rodriguez, Susana; Buxo, Xavi; Morancho, Anna; Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Carrera, Ana; Bustamante, Alejandro; Giralt, Dolors; Montaner, Joan; Martinez, Carmen; Bori, Immaculada; Rosell, Anna

    2016-11-01

    To study plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as potential markers of recovery during intensive rehabilitation therapy (IRT) after stroke. Prospective and descriptive 3-month follow-up study. Rehabilitation unit and research center. Patients with first-ever ischemic stroke (n=15) enrolled to IRT (≥3h/d and 5d/wk) and healthy volunteers (n=15) (N=30). Not applicable. The primary outcome was to measure plasma MMP3, MMP12, and MMP13 levels and evaluate potential associations with motor/functional scales using a battery of tests (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin scale, Barthel Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Functional Ambulation Categories, Medical Research Council scale, Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory, and the 10-m walk test) before IRT and at 1- and 3-month follow-ups. The secondary outcome was to evaluate the use of these MMPs as biomarkers as predictors of patient's outcome. MMP levels remained stable during the study period and were similar to those in the healthy volunteer group. However, baseline MMP12 and MMP13 levels were strongly associated with stroke severity and were found to be elevated in those patients with the poorest outcomes. Interestingly, plasma MMP3 was independent of baseline stroke characteristics but was found to be increased in patients with better motor/functional recovery and in patients with larger improvements during rehabilitation. MMPs might act as biologic markers of recovery during rehabilitation therapy related to their roles in both injury and tissue remodeling. Future confirmatory investigations in multicenter studies are warranted by our data. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of additional core stability exercises on improving dynamic sitting balance and trunk control for subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda Mª; Hernández-Valiño, Montserrat; Urrútia Cuchí, Gerard

    2016-10-01

    To examine the effect of core stability exercises on trunk control, dynamic sitting and standing balance, gait, and activities of daily living in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation hospital in two centres. Eighty patients (mean of 23.25 (±16.7) days post-stroke) were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. Both groups underwent conventional therapy for five days/week for five weeks and the experimental group performed core stability exercises for 15 min/day. The patients were assessed before and after intervention. The Trunk Impairment Scale (Spanish-Version) and Function in Sitting Test were used to measure the primary outcome of dynamic sitting balance. Secondary outcome measures were standing balance and gait as evaluated via Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Test, Brunel Balance Assessment, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (Spanish-Version), and activities of daily living using Barthel Index. The experimental group showed statistically significant differences for all of the total scale scores (PCore stability exercises in addition to conventional therapy improves trunk control, dynamic sitting balance, standing balance, gait and activities of daily living in subacute post-stroke patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) on post-stroke spasticity: a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Jun; Hou, Ying; Jiang, Bao-Yin; Pan, Hua-Fei; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Da-Yong; Guo, Hai-Ying; Zhu, Yi; Cheng, Jie

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) for patients with post-stroke spasticity. A prospective, multicenter, blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention trial. A total of 90 patients with post-stroke spasticity were randomly assigned to the experimental (Tui Na therapy) group ( n = 45) or control (placebo Tui Na therapy) group ( n = 45). Participants in the experimental group received Tui Na therapy, while those in the control group received placebo-Tai Na (gentle rubbing) for 20-25 minutes per limb, once per day, five days per week for a total of four weeks. All participants in both groups received conventional rehabilitation. The Modified Ashworth Scale, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and the Modified Barthel Index were used to assess the severity of spasticity, motor function of limbs and activities of daily living, respectively. Assessments were performed at baseline, at four weeks and at three months. Tui Na group had a significantly greater reduction in Modified Ashworth Scale in only four muscle groups than the control did (elbow flexors, P = 0.026; wrist flexors, P = 0.005; knee flexors, P = 0.023; knee extensors, P = 0.017). Improvements were sustained at three months follow-up. There was no significant difference between the two groups in Fugl-Meyer Assessment ( P = 0.503) and Modified Barthel Index ( P = 0.544). No adverse reaction was recorded in any of the cases mentioned at all study sites. Tui Na might be a safe and effective treatment to reduce post-stroke spasticity of several muscle groups.

  19. Psychometric comparisons of four disease-specific health-related quality of life measures for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Yeh; Ou, Yu-Chih; Chiang, Tsuey-Ru

    2015-08-01

    To examine psychometric properties of four stroke-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures, including original Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (12-domain SSQoL), modified 8-domain SSQoL, Stroke Impact Scale (SIS 3.0), and modified SIS-16 focused on physical domains. Prospective repeated measures study conducted in rehabilitation and wards in hospitals. Study cohort was recruited with 263 patients in the first administration and 121 in the second administration, an average of two weeks later. To investigate discriminant validity, the same number of patients (i.e., 52) was grouped for each of 3 levels of stroke severity. Outcome measures, including National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, and Barthel Index. Patients completed HRQoL self-reports. Domains of four measures showed (1) good reliability, except 12-domainSSQoL family roles (Cronbach's α = 0.68) and personality domains (Cronbach's α = 0.65) and SIS 3.0 social participation (ICC=0.67) domain; (2) acceptable precision, except 12-domain SSQoL family role domain and SIS 3.0 social participation domain; (3) good convergent validity, except 12-domain SSQoL/8-domain SSQoL vision domain (r = 0.19), (4) good discriminant validity, except 12-domain SSQoL and 8-domain SSQoL thinking domains (P = 0.365); and (5) acceptable floor effects and strong ceiling effects. The 12-domain SSQoL and 8-domain SSQoL met scaling assumptions better than SIS 3.0 and SIS-16. Four measures showed acceptable psychometric properties with some domains slightly less satisfactory. Overall, use of 8-domain SSQoL and SIS 3.0 are feasible for clinical practice to monitor HRQoL of stroke survivors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. The Stroke Impact Scale: validation in a UK setting and development of a SIS short form and SIS index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Crispin; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Crocker, Helen; Peters, Michele

    2013-09-01

    The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) covers 8 dimensions and a composite disability score. This study evaluates the SIS in the UK context, and develops a single index and an 8-item short form. Patients with a diagnosis of stroke were recruited through general practices in London and the North-West of England. Patients completed the SIS and the EQ-5D. Internal consistency of the SIS dimensions and the disability score ranged from α 0.86 to 0.95. Complete data were available on 73 questionnaires (48.34%). Factor analysis suggested the 8 domains could be aggregated into a single index. A short-form SIS (SF-SIS) index was created by summing 1 item per dimension. Selected items were those that most highly correlated with their respective domain score (ρ ranged from 0.77-0.94, PSIS index scores were highly correlated with those gained from the parent form (ρ=0.98; PSIS index and SF-SIS index with the EQ-5D was identical (ρ=0.83; PSIS, or relevant items on the SF-SIS, were highly correlated (ρ=0.97; PSIS covers aspects of health, which are of importance to stroke patients, and the dimensions were found to have high levels of internal consistency in the UK context. The amount of incomplete data suggests that the length of the questionnaire may present a substantial patient burden. In comparison to the parent form the SF-SIS can accurately provide the disability score and overall index score with considerable brevity.

  1. Associations between different measures of anticholinergic drug exposure and Barthel Index in older hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, Clare V; Soiza, Roy L; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2013-12-01

    To compare associations between four measures of anticholinergic exposure (anticholinergic risk scale, ARS; anticholinergic drug burden, DBAC; number and use versus no use of anticholinergic drugs), Barthel Index (BI, physical function) and Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT, cognitive function) on admission in older hospitalized patients. Prospective observational study of a consecutive series of 271 older patients (age 83 ± 7 years) from community-dwelling and institutionalized settings, admitted to an acute geriatric admission unit between 28 September 2011 and 18 December 2011. The main outcome measures were BI quartiles (primary outcome) and AMT (secondary outcome) on admission. Anticholinergic prevalence was 47%. Multinomial logistic regression showed higher DBAC was associated with a greater risk of being in the lower BI quartiles versus highest BI quartile (Q4). This risk was significant for Q3 (p = 0.04) and Q2 (p = 0.02) but not for Q1 (p = 0.06). A greater number of anticholinergic drugs was associated with a higher risk of being in Q2 (p = 0.02). This risk was not significant for either Q3 (p = 0.10) or Q1 (p = 0.06). No significant associations were observed either with use of anticholinergic medication or with ARS and BI quartiles. AMT did not show independent associations with any of the four measures of anticholinergic exposure. In older hospitalized patients, DBAC and some crude measures of anticholinergic exposure, but not ARS, showed independent associations with lower BI, but not AMT. These results highlight differences between various measures of anticholinergic drug exposure when studying their associations with functional status.

  2. Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conductive Education for stroke survivors has shown promise but randomised evidence is unavailable. This study assessed the feasibility of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate efficacy. Methods. Adult stroke survivors were recruited through local community notices. Those completing the baseline assessment were randomised using an online program and group allocation was independent. Intervention group participants received 10 weekly 1.5-hour sessions of Conductive Education at the National Institute of Conductive Education in Birmingham, UK. The control group participants attended two group meetings. The study evaluated the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, retention of participants, and appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Independent assessments included the Barthel Index, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. Eighty-two patients were enrolled; 77 completed the baseline assessment (46 men, mean age 62.1 yrs. and were randomised. 70 commenced the intervention (n=37 or an equivalent waiting period (n=33. 32/37 completed the 10-week training and 32/33 the waiting period. There were no missing items from completed questionnaires and no adverse events. Discussion. Recruitment, intervention, and assessment methods worked well. Transport issues for intervention and assessment appointments require review. Conclusion. A definitive trial is feasible. This trial is registered with ISRCTN84064492.

  3. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Stroke

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    Ashu Bhasin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell transplantation is a ‘hype and hope’ in the current scenario. It is in the early stage of development with promises to restore function in chronic diseases. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in stroke patients has shown significant improvement by reducing clinical and functional deficits. They are feasible and multipotent and have homing characteristics. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous MSC transplantation in patients with chronic stroke using clinical scores and functional imaging (blood oxygen level-dependent and diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke patients were recruited; inclusion criteria were stroke lasting 3 months to 1 year, motor strength of hand muscles of at least 2, and NIHSS of 4–15, and patients had to be conscious and able to comprehend. Fugl Meyer (FM, modified Barthel index (mBI, MRC, Ashworth tone grade scale scores and functional imaging scans were assessed at baseline, and after 8 and 24 weeks. Bone marrow was aspirated under aseptic conditions and expansion of MSC took 3 weeks with animal serum-free media (Stem Pro SFM. Six patients were administered a mean of 50–60 × 106 cells i.v. followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Six patients served as controls. This was a non-randomized experimental controlled trial. Results: Clinical and radiological scanning was normal for the stem cell group patients. There was no mortality or cell-related adverse reaction. The laboratory tests on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 were also normal in the MSC group till the last follow-up. The FM and mBI showed a modest increase in the stem cell group compared to controls. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4 and BA 6 after stem cell infusion compared to controls, indicating neural plasticity. Conclusion: MSC therapy aiming to restore function in stroke is safe and feasible. Further randomized controlled trials are needed

  4. Rehabilitation-triggered cortical plasticity after stroke: in vivo imaging at multiple scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Conti, Emilia; Lai, Stefano; Spalletti, Cristina; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Alia, Claudia; Panarese, Alessandro; Sacconi, Leonardo; Micera, Silvestro; Caleo, Matteo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2017-02-01

    Neurorehabilitation protocols based on the use of robotic devices provide a highly repeatable therapy and have recently shown promising clinical results. Little is known about how rehabilitation molds the brain to promote motor recovery of the affected limb. We used a custom-made robotic platform that provides quantitative assessment of forelimb function in a retraction test. Complementary imaging techniques allowed us to access to the multiple facets of robotic rehabilitation-induced cortical plasticity after unilateral photothrombotic stroke in mice Primary Motor Cortex (Caudal Forelimb Area - CFA). First, we analyzed structural features of vasculature and dendritic reshaping in the peri-infarct area with two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Longitudinal analysis of dendritic branches and spines of pyramidal neurons suggests that robotic rehabilitation promotes the stabilization of peri-infarct cortical excitatory circuits, which is not accompanied by consistent vascular reorganization towards pre-stroke conditions. To investigate if this structural stabilization was linked to functional remapping, we performed mesoscale wide-field imaging on GCaMP6 mice while performing the motor task on the robotic platform. We revealed temporal and spatial features of the motor-triggered cortical activation, shining new light on rehabilitation-induced functional remapping of the ipsilesional cortex. Finally, by using an all-optical approach that combines optogenetic activation of the contralesional hemisphere and wide-field functional imaging of peri-infarct area, we dissected the effect of robotic rehabilitation on inter-hemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity.

  5. Translation and cultural validation of clinical observational scales - the Fugl-Meyer assessment for post stroke sensorimotor function in Colombian Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Nubia E; Forero, Sandra M; Galeano, Claudia P; Hernández, Edgar D; Landinez, Nancy S; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Alt Murphy, Margit

    2018-04-24

    Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) is the most widely used and recommended clinical scale for evaluation of sensorimotor impairment post stroke, but an official Spanish version is not available today. This study aimed to establish methodological structure for translation and cultural adaptation process and perform a transcultural validation of the upper and lower extremity FMA to Colombian Spanish. Procedures included forward and backward translation, step-wise reviewing by bilingual and professional experts to ensure conceptual and semantic equivalence. Validation included a pilot evaluation of item-level agreement on 10 individuals with stroke at the Central Military Hospital of Colombia. Comprehensive step-wise procedure for transcultural validation was established. Low agreement (less than 70%) was detected for items assessing arm movements within synergies and for coordination/speed subscale. All points of disagreement were systematically reviewed and agreed upon when drafting the final version of the Spanish FMA. Use of FMA will allow unified description of stroke severity and motor recovery in Spanish speaking countries. This will open up possibility to compare stroke and rehabilitation outcomes with other countries and regions world-wide. Comprehensive methodological procedures provided can facilitate introduction of well-established clinical scales in other languages. Implications for Rehabilitation The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) of upper and lower extremity is the most used and recommended clinical scale for evaluation of sensorimotor impairment after stroke. The Spanish version of FMA, validated in this study, is now first time available for use in research and clinical practice. Use of FMA will allow unified description of stroke severity and motor recovery in Spanish speaking countries, which in turn opens up possibility to compare stroke and rehabilitation outcomes with other countries and regions world-wide.

  6. The reliability and sensitivity of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in an uncontrolled setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian V Specogna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS is commonly used to measure neurologic function and guide treatment after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH in routine stroke clinics. We evaluated its reliability and sensitivity to detect change with consecutive and unique rater combinations in a real-world setting. METHODS: Conservative measures of interrater reliability (unweighted Kappa (κ, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC1,1 and sensitivity to detect change (Minimal Detectable Difference (MDD were estimated. Sixty-one repeated ratings were completed within 1 week after ICH by physicians and nurses with no investigator intervention. RESULTS: Reliability (consistency of the NIHSS total score was good for both physicians vs. nurses and nurses vs. nurses (ICC=0.78, 95%CI: 0.58-0.89 and ICC=0.75, 95%CI: 0.55-0.87 respectively in this scenario. Reliability (agreement of items 1C and 9 were excellent (κ>=0.61 for both rater comparisons, however, reliability was poor to fair on most remaining items (κ:0.01-0.60, with item 11 being completely unreliable in this scenario (κ=10 points need to be observed for clinicians to be confident that real changes had occurred within 1 week after ICH.

  7. Assessment of the Effects of Rehabilitation on Balance Impairment in Patients After Ischemic Stroke According to Selected Tests and Scales

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    Jaworska Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral stroke is one of the most important issues for modern medicine. Despite the fact that numerous activities have been undertaken for the purpose of raising awareness and significance of prevention, this condition still remains one of the main reasons behind disability. The objective of the work was to assess the effects of the type of therapy, age and period from the incident occurrence, on the progress of rehabilitation of imbalance and body stability observed in a group of researched patients, on the basis of results obtained according to the Berg Balance Scale, tandem balance test, Kwolek’s loading symmetry index and Timed Up and Go test. The test group comprised of 55 post-stroke patients. The group consisted of 29 women (52.73% and 26 men (47.27%. The average age of the subjects was 61.02 years (age range between 33-85 years. A number of the patients were subjected to rehabilitation with the use of classic kinesitherapy, whereas the remaining group underwent rehabilitation based on the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation method (PNF.

  8. The Additive Effects of Core Muscle Strengthening and Trunk NMES on Trunk Balance in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Jae; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Dae Yul; Yi, Jin Hwa; Kim, Won; Hong, Jayoung

    2016-02-01

    To investigate an additive effect of core muscle strengthening (CMS) and trunk neuromuscular electrical stimulation (tNEMS) on trunk balance in stroke patients. Thirty patients with acute or subacute stroke who were unable to maintain static sitting balance for >5 minutes were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups, i.e., patients in the CMS (n=10) group received additional CMS program; the tNMES group (n=10) received additional tNMES over the posterior back muscles; and the combination (CMS and tNMES) group (n=10) received both treatments. Each additional treatment was performed 3 times per week for 20 minutes per day over 3 weeks. Korean version of Berg Balance Scale (K-BBS), total score of postural assessment scale for stroke patients (PASS), Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) were evaluated before and after 3 weeks of therapeutic intervention. All 3 groups showed improvements in K-BBS, PASS, TIS, and K-MBI after therapeutic interventions, with some differences. The combination group showed more improvements in K-BBS and the dynamic sitting balance of TIS, as compared to the CMS group; and more improvement in K-BBS, as compared to the tNMES group. The results indicated an additive effect of CMS and tNMES on the recovery of trunk balance in patients with acute or subacute stroke who have poor sitting balance. Simultaneous application of CMS and tNMES should be considered when designing a rehabilitation program to improve trunk balance in stroke patients.

  9. Spasticity and its association with functioning and health-related quality of life 18 months after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; von Arbin, Magnus; Widén Holmqvist, Lotta; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2006-01-01

    There is no consensus concerning the presence of spasticity or the relationship between spasticity and functioning and spasticity and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in the stable phase after stroke. The aim of the present study was to describe, 18 months after stroke, the frequency of spasticity and its association with functioning and HRQL. In a cohort of 66 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, studied prospectively, the following parameters were assessed 18 months after stroke: spasticity, by the Modified Ashworth Scale (0-4 points with 1+ as the modification), muscle stiffness, by self-report, abnormal tendon reflexes, by physical examination, motor performance, by the Lindmark Motor Assessment Scale, mobility, by the Rivermead Mobility Index, activities of daily living, by the Barthel Index, and HRQL, by the Swedish Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36). Of 66 patients studied, 38 were hemiparetic; of these, 13 displayed spasticity, 12 had increased tendon reflexes, and 7 reported muscle stiffness 18 months after stroke. Weak (r < 0.5) to moderate (r = 0.5-0.75) correlations were seen between spasticity and functioning scores. Correlations between spasticity and HRQL were generally weak (r < 0.5). Hemiparetic patients without spasticity had significantly better functioning scores and significantly better HRQL on 1 of the 8 SF-36 health scales (physical functioning) than patients with spasticity. Few patients displayed spasticity 18 months after stroke. Spasticity might contribute to impairment of movement function and to limitation of activity, but seems to have a less pronounced effect on HRQL.

  10. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  11. Explanatory factors for the association between depression and long-term physical disability after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerbe, Luis; Ayis, Salma A; Crichton, Siobhan; Rudd, Anthony G; Wolfe, Charles D A

    2015-11-01

    To identify explanatory factors for the association between depression at 3 months after stroke and physical disability at 3 years. Data from the South London Stroke Register (1998-2013) were used. Patients (n = 3,612) were assessed at stroke onset. Follow-up at 3 months included assessment for depression with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (scores ≥ 7 = depression), physical disability (Barthel index) cognitive function, smoking habit, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use, perception of recovery and social support. Physical disability was reassessed at 3 years. The associations between depression at 3 months and physical disability at 3 years were estimated with multinomial regression adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, stroke severity and possible explanatory factors for the association (introduced in the models first individually and then sequentially): pre-stroke medical history and physical disability, cognitive function, smoking, SSRIs, perception of recovery and social support at 3 months. One thousand three hundred and seven survivors were assessed at 3 months, of which 418 (32.0%) had depression. Survivors with depression had a higher physical disability rate at 3 years. These associations remained significant after adjustment for individual explanatory factors but were not significant after adjustment for combined explanatory factors. Physical disability at 3 months was a relevant explanatory factor for this association. SSRIs were associated with severe, relative risk: 6.62 (2.92-15.02) P disability, relative risk: 3.45 (1.58-7.52) P = 0.002, at 3 years. The association between depression and physical disability appears to be multifactorial. The use of SSRIs after stroke requires further research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Production and validation of Putonghua- and Cantonese-Chinese language National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale training and certification videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, R T F; Lyden, P D; Tsoi, T H; Huang, Y; Liu, M; Hon, S F K; Raman, R; Liu, L

    2010-04-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is an integral part of acute stroke assessment. We report our experience with new Putonghua- and Cantonese-Chinese language NIHSS (PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS) training and certification videos. A professional video production company was hired to create the training and certification videos for both PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS. Two training and certification workshops were held in Chengdu and Beijing, and two workshops in Hong Kong. The instruction, training and group A certification videos were presented to workshop attendees. Unweighted kappa statistics were used to measure the agreement among raters, and the inter-rater agreements for PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS videos were compared with those of original English language NIHSS (E-NIHSS) videos. The pass rates using PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS videos were 79% and 82%, respectively. All possible responses on individual scale items were included. Facial palsy and limb ataxia (13%) showed poor agreement, nine (60%) to 10 (67%) items showed moderate agreement (0.4videos, the agreements on best gaze, visual fields, facial weakness and aphasia were less for PC-NIHSS videos, and the agreements on commands for level of consciousness and visual fields were less for CC-NIHSS videos. Nevertheless, there was no difference between PC-NIHSS or CC-NIHSS and E-NIHSS videos in the agreement on total score. Compared with E-NIHSS videos, PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS videos show good content validity and inter-rater reliability. Availability of these videos may facilitate the proper use of NIHSS among physicians and nurses in Putonghua- or Cantonese-speaking communities.

  13. A Comparison of the Long-term Health Related Quality of Life and Handicap of Stroke Patients in Mainland China and Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Kwok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To compare health related quality of life (HRQOL and handicap of stroke survivors in Hong Kong (HK and Chengdu (CD in Mainland China. Method Fifty-four pairs of first ever stroke patients in CD and in HK matched by age, sex and Modified Barthel Index (MBI were interviewed using a structured questionnaire at 16–36 months after stroke. HRQOL and handicap outcomes were evaluated by the Chinese version of the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 and London Handicap Scale (LHS respectively. Results Compared to stroke patients in CD, HK subjects reported significantly greater handicap, especially in the occupation domain. HK subjects also had significantly lower HRQOL Z scores in domains of role limitations due to emotional or physical problems, and bodily pain. CD subjects had more social support, but had more difficulties in meeting medical costs, and were less likely to have regular medical follow-up and dysphagia symptom. After adjusting for social and health related factors, the site differences in handicap and the role limitation (physical domain of SF36 became insignificant. Conclusions CD stroke survivors had better scores in HRQOL and fewer handicaps than their counterparts in HK, because of social and health related factors.

  14. Comparison of Two Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Programs: A Follow-Up Study among Primary versus Specialized Health Care.

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    Remedios López-Liria

    Full Text Available To compare home-based rehabilitation (RITH and standard outpatient rehabilitation in a hospital setting, in terms of improving the functional recovery and quality of life of stroke patients.This was a prospective cohort study in Andalusia (Spain.One hundred and forty-five patients completed the outcome data.Daily activities were measured by the Barthel index, Canadian Neurological Scale (to assess mental state, Tinetti scale (balance and gait, and Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36 to compare the quality of life.No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups regarding the clinical characteristics of patients in the initial measurement, except for age and mental state (younger and with greater neurological impairment in the hospital group. After physical therapy, both groups showed statistically significant improvements from baseline in each of the measures. These improvements were better in RITH patients than in the hospital patients on all functionality scales with a smaller number of sessions.Home rehabilitation is at least as effective as the outpatient rehabilitation programs in a hospital setting, in terms of recovery of functionality in post-stroke patients. Overall quality of life is severely impaired in both groups, as stroke is a very disabling disease that radically affects patients' lives.

  15. Comparison of Two Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Programs: A Follow-Up Study among Primary versus Specialized Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Liria, Remedios; Vega-Ramírez, Francisco Antonio; Rocamora-Pérez, Patricia; Aguilar-Parra, José Manuel; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2016-01-01

    To compare home-based rehabilitation (RITH) and standard outpatient rehabilitation in a hospital setting, in terms of improving the functional recovery and quality of life of stroke patients. This was a prospective cohort study in Andalusia (Spain). One hundred and forty-five patients completed the outcome data. Daily activities were measured by the Barthel index, Canadian Neurological Scale (to assess mental state), Tinetti scale (balance and gait), and Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36 to compare the quality of life). No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups regarding the clinical characteristics of patients in the initial measurement, except for age and mental state (younger and with greater neurological impairment in the hospital group). After physical therapy, both groups showed statistically significant improvements from baseline in each of the measures. These improvements were better in RITH patients than in the hospital patients on all functionality scales with a smaller number of sessions. Home rehabilitation is at least as effective as the outpatient rehabilitation programs in a hospital setting, in terms of recovery of functionality in post-stroke patients. Overall quality of life is severely impaired in both groups, as stroke is a very disabling disease that radically affects patients' lives.

  16. Cross-diagnostic validity of the SF-36 physical functioning scale in patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study using Rasch analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; de Groot, Vincent; Roorda, Leo D.; Schepers, Vera P. M.; Lindeman, Eline; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Beelen, Anita; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate unidimensionality and differential item functioning of the SF-36 physical functioning scale (PF10) in patients with various neurological disorders. Patients: Patients post-stroke (n = 198), with multiple sclerosis (n = 151) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  17. Effect of Gait Retraining on Balance, Activities of Daily Living, Quality of Life and Depression in Stroke Patients

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    Majid Farhadian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stroke is one of the most common neurological disease and it is the main cause of physical and mental disability and staying in house. Gait difficulties have high incidence in patients with stroke. So the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gait retraining on balance, activities of daily living, quality of life and depressionin stroke patients. Methods: This study was a clinical trial without control group. Sampling was performed by convenience sampling method and 18 patients participated. After recording demographic data, Berg Balance Scale, Barthel Index, SF36 questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory-II used in pre-test and post-test to assess balance, activities of daily living, quality of life and depression, respectively .Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and paired T-test. Results: The results showed statistically significant correlation in pre-test and difference between mean score of the all instruments before and after the intervention. Discussion: According to high prevalence of gait difficulties in stroke patients, it seems interventions in this area is necessary. Statistical results showed that the gait retraining intervention may have a positive effect on improving balance, activities of daily living, quality of life and depression of these patients. According to lack of information in this area, further research is needed.

  18. Barthel Index-Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment (BI-EFFECT) Study: contribution of the Barthel Index to the Heart Failure Risk Scoring System model in elderly adults with acute heart failure in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, F Javier; Gil, Víctor; Llorens, Pere; Herrero, Pablo; Jacob, Javier; Fernández, Cristina; Miró, Òscar

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate whether the Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment (EFFECT) scale for 30-day prediction of mortality is applicable to elderly adults with acute heart failure (AHF) in emergency departments (EDs) and whether discriminatory power is added with the inclusion of the Barthel Index (BI) to this scale (BI-EFFECT scale). BI-EFFECT is a multipurpose, nonintervention, multicenter cohort study. Twenty EDs. Individuals aged 65 and older with AHF. Information on baseline and episode characteristics and 30-day mortality was collected, and participants were categorized according to the EFFECT scale. Baseline degree of functional dependence was measured using the BI. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were made of the EFFECT and BI-EFFECT scales to predict mortality. One thousand sixty-eight participants were included. Thirty-day mortality was 5.1% and was directly and independently associated with high and very high risk categories of the EFFECT scale and with severe dependence. These two variables remained significant after adjustment of the model for both (OR = 4.5, 95% CI = 1.8-11.1 and OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.6-5.4, respectively). The EFFECT and the BI-EFFECT scales had significant ROC curves (area under the ROC curve (AUC) = 0.69, 95% CI = from 0.62 to 0.76; and AUC = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.69-0.81, respectively), and the difference in discriminatory power between the second and the first was also statistically significant (P = .02). The EFFECT scale may be applied in the elderly population, and inclusion of functional status according to the BI in the new BI-EFFECT scale significantly improves the model for the prediction of 30-day mortality. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Intracluster correlation coefficients and reliability of randomized multicenter stroke trials within VISTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Benedikt; Fulton, Rachael L; Goldie, Fraser C; Hacke, Werner; Weimar, Christian; Lees, Kennedy R

    2014-07-01

    Reliable estimates of intracluster correlation coefficients (ICCs) for specific outcome measures are crucial for sample size calculations of future cluster randomized trials. ICCs indicate the proportion of data variability that is explained by defined levels of clustering. In this manuscript, we present potentially valuable and reliable estimates of ICCs for specific baseline and follow-up data. ICCs were estimated from linear and generalized linear mixed models using maximum likelihood estimation for common measures used in stroke research, including modified Rankin Scale (mRS), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and Barthel Index (BI). Data were available for 11 841 patients with ischemic stroke from 11 randomized trials. After adjusting for age, thrombolysis, and baseline NIHSS, the median ICC for follow-up data, using center as the level of clustering, ranged from 0·007 to 0·041. The ICCs using trial, continent or year of enrollment as level of clustering were distinctly lower. Less than 1% of the variability of mRS, NIHSS, and BI was explained by any of these three cluster levels. This compendium of relevant ICC estimates should assist trial planning. For example, the sample size for a cluster trial with 150 patients per center using ordinal analysis of mRS should be inflated by 2·0 due to the ICC of 0·007; whereas the ICC of 0·031 using mRS dichotomized above mRS 0-1, requires inflation by 5·6. The low contribution of trials, year or continent of enrollment to overall variation in outcome offers reassurance that analyses using pooled data from multiple trials in VISTA are unlikely to suffer from bias from these sources. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  20. The spasticity in the motor and functional disability in adults with post-stroke hemiparetic

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    Roberta de Oliveira Cacho

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Spasticity acts as a limiting factor in motor and functional recovery after Stroke, impairing the performance of daily living activities. Objective: To analyze the influence of spasticity on main muscle groups and to associate it with motor impairment and functional level of chronic hemiparetic patients after stroke. Methods: Twenty-seven chronic hemiparetic patients of both sexes were selected at the Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Service of the Unicamp Clinics Hospital. Assessments were carried out in two sessions, in the first one the motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer Assessment - FM and functional impairment (Barthel Index - BI were evaluated, and in the second, the degree of spasticity of the main muscle groups (Modified Ashworth Scale - MAS. Results: A negative correlation was detected between upper limb spasticity and motor and functional impairment. No muscle group evaluated in the lower limbs showed correlation between muscle tone and the level of impairment of the lower extremity on FM and the functional level measured by BI. Conclusion: Spasticity has been shown to be a negative influence factor in the level of motor and functional impairment of the upper limbs of chronic hemiparetic patients after stroke.

  1. Mirror therapy for upper limb rehabilitation in chronic patients after stroke

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    Dreyzialle Vila Nova Mota

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Individuals with stroke sequelae present changes in the postural alignment and muscle strength associated with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. Mirror therapy is a technique that aims to improve the motor function of the paretic limb. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mirror therapy, associated with conventional physiotherapy, for range of motion (ROM, degree of spasticity of the affected upper limb, and the level of independence in the activities of daily living (ADL of chronic patients after stroke. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental (before and after study. The study included ten stroke survivors undertaking physiotherapy and presenting with upper limb paresis. The following gauges were used for the present study: goniometry, the Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer and Barthel Index. Fifteen sessions were performed, each lasting 30 minutes, consisting of stretching of the flexor and extensor muscles of the wrist and elbow, pronators and supinators, followed by mirror therapy with gradual functional exercises. Results: Improvement was observed in all aspects studied, however with significant differences for ROM wrist extension (p = 0.04 and forearm supination (p = 0.03 Conclusion: It can be concluded that mirror therapy contributed to the participants' good performance in the aspects studied, mainly in relation to ROM of the affected upper limb.

  2. Effect of Sling Exercise Training on Balance in Patients with Stroke: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lianghua; Chen, Junqi; Peng, Qiyuan; Chen, Jingjie; Zou, Yucong; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of sling exercise training (SET) on balance in patients with stroke. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Ovid LWW, CBM, CNKI, WanFang, and VIP databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of the effect of SET on balance in patients with stroke. The study design and participants were subjected to metrological analysis. Berg balance Scale (BBS), Barthel index score (BI), and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) were used as independent parameters for evaluating balance function, activities of daily living(ADL) and motor function after stroke respectively, and were subjected to meta-analysis by RevMan5.3 software. Nine studies with 460 participants were analyzed. Results of meta-analysis showed that the SET treatment combined with conventional rehabilitation was superior to conventional rehabilitation treatments, with increased degrees of BBS (WMD = 3.81, 95% CI [0.15, 7.48], P = 0.04), BI (WMD = 12.98, 95% CI [8.39, 17.56], P risk of bias. Therefore, more multi-center and large-sampled randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm its clinical applications.

  3. Effect of motor relearning programme on motor function recovery of acute stroke patients with hemiplegia

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    Min GUAN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of motor relearning programme (MRP on motor function recovery of patients with hemiplegia after acute stroke.  Methods A total of 64 hemiplegic patients with acute stroke (duration ≤ 14 d were randomly divided into 2 groups: control group (N = 32 and observation group (N = 32. Control group received routine drug therapy and conventional rehabilitation training, and observation group was treated by routine therapy and MRP training. Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale - Balance (FMA - Balance, Modified Rivermead Mobility Index (MRMI and modified Barthel Index (mBI were used to assess the motor function of patients in both groups before and after treatment.  Results All patients successfully completed the rehabilitation training without severe adverse events. A few patients felt fatigue occasionally after training and recovered after rest. Compared to before treatment, the FMA-Balance score (P = 0.000, MRMI score (P = 0.000 and mBI score (P = 0.000 after treatment in both groups were significantly increased. Compared to control group, the FMA-Balance score (P = 0.031, MRMI score (P = 0.013 and mBI score (P = 0.049 after treatment in observation group were significantly increased.  Conclusions MRP training in the early stage of stroke is beneficial to the recovery of motor function of patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.03.007

  4. The Early Functional Abilities (EFA) scale to assess neurological and neurosurgical early rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankemeier, Ariane; Rollnik, Jens D

    2015-10-19

    It is difficult to assess neurological and neurosurgical early rehabilitation patients comprehensively. Available scales focus on activities of daily living (Barthel (BI) and Early Rehabilitation Barthel Index (ERBI)) or wakefulness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Coma Remission Scale (CRS)) while cognitive items are missing. The Early Functional Abilities (EFA) scale comprises 20 items referring to activities of daily living (ADL), wakefulness and cognitive abilities. To evaluate its validity, n = 623 early neurological and neurosurgical rehabilitation patients (most of them after ischemic stroke or cerebral bleeding) were assessed on admission using the EFA, ERBI, GCS, CRS and measures of morbidity (co-diagnoses). The more co-diagnoses the lower EFA sum scores were obtained (Spearman-Rho rs = -0.509, p < 0.001). EFA predicted length of stay (LOS, rs = -0.565, p < 0.001) and BI at discharge (rs = 0.571, p < 0.001). The results suggest that EFA is a valid instrument to assess critically ill neurological and neurosurgical early rehabilitation patients. It may be used as a measure of morbidity and a predictor of LOS and outcome. Further studies are strongly encouraged.

  5. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    Full Text Available Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes.

  6. Reliability of the Tone Assessment Scale and the modified Ashworth scale as clinical tools for assessing poststroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, J M; Leathley, M; Moore, A P; Sharma, A K; Smith, T L; Watkins, C L

    1999-09-01

    To establish reliability of the Tone Assessment Scale and modified Ashworth scale in acute stroke patients. A North Liverpool university hospital. Eighteen men and 14 women admitted with acute stroke and still in hospital at the study start date (median age, 74 yrs; median Barthel score, 8). The modified Ashworth scale and the Tone Assessment Scale. The 32 patients were examined with both scales on the same occasion by two raters (interrater comparison) and on two occasions by one rater (intrarater comparison). The reliability of the modified Ashworth scale was very good (kappa = .84 for interrater and .83 for intrarater comparisons). The reliability of the Tone Assessment Scale was not as strong as the modified Ashworth scale, with marked variability in the assessment of posture (kappa = .22 to .50 for interrater and .29 to .55 for intrarater comparisons) and associated reaction (kappa/kappaW = -.05 to .79 for interrater and .19 to .83 for intrarater comparisons). However, those aspects of the Tone Assessment Scale that addressed response to passive movement and that are scored similarly to the modified Ashworth scale showed good to very good interrater reliability (kappaW = .79 to .92) and good to very good intrarater reliability (kappaW = .72 to .86), except for the question related to movement at the ankle where agreement was only moderate (kappaW = .59). The modified Ashworth scale is reliable. The section of the Tone Assessment Scale relating to response to passive movement is reliable at various joints, except the ankle. It may assist in studies on the prevalence of spasticity after stroke and the relationship between tone and function. Further development of a measure of spasticity at the ankle is required. The Tone Assessment Scale is not reliable for measuring posture and associated reactions.

  7. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, S; Krishnan, Gopee

    2013-07-01

    Quality of life (QoL) dwells in a person's overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39) into Kannada, to measure test-retest reliability and internal consistency. The original English instrument was modified considering socio-cultural differences among native English and Kannada speakers. Cross-linguistic adaptation of SAQOL-39 into Kannada was carried out through forward-backward translation scheme. The scale was administered on 32 people from Karnataka (a state in India) having aphasia. For a direct understanding of the subject's QoL, scores were categorized into QoL severity levels. Item reliability of the Kannada version was examined by measuring Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was examined by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Kannada SAQOL-39 showed good acceptability with minimum missing data and excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.8). Value of Cronbach's α observed for four items modified in the original version was 0.9 each and the mean α of all Kannada items was 0.9, demonstrating high internal consistency. The present study offers a valid, reliable tool to measure QoL in Kannada-speaking individuals with aphasia. This tool is useful in a cross-center, cross-national comparison of QoL data from people with aphasia. This instrument also permits direct translation into other Indian languages as the items are culturally validated to the Indian population. This study promotes future research using the Kannada SAQOL-39.

  8. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of life (QoL dwells in a person′s overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39 into Kannada, to measure test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Materials and Methods: The original English instrument was modified considering socio-cultural differences among native English and Kannada speakers. Cross-linguistic adaptation of SAQOL-39 into Kannada was carried out through forward-backward translation scheme. The scale was administered on 32 people from Karnataka (a state in India having aphasia. For a direct understanding of the subject′s QoL, scores were categorized into QoL severity levels. Item reliability of the Kannada version was examined by measuring Cronbach′s alpha. Test-retest reliability was examined by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results: Kannada SAQOL-39 showed good acceptability with minimum missing data and excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.8. Value of Cronbach′s α observed for four items modified in the original version was 0.9 each and the mean α of all Kannada items was 0.9, demonstrating high internal consistency. Conclusions: The present study offers a valid, reliable tool to measure QoL in Kannada-speaking individuals with aphasia. This tool is useful in a cross-center, cross-national comparison of QoL data from people with aphasia. This instrument also permits direct translation into other Indian languages as the items are culturally validated to the Indian population. This study promotes future research using the Kannada SAQOL-39.

  9. Epidemiology of nonfatal stroke and transient ischemic attack in Al-Kharga District, New Valley, Egypt

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    Farghaly WM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wafaa MA Farghaly,1 Hamdy N El-Tallawy,1 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Nabil M Abdel-Hakeem,2 Mohamed A Abd Elhamed,1 Bastawy MA Al-Fawal,3 Reda Badry1 1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, 2Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Assiut Branch, Assiut, 3Aswan Health Insurance Hospital, Ministry of Health, Aswan, Egypt Background: Stroke is a medical emergency. Nonfatal stroke may cause permanent neurologic damage, complications, and disability. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology of nonfatal stroke in Al-Kharga District, New Valley, Egypt. Methods: The total population (62,583 was screened via a door-to-door study by three neurology specialists and 15 female social workers for demographic data collection. All subjects with probable stroke were subjected to a full clinical examination, neuroimaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, and laboratory investigations including blood sugar, lipid profile, serum uric acid, a complete blood count, blood urea, and serum creatinine. Stroke severity and outcome were assessed using the Scandinavian Stroke Scale and Barthel Index. Carotid Doppler, echocardiography, and thyroid function tests were done in selected cases. Results: During the study period (June 1, 2005 to May 31, 2008, 351 subjects were diagnosed as having suffered a cerebrovascular stroke at some point during their lives, yielding a total lifetime prevalence of 5.6 per 1,000 population. Of these, 156 subjects were identified as having suffered a stroke during the year from January 1 to December 31, 2007, with an incidence rate of 2.5 per 1,000. Both prevalence and incidence rates were higher in urban (5.8 per 1,000 and 2.6 per 1,000, respectively than rural communities (5.2 per 1,000 and 2.3 per 1,000, and were higher in males (6.1 per 1,000 and 2.7 per 1,000, respectively than in females (5.1 per 1,000 and 2.3 per 1

  10. Discriminative and predictive validity of the short-form activities-specific balance confidence scale for predicting fall of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, SeungHeon; Lee, Yunbok; Lee, DongGeon; Cho, Ki-Hun; Lee, GyuChang; Park, Dong-Sik

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to investigate the discriminative validity of the short-form activities-specific balance confidence scale (ABC scale) in predicting falls, and its validity. [Subjects and Methods] 43 stroke survivors were identified as a group with a history of multiple falls (faller group) and a group without or with a history of one falls (non-faller group). The balance confidence was examined using the ABC scale and the short-form ABC scale. Functional abilities were examined with Fugl-Meyer assessment, sit-to-stand test, and Berg balance scale. [Results] The area under the curve of the ABC scale and the short-form ABC scale in predicting fall was>0.77. This result indicates that both examination tools have discriminative validity in predicting falls. Although both tools showed an identical predictable specificity of 72% in the non-faller and faller groups, the short-form ABC scale exhibited a predictable sensitivity of 86% in the faller group, which is higher than that of the ABC scale (71%). [Conclusion] Results of this study showed that the short-form ABC scale is an efficient clinical tool to evaluate and predict the balance confidence of stroke survivors.

  11. A Comparative Field Based Study of Katz and Barthel Indices in North Indian City of Dehradun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Luthra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elderly persons are one of the most vulnerable groups of society and have more chances of disease and disabilities (restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being. It reflects how well an individual is able to function in general areas of life. Magnitude of disability has become an important indicator in measuring disease burden along with morbidity and mortality rates. Katz and Barthel Indices have been largely used to assess disability in activities of daily living among elderly people.Aim & objectives: This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among persons aged 60 years and above in urban field practice area of SGRRIM&HS, Dehradun, Uttarakhand with the aim of comparing these two indices in community setting. The specific objectives were to find ADL dependence by both the indices, find the factors which significantly affect ADL dependence and to find the degree of agreement which is not by chance between Katz and Barthel Indices.Material methods: An interview schedule was developed and administered to participants in Hindi, by trained investigators. Information on age, marital status, living status education, occupation and economic dependence was recorded. House-to-house visits were conducted in the selected area to collect the data. All elderly persons residing in the selected area were included in the study.Results: Prevalence of ADL dependence was 8.23% as per Katz Index and 28.45% as per Barthel Index, taking a score of less than 20 for BI and less than 6 for KI as criterion for ADL dependence. That there is a moderate degree of agreement between Katz and Barthel Scores which is not by chance was estimated by Kappa Statistic.Conclusion: Katz Index is better suited for ADL estimation in a community setting.

  12. Effect of core strengthening with pelvic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on trunk, balance, gait, and function in chronic stroke.

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    Sharma, Vishal; Kaur, Jaskirat

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of core strengthening combined with pelvic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on trunk impairment, balance, gait, and functional ability of chronic stroke patients. Twenty-three participants with chronic stroke were recruited and randomly allocated to one of the two groups: core strengthening combined with pelvic PNF (group 1, n=13), and pelvic PNF with trunk flexibility exercises (group 2, n=10). Intervention was given to both groups for 60 min per session 5 times per week for 4 weeks. Performance of both groups was evaluated on Trunk Impairment Scale, Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (Tinetti-POMA), Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest), Wisconsin Gait Scale, and Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index prior to and after the completion of the intervention. The comparison between postintervention scores of Tinetti-POMA between group 1 (18.76±1.78) and group 2 (16.8±1.87) and Mini-BESTest group 1 (16.15±1.28) and group 2 (14.7±1.41) showed significant difference ( P =0.018). The results indicated that core stabilisation combined with pelvic PNF was more effective for improving trunk impairment, balance and gait of chronic stroke patients.

  13. Development of a Barthel Index based on dyspnea for patients with respiratory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitacca, Michele; Paneroni, Mara; Baiardi, Paola; De Carolis, Vito; Zampogna, Elisabetta; Belli, Stefano; Carone, Mauro; Spanevello, Antonio; Balbi, Bruno; Bertolotti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Background As Barthel Index (BI) quantifies motor impairment but not breathlessness, the use of only this index could underestimate disability in chronic respiratory disease (CRD). To our knowledge, no study evaluates both motor and respiratory disability in CRD during activities of daily living (ADLs) simultaneously and with a unique tool. The objective of this study was to propose for patients with CRD an additional tool for dyspnea assessment during ADLs based on BI items named Barthel Index dyspnea. Methods Comprehensibility, reliability, internal consistency, validity, responsiveness, and ability to differentiate between disease groups were assessed on 219 subjects through an observational study performed in an in-hospital rehabilitation setting. Results Good comprehensibility, high reliability (interrater intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 [95% confidence interval 0.892–0.964] and test–retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.99 [95% confidence interval 0.983–0.994]), good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha 0.89), strong concurrent validity with 6 minute walking distance (Pearson r=−0.538, Pdyspnea severity. Divergent validity showed weak correlation (Pearson r=−0.38) comparing Barthel Index dyspnea and BI. Conclusion The BI based on dyspnea perception proved to be reliable, sensitive, and adequate as a tool for measuring the level of dyspnea perceived in performing basic daily living activities. A unique instrument simultaneously administered may provide a global assessment of disability during ADLs incorporating both motor and respiratory aspects. PMID:27354778

  14. Mirror neurons: action observation treatment as a tool in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, M; Agosti, M; Cantagallo, A; Sale, P; Mancuso, M; Buccino, G

    2010-12-01

    The observation of actions performed by others activate in an observer the same neural structures (including mirror neurons) as when he/she actually performs the same actions. The aim of the present study was to assess whether action observation treatment may improve upper limb motor impairment in chronic stroke patients. This was an observational study. Patients were recruited by three Italian Centres for Neurorehabilitation between 2006 and 2008. Twenty-eight chronic stroke patients with upper limb impairment have undergone for four weeks, five days a week, a rehabilitation treatment based on observation of video-clips presenting hand daily actions, followed by the imitation of those same actions with the affected limb. Functional evaluation by means of Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Frenchay Arm Test (FAT) and Fugl Meyer (FM) was carried out twice before treatment (BT1 and BT2), at an interval of 15 days, then after treatment (AT1) and finally at a two-month follow-up (AT2). Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was applied to test differences between scores obtained from functional scales before and after treatment (BT1 vs. BT2; BT2 vs. AT1; AT1 vs. AT2). In all scales, scores did not differ when comparing BT1 with BT2. Scores improved significantly in all scales at AT1 as compared to BT2 (MBI, P=0.026; FAT, P=0.005; FM, P=0.001). This improvement was still present at the two-month follow-up as testified by no score difference between AT1 and AT2. Action Observation Treatment may become a useful strategy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The present preliminary study suggests that stimulation of neural structures (including mirror neurons), activated when the patients actually perform the same actions as those observed could constitute a good alternative rehabilitative approach in chronic stroke patients.

  15. Bobath or motor relearning programme? A follow-up one and four years post stroke.

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    Langhammer, Birgitta; Stanghelle, Johan K

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this follow-up one and four years post stroke was to find out whether the initial physiotherapy approach had had any long-term effects on mortality, motor function, postural control, activities of daily living, life quality, follow-up from community services and living conditions. A randomized controlled trial of first time ever stroke patients. Group 1 (n = 33) and group 2 (n = 28) had initial physiotherapy according to the Motor Relearning Programme and Bobath, respectively. The Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), the Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale (SMES), the Barthel ADL Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and Berg Balance Scale were used. The following parameters were also registered: incidence of new strokes, other diseases, use of assistive devices, the patient's accommodation and use of services from the community. The mortality rates were similar in the two groups. In both groups the motor function, postural control and ADL had decreased rapidly, leaving many of the patients dependent and with a high risk of falling. Life quality had increased compared to the acute stage, but was still low in comparison with healthy persons. Patients in both groups lived at home, but were dependent on help from relatives and community services. Physiotherapy as follow-up service was seldom used. The initial physiotherapy approach did not seem to have a major influence on the patients' ability to cope in the long-term. This follow-up at one and four years post stroke showed no major influence of two different initial physiotherapy regimens on long-term function. The study confirmed a rapid deterioration of ADL and motor function and an increased dependence on relatives. The study reveals a gap between the intense treatment in the acute phase and little or no follow-up of physiotherapy treatment or other rehabilitation activities later.

  16. Integrative medicine for subacute stroke rehabilitation: a study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jianqiao; Chen, Lifang; Chen, Luni; Wang, Chao; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Ma, Ruijie; Xu, Shouyu; Shen, Laihua; Bao, Yehua; Ji, Conghua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many patients with stroke receive integrative medicine in China, which includes the basic treatment of Western medicine and routine rehabilitation, in conjunction with acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The question of whether integrative medicine is efficacious for stroke rehabilitation is still controversial and very little research currently exists on the integrated approach for this condition. Consequently, we will conduct a multicentre, randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of integrative medicine on stroke rehabilitation. Methods and analysis 360 participants recruited from three large Chinese medical hospitals in Zhejiang Province will be randomly divided into the integrative medicine rehabilitation (IMR) group and the conventional rehabilitation (CR) group in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the IMR group will receive acupuncture and Chinese herbs in addition to basic Western medicine and rehabilitation treatment. The CR group will not receive acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. The assessment data will be collected at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks postrandomisation, and then at 12 weeks’ follow-up. The primary outcome is measured by the Modified Barthel Index. The secondary outcomes are the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the mini-mental state examination and Montreal Cognitive, Hamilton's Depression Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale, and the incidence of adverse events. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from ethics committees of three hospitals. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone, during follow-up calls inquiring on patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number Chinese Clinical Trial Register: ChiCTR-TRC-12001972, http://www.chictr.org/en/proj/show.aspx?proj=2561 PMID:25475247

  17. CORRELATION C-REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVELS WITH CLINICAL OUTCOME INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE STROKE PATIENTS

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    Catur Arisetianto; Hari Purnomo; Eko Arisetijono Marhendraputro; Widodo Mardi Santoso

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Intracerebral hemorrhage stroke remains a major health problem and disability. Increased levels of markers of inflammatory factors after hemorrhage stroke was able to predict poor clinical outcome. Until now, the role of C Reactive Protein (CRP) in the local inflammatory response and clinical determinants output remains unclear. Aims to investigate the correlation of CRP level with poor clinical outcome as measured by Barthel Index. Methods and material. This study was...

  18. The course of delirium in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, John; Pathansali, Rohan; Hassan, Hardi; Ouldred, Emma; Cooper, Derek; Stewart, Robert; Macdonald, Alastair; Jackson, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    several studies have assessed delirium post-stroke but conflicting results have been obtained. Also, the natural history and outcome of delirium post-stroke need to be fully elucidated. eligible stroke patients were assessed for delirium on admission and for four consecutive weeks using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Risk factors for delirium were recorded. Our outcome measures were length of stay, inpatient mortality and discharge destination. of 110 eligible patients, 82 were recruited over 7 months. Delirium was detected in 23 patients (28%); 21 of these were delirious on their first assessment. Sixty-nine per cent of patients who had four weekly assessments were delirious at 4 weeks. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed, and two models were identified. With unsafe swallow in the analysis, delirium was associated with an unsafe swallow on admission (OR 28.4, Pstroke (OR 110.8, P = 0.01). With unsafe swallow removed from the analysis, delirium was associated with an admission C-reactive protein (CRP) > 5 mg/l (OR 10.2, P = 0.009), Barthel score stroke (OR 85.2, P = 0.01). Delirious patients had a higher mortality (30.4% vs. 1.7%, Pvs. 28.9 days, Pvs. 5.2%, OR 14, Pstroke. Most cases develop at stroke onset and remain delirious for an appreciable period. Delirium onset is associated with stroke severity (low admission Barthel), unsafe swallow on admission, poor vision pre-stroke and a raised admission CRP. Delirium is a marker of poor prognosis.

  19. Evaluation of complete functional status of patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure scale on admission, discharge, and six months poststroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Alikhani, Ebrahim; Bayat, Masume; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, at the times of admission to hospital, discharge, and six-month poststroke, and to determine the level of improvement in patients after rehabilitative procedures. Methods: A total number of 108 patients with stroke entered the study who were admitted to neurology ward. They all received rehabilitation consultation, and occupational and physical therapies were prescribed for them. Finally, their functional status was evaluated by FIM scale. Results: The median (and range) of FIM scores were 86 (15-119), 102 (16-123) and 119 (17-126) at admission, discharge, and after six-month follow-up, respectively. Our observations showed a significant improvement in FIM scores (P < 0.001). About 13, 30, and 76 percent of the patients in individual functional tasks of motor domain and 61, 75, and 86 percent in cognitive domain got the score of 6 or 7 (complete or partial independence) on admission, discharge, and after six months, respectively. There was a reverse correlation between age and FIM improvement and also duration of hospitalization (P = 0.002). Conclusion: The study showed that the FIM is a valid tool for evaluation of patients with stroke, their follow-up and tracking the disease course. Moreover, we concluded that patients with stroke make a significant improvement in their functional status overtime. The exact effect of rehabilitative procedures and comparison with no treatment, must be assessed in separate studies. PMID:28435628

  20. Evaluation of complete functional status of patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure scale on admission, discharge, and six months poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Alikhani, Ebrahim; Bayat, Masume; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2016-10-07

    Background: To evaluate the patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, at the times of admission to hospital, discharge, and six-month poststroke, and to determine the level of improvement in patients after rehabilitative procedures. Methods: A total number of 108 patients with stroke entered the study who were admitted to neurology ward. They all received rehabilitation consultation, and occupational and physical therapies were prescribed for them. Finally, their functional status was evaluated by FIM scale. Results: The median (and range) of FIM scores were 86 (15-119), 102 (16-123) and 119 (17-126) at admission, discharge, and after six-month follow-up, respectively. Our observations showed a significant improvement in FIM scores (P < 0.001). About 13, 30, and 76 percent of the patients in individual functional tasks of motor domain and 61, 75, and 86 percent in cognitive domain got the score of 6 or 7 (complete or partial independence) on admission, discharge, and after six months, respectively. There was a reverse correlation between age and FIM improvement and also duration of hospitalization (P = 0.002). Conclusion: The study showed that the FIM is a valid tool for evaluation of patients with stroke, their follow-up and tracking the disease course. Moreover, we concluded that patients with stroke make a significant improvement in their functional status overtime. The exact effect of rehabilitative procedures and comparison with no treatment, must be assessed in separate studies.

  1. The efficacy of mirror therapy combined with conventional stroke rehabilitation program on motor and functional recovery

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    Selen Kuzgun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A variety of methods is used in the treatment of upper extremity functional impairment after stroke.In recent years, a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of stroke rehabilitation is the mirror therapy.The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of mirror therapy,which is applied through motor imagination training, combined with conventional stroke rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in patients with subacute stroke. MATERIAL and METHODS: This is a randomized,prospective,controlled single-blind trial.The study included 20 patients who were diagnosed with stroke.Patients were randomly divided into two groups:first group received conventional rehabilitation program and the second group received conventional rehabilitation program plus mirror therapy on nonparetic upper extremity consisting of wrist extension daily 4 times for 15minutes per session. Both groups received the conventional rehabilitation program for 4 weeks, 5 days a week and daily 1-2h. All patients were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the treatment(week 4.The evaluations were performed by using Brunnstrom Staging, Fugl Meyer Motor Function Scale(FM,Barthel Index(BI and goniometric measurement of wrist extension. RESULTS: The Brunnstrom stage(p<0.01, total score on FM and BI scores (p<0.01 were improved at week 4 compared to the baseline, whereas wrist subscore on FM and the goniometric measurements of the wrist and wrist extension were significantly improved only in group II.The two treatment groups were not statistically different in terms of posttreatment evaluation parameters. CONCLUSION: In our study,the mirror therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation program was not superior to conventional rehabilitation program alone in terms of upper extremity motor and functional recovery.

  2. [The contribution of the new scale for assessing disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksibi, Imene; Dziri, Catherine; Ben Salah, Fatma Zohra; Hammadi, Mejda; Bellelahom, Lotfi

    2010-08-01

    The assessment of disability and its management is complex and problematic. With a view to ensuring equality of opportunity between disabled people and others, a new law adopted in August 2005 proposed a new method for assessing disability is applicable on a wider scale by GPs. Assessing the contribution of the new scale for assessing disability in patients suffering from debilitating diseases, to verify compliance in Tunisia. Cross-sectional study on 60 hemiplegic, paraplegic and post traumatic head injuries. The patients underwent clinical evaluation and a functional assessment. The assessment tools used were: the classification of the American Spinal Injury Association, the Barthel Index, Glasgow Outcome Scale, Functional Independence Measure, the Health Assessement Questionnaire and the Social Function-36. Patients were also evaluated with the new scale of disability. concerning paraplegic patients, limitation of activity concerned mobility, maintenance staff, domestic life, social relationships, community life and major areas of life. On the hemiplegic, areas related to communication, mobility, maintenance staff, domestic life, social relationships, community life and major areas of life have been affected. We have noted a correlation between the new scale and the Barthel Index. Regarding traumatic brain injury, the areas most affected were those related to mobility, maintenance staff, domestic life and the major areas of life. A correlation was found between the new scale and the Functional Independence Measure in three populations, as well as the quality of life that has been correlated with disability. Disability was observed in 90% of paraplegics, 80% and 50% of hemiplegic patients with severe brain injury. The handicap was the heaviest seen in traumatic brain injury patients with a frequency of 20%. The new scale for assessing disability has reproduced disability and special needs of paraplegic patients, stroke patients and traumatic brain injury.

  3. A new prognostic scale for the early prediction of ischemic stroke recovery mainly based on traditional Chinese medicine symptoms and NIHSS score: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ke-Gang; Fu, Cai-Hong; Li, Huan-Qin; Xin, Xi-Yan; Gao, Ying

    2015-11-16

    Ischemic stroke (IS) is a common disease, often resulting in death or disability. Previous studies on prognosis of stroke mainly focused on the baseline condition or modern expensive tests. However, the change of clinical symptoms during acute stage is considerably neglected. In our study, we aim to develop a new prognostic scale to predict the 90-day outcome of IS patients. In this retrospective cohort study, a secondary data analysis was performed on 489 patients extracted from 1046 patients of 4 hospitals. A new prognostic scale was constructed to predict the recovery of IS mainly based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) symptoms & signs and the changes during the first 3 days of patients in the 3 TCM hospitals. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cutoff point for prediction. In the end, the scale was used to test the outcome of IS patients in Xuanwu hospital. The new prognostic scale was composed of 8 items including age degree (OR = 3.32; 95 % CI: 1.72-6.42), history of diabetes mellitus (DM) (OR = 2.20; 95 % CI: 1.19-4.08), NIHSS score (OR = 3.08; 95 % CI: 2.16-4.40), anxiety (OR = 3.17; 95 % CI: 1.90-5.29) and irritability (OR = 4.61; 95 % CI: 1.36-15.63) on the 1st day of illness onset, change in NIHSS score (OR = 2.49; 95 % CI: 1.31-4.73), and circumrotating (OR = 7.80; 95 % CI: 1.98-30.64) and tinnitus (OR = 13.25; 95 % CI: 1.55-113.34) during the first 3 days of stroke onset. The total score of the scale was 16.5 and the cutoff point was 9.5, which means patients would have poor outcome at 90 days of stroke onset if the score was higher than 9.5. The new scale was validated on the data of Xuanwu hospital, and the value of its sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy were 69.6 %, 83.3 % and 75.0 % respectively. The 8-item scale, mainly based on TCM symptoms, NIHSS score and their changes during the first 3 days, can predict the 90-day outcome for IS

  4. The effects of core stability strength exercise on muscle activity and trunk impairment scale in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong-Hun; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of core stability-enhancing exercises on the lower trunk and muscle activity of stroke patients. The control group (n = 10) underwent standard exercise therapy, while the experiment group (n =10) underwent both the core stability-enhancing exercise and standard exercise therapy simultaneously. The standard exercise therapy applied to the two groups included weight bearing and weight shifts and joint movements to improve flexibility and the range of motion. The core stability-enhancing exercise was performed 5 times a week for 30 min over a period of 4 weeks in the room where the patients were treated. For all 20 subject, the items measured before the exercise were measured after the therapeutic intervention, and changes in muscle activity of the lower trunk were evaluated. The activity and stability of the core muscles were measured using surface electromyography and the trunk impairment scale (TIS). The mean TIS score and muscle activity of the lower trunk increased in the experiment group significantly after performing the core stability-enhancing exercise (Pcore stability-enhancing exercise is effective in improving muscle activity of the lower trunk, which is affected by hemiplegia.

  5. Epidemiology of non-fatal cerebrovascular stroke and transient ischemic attacks in Al Quseir, Egypt

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    El-Tallawy HN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy N El-Tallawy,1 Wafaa MA Farghaly,1 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Nabil M Abdel-Hakeem,2 Tarek A Rageh,1 Reda Badry,1 Mahmoud R Kandil1 1Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Assiut branch, Assuit, Egypt Background and purpose: Stroke is a medical emergency that can cause permanent neurological damage, complications, and disability. We aim to determine the epidemiology of non-fatal cerebrovascular stroke (CVS and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs in Al Quseir City, Red Sea, Egypt. Methods: The total population (n=33,285 was screened through a door to door study by three specialists of neurology and 15 female social workers (for demographic data collection. All suspected stroke patients were subjected to a full clinical examination, computerized tomography (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of their brain, blood sugar, lipogram, serum uric acid, complete blood cells, blood urea, and serum creatinine, as well as evaluated by Barthel Index and Scandinavian Stroke Scale. Carotid doppler, echocardiography, and thyroid functions were done for selected cases. Results: CVS was recorded among 130 patients out of 19,848 subjects aged 20 years and more, yielding a total prevalence of 6.55/1,000 population. From June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011, 36 patients were recorded to have stroke within 1-year, yielding an incidence rate of 1.81/1,000. Prevalence and incidence rates were higher among males than females, and both indices increased steadily with advancing age to reach the highest prevalence (37.02/1,000 and incidence rate (9.5/1,000 among aged persons 60 years and more. Conclusion: The prevalence of non-fatal stroke in Al Quseir city (6.55/1,000 was at the lower range of that recorded in developing countries (5–10/1,000 and slightly higher than that recorded in industrialized countries (5/1,000 population. Ischemic stroke is the most

  6. Role of brain natriuretic peptide as a novel prognostic biomarker in acute ischemic stroke

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    Bindu Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We investigated to study the prognostic importance of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke and measured plasma BNP levels and compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Risk factors, biochemical parameters, lipid profile, carotid and vertebral Doppler, imaging, and cardiac evaluation were done. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission and functional disability by Barthel Index (BI at 3 months. Ischemic stroke subtype was classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP. Data were entered in MS Excel, and appropriate statistical analysis was done using the SPSS software version 21.0. A P = 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Mean age of patients was 55.17 ± 11.37 years with a male:female ratio 3:1. OCSP showed total anterior circulation infarct (TACI 35, partial anterior circulation infarct 9, lacunar infarct 12, and posterior circulation infarct 44. NIHSS on admission was average 10 ± 7 and BI was 57 ± 30. BNP in patients (435 ng/ml was very high as compared to controls (<60 ng/ml (P < 0.001. There was a positive correlation between age and BNP (R2 = 0.34; P < 0.00; NIHSS and BNP (R2 = 0.255; P < 0.01, negative correlation between BI and BNP (R2 = −0.064; P < 0.01. Mean BNP levels across the OCSP showed higher values in TACI (F = 4.609 P = 0.005. Regression analysis showed that BNP can predict BI which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Plasma BNP levels was significantly elevated in patients with ischemic stroke. Our study concludes that high BNP levels are seen in large anterior circulation stroke and is a predictor for the poor functional outcome at 3 months. Determination of BNP levels as a biomarker could be helpful in predicting the outcome in stroke patients.

  7. Is the long form of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale more responsive than the short form in patients with stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chen, Cheng-Te; Chou, Yei-Tai; Shih, Ching-Lin; Koh, Chia-Lin; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-05-01

    To compare the responsiveness of the Rasch-calibrated 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor Scale with that of the 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale at both an individual and a group level. Repeated-measurements design. Medical center. Patients (N=301) 14 days after stroke. Not applicable. 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, and 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale. The patients were assessed with the original 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale 4 times, at 14, 30, 90, and 180 days after stroke onset. The patients' responses were used for estimating the Rasch scores of the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale and 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale. The effect size, standardized response mean, and paired t test were used to compare the group-based responsiveness of the 3 forms (50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale). Individual-level responsiveness was compared based on the significance of change between the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale and 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale. Because up to 13 items of the 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale did not meet the Rasch model's assumptions, the significance of change of the 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale was not calculated. At the group level, the FM-37 and FM-12 Fugl-Meyer motor scale had sufficient and similar responsiveness. At the individual level, the FM-37 Fugl-Meyer motor scale detected more patients with significant improvement than the FM-12 Fugl-Meyer motor scale. The SC values and category distribution of the FM-37 Fugl-Meyer motor scale were significantly better than those of the FM-12 Fugl-Meyer motor scale (PFugl-Meyer motor scale was sufficient and very similar to that of the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale had better individual-level responsiveness. The 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale is suggested as an outcome measure for both clinicians and researchers. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by

  8. Cross-sectional analysis of cognitive impairment and relative factors after acute ischemic stroke

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    ZHOU Yu-ying

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute ischemic stroke may decline cognitive function and induce vascular dementia (VaD. In early identification of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI, active searching for relevant factors, effective and timely treatment can reduce or even prevent further decline of cognitive function. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cognitive impairment after acute ischemic stroke and its associated factors. Methods A total of 314 cases of acute ischemic stroke patients were recruited in this study. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA was used to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment. The American National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to evaluate the extent of neurological deficit. The Barthel Index (BI was used to evaluate activities of daily living. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD was used to evaluate the patients' mental or emotional state. Results Based on the examination results, post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI group were less educated ( P = 0.000 with lower BI score ( P = 0.008, higher HAMD score and higher NIHSS score ( P = 0.000, for all, and elevated serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, P = 0.002 and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels (P = 0.005 than those in post-stroke no cognitive impairment (PSNCI group. In PSCI group, the concentration of serum hs-CRP and HbA1c, NIHSS and HAMD scores were negatively correlated with the MoCA rating (P < 0.05, for all; whereas, BI score was positively correlated with the MoCA rating (P < 0.05. The subjects in PSCI group had more cortical ischemic vascular disease (CIVD and left hemisphere ischemic vascular disease (LHIVD than subjects in PSNCI group ( P < 0.05. Logistic regression analysis indicated that lower education, history of diabetes, higher HAMD score, higher serum hs-CRP and HbA1c levels were independent risk factors for PSCI. Conclusion Cognitive impairment after acute ischemic stroke may be closely related to

  9. Creative art therapy to enhance rehabilitation for stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkasuwan, Ratcharin; Voraakhom, Kotchakorn; Pisolayabutra, Prim; Maneechai, Pichai; Boonin, Jiraporn; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2016-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of creative art therapy plus conventional physical therapy, compared with physical therapy only, in increasing cognitive ability, physical functions, psychological status and quality of life of stroke patients. Randomized controlled trial with blinded assessor. An in-patient setting PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and eighteen stroke patients aged ⩾50 years who could communicate verbally. All participants received conventional physical therapy five days per week. An intervention group received additional creative art therapy, twice a week for four weeks, in a rehabilitation ward. Cognitive function, anxiety and depression, physical performance and quality of life were measured with the Abbreviated Mental Test, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the modified Barthel Index scale and the pictorial Thai Quality of Life questionnaire, respectively. Mean differences for the intervention group were significantly greater than the control group for depression (-4.5, 95% CI -6.5, -2.5, pcreative art therapy and most reported improved concentration (68.5%), emotion (79.6%), self-confidence (72.2%) and motivation (74.1%). Creative art therapy combined with conventional physical therapy can significantly decrease depression, improve physical functions and increase quality of life compared with physical therapy alone. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Rehabilitation of the upper extremity and basic activities of daily living in the first month after ischemic stroke: an international cohort comparison study

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    Cesar Minelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inpatient rehabilitation has been traditionally employed in developed countries, while in developing countries, outpatient rehabilitation is the rule. The purpose of this study was to compare the patterns of recovery of upper extremity (UE function, global impairment and independence in activities of daily living (ADL during the first month after ischaemic stroke in inpatient (United States and outpatient (Brazil rehabilitation settings. Design and Methods: This is a prospective cohort comparison study. Twenty patients from each country were selected using identical inclusion criteria. The study measures employed were the UE portion of the Fugl-Meyer scale, the Action Research Arm test, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Barthel Index. Changes from baseline to the end of treatment, efficiency and effectiveness of each treatment were compared. Results: Both populations exhibited significant improvement between the first and second evaluations in the four outcome scales (P 0.05. Conclusions: Substantially different treatment approaches after ischaemic stroke led to similar results in UE function, global impairment and ADL. Further studies in larger populations should be performed in order to confirm the present results.

  11. A criterion for stability of the motor function of the lower extremity in stroke patients using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman; Vogelaar, T W; Lankhorst, G J; Verbeek, A L

    1996-03-01

    A test-retest reproducibility study was performed to define a criterion for stability as opposed to change of motor function of the lower extremity in stroke patients. Forty-nine patients with stroke were examined twice by the same physiotherapist, using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale. The interval between both measurements was three weeks. The mean differences between the first and the second measurement were small, with 0.04 points for the lower extremity scale and 0.92 points for the balance scale, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient for the lower extremity scale was 0.86, and 0.34 for the balance scale. The standard error of measurement for each scale was 1.76 and 1.17 points, respectively. The standard error of measurement can be transformed in an 'error threshold', which is a criterion to differentiate real changes from changes due to chance variation or measurement error. As the absence of real change is a parameter for stability, a change of less than 5 points for the lower extremity scale and of less than 4 points for balance confirms stability of motor function.

  12. Patient-specific prediction of functional recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douiri, Abdel; Grace, Justin; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; Tilling, Kate; McKevitt, Christopher; Wolfe, Charles DA; Rudd, Anthony G

    2017-07-01

    Background and aims Clinical predictive models for stroke recovery could offer the opportunity of targeted early intervention and more specific information for patients and carers. In this study, we developed and validated a patient-specific prognostic model for monitoring recovery after stroke and assessed its clinical utility. Methods Four hundred and ninety-five patients from the population-based South London Stroke Register were included in a substudy between 2002 and 2004. Activities of daily living were assessed using Barthel Index) at one, two, three, four, six, eight, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after stroke. Penalized linear mixed models were developed to predict patients' functional recovery trajectories. An external validation cohort included 1049 newly registered stroke patients between 2005 and 2011. Prediction errors on discrimination and calibration were assessed. The potential clinical utility was evaluated using prognostic accuracy measurements and decision curve analysis. Results Predictive recovery curves showed good accuracy, with root mean squared deviation of 3 Barthel Index points and a R 2 of 83% up to one year after stroke in the external cohort. The negative predictive values of the risk of poor recovery (Barthel Index <8) at three and 12 months were also excellent, 96% (95% CI [93.6-97.4]) and 93% [90.8-95.3], respectively, with a potential clinical utility measured by likelihood ratios (LR+:17 [10.8-26.8] at three months and LR+:11 [6.5-17.2] at 12 months). Decision curve analysis showed an increased clinical benefit, particularly at threshold probabilities of above 5% for predictive risk of poor outcomes. Conclusions A recovery curves tool seems to accurately predict progression of functional recovery in poststroke patients.

  13. Does the Inclusion of Virtual Reality Games within Conventional Rehabilitation Enhance Balance Retraining after a Recent Episode of Stroke?

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    B. S. Rajaratnam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomised controlled and double-blinded pilot study evaluated if interactive virtual reality balance related games integrated within conventional rehabilitation sessions resulted in more superior retraining of dynamic balance compared to CR after stroke. 19 subjects diagnosed with a recent episode of stroke were recruited from a local rehabilitation hospital and randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental group. Subjects in the control groups underwent 60 minutes of conventional rehabilitation while those in the experimental groups underwent 40 minutes of convention rehabilitation and 20 minutes of self-directed virtual reality balanced rehabilitation. Functional Reach Test, Timed Up and Go, Modified Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, and Centre of Pressure of subjects in both groups were evaluated before and on completion of the rehabilitation sessions. Results indicate that the inclusion of interactive virtual reality balance related games within conventional rehabilitation can lead to improved functional mobility and balance after a recent episode of stroke without increasing treatment time that requires more health professional manpower.

  14. Does the Inclusion of Virtual Reality Games within Conventional Rehabilitation Enhance Balance Retraining after a Recent Episode of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaratnam, B S; Gui Kaien, J; Lee Jialin, K; Sweesin, Kwek; Sim Fenru, S; Enting, Lee; Ang Yihsia, E; Keathwee, Ng; Yunfeng, Su; Woo Yinghowe, W; Teo Siaoting, S

    2013-01-01

    This randomised controlled and double-blinded pilot study evaluated if interactive virtual reality balance related games integrated within conventional rehabilitation sessions resulted in more superior retraining of dynamic balance compared to CR after stroke. 19 subjects diagnosed with a recent episode of stroke were recruited from a local rehabilitation hospital and randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental group. Subjects in the control groups underwent 60 minutes of conventional rehabilitation while those in the experimental groups underwent 40 minutes of convention rehabilitation and 20 minutes of self-directed virtual reality balanced rehabilitation. Functional Reach Test, Timed Up and Go, Modified Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, and Centre of Pressure of subjects in both groups were evaluated before and on completion of the rehabilitation sessions. Results indicate that the inclusion of interactive virtual reality balance related games within conventional rehabilitation can lead to improved functional mobility and balance after a recent episode of stroke without increasing treatment time that requires more health professional manpower.

  15. Effectiveness of home rehabilitation for ischemic stroke

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    Pakaratee Chaiyawat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop and examine the effectiveness of an individual home rehabilitation program for patients with ischemic stroke. This was a randomized controlled trial in 60 patients with recent middle cerebral artery infarction. After hospital discharge for acute stroke care, they were randomly assigned to receive either a home rehabilitation program for three months (intervention group or usual care (control group. We collected outcome data over three months after their discharge from the hospital. The Barthel Index (BI, the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, the health-related quality-of-life index (EQ-5D, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression score (HADs, and the Thai Mental State Examination (TMSE were used to analyze the outcomes. In the intervention group, all outcomes were significantly better (p<0.05 than in the control group, except in the case of TMSE. A favorable outcome, which was defined as minimal or no disability as measured by BI (score 95-100, was achieved by 93.33% of patients in the intervention group, and 90% had favorable scores (0 or 1 on the MRS. This showed a benefit in reducing disability, with two being the number of patients considered as needed-to-treat (NNT (95% CI, 1.0-1.2. All dimensions of EQ-5D in the intervention group were significantly better for quality of life and generic health status than in the control group (p=0.001. Depression was found in one patient (3.33% in the intervention group and in two patients (6.67% in the control group. Dementia was found in three patients (10% in the intervention group and in four patients (13.33% in the control group. We concluded that an early home rehabilitation program for patients with ischemic stroke in the first three-month period provides significantly better outcomes in improving function, reducing disability, increasing quality of life, and reducing depression than a program of usual care does.

  16. Valoración de la discapacidad física: el indice de Barthel

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    Cid-Ruzafa Javier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available En Salud Pública existe una tendencia creciente a valorar el impacto que los problemas de salud tienen, tanto sobre la calidad de vida de las personas como sobre el uso de servicios sanitarios. En este sentido, la evaluación de la discapacidad está adquiriendo una relevancia cada vez mayor. El índice de Barthel es un instrumento ampliamente utilizado para este propósito y mide la capacidad de la persona para la realización de diez actividades básicas de la vida diaria, obteniéndose una estimación cuantitativa del grado de dependencia del sujeto. El Indice de Barthel se ha venido utilizando desde que fue propuesto en 1955 y ha dado lugar a múltiples versiones, además de servir como estándar para la comparación con otras escalas. Es una medida fácil de aplicar, con alto grado de fiabilidad y validez, capaz de detectar cambios, fácil de interpretar y cuya aplicación no causa molestias. Por otra parte, su adaptación a diferentes ámbitos culturales resulta casi inmediata. A pesar de tener algunas limitaciones, el Indice de Barthel puede recomendarse como un instrumento de elección para la medida de la discapacidad física, tanto en la práctica clínica como en la investigación epidemiológica y en Salud Pública.

  17. The Barthel index-dyspnea: a new two-dimensional dyspnea scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Ming-Lung Chuang1–3 1Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, 3School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China Clinical evaluation tools have been widely used in assessing the baseline status, treatment response, and prognosis for patients with chronic respiratory diseases and mostly for patients with chronic obstructive pul...

  18. Hierarchical properties of the motor function sections of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for people after stroke: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, J Lesley; Harmeling-van der Wel, Barbara C

    2008-12-01

    The upper-extremity (UE) and lower-extremity (LE) sections (excluding balance) of the motor function domain of the Fugl-Meyer (FM) assessment scale (a construct referred to here as the FM motor scale) are recognized as a robust part of the scale for use with people after stroke. However, it is frequently criticized as a lengthy and time-consuming measurement tool. The aims of this study were to support a shortened method of administration for the FM motor scale and to provide arguments for the use of a summed score. In pursuit of these aims, the hierarchical properties of both the UE and LE sections of the FM motor scale were investigated. A retrospective analysis of data from 62 people with a previous stroke was performed. Guttman scale analysis considered the hierarchy of items within each subsection and each stage, between subsections and stages, and across all of the scale items (ignoring the stage divisions) of the FM motor scale. For the within-stage and subsection analyses and between-stage and subsection analyses, all of the results met or exceeded the acceptable levels for the coefficient of reproducibility and the coefficient of scalability. When stage divisions were ignored, the coefficient of reproducibility for both extremities was just below acceptable levels. The results support the use of the UE and LE sections of the FM motor scale as a stagewise and subsectionwise hierarchical assessment and outcome measure. This allows the use of a shortened method of administration, which can potentially reduce the time required for scale administration, and appropriate scores can be allocated for untested items, such that a legitimate total summed score can be used. A limitation of this study was that the study population consisted predominantly of older people with such severe disability that they were unable to function independently.

  19. Excellent test-retest and inter-rater reliability for Tardieu Scale measurements with inertial sensors in elbow flexors of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Winifred D; Horemans, Herwin L D; Brouwer, Betty S; Stam, Henk J

    2011-02-01

    Spasticity is often clinically assessed with the Tardieu Scale, using goniometry to measure the range of motion and angle of catch. However, the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of these measurements have been questioned. Inertial sensors (IS) have been developed to measure orientation in space and are suggested to be a more appropriate tool than goniometry to measure angles in Tardieu Scale measurements. To compare the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of Tardieu Scale scores measured with IS and goniometry. Two physiotherapists performed Tardieu Scale measurements in two sessions, using both goniometry and IS, to quantify spasticity in elbow flexors of 13 stroke patients. For goniometry, test-retest and inter-rater reliability proved to be excellent (ICC 0.86) and fair to good (ICC 0.66), respectively. For IS, both test-retest (ICC 0.76) and inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.84) were excellent. Inertial sensors are reliable and accurate to use in Tardieu Scale measurements to quantify spasticity in the elbow flexors of hemiplegic stroke patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effectiveness of Functional Electrical Stimulation Based on a Normal Gait Pattern on Subjects with Early Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Zhimei Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effectiveness of four-channel FES based on a normal gait pattern on improving functional ability in subjects early after ischemic stroke. Methods. Forty-five subjects were randomly assigned into a four-channel FES group (n=16, a placebo group (n=15, or a dual-channel group (n=14. Stimulation lasted for 30 min in each session with 1 session/day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. All subjects were assessed at baseline, at 3 weeks of treatment, and at 3 months after the treatment had finished. The assessments included Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS, Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Functional Ambulation Category (FAC, and the Modified Barthel Index (MBI. Results. All 3 groups demonstrated significant improvements in all outcome measurements from pre- to posttreatment and further gains at followup. The score of FMA and MBI improved significantly in the four-channel group at the end of the 3 weeks of training. And the scores of PASS, BBS, MBI, and FAC in the four-channel group were significantly higher than those of the placebo group. Conclusions. This study indicated that four-channel FES can improve motor function, balance, walking ability, and performance of activities of daily living in subjects with early ischemic stroke.

  1. Use of Rasch Analysis to Evaluate and Refine the Community Balance and Mobility Scale for Use in Ambulatory Community-Dwelling Adults Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Courtney L.; Brouwer, Brenda; Garland, S. Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Background The Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CB&M) is increasingly used to evaluate walking balance following stroke. Objective This study applied Rasch analysis to evaluate and refine the CB&M for use in ambulatory community-dwelling adults following stroke. Methods The CB&M content was linked to task demands and motor skill classifications. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate internal construct validity (structural validity) and refine the CB&M for use with ambulatory community-dwelling adults following stroke. The CB&M data were collected at 3 time points: at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation and at 6 and 12 months postdischarge (N=238). Rasch analysis evaluated scale dimensionality, item and person fit, item response bias, scoring hierarchy, and targeting. Disordered scoring hierarchy was resolved by collapsing scoring categories. Highly correlated and “misfitting” items were removed. Sensitivity to change was evaluated with standardized response means (SRMs) and one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The CB&M was primarily linked to closed body transport task demands. Significant item-trait interaction, disordered scoring hierarchies, and multidimensionality were found. Scoring categories were collapsed in 15/19 items, and 5 misfitting items were removed. The resulting stroke-specific 14-item unidimensional CB&M (CB&MStroke) fit Rasch model expectations, with no item response bias, acceptable targeting (13% floor effects and 0% ceiling effects), and moderate-to-strong sensitivity to change at 6 months postdischarge (SRM=0.63; 95% confidence interval=−1.523, −0.142) and 12 months postdischarge (SRM=0.73; 95% confidence interval=−2.318, −0.760). Limitations Findings are limited to a modest-sized sample of individuals with mild-to-moderate balance impairment following stroke. Conclusions The CB&MStroke shows promise as a clinical scale for measuring change in walking balance in ambulatory community-dwelling adults

  2. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. MEASURES: ADL-observations, Barthel ADL Index, Apraxia Test, Motricity Index. RESULTS: During the study period of 20 weeks, patients showed small improv...

  3. [Evaluation on efficacy of Jin's "Sanzhen" therapy combined with rehabilitation training for hemiplegia of stroke patients by Fugl-Meyer scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, De-Xiong; Zhuang, Li-Xing; Zhang, Ying

    2011-06-01

    To assess the therapeutic effect of Jin's "Sanzhen" therapy combined with rehabilitation training on limb-motor function of stroke patients by using Fugl-Meyer scale. A total of 254 hemiplegic stroke outpatients and inpatients from 7 hospitals were randomly divided into Jin's "Sanzhen" (JSZ) group (n = 83), rehabilitation group (n = 84) and combination group (n = 87). Acupuncture was applied to acupoints of Jin's "Sanzhen" including Quchi (LI 11), Waiguan (SJ 5) and Hegu (LI 4); Futu (ST 32). Zusanli (ST 36) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6); etc. The acupuncture needles were retained for 30 min after "Deqi". Rehabilitation training included passive joint movement, standing-sitting training, tapping-pressing stimulation, walking training, etc. The treatment was conducted once daily, 5 sessions a week and for 4 weeks. Fugl-Meyer scale composed of 100-point motor domain of the upper- and lower-extremity sections was used to assess the patients' motor function. On day 28 after the treatment, of the 83.84 and 87 hemiplegic stroke patients in the JSZ, rehabilitation and combination groups, 48 (57.8%), 31 (36.9%) and 50 (57.5%) experienced marked improvement in their clinical symptoms and signs, 26 (31.3%), 44 (52.4%) and 31(35.6%) had an improvement, and 9 (10.8%), 9 (10.7%) and 6 (6.9%) failed in the treatment, with the total effective rates being 89.2%, 89.3% and 93.1%, respectively. The neurological deficit score (NDS) of the combination group was significantly lower than that of the rehabilitation group (P Fugl-Meyer assessment score (FMAS) for extremity motor function of the combination group was apparently higher than those of the JSZ and rehabilitation groups (P 0.05). Jin's "Sanzhen" therapy combined with rehabilitation training can significantly improve the limb motor function of hemiplegic stroke patients, and has a good synergistic effect.

  4. Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute ischemic stroke: A pilot study in Indian patients

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    Padma M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of normobaric high-flow oxygen therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Materials and Methods: Patients with anterior circulation ischemic strokes presenting within 12 h of onset, ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis, an National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of >4, a mean transit time (MTT lesion larger than diffusion-weighted image (DWI (perfusiondiffusion mismatch, and an evidence of cortical hypoperfusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were included into the trial. Active chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, requirement of >3/L min oxygen delivery to maintain SaO2 > 95%, rapidly improving neurological deficits, pregnancy, contraindications to MRI, or unstable medical conditions were excluded. The experimental group received humidified oxygen at flow rates of 10 L/min for 12 h. The NIHSS, modified Rankin Score (mRS, Barthel Index (BI were measured at 0, 1, 7 day of admission and at 3 months follow-up. MRI with DWI/PWI was performed at admission, 24 h later and at 3 months follow-up. Results: Of 40 patients (mean age = 55.8 years ± 13.2 (range, 26-82, 20 patients were randomized to normobaric oxygen (NBO. The mean NIHSS in NBO and control groups were 14.25 and 12.7 at admission which decreased to 11.6 and 9.5 on the seventh day, and 9.4 and 9.05 at 3 months, respectively. The mean mRS (3.7/3.7 and BI (58.2/53.9 in NBO and control groups improved to 2/2.2 and 73.05/73.8 at the end of 3 months, respectively. Conclusions: NBO did not improve the clinical scores of stroke outcome in Indian patients with AIS.

  5. Experience with Relatox® in the combination therapy of arm and hand spasticity after stroke

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    V. V. Gusev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the botulinum toxin A Relatox® in arm and hand spasticity after ischemic stroke in routine clinical practice.Patients and methods. The instigation enrolled 7 patients after ischemic stroke (7 years ago with the signs of upper limb spasticity. All the patients received combination treatment that involved daily kinesiotherapy sessions and electrical stimulation of the paralyzed limbs. Relatox® was once injected into the forearm muscles of the paralyzed arm 6 months or later after stroke. Muscles were chosen according to clinical and electromyographic findings. The patients' status was assessed before, 2 weeks and 3 months after injection.There were changes in muscle tone, motor abilities of the hand, in the degree of self-service, the presence of subjective sensations, and the degree of local and systemic reactions. The efficiency of therapy was evaluated clinically (Ashworth scale, Frenchay test, Barthel index and on the basis of an analysis of video monitoring a patient's status and of the consideration of care-givers' views.Before included in the study, all the patients were treated with different types of botulinum neurotoxin type A made by other manufacturers.Results. The clinical efficiency of local intramuscular injection of the botulinum toxin type Relatox® in combination with kinesiotherapy and electrical stimulation after 14 days and 3 months after injection was noted in all cases.The good tolerability, efficacy, and long-term of action of relatox, which were comparable to those of other botulinum neurotoxin type A products, were noted during a 3-month follow-up. Neither side effects no adverse events were identified.Conclusion. Accumulation of data on the doses and effects of drugs for the local therapy of post-stroke spasticity, which have been obtained by different clinical centers, and the possibility of choosing a medication will be able to improve treatment in such

  6. Development of a Barthel Index based on dyspnea for patients with respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitacca, Michele; Paneroni, Mara; Baiardi, Paola; De Carolis, Vito; Zampogna, Elisabetta; Belli, Stefano; Carone, Mauro; Spanevello, Antonio; Balbi, Bruno; Bertolotti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    As Barthel Index (BI) quantifies motor impairment but not breathlessness, the use of only this index could underestimate disability in chronic respiratory disease (CRD). To our knowledge, no study evaluates both motor and respiratory disability in CRD during activities of daily living (ADLs) simultaneously and with a unique tool. The objective of this study was to propose for patients with CRD an additional tool for dyspnea assessment during ADLs based on BI items named Barthel Index dyspnea. Comprehensibility, reliability, internal consistency, validity, responsiveness, and ability to differentiate between disease groups were assessed on 219 subjects through an observational study performed in an in-hospital rehabilitation setting. Good comprehensibility, high reliability (interrater intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 [95% confidence interval 0.892-0.964] and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.99 [95% confidence interval 0.983-0.994]), good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.89), strong concurrent validity with 6 minute walking distance (Pearson r=-0.538, Pmeasuring the level of dyspnea perceived in performing basic daily living activities. A unique instrument simultaneously administered may provide a global assessment of disability during ADLs incorporating both motor and respiratory aspects.

  7. Psychological health of caregivers and association with functional status of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Em, Serda; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Caglayan, Mehmet; Ceylan Cevik, Figen; Kaya, Cemal; Oktayoglu, Pelin; Nas, Kemal

    2017-07-01

    Stroke does not only affect the physical state of patients but also the emotional state of their relatives, most effectively their caregivers. The study aims to examine the mood of caregivers experienced with care for patients with stroke who are highly dependent on the assistance and also to establish the relationship between the emotional state of caregivers and the severity of disability of the patients. This study contained a total of 76 patients with sufficient cognitive functions and severe physical disabilities with hemiplegia caused by a cerebrovascular accident and their caregivers and 94 controls. The functional state of patients was assessed by the Barthel Index (BI). Furthermore, emotional state of the caregivers was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and their life quality was assessed by the SF36 Health Survey. The mean anxiety (9.73 ± 4.88) and depression rates (9.81 ± 5.05) in the caregivers were significantly higher than those in controls (p<0.001, respectively). Significant impairments were observed in both their mental and physical health. Regression analysis also showed a significant negative correlation between the BI scores and the HADS scores. Caregivers had an impaired emotional state and the level of their anxiety was associated with the severity of functional disability of the patients. Therefore, the support provided to the caregiver might be influential on the functional recovery of the patients.

  8. [Interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture combined with occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment in stroke: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Pei, Jian; Cui, Xiao; Sun, Kexing; Ni, Huanhuan; Zhou, Cuixia; Wu, Ji; Huang, Mei; Ji, Li

    2015-10-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy on upper limb motor impairment in stroke between the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture therapy and the traditional scalp acupuncture therapy. The randomized controlled trial and MINIMIZE layering randomization software were adopted. Seventy patients of upper limb with III to V grade in Brunnstrom scale after stroke were randomized into an interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group and a traditional scalp acupuncture group, 35 cases in each one. In the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group, the middle 2/5 of Dingnieqianxiexian (anterior oblique line of vertex-temporal), the middle 2/5 of Dingniehouxiexian (posterior oblique line of vertex-temporal) and Dingpangerxian (lateral line 2 of vertex) on the affected side were selected as the stimulation areas. Additionally, the rehabilitation training was applied during scalp acupuncture treatment. In the traditional scalp acupuncture group, the scalp stimulation areas were same as the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group. But the rehabilitation training was applied separately. The rehabilitation training was applied in the morning and the scalp acupuncture was done in the afternoon. The results in Fugl-Meyer for the upper limb motor function (U-FMA), the Wolf motor function measure scale (WM- FT) and the modified Barthel index in the two groups were compared between the two groups before treatment and in 1 and 2 months of treatment, respectively. After treatment, the U-FMA score, WMFT score and the score of the modified Barthel index were all apparently improved as compared with those before treatment (all P acupuncture group was better than that in the traditional scalp acupuncture group (P acupuncture group were improved apparently as compared with those in the traditional scalp acupuncture group (P acupuncture group were not different significantly as compared with those in the traditional scalp acupuncture group (both P > 0.05). For the patients of IV to V grade in

  9. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  10. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  11. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Functional Recovery Following Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Young; Shin, Sung Bong; Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the factors related to upper extremity functional improvement following inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in stroke patients. Forty-one stroke patients received low-frequency rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere according to a standard protocol, in addition to conventional physical and occupational therapy. The rTMS-treated patients were divided into two groups according to their responsiveness to rTMS measured by the self-care score of the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI): responded group (n=19) and non-responded group (n=22). Forty-one age-matched stroke patients who had not received rTMS served as controls. Neurological, cognitive and functional assessments were performed before rTMS and 4 weeks after rTMS treatment. Among the rTMS-treated patients, the responded group was significantly younger than the non-responded group (51.6±10.5 years and 65.5±13.7 years, respectively; p=0.001). Four weeks after rTMS, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Brunnstrom recovery stage and upper extremity muscle power scores were significantly more improved in the responded group than in the control group. Besides the self-care score, the mobility score of the K-MBI was also more improved in the responded group than in the non-responded group or controls. Age is the most obvious factor determining upper extremity functional responsiveness to low-frequency rTMS in stroke patients.

  12. Hyperacute thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator of acute ischemic stroke: Feasibility and effectivity from an Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the constraints of resources, thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke (AIS is under evaluation in developing countries like India, especially in areas such as western Utter Pradesh, where it is overly crowded and there is poor affordability. Aim: This study was done to evaluate recombinant tissue plasminogen activator r-tpa in acute ischemic stroke in hyper acute phase, in selected patients of western Utter Pradesh, in terms of feasibility and effectivity. Design: Open, non randomized study. Materials and Methods: Thirty two patients were classified using Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke treatment (TOAST criteria (large artery atherosclerotic = 8; cardio embolic = 6; small vessel occlusion = 14; other determined etiology = 2; undetermined etiology = 2. The mean time to reach the hospital was 2 h (1.15-3.0, the mean door to CT scan 20 min (10-40 and door to r-tpa injection was 30 min (24-68. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores ranged from 11-22 (mean 15.5 +2.7. The dose of r-tpa administered was 0.9 mg/kg. Results: Twenty one patients (65.6% showed significant improvement on the NIHSS score, at 48 h (4 points. (Mean change = 10; range = 4-17. At one month, 25 (78% recorded improvement on the Barthel index (mean change = 45%. One developed frontal lobe hemorrhage and another developed recurrent stroke; one died of aspiration; and four showed no improvement. Modified Rankin score (m RS was administered at the end of three months to 28 patients (90%; however, the rest could not be directly observed. The average modified Rankin Score was 1.2 (0-2. Conclusions: Hyperacute thrombolysis was found feasible and effective in selected patients with AIS from western Utter Pradesh and who had poor affordability.

  13. Are activity limitations associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in stroke patients? A cross-sectional, clinical survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2009-01-01

    stroke patients were invited to complete four activity limitations measurements: Barthel Index, mobility velocity, mobility distance, mobility aids and one LUTS measurement: the Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire. Of 519 stroke patients, 482 subjects were eligible. Results......Objective. To assess self-reported activity limitations in a clinical sample of stroke patients and to identify their association with prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Material and methods. A cross-sectional, clinical survey was initiated whereby...... time that activity limitations are closely related to LUTS in stroke patients and that rehabilitation should also be directed towards the treatment of LUTS....

  14. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity.

  15. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity

  16. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency

    OpenAIRE

    S Kiran; Gopee Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) dwells in a person's overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39) into Kannada, to measure test?retest reliability and internal con...

  17. Post-acute care for stroke – a retrospective cohort study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai CL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chung-Liang Lai,1,* Ming-Miau Tsai,1,* Jia-Yuan Luo,1 Wan-Chun Liao,1 Pi-Shan Hsu,2,3 Han-Yu Chen4 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Family Medicine, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, 3Graduate Institute of Microbiology and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, 4Department of Physical Therapy, Hungkuang University, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Stroke often causes functional decline in patients. Therefore, after the acute phase, many patients require post-acute care (PAC to maximize their functional progress, reduce disability, and make it possible for them to return to their home and community. PAC can be provided in different settings. Taiwan’s National Health Insurance (NHI proposed a PAC pilot program, effective since 2014, for stroke patients that allowed patients with the potential for functional improvement to receive PAC rehabilitation in regional or community hospitals. The purpose of this study was to explore the initial achievements and clinical impact of this program in Taiwan. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that mainly analyzed basic hospitalization data and scores for function and quality of life, as recorded immediately after admission and before discharge, for stroke patients in the PAC program in a hospital in Taiwan. Results: This study collected complete data from a total of 168 patients. After an average of 43.57 days in the program, patients showed significant improvement in the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, the Barthel Activity Daily Living Index (B-ADL, the Lawton–Brody Instrumental Activity Daily Living Scale (LB-IADL, the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS, and the Mini Nutrition Assessment (MNA, in mobility, self-care, and usual activity, as well as on anxiety/depression in the EuroQol Five Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D and in the Mini Mental State Examination

  18. Gothenburg very early supported discharge study (GOTVED) NCT01622205: a block randomized trial with superiority design of very early supported discharge for patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Danielsson, Anna; Rafsten, Lena; Björkdahl, Ann; Axelsson, Åsa B; Nordin, Åsa; Petersson, Cathrine A; Lundgren-Nilsson, Åsa; Fröjd, Karin

    2013-06-24

    Stroke is the disease with the highest costs for hospital care and also after discharge. Early supported discharge (ESD) has shown to be efficient and safe and the best results with well-organised discharge teams and patients with less severe strokes. The aim is to investigate if very early supported discharge (VESD) for stroke patients in need for on-going individualised rehabilitation at home is useful for the patient and cost effective. A randomized controlled trial comparing VESD with ordinary discharge. confirmed stroke, >18 years of age, living within 30 min from the stroke unit, on day 2 0-16 points on the National institute of health stroke scale (NIHSS) and 50-100 points on the Barthel Index (BI), with BI 100 then the patient can be included if the Montreal Cognitive Assessment is 16, BI block randomization of 20 and with blinded assessor. levels of anxiety and depression. independence, security, level of function, quality of health, needs of support in activities of daily living and caregiver burden. Power calculation is based on the level of anxiety and with a power of 80%, p-value 0.05 (2 sided test) 44 persons per group are needed. Data is gathered on co-morbidity, re-entry to hospital, mortality and a health economic analysis. Interviews will be accomplished with a strategic sample of 15 patients in the intervention group before discharge, within two weeks after homecoming and 3 months later. Interviews are also planned with 15 relatives in the intervention group 3 months after discharge. The ESD studies in the Cochrane review present hospital stays of a length that no longer exist in Sweden. There is not yet, to our knowledge, any study of early supported discharge with present length of hospital stay. Thus it is not clear if home rehabilitation nowadays without risks, is cost effective, or with the same patient usefulness as earlier studies. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01622205.

  19. Hubungan Antara Lama Pembacaan Ct Scan Terhadap Outcome Penderita Stroke Non Hemoragik

    OpenAIRE

    Prakasita, Masayu; Tugasworo, Dodik; Ismail, Akhmad

    2015-01-01

    Background : Stroke is world's health problem that can leads into death and disability. Stroke is one of emergency case because it can threatening life so that it needs an urgent intervention with an accurate and fast diagnosis using non-contrast CT Scan as gold standart. Faster the diagnosis is made then faster the intervention is given, so the outcome of non-hemorrhagic stroke patients which is measured by Barthel Index are better.Methods : This study is an observational analytic study with...

  20. [Evaluation of functional capacity and quality of life of the elderly after ischemic stroke with and without dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Dênis Marinho da Silva; Nascimento, Joanna Lopes da Silva; Vianna, Lucy Gomes

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the functional capacity and quality of life of elderly individuals with ischemic stroke comparing these with and without dysphagia. Cross sectional study was realized in 60 elderly individuals after ischemic stroke, 30 with dysphagia and 30 without. Their cognitive state was evaluated with the Mini-Mental test. The scales used were: KATZ, Lawton, Barthel and SF-36. The functional capacity was similar in both groups studied. In the SF-36, the group without dysphagia presented more pain and a better general health. Functional capacity, physical limitations those due to emotional aspects, general state of health , social vitality, mental health limitation were similar in both groups. Among men, for all scales used, functional capacity was similar. Among women, functional capacity was similar in both groups; however, in the quality of life, the domain 'vitality' was higher in the group without dysphagia. The income bracket did not influence the functional capacity or the quality of life. There was no difference between groups whether they had or not a care provider. 1) Functional capacity was similar in both groups studied. 2) The group without dysphagia presented better general health.

  1. Japanese Adaptation of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39): Comparative Study among Different Types of Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Akane; Kamiya, Kentaro; Tatsumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Makihiko; Horiguchi, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a Japanese version of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39), designated as SAQOL-39-J, and used psychometric methods to examine its acceptability and reliability. The acceptability and reliability of SAQOL-39-J, which was developed from the English version using a standard translation and back-translation method, were examined in 54 aphasia patients using standard psychometric methods. The acceptability and reliability of SAQOL-39-J were then compared among patients with different types of aphasia. SAQOL-39-J showed good acceptability, internal consistency (Cronbach's α score = .90), and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .97). Broca's aphasia patients showed the lowest total scores and communication scores on SAQOL-39-J. The Japanese version of SAQOL-39, SAQOL-39-J, provides acceptable and reliable data in Japanese stroke patients with aphasia. Among different types of aphasia, Broca's aphasia patients had the lowest total and communication SAQOL-39-J scores. Further studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of health care interventions on health-related quality of life in this population. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inter-rater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale as a clinical tool in measurements of post-stroke elbow flexor spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasson, Scott; Mousakhani, Atefeh; Nouriyan, Azam; Omidvar, Zeinab

    2009-01-01

    Patients with neurological conditions may be affected by spasticity. The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) is a clinical tool used to measure spasticity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of the MMAS during the assessment of elbow flexor spasticity in adult patients with post-stroke hemiplegia. Twenty-one adult patients with stroke (5 women, 16 men) with a median age of 60 years (interquartile range, 47-68) were tested. Elbow flexors on the affected side were examined. Inter-rater reliability for two inexperienced raters was very good. The weighted Kappa value was 0.81 (Standard Error = 0.097, 95% CI: 0.62-1.00, p = 0.0002). The weighted percentage agreement was 97.4%. The agreement between raters occurred mostly on score 1 (38.1%) followed by score 0 (23.8%). The MMAS yielded reliable measurements between raters when used on patients post-stroke with elbow flexor spasticity.

  3. A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Sui-Cheung; Hung, Ben H B; Ng, Roger M K; Yu, Xiao-Chun; Cheung, Hobby; Fung, Mandy P M; Li, Leonard S W; Leung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Kei-Pui; Tsang, Kevin W Y; Ziea, Eric; Wong, Vivian T; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2014-07-19

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression - Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients' depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394.

  4. Development of a Barthel Index based on dyspnea for patients with respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitacca M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michele Vitacca,1 Mara Paneroni,1 Paola Baiardi,2 Vito De Carolis,3 Elisabetta Zampogna,4 Stefano Belli,5 Mauro Carone,3 Antonio Spanevello,4,6 Bruno Balbi,5 Giorgio Bertolotti7 1Respiratory Rehabilitation Division, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Institute of Lumezzane, Brescia, 2Scientific Direction, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Institute of Pavia, Pavia, 3Respiratory Division, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Institute of Cassano delle Murge, Bari, 4Respiratory Division, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Institute of Tradate, Varese, 5Respiratory Division, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Institute of Veruno, Novara, 6Respiratory Diseases Unit, University of Insubria, Varese, 7Psychology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Institute of Tradate, Varese, Italy Background: As Barthel Index (BI quantifies motor impairment but not breathlessness, the use of only this index could underestimate disability in chronic respiratory disease (CRD. To our knowledge, no study evaluates both motor and respiratory disability in CRD during activities of daily living (ADLs simultaneously and with a unique tool. The objective of this study was to propose for patients with CRD an additional tool for dyspnea assessment during ADLs based on BI items named Barthel Index dyspnea.Methods: Comprehensibility, reliability, internal consistency, validity, responsiveness, and ability to differentiate between disease groups were assessed on 219 subjects through an observational study performed in an in-hospital rehabilitation setting.Results: Good comprehensibility, high reliability (interrater intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 [95% confidence interval 0.892–0.964] and test–retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.99 [95% confidence interval 0.983–0.994], good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha 0.89, strong concurrent validity with 6 minute walking distance (Pearson r=–0.538, P<0.001 and Medical Research Council

  5. Validation of the RRE-90 Scale to Predict Stroke Risk after Transient Symptoms with Infarction: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Song

    Full Text Available The risk of stroke after a transient ischemic attack (TIA for patients with a positive diffusion-weighted image (DWI, i.e., transient symptoms with infarction (TSI, is much higher than for those with a negative DWI. The aim of this study was to validate the predictive value of a web-based recurrence risk estimator (RRE; http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/RRE/ of TSI.Data from the prospective hospital-based TIA database of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University were analyzed. The RRE and ABCD2 scores were calculated within 7 days of symptom onset. The predictive outcome was ischemic stroke occurrence at 90 days. The receiver-operating characteristics curves were plotted, and the predictive value of the two models was assessed by computing the C statistics.A total of 221 eligible patients were prospectively enrolled, of whom 46 (20.81% experienced a stroke within 90 days. The 90-day stroke risk in high-risk TSI patients (RRE ≥4 was 3.406-fold greater than in those at low risk (P <0.001. The C statistic of RRE (0.681; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.592-0.771 was statistically higher than that of ABCD2 score (0.546; 95% CI, 0.454-0.638; Z = 2.115; P = 0.0344 at 90 days.The RRE score had a higher predictive value than the ABCD2 score for assessing the 90-day risk of stroke after TSI.

  6. Towards an objective assessment of motor function in sub-acute stroke patients: Relationship between clinical rating scales and instrumental gait stability indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, P; Mazzoli, D; Stagni, R

    2018-01-01

    The assessment of walking function alterations is a key issue to design effective rehabilitative interventions in sub-acute stroke patients. Nevertheless, the objective quantification of these alterations remains a challenge. Clinical rating scales are commonly used in clinical practice, but have been proven prone to errors associated to the evaluator subjective perception. On the other hand, instrumental measurement of trunk acceleration can be exploited for an objective quantitative characterization of gait function, but it is not applied in routine clinical practice, because the resulting quantitative indexes have not been related to the clinically information, conventionally provided by the rating scales. To overcome this limitation, the relationship between the indexes, in specific clinical conditions, and rating scale must be better investigated, to support their exploitability in the clinical practice as a fast and reliable screening tool. Thirty-one sub-acute stroke patients (17 with and 14 without cane) participated in the study. All were assessed with 6 rating scales (MI, TCT, MRI, FAC, WHS, CIRS) and 2 functional tests (2MWT and TUG). Sample Entropy (SEN) and Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) in AP, ML and V directions were calculated over 2MWT and walking section of TUG. The influence of assessment task and cane was analysed, as well as correlation of SEN and RQA indexes with clinical rating scales. SEN and RQA on the medio-lateral plane resulted influenced by the use of the cane, while the correlations between indexes and clinical scales showed that SEN and RQA for antero-posterior direction correlate positively with WHS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  8. Bidirectional and Multi-User Telerehabilitation System: Clinical Effect on Balance, Functional Activity, and Satisfaction in Patients with Chronic Stroke Living in Long-Term Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan-Hwa Lin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The application of internet technology for telerehabilitation in patients with stroke has developed rapidly. Objective: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of a bidirectional and multi-user telerehabilitation system on balance and satisfaction in patients with chronic stroke living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs. Method: This pilot study used a multi-site, blocked randomization design. Twenty-four participants from three LTCFs were recruited, and the participants were randomly assigned into the telerehabilitation (Tele and conventional therapy (Conv groups within each LTCF. Tele group received telerehabilitation but the Conv group received conventional therapy with two persons in each group for three sessions per week and for four weeks. The outcome measures included Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Barthel Index (BI, and the telerehabilitation satisfaction of the participants. Setting: A telerehabilitation system included “therapist end” in a laboratory, and the “client end” in LTCFs. The conventional therapy was conducted in LTCFs. Results: Training programs conducted for both the Tele and Conv groups showed significant effects within groups on the participant BBS as well as the total and self-care scores of BI. No significant difference between groups could be demonstrated. The satisfaction of participants between the Tele and the Conv groups also did not show significant difference. Conclusions: This pilot study indicated that the multi-user telerehabilitation program is feasible for improving the balance and functional activity similar to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke living in LTCFs.

  9. The Effect of a Virtual Reality Game Intervention on Balance for Patients with Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Chieh; Huang, Chia-Lin; Ho, Sui-Hua; Sung, Wen-Hsu

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of virtual reality (VR) balance training conducted using Kinect for Xbox® games on patients with chronic stroke. Fifty patients with mild to moderate motor deficits were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups: VR plus standard treatment group and standard treatment (ST) group. In total, 12 training sessions (90 minutes a session, twice a week) were conducted in both groups, and performance was assessed at three time points (pretest, post-test, and follow-up) by a blinded assessor. The outcome measures were the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Functional Reach Test, and Timed Up and Go Test (cognitive; TUG-cog) for balance evaluations; Modified Barthel Index for activities of daily living ability; Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale for balance confidence; and Stroke Impact Scale for quality of life. The pleasure scale and adverse events were also recorded after each training session. Both groups exhibited significant improvement over time in the BBS (P = 0.000) and TUG-cog test (P = 0.005). The VR group rated the experience as more pleasurable than the ST group during the intervention (P = 0.027). However, no significant difference was observed in other outcome measures within or between the groups. No serious adverse events were observed during the treatment in either group. VR balance training by using Kinect for Xbox games plus the traditional method had positive effects on the balance ability of patients with chronic stroke. The VR group experienced higher pleasure than the ST group during the intervention.

  10. Apathy among institutionalized stroke patients: prevalence and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Almenkerk, Suzanne; Smalbrugge, Martin; Depla, Marja F I A; Eefsting, Jan A; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2015-02-01

    Apathy is a frequent neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke. In the under-researched population of institutionalized stroke patients, we aimed to explore the prevalence of apathy, its clinical correlates, and the relation to the amount of stimulating activities in the nursing home (NH). A cross-sectional, observational study. Dutch NHs. 274 chronic stroke patients. Data were collected through observation lists that were filled out in structured interviews with qualified nurse assistants who knew the residents well. The lists comprised the NH-version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES10), the Barthel Index, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire, and sections of the Resident Assessment Instrument for Long-Term Care Facilities. Attending physicians and therapists provided additional information. Apathy (AES10 score ≥30) was present in 28% of residents. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that this apathy was independently related to (moderate, severe) cognitive impairment (odds ratio [OR] 11.30 [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.96-25.74], OR 5.54 [95% CI: 2.48-12.40]), very severe ADL-dependency (OR 12.10 [95% CI: 1.35-108.66]), and being >12 hours per day in bed (OR 2.10 [95% CI: 1.07-4.13]). It was not related to depressive mood symptoms (OR 1.75 [95% CI: 0.91-3.37]). Only in residents aged less than 80 years were a higher amount of activities independently related to a lower AES10 score (-0.70 [95% CI: -1.18 to -0.20] points per four extra activities in a 4-week period). Apathy is prevalent in largely one-quarter of institutionalized stroke patients, and that is most strongly related to cognitive impairment in this explorative study. We discuss the need for research on the relation with distinct dimensions of depression and fatigue as partly overlapping constructs, and on (individualized) stimulating activities as a possible intervention method. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Lower Barthel Index Is Associated with Higher Risk of Hospitalization-Requiring Pneumonia in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, I-Ling; Weng, Ching-Yi; Chuang, Jui-Chu; Lin, Su-Chiu; Tsai, Fong-Fong; Chen, Zen-Yong

    2015-08-01

    Pneumonia is an important infectious entity that affects residents in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), whereas hospitalization-requiring pneumonia (HRP) represents a more critical patient condition with worse outcomes. The evidence addressing the association between Barthel index and risk of HRP among LTCF residents is lacking. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study was conducted in three LTCFs enrolling adult patients who resided for 3 months or more and ever underwent Barthel index evaluation within a study period of January 1 to December 31, 2010. The endpoint was HRP after enrollment. A total of 299 patients (169 women; age, 79.0 ± 12.2 years) were enrolled and categorized into HRP Group (n = 68; 36 women; age, 79.1 ± 11.3 years) and Non-HRP Group (n = 231; 133 women; age, 79.0 ± 12.4 years) by the endpoint. The patients in HRP Group had significantly lower Barthel index (8.6 versus 25.8 points, p hospitalization in long-term care residents. Barthel index is a useful and reliable tool for risk evaluation in this population.

  12. The Barthel Index: comparing inter-rater reliability between nurses and doctors in an older adult rehabilitation unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hartigan, Irene

    2011-02-01

    To ensure accuracy in recording the Barthel Index (BI) in older people, it is essential to determine who is best placed to administer the index. The aim of this study was to compare doctors\\' and nurses\\' reliability in scoring the BI.

  13. A nearly full-recovery from AVM hemorrhagic stroke 17 years after insult using a new integrated neurodevelopmental approach: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Alberto J

    2017-09-01

    six month period, as gains were being observed, a more formal measurement process was begun for a second six-month period. Initial measurements of progress were taken every six weeks using the Fugl-Meyer test, the Berg Balance Test, the Barthel Index, and the Stroke Specific Quality Of Life scale. Results showed clinically significant improvements in all areas of recovery.

  14. The relation between Ashworth scale scores and the excitability of the alpha motor neurones in patients with post-stroke muscle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, A M O; Maynard, V A; Curnow, J; Hudson, N; Kodapala, S

    2003-05-01

    The modified Ashworth scale (MAS) is the most widely used method for assessing muscle spasticity in clinical practice and research. However, the validity of this scale has been challenged. To compare the MAS with objective neurophysiological tests of spasticity. The MAS was recorded in patients with post-stroke lower limb muscle spasticity and correlated with the excitability of the alpha motor neurones. The latter was evaluated by measuring the latency of the Hoffmann reflex (H reflex) and the ratio of the amplitude of the maximum H reflex (H(max)) to that of the compound action motor potential of the soleus muscle (M(max)). Data on 24 randomly recruited patients were analysed. Patients were divided into two groups according to their MAS score: 14 had a MAS score of 1 (group A) and 10 scored 2 (group B). The two groups were comparable with respect to age and sex, but in group A there was a longer period since the stroke. The H reflex latency was reduced and the H(max):M(max) ratio was increased in both groups. The H(max):M(max) ratio values were higher for group B but the differences were not statistically significant. There is a relation between the MAS scores and alpha motor neurone excitability, although it is not linear. This suggests that the MAS measures muscle hypertonia rather than spasticity.

  15. Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Shaw, Lisa; Bosomworth, Helen; Aird, Lydia; Alvarado, Natasha; Andole, Sreeman; Cohen, David L; Dawson, Jesse; Eyre, Janet; Finch, Tracy; Ford, Gary A; Hislop, Jennifer; Hogg, Steven; Howel, Denise; Hughes, Niall; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Price, Christopher; Rochester, Lynn; Stamp, Elaine; Ternent, Laura; Turner, Duncan; Vale, Luke; Warburton, Elizabeth; van Wijck, Frederike; Wilkes, Scott

    2017-07-20

    Loss of arm function is a common and distressing consequence of stroke. We describe the protocol for a pragmatic, multicentre randomised controlled trial to determine whether robot-assisted training improves upper limb function following stroke. Study design: a pragmatic, three-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial, economic analysis and process evaluation. NHS stroke services. adults with acute or chronic first-ever stroke (1 week to 5 years post stroke) causing moderate to severe upper limb functional limitation. Randomisation groups: 1. Robot-assisted training using the InMotion robotic gym system for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks 2. Enhanced upper limb therapy for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks 3. Usual NHS care in accordance with local clinical practice Randomisation: individual participant randomisation stratified by centre, time since stroke, and severity of upper limb impairment. upper limb function measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 3 months post randomisation. upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Test), activities of daily living (Barthel ADL Index), quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, EQ-5D-5L), resource use, cost per quality-adjusted life year and adverse events, at 3 and 6 months. Blinding: outcomes are undertaken by blinded assessors. Economic analysis: micro-costing and economic evaluation of interventions compared to usual NHS care. A within-trial analysis, with an economic model will be used to extrapolate longer-term costs and outcomes. Process evaluation: semi-structured interviews with participants and professionals to seek their views and experiences of the rehabilitation that they have received or provided, and factors affecting the implementation of the trial. allowing for 10% attrition, 720 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in successful outcome between each of the treatment pairs. Successful outcome definition: baseline ARAT 0-7 must improve by 3 or more points; baseline

  16. Validity and reliability of a Nigerian-Yoruba version of the stroke-specific quality of life scale 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetunde, Marufat Oluyemisi; Akinpelu, Aderonke Omobonike; Odole, Adesola Christiana

    2017-10-19

    Psychometric evidence is necessary to establish scientific integrity and clinical usefulness of translations and cultural adaptations of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life (SS-QoL) scale. However, the limited evidence on psychometrics of Yoruba version of SS-QoL 2.0 (SS-QoL(Y)) is a significant shortcoming. This study assessed the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, convergent, divergent, discriminant and known-group validity of the SS-QoL(Y). Yoruba version of the WHOQoL-BREF was used to test the convergent and divergent validity of the SS-QoL(Y) among 100 consenting stroke survivors. The WHOQoL-BREF and SS-QoL(Y) was administered randomly in order to eliminate bias. The test-retest reliability of the SS-QoL(Y) was carried out among 68 of the respondents within an interval of 7 days. All respondents were purposively recruited from selected secondary and tertiary health facilities in South-west Nigeria. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics of mean and standard deviation, and inferential statistics of Spearman correlation, Cronbach's alpha, Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC), Independent t-test and One-way ANOVA. Alpha level was set at p validity of SS-QoL(Y) showed that items' r value ranged from 0.711 to 0.920 with their hypothesized domains. The scale demonstrated moderate to strong test-retest reliability with Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for the domains and overall scores (r = 0.47 to 0.81) and moderate to high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha =0.61 to 0.82) for domains scores. These correlations were also significant for the domains and overall scores (p validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Yoruba version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life 2.0 are adequate while the convergent and divergent validity are low but acceptable. The SS-QoL(Y) is recommended for assessing health-related quality of life among Yoruba stroke survivors.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of a modified wheelchair arm-support to reduce shoulder pain in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ruihuan; Zhou, Mingchao; Cai, Hao; Guo, Youhua; Zhan, Lechang; Li, Mei; Yang, Zhijing; Zhu, Leying; Zhan, Jie; Chen, Hongxia

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of modified wheelchair arm-support to mitigate hemiplegic shoulder pain and reduce pain frequency in stroke patients. A single-blind randomized controlled trial using computer-generated simple randomization. Participants recruited from inpatients at the Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine. A total of 120 patients with stroke were divided into two groups. All subjects underwent basic rehabilitation training and wheelchair assistance with eight weeks follow-up period. Patients in the treatment group additionally received modified wheelchair arm-support for at least 60 minutes a day, six days a week, for four weeks. Primary outcome was measured by the Visual Analogue Pain Scale or Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Secondary outcome was measured using the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale, Modified Barthel Index and Quality of Life Index. Measurements were made at 4 weeks and 12 weeks, following the intervention. Patients age from 21 to 83 years (mean ± SD = 62.41 ± 12.26). The average duration of disease was 1.9 ± 1.3 months. At four weeks, the median of pain intensity was higher in the control group (median, interquartile range = 3, 5.75 vs. 2, 3.75; P = 0.059). At 12 weeks, the median of pain intensity was higher in the control group (median, interquartile range = 3, 5.00 vs. 0, 1.00; P vs. 1; P stroke patients. It may also improve the patients' quality of life.

  18. Effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) after acute stroke: A one-year longitudinal randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yu-Zhou; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xue-Wei; Wu, Shuang; Du, Hua; Cui, Li-Ying; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on motor recovery after stroke using a prospective, double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled study. Patients with unilateral subcortical infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory within 1 week after onset were enrolled. The patients were randomly divided into an rTMS treatment group and a sham group. We performed high-frequency rTMS or sham rTMS on the two groups. Motor functional scores were assessed pre- and post-rTMS/sham rTMS and at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after stroke onset. The scores included the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel Index (BI), Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Limb/Lower Limb (FMA-UL/LL), modified Rank Score (mRS), and the resting motor threshold (RMT) of the hemiplegic limb. At baseline, no significant differences were found between the two groups for motor functional scores. On the second day after rTMS treatment, score improvements of the NIHSS, BI, FMA-UL in the real treatment group were more significant than those in the sham group. In addition, similar results were obtained at 1 month. However, at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after onset, no significant differences in improvement were observed between the two groups, except for the FMA-UL score improvement. rTMS facilitates motor recovery of acute stroke patients, and the effect can last to 1 month, except the function improvement on upper extremities could last for 1 year. A single course of rTMS in the acute stage may induce the improvement of upper extremities function lasted for 1 year. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Commercial video games in the rehabilitation of patients with sub-acute stroke: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Manas, M J; Collado-Vazquez, S; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R

    2017-10-16

    Stroke generates dependence on the patients due to the various impairments associated. The use of low-cost technologies for neurological rehabilitation may be beneficial for the treatment of these patients. To determine whether combined treatment using a semi-immersive virtual reality protocol to an interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach, improve balance and postural control, functional independence, quality of life, motivation, self-esteem and adherence to intervention in stroke patients in subacute stage. A longitudinal prospective study with pre and post-intervention evaluation was carried out. Fourteen were recruited at La Fuenfria Hospital (Spain) and completed the intervention. Experimental intervention was performed during eight weeks in combination with conventional treatment of physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Each session was increased in time and intensity, using commercial video games linked to Xbox 360° videoconsole and Kinect sensor. There were statistical significant improvements in modified Rankin scale (p = 0.04), baropodometry (load distribution, p = 0.03; support surface, p = 0.01), Barthel Index (p = 0.01), EQ-5D Questionnaire (p = 0.01), motivation (p = 0.02), self-esteem (p = 0.01) and adherence to the intervention (p = 0.02). An interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach supplemented with semi-immersive virtual reality seems to be useful for improving balance and postural control, functional independence in basic activities of daily living, quality of life, as well as motivation and self-esteem, with excellent adherence. This intervention modality could be adopted as a therapeutic tool in neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients in subacute stage.

  20. The Effect of an Upper Limb Rehabilitation Robot on Hemispatial Neglect in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Sik; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Park, Gyu Tae; Lee, Sook Joung

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an upper limb rehabilitation robot therapy on hemispatial neglect in stroke patients. Patients were randomly divided into an upper limb rehabilitation robot treatment group (robot group) and a control group. The patients in the robot group received left upper limb training using an upper limb rehabilitation robot. The patients sat on the right side of the robot, so that the monitor of the robot was located on the patients' left side. In this position, patients could focus continuously on the left side. The control group received conventional neglect treatment, such as visual scanning training and range of motion exercises, administered by occupational therapists. Both groups received their respective therapies for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Several tests were used to evaluate treatment effects before and after the 3-week treatment. In total, 38 patients (20 in the robot group and 18 in the control group) completed the study. After completion of the treatment sessions, both groups showed significant improvements in the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test 3rd edition (MVPT-3), the line bisection test, the star cancellation test, the Albert's test, the Catherine Bergego scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index. The changes in all measurements showed no significant differences between the two groups. This present study showed that the upper limb robot treatment had benefits for hemispatial neglect in stroke patients that were similar to conventional neglect treatment. The upper limb robot treatment could be a therapeutic option in the treatment of hemispatial neglect after stroke.

  1. [Effectiveness of acupuncture in spasticity of the post-stroke patient. Systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; Espejo-Antúnez, Luis; Bustamante-López, Ana Isabel

    2016-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture for reducing spasticity in post-stroke patients. Literature review. The literature search was performed using scientific databases from January 2000 to January 2013. Out of the 110 studies that were found, nine random and controlled trials were included. Inclusion criteria were based on clinical trials in which participants were over 18 years old, who were suffering with post-stroke spasticity, and one of the experimental groups was treated with acupuncture. The variables were the passive resistance to stretching of the affected limb, and the degree of personal dependence. The variables were assessed by the Modified Ashworth Scale and Barthel Index. The search was performed in the PUBMED, COCHRANE Library, PEDro, Dialnet, CSIC, CINAHL, databases. Search terms included the combination of keywords "acupuncture"; "muscle spasticity"; "stroke". Passive resistance to stretching, the degree of personal dependence, and motor function of the affected limb showed statistically significant improvements in at least one study included; however, these improvements are not clinically relevant changes. Passive resistance improved in the elbow, ankle, knee, and wrist. An increased joint range was observed, except for the elbow, forearm, and thumb. Improved of the patient dependency was also observed. Although improvements relative to the reduction of spasticity are shown, the results have failed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique for this ailment. It would take a greater number of studies to calculate the size of the reported effects with homogeneous procedures in the design as well as in the duration, frequency, and measurement tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [The effectiveness of physical therapy methods (Bobath and motor relearning program) in rehabilitation of stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutulyte, Grazina; Kimtys, Algimantas; Krisciūnas, Aleksandras

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether two different physiotherapy regimes caused any differences in outcome in the rehabilitation after stroke. We examined 240 patients with stroke. Examination was carried out at the Rehabilitation Center of Kaunas Second Clinical Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Bobath method was applied to the first (I) group (n=147), motor relearning program (MRP) method was applied to the second (II) group (n=93). In every group of patients we established samples according to sex, age, hospitalization to rehab unit as occurrence of CVA degree of disorder (hemiplegia, hemiparesis). The mobility of patients was evaluated according to European Federation for Research in Rehabilitation (EFRR) scale. Activities of daily living were evaluated by Barthel index. Analyzed groups were evaluated before physical therapy. When preliminary analysis was carried out it proved no statically reliable differences between analyzed groups (reliability 95%). The same statistical analysis was carried out after physical therapy. The results of differences between patient groups were compared using chi(2) method. Bobath method was applied working with the first group of patients. The aim of the method is to improve quality of the affected body side's movements in order to keep both sides working as harmoniously as possible. While applying this method at work, physical therapist guides patient's body on key-points, stimulating normal postural reactions, and training normal movement pattern. MRP method was used while working with the second group patients. This method is based on movement science, biomechanics and training of functional movement. Program is based on idea that movement pattern shouldn't be trained; it must be relearned. CONCLUSION. This study indicates that physiotherapy with task-oriented strategies represented by MRP, is preferable to physiotherapy with facilitation/inhibition strategies, such the Bobath programme, in the

  3. Psychometric evaluation of the Signs of Depression Scale with a revised scoring mechanism in stroke patients with communicative impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Mariska J; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M.; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate (1) the diagnostic value of the Signs of Depression Scale (SODS) in a Likert scale format and (2) whether the Likert scale improves the diagnostic value compared with the original dichotomous scale. Design: Cross-sectional multicentre study. Setting: One general and one

  4. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial on additional core stability exercises training for improving dynamic sitting balance and trunk control in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanas-Valdés, Rosa; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Caballero-Gómez, Fernanda Mª; du Port de Pontcharra-Serra, Helena; German-Romero, Ana; Urrútia, Gerard

    2017-11-01

    Analyse the effect of core stability exercises in addition to conventional physiotherapy training three months after the intervention ended. A randomized controlled trial. Outpatient services. Seventy-nine stroke survivors. In the intervention period, both groups underwent conventional physiotherapy performed five days/week for five weeks, and in addition the experimental group performed core stability exercises for 15 minutes/day. Afterwards, during a three-month follow-up period, both groups underwent usual care that could eventually include conventional physiotherapy or physical exercise but not in a controlled condition. Primary outcome was trunk control and dynamic sitting balance assessed by the Spanish-Version of Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0 and Function in Sitting Test. Secondary outcomes were standing balance and gait evaluated by the Berg Balance Scale, Tinetti Test, Brunel Balance Assessment, Spanish-Version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke and activities of daily living using the Barthel Index. A total of 68 subjects out of 79 completed the three-month follow-up period. The mean difference (SD) between groups was 0.78 (1.51) points ( p = 0.003) for total score on the Spanish-Version of Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, 2.52 (6.46) points ( p = 0.009) for Function in Sitting Test, dynamic standing balance was 3.30 (9.21) points ( p= 0.009) on the Berg Balance Scale, gait was 0.82 (1.88) points ( p = 0.002) by Brunel Balance Assessment (stepping), and 1.11 (2.94) points ( p = 0.044) by Tinetti Test (gait), all in favour of core stability exercises. Core stability exercises plus conventional physiotherapy have a positive long-term effect on improving dynamic sitting and standing balance and gait in post-stroke patients.

  5. Synergistic effect of moxibustion and rehabilitation training in functional recovery of post-stroke spastic hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Bao-Chao

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic benefit of combining moxibustion and rehabilitation training for functional recovery in post-stroke spastic hemiplegic patients. We randomly divided 84 cases subjecting to inclusion criteria into moxibustion plus rehabilitation training group (MRT group, n=44) and rehabilitation training group (RT group, n=40). Evaluation of therapeutic effect was observed before treatment, 2 weeks during treatment and 6 months after treatment. Spasticity was evaluated using modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and Clinical Spasticity Index (CSI), recovery of motor function was assessed by Brunnstrom recovery stages and Simplified Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale, and performance of activities of daily living (ADL) was measured, and the quality of life was assessed by Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO). Evaluation of upper limbs, hands and lower limbs based on CSI and MAS revealed significant improvements in patients treated with MRT, compared to RT alone, both during and after therapy. CSI and MAS also showed significant improvement in patients at each time point in the MRT group, compared to RT group. Marked improvement in Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale was also observed in MRT group at each time point. Based on Brunnstrom grades of upper limbs, hands and lower limbs, significant differences between the two groups were recorded at all time points during and after therapy. Barthel index (BI) and PRO also confirmed the dramatic differences between the two therapy groups. Our results demonstrate that combination therapy with moxibustion and rehabilitation training offers greater clinical benefits in relieving spasticity, promoting function recovery of motion, improving the performance of ADL, and increasing quality of life in post-stroke spastic hemiplegic patients, compared to RT alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The social and economic burden of stroke survivors in Italy: a prospective, incidence-based, multi-centre cost of illness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattore Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    costs while functional outcomes (Barthel Index and Modified Ranking Scale scores were significantly associated with both healthcare and societal costs at one year. Conclusions The significant role of informal care in stroke management and different distribution of costs over time suggest that appropriate planning should look at both incident and prevalent stroke cases to forecast health infrastructure needs and more importantly, to assure that stroke patients have adequate “social” support.

  7. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  8. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  9. Functional Outcomes, Subsequent Healthcare Utilization, and Mortality of Stroke Postacute Care Patients in Taiwan: A Nationwide Propensity Score-matched Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Ning; Lu, Wan-Hsuan; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Chung, Chih-Ping; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the benefits of the national stroke postacute care (PAC) program on clinical outcomes and subsequent healthcare utilization. Propensity score-matched case-control study using the National Health Insurance data. A total of 1480 stroke cases receiving PAC services and 3159 matched controls with similar stroke severity but without PAC services. Demographic characteristics, functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index, Lawton-Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Functional Oral Intake Scale, Mini-Nutritional Assessment, Berg Balance Test, Usual Gait Speed Test, 6-Minute Walk Test, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (modified sensation and motor), Mini-Mental State Examination, Motor Activity Log, and the Concise Chinese Aphasia Test), subsequent healthcare utilization (90-day stroke re-admission and emergency department visits), and 90-day mortality. After propensity score matching, baseline characteristics, stroke severity, and status of healthcare utilization before index stroke admission were similar between cases and controls. After PAC services, the case group obtained significant improvement in all functional domains and may have reduced subsequent disability. Among all functional assessments, balance was the most significantly improved domain and was suggestive for the reduction of subsequent falls risk and related injuries. Compared with controls, patients receiving PAC services had significantly lower 90-day hospital re-admissions [11.1% vs 21.0%, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.47 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-0.64], stroke-related re-admissions (2.1% vs 8.8%, aOR 0.22, 95% CI 0.12-0.41), and emergency department visits (13.5% vs 24.0%, aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.37-0.65), but the 90-day mortality rate remained similar between groups (1.4% case group vs 2.0% control group, aOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.29-1.62). PAC significantly improved the recovery of stroke patients in all functional domains through the program, with universal interorganizational

  10. Burden and outcome of prevalent ischemic brain disease in a national acute stroke registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koton, Silvia; Tsabari, Rakefet; Molshazki, Noa; Kushnir, Moshe; Shaien, Radi; Eilam, Anda; Tanne, David

    2013-12-01

    Previous overt stroke and subclinical stroke are frequent in patients with stroke; yet, their clinical significance and effects on stroke outcome are not clear. We studied the burden and outcome after acute ischemic stroke by prevalent ischemic brain disease in a national registry of hospitalized patients with acute stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke in the National Acute Stroke Israeli prospective hospital-based registry (February to March 2004, March to April 2007, and April to May 2010) with information on previous overt stroke and subclinical stroke per computed tomography/MRI (n=3757) were included. Of them, a subsample (n=787) was followed up at 3 months. Logistic regression models were computed for outcomes in patients with prior overt stroke or subclinical stroke, compared with patients with first stroke, adjusting for age, sex, vascular risk factors, stroke severity, and clinical classification. Two-thirds of patients had a prior overt stroke or subclinical stroke. Death rates were similar for patients with and without prior stroke. Adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]) for disability were increased for patients with prior overt stroke (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03-1.66) and subclinical stroke (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.16-1.82). Relative odds of Barthel Index≤60 for patients with prior overt stroke (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.14-3.68) and with prior subclinical stroke (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15-3.64) were twice higher than for patients with a first stroke. ORs for dependency were significantly increased for patients with prior overt stroke (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.19-3.20) but not for those with subclinical stroke (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.84-2.19). In our national cohort of patients with acute ischemic stroke, nearly two thirds had a prior overt stroke or subclinical stroke. Risk of poor functional outcomes was increased for patients with prior stroke, both overt and subclinical.

  11. Swallowing Tablets and Capsules Increases the Risk of Penetration and Aspiration in Patients with Stroke-Induced Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Julia T; Penner, Heike; Schneider, Hendrik; Quinzler, Renate; Reich, Gabriele; Wezler, Nikolai; Micol, William; Oster, Peter; Haefeli, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of difficulties swallowing solid dosage forms in patients with stroke-induced dysphagia and whether swallowing tablets/capsules increases their risk of penetration and aspiration. Concurrently, we explored whether routinely performed assessment tests help identify patients at risk. Using video endoscopy, we evaluated how 52 patients swallowed four different placebos (round, oval, and oblong tablets and a capsule) with texture-modified water (TMW, pudding consistency) and milk and rated their swallowing performance according to the Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS). Additionally, Daniels Test, Bogenhausener Dysphagiescore, Scandinavian Stroke Scale, Barthel Index, and Tinetti's Mobility Test were conducted. A substantial proportion of the patients experienced severe difficulties swallowing solid oral dosage forms (TMW: 40.4 %, milk: 43.5 %). Compared to the administration of TMW/milk alone, the placebos increased the PAS values in the majority of the patients (TMW: median PAS from 1.5 to 2.0; milk: median PAS from 1.5 to 2.5, each p value <0.0001) and residue values were significantly higher (p < 0.05). Whereas video-endoscopic examination reliably identified patients with difficulties swallowing medication, neither patients' self-evaluation nor one of the routinely performed bedside tests did. Therefore, before video-endoscopic evaluation, many drugs were modified unnecessarily and 20.8 % of these were crushed inadequately, although switching to another dosage form or drug would have been possible. Hence, safety and effectiveness of swallowing tablets and capsules should be evaluated routinely in video-endoscopic examinations, tablets/capsules should rather be provided with TMW than with milk, and the appropriateness of "non per os except medication" orders for dysphagic stroke patients should be questioned.

  12. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  13. Clinically important differences for the upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Scale in people with minimal to moderate impairment due to chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephen J; Fulk, George D; Boyne, Pierce

    2012-06-01

    The upper-extremity portion of the Fugl-Meyer Scale (UE-FM) is one of the most established and commonly used outcome measures in stroke rehabilitative trials. Empirical work is needed to determine the amount of change in UE-FM scores that can be regarded as important and clinically meaningful for health professionals, patients, and other stakeholders. This study used anchor-based methods to estimate the clinically important difference (CID) for the UE-FM in people with minimal to moderate impairment due to chronic stroke. One hundred forty-six individuals with stable, mild to moderate upper-extremity (UE) hemiparesis were administered the UE-FM before and after an intervention targeting their affected UEs. The treating therapists rated each participant's perceived amount of UE motor recovery on a global rating of change (GROC) scale evaluating several facets of UE movement (grasp, release, move the affected UE, perform 5 important functional tasks with the affected UE, overall UE function). Estimated CID of the UE-FM scores was calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with the GROC scores as the anchor. The ROC curve analysis revealed that change in UE-FM scores during the intervention period distinguished participants who experienced clinically important improvement from those that did not based on the therapists' GROC scores. The area under the curve ranged from 0.61 to 0.70 for the different facets of UE movement. The estimated CID of the UE-FM scores ranged from 4.25 to 7.25 points, depending on the different facets of UE movement.

  14. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackley, Catherine M; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Christopher R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2015-02-05

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an established programme of occupational therapy in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity in care home residents living with stroke sequelae. Pragmatic, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial. 228 care homes (>10 beds each), both with and without the provision of nursing care, local to 11 trial administrative centres across the United Kingdom. 1042 care home residents with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, including those with language and cognitive impairments, not receiving end of life care. 114 homes (n=568 residents, 64% from homes providing nursing care) were allocated to the intervention arm and 114 homes (n=474 residents, 65% from homes providing nursing care) to standard care (control arm). Participating care homes were randomised between May 2010 and March 2012. Targeted three month programme of occupational therapy, delivered by qualified occupational therapists and assistants, involving patient centred goal setting, education of care home staff, and adaptations to the environment. Primary outcome at the participant level: scores on the Barthel index of activities of daily living at three months post-randomisation. Secondary outcome measures at the participant level: Barthel index scores at six and 12 months post-randomisation, and scores on the Rivermead mobility index, geriatric depression scale-15, and EuroQol EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, at all time points. 64% of the participants were women and 93% were white, with a mean age of 82.9 years. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups for all measures, personal characteristics, and diagnostic tests. Overall, 2538 occupational therapy visits were made to 498 participants in the intervention arm (mean 5.1 visits per participant). No adverse events attributable to the intervention were recorded. 162 (11%) died before the primary outcome time point, and 313 (30%) died over the 12 months of

  15. Can physiotherapy after stroke based on the Bobath concept result in improved quality of movement compared to the motor relearning programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhammer, Birgitta; Stanghelle, Johan K

    2011-06-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate, based on data from our study in 2000, whether the Bobath approach enhanced quality of movement better than the Motor Relearning Programme (MRP) during rehabilitation of stroke patients. A randomized controlled stratified trial of acute stroke patients. The patients were treated according to Motor Relearning Programme and Bobath approach and assessed with Motor Assessment Scale, Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale, Nottingham Health Profile and the Barthel Index. A triangulation of the test scores was made in reference to the Movement Quality Model and biomechanical, physiological, psycho-socio-cultural, and existential themes. The items arm (p = 0.02-0.04) sitting (p = 0.04) and hand (p = 0.01-0.03) were significantly better in the Motor Relearning Programme group than in the Bobath group, in both Sødring Motor Evaluation Scale and Motor Assessment Scale. Leg function, balance, transfer, walking and stair climbing did not differ between the groups. The Movement Quality Model and the movement qualities biomechanical, physiological and psycho-socio-cultural showed higher scoring in the Motor Relearning Programme group, indicating better quality of movement in all items. Regression models established the relationship with significant models of motor performance and self reported physical mobility (adjusted R(2) 0.30-0.68, p < 0.0001), energy (adjusted R(2) 0.13-0.14, p = 0.03-0.04, emotion (adjusted R(2) 0.30-0.38, p < 0.0001) and social interaction (arm function, adjusted R(2) 0.25, p = 0.0001). These analyses confirm that task oriented exercises of the Motor Relearning Programme type are preferable regarding quality of movement in the acute rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Pui Hing; Tang, Maria W S; Yeung, Fannie; Chan, Tsz Wai; Cheng, Joanna O Y; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap. The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline) between those using short-term residential care (intervention group) and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group), and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group. 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline. The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital. Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate. Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score) of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel Index score) of the patients could be further improved after 4 months up to 1 year. Meanwhile, insignificant between-group difference in rehabilitation outcomes was observed. The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%). Short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation promoted improvements in rehabilitation outcomes comparable with, if not better than, the usual

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in different acute stroke subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasovic, Ines; Tesija-Kuna, Andrea; Topic, Elizabeta; Supanc, Visnja; Demarin, Vida; Petrovcic, Marija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine serum levels of selected matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs) in the acute phase of different stroke types subdivided according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP) classification and the possibility of discriminating stroke types according to their levels. The study included 126 patients with acute stroke within the first 24 h of symptom onset, and 124 healthy volunteers. The stroke group had lower MMP-2 concentrations and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratios (pnegative correlation of MMP-2 levels with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was recorded in all stroke subtypes except for TACI. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed similar discriminating power for MMP-9 levels and Barthel index in the differential diagnosis of TACI. High MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio (odds ratio 3.263) was associated with TACI. Our results demonstrate that the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio may provide information to help in assessing stroke patients in the future as a baseline biomarker of infarct extent.

  18. New Resolution Strategy for Multi-scale Reaction Waves using Time Operator Splitting and Space Adaptive Multiresolution: Application to Human Ischemic Stroke*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louvet Violaine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling multi-scale reaction waves. This type of problems induces peculiar difficulties and potentially large stiffness which stem from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of large spatial gradients in the reactive fronts, spatially very localized. A new resolution strategy was recently introduced ? that combines a performing time operator splitting with high oder dedicated time integration methods and space adaptive multiresolution. Based on recent theoretical studies of numerical analysis, such a strategy leads to a splitting time step which is not restricted neither by the fastest scales in the source term nor by stability limits related to the diffusion problem, but only by the physics of the phenomenon. In this paper, the efficiency of the method is evaluated through 2D and 3D numerical simulations of a human ischemic stroke model, conducted on a simplified brain geometry, for which a simple parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures was implemented, in order to reduce computing costs related to “detailed chemistry” features of the model.

  19. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of State Self-Esteem Scale: an analysis of data from a cross-sectional survey of patients in the first four months after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Janita P C; Thompson, David R; Chang, Anne M; Woo, Jean

    2012-11-01

    To establish the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the State Self-Esteem Scale in stroke patients. Self-esteem is seen to enhance peoples' ability to cope with disease: low self-esteem may inhibit participation in rehabilitation and thus result in poor health and social outcomes. Although the Chinese version of the State Self-Esteem Scale has been used as an outcome measure for stroke rehabilitation, no study has examined its factor structure in this patient group. A cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of 265 Chinese stroke patients (mean age 71·4, SD 10·3 years), with a minimum score of 18 out of a possible 30 for the Mini Mental State Exam recruited from two regional rehabilitation hospitals in Hong Kong. An exploratory factor analysis and an internal consistency analysis of the State Self-Esteem Scale were conducted. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between the State Self-Esteem Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale to determine convergent validity. The final factor solution comprised a three-factor model with correlated constructs and accounted for 49·5% of the total variance. Significant negative correlations were found between the Geriatric Depression Scale and the State Self-Esteem Scale subscale scores (r-0·31 to -0·55, p State Self-Esteem Scale had acceptable convergent validity. The new three-factor structure had higher Cronbach's alphas when compared with the original three-factor structure. The State Self-Esteem Scale appears to be a useful measure for assessing state self-esteem in stroke patients. To establish the concurrent, discriminative and construct validities, the factor structure of the SSES could be further developed and tested. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Prognostic value of perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in first 3 days of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluytmans, M.; Everdingen, K.J. van; Ramos, L.M.P.; Viergever, M.A.; Grond, J. van der; Kappelle, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in cerebral perfusion seen on mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and to assess the subsequent prognostic value of the MTT-DWI (diffusion-weighted MRI) and CBV-DWI mismatch in the first three days of stroke on lesion enlargement and clinical outcome. In 38 patients, imaged 1-46 h after onset of symptoms, lesion volumes on proton-density (PD)-weighted MRI, DWI and PWI (both MTT and CBV maps) were compared with lesion volumes on follow-up PD-weighted scans, and to clinical outcome (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel index, and Rankin scale). The MTT-CBV, MTT-DWI and CBV-DWI mismatches were compared with change in lesion volume between initial and follow-up PD-weighted scans. Lesion volume on both DWI and PWI correlated significantly with clinical outcome parameters (p < 0.001) with strongest correlation for lesion volume on CBV. Perfusion-diffusion mismatches were found for both CBV and MTT and correlated significantly with lesion enlargement on PD-weighted imaging with strongest correlation for the CBV-DWI mismatch. The CBV-DWI mismatch has the highest accuracy in predicting lesion size on follow-up imaging and in predicting clinical outcome. Lesion volume measurements on CBV maps have a higher specificity than on PD-weighted, MTT or DWI images in predicting clinical follow-up imaging and in predicting clinical outcome. (orig.)

  1. [Clinical observation of acupuncture plus electroacupuncture for hand spasm in stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Meng; Lou, Tianwei; Leng, Jun

    2017-09-12

    To observe the effect difference between acupuncture combined with electroacupuncture (EA) and simple acupuncture for hand spasm in stroke patients. Sixty patients were randomly assigned into an acupuncture group and a combination group, 30 cases in each one. Patients in the two groups were treated with acupuncture at the affected Jianyu (LI 15), Binao (LI 14), Jianliao (TE 14), Quchi (LI 11), Shousanli (LI 10), Waiguan (TE 5), Futu (ST 32), Liangqiu (ST 34), Xuehai (SP 10), Zusanli (ST 36), Shangjuxu (ST 37), Xiajuxu (ST 39), Yinlingquan (SP 9), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Taixi (KI 3), Taichong (LR 3), and the points at the middle of all the dorsal muscles between metacarpal bones. EA with discontinuous wave was used in the combination group at Waiguan (TE 5) and the middle point of the dorsal muscle between the second and the third metacarpal bones. The treatment was given for 40 min, once a day for 3 courses, five treatment per week, 4 weeks as a course. The modified Ashworth scale (MAS), the Fugl-Meyer finger motor function rating scale and the modified Barthel index (BI) were observed before and after treatment in the two group. The MAS scores after treatment significantly decreased compared with those before treatment in the two groups (both P Fugl-Meyer scores and BI scores after treatment increased in the two groups (all P <0.05), with higher scores in the combination group (both P <0.05). EA combined with acupuncture can more apparently alleviate hand spasm, promote the recovery of hand function, improve the quality of life for stroke patients than simple acupuncture.

  2. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and validity in stroke trials. Objectives: The aim of the work was to evaluate the FOUR score predictability for outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS ...

  3. [The effect of floating-needle therapy combined with rehabilitation training for the hand function recovery of post-stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiangxia; Xiao, Hong

    2015-08-01

    To explore the improvement of hand motion function,spasm and self-care ability of daily life for stroke patients treated with floating-needle combined with rehabilitation training. Eighty hand spasm patients of post-stroke within one year after stroke were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 40 cases in each one. In the two groups, rehabilitation was adopted for eight weeks,once a day,40 min one time. In the observation group, based on the above treatment and according to muscle fascia trigger point, 2~3 points in both the internal and external sides of forearm were treated with floating-needle. The positive or passive flexion and extension of wrist and knuckle till the relief of spasm hand was combined. The floating-needle therapy was given for eight weeks, on the first three days once a day and later once every other day. Modified Ashworth Scale(MAS), activity of daily life(ADL, Barthel index) scores and Fugl-Meyer(FMA) scores were used to assess the spasm hand degree,activity of daily life and hand motion function before and after 7-day, 14-day and 8-week treatment. After 7-day, 14-day and 8-week treatment, MAS scores were apparently lower than those before treatment in the two groups(all Prehabilitation training and simple rehabilitation training could both improve hand spasm degree, hand function and activity of daily life of post-stroke patients, but floating-needle therapy combined with rehabilitation training is superior to simple rehabilitation training for the improvement of hand function.

  4. Acceptability, reliability, and validity of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39) across languages: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Akram; Tohidast, Seyed Abolfazl; Mansuri, Banafshe; Kamali, Mohammad; Krishnan, Gopee

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review aimed to explore the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life-39 (SAQOL-39) scale across languages. We employed a systematic search of the online databases including MEDLINE (Pubmed), Science direct, Web of science, Psychinfo, Scopus, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and Cochrane library published between 2003 and 2016. We used PRISMA guidelines for conducting and reporting this review. Subsequently, screening of the titles and abstracts, extraction of data as well as the appraisal of the quality of relevant studies were carried out. The initial search returned 8185 studies. Subsequent screening and study selection processes narrowed them to 20, needing detailed review. Forward-backward translation scheme was the preferred method for translation of the SAQOL-39 from English to other languages. Mainly, the socio-cultural and linguistic adaptations were performed in the translated versions. Most versions of the SAQOL-39 showed high test-retest reliability and internal consistency. However, several psychometric properties including the validity and responsiveness were seldom reported in these versions. The SAQOL-39 scale showed high acceptability, and reliability across the languages reviewed in this study. Future translations may additionally focus on reporting the validity and responsiveness of the instrument.

  5. [Motor dysfunction in stroke of subacute stage treated with acupuncture: multi-central randomized controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Fang; Fang, Jian-Qiao; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Rui-Jie; Xu, Shou-Yu; Shen, Lai-Hua; Luo, Kai-Tao; Gao, Feng; Bao, Ye-Hua; Ni, Ke-Feng; Li, Li-Ping

    2014-04-01

    To verify the clinical efficacy of acupuncture on motor dysfunction in ischemic stroke of subacute stage. The multi-central randomized controlled trial was adopted. One hundred and twenty-six cases of ischemic stroke of subacute stage were randomized into an acupuncture group (61 cases) and a conventional treatment group (65 cases). The basic treatment of western internal medicine and rehabilitation training were applied to the patients of the two groups. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture was supplemented at the body points located on the extensor of the upper limbs and the flexor of the lower limbs. In combination, scalp acupuncture was applied to NS5, MS6 and MS6 on the affected side. The treatment was given 5 times a week and totally 8 weeks were required. The follow-up observation lasted for 3 months. The scores in Fugl-Meyer scale and NIHSS scale and Barthel index were compared between the two groups before treatment, in 4 and 8 weeks of treatment and the 3-month follow-up observation after treatment separately. In 4 and 8 weeks of treatment and the follow-up observation, Fugl-Meyer scale score was improved obviously in the patients of the two groups (all PFugl-Meyer scale score in the acupuncture groupwas im proved much apparently as compared with that in the conventional treatment group [68. 0 (43. 0,86. 5) vs 52. 5 (30.3, 77.0), 77.0 (49.5, 89.0) vs 63. 0 (33.0, 84.0), both Pscale score was not reduced apparently in 4 weeks of treatment in the conventional treatment group (P>0.05), the results of NIHSS scale at the other time points were all decreased obviously as compared with those before treatment in the patients of the two groups (all P<0. 01). In 8 weeks of treatment and the follow-up observation, the results in the acupuncture group were reduced much apparently as compared with those in the conventional treatment group [5. 0 (3.0,8.0) vs 7. 0 (3.0,13.8), 4. 0 (1.5,7.0) vs 6.0 (2.0,11.7) ,both P<0. 05]. In 8 weeks of treatment and the follow

  6. Use of EMG biofeedback for basic activities of daily living training in stroke patients. Pilot randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Garrido-Montenegro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sequels in stroke patients include hemiparesis and dependency for performing basic activities of daily living (BADL. EMG biofeedback has yielded some benefits but has been limited to repetitive movement, therefore, it is insufficient for current task-oriented neurorehabilitation paradigms. Objective: To assess whether the application of EMG biofeedback in upper limbs during BADL training improves motor, occupational and satisfaction performances compared to BADL training without this feedback. Materials and methods: A pilot randomized clinical trial was conducted with stroke patients of more than six months of evolution, who showed hemiparesis and no cognitive deterioration. These patients were randomly classified into two groups: control group, who underwent conventional occupational therapy (COT, and experimental group, who underwent COT+EMG-BF. Patients were given 10 therapy sessions. Entry, evaluation and data analysis were masked. Results: Seven patients were included in each group, showing the same initial clinical and demographic characteristics (p>0.05. The group that underwent COT+EMG-BF showed a significantly better performance in all assessments. For example, the Barthel scale obtained a median of 100 points [85-100] for the COT+EMG-BF group versus 85 [80-90] for the control group (p<0.05, whereas ARAT score was 42 [40-47] points versus 20 [15-38] (p=0.03, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of COT+EMG-BF for BADL may be considered as an alternative for treatment of stroke patients.

  7. Ginkgo biloba extract improved cognitive and neurological functions of acute ischaemic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Xinjiang; Fang, Qi; Zhou, Junshan; Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Xu, Biyun; Wu, Yanfeng; Qian, Lai

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) in acute ischaemic stroke and its impact on the recurrence of vascular events. Methods We conducted a multicentre, prospective, randomised, open label, blinded, controlled clinical trial enrollingpatients with an onset of acute stroke within 7 days from five hospitals in China Jiangsu Province. Participants were assigned to the GBE group (450 mg GBE with 100 mg aspirin daily) or the control group (100 mg aspirin daily) for 6 months. The primary outcome was the decline in the Montreal Cognitive Assessment score at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were other neuropsychological tests of cognitive and neurological function, the the incidence of adverse events and vascular events. Results 348 patients were enrolled: 179 in the GBE group and 169 in the control group. With 18 patients lost to follow-up, the dropout rate was 5.17%. Admission data between two groups were similar, but in the GBE group there was a marked slow down in the decline in the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores (−2.77±0.21 vs −1.99±0.23, P=0.0116 (30 days); −3.34±0.24 vs −2.48±0.26, P=0.0165 (90 days); −4.00±0.26 vs −2.71±0.26, P=0.0004 (180 days)) compared with controls. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores at 12 and 30 days, the modified Rankin Scale scores for independent rate at 30, 90 and 180 days, and the Barthel Index scores at 30, 90 and 180 days in the GBE group were significantly improved compared with controls. Improvements were also observedin GBE groups for Mini-Metal State Examination scores of 30, 90 and 180 days, Webster’s digit symbol test scores at 30 days and Executive Dysfunction Index scores at 30 and 180 days. No significant differences were seen in the incidence of adverse events or vascular events. Conclusions We conclude that GBE in combination with aspirin treatment alleviated cognitive and neurological deficits after acute ischaemic stroke without increasing

  8. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  9. The effects of physical therapy on exaggerated muscle tonicity, balance and quality of life on hemiparetic patients due to stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoseinabadi, M.R.; Taheri, H.R.; Keavanloo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of physical therapy on balance, exaggerated muscle tonicity and quality of life on patients with hemiparesis. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2011 among male hemiparetic patients secondary to stroke, at a physiotherapy centre in Neyshabur, Iran. Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to two equal groups representing the cases and the controls. The cases were assigned to do the practical protocol for 4 weeks. To collect the data, Berg Balance Scaling, Modified Ashworth Scale, Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index and demographic questionnaires were used. Paired and un-paired t-tests were used to analyse data. All analyses were done on SPSS 16. Results: The two groups were similar before intervention. Post-test analysis showed that the average balance and quality of life significantly improved (p<0.001) among the cases, and the quadriceps muscle tonicity decreased (p<0.001). Among the controls, there was no significant change between pre-test and post-test readings. Conclusions: Physical therapy can enhance balance and quality of life of hemiparetic patients and reduces their exaggerated muscle tonicity. (author)

  10. Assessment of the validity and internal consistency of a performance evaluation tool based on the Japanese version of the modified barthel index for elderly people living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohura, Tomoko; Higashi, Takahiro; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Nakayama, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the validity and internal consistency of the Japanese version of a performance evaluation tool for activities of daily living (ADL) based on the modified Barthel Index (PET-MBI) among elderly people at home. [Subjects] The subjects were elderly people living at home in Japan. [Methods] A cross-sectional study was performed at five home care facilities for elderly people in Japan. ADL performance was evaluated for 128 participants using the PET-MBI, which included 10 self-care items. We used confirmatory factor analysis to estimate the factorial validity. We assessed data model fitness with the χ(2) statistic, the Goodness of Fit Index (GFI), Adjusted Goodness of Fit Index (AGFI), and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA). Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to determine the internal consistency. [Results] The mean age of the participants was 79.1±8.9 years. Among the 126 participants included in the analysis, 67 were women (53.2%). The single-factor model demonstrated a fair fit to the data, with the χ(2) statistic = 74.9 (df =35), GFI = 0.88, AGFI = 0.81, and RMSEA = 0.096, and the path coefficients of each item ranged from 0.44 to 0.95. The alpha coefficient of the 10-item scale was 0.93. [Conclusion] The PET-MBI for elderly people at home was well validated.

  11. Development and validation of a short form of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale in patients with stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsieh, Y.W.; Hsueh, I.P.; Chou, Y.T.; Sheu, C.F.; Hsieh, C.L.; Kwakkel, G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale (FM) is commonly used in outcome studies. However, the lengthy administration time of the FM keeps it from being widely accepted for routine clinical use. We aimed to develop a short form of the FM (the S-FM) with sound psychometric

  12. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q 25 , 75 ) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men ( P stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  14. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  15. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  16. Minimal detectable changes of the Berg Balance Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale, Timed "Up & Go" Test, gait speeds, and 2-minute walk test in individuals with chronic stroke with different degrees of ankle plantarflexor tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiengkaew, Vimonwan; Jitaree, Khanitha; Chaiyawat, Pakaratee

    2012-07-01

    To determine test-retest reliability and absolute and relative minimal detectable changes at the 95% confidence level (MDC(95)) of measures to detect postural balance and lower limb movements in individuals with chronic stroke who were able to walk and had differences in ankle plantarflexor tone. Test-retest study. Data were collected on 2 occasions, about 6 days apart. Outpatient physical therapy clinics. Volunteers (N=61) with chronic stroke who were able to walk and had differences in ankle plantarflexor tone: no increase in ankle plantarflexor tone (n=12), a slight increase in ankle plantarflexor tone (n=32), and a marked increase in ankle plantarflexor tone (n=17). Not applicable. Reliability and absolute and relative MDC(95) of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the lower limb subscale of Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-LE), the Timed "Up & Go" test (TUG), the comfortable gait speed (CGS), the fast gait speed (FGS), and the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). Excellent reliability of the BBS, FMA-LE, TUG, CGS, FGS, and 2MWT for all the participants combined and for the subgroups was shown. All the participants combined showed the absolute and relative MDC(95) in the BBS of 5 points and 10%, FMA-LE of 4 points and 16%, TUG of 8 seconds and 28%, CGS of 0.2m/s and 34%, FGS of 0.1m/s and 21%, and 2MWT of 13m and 23%. The absolute and relative MDC(95) of the subgroups were varied based on ankle plantarflexor tone. The BBS, FMA-LE, TUG, CGS, FGS, and 2MWT are reliable measures to detect postural balance and lower limb movements in individuals with chronic stroke who have differences in ankle plantarflexor tone. The absolute and relative MDC(95) of each measure are dissimilar in those with differences in ankle plantarflexor tone. The relative MDC(95) seems more useful than the absolute MDC(95) because the relative value can be used for a single individual. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale and the Biomechanical Measure in Assessing Knee Extensor Muscle Spasticity in Patients with Post-Stroke Hemiparesia:A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nakhostin Ansari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS is a clinical meas-ure that has been recently developed for the assessment of muscle spasticity. There is a dearth of research on the validity of the MMAS. The aim of the present study was to investi-gate the relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope in assessing knee extensor muscle spasticity in patients with hemiparesia. Materials & Methods: Fourteen patients with post-stroke hemiparesia were included in this cross sectional study. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed with MMAS. An isokinetic dy-namometer was used to impose knee passive flexion with the angular velocity of 10, 30, 60, and 90 °/Sec to measure Torque-angle data. Work (Joule was calculated at each velocity to determine the slope of the work-velocity curves as the biomechanical measure of muscle spasticity. Results: The mean work decreased as the velocity increased but was not statistically signifi-cant (P = 0.07. The mean slope was – 0.35 [J /(°/Sec]. There was no significant correlation between the MMAS and the work-velocity slope (r =0.31, P = 0.28. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope. Further studies with larger sample size are suggested. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2: 131-136

  18. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  19. The stroke oxygen pilot study: a randomized controlled trial of the effects of routine oxygen supplementation early after acute stroke--effect on key outcomes at six months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ali

    Full Text Available Post-stroke hypoxia is common, and may adversely affect outcome. We have recently shown that oxygen supplementation may improve early neurological recovery. Here, we report the six-month outcomes of this pilot study.Patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke were randomized within 24 h of admission to oxygen supplementation at 2 or 3 L/min for 72 h or to control treatment (room air. Outcomes (see below were assessed by postal questionnaire at 6 months. Analysis was by intention-to-treat, and statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05.Out of 301 patients randomized two refused/withdrew consent and 289 (148 in the oxygen and 141 in the control group were included in the analysis: males 44%, 51%; mean (SD age 73 (12, 71 (12; median (IQR National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 6 (3, 10, 5 (3, 10 for the two groups respectively. At six months 22 (15% patients in the oxygen group and 20 (14% in the control group had died; mean survival in both groups was 162 days (p = 0.99. Median (IQR scores for the primary outcome, the modified Rankin Scale, were 3 (1, 5 and 3 (1, 4 for the oxygen and control groups respectively. The covariate-adjusted odds ratio was 1.04 (95% CI 0.67, 1.60, indicating that the odds of a lower (i.e. better score were non-significantly higher in the oxygen group (p = 0.86. The mean differences in the ability to perform basic (Barthel Index and extended activities of daily living (NEADL, and quality of life (EuroQol were also non-significant.None of the key outcomes differed at 6 months between the groups. Although not statistically significant and generally of small magnitude, the effects were predominantly in favour of the oxygen group; a larger trial, powered to show differences in longer-term functional outcomes, is now on-going.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN12362720; Eudract.ema.europa.eu 2004-001866-41.

  20. Functional and motor outcome 5 years after stroke is equivalent to outcome at 2 months: follow-up of the collaborative evaluation of rehabilitation in stroke across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; Verheyden, Geert; Brinkmann, Nadine; Dejaeger, Eddy; De Weerdt, Willy; Feys, Hilde; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Jenni, Walter; Laenen, Annouschka; Lincoln, Nadina; Putman, Koen; Schuback, Birgit; Schupp, Wilfried; Thijs, Vincent; De Wit, Liesbet

    2015-06-01

    Recovery of patients within the first 6 months after stroke is well documented, but there has been little research on long-term recovery. The aim of this study was to analyze functional and motor recovery between admission to rehabilitation centres and 5 years after stroke. This follow-up of the Collaborative Evaluation of Rehabilitation in Stroke Across Europe study, included patients from 4 European rehabilitation centres. Patients were assessed on admission, at 2 and 6 months, and 5 years after stroke, using the Barthel Index, Rivermead Motor Assessment Gross Function, Leg and Trunk function, and Arm function. Linear mixed models were used, corrected for baseline characteristics. To account for the drop-out during follow-up, the analysis is likelihood-based (assumption of missingness at random). A total of 532 patients were included in this study, of which 238 were followed up at 5 years post stroke. Mean age at stroke onset was 69 (±10 SD) years, 53% were men, 84% had ischemic strokes, and 53% had left-sided motor impairment. Linear mixed model analysis revealed a significant deterioration for all 4 outcomes between 6 months and 5 years (Pstroke. Higher age (Pstroke severity on admission (Pstroke severity negatively affected recovery up to 5 years after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Intake of potassium- and magnesium-enriched salt improves functional outcome after stroke: a randomized, multicenter, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Harn; Lai, Ying-Ho; Yeh, Wen-Ting; Chen, Jiunn-Rong; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Chang, Ku-Chou; Lin, Huey-Juan; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lien, Li-Ming; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chang, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality and neurologic deficits. Management measures to improve neurologic outcomes are in great need. Our previous intervention trial in elderly subjects successfully used salt as a carrier for potassium, demonstrating a 41% reduction in cardiovascular mortality by switching to potassium-enriched salt. Dietary magnesium has been associated with lowered diabetes and/or stroke risk in humans and with neuroprotection in animals. Objective: Because a large proportion of Taiwanese individuals are in marginal deficiency states for potassium and for magnesium and salt is a good carrier for minerals, it is justifiable to study whether further enriching salt with magnesium at an amount near the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) amount may provide additional benefit for stroke recovery. Design: This was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial comprising 291 discharged stroke patients with modified Rankin scale (mRS) ≤4. There were 3 arms: 1 ) regular salt (Na salt) ( n = 99), 2 ) potassium-enriched salt (K salt) ( n = 97), and 3 ) potassium- and magnesium-enriched salt (K/Mg salt) ( n = 95). The NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel Index (BI), and mRS were evaluated at discharge, at 3 mo, and at 6 mo. A good neurologic performance was defined by NIHSS = 0, BI = 100, and mRS ≤1. Results: After the 6-mo intervention, the proportion of patients with good neurologic performance increased in a greater magnitude in the K/Mg salt group than in the K salt group and the Na salt group, in that order. The K/Mg salt group had a significantly increased OR (2.25; 95% CI: 1.09, 4.67) of achieving good neurologic performance compared with the Na salt group. But the effect of K salt alone (OR: 1.58; 95% CI: 0.77, 3.22) was not significant. Conclusions: This study suggests that providing the DRI amount of magnesium and potassium together long term is beneficial for stroke patient recovery from neurologic deficits. This trial was

  2. Functional Recovery of the Paretic Upper Limb After Stroke: Who Regains Hand Capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Participants: Patients with stroke (N=299)

  3. Functional recovery of the paretic upper limb after stroke: who regains hand capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with stroke (N=299)

  4. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF). This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I–III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index. A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were −52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = −0.318, P lower extremities (r = −0.288, P lower extremities (r = −0.311, P limbs. FVC was more strongly associated with MIP and MEP than predicted FVC%. FEV1/FVC may be used as a reference for the pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:27749577

  5. [Clinical study of post-stroke upper limb spasmodic hemiplegia treated with jingou diaoyu needling technique and Bobath therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Runjie; Tian, Liang; Fang, Xiaoli; Du, Xiaozheng; Zhu, Bowen; Song, Zhongyang; Xu, Xuan; Qin, Xiaoguang

    2017-04-12

    To compare the difference in the clinical efficacy on post-stroke upper limb spasmodic hemiplegia between the combined therapy of jingou diaoyu needling technique and Bobath technology and simple Bobath technology. Sixty patients were randomized into an observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each one. The usual medication of neurological internal medicine was used in the two groups. In the control group, Bobath facilitation technology was applied to the rehabilitation training. In the observation group, on the basis of the treatment as the control group, jingou diaoyu needling technique was used to stimulate Zhongfu (LU 1), Tianfu (LU 3), Chize (LU 5), Quchi (LI 11), Jianshi (PC 5) and Daling (PC 7). The treatment was given once a day; 5 treatments made one session and totally 4-week treatment was required in the two groups. The modified Ashworth scale, the modified Fugle-Meyer assessment (FMA) and the Barthel index (BI) were adopted to evaluate the muscular tension, the upper limb motor function and the activities of daily living (ADL) before and after treatment in the two groups. The clinical efficacy was compared between the two groups. Compared with those before treatment, the modified Ashworth scale, Fugl-Meyer score and BI score were all improved after treatment in the two groups (all P Bobath therapy achieve the superior efficacy on post-stroke upper limb spasmodic hemiplegia as compared with the simple application Bobath therapy. This combined treatment effectively relieve spasmodic state and improve the upper limb motor function and the activities of daily living.

  6. Implementation of evidence-based treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke (QASC): a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; McElduff, Patrick; Ward, Jeanette; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dale, Simeon; D'Este, Catherine; Drury, Peta; Griffiths, Rhonda; Cheung, N Wah; Quinn, Clare; Evans, Malcolm; Cadilhac, Dominique; Levi, Christopher

    2011-11-12

    We assessed patient outcomes 90 days after hospital admission for stroke following a multidisciplinary intervention targeting evidence-based management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke units (ASUs). In the Quality in Acute Stroke Care (QASC) study, a single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial, we randomised ASUs (clusters) in New South Wales, Australia, with immediate access to CT and on-site high dependency units, to intervention or control group. Patients were eligible if they spoke English, were aged 18 years or older, had had an ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage, and presented within 48 h of onset of symptoms. Intervention ASUs received treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction with multidisciplinary team building workshops to address implementation barriers. Control ASUs received only an abridged version of existing guidelines. We recruited pre-intervention and post-intervention patient cohorts to compare 90-day death or dependency (modified Rankin scale [mRS] ≥2), functional dependency (Barthel index), and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. Research assistants, the statistician, and patients were masked to trial groups. All analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered at the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), number ACTRN12608000563369. 19 ASUs were randomly assigned to intervention (n=10) or control (n=9). Of 6564 assessed for eligibility, 1696 patients' data were obtained (687 pre-intervention; 1009 post-intervention). Results showed that, irrespective of stroke severity, intervention ASU patients were significantly less likely to be dead or dependent (mRS ≥2) at 90 days than control ASU patients (236 [42%] of 558 patients in the intervention group vs 259 [58%] of 449 in the control group, p=0·002; number needed to treat 6·4; adjusted absolute difference 15·7% [95% CI 5·8-25·4]). They also had a

  7. Endovascular stroke treatment in a small-volume stroke center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Gry N; Fjetland, Lars; Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Martin W; Kurz, Kathinka D

    2017-04-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) of stroke caused by large vessel occlusions (LVO) performed by general interventional radiologists in cooperation with stroke neurologists and neuroradiologists at a center with a limited annual number of procedures. We aimed to compare our results with those previously reported from larger stroke centers. A total of 108 patients with acute stroke due to LVO treated with EVT were included. Outcome was measured using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days. Efficacy was classified according to the modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (mTICI) scoring system. Safety was evaluated according to the incidence of procedural complications and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Mean age of the patients was 67.5 years. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on hospital admission was 17. Successful revascularization was achieved in 76%. 39.4% experienced a good clinical outcome (mRS<3). Intraprocedural complications were seen in 7.4%. 7.4% suffered a sICH. 21.3% died within 3 months after EVT. The use of general interventional radiologists in EVT of LVO may be a possible approach for improving EVT coverage where availability of specialized neurointerventionalists is challenging. EVT for LVO stroke performed by general interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists can be safe and efficacious despite the low number of annual procedures.

  8. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  9. Dinamometria de preensão manual como parâmetro de avaliação funcional do membro superior de pacientes hemiparéticos por acidente vascular cerebral Handgrip dynamometry as a parameter of functional evaluation of the upper extremity hemiparetic after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vinicius Soares

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A força muscular é a valência física mais importante. É provável que exista correlação entre a força de preensão manual e outros testes para o membro superior afetado por um acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. O propósito deste estudo é analisar o valor preditivo da dinamometria de preensão manual (DPM para recuperação do membro superior parético por AVC. Foram avaliados 43 pacientes hemiparéticos pós-AVC (60,7 anos±12,1. Vários testes (Escala de movimento da mão (EMM, Estesiometria, Teste de caixa e blocos, 9 buracos e pinos, Escala de Ashworth modificada e Índice de Barthel foram relacionados com a DPM. Os resultados apontaram que a DPM apresenta boa correlação com EMM e, contrariamente, os testes de destreza manual, a sensibilidade e o índice de independência funcional não apresentaram valores significativos. A DPM é um teste rápido, fácil e acessível, e pode fazer parte dos protocolos de avaliação funcional do membro superior de pacientes hemiparéticos por AVC.Muscle strength is the most important physical valence. It is likely that there is a correlation between handgrip strength and other tests for the upper extremity affected by stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze the predictive value of handgrip dynamometry (HD for upper limb recovery in stroke. Were studied 43 hemiparetic patients after stroke (60.7 years±12.1. Several tests (Hand moviment scale (HMS, Esthesiometry, Box and blocks test, 9 hole and peg test, Modified Ashworth scale and Barthel index were related to HD. The results showed that there is good correlation of the HD with HMS and, by contrast, the tests of manual dexterity, the sensitivity and index of functional independence showed no significant values. The HD is a quick, easy and affordable test, and can be part of protocols for functional evaluation of upper extremity of hemiparetic patients by stroke.

  10. A randomized controlled clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of edaravone in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Edaravone has potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties. Few Japanese studies had demonstrated its neuroprotective role in acute ischemic stroke (AIS. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of edaravone in terms of functional outcome in a group of Indian patients of AIS. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients of AIS were randomly divided into two groups. The study group received 30 mg of edaravone twice daily for 14 days by infusion, while control group received normal saline infusion as placebo. Outcome assessment was done by the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS. MRS score ≤2 at 90 days was considered as a favorable outcome. Results: Of 25 patients, 18 (72% had favorable outcomes (MRS ≤2 at 90 days in edaravone group, while 10 (40% of 25 patients in placebo group had favorable outcome (P < 0.005. Two patients expired (one in each group during treatment. The mean Barthel index increased from 41.20 ± 32.70 at baseline to 82.40 ± 18.32 at day 90 in edaravone group as compared with placebo group in which scores were 44.20 ± 22.76 at baseline and 68.20 ± 21.30 at day 90 (P < 0.005. Conclusions: We therefore conclude that edaravone effectively improves functional outcome in AIS.

  11. Hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics as primary stroke prevention make better functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Mo; Lin, Wei Chun; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Thiazides have been used for the control of blood pressure and primary prevention of ischemic stroke. No previous studies have assessed the influence of thiazides on functional prognosis after ischemic stroke. Demographics, prestroke conditions, poststroke National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and clinical and laboratory parameters were prospectively registered in 216 Taiwanese patients. One hundred forty patients who completed follow-up 3 months after experiencing ischemic stroke were assessed with the modified Rankin scale as functional prognoses. Twenty-one patients used thiazide to control hypertension before experiencing ischemic stroke. No differences of stroke subtypes and comorbidities before stroke were observed between the 2 groups. The emergency department National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was lesser among thiazide users (4 [2-7] versus 6 [4-16], P = .02). Among 140 patients who completed follow-up in 90 days, thiazide users had more favorable functional status (modified Rankin scale ≤2: 42.4% versus 26.9%, P = .02, odds ratio 3.34, 95%, confidence interval .130-.862). Hypertensive patients treated with thiazides long term had a lesser severity of stroke and better functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. mStroke: "Mobile Stroke"-Improving Acute Stroke Care with Smartphone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Benjamin Y; Stack, Colleen M; Yang, Julian P; Dodds, Jodi A

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of method and time of system activation on clinical metrics in cases utilizing the Stop Stroke (Pulsara, Inc.) mobile acute stroke care coordination application. A retrospective cohort analysis of stroke codes at 12 medical centers using Stop Stroke from March 2013 to May 2016 was performed. Comparison of metrics (door-to-needle time [DTN] and door-to-CT time [DTC], and rate of DTN ≤ 60 minutes [goal DTN]) was performed between subgroups based on method (emergency medical service [EMS] versus emergency department [ED]) and time of activation. Effects were adjusted for confounders (age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) using multiple linear and logistic regression. The final dataset included 2589 cases. Cases activated by EMS were more severe (median NIHSS score 8 versus 4, P smartphone technology provides unique insight into acute stroke codes. Activation of mobile electronic stroke coordination in the field appears to promote a more expedited and successful care process. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  14. The Prognostic Value of a Four-Dimensional CT Angiography-Based Collateral Grading Scale for Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Weili; Tang, Huan; Han, Quan; Yan, Shenqiang; Zhang, Xiaocheng; Chen, Qingmeng; Parsons, Mark; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal collaterals, which affects tissue fate, are still challenging to assess. Four-dimensional CT angiography (4D CTA) originated from CT perfusion (CTP) provides the possibility of non-invasive and time-resolved assessment of leptomeningeal collateral flow. We sought to develop a comprehensive rating system to integrate the speed and extent of collateral flow on 4D CTA, and investigate its prognostic value for reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. We retrospectively studied 80 patients with M1 ± internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion who had baseline CTP before intravenous thrombolysis. The velocity and extent of collaterals were evaluated by regional leptomeningeal collateral score on peak phase (rLMC-P) and temporally fused intensity projections (tMIP) (rLMC-M) on 4D CTA, respectively. The cutoffs of rLMC-P and rLMC-M score for predicting good outcome (mRS score ≤ 2) were integrated to develop the collateral grading scale (CGS) (rating from 0-2). The CGS score was correlated with 3-months mRS score (non-recanalizers: ρ = -0.495, p = 0.01; recanalizers: ρ = -0.671, p < 0.001). Patients with intermediate or good collaterals (CGS score of 1 and 2) who recanalized were more likely to have good outcome than those without recanalization (p = 0.038, p = 0.018), while there was no significant difference in outcome in patients with poor collaterals (CGS score of 0) stratified by recanalization (p = 0.227). Identification of collaterals based on CGS may help to select good responders to reperfusion therapy in patients with large artery occlusion.

  15. A cluster randomised controlled trial of an occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke living in UK care homes (OTCH: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sackley Cath M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occupational therapy (OT in care homes study (OTCH aims to investigate the effect of a targeted course of individual OT (with task training, provision of adaptive equipment, minor environmental adaptations and staff education for stroke survivors living in care homes, compared to usual care. Methods/Design A cluster randomised controlled trial of United Kingdom (UK care homes (n = 90 with residents (n = 900 who have suffered a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA, and who are not receiving end-of-life care. Homes will be stratified by centre and by type of care provided and randomised (50:50 using computer generated blocked randomisation within strata to receive either the OT intervention (3 months intervention from an occupational therapist or control (usual care. Staff training on facilitating independence and mobility and the use of adaptive equipment, will be delivered to every home, with control homes receiving this after the 12 month follow-up. Allocation will be concealed from the independent assessors, but the treating therapists, and residents will not be masked to the intervention. Measurements are taken at baseline prior to randomisation and at 3, 6 and 12 months post randomisation. The primary outcome measure is independence in self-care activities of daily living (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index. Secondary outcome measures are mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index, mood (Geriatric Depression Scale, preference based quality of life measured from EQ-5D and costs associated with each intervention group. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs will be derived based on the EQ-5D scores. Cost effectiveness analysis will be estimated and measured by incremental cost effectiveness ratio. Adverse events will be recorded. Discussion This study will be the largest cluster randomised controlled trial of OT in care homes to date and will clarify the currently inconclusive literature on the efficacy of OT for

  16. Does feedback on daily activity level from a Smart watch during inpatient stroke rehabilitation increase physical activity levels? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yun; Steins, Dax; Sun, Shanbin; Li, Fei; Amor, James D; James, Christopher J; Xia, Zhidao; Dawes, Helen; Izadi, Hooshang; Cao, Yi; Wade, Derick T

    2018-03-09

    Practicing activities improves recovery after stroke, but many people in hospital do little activity. Feedback on activity using an accelerometer is a potential method to increase activity in hospital inpatients. This study's goal is to investigate the effect of feedback, enabled by a Smart watch, on daily physical activity levels during inpatient stroke rehabilitation and the short-term effects on simple functional activities, primarily mobility. A randomized controlled trial will be undertaken within the stroke rehabilitation wards of the Second Affiliated hospital of Anhui University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hefei, China. The study participants will be stroke survivors who meet inclusion criteria for the study, primarily: able to participate, no more than 4 months after stroke and walking independently before stroke. Participants will all receive standard local rehabilitation and will be randomly assigned either to receive regular feedback about activity levels, relative to a daily goal tailored by the smart watch over five time periods throughout a working day, or to no feedback, but still wearing the Smart watch. The intervention will last up to 3 weeks, ending sooner if discharged. The data to be collected in all participants include measures of daily activity (Smart watch measure); mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index and 10-metre walking time); independence in personal care (Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Index); overall activities (the World Health Organization (WHO) Disability Assessment Scale, 12-item version); and quality of life (the Euro-Qol 5L5D). Data will be collected by assessors blinded to allocation of the intervention at baseline, 3 weeks or at discharge (whichever is the sooner); and a reduced data set will be collected at 12 weeks by telephone interview. The primary outcome will be change in daily accelerometer activity scores. Secondary outcomes are compliance and adherence to wearing the watch, and changes in mobility

  17. Predictors of activities of daily living outcomes after upper limb robot-assisted therapy in subacute stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Upper limb recovery is one of the main goals of post-stroke rehabilitation due to its importance for autonomy in Activities of Daily Living (ADL. Although the efficacy of upper limb Robot-assisted Therapy (RT is well established in literature, the impact of the initial status of the patient on the effects of RT is still understudied. This paper aims to identify whether demographic, clinical and motor characteristics of stroke patients may influence the ability to independently perform ADL after RT.A retrospective study was conducted on sixty stroke patients who conducted planar upper limb goal-directed tasks with the InMotion 2.0 robot. The RT was administered 5 days/week for 4 weeks and each session lasted 45 minutes. The primary outcome measure was the Modified Barthel Index (BI, dichotomized into favourable (BI ≥75 and unfavourable (BI<75 outcomes. The potential predictors were the demographic and clinical records, and the following clinical assessment scores: Modified Ashworth Scale-Shoulder (MAS-S; Modified Ashworth Scale-Elbow (MAS-E; Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE; upper limb section of the Motricity Index (MIul; total passive Range Of Motion (pROM; and Box and Block Test (BBT.Statistical analysis showed that the BBT, FMA-UE and MIul scores were significant predictors of a favourable outcome in ADL. The cut-off scores of the independent variables were calculated (FMA-UE = 32; MIul = 48; BBT = 3 with respect to the dichotomic BI outcome. Their robustness was assessed with the Fragility Index (FMA-UE = 2; MIul = 3; BBT = 7, showing that BBT is the most robust predictor of favourable BI outcome. Moreover, subjects with all predictors higher than the cut-off scores had higher probability to increase their independence in ADL at the end of the therapy. Demographic records, spasticity and pROM were not identified as predictors.Stroke patients with greater manual dexterity and less impairment appear to have a higher probability

  18. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    higher mortality risk (HR, 1.564; 95% CI, 1.441-1.696). The increased risk was, however, time-dependent; initially, risk was 4-fold, after 1 week it was 2.5-fold, and after 3 weeks it was 1.5-fold. After 3 months stroke type did not correlate to mortality. Conclusion-Strokes are generally more severe......Background and Purpose-Stroke patients with hemorrhagic (HS) and ischemic strokes were compared with regard to stroke severity, mortality, and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods-A registry started in 2001, with the aim of registering all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds...... information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  19. Stroke Location Is an Independent Predictor of Cognitive Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Fanny; Sagnier, Sharmila; Asselineau, Julien; Bigourdan, Antoine; Guttmann, Charles R; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Poli, Mathilde; Renou, Pauline; Perez, Paul; Dousset, Vincent; Sibon, Igor; Tourdias, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    On top of functional outcome, accurate prediction of cognitive outcome for stroke patients is an unmet need with major implications for clinical management. We investigated whether stroke location may contribute independent prognostic value to multifactorial predictive models of functional and cognitive outcomes. Four hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were prospectively assessed with magnetic resonance imaging at 24 to 72 hours and at 3 months for functional outcome using the modified Rankin Scale and cognitive outcome using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Statistical maps of functional and cognitive eloquent regions were derived from the first 215 patients (development sample) using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. We used multivariate logistic regression models to study the influence of stroke location (number of eloquent voxels from voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping maps), age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and stroke volume on modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. The second part of our cohort was used as an independent replication sample. In univariate analyses, stroke location, age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume were all predictive of poor modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. In multivariable analyses, stroke location remained the strongest independent predictor of MoCA and significantly improved the prediction compared with using only age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume (area under the curve increased from 0.697-0.771; difference=0.073; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.155). In contrast, stroke location did not persist as independent predictor of modified Rankin Scale that was mainly driven by initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (area under the curve going from 0.840 to 0.835). Similar results were obtained in the replication sample. Stroke location is an independent predictor of cognitive outcome (MoCA) at 3

  20. Effect of home-based training using a slant board with dorsiflexed ankles on walking function in post-stroke hemiparetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yasuhide; Iijima, Setsu; Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of a 30-day rehabilitation program using a slant board on walking function in post-stroke hemiparetic patients. [Subjects and Methods] Six hemiparetic patients with gait disturbance were studied. The patients were instructed to perform a home-based rehabilitation program using a slant board, thrice daily for 30 days, the exercise included standing on the slant board for 3 minutes, with both ankles dorsiflexed without backrest. For all patients, the Brunnstrom Recovery Stage, Barthel Index, range of motion of the ankle joint, modified Ashworth scale scole for calf muscle, sensory impairments with Numeral Rating Scale, maximum walking speed, number of steps, and Timed "Up and Go" test were serially evaluated at the beginning and end of the 30-day program. [Results] The program significantly increased walking velocity, decreased the number of steps in the 10-m walking test, and decreased Timed "Up and Go" test performance time. [Conclusion] This rehabilitation program using the slant board was safe and improved walking function in patients. The improvement in walking function could be due to a forward shift of the center of gravity, which can be an important part of motor learning for gait improvement.

  1. National Trends in Patients Hospitalized for Stroke and Stroke Mortality in France, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoffre, Camille; de Peretti, Christine; Gabet, Amélie; Grimaud, Olivier; Woimant, France; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Olié, Valérie

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men in France. In young adults (ie, stroke was observed at a local scale between 1985 and 2011. After the implementation of the 2010 to 2014 National Stroke Action Plan, this study investigates national trends in patients hospitalized by stroke subtypes, in-hospital mortality, and stroke mortality between 2008 and 2014. Hospitalization data were extracted from the French national hospital discharge databases and mortality data from the French national medical causes of death database. Time trends were tested using a Poisson regression model. From 2008 to 2014, the age-standardized rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke increased by 14.3% in patients stroke was stable (+2.0%), irrespective of age and sex. The proportion of patients hospitalized in stroke units substantially increased. In-hospital mortality decreased by 17.1% in patients with ischemic stroke. From 2008 to 2013, stroke mortality decreased, except for women between 45 and 64 years old and for people aged ≥85 years. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors and improved stroke management may explain the increase in the rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke. The decrease observed for in-hospital stroke mortality may be because of recent improvements in acute-phase management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Comparing the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in the assessment of wrist flexor spasticity in patients with stroke: protocol for a neurophysiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Hamid; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mansouri, Korosh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Hasson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reliable and valid tools must be used to assess spasticity in clinical practise and research settings. There is a paucity of literature regarding the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). No study, to date, has been performed to compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS. This neurophysiological study protocol will compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS in the assessment of poststroke wrist flexor spasticity. Methods and analysis Thirty-two patients with stroke from the University Rehabilitation clinics will be recruited to participate in this cross-sectional, non-interventional study. All measurements will be taken in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Shafa University Hospital in Tehran, Iran. First, wrist flexor spasticity will be assessed clinically using the MMAS and MTS. The tests will be applied randomly. For the MTS, the components of R1, R2, R2−R1 and quality of muscle reaction will be measured. Second, neurophysiological measures of H-reflex latency, Hmax/Mmax ratio, Hslp and Hslp/Mslp ratio will be collected from the affected side. The results will be analysed using Spearman's ρ test or Pearson's correlation test to determine the validity of the MMAS and the MTS as well as to compare the validity between the MMAS and the MTS. Ethics and dissemination The Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) approved the study protocol.  The study results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at international congresses. PMID:23166123

  3. Comparing the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in the assessment of wrist flexor spasticity in patients with stroke: protocol for a neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Hamid; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mansouri, Korosh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Hasson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and valid tools must be used to assess spasticity in clinical practise and research settings. There is a paucity of literature regarding the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). No study, to date, has been performed to compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS. This neurophysiological study protocol will compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS in the assessment of poststroke wrist flexor spasticity. Thirty-two patients with stroke from the University Rehabilitation clinics will be recruited to participate in this cross-sectional, non-interventional study. All measurements will be taken in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Shafa University Hospital in Tehran, Iran. First, wrist flexor spasticity will be assessed clinically using the MMAS and MTS. The tests will be applied randomly. For the MTS, the components of R1, R2, R2-R1 and quality of muscle reaction will be measured. Second, neurophysiological measures of H-reflex latency, H(max)/M(max) ratio, H(slp) and H(slp)/M(slp) ratio will be collected from the affected side. The results will be analysed using Spearman's ρ test or Pearson's correlation test to determine the validity of the MMAS and the MTS as well as to compare the validity between the MMAS and the MTS. The Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) approved the study protocol.  The study results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at international congresses.

  4. Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau PH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pui Hing Chau,1 Maria WS Tang,2 Fannie Yeung,2 Tsz Wai Chan,1 Joanna OY Cheng,1 Jean Woo2 1School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China Background: Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap. Objectives: The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline between those using short-term residential care (intervention group and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group, and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group. Participants: 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline. Intervention: The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital. Measurements: Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate. Results: Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel

  5. Follow-up services for stroke survivors after hospital discharge--a randomized control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hanne Elkjaer; Eriksen, Karen; Brown, Anne

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether follow-up services for stroke survivors could improve functional outcome and reduce readmission rate. In this paper results of functional outcome are reported. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial allocating patients to one of three different types of aftercare: (1......) follow-up home visits by a physician, (2) physiotherapist instruction in the patient's home, or (3) standard aftercare. SUBJECTS: Stroke patients with persisting impairment and disability who, after completing inpatient rehabilitation, were discharged to their homes. OUTCOME MEASURES: Six months after...... discharge, functional outcome was assessed with Functional Quality of Movement, Barthel Index, Frenchay Activity Index and Index of Extended Activites of Daily Living. RESULTS: One-hundred and fifty-five stroke patients were included in the study. Fifty-four received follow-up home visits by a physician, 53...

  6. In-hospital stroke recurrence and stroke after transient ischemic attack: frequency and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Hebun; Scheitz, Jan F; Ebinger, Martin; Rocco, Andrea; Grittner, Ulrike; Meisel, Andreas; Rothwell, Peter M; Endres, Matthias; Nolte, Christian H

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to assess the risk of recurrent ischemic events during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) with optimal current management and to identify associated risk factors. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients treated for acute ischemic stroke or TIA in 3 stroke units between 2010 and 2013. Recurrent stroke was defined as new persisting (≥24 hours) neurological deficit occurring >24 hours after the index event and not attributable to other causes of neurological deterioration. Cox proportional hazard regression identified risk factors associated with recurrent stroke. The study included 5106 patients. During a median length of stay of 5 days (interquartile range, 4-8), stroke recurrence (or stroke after TIA) occurred in 40 patients (0.8%) and was independently associated with history of TIA, symptomatic carotid stenosis (≥70%), or other determined etiology. Patients with recurrent stroke and other determined etiology had cervical arterial dissection (n=2), primary angiitis of the central nervous system (n=1), giant cell arteritis (n=1), and lung cancer with nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (n=1). In patients with initial TIA or minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤5) recurrence was associated additionally with pneumonia after the inciting ischemic event but before stroke recurrence. Patients with initial stroke and aphasia had a lower stroke recurrence rate and there were no recurrences in patients with lacunar stroke. Recurrence was associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality (17.5% versus 3.1%; Pstroke recurrence was low with optimal current management. Patients with a history of TIA, severe symptomatic carotid stenosis, or uncommon causes of stroke were at higher risk. Pneumonia was associated with a higher risk of stroke recurrence in patients with initial TIA or minor stroke but not in the overall population studied. Aphasia may bias the detection rate by concealing new

  7. Reduction in patient burdens with graphical computerized adaptive testing on the ADL scale: tool development and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Weng-Chung

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness and efficacy of saving time and reducing burden for patients, nurses, and even occupational therapists through computer adaptive testing (CAT. Methods Based on an item bank of the Barthel Index (BI and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI for assessing comprehensive activities of daily living (ADL function in stroke patients, we developed a visual basic application (VBA-Excel CAT module, and (1 investigated whether the averaged test length via CAT is shorter than that of the traditional all-item-answered non-adaptive testing (NAT approach through simulation, (2 illustrated the CAT multimedia on a tablet PC showing data collection and response errors of ADL clinical functional measures in stroke patients, and (3 demonstrated the quality control of endorsing scale with fit statistics to detect responding errors, which will be further immediately reconfirmed by technicians once patient ends the CAT assessment. Results The results show that endorsed items could be shorter on CAT (M = 13.42 than on NAT (M = 23 at 41.64% efficiency in test length. However, averaged ability estimations reveal insignificant differences between CAT and NAT. Conclusion This study found that mobile nursing services, placed at the bedsides of patients could, through the programmed VBA-Excel CAT module, reduce the burden to patients and save time, more so than the traditional NAT paper-and-pencil testing appraisals.

  8. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  9. Effects of Innovative WALKBOT Robotic-Assisted Locomotor Training on Balance and Gait Recovery in Hemiparetic Stroke: A Prospective, Randomized, Experimenter Blinded Case Control Study With a Four-Week Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Yang, Li; Park, In Jae; Kim, Eun Joo; JoshuaPark, Min Su; You, Sung Hyun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Ko, Hyun-Yoon; Shin, Yong-Il

    2015-07-01

    The present clinical investigation was to ascertain whether the effects of WALKBOT-assisted locomotor training (WLT) on balance, gait, and motor recovery were superior or similar to the conventional locomotor training (CLT) in patients with hemiparetic stroke. Thirty individuals with hemiparetic stroke were randomly assigned to either WLT or CLT. WLT emphasized on a progressive, conventional locomotor retraining practice (40 min) combined with the WALKBOT-assisted, haptic guidance and random variable locomotor training (40 min) whereas CLT involved conventional physical therapy alone (80 min). Both intervention dosages were standardized and provided for 80 min, five days/week for four weeks. Clinical outcomes included function ambulation category (FAC), Berg balance scale (BBS), Korean modified Barthel index (K-MBI), modified Ashworth scale (MAS), and EuroQol-5 dimension (EQ-5D) before and after the four-week program as well as at follow-up four weeks after the intervention. Two-way repeated measure ANOVA showed significant interaction effect (time × group) for FAC (p=0.02), BBS (p=0.03) , and K-MBI (p=0.00) across the pre-training, post-training, and follow-up tests, indicating that WLT was more beneficial for balance, gait and daily activity function than CLT alone. However, no significant difference in other variables was observed. This is the first clinical trial that highlights the superior, augmented effects of the WALKBOT-assisted locomotor training on balance, gait and motor recovery when compared to the conventional locomotor training alone in patients with hemiparetic stroke.

  10. Cantonese version of the Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS: Validation for stroke survivors in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinky Hiu Ping Lam

    2014-04-01

    -speaking stroke participants (aged 21-83 years; 72% left hemispheric stroke participated and received a short test of gestural production (Goldenberg, 1996, Albert’s test of visual neglect, Chinese version of the Modified Barthel Index, and Hong Kong Chinese version of Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale, Cantonese-WAB, Cantonese-MMSE, HK-MoCA, and HK-OCS. Results Cut-off scores for most HK-OCS sections were comparable across the three age groups. Paired-sample t-tests revealed the stroke group achieved significantly lower scores across most sections than matched controls. The tool demonstrated strong concurrent validity with positive and significant correlations across related cognitive subtests in other batteries (Table 1. The HK-OCS also had excellent intra-rater and inter-rater, good test-retest reliability, and acceptable internal consistency. Regarding its predictive values on functional outcomes, while semantics and episodic memory best predicted basic ADL, number writing and orientation best predicted complex ADL.

  11. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  12. Rehabilitation of stroke patients using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbritt, David; van der Riet, Pamela; Dedkhard, Saowapa; Srithong, Kannapatch

    2012-07-01

    To determine quantitatively if a unique rehabilitation program using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies could improve activities of daily living, mood and sleep patterns, and pain intensity of stroke patients over time. This was a prospective cohort study, conducted over a three-month period. Patients were recruited from a 42-bed rehabilitation centre in Northern Thailand, which admits mainly stroke, head injury and spinal patients for rehabilitation. There were 62 patients enrolled in the study, with 55% being male. The average age of patients was 59 years and 63% were married. The average time since the initial stroke was 15 months. At baseline, the average Barthel Index score was 50.7, and the average emotion, pain and sleep scores were 2.6, 3.1, and 3.2, respectively. After adjusting for age, gender and time since initial stroke in the longitudinal model, the Barthel Index significantly improved by 6.1 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 14.2 points after three months (P<0.01); emotion significantly improved by 0.7 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.9 points after three months (P<0.01); pain significantly improved by 0.5 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.5 points after three months (P<0.01); sleep significantly improved by 0.5 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.6 points after three months (P<0.01). This unique stroke rehabilitation program has produced significant improvements in activities of daily living, mood, pain and sleep patterns of stroke patients. These findings warrant the need for further research to compare patients undergoing this program of rehabilitation with patients undergoing more conventional rehabilitation programs.

  13. Effects of traditional Chinese exercises on the rehabilitation of limb function among stroke patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li; Zheng, Qing-Xiang; Liao, Yan-Tan; Tan, Jing-Yu; Xie, Qiu-Lin; Rask, Mikael

    2017-11-01

    To systematically review literature about the rehabilitative effects of traditional Chinese exercises (TCEs) on limb function among patients with stroke. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Twelve electronic databases were searched from their inceptions to February 2017, including PudMed, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EMBase, Science Direct, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Allied and Complementary Medicine, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database and WanFang Data. RCTs were located to examine the rehabilitative effects of TCEs on limb function among stroke patients. Two authors independently screened the literature, extracted data and assessed the risk bias of the included studies. Methodological quality evaluation and meta-analysis of included studies was performed by using Cochrane Collaboration's tool (RevMan 5.3). A total of 31 RCTs with 2349 participants were included. Results of meta-analysis showed that TCEs produced positive effects on limb motor function (random effects model, standardized mean difference [SMD] = 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.66 to 1.77, P < 0.01), balance function{Berg balance scale: (random effects model, SMD = 2.07, 95%CI = 1.52 to 2.62, P < 0.01), timed-up-and-go test: (fixed effects model, mean difference [MD] = -1.77, 95%CI = -2.87 to -0.67, P < 0.01)}, activities of daily living (ADL) ability {Barthel Index scale: (random effects model, MD = 15.60, 95%CI = 7.57 to 23.63, P < 0.01), Modified Barthel Index scale: (random effects model, MD = 12.30, 95%CI = 7.48 to 17.12, P < 0.01)}, and neurological impairment (fixed effects model, MD = -2.57, 95%CI = -3.14 to -2.00, P < 0.01). After subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis, the positive effects did not be affected by different types of TCEs and different lengths of intervention

  14. Participation in Leisure Activity and Exercise of Chronic Stroke Survivors Using Community-Based Rehabilitation Services in Seongnam City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tae Im; Lee, Ko Eun; Ha, Seung A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To clarify how participation in leisure activities and exercise by chronic stroke survivors differs before and after a stroke. Methods Sixty chronic stroke survivors receiving community-based rehabilitation services from a health center in Seongnam City were recruited. They completed a questionnaire survey regarding their demographic characteristics and accompanying diseases, and on the status of their leisure activities and exercise. In addition, their level of function (Korean version of Modified Barthel Index score), risk of depression (Beck Depression Inventory), and quality of life (SF-8) were measured. Results After their stroke, most of the respondents had not returned to their pre-stroke levels of leisure activity participation. The reported number of leisure activities declined from a mean of 3.9 activities before stroke to 1.9 activities post-stroke. In addition, many participants became home-bound, sedentary, and non-social after their stroke. The most common barriers to participation in leisure activities were weakness and poor balance, lack of transportation, and cost. The respondents reported a mean daily time spent on exercise of 2.6±1.3 hours. Pain was the most common barrier to exercise participation. Conclusion Chronic stroke survivors need information on leisure activities and appropriate pain management. PMID:25932420

  15. [Spasmodic hemiplegia after stroke treated with scalp acupuncture, music therapy and rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chengjie; Zhang, Hongru; Ni, Guangxia; Zhang, Yinan; Su, Bin; Xu, Xinlei

    2017-12-12

    To evaluate the differences in the clinical therapeutic effects on spasmodic hemiplegia after stroke among the alliance therapy of scalp acupuncture, music therapy combined with rehabilitation, the simple rehabilitation therapy and the combination of music therapy and rehabilitation. A total of 76 patients of post-stroke spasmodic hemiplegia were randomized into a rehabilitation group (25 cases), a combination group with music therapy and rehabilitation (25 cases) and an alliance therapy group with scalp acupuncture, music therapy and rehabilitation (26 cases). In the rehabilitation group, the routine rehabilitation therapy was applied, including the removal of various incentives that cause spasm, the correction of body position and the physical therapy. In the combination group, the music therapy was added on the basis of the treatment as the rehabilitation group. The music physician used the rhythmic auditory stimulation, the patterned sensory enhancement and the therapeutic instrumental music playing to set up the task in the treatment. In the alliance therapy group, scalp acupuncture was added on the basis of the treatment as the combination group. The anterior oblique line of vertex-tempora (MS 6) and the posterior oblique line of vertex-tempora (MS 7) on the contralateral side were selected and stimulated with penetrating needling technique. The needles were retained. During the needling retaining, the needles were rotated once every 10 min, for 2 min each time. The treatment was given one session a day, totally for 5 sessions a week, continuously for 4 weeks. The Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), Barthel index (BI) and the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) of the affected elbow and the passive knee movement at static condition were observed in the patients before and after treatment. The results of FMA, BI and MAS were not different before treatment in the patients among the three groups (all P >0.05), indicating the comparability among groups. After treatment, FMA

  16. Impact of Libido at 2 Weeks after Stroke on Risk of Stroke Recurrence at 1-Year in a Chinese Stroke Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Jing Li; Huai-Wu Yuan; Chun-Xue Wang; Ben-Yan Luo; Jie Ruan; Ning Zhang; Yu-Zhi Shi; Yong Zhou; Yi-Long Wang; Tong Zhang; Juan Zhou; Xing-Quan Zhao; Yong-Jun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: There were few studies on the relation between changes in libido and incidence of stroke recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between libido decrease at 2 weeks after stroke and recurrent stroke at 1-year. Methods: It is a multi-centered, prospective cohort study. The 14 th item of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 was used to evaluate changes of libido in poststroke patients at 2 weeks. Stroke recurrence was defined as an aggravation of ...

  17. Estimates of outcomes up to ten years after stroke: analysis from the prospective South London Stroke Register.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D A Wolfe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although stroke is acknowledged as a long-term condition, population estimates of outcomes longer term are lacking. Such estimates would be useful for planning health services and developing research that might ultimately improve outcomes. This burden of disease study provides population-based estimates of outcomes with a focus on disability, cognition, and psychological outcomes up to 10 y after initial stroke event in a multi-ethnic European population.Data were collected from the population-based South London Stroke Register, a prospective population-based register documenting all first in a lifetime strokes since 1 January 1995 in a multi-ethnic inner city population. The outcomes assessed are reported as estimates of need and included disability (Barthel Index 10, and mental and physical domain scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item short form (SF-12 health survey. Estimates were stratified by age, gender, and ethnicity, and age-adjusted using the standard European population. Plots of outcome estimates over time were constructed to examine temporal trends and sociodemographic differences. Between 1995 and 2006, 3,373 first-ever strokes were registered: 20%-30% of survivors had a poor outcome over 10 y of follow-up. The highest rate of disability was observed 7 d after stroke and remained at around 110 per 1,000 stroke survivors from 3 mo to 10 y. Rates of inactivity and cognitive impairment both declined up to 1 y (280/1,000 and 180/1,000 survivors, respectively; thereafter rates of inactivity remained stable till year eight, then increased, whereas rates of cognitive impairment fluctuated till year eight, then increased. Anxiety and depression showed some fluctuation over time, with a rate of 350 and 310 per 1,000 stroke survivors, respectively. SF-12 scores showed little variation from 3 mo to 10 y after stroke. Inactivity was higher in males at all time points, and in white compared to black stroke survivors, although black

  18. A randomized controlled trial of a modified wheelchair arm-support to reduce shoulder pain in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ruihuan; Zhou, Mingchao; Cai, Hao; Guo, Youhua; Zhan, Lechang; Li, Mei; Yang, Zhijing; Zhu, Leying; Zhan, Jie; Chen, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of modified wheelchair arm-support to mitigate hemiplegic shoulder pain and reduce pain frequency in stroke patients. Design: A single-blind randomized controlled trial using computer-generated simple randomization. Setting: Participants recruited from inpatients at the Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine. Subjects: A total of 120 patients with stroke were divided into two groups. Interventions: All subjects underwent basic rehabilitation training and wheelchair assistance with eight weeks follow-up period. Patients in the treatment group additionally received modified wheelchair arm-support for at least 60 minutes a day, six days a week, for four weeks. Outcome measures: Primary outcome was measured by the Visual Analogue Pain Scale or Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Secondary outcome was measured using the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale, Modified Barthel Index and Quality of Life Index. Measurements were made at 4 weeks and 12 weeks, following the intervention. Results: Patients age from 21 to 83 years (mean ± SD = 62.41 ± 12.26). The average duration of disease was 1.9 ± 1.3 months. At four weeks, the median of pain intensity was higher in the control group (median, interquartile range = 3, 5.75 vs. 2, 3.75; P = 0.059). At 12 weeks, the median of pain intensity was higher in the control group (median, interquartile range = 3, 5.00 vs. 0, 1.00; P < 0.001). At 12 weeks, patients with shoulder pain were higher in the control group (6 vs. 1; P < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the modified wheelchair arm-support could lead to the mitigation of hemiplegic shoulder pain and reduction in pain incidence in stroke patients. It may also improve the patients’ quality of life. PMID:28629270

  19. Citicoline in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: an international, randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled study (ICTUS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Antoni; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Castillo, José; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo; Serena, Joaquín; Segura, Tomás; Cruz, Vitor T; Masjuan, Jaime; Cobo, Erik; Secades, Julio J

    2012-07-28

    Citicoline is approved in some countries for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke. The drug has shown some evidence of efficacy in a pooled analysis. We sought to confirm the efficacy of citicoline in a larger trial. We undertook a randomised, placebo-controlled, sequential trial in patients with moderate-to-severe acute ischaemic stroke admitted at university hospitals in Germany, Portugal, and Spain. Using a centralised minimisation process, patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive citicoline or placebo within 24 h after the onset of symptoms (1000 mg every 12 h intravenously during the first 3 days and orally thereafter for a total of 6 weeks [2×500 mg oral tablets given every 12 h]). All study participants were masked. The primary outcome was recovery at 90 days measured by a global test combining three measures of success: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤1, modified Rankin score ≤1, and Barthel Index ≥95. Safety endpoints included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage in patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, neurological deterioration, and mortality. This trial is registered, NCT00331890. 2298 patients were enrolled into the study from Nov 26, 2006, to Oct 27, 2011. 37 centres in Spain, 11 in Portugal, and 11 in Ger