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Sample records for stroke risk factor

  1. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of getting ... disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do to ...

  2. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  3. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND USE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To review risk factors for stroke and the use of echocardiography in its diagnosis. ... therapy. Several risk factors are shared between ischaemic heart disease and ischaemic stroke and these have been well documented. Stroke has .... history, physical examination, electrocardiography or chest.

  5. Do Stroke Patients Know Their Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomann, Maarja; Vibo, Riina; Kõrv, Janika

    2016-03-01

    Risk factor management is the key to stroke prevention. Although several studies have assessed the awareness of different risk factors in the general public, there are limited data available on how well acute stroke patients know their own risk factors. The aim of this study was to assess stroke patients' informedness of their own stroke risk factors. All consecutive eligible acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients hospitalized at the Tartu University Hospital, Department of Neurology, during 9 months in 2010 were interviewed about different stroke risk factors within 72 hours from hospitalization. The respective information was also retrieved from medical records. Of the 341 patients admitted during the study period, 195 were eligible for the interview. Diabetes was the best known risk factor (89%) followed by hypertension (80%), atrial fibrillation (78%), previous stroke (77%), and heart failure and/or ischemic heart disease (66%). We found that acute stroke patients are best informed of their diabetes and worst informed of their ischemic heart disease and/or heart failure. There is, however, room for amelioration in the awareness of all of the studied risk factors. More attention should be addressed to explaining the risks and treatment options to patients at risk of stroke and the general population. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  9. Stroke Risk Factors among Participants of a World Stroke Day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension is the most common stroke risk factor globally as well as in the Nigerian population, however other modifiable risk factors such as obesity are becoming increasingly prevalent due to unhealthy diets and sedentary lifestyle. Materials and Methods: We screened 224 volunteers from Ile‑Ife during the 2011 and ...

  10. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  11. RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND USE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To review risk factors for stroke and the use of echocardiography in its diagnosis. ... embolism(5,18). Intra-cardiac thrombosis: This occurs in the setting of post myocardial infarction particularly in the anterior cardiac area (19). AC with INR .... of left ventricular thrombi in patients with acute anterior.

  12. STROKE AND PREGNANCY: THE MAIN RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Taitubayeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify risk factors for the development of acute cerebral circulatory impairments (ACCI in pregnant women.Materials and methods. The material for the study was the medical history of 31 pregnant women with diagnosis ACCI. The average age was 29,5 ± 5,1 years. The comparison group consisted of pregnant women with physiological pregnancy (n = 30 with different gestation periods, the mean age was 29,1 ± 6,7 years. In this study, a comparative analysis of risk factors for stroke was carried out: gynecological and allergic history, smoking and taking contraceptives, the presence of chronic diseases, indicators of the hemostasis and lipid spectrum, polymorphism of thrombophilia genes.Results. The prevalence of ischemic stroke over hemorrhagic stroke was found, which was 77.4% and 22.6%, respectively. In 93.5% of cases, a stroke occurred during pregnancy, in 79.3% of them in the third trimester of gestation. The number of recuperated women was 67.7%. As a result of statistical treatment, a significant difference in study and comparison groups was obtained (p < 0.05 as a result of a burdened obstetric-gynecological history. Among the women taking contraceptives, 11 (35.5% women were in the study group, and 3 (10% women were found in the comparison group (p < 0.05. At the analysis of smoking in the history the number of women in the study group prevailed comparing to the comparison group (35.5–13.3%, p < 0.05. Changes in the lipid spectrum system and hemostasis were detected, but there were no significant differences between the study group and the comparison group (p> 0.05. Various forms of mutations were identified in the group with ischemic stroke in 14 (58.3% women, in 2 (28.5% women in the group with hemorrhagic stroke.Conclusion. Of all the data analyzed in pregnant women with stroke, statistically significant risk factors are: smoking, taking contraceptives, the presence of chronic diseases, including an obstructed obstetric

  13. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  14. Risk factors for falls of hospitalized stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutuarima, J. A.; van der Meulen, J. H.; de Haan, R. J.; van Straten, A.; Limburg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with stroke are at a high risk for falling. We assessed the fall incidence and risk factors for patients hospitalized as the result of an acute stroke. We studied a cohort of 720 stroke patients from 23 hospitals in The Netherlands. The data were abstracted from the medical and nursing

  15. Relationship between Sleep Duration and Risk Factors for Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Phua, Chun Seng; Jayaram, Lata; Wijeratne, Tissa

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. While various risk factors have been identified, sleep has only been considered a risk factor more recently. Various epidemiologic studies have associated stroke with sleep such as sleep duration, and laboratory and clinical studies have proposed various underlying mechanisms. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, especially considering sleep affects many common risk factors for stroke. This review aims to provide an outline of the...

  16. Changes in risk factor profile after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete

    Background and aims. Adherence to preventive medication and to a healthy life style reduces stroke survivors’ risk of recurrent stroke. We investigated risk factor management in patients admitted to 3 Copenhagen hospitals with ischemic stroke (IS) Methods. 320 patients with acute IS were followed...... up 1 year after stroke. We constructed a baseline risk factor profile (RFP) of 6 variables: smoking, excessive drinking, physical inactivity, untreated hypertension, no cholesterol-lowering, and no antithrombotic treatment/warfarin at discharge from hospital. Each item was rated 0 or 1 giving......-fatal recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction Conclusions. We suggest the organisation of secondary prevention clinics within the stroke units for life style modification and treatment to target of risk factors immediately after discharge, thus extending the success of TIA clinics to all stroke survivors...

  17. OSA – a risk factor for stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan CM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clodagh M RyanCentre for Sleep Health and Research, University of Toronto/Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, CanadaAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep breathing disorder characterized by recurrent and intermittent hypoxia with continued respiratory effort against a closed glottis. The result of this is a cascade of acute and chronic systemic pathophysiological responses that cause endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and lead to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. This article focuses on the clinical evidence linking obstructive sleep apnea and stroke and on the specific mechanisms perpetuating stroke risk in this population.Keywords: stroke, obstructive sleep apnea, brain injury, atherosclerosis, continuous positive airway pressure, outcomes

  18. Stroke Risk Factors among Patients in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... aim of this study was to describe the risk factors in stroke patients admitted in a Nigerian teaching hospital. Methods: This is a prospective study carried out in the Jos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. The participants were 120 patients admitted into the hospital with stroke. Stroke was defined by the WHO definition.

  19. Differences in the role of black race and stroke risk factors for first vs recurrent stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissela, Brett M.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; McClure, Leslie A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Rhodes, J. David; Cushman, Mary; Moy, Claudia S.; Sands, Kara A.; Howard, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether black race and other cerebrovascular risk factors have a differential effect on first vs recurrent stroke events. Methods: Estimate the differences in the magnitude of the association of demographic (age, back race, sex) or stroke risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, cigarette smoking, atrial fibrillation, left ventricular hypertrophy, or heart disease) for first vs recurrent stroke from a longitudinal cohort study of 29,682 black or white participants aged 45 years and older. Results: Over an average 6.8 years follow-up, 301 of 2,993 participants with a previous stroke at baseline had a recurrent stroke, while 818 of 26,689 participants who were stroke-free at baseline had a first stroke. Among those stroke-free at baseline, there was an age-by-race interaction (p = 0.0002), with a first stroke risk 2.70 (95% confidence interval: 1.86–3.91) times greater for black than white participants at age 45, but no racial disparity at age 85 (hazard ratio = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.70–1.18). In contrast, there was no evidence of a higher risk of recurrent stroke at any age for black participants (p > 0.05). The association of traditional stroke risk factors was generally similar for first and recurrent stroke. Conclusion: The association of age and black race differs substantially on first vs recurrent stroke risk, with risk factors playing a similar role. PMID:26791153

  20. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    higher mortality risk (HR, 1.564; 95% CI, 1.441-1.696). The increased risk was, however, time-dependent; initially, risk was 4-fold, after 1 week it was 2.5-fold, and after 3 weeks it was 1.5-fold. After 3 months stroke type did not correlate to mortality. Conclusion-Strokes are generally more severe......Background and Purpose-Stroke patients with hemorrhagic (HS) and ischemic strokes were compared with regard to stroke severity, mortality, and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods-A registry started in 2001, with the aim of registering all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds...... information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  1. Contribution of Established Stroke Risk Factors to the Burden of Stroke in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Annette; Grittner, Ulrike; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Siegerink, Bob; Busch, Markus A

    2017-07-01

    As stroke in young adults is assumed to have different etiologies and risk factors than in older populations, the aim of this study was to examine the contribution of established potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factors to the burden of stroke in young adults. A German nationwide case-control study based on patients enrolled in the SIFAP1 study (Stroke In Young Fabry Patients) 2007 to 2010 and controls from the population-based GEDA study (German Health Update) 2009 to 2010 was performed. Cases were 2125 consecutive patients aged 18 to 55 years with acute first-ever stroke from 26 clinical stroke centers; controls (age- and sex-matched, n=8500, without previous stroke) were from a nationwide community sample. Adjusted population-attributable risks of 8 risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, smoking, heavy episodic alcohol consumption, low physical activity, and obesity) and their combinations for all stroke, ischemic stroke, and primary intracerebral hemorrhage were calculated. Low physical activity and hypertension were the most important risk factors, accounting for 59.7% (95% confidence interval, 56.3-63.2) and 27.1% (95% confidence interval, 23.6-30.6) of all strokes, respectively. All 8 risk factors combined explained 78.9% (95% confidence interval, 76.3-81.4) of all strokes. Population-attributable risks of all risk factors were similar for all ischemic stroke subtypes. Population-attributable risks of most risk factors were higher in older age groups and in men. Modifiable risk factors previously established in older populations also account for a large part of stroke in younger adults, with 4 risk factors explaining almost 80% of stroke risk. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  3. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  4. Traditional Risk Factors for Stroke in East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Dae; Jung, Yo Han; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and morbidity worldwide. The occurrence of stroke is strongly dependent on well-known vascular risk factors. After rapid modernization, urbanization, and mechanization, East Asian countries have experienced growth in their aged populations, as well as changes in lifestyle and diet. This phenomenon has increased the prevalence of vascular risk factors among Asian populations, which are susceptible to developing cardiovascular risk factors. However, ...

  5. Survival after stroke. Risk factors and determinants in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2010-01-01

    -based surveys is emphasized. For factors such as sex, and most cardiovascular risk factors further studies are necessary to clarify the relation to survival because studies disagree. Conclusions from studies of the relation between survival and alcohol intake are still debatable, mostly because of diverging...... definitions of the intensity of exposure. Smoking is uniformly associated with a poorer survival after stroke. Stroke unit treatment improves both short- and longterm survival regardless of stroke type, severity, age, and cardiovascular risk factor profile....

  6. In-hospital stroke recurrence and stroke after transient ischemic attack: frequency and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Hebun; Scheitz, Jan F; Ebinger, Martin; Rocco, Andrea; Grittner, Ulrike; Meisel, Andreas; Rothwell, Peter M; Endres, Matthias; Nolte, Christian H

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to assess the risk of recurrent ischemic events during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) with optimal current management and to identify associated risk factors. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients treated for acute ischemic stroke or TIA in 3 stroke units between 2010 and 2013. Recurrent stroke was defined as new persisting (≥24 hours) neurological deficit occurring >24 hours after the index event and not attributable to other causes of neurological deterioration. Cox proportional hazard regression identified risk factors associated with recurrent stroke. The study included 5106 patients. During a median length of stay of 5 days (interquartile range, 4-8), stroke recurrence (or stroke after TIA) occurred in 40 patients (0.8%) and was independently associated with history of TIA, symptomatic carotid stenosis (≥70%), or other determined etiology. Patients with recurrent stroke and other determined etiology had cervical arterial dissection (n=2), primary angiitis of the central nervous system (n=1), giant cell arteritis (n=1), and lung cancer with nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (n=1). In patients with initial TIA or minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤5) recurrence was associated additionally with pneumonia after the inciting ischemic event but before stroke recurrence. Patients with initial stroke and aphasia had a lower stroke recurrence rate and there were no recurrences in patients with lacunar stroke. Recurrence was associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality (17.5% versus 3.1%; Pstroke recurrence was low with optimal current management. Patients with a history of TIA, severe symptomatic carotid stenosis, or uncommon causes of stroke were at higher risk. Pneumonia was associated with a higher risk of stroke recurrence in patients with initial TIA or minor stroke but not in the overall population studied. Aphasia may bias the detection rate by concealing new

  7. Risk factors for stress in children after parental stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, D.S.; Meijer, A.M.; Visser-Meily, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess risk factors for stress in children 3 years after parental stroke. Participants: Questionnaires were filled in by 44 children aged 7-18 years, parents who suffered a stroke and healthy spouses from 29 families recruited in 9 participating rehabilitation centers across the

  8. Factor V leiden and ischemic stroke risk: the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, Oscar C; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study. A population-based case control study identified 354 women and 476 men 15 to 49 years of age with first-ever ischemic stroke and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-5.1%) and nonstroke controls (3.8%; 95% CI 2.7%-5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%; 95% CI 2.6%-6.4%). Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between FVL and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Genetic and Hemostatic Risk Factors for Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. van den Herik (Evita)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiovascular disorders are the main causes of death worldwide, with stroke accounting for 9-10% of all deaths1,2. Moreover, stroke is the most frequent cause of disability in the western world3. In the Netherlands alone, over 39,000 persons are admitted to hospitals with stroke each

  10. Statistical evaluation of adding multiple risk factors improves Framingham stroke risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Xiaonan; Duncan, Ashlee; Hu, Guizhou; Zheng, Jiayin

    2017-04-14

    Framingham Stroke Risk Score (FSRS) is the most well-regarded risk appraisal tools for evaluating an individual's absolute risk on stroke onset. However, several widely accepted risk factors for stroke were not included in the original Framingham model. This study proposed a new model which combines an existing risk models with new risk factors using synthesis analysis, and applied it to the longitudinal Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) data set. Risk factors in original prediction models and new risk factors in proposed model had been discussed. Three measures, like discrimination, calibration and reclassification, were used to evaluate the performance of the original Framingham model and new risk prediction model. Modified C-statistics, Hosmer-Lemeshow Test and classless NRI, class NRI were the statistical indices which, respectively, denoted the performance of discrimination, calibration and reclassification for evaluating the newly developed risk prediction model on stroke onset. It showed that the NEW-STROKE (new stroke risk score prediction model) model had higher modified C-statistics, smaller Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square values after recalibration than original FSRS model, and the classless NRI and class NRI of the NEW-STROKE model over the original FSRS model were all significantly positive in overall group. The NEW-STROKE integrated with seven literature-derived risk factors outperformed the original FSRS model in predicting the risk score of stroke. It illustrated that seven literature-derived risk factors contributed significantly to stroke risk prediction.

  11. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  12. Prevalence of risk factors for ischaemic stroke and their treatment among a cohort of stroke patients in Dublin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2000-10-01

    The majority of strokes are due to ischaemia. Risk factors include atrial fibrillation, hypertension and smoking. The incidence can be reduced by addressing these risk factors. This study examines the prevalence of risk factors and their treatment in a cohort of patients with ischaemic stroke registered on a Dublin stroke database.

  13. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    Background To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. Material/Methods This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressur...

  14. Risk factors for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Flávia Ferraz Barros Baroni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Stroke is a frequent cause of dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a tertiary care hospital the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients, to analyze factors associated with the dysfunction and to relate swallowing dysfunction to mortality 3 months after the stroke. METHODS: Clinical evaluation of deglutition was performed in 212 consecutive patients with a medical and radiologic diagnosis of stroke. The occurrence of death was determined 3 months after the stroke. RESULTS: It was observed that 63% of the patients had swallowing dysfunction. The variables gender and specific location of the lesion were not associated with the presence or absence of swallowing dysfunction. The patients with swallowing dysfunction had more frequently a previous stroke, had a stroke in the left hemisphere, motor and/or sensitivity alterations, difficulty in oral comprehension, alteration of oral expression, alteration of the level of consciousness, complications such as fever and pneumonia, high indexes on the Rankin scale, and low indexes on the Barthel scale. These patients had a higher mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Swallowing evaluation should be done in all patients with stroke, since swallowing dysfunction is associated with complications and an increased risk of death.

  15. Stroke risk factors among participants of a world stroke day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-20

    Apr 20, 2015 ... were screened at the two events. The sample was obtained by convenience sampling and is obviously small because recruitment was done only once on the particular occasion of a stroke awareness event. All test measurements were carried out by a team of six doctors, two physiotherapists, four nurses.

  16. [Risk factors of stroke among Congolese black hypertensive diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Ngimbi, R Mombo; Ngoma, D Vangu; Fuele, S Mbungu; Buassa-bu-Tsumbu, B

    2008-02-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and risk of stroke is well established. This risk is more elevated for hypertensive diabetics men. To determine the incidence and the risk factors of stroke among hypertensive diabetics. This prospective study has considered baseline demographic, behavioural and biological parameters collected in 2002 among black Congolese hypertensive diabetics from Kinshasa till the onset of stroke or not in 2006. Out of 492 followed-up patients (279 women, 213 men, 57+/-10 years), 41.9% were old of age > or = 60 years, and 16.5% experienced acute stroke. In univariate analysis, a significant association between age > or = 60 years, cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol intake, diabetes duration > or = 2 years, pulse pressure > or = 60 mmHg, acute bacterian pneumonia, left ventricule hypertrophy, hypertensive retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic foot, diabetic neuropathy, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure, lack of diabetic treatment compliance and the occurrence of acute stroke. However, multivariate analysis identified only acute bacterian pneumonia, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, chronic renal failure and pulse pressure > or = 60 mmHg as the independent risk factors of stroke onset among these black congolese hypertensive diabetics with the following and respective values of relative risk (hazard ratio): 6,2 (IC 95%: 3.2 to 11.9; P<0.0001), 2,2 (IC 95%: 1.2 to 4.1; P<0.01), 3.6 (IC 95%: 1.9 to 6.8; P<0.0001), 6.4 (IC 95%: 2.9 to 14.1; P<0.01) and 4.1 (IC 95%: 1.6 to 10.3; P<0.0001). The rate of stroke onset is high among these hypertensive diabetics. This is the consequence of independent and respective action of infection, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, chronic renal failure and arterial stiffness.

  17. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.Methods:From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22 and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497. The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis > 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression.Results:Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02, diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21 and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28.Conclusion:Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy.

  18. Female Sex Is a Risk Modifier Rather Than a Risk Factor for Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Skjøth, Flemming; Overvad, Thure Filskov

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke risk in atrial fibrillation is assessed by using the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Sex category (Sc, ie, female sex) confers 1 point on CHA2DS2-VASc. We hypothesized that female sex is a stroke risk modifier, rather than an overall risk factor, when added to a CHA2DS2-VA (sex...... strata as events per 100 person-years. For quantifying absolute risk of stroke, we calculated risks based on the pseudovalue method. Female sex as a prognostic factor was investigated by inclusion as an interaction term on the CHA2DS2-VA score to calculate the thromboembolic risk ratio for different......), but the Sc risk component modifies and accentuates stroke risk in women who would have been eligible for oral anticoagulant treatment on the basis of ≥2 additional stroke risk factors....

  19. Ischemic Stroke Profile, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in India: The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylaja, P N; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Kaul, Subhash; Srivastava, M V Padma; Khurana, Dheeraj; Schwamm, Lee H; Kesav, Praveen; Arora, Deepti; Pannu, Aman; Thankachan, Tijy K; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2018-01-01

    The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project was designed to characterize ischemic stroke across 5 high-volume academic tertiary hospitals in India. From January 2012 to August 2014, research coordinators and physician coinvestigators prospectively collected data on 2066 patients with ischemic stroke admitted Stroke Scale score was 10 (interquartile range, 5-15) and 24.5% had National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16. Hypertension (60.8%), diabetes mellitus (35.7%), and tobacco use (32.2%, including bidi/smokeless tobacco) were common risk factors. Only 4% had atrial fibrillation. All patients underwent computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; 81% had cerebrovascular imaging. Stroke etiologic subtypes were large artery (29.9%), cardiac (24.9%), small artery (14.2%), other definite (3.4%), and undetermined (27.6%, including 6.7% with incomplete evaluation). Intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was administered in 13%. In-hospital mortality was 7.9%, and 48% achieved modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 90 days. On multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus predicted poor 3-month outcome and younger age, lower admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and small-artery etiology predicted excellent 3-month outcome. These comprehensive and novel clinical imaging data will prove useful in refining stroke guidelines and advancing stroke care in India. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Stroke risk factors, subtypes, and 30‑day case fatality in Abuja, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability worldwide. A better understanding of stroke risk factors and outcome may help guide efforts at reducing the community burden of stroke. This study aimed to understand stroke risk factors, imaging subtypes, and 30‑day ...

  1. Stroke survivors' endorsement of a "stress belief model" of stroke prevention predicts control of risk factors for recurrent stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L Alison; Tuhrim, Stanley; Kronish, Ian M; Horowitz, Carol R

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions that stress causes and stress-reduction controls hypertension have been associated with poorer blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension populations. The current study investigated these "stress-model perceptions" in stroke survivors regarding prevention of recurrent stroke and the influence of these perceptions on patients' stroke risk factor control. Stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors (N=600) participated in an in-person interview in which they were asked about their beliefs regarding control of future stroke; BP and cholesterol were measured directly after the interview. Counter to expectations, patients who endorsed a "stress-model" but not a "medication-model" of stroke prevention were in better control of their stroke risk factors (BP and cholesterol) than those who endorsed a medication-model but not a stress-model of stroke prevention (OR for poor control=.54, Wald statistic=6.07, p=.01). This result was not explained by between group differences in patients' reported medication adherence. The results have implications for theory and practice, regarding the role of stress belief models and acute cardiac events, compared to chronic hypertension.

  2. Risk Factors, Subtypes, and Outcome of Ischemic Stroke in Kuwait: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Al-Sabah, Al-Alya; Ahmed, Samar F; Al-Enezi, Maha; Al-Tawheid, Nour; Al Mesailekh, Zainab; Eliwa, Jasmine; Alroughani, Raed

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies of stroke burden in Kuwait are scarce. We aimed to identify the risk factors, subtypes, and outcome of ischemic stroke in the 6 major hospitals in Kuwait between 2008 and 2013. A cross-sectional survey was carried out using randomly selected ischemic stroke patients. It included data of sociodemographic status, stroke risk factors, stroke subtypes, treatment, and outcomes. A total of 1257 ischemic stroke patients (811 men and 446 women; mean age 60.2 ± 13.1) were included. Small-artery ischemic stroke was the most common stroke subgroup (69.8%) whereas hypertension was the most prevalent risk factor (80.9%). History of heart disease was significantly associated (P strokes (58.3%) compared to large-artery stroke (37.5%) and small-artery stroke (32.5%). Atrial fibrillation was significantly prevalent (P stroke (54.2%) compared to large-artery stroke (13%) and small-artery stroke (7.6%). Presentation at ages less than 45 years was significantly (P stroke was significantly associated with higher mortality rates (25% versus 12.4% and 6.8%; P strokes, respectively. Small-artery ischemic stroke was the most common stroke subgroup, and hypertension was the most common risk factor. The outcome was better in younger patients. Cardioembolic stroke was associated with worse outcome. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of stroke/cardiovascular risk factors in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, M.; Sipos, K.; Thuroczy, G.; Panczel, G.; Ilias, L.; Szonyi, P.; Bodo, M., Jr.; Nebella, T.; Banyasz, A.; Nagy, Z.

    2010-04-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Hungary using the Cerberus system which includes: 1) a questionnaire addressing the risk factors for stroke/cardiovascular disease; 2) amplifiers to record the pulse waves of cerebral arteries (rheoencephalography) and peripheral arteries, electrocardiogram and electroencephalogram. Additionally, subjects were measured for carotid stenosis by Doppler ultrasound and 12-lead electrocardiogram; subjects were also screened for blood cholesterol, glucose, and triglyceride levels. Prevalence of the following stroke risk factors was identified: overweight, 63.25%; sclerotic brain arteries (by rheoencephalogram), 54.29%; heart disease, 37.92%; pathologic carotid flow, 34.24%; smoking, 30.55%; high blood cholesterol, 28.70%; hypertension, 27.83%; high triglyceride, 24.35%; abnormality in electrocardiogram, 20%; high glucose, 15.95%; symptoms of transient ischemic attack, 16.07%; alcohol abuse, 6.74%; and diabetes, 4.53%. The study demonstrates a possible model for primary cardiovascular disease/stroke prevention. This method offers a standardizable, cost effective, practical technique for mass screenings by identifying the population at high risk for cardiovascular disturbances, especially cerebrovascular disease (primary prevention). In this model, the rheoencephalogram can detect cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in the susceptibility/presymptomatic phase, earlier than the Doppler ultrasound technique. The method also provides a model for storing analog physiological signals in a computer-based medical record and is a first step in applying an expert system to stroke prevention.

  4. Risk factors between intracranial-extracranial atherosclerosis and anterior-posterior circulation stroke in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Cai, Yefeng; Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingbo

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an important cause of stroke and remains a challenge for stroke prevention. Risk factors involved in atherosclerotic stroke and anterior and posterior circulation strokes (ACS and PCS, respectively) are different. The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in risk factors between intracranial and extracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS and ECAS), ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS in a Chinese acute ischaemic stroke population. We analysed 551 ischaemic stroke patients who had been enrolled between August 2005 and July 2008. First, risk factors were compared between non-atherosclerosis, ICAS, ECAS, and combined ICAS and ECAS groups. ICAS and ECAS were assessed with transcranial Doppler and carotid colour Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Second, risk factors were compared between ACS and PCS groups. Stroke lesion was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Third, risk factors were compared in ICAS/ECAS associated with ACS/PCS. The risk factor for ICAS was high diastolic blood pressure (OR, 1.075; 95% CI, 1.016-1.138; p = 0.013), and the risk factors for ECAS were age (OR, 1.113; 95% CI, 1.046-1.183; p = 0.001) and low density lipoprotein (OR, 1.450; 95% CI, 1.087-1.935; p = 0.012). Hypertension (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 1.001-1.109; p = 0.027) was associated with PCS. Age (OR, 1.026; 95% CI, 1.011-1.128; p = 0.003), male gender (OR, 2.278; 95% CI, 1.481-3.258; p = 0.003) and age (OR, 1.067; 95% CI, 1.013-1.123; p = 0.014), scores of NIHSS (OR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.012-1.130; p = 0.018) were risk factors for ICAS and ECAS with ACS, respectively. Risk factors are different between ICAS and ECAS, ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS. Thus, targeted strategies are needed to consider these differences to prevent, treat and manage these diseases.

  5. Genetic Factors Influencing Coagulation Factor XIII B-Subunit Contribute to Risk of Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanscombe, Ken B; Traylor, Matthew; Hysi, Pirro G; Bevan, Stephen; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Worrall, Bradford B; Seshadri, Sudha; Sudlow, Cathie; Williams, Frances M K; Markus, Hugh S; Lewis, Cathryn M

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal coagulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, but how this association is mediated and whether it differs between ischemic stroke subtypes is unknown. We determined the shared genetic risk between 14 coagulation factors and ischemic stroke and its subtypes. Using genome-wide association study results for 14 coagulation factors from the population-based TwinsUK sample (N≈2000 for each factor), meta-analysis results from the METASTROKE consortium ischemic stroke genome-wide association study (12 389 cases, 62 004 controls), and genotype data for 9520 individuals from the WTCCC2 ischemic stroke study (3548 cases, 5972 controls-the largest METASTROKE subsample), we explored shared genetic risk for coagulation and stroke. We performed three analyses: (1) a test for excess concordance (or discordance) in single nucleotide polymorphism effect direction across coagulation and stroke, (2) an estimation of the joint effect of multiple coagulation-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke, and (3) an evaluation of common genetic risk between coagulation and stroke. One coagulation factor, factor XIII subunit B (FXIIIB), showed consistent effects in the concordance analysis, the estimation of polygenic risk, and the validation with genotype data, with associations specific to the cardioembolic stroke subtype. Effect directions for FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly discordant with cardioembolic disease (smallest P=5.7×10(-04)); the joint effect of FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms was significantly predictive of ischemic stroke (smallest P=1.8×10(-04)) and the cardioembolic subtype (smallest P=1.7×10(-04)). We found substantial negative genetic covariation between FXIIIB and ischemic stroke (rG=-0.71, P=0.01) and the cardioembolic subtype (rG=-0.80, P=0.03). Genetic markers associated with low FXIIIB levels increase risk of ischemic stroke cardioembolic subtype. © 2015 The

  6. Perinatal stroke in Saudi children: clinical features and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the clinical features and presentations of perinatal stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the risk factors. Patients with perinatal stroke were identified from within a cohort of 104 Saudi children who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology at King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Neuroimaging for suspected cases of stroke consisted of cranial CT, MRI, or both. During the study period, 23 (22%) of 104 children (aged one months to 12 years) were diagnosed to have had perinatal stroke. The male: female ratio was 1.6:1. Ten (67%) of the 15 children who had unilateral ischemic involvement had their lesion in the left hemisphere. The presentation of the ischemic result was within 24-72 hours of life in 13 (57%) patients, and in 6 children (26%), motor impairment was recognized at or after the age of 4 months. Nine children (39%) had seizures at presentation. Pregnancy, labor, and delivery risk factors were ascertained in 18 (78%) cases. The most common of these included emergency cesarean section in 5 cases, and instrumental delivery in other 5. Screening for prothrombotic risk factors detected abnormalities in 6 (26%) patients on at least one test carried out between 2 months and 9 years of age. Four children (17%) had low protein C, which was associated low protein S and raised anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) in one patient, and low antithrombin III in another. Low proteins S was detected in a 42-month-old boy. The abnormality in the sixth child was confined to raised ACA. The present study highlights the non-specific features by which stroke presents during the neonatal period. The data are in keeping with the potential role for inherited and acquired thrombophilia as being the underlying cause. However, the high prevalence of

  7. Risk Factors and Neurologic Outcomes in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Sezer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, treatment modalities and outcomes of children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 102 children (62 girls and 40 boys with AIS admitted at our hospital between 2009 and 2015. Age at stroke, sex, medical history, family history, clinical findings upon admission, history of seizure, and radiological findings were recorded. Cardiac assessment, hematological and immunological tests, metabolic screening were all performed in the patients. Results: In 25 children stroke occured as a complication of cardiac disease, 12 had transient cerebral arteriopathy, 11 had Down’s syndrome, 9 had thalassemia, 7 had moyamoya disease, 6 had MTHFR mutation, 4 had homozygote for factor V Leiden, 3 had protein C deficiency, 1 had sickle cell disease, and in 24 children no underlying cause could be found. Multiple risk factors were found in 16 children and recurrent stroke was observed in 4 patients. Hemiplegia was the commonest initial clinical presentation (88.2% followed by seizure (66.6% and decreased level of consciousness (54.9%. The avarage length of follow-up was 32.1±5.4 months. The outcome in all 102 stroke patients was as follows: asymptomatic 57.8%; persistent neurologic deficit or epilepsy 40.2%; and death 2%. Conclusion: Our study showed an underlying cause for AIS in 76.5% of the patients; 42.2% of the patients either died or had motor and/or cognitive sequelae and recurrence occured despite prophylactic aspirin treatment in 4 patients. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(3.000: 278-283

  8. Time course and risk factors of post-stroke fatigue: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaphaan, L.; van der Werf, S.; de Leeuw, F.-E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke fatigue (PSF) often occurs after stroke and has a negative impact on the rehabilitation process. Several studies focused either on short- or on long-term PSF and their relations with stroke characteristics. However, possible pre-stroke risk factors such as history of

  9. Female- and Male-Specific Risk Factors for Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, M.H.; Algra, A.M.; Kappelle, L.J.; Klijn, C.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Importance: The incidence of stroke is higher in men than in women. The influence of sex-specific risk factors on stroke incidence and mortality is largely unknown. Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of female- and male-specific risk factors for stroke. Data Sources: PubMed,

  10. Female sex as an independent risk factor for stroke in atrial fibrillation : Possible mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Covel, Christina L.; Albert, Christine M.; Andreotti, Felicita; Badimon, Lina; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Hylek, Elaine M.

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for thromboembolism and stroke. Women with AF are at a higher overall risk for thromboembolic stroke when compared to men with AF. Recent evidence suggests that female sex, after adjusting for stroke risk profile and sex differences in

  11. Analysis of risk factors and risk assessment for ischemic stroke recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-ying LONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To screen the risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke and to assess the risk of recurrence. Methods Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS was used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in 176 patients with ischemic stroke (96 cases of first onset and 80 cases of recurrence. Univariate and multivariate stepwise Logistic regression analysis was used to screen risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke.  Results There were significant differences between first onset group and recurrence group on age, the proportion of > 75 years old, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, peripheral angiopathy, transient ischemic attack (TIA or ischemic stroke, drinking and ESRS score (P < 0.05, for all. First onset group included one case of ESRS 0 (1.04%, 8 cases of 1 (8.33%, 39 cases of 2 (40.63%, 44 cases of 3 (45.83%, 4 cases of 4 (4.17%. Recurrence group included 2 cases of ESRS 3 (2.50%, 20 cases of 4 (25% , 37 cases of 5 (46.25% , 18 cases of 6 (22.50% , 3 cases of 7 (3.75% . There was significant difference between 2 groups (Z = -11.376, P = 0.000. Logistic regression analysis showed ESRS > 3 score was independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke (OR = 31.324, 95%CI: 3.934-249.430; P = 0.001.  Conclusions ESRS > 3 score is the independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke. It is important to strengthen risk assessment of recurrence of ischemic stroke. To screen and control risk factors is the key to secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.011

  12. Associations of estimated Δ-5-desaturase and Δ-6-desaturase activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Roya; Kurl, Sudhir; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The role of PUFA in reducing the risk of stroke is uncertain. The concentrations of PUFA in the human body are determined both by dietary intake and by activities of desaturase enzymes. Desaturase enzymes have been associated with chronic diseases, but little is known about their association with stroke risk. We investigated the associations of Δ-6-desaturase (D6D) and Δ-5-desaturase (D5D) activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke among 1842 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989. ANCOVA and Cox regression models were used for the analyses. Whole serum desaturase activities were estimated as product:precursor ratios - γ-linolenic acid:linoleic acid for D6D and arachidonic acid:dihomo-γ-linolenic acid for D5D. Higher D6D activity was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin and TAG concentrations and worse homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA) indices. In contrast, higher D5D activity was associated with lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin, LDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein concentrations, higher HDL-cholesterol concentration, and better HOMA indices. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred. Neither D6D activity (multivariable-adjusted extreme-quartile hazard ratios (HR) 1·18; 95 % CI 0·80, 1·74) nor D5D activity (HR 1·06; 95 % CI 0·70, 1·60) were associated with stroke risk. In conclusion, higher D5D activity was favourably associated and higher D6D activity unfavourably associated with several stroke risk factors, but not with the risk of incident stroke.

  13. Efficacy of Tai Chi and qigong for the prevention of stroke and stroke risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Peng, Wenbo; Ferguson, Caleb; Cramer, Holger; Frawley, Jane; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This review aims to summarize the evidence of Tai Chi and qigong interventions for the primary prevention of stroke, including the effects on populations with major stroke risk factors. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted on January 16, 2017 using the PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases. Randomized controlled trials examining the efficacy of Tai Chi or qigong for stroke prevention and stroke risk factors were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Results: Twenty-one trials with n = 1604 patients with hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, overweight or obesity, or metabolic syndrome were included. No trials were found that examined the effects of Tai Chi/qigong on stroke incidence. Meta-analyses revealed significant, but not robust, benefits of Tai Chi/qigong over no interventions for hypertension (systolic blood pressure: −15.55 mm Hg (95% CI: −21.16; −9.95); diastolic blood pressure: −10.66 mm Hg (95% CI: −14.90, −6.43); the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index (−2.86%; 95% CI: −5.35, −0.38) and fasting blood glucose (−9.6 mg/dL; 95% CI: −17.28, −1.91), and for the body mass index compared with exercise controls (−1.65 kg/m2; 95% CI: −3.11, −0.20). Risk of bias was unclear or high for the majority of trials and domains, and heterogeneity between trials was high. Only 6 trials adequately reported safety. No recommendation for the use of Tai Chi/qigong for the prevention of stroke can be given. Conclusion: Although Tai Chi and qigong show some potential more robust studies are required to provide conclusive evidence on the efficacy and safety of Tai Chi and qigong for reducing major stroke risk factors. PMID:29137055

  14. Kalirin: a novel genetic risk factor for ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Tiago; Manso, Helena; Gouveia, Liliana; Sobral, João; Xavier, Joana M; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Correia, Manuel; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Simões, Rita Moiron; Pinto, Amélia Nogueira; Taipa, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla; Fontes, João Ramalho; Silva, Mário Rui; Gabriel, João Paulo; Matos, Ilda; Lopes, Gabriela; Ferro, José M; Vicente, Astrid M; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2010-03-01

    Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. They are complex disorders resulting from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, and may share several susceptibility genes. Several recent studies have implicated variants of the Kalirin (KALRN) gene with susceptibility to cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes, but no studies have yet been performed in stroke patients. KALRN is involved, among others, in the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase, in the regulation of ischemic signal transduction, and in neuronal morphogenesis, plasticity, and stability. The goal of the present study was to determine whether SNPs in the KALRN region on 3q13, which includes the Ropporin gene (ROPN1), predispose to ischemic stroke (IS) in a cohort of Portuguese patients and controls. We genotyped 34 tagging SNPs in the KALRN and ROPN1 chromosomal region on 565 IS patients and 517 unrelated controls, and performed genotype imputation for 405 markers on chromosome 3. We tested the single-marker association of these SNPs with IS. One SNP (rs4499545) in the ROPN1-KALRN intergenic region and two SNPs in KALRN (rs17286604 and rs11712619) showed significant (P < 0.05) allelic and genotypic (unadjusted and adjusted for hypertension, diabetes, and ever smoking) association with IS risk. Thirty-two imputed SNPs also showed an association at P < 0.05, and actual genotyping of three of these polymorphisms (rs7620580, rs6438833, and rs11712039) validated their association. Furthermore, rs11712039 was associated with IS (0.001 < P < 0.01) in a recent well-powered genomewide association study (Ikram et al. 2009). These studies suggest that variants in the KALRN gene region constitute risk factors for stroke and that KALRN may represent a common risk factor for vascular diseases.

  15. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors and Warning Signs in Patients with Recurrent Stroke or Recurrent Transient Ischaemic Attack in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittima Saengsuwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a global burden. It is not known whether patients who are most at risk of stroke (recurrent stroke or recurrent transient ischaemic attack have enough knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in this high-risk population. We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of patients with recurrent stroke or recurrent TIA admitted to Srinagarind Hospital and Khon Kaen Hospital, Thailand. A total of 140 patients were included in the study (age 65.6±11.3 years [mean ± SD], 62 females. Using an open-ended questionnaire, nearly one-third of patients (31.4% could not name any risk factors for stroke. The most commonly recognized risk factors were hypertension (35%, dyslipidemia (28.6%, and diabetes (22.9%. Regarding stroke warning signs, the most commonly recognized warning signs were sudden unilateral weakness (61.4%, sudden trouble with speaking (25.7%, and sudden trouble with walking, loss of balance, or dizziness (21.4%. Nineteen patients (13.6% could not identify any warning signs. The results showed that knowledge of stroke obtained from open-ended questionnaires is still unsatisfactory. The healthcare provider should provide structured interventions to increase knowledge and awareness of stroke in these patients.

  16. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus as a predictive risk factors for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloubani, Aladeen; Saleh, Abdulmoneam; Abdelhafiz, Ibrahim

    2018-03-19

    Stroke is becoming a major challenge in healthcare systems, and this has necessitated the study of the various risk factors. As the number of people with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity increases, the problem is expected to worsen. This review paper evaluates what can be done to eliminate or reduce the risk of stroke. The aim of the research is to evaluate the risk factors for stroke. The paper also aims to understand how these risks can be handled to avoid incidences of stroke. Published clinical trials of stroke risk factors studies were recognised by a search of EMBASE and MEDLINE databases with keywords hypertension, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, stroke or cardiovascular disease, or prospective study, and meta-analysis. The findings of this review are that the prevention of stroke starts with identifying risk factors for stroke, most of the patients diagnosed with stroke have various risk factors. Consequently, it is a very significant to identify all the risk factors for stroke as well as to teach the patient how to dominate them. after summarising all the studies mentioned in the paper, it can be established that hypertension and diabetes mellitus are a stroke risk factors and correlated in patients with atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2018 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stroke awareness in the general population: knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Anne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. METHODS: Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+) in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate). Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. RESULTS: Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia), hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%). Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache), with slurred speech (54%) as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland). CONCLUSION: Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke.

  18. The profile of risk factors and in-patient outcomes of stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    85%, 73% and 58% of patients had systemic arterial hypertension, physical inactivity and obesity respectively as common risk factors. We identified that patients with stroke had a median of 3 traditional risk factors, were unaware of the presence of these risk factors or were poorly controlled if known. Stroke was associated ...

  19. Awareness of risk factors and warning signs of stroke in a Nigeria university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obembe, Adebimpe O; Olaogun, Matthew O; Bamikole, Adesola A; Komolafe, Morenikeji A; Odetunde, Marufat O

    2014-04-01

    Rapid access to medical services which is an important predictor of treatment and rehabilitation outcome requires that there is an understanding of stroke risk factors and early warning signs. This study assessed awareness of stroke risk factors and warning signs among students and staff of Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria. This was a cross sectional survey involving 994 (500 students and 494 staff) respondents. Information on the awareness of stroke risk factors and warning signs was collected with the aid of a structured questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. Weakness (66.2%) was the most commonly identified warning sign of stroke with more staff (69.8%) identifying correctly than students (62.6%). Hypertension (83.4%) was the most commonly identified stroke risk factor, with more staff (91.7%) identifying correctly than students (83.2%). There were significant differences (p stress and obesity), and warning signs (dizziness, numbness, weakness, headache and vision problems) between students and staff. Predictors for adequate awareness of both stroke risk factors and warning signs were younger age, smoking history and higher educational level. Majority of the respondents recognized individual important stroke risk factors and warning signs, but few recognized multiple stroke risk factors and warning signs. Awareness programs on stroke should be organized, even in communities with educated people to increase public awareness on the prevention of stroke and on the reduction of morbidity in the survivors. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between Family Risk of Stroke and Myocardial Infarction with Prevalent Risk Factors and Coexisting Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard E.; Howard, George; Go, Rodney C.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Feng, Rui; McClure, Leslie A.; Prineas, Ronald J.; Banerjee, Amitava; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial transmission of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) is partially mediated by transmission of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular risk factors. We examined relationships between family risk of stroke and MI with risk factors for these phenotypes. Methods Cross-sectional association between the stratified log-rank family score (SLFS) for stroke and MI with prevalent risk factors was assessed in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort. Results Individuals in the 4th quartile of SLFS scores for stroke were more likely to have prevalent risk factors including hypertension (OR: 1.43; 95% CI: [1.30, 1.58]), left ventricular hypertrophy (OR 1.42; 95% CI: [1.16, 1.42]), diabetes (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: [1.12, 1.43]) and atrial fibrillation (OR 1.23; 95% CI: [1.03, 1.45]) compared to individuals in the 1st quartile. Likewise, individuals in the 4th quartile of SLFS scores for MI were more likely to have prevalent risk factors including hypertension (OR 1.57; 95% CI: [1.27, 1.94]) and diabetes (OR 1.29; 95% CI: [1.12, 1.43]) than the 1st quartile. In contrast to stroke, the family risk score for MI was associated with dyslipidemia (OR 1.38; 95% CI: [1.23, 1.55]) and overweight/obesity (OR 1.22; 95% CI: [1.10, 1.37]). Conclusions Family risk of stroke and MI are strongly associated with the majority of risk factors associated with each disease. Family history and genetic studies separating nonspecific contributions of intermediate phenotypes from specific contributions to the disease phenotype may lead to more thorough understanding of transmission for these complex disorders. PMID:22328552

  1. Risk Factors and Etiology of Young Ischemic Stroke Patients in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siim Schneider

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Reports on young patients with ischemic stroke from Eastern Europe have been scarce. This study aimed to assess risk factors and etiology of first-ever and recurrent stroke among young Estonian patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of consecutive ischemic stroke patients aged 18–54 years who were treated in our two hospitals from 2003 to 2012. Results. We identified 741 patients with first-ever stroke and 96 patients with recurrent stroke. Among first-time patients, men predominated in all age groups. The prevalence of well-documented risk factors in first-time stroke patients was 83% and in the recurrent group 91%. The most frequent risk factors were hypertension (53%, dyslipidemia (46%, and smoking (35%. Recurrent stroke patients had fewer less well-documented risk factors compared to first-time stroke patients (19.8 versus 30.0%, P=0.036. Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of cardioembolic strokes (48% and large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA was the cause in 8% among those aged <35 years. Compared to first-time strokes, recurrent ones were more frequently caused by LAA (14.3 versus 24.0%, P=0.01 and less often by other definite etiology (8.5 versus 1.0%, P=0.01. Conclusions. The prevalence of vascular risk factors among Estonian young stroke patients is high. Premature atherosclerosis is a cause in a substantial part of very young stroke patients.

  2. Identification of Barriers to Stroke Awareness and Risk Factor Management Unique to Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to risk factor control may differ by race/ethnicity. The goal of this study was to identify barriers to stroke awareness and risk factor management unique to Hispanics as compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs. We performed a prospective study of stroke patients from an academic Stroke Center in Arizona and surveyed members of the general community. Questionnaires included: the Duke Social Support Index (DSSI, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC Scale, a stroke barriers questionnaire, and a Stroke Awareness Test. Of 145 stroke patients surveyed (72 Hispanic; 73 NHW, Hispanics scored lower on the Stroke Awareness Test compared to NHWs (72.5% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.029. Hispanic stroke patients also reported greater barriers related to medical knowledge, medication adherence, and healthcare access (p < 0.05 for all. Hispanics scored higher on the “powerful others” sub-scale (11.3 vs. 10, p < 0.05 of the MHLC. Of 177 members of the general public surveyed, Hispanics had lower stroke awareness compared to NHWs and tended to have lower awareness than Hispanic stroke patients. These results suggest that Hispanic stroke patients perceive less control over their health, experience more healthcare barriers, and demonstrate lower rates of stroke literacy. Interventions for stroke prevention and education in Hispanics should address these racial/ethnic differences in stroke awareness and barriers to risk factor control.

  3. Stroke types, risk factors, quality of care and outcomes at a Referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of stroke is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa due to increases in size of aging population and stroke risk factors. ... Subjects: All patients >18 years admitted with a diagnosis of stroke as per the WHO definition and with a supporting brain imaging (CT scan/ MRI )were included in the study.

  4. Risk factors, clinical presentation, and neuroimaging findings of neonatal perforator stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Raets, Marlou M A; Lequin, Maarten; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    2013-08-01

    To date, studies on neonatal stroke have mainly focused on cortical stroke. We have focused on perforator strokes, noncortical strokes in the arterial vascular perforator area. We sought to identify risk factors and evaluate clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings for neonatal perforator stroke, which seems to be under-recognized. All infants admitted to our tertiary intensive care unit in ≈12 years, whose perforator stroke was diagnosed with postnatal brain imaging, were enrolled in this study. Demographic, perinatal, and postnatal data were evaluated. Seventy-nine perforator strokes were detected in 55 patients (28 boys), with a median gestational age of 37 1/7 weeks (range 24 1/7 to 42 1/7 weeks, 25 preterm). Perforator stroke was asymptomatic in most patients (58%). Initial diagnosis was predominantly made with cranial ultrasound (80%) in the first week of life (60%). Risk factors for stroke were present in all cases: maternal, fetal, and perinatal. Likely pathogenic mechanisms were prolonged birth asphyxia (16%), hypoxia or hypotension (15%), embolism (15%), infection (15%), acute blood loss (9%), and birth trauma (9%). Previously described risk factors for developing neonatal main artery stroke are probably also associated with neonatal perforator stroke. Perforator stroke is often asymptomatic, but cranial ultrasound is a reliable diagnostic tool in diagnosing perforator stroke.

  5. Epidemiology of stroke in the elderly in the Nordic countries. Incidence, survival, prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgeir Engstad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review what is known at present with respect to incidence, survival, risk factors and prevalence among the elderly stroke patients in the Nordic countries.Method: This article is based mainly on literature identified through search engines (Mc Master Plus, Cochrane Library, Medline and PubMed, restricted to first-ever stroke in Nordic population-based studies and having applied to the standard WHO definition, a prospective study design and no upper age limit.Results: Data from the Nordic countries show an incidence rate of 1250 to 1796/100 000 in the age group 75-84, and 1628 to 2234 in those above 85 years. The incidence rates are higher among men, but women are expected to contribute more to incident cases due to their higher life expectancy. If the age-specific incidence of stroke remains stable, the proportion of stroke patients aged 80 years and older may reach 50% in a few decades. The elderly stroke patients have a higher 30-days case fatality, and a higher risk of dependency. Better treatment of stroke patients has improved the survival over the last two decades. The prevalence is expected to increase due to the decrease in lethality, a slower fall in incidence and a higher proportion of elderly. Cardiovascular risk factors increase with age. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke mortality in the elderly. Cardioembolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation is the most common stroke subtype in the elderly. Lifestyle risk factors are less prevalent in the older stroke patients.Conclusion: The growing proportion of elderly stroke patients is a major challenge for future stroke care. The elderly stroke patients have a different risk factor profile compared to younger stroke patients. Treatment should focus on regaining independency. The age-specific epidemiology of stroke needs to be studied further in large studies in order to plan for future health care.

  6. Age dependency of ischaemic stroke subtypes and vascular risk factors in western Norway: the Bergen Norwegian Stroke Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, A; Fromm, A; Sand, K M; Waje-Andreassen, U; Thomassen, L; Naess, H

    2016-03-01

    Age dependency of acute ischaemic stroke aetiology and vascular risk factors have not been adequately evaluated in stroke patients in Norway. Aims of this study were to evaluate how stroke subtypes and vascular risk factors vary with age in a western Norway stroke population. Patients aged 15-100 years consecutively admitted to our neurovascular centre with acute ischaemic stroke between 2006 and 2012 were included. The study population was categorized as young (15-49 years), middle-aged (50-74 years) or elderly (≥ 75 years). Stroke aetiology was defined by TOAST criteria. Risk factors and history of cardiovascular disease were recorded. In total, 2484 patients with acute cerebral infarction were included: 1418 were males (57.3%). Mean age was 70.8 years (SD ± 14.9), 228 patients were young, 1126 middle-aged, and 1130 were elderly. The proportion of large-artery atherosclerosis and of small-vessel occlusion was highest among middle-aged patients. The proportion of cardioembolism was high at all ages, especially among the elderly. The proportion of stroke of other determined cause was highest among young patients. Some risk factors (diabetes mellitus, active smoking, angina pectoris, prior stroke and peripheral artery disease) decreased among the elderly. The proportions of several potential causes increased with age. The proportion of stroke subtypes and vascular risk factors are age dependent. Age 50-74 years constitutes the period in life where cardiovascular risk factors become manifest and stroke subtypes change. © 2015 The Authors. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cardiovascular risk factors and 5-year mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has improved over the recent years and may have improved survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the up-to-date prognostic significance of cardiovascular risk factors for 5-year survival in a large unselected ischemic stroke...... population. METHODS: We studied 905 ischemic stroke patients from the community-based Copenhagen Stroke Study. Patients had a CT scan and stroke severity was measured by the Scandinavian Stroke Scale on admission. A comprehensive evaluation was performed by a standardized medical examination...... by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...

  8. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and 5-year Mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has improved over the recent years and may have improved survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the up-to-date prognostic significance of cardiovascular risk factors for 5-year survival in a large unselected ischemic stroke...... population. METHODS: We studied 905 ischemic stroke patients from the community-based Copenhagen Stroke Study. Patients had a CT scan and stroke severity was measured by the Scandinavian Stroke Scale on admission. A comprehensive evaluation was performed by a standardized medical examination...... by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...

  9. Rationale and design of INTERSTROKE: a global case-control study of risk factors for stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Diener, C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major global health problem. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability. INTERHEART, a global case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries (29,972 participants), identified nine modifiable risk factors that accounted for >90......% of population-attributable risk. However, traditional risk factors (e.g. hypertension, cholesterol) appear to exert contrasting risks for stroke compared with coronary heart disease, and the etiology of stroke is far more heterogeneous. In addition, our knowledge of risk factors for stroke in low...... years). A questionnaire (cases and controls) is used to acquire information on known and proposed risk factors for stroke. Cardiovascular (e.g. blood pressure) and anthropometric (e.g. waist-to-hip ratio) measurements are obtained at the time of interview. Nonfasting blood samples and random urine...

  10. Risk Factors for Stroke in the Chinese Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wen, Xin; Li, Wen; Li, Xin; Wang, Yuan; Lu, Wenli

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in China. According to the Chinese Stroke Screening and Prevention Project, 8 main risk factors were assessed and individuals with 3 or more risk factors were identified as high-risk population of stroke. To explore the potential impropriety of counting the risk factors but ignoring the different strength of association of each risk factor, we performed this study. Relevant databases were searched for case-control and cohort studies focusing on the risk factors of stroke. We systematically identified studies conducted between 1990 and 2015 that included data on the frequency of risk factors in Chinese Han populations. Pooled relative risks and odds ratios, with their 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for the cohort and case-control studies, respectively. Fifteen cohort studies and 178 case-control studies were identified. Hypertension was the strongest independent risk factor for stroke (pooled odds ratio, 3.50; pooled relative risk, 2.68). Diabetes mellitus, heart disease, family history of stroke, hyperlipidemia, overweight, and smoking were also mildly predictive (pooled odd ratios, 1.82-2.68; pooled relative risks, 1.27-2.47). By contrast, physical exercise was a protective factor against stroke (pooled odd ratio, .49). There was a measurable difference in the strength of association of the 8 risk factors with stroke; hypertension and diabetes were associated with the highest risks, indicating a need to focus resources on patients with these conditions. Giving risk factors equal weighting may not be an appropriate screening methodology. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults of Northern China: Characteristics and Risk Factors for Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Yang, Li; Yang, Rui; Xu, Wei; Chen, Fu-Ping; Li, Nan; Zhang, Jin-Biao

    2017-01-01

    Young adults accounted for 10-14% of ischemic stroke patients. The risk factors may differ in this population from elder patients. In addition, the factors associated with stroke recurrence in this population have not been well investigated. The study aimed to investigate the characteristics and risk factors associated with recurrence of ischemic stroke in young adults. Clinical data of 1,395 patients of age 18-45 years who were treated between 2008 and 2014 in 3 centers located in northern China was reviewed. The first onset of stroke was taken as the initial events and recurrent stroke as the end point events. The end point events, age, gender, duration after first onset of stroke, history of disease, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission, Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classifications of the cause of stroke and adherence to medication were recorded. These factors were analyzed and compared between recurrence and non-recurrence group. Information about recurrent stroke was collected through clinical (readmission to hospital with ischemic stroke) or telephone follow-up survey. Logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors of recurrence. The most common causes of stroke were large vessel atherosclerosis and small vessel occlusion, followed by cardioembolism. NIHSS score at admission (OR 1.088; 95% CI 1.028-1.152; p = 0.004) were associated with recurrence. Vascular disease, especially premature atherosclerosis, is the major risk factor for ischemic stroke in the young adult population of northern China. Timely screening of the cause of stroke with severe NIHSS score needs further attention. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Risk Factors of Ischemic Stroke and Subsequent Outcome in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Mark D; Thomson, Peter C; Fulton, Rachael L; Solbu, Marit D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Stevens, Kathryn K; Geddes, Colin C; Dawson, Jesse; Mark, Patrick B

    2015-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis carries up to a 10-fold greater risk of stroke than normal renal function. Knowledge on risk factors and management strategies derived from the general population may not be applicable to those with ESRD. We studied a large ESRD population to identify risk factors and outcomes for stroke. All adult patients receiving hemodialysis for ESRD from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2012, were extracted from the electronic patient record. Variables associated with stroke were identified by survival analysis; demographic, clinical, imaging, and dialysis-related variables were assessed, and case-fatality was determined. Follow-up was until December 31, 2013. A total of 1382 patients were identified (mean age, 60.5 years; 58.5% men). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 21.2%, and 59.4% were incident hemodialysis patients. One hundred and sixty patients (11.6%) experienced a stroke during 3471 patient-years of follow-up (95% ischemic). Stroke incidence was 41.5/1000 patient-years in prevalent and 50.1/1000 patient-years in incident hemodialysis patients. Factors associated with stroke on regression analysis were prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, and age at starting renal replacement therapy. Atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with stroke, and warfarin did not affect stroke risk in warfarin-treated patients. Fatality was 18.8% at 7 days, 26.9% at 28 days, and 56.3% at 365 days after stroke. Incidence of stroke is high in patients with ESRD on hemodialysis with high case-fatality. Incident hemodialysis patients had the highest stroke incidence. Many, but not all, important risk factors commonly associated with stroke in the general population were not associated with stroke in patients receiving hemodialysis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Risk factor and etiology analysis of ischemic stroke in young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, Rosaria; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Morosetti, Roberta; Frisullo, Giovanni; Rossi, Elena; De Stefano, Valerio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 10%-14% of ischemic strokes occur in young adults. To investigate risk factors and etiologies of strokes of young adults admitted to the "stroke unit" of Policlinico "Gemelli" of Rome from December 2005 to January 2013. In all, 150 consecutive patients younger than 50 years diagnosed with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Clinical evaluation consisted of a complete neurologic examination and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Diagnostic workup consisted of anamnesis, extensive laboratory, radiologic, and cardiologic examination. Stroke etiologies were classified according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment. Patients' mean age was 41 ± 8.0 years. The most common risk factors were dyslipidemia (52.7%), smoking (47.3%), hypertension (39.3%), and patent foramen ovale (PFO, 32.8%). Large-artery atherosclerosis was diagnosed as the cause of stroke in 17 patients (11.3%). Cardioembolism was presumed in 36 patients (24%), most of them presented a PFO at transesophageal echocardiography. Small-vessel occlusion was diagnosed in 12 patients (8%); all of them were hypertensive and most of them presented additional risk factors. Forty-one patients (27.3%) presented a stroke of other determined etiology and 44 (29.3%) presented a stroke of undetermined etiology. The 3-year survival was 96.8% and recurrent strokes occurred in only 3 cases. Traditional vascular risk factors are also very common in young adults with ischemic stroke, but such factors increase the susceptibility to stroke dependent to other causes as atherosclerosis and small-artery occlusion represent less than 20% of cases. Prognosis quoadvitam is good, being characterized by low mortality and recurrence rate. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How does number of risk factors affect prognosis in young patients with ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Jukka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2012-02-01

    We aimed to explore clinical features of young patients with ischemic stroke with no traditional vascular risk factors and to assess the impact of risk factor counts on outcomes. We included 990 patients aged 15 to 49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke followed for a mean of 9.0 ± 3.8 years (survivors). Risk factors were categorized as well-documented and less well-documented. Outcome measures were unfavorable functional outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale 2-6); recurrent ischemic stroke; myocardial infarction or other arterial noncerebrovascular event; and death from any cause. Compared with those with at least 1 well-documented risk factor, the 127 (12.8%) patients without risk factors were younger (median age, 37 versus 44 years; Pischemic strokes (4.7% versus 13.6%; log rank P=0.014), noncerebrovascular arterial events (0% versus 6.1%; P=0.008), and lower long-term mortality (3.4% versus 14.3%; P=0.003) than did those with at least 1 risk factor. Adjusted for demographics and stroke etiology, the number of well-documented risk factors was associated with higher risk for noncerebrovascular events. Increasing count of less well-documented risk factors was, in turn, independently associated with higher long-term mortality. In young adults with first-ever ischemic stroke, risk factor counts added independent prognostic information regarding noncerebrovascular events and mortality.

  15. Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke: The Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Hamidreza; Himali, Jayandra J; Beiser, Alexa S; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Pikula, Aleksandra; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Romero, Jose R; Kase, Carlos S; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis and atrial fibrillation in cross-sectional studies. Yet, prospective data linking IGF-1 levels to the development of ischemic stroke remain inconclusive. We examined prospectively the association between serum IGF-1 levels and incident ischemic stroke. We measured serum IGF-1 levels in 757 elderly individuals (mean age 79±5, 62% women), free of prevalent stroke, from the Framingham original cohort participants at the 22nd examination cycle (1990-1994) and were followed up for the development of ischemic stroke. Cox models were used to relate IGF-1 levels to the risk for incident ischemic stroke, adjusted for potential confounders. During a mean follow-up of 10.2 years, 99 individuals developed ischemic stroke. After adjustment for age, sex, and potential confounders, higher IGF-1 levels were associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, with subjects in the lowest quintile of IGF-1 levels having a 2.3-fold higher risk of incident ischemic stroke (95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.06; P =0.03) as compared with those in the top quintile. We observed an effect modification by diabetes mellitus and waist-hip ratio for the association between IGF-1 and ischemic stroke ( P risk of incident ischemic stroke, respectively. IGF-1 levels were inversely associated with ischemic stroke, especially among persons with insulin resistance. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Knowledge of stroke risk factors among primary care patients with previous stroke or TIA: a questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strender Lars-Erik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivers of stroke or transient ischaemic attacks (TIA are at risk of new vascular events. Our objective was to study primary health care patients with stroke/TIA regarding their knowledge about risk factors for having a new event of stroke/TIA, possible associations between patient characteristics and patients' knowledge about risk factors, and patients' knowledge about their preventive treatment for stroke/TIA. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 240 patients with stroke/TIA diagnoses, and 182 patients (76% responded. We asked 13 questions about diseases/conditions and lifestyle factors known to be risk factors and four questions regarding other diseases/conditions ("distractors". The patients were also asked whether they considered each disease/condition to be one of their own. Additional questions concerned the patients' social and functional status and their drug use. The t-test was used for continuous variables, chi-square test for categorical variables, and a regression model with variables influencing patient knowledge was created. Results Hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking were identified as risk factors by nearly 90% of patients, and atrial fibrillation and diabetes by less than 50%. Few patients considered the distractors as stroke/TIA risk factors (3-6%. Patients with a family history of cardiovascular disease, and patients diagnosed with carotid stenosis, atrial fibrillation or diabetes, knew these were stroke/TIA risk factors to a greater extent than patients without these conditions. Atrial fibrillation or a family history of cardiovascular disease was associated with better knowledge about risk factors, and higher age, cerebral haemorrhage and living alone with poorer knowledge. Only 56% of those taking anticoagulant drugs considered this as intended for prevention, while 48% of those taking platelet aggregation inhibitors thought this was for prevention. Conclusions Knowledge about hypertension

  17. Age-Specific Vascular Risk Factor Profiles According to Stroke Subtype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Allard J.; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; Algra, Ale; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Wermer, Marieke J.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Klijn, Catharina J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background--Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are increasingly recognized as heterogeneous diseases with distinct subtypes and etiologies. Information on variation in distribution of vascular risk factors according to age in stroke subtypes is limited. We investigated the prevalence of vascular risk

  18. Evaluation of the modifying effects of unfavourable genotypes on classical clinical risk factors for ischaemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Szolnoki, Z; Somogyvari, F; Kondacs, A; Szabo, M; Fodor, L; Bene, J; Melegh, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Ischaemic stroke is a frequent heterogeneous multifactorial disease that is affected by a number of genetic mutations and environmental factors. We hypothesised the clinical importance of the interactions between common, unfavourable genetic mutations and clinical risk factors in the development of ischaemic stroke.

  19. Genetic Drivers of von Willebrand Factor Levels in an Ischemic Stroke Population and Association With Risk for Recurrent Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Keene, Keith L; Chen, Wei-Min; Dzhivhuho, Godfrey; Rowles, Joe L; Southerland, Andrew M; Furie, Karen L; Rich, Stephen S; Worrall, Bradford B; Sale, Michèle M

    2017-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) plays an important role in thrombus formation during cerebrovascular damage. We sought to investigate the potential role of circulating vWF in recurrent cerebrovascular events and identify genetic contributors to variation in vWF level in an ischemic stroke population. We analyzed the effect of circulating vWF on risk of recurrent stroke using survival models in the VISP trial (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention) and the use of vWF in reclassification over traditional factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study) with imputation, based on 1000 Genomes Project data, for circulating vWF levels and then interrogated loci previously associated with vWF levels. We performed expression quantitative trait locus analysis for vWF across different tissues. Elevated vWF levels were associated with increased risk for recurrent stroke in VISP. Adding vWF to traditional clinical parameters also improved recurrent stroke risk prediction. We identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with circulating vWF at the ABO locus ( P stroke in VISP. In the VISP population, genetic determinants of vWF levels that impact vWF gene expression were identified. These data add to our knowledge of the pathophysiologic and genetic basis for recurrent stroke risk and may have implications for clinical care decision making. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Risk factors, aetiology and outcome of ischaemic stroke in young adults: the Swiss Young Stroke Study (SYSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Mono, Marie-Luise; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Michel, Patrik; Odier, Celine; Sztajzel, Roman; Lyrer, Philippe; Engelter, Stefan T; Bonati, Leo; Gensicke, Henrik; Traenka, Christopher; Tettenborn, Barbara; Weder, Bruno; Fischer, Urs; Galimanis, Aekaterini; Jung, Simon; Luedi, Rudolf; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Weck, Anja; Cereda, Carlo W; Baumgartner, Ralf; Bassetti, Claudio L; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Arnold, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke (IS) in young adults has been increasingly recognized as a serious health condition. Stroke aetiology is different in young adults than in the older population. This study aimed to investigate aetiology and risk factors, and to search for predictors of outcome and recurrence in young IS patients. We conducted a prospective multicentre study of consecutive IS patients aged 16-55 years. Baseline demographic data, risk factors, stroke aetiology including systematic genetic screening for Fabry disease and severity were assessed and related to functional neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale, mRS), case fatality, employment status, place of residence, and recurrent cerebrovascular events at 3 months. In 624 IS patients (60% men), median age was 46 (IQR 39-51) years and median NIHSS on admission 3 (IQR 1-8). Modifiable vascular risk factors were found in 73%. Stroke aetiology was mostly cardioembolism (32%) and of other defined origin (24%), including cervicocerebral artery dissection (17%). Fabry disease was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.3%). Aetiology remained unknown in 20%. Outcome at 3 months was favourable (mRS 0-1) in 61% and fatal in 2.9%. Stroke severity (p young adults with IS had modifiable vascular risk factors, emphasizing the importance of prevention strategies. Outcome was unfavourable in more than a third of patients and was associated with initial stroke severity and diabetes mellitus. Previous cerebrovascular events predicted recurrent ones.

  1. Risk factors and strategies for stroke prevention in low to middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Л. Фейгин

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent meta-analysis of the population-based stroke incidence studies showed a significant trend towards almost 2-fold increasing of stroke incidence rates in low to middle-income countries over the last 4 decades. The study also demonstrated that stroke incidence rates in low to middle-income countries currently exceed the level of stroke incidence in the developed (high income countries by 20%. Compared with people in high-income countries, people in low to middle-income countries also experience a higher stroke mortality rate and greater proportions of hemorrhagic strokes. Should the current trends in stroke incidence and aging of the population continue, deaths from stroke in the developing countries will increase over the next decade by 20% and the overall burden of stroke may soon become unbearable for the economy of these countries. The way to stop the stroke pandemic and reduce stroke incidence is effective stroke prevention. In this review, we summarize current evidence for stroke risk factors and prevention in low to middle-income countries and outline possible promising strategies for tackling the problem.

  2. Risk factors of outcomes in elderly patients with acute ischemic stroke in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Zou, Chunying; Wu, Chengji; Zhang, Shuping; Huang, Zuoyi

    2016-08-01

    Stroke results in poor outcomes among elderly patients. However, the factors associated with outcome over different follow-up periods in this population are unknown. To evaluate the outcomes and risk factors of outcomes in elderly patients after stroke. Outcomes, including mortality, dependency (defined as a mRS >2), and recurrence rates, and associated risk factors were assessed at 3 and 12 months after stroke in patients aged ≥80 years. There were 419 acute ischemic stroke patients aged ≥80 years at 3 months, and 309 patients at 12 months; outcomes and relevant risk factors were assessed in these patients. Hypertension was more prevalent in women than in men. At 3 months, the mortality, dependency, and recurrence rates were 13.8, 54.2, and 18.1 %, respectively; the corresponding rates at 12 months were 26.9, 58.0, and 32.6 %, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting by confounding factors, TOAST classification and stroke severity were associated with mortality and recurrence, while stroke severity was associated with dependency at 3 months. The mortality and dependency rates at 12 months were significantly associated with moderate and severe stroke, but severe stroke was an independent factor associated with recurrence. Stroke subtype and severity were associated with stroke outcomes among elderly patients in northern China. These findings suggest that it is crucial to highlight the affected factors of stroke outcome among elderly patients for reduce the burden of stroke in China.

  3. Female- and Male-Specific Risk Factors for Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorthuis, Michiel H F; Algra, Annemijn M; Algra, Ale; Kappelle, L Jaap; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of stroke is higher in men than in women. The influence of sex-specific risk factors on stroke incidence and mortality is largely unknown. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of female- and male-specific risk factors for stroke. PubMed, EMBASE, and the bibliographies of articles were searched for studies published between January 1, 1985, and January 26, 2015, reporting on the association between female- and male-specific characteristics and stroke. Observational studies reporting associations between sex-specific risk factors and stroke were selected. Two authors performed data extraction independently. Estimates were pooled with a generic variance-based, random-effects method. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. In addition, our study adhered to the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, any stroke, and stroke mortality. This systematic review and meta-analysis included 78 studies (70 longitudinal and 8 case-control) comprising 10 187 540 persons. In women, the pooled relative risks of ischemic stroke were 1.80 (95% CI, 1.49-2.18) after any hypertensive disorder in pregnancy (HDP) (gestational hypertension [GH], preeclampsia, or eclampsia) and 1.81 (95% CI, 1.44-2.27) after GH vs no HDP. The pooled relative risks of hemorrhagic stroke were 2.24 (95% CI, 1.19-4.21) in women with menopause at the age of at least 55 years vs 50 to 54 years and 5.08 (95% CI, 1.80-14.34) after GH vs no GH. The pooled relative risks of any stroke were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.34-1.50) after oophorectomy vs no oophorectomy, 0.88 (95% CI, 0.85-0.90) after hysterectomy vs no hysterectomy, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.52-1.75) after any vs no HDP, 1.54 (95% CI, 1.39-1.70) after preeclampsia or eclampsia, 1.51 (95% CI, 1.27-1.80) after GH vs no HDP, 1.62 (95% CI, 1.46-1.79) after preterm delivery, and 1.86 (95% CI, 1.15-3.02) after

  4. Cigarette smoking is an independent risk factor for post-stroke delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae Sung; Lee, Jin Soo; Yoon, Jung Han; Moon, So Young; Joo, In Soo; Huh, Kyoon; Hong, Ji Man

    2017-03-23

    Post-stroke delirium is a common problem in the care of stroke patients, and is associated with longer hospitalization, high short-term mortality, and an increased need for long-term care. Although post-stroke delirium occurs in approximately 10 ~ 30% of patients, little is known about the risk factors for post-stroke delirium in patients who experience acute stroke. A total of 576 consecutive patients who experienced ischemic stroke (mean age, 65.2 years; range, 23-93 years) were screened for delirium over a 2-year period in an acute stroke care unit of a tertiary referral hospital. We screened for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method. Once delirium was suspected, we evaluated the symptoms using the Korean Version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98. Neurological deficits were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at admission and discharge, and functional ability was assessed using the Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale at discharge and 3 months after discharge. Thirty-eight (6.7%) patients with stroke developed delirium during admission to the acute stroke care unit. Patients with delirium were significantly older (70.6 vs. 64.9 years of age, P = .001) and smoked cigarettes more frequently (40% vs. 24%, P = .033) than patients without delirium. In terms of clinical features, the delirium group experienced a significantly higher rate of major hemispheric stroke (55% vs. 26%, P delirium were older age, history of cigarette smoking, and major hemispheric stroke. Abrupt cessation of cigarette smoking may be a risk factor for post-stroke delirium in ischemic stroke patients. The development of delirium after stroke is associated with worse outcome and longer hospitalization.

  5. Stroke subtypes, risk factors and mortality rate in northwest of Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhoudi, Mehdi; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2017-01-01

    data, risk factors, types and mortality. Methods: A retrospective study was done in two university tertiary referral hospitals in Tabriz, northwest of Iran, from March 2008 to April 2013. Patients diagnosed with stroke were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, stroke subtypes, duration...... of hospitalization, stroke risk factors and hospital mortality rate were recorded for all the patients. Results: A total number of 5355 patients were evaluated in the present study. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 13.8 years, and 50.6% were men. Final diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made in 76.......5% of the patients, intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH) with or without intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in 14.3% and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 9.2%. Stroke risk factors among the patients were hypertension in 68.8% of the patients, diabetes mellitus (DM) in 23.9%, smoking in 12.6% and ischemic heart diseases...

  6. Multivariate logistic analysis of risk factors for stroke in Tilburg, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, B; Schmitz, P I; Leyten, A C; Van Luijk, J H; Frenken, C W; Op De Coul, A A; Schulte, B P

    1983-10-01

    By means of a case-control study conducted between October 1, 1978, and July 31, 1981, in Tilburg, The Netherlands, various characteristics and events, including personal data, health-related behavior, and medical history, were evaluated as risk factors for stroke. The study subjects included 132 stroke patients and 239 age- and sex-matched control patients interviewed at the two city hospitals. To assess joint effects and possible interactions, and to control for multiple confounding factors, a series of multivariate logistic models for matched data were studied. From this analysis, it appeared that hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmias, transient cerebral ischemic attacks, obesity, physical activity during leisure time, education of head of household, and Rhesus factor were all significant stroke risk factors. These risk determinants demonstrated a multiplicative effect in general; however, the influence of some variables on stroke risk was not constant with age (hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmias, obesity, and Rhesus factor) and sex (hypertension and education of head of household). The relationship of diabetes mellitus to stroke slightly decreased and became nonsignificant after adjustment for factors besides age and sex. Stroke risk was not associated with cigarette and alcohol use, family history of stroke and related disorders, marital status, and ABO blood typing.

  7. Identification of risk factors related to perceived unmet demands in patients with chronic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, I. G. L.; van den Bos, G. A. M.; Voorendt, M.; Kwakkel, G.; Lindeman, E.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence of unmet demands concerning autonomy and participation and to identify risk factors related to these unmet demands in patients with chronic stroke. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of 147 patients three years after stroke. We assessed perceived unmet care

  8. Dyslipidaemia as a risk factor in the occurrence of stroke in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: stroke is a major public health problem worldwide. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and smoking are some of the common modifiable risk factors in the occurrence of stroke. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the prevalence and patterns of dyslipidaemia among individuals with acute ...

  9. Quantifying links between stroke and risk factors: a study on individual health risk appraisal of stroke in a community of Chongqing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yazhou; Zhang, Ling; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yamin; Yi, Dong

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the risk factors of stroke in a community in Chongqing by setting quantitative criteria for determining the risk factors of stroke. Thus, high-risk individuals can be identified and laid a foundation for predicting individual risk of stroke. 1,034 cases with 1:2 matched controls (2,068) were chosen from five communities in Chongqing including Shapingba, Xiaolongkan, Tianxingqiao, Yubei Road and Ciqikou. Participants were interviewed with a uniform questionnaire. The risk factors of stroke and the odds ratios of risk factors were analyzed with a logistic regression model, and risk exposure factors of different levels were converted into risk scores using statistical models. For men, ten risk factors including hypertension (5.728), family history of stroke (4.599), and coronary heart disease (5.404), among others, were entered into the main effect model. For women, 11 risk factors included hypertension (5.270), family history of stroke (4.866), hyperlipidemia (4.346), among others. The related risk scores were added to obtain a combined risk score to predict the individual's risk of stoke in the future. An individual health risk appraisal model of stroke, which was applicable to individuals of different gender, age, health behavior, disease and family history, was established. In conclusion, personal diseases including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, etc., were very important to the prevalence of stoke. The prevalence of stroke can be effectively reduced by changing unhealthy lifestyles and curing the positive individual disease. The study lays a foundation for health education to persuade people to change their unhealthy lifestyles or behaviors, and could be used in community health services.

  10. Rationale and design of INTERSTROKE: a global case-control study of risk factors for stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Diener, C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major global health problem. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability. INTERHEART, a global case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries (29,972 participants), identified nine modifiable risk factors that accounted for >90......-income countries is inadequate, where a very large burden of stroke occurs. Accordingly, a similar epidemiological study is required for stroke, to inform effective population-based strategies to reduce the risk of stroke. Methods: INTERSTROKE is an international, multicenter case-control study. Cases are patients...... years). A questionnaire (cases and controls) is used to acquire information on known and proposed risk factors for stroke. Cardiovascular (e.g. blood pressure) and anthropometric (e.g. waist-to-hip ratio) measurements are obtained at the time of interview. Nonfasting blood samples and random urine...

  11. The effect of a locally adapted, secondary stroke risk factor self-management program on medication adherence among veterans with stroke/TIA

    OpenAIRE

    Damush, Teresa M.; Myers, Laura; Anderson, Jane A.; Yu, Zhangsheng; Ofner, Susan; Nicholas, Gloria; Kimmel, Barbara; Schmid, Arlene A.; Kent, Thomas; Williams, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    We targeted stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) survivors to engage in self-management practices to manage secondary stroke risk factors. We conducted a randomized, regional pilot trial of a locally adapted, secondary stroke prevention program. We implemented the program at two Veterans Administration Medical Centers. Program sessions targeted stroke risk factor self-management. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of the program on the reach, implementation, and effectiveness on patient ...

  12. Risk Factors for Post-stroke Depression: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Yang, Dongdong; Zeng, Yanyan; Wu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke not only impacts patients physically but also economically. Post-stroke depression (PSD), as a common complication of stroke, always obstructs the process of stroke rehabilitation. Accordingly, defining the risk factors associated with PSD has extraordinary importance. Although there have been many studies investigating the risk factors for PSD, the results are inconsistent. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to identify the risk factors for PSD by evidence-based medicine. Data sources: A systematic and comprehensive database search was performed of PubMed, Medline, CENTRAL, EMBASE.com, the Cochrane library and Web of Science for Literature, covering publications from January 1, 1998 to November 19, 2016. Study Selection: Studies on risk factors for PSD were identified, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The risk of bias tool, described in the Cochrane Handbook version 5.1.0, was used to assess the quality of each study. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software. Results: Thirty-six studies were included for review. A history of mental illness was the highest ranking modifiable risk factor; other risk factors for PSD were female gender, age (Social support was a protective factor for PSD. Conclusion: There are many factors that have effects on PSD. The severity of stroke is an important factor in the occurrence of PSD. Mental history is a possible predictor of PSD. Prevention of PSD requires social and family participation.

  13. Mining association rules between stroke risk factors based on the Apriori algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhang, Yiyan; Kang, Hongyu; Xin, Yi; Shi, Caicheng

    2017-07-20

    Stroke is a frequently-occurring disease and is a severe threat to human health. We aimed to explore the associations between stroke risk factors. Subjects who were aged 40 or above were requested to do surveys with a unified questionnaire as well as laboratory examinations. The Apriori algorithm was applied to find out the meaningful association rules. Selected association rules were divided into 8 groups by the number of former items. The rules with higher confidence degree in every group were viewed as the meaningful rules. The training set used in association analysis consists of a total of 985,325 samples, with 15,835 stroke patients (1.65%) and 941,490 without stroke (98.35%). Based on the threshold we set for the Apriori algorithm, eight meaningful association rules were obtained between stroke and its high risk factors. While between high risk factors, there are 25 meaningful association rules. Based on the Apriori algorithm, meaningful association rules between the high risk factors of stroke were found, proving a feasible way to reduce the risk of stroke with early intervention.

  14. Impact of Stroke Risk Factors on Ethnic Stroke Disparities Among Midlife Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajiv C; Sánchez, Brisa N; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Li, Chengwei; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-10-01

    We examined the contribution of stroke risk factors to midlife (age 45-59 years) Mexican American and non-Hispanic White ischemic stroke (IS) rate disparities from 2000 to 2010. Incident IS cases (n=707) and risk factors were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project, Nueces County, TX (2000-2010). US Census data (2000-2010) were used to estimate the population at-risk for IS, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2000-2010) was used to estimate risk factor prevalence in the stroke-free population. Poisson regression models combined IS counts (numerator) and population at-risk counts (denominator) classified by ethnicity and risk factor status to estimate unadjusted and risk factor-adjusted associations between ethnicity and IS rates. Separate models were run for each risk factor and extended to include an interaction term between ethnicity and risk factor. The crude rate ratio (RR) for ethnicity (Mexican American versus non-Hispanic White) was 2.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-2.36) and was attenuated in models that adjusted for diabetes mellitus (RR: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26-1.78) and hypertension (RR: 1.84; 95% CI, 1.50-2.26). In addition, diabetes mellitus had a stronger association with IS rates among Mexican Americans (RR: 6.42; 95% CI, 5.31-7.76) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (RR: 4.07; 95% CI, 3.68-4.51). The higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and stronger association of diabetes mellitus with IS among midlife Mexican Americans likely contribute to persistent midlife ethnic stroke disparities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. PATIENT DEMOGRAPHIC, RISK FACTORS AND SEASONAL VARIATION IN ONSET OF STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. M. Kathyayani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Existence of particular chronobiological pattern in onset of acute cerebrovascular diseases characterised by circannual rhythms has been detected. India is a subtropical country with clear seasonal variations in weather conditions. Stroke causes death and disability worldwide. Seasons may influence stroke occurrence. The mechanisms underlying these seasonal variations of stroke are not fully understood, but a possible reason may include seasonal variation of biological factors such as arterial blood pressure, serum lipid levels and other blood components. Better understanding and controlling of risk factors associated with onset of stroke will improve the disease prevention. The objective of the present study is to examine the role of possible precipitating or triggering factors. This study reviews records of patients with stroke attending the Department of Medicine, KGH, Visakhapatnam. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients with diagnosis of stroke attending the Department of Medicine, KGH, Visakhapatnam, were selected. Computed tomographic types of stroke, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic and risk factors associated were considered with tropical seasonal variation. RESULTS A total of 150 stroke patients were included in the study of which 93 (62% were males, 57 (38% were females and 46% in 50-65 years age group, 4% in 20-35 years, 28% in 35-50 years, 22% in 65-80 years and above age groups. Of the total, 93.33% presented with 1st attack and only 6.66% presented with recurrent stroke. The prevalence of types of stroke was: ischaemic stroke 54.66%, haemorrhagic stroke 45.33%. The prevalence of risk factors associated with stroke was - male gender 62%, smoking 56.66%, hypertension 56%, age >50 years 46%, alcohol consumption 43%, hyperlipidaemia 16.66%, consumption of alcohol and smoking together 13.33%, valvular heart diseases 6.66%. A high seasonal prevalence was observed in winter season (50.66%. CONCLUSION This study revealed that male

  16. Early consciousness disorder in acute ischemic stroke: incidence, risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Deren; Tao, Wendan; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Jie; Liu, Ming

    2016-08-17

    Little is known about the incidence and risk factors of early consciousness disorder (ECD) in patients with acute ischemic stroke, or about how ECD may affect complications and outcomes. Patients admitted to our hospital within 24 h of onset of acute ischemic stroke were consecutively enrolled. ECD was evaluated clinically and using the Glasgow coma scale. Multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors of ECD, as well as associations between ECD and clinical outcomes. Of the 569 patients enrolled, 199 (35 %) had ECD. Independent risk factors of ECD were advanced age (OR 1.027, 95 % CI 1.007 to 1.048), National Institutes of Health Stroke Score on admission (OR 1.331, 95 % CI 1.257 to 1.410), and massive cerebral infarct (OR 3.211, 95 % CI 1.642 to 6.279). ECD was associated with higher frequency of stroke-related complications (83.4 % vs. 31.1 %, P stroke. Risk factors include advanced age, stroke severity, and massive cerebral infarct. ECD is associated with higher frequency of stroke-related complications and 3-month death/disability.

  17. Nurses Knowledge Regarding Risk Factors And Management Of Stroke At Rajshahi Medical College Hospital Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Uz Zaman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out with a view to assess the nurses knowledge regarding the risk factors and management of stroke following a cross type descriptive study. Nurses having academic qualification were S.S.C 32 and H.S.C 68. Nurses having professional qualification were Diploma in Nursing amp Midwifery 50 because this degree was compulsory and basic for all. During the data collection there were also 42 B.Sc. in Nursing and 8 MPHM.Sc. among those respondents. Length of Service of the respondents nurses were 6 1 to 10 years followed by 24 58 amp 12 were in the 11 to 20 years 21 to 30 years and 31 to 40 years. The Nurses were given correct answer about 74 knowledge regarding stroke 50 types of stroke 82 controllable risk factor of stroke 76 uncontrollable risk factor of stroke 85 positioning needed for patients and 86 management of stroke. Considering the above discussion it was obviously clear that the Senior Staff Nurses SSN were much conscious regarding the risk factors and management of stroke working at Rajshahi Medical College Hospital RMCH.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for stroke in a population of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Copstein

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of death in many countries of Latin America. Population studies are necessary in this region. Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of stroke and its risk factors in a population of vulnerable communities of southern Brazil. Methods: Population-based crosssectional study with systematic sampling. Individuals aged 20 and over were included (n=3,391. Individuals with previous diagnosis of stroke or identified by a validate stroke questionnaire were compared with those without stroke in many variables. Results: 285 individuals (8.4% had previous stroke. The group without stroke showed greater average of years of study than the group with stroke (p≪0.001. Multivariable analysis identified as risk factors for stroke (p≪0.05: age from 40 to 59, age from 60 to 79, widowhood, present smoking, previous smoking, hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Conclusion: The findings in this population indicate the need of preventive cost-effective public health policies in Brazil.

  19. Stroke in Trinidad and Tobago: burden of illness and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahabir Deepak

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the burden of stroke on hospital services in a Caribbean community. The settings are the two main acute general hospitals in Trinidad observed over a 12-month period. All subjects were admitted with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke. The measures were hospital admission rates, length of hospital stay, case-fatality rates, disability at discharge, and risk factors for stroke. There were 1 105 hospital admissions with a diagnosis of stroke. The median length of stay was 4 days, with an interquartile range of 2 to 9, and stroke accounted for approximately 9 478 bed days per annum. The hospital admission fatality rate was 29%. Among surviving patients, 437 (56% were severely disabled at discharge. Age-standardized admission rates for first strokes in persons aged 35_64 years were 114 (95%CI: 83 to 145 per 100 000 in Afro-Trinidadian men and 144 (109 to 179 in Indo-Trinidadian men. The equivalent rates for women were 115 (84 to 146 and 152 (118 to 186. Among patients with first strokes, 348/531 (66% reported physician-diagnosed hypertension, but only 226 (65% of these reported being on antihypertensives at admission. Stroke in Trinidad and Tobago is associated with a high case-fatality rate and severe disability in survivors. Modifiable risk factors were reported in a majority of stroke cases, and there is a need to develop effective preventive strategies.

  20. Stroke in Trinidad and Tobago: burden of illness and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Mahabir

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the burden of stroke on hospital services in a Caribbean community. The settings are the two main acute general hospitals in Trinidad observed over a 12-month period. All subjects were admitted with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke. The measures were hospital admission rates, length of hospital stay, case-fatality rates, disability at discharge, and risk factors for stroke. There were 1 105 hospital admissions with a diagnosis of stroke. The median length of stay was 4 days, with an interquartile range of 2 to 9, and stroke accounted for approximately 9 478 bed days per annum. The hospital admission fatality rate was 29%. Among surviving patients, 437 (56% were severely disabled at discharge. Age-standardized admission rates for first strokes in persons aged 35_64 years were 114 (95%CI: 83 to 145 per 100 000 in Afro-Trinidadian men and 144 (109 to 179 in Indo-Trinidadian men. The equivalent rates for women were 115 (84 to 146 and 152 (118 to 186. Among patients with first strokes, 348/531 (66% reported physician-diagnosed hypertension, but only 226 (65% of these reported being on antihypertensives at admission. Stroke in Trinidad and Tobago is associated with a high case-fatality rate and severe disability in survivors. Modifiable risk factors were reported in a majority of stroke cases, and there is a need to develop effective preventive strategies.

  1. Risk factor profile by etiological subtype of ischemic stroke in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffre, Aude; Ruidavets, Jean Bernard; Calviere, Lionel; Viguier, Alain; Ferrieres, Jean; Larrue, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    Studies of risk factors for ischemic stroke in the young have generally considered ischemic stroke as a whole. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association of traditional cardiovascular risk factors with etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke in young adults. Retrospective review of data from patients aged 16-54 years consecutively treated for first-ever ischemic stroke in an academic stroke unit. Definite causes of stroke were classified using the ASCO (A for atherothrombosis, S for small vessel disease, C for cardiac source, O for other cause) classification system. We used multinomial logistic regression analysis to evaluate associations of age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes and blood lipids with each etiological subtype. A total of 400 patients were included: 244 men (61.1%), 156 women (38.9%); mean age (SD) 44.5 (8.5) years. A definite cause of stroke could be identified in 202 (50.5%) patients. Definite causes of stroke included: atherothrombosis, 72 (18.0%) patients; cardioembolism, 37 (9.25%) patients; small vessel disease, 28 (7.0%) patients; other definite cause, 65 (16.25%) patients including 44 patients with carotid or vertebral artery dissection. Atherothrombosis was associated with age, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and low HDL-cholesterol. Small vessel disease was associated with age and hypertension. Cardioembolism was associated with age. The risk factor profile differs between etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke in young adults. Our findings emphasize the impact of smoking, diabetes, hypertension and low HDL-cholesterol as risk factors for atherothrombosis, and of hypertension as a risk factor for small vessel disease in young adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Which risk factors are more associated with ischemic stroke than intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Emer R; Kapral, Moira K; Fang, Jiming; Eikelboom, John W; ó Conghaile, Aengus; Canavan, Michelle; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The decision to prescribe oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation is based on an assessment of the competing risks of ischemic stroke and major bleeding, of which intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most important type. We sought to determine the comparative importance of risk factors for ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation with particular emphasis on risk factors common to both stroke types. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or ICH and atrial fibrillation included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network constituted the cohort. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline risk factors and presentation with ICH versus ischemic stroke. Risk factors included: (1) those previously reported to be risk factors for both ischemic stroke and major bleeding (particularly ICH) ("shared" risk factors, including age, alcohol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, prior stroke/transient ischemic attack and preadmission dementia); and (2) other risk factors associated with either stroke subtype alone. A total of 3197 patients presented with atrial fibrillation and acute stroke, of which 12.2% presented with ICH. Of the "shared" risk factors, age (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34 per decade) and prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.12-1.87) were more associated with ischemic stroke than ICH, whereas a history of hypertension (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.68-1.17), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.23; 95% CI, 0.92-1.64), renal impairment (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71), and alcohol intake were not more strongly associated with either stroke subtype. Of the risk factors known to be associated with both ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with atrial fibrillation, we found that none had a stronger association with ICH. Older age was more strongly associated with ischemic stroke than ICH.

  3. Comparison of patient and proxy responses on risk factors for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelle, L G; Vlak, M H M; Algra, A; Rinkel, G J E

    2011-03-01

    For studies on chronic risk factors and trigger (i.e. acute risk) factors, stroke researchers often have to rely on proxies. The reliability of proxy responses regarding trigger factors for stroke is unknown. Thirty patients with stroke and their proxies were interviewed about chronic risk factors and trigger factors. We assessed the completeness of proxy-derived data by calculating the level of non-response and the level of agreement using Cohen kappa statistics. For most chronic risk factors and trigger factors, the response rate to whether or not exposure had taken place in the past year was 87% or higher. If couples agreed on exposure, patient and proxy could also provide a comparable estimate of the average frequency of exposure. Although the non-response on last time of exposure was higher, proxies who could answer provide a reasonably good estimate for most trigger factors. Proxies provide reliable information on exposure to chronic risk factors and trigger factors for stroke. For exposure and average frequency of exposure, non-response is low and the level of agreement is high for most chronic risk factors; for last time of exposure non-response is higher, but proxies who could respond provided reliable estimates of last time of exposure to most trigger factors. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Migraine as a risk factor for young patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanoz, Yasin; Gülen Abanoz, Yeşim; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uludüz, Derya; İnce, Birsen; Yavuz, Burcu; Göksan, Baki

    2017-04-01

    Studies have suggested a possible association of migraine and increased risk of ischemic stroke in young adults, particularly in smokers and in women who use oral contraceptive drugs. We aimed to analyze the association between migraine and ischemic stroke in young population in a hospital-based cohort. We included 202 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of ischemic stroke who were between 15 and 50 years and age- and gender-matched 250 volunteers with no history of stroke. All participants were interviewed using a questionnaire for migraine. Localization of ischemic lesion was classified as anterior and posterior circulation according to neuroimaging findings. The cause of ischemic lesion and all risk factors were recorded. Undetermined etiology was the most frequent (43.1%) and the most common determined cause was cardioembolism (22.3%) in young stroke patients. Frequency of migraine was 30.2% among patients with stroke whereas 16.8% of healthy subjects had migraine (p = 0.001). Migraine with aura was significantly more common among patients with stroke compared to healthy subjects (18.3 vs 4.4%; p = 0.000) whereas the frequency of migraine without aura was similar in both groups (11.9 vs 12.4%). Using logistic regression, migraine with aura was shown to be an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in young population (p = 0.000) and separate analysis for gender demonstrated that it was only a risk factor for women (p = 0.009) but not for men (p = 0.107). Migraine with aura was found to be more common in ischemic stroke in young patients. It was an independent risk factor in women.

  5. Risk factor management in survivors of stroke: a double-blind, cluster-randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Amanda G; Srikanth, Velandai K; Nelson, Mark R; Kim, Joosup; Fitzgerald, Sharyn M; Gerraty, Richard P; Bladin, Christopher F; Phan, Thanh G; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2014-07-01

    Comprehensive community care has the potential to improve risk factor management of patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack. The primary aim is to determine the effectiveness of an individualized management program on risk factor management for patients discharged from hospital after stroke. Multicentre, cluster-randomized, controlled trial, with clusters by general practice. Participants are randomized to receive intervention or control after a baseline assessment undertaken after discharge from hospital. The general practice they attend is marked as an intervention or control accordingly. All subsequent participants attending those practices are automatically assigned as intervention or control. Baseline and all outcome assessments, including an analysis of risk factors, are undertaken by assessors blinded to patient randomization. Based on the results of blinded assessments, the individualized management program group will receive targeted advice on how to manage their risk factors using a standardized, evidence-based template to communicate 'ideal' management with their general practitioner. In addition, patients randomized to the individualized management program group will receive counselling and education about stroke risk factor management by an intervention study nurse. Individualized management programs will be reviewed at three-months, six-months, 12 months, and 18 months after stroke, at which times they will be modified if appropriate. Stroke risk management will be evaluated using changes in the Framingham cardiovascular risk score. Analysis will be on an intention-to-treat basis using analysis of covariance or generalized linear model to adjust for baseline risk score and other relevant confounding factors. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  6. Intracardiac tumor: A risk factor for stroke in the young –A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intracardiac mass should be considered a possible risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adult, especially in the absence of other risk factors such as connective tissue disorders, HIV/AIDS, hemoglobinopathy or use of recreational drugs. High index of suspicion is required in order not to overlook such source of emboli.

  7. Risk factors of carotid plaque and carotid common artery intima-media thickening in a high-stroke-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ChunFang; Lv, GaoPeng; Zang, DaWei

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the risk factors of carotid plaque (CP) and carotid common artery intima-media thickening (CCAIMT) and the association between the risk factors and CP numbers and the side of the CCAIMT in a high-stroke-risk population. Carotid ultrasonography was conducted in 2025 participants with high stroke risk. Participants were divided into different groups according to the results of the ultrasound. The risk factors and blood biochemical indices were recorded. The presence of CP and CCAIMT were 38.9% and 24.8% respectively. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that the risk factors of CP were age, high LDL-C and FBG levels, male gender, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, and tobacco use. Compared with participants without CPs, the participants who were male, and older in age, with risk factors of tobacco use, diabetes, high LDL-C levels, and a family history of hypertension were likely to have a single CP, whereas the participants with risk factors of tobacco use, diabetes, hypertension, male gender, older age, high LDL-C levels, stroke and AF or valvulopathy were prone to have multiple CPs. The risk factors of CCAIMT were male gender, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, AF or valvulopathy, tobacco use and age. Compared with the N-CCAIMT subgroup, the risk factors of left CCAIMT were tobacco use, diabetes, male gender, and age. The risk factors of right CCAIMT were male gender, high FBG levels, age, AF or valvulopathy. The risk factors of dual CCAIMT were high frequency of drinking milk, tobacco use, male gender, age, stroke, and hypertension. These findings revealed the risk factors of CP and CCAIMT, and an association between the risk factors and the CP numbers and the side of the CCAIMT.

  8. The role of genetics in stroke risk factors; the discussion of two rare genetic syndroms associated with stroke and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Kılıç Çoban

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is defined as a focal or at times global neurological impairment of sudden onset, that lasts more than 24 hours or that leads to death. The nonmodifiable risk factors for stroke include age, race, gender and acquired risk factors include smoking, hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Previous studies have shown that these mentioned risk factors might be responsible for approximately 50% of patients presenting stroke. However for the remaining half of the stroke patients no risk factors could be detected and genetics might be responsible for this group. In this manuscript we would like to present 2 cases who were being followed-up with the rare genetic syndromes as Marfan syndrome and Robinow syndrome respectively. These patients presented to our clinic with stroke and no identifiable risk factors other than these genetic syndromes could be detected. By this case-series we would like to further discuss the relationship between genetic syndromes and stroke.

  9. Female sex as a risk factor for stroke in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Anders; Lindhardsen, J; Lip, G Y H

    2012-01-01

    Female sex has been suggested as a risk factor for stroke/thromboembolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and has therefore been included within risk scores, e.g., the CHA2 DS2 -VASc score, and guidelines.......Female sex has been suggested as a risk factor for stroke/thromboembolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and has therefore been included within risk scores, e.g., the CHA2 DS2 -VASc score, and guidelines....

  10. Behavioral Risk Factor Data: Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011 to present. BRFSS is a continuous, state-based surveillance system that collects information about modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases and other...

  11. Aspirin for Stroke Prevention in Elderly Patients With Vascular Risk Factors: Japanese Primary Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Ishizuka, Naoki; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Teramoto, Tamio; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Oikawa, Shinichi; Sugawara, Masahiro; Ando, Katsuyuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Yokoyama, Kenji; Minematsu, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The effect of aspirin in primary prevention of stroke is controversial among clinical trials conducted in Western countries, and no data are available for Asian populations with a high risk of intracranial hemorrhage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of aspirin on the risk of stroke and intracranial hemorrhage in the Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP). A total of 14 464 patients (age, 60-85 years) with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus participated and were randomized into 2 treatment groups: 100 mg of aspirin or no aspirin. The median follow-up period was 5.02 years. The cumulative rate of fatal or nonfatal stroke was similar for the aspirin (2.068%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.750-2.443) and no aspirin (2.299%; 95% CI, 1.963-2.692) groups at 5 years; the estimated hazard ratio was 0.927 (95% CI, 0.741-1.160; P=0.509). Aspirin nonsignificantly reduced the risk of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (hazard ratio, 0.783; 95% CI, 0.606-1.012; P=0.061) and nonsignificantly increased the risk of intracranial hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 1.463; 95% CI; 0.956-2.237; P=0.078). A Cox regression adjusted by the risk factors for all stroke, which were age >70 years, smoking, and diabetes mellitus, supported the above result. Aspirin did not show any net benefit for the primary prevention of stroke in elderly Japanese patients with risk factors for stroke, whereas age >70 years, smoking, and diabetes mellitus were risk factors for stroke regardless of aspirin treatment. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00225849. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Risk Factors for Post-stroke Depression: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke not only impacts patients physically but also economically. Post-stroke depression (PSD, as a common complication of stroke, always obstructs the process of stroke rehabilitation. Accordingly, defining the risk factors associated with PSD has extraordinary importance. Although there have been many studies investigating the risk factors for PSD, the results are inconsistent.Objectives: The objectives of this study were to identify the risk factors for PSD by evidence-based medicine.Data sources: A systematic and comprehensive database search was performed of PubMed, Medline, CENTRAL, EMBASE.com, the Cochrane library and Web of Science for Literature, covering publications from January 1, 1998 to November 19, 2016.Study Selection: Studies on risk factors for PSD were identified, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The risk of bias tool, described in the Cochrane Handbook version 5.1.0, was used to assess the quality of each study. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software.Results: Thirty-six studies were included for review. A history of mental illness was the highest ranking modifiable risk factor; other risk factors for PSD were female gender, age (<70 years, neuroticism, family history, severity of stroke, and level of handicap. Social support was a protective factor for PSD.Conclusion: There are many factors that have effects on PSD. The severity of stroke is an important factor in the occurrence of PSD. Mental history is a possible predictor of PSD. Prevention of PSD requires social and family participation.

  13. Epidemiology and risk factors for chronic kidney disease in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu-Shi; Song, Li-Ting; Zhong, Di; Song, A-Xia; Jia, Xi-Bei; Liu, Rui-Chan; Xie, Ru-Juan; Na, Shi-Ping

    2013-08-01

    There is growing evidence for an association between chronic renal disease (CKD) and adverse cerebrovascular events because of the overlap of several risk factors. The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of CKD and the characteristics of risk factors for CKD in the population with ischaemic stroke. This retrospective study included 571 patients with ischaemic stroke. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation. Renal function was assessed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI)-CKD classification. Study demonstrated that the major factors associated with CKD in the ischaemic stroke patients were age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and serum uric acid. Diabetes mellitus (OR 4·146, 95% CI 1·047-16·418, P = 0·043), hypertension and diabetes mellitus (OR 3·574, 95% CI 1·248-10·234, P = 0·018), serum uric acid (OR 1·010, 95% CI 1·006-1·013, P ischaemic stroke. The patients with ischaemic stroke may be considered as a high-risk population for CKD and be aggressively managed for CKD prevention. The high prevalence of CKD in population with ischaemic stroke prompts the need for greater public awareness about risks of CKD. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The neighborhood where you live is a risk factor for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Appathurai; Delongchamp, Robert; Bates, Joseph H; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2013-11-01

    The excess stroke mortality in the southeastern states of the United States (stroke-belt states) is well known; however, the factors associated with this pattern have not been fully elucidated. We measured the contribution of several demographic factors by analyzing stroke mortality data (2005-2009) at the census block group (BG) level in the state of Arkansas. Census BGs were used as proxies for neighborhoods. BGs were stratified using 5 census measures: poverty (percent of population below federal poverty level), population density (population per square mile), education (percent of population aged >25 years who did not graduate from high school), population mobility (percent of population who resided at the same address 1 year ago), and the percent of non-Hispanic blacks (percent of population that is black). Generalized additive models were used to estimate the variation in stroke mortality among BGs and to assess the impact of different demographic variables. From 2005 to 2009, there were 8930 stroke deaths in Arkansas. There was considerable variation in the relative risk even between adjacent BGs within a single county. The geographically weighted regression analyses indicated that 4.5% to 9% of deviance in stroke mortality among BGs could be explained by poverty, education, population density, and population mobility. Race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic blacks) explains BGs. Our study shows that primordial risk factors such as poverty and education drive disparities in stroke mortality among neighborhoods in Arkansas.

  15. Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia and Posterior Circulation Infarction in Patients with Isolated Vertigo with Stroke Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Lu, Gui Feng; Zhang, Jie Wen; Zhang, Shu Ling; Ma, Qian Kun; Yin, Suo

    2017-02-01

    We aimed in this study to investigate the prevalence of vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) in a population with isolated vertigo in association with stroke risk factors, to determine whether VAH is an independent risk factor for posterior circulation infarction (PCI). We sequentially enrolled 245 patients with isolated vertigo with at least 1 vascular risk factor, who were divided into PCI and non-PCI groups, according to present signs of acute infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent magnetic resonance angiography and cervical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to screen for VAH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the significant risk factors for PCI. VAH was found in 64 of 245 patients (26%). VAH (odds ratio [OR] = 2.70, 95%confidence interval [CI] 1.17-6.23, P = .020), median stenosis of the posterior circulation (OR = 7.09, 95%CI = 2.54-19.79, P diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.13, 95%CI 1.38-7.12, P = .006) were independent risk factors for PCI. The predominant Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype in our patients with isolated vertigo with PCI complicated by VAH was mainly small-artery occlusion. Our findings suggest that VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI in patients with isolated vertigo with confirmed risk from stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Etiologic Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Şule Özer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke in people aged less than 45 years is less frequent than in older patients, but has major impacts on both the individual and society. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic subtypes of acute ischemic stroke in the young. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 619 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and November 2014. Acute ischemic stroke in the young was defined as patients aged 45 years and under. Demographic data, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at admission and detailed investigations aimed at determining etiologic cause were recorded. Etiologic stroke subtypes were determined using the automated Causative Classification System. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores were recorded in the follow-up. Results: There were 32 (5.2% young patients with acute ischemic stroke. The rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and coronary artery disease were significantly lower in young patients compared with patients aged more than 45 years (p<0.05. The mean NIHSS score at admission and hospital mortality was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p=0.006, p=0.043. Cardioaortic embolism was the most common etiologic stroke subtype in both groups. Other causes were significantly more frequent in the young acute ischemic stroke group compared with the older patients. The median follow-up mRS was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p<0.001. Conclusion: Young patients with ischemic stroke have different risk factors, stroke etiology, stroke severity and prognosis compared with patients older than 45 years with the same condition

  17. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in young adults: risk factors, diagnostic yield, neuroimaging, and thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ruijun; Schwamm, Lee H; Pervez, Muhammad A; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10% to 14% of ischemic strokes occur in young adults. To investigate the yield of diagnostic tests, neuroimaging findings, and treatment of ischemic strokes in young adults. We retrospectively reviewed data from our Get with the Guidelines-Stroke database from 2005 through 2010. University hospital tertiary stroke center. A total of 215 consecutive inpatients aged 18 to 45 years with ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack. The mean (SD) age was 37.5 (7) years; 51% were male. There were high incidence rates of hypertension (20%), diabetes mellitus (11%), dyslipidemia (38%), and smoking (34%). Relevant abnormalities were shown on cerebral angiography in 136 of 203 patients, on cardiac ultrasonography in 100 of 195, on Holter monitoring in 2 of 192; and on hypercoagulable panel in 30 of 189 patients. Multiple infarcts were observed in 31% and were more prevalent in individuals younger than age 35 years. Relevant arterial lesions were frequently detected in the middle cerebral artery (23%), internal carotid artery (13%), and vertebrobasilar arteries (13%). Cardioembolic stroke occurred in 47% (including 17% with isolated patent foramen ovale), and 11% had undetermined stroke etiology. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 3 (interquartile range, 0-9) and 81% had good outcome at hospital discharge. Of the 29 patients receiving thrombolysis (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 14; interquartile range, 9-17), 55% had good outcome at hospital discharge and none developed symptomatic brain hemorrhage. This study shows the contemporary profile of ischemic stroke in young adults admitted to a tertiary stroke center. Stroke etiology can be determined in nearly 90% of patients with modern diagnostic tests. The causes are heterogeneous; however, young adults have a high rate of traditional vascular risk factors. Thrombolysis appears safe and short-term outcomes are favorable.

  18. Cause-Specific Mortality after Stroke: Relation to Age, Sex, Stroke Severity, and Risk Factors in a 10-Year Follow-Up Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, UB; Olsen, TS; Andersen, KK

    2013-01-01

    We investigated cause-specific mortality in relation to age, sex, stroke severity, and cardiovascular risk factor profile in the Copenhagen Stroke Study cohort with 10 years of follow-up. In a Copenhagen community, all patients admitted to the hospital with stroke during 1992-1993 (n = 988) were...... registered on admission. Evaluation included stroke severity, computed tomography scan, and a cardiovascular risk profile. Cause of death within 10 years according to death certificate information was classified as stroke, heart/arterial disease, or nonvascular disease. Competing-risks analyses were...... after 10 years (18%). Stroke was the dominant cause of death during first year, with an absolute risk of 20.2% versus 5.2% for heart/arterial disease and 6.5% for nonvascular disease. The subsequent absolute risk of death per year was 2.8% for stroke, 4.5% for heart/arterial disease, and 5...

  19. Prevalence of Stroke and Its Risk Factors in Urban Sri Lanka: Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thashi; Gajasinghe, Seneth; Arambepola, Carukshi

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. In the absence of published population-based prevalence data, we investigated the prevalence and risk factors of stroke in a population of varying urbanization in Sri Lanka. A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted among 2313 adults aged ≥18 years residing in Colombo, selected using a multistage, probability proportionate-to-size, cluster sampling technique. Data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Ever diagnosis of stroke was confirmed by medical doctors based on World Health Organization criteria and corroborated by documental evidence. Of the total population (52.4% women; mean age, 44.2 years; SD, 16.6), the prevalence of stroke was 10.4 per 1000 (95% confidence interval, 6.3-14.5) with a 2:1 male:female ratio. Beyond the age of 65 years, the prevalence was higher by 6-fold among men and by 2-fold among women. Ninety two percent had developed hemiparesis, 58.3% had dysphasia, and 16.7% had loss of balance. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (62.5%) followed by smoking (45.8%), excess alcohol (41.7%), diabetes mellitus (33.3%), and transient ischemic attack (29.2%); 79.2%, predominantly men, had ≥2 risk factors. A percentage of 58.3 had brain computed tomographic scans, of whom 85.7% had ischemic strokes. A percentage of 64.3 had to change or give up working because of stroke-related disability. Age-adjusted stroke prevalence in urban Sri Lanka lies between high-income and low-/middle-income countries. The prevalence of stroke and its risk factors were higher among men. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Anemia Is a Risk Factor of New Intraoperative Hemorrhagic Stroke During Valve Surgery for Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Toda, Koichi; Okazaki, Shuhei; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-07-01

    Infective endocarditis is often associated with cerebral complications, the most serious of which is intraoperative hemorrhagic stroke owing to anticoagulation for cardiopulmonary bypass. However, its prevalence and risk factors are unknown. We evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of intraoperative hemorrhagic stroke in patients with infective endocarditis. In 246 patients who underwent valve surgery for active endocarditis between 2005 and 2012, 127 patients had both preoperative and postoperative intracranial neuroimaging. The prevalence and risk factors of intraoperative stroke were analyzed in those 127 patients. Valve surgery was performed in 127 patients 19.6 ± 27.1 days after infective endocarditis diagnosis. Fourteen experienced intraoperative hemorrhagic stroke, and 1 died. None of 29 patients with preoperative hemorrhagic stroke showed exacerbation of hemorrhagic lesions, whereas 1 of 57 patients with preoperative cerebral infarction showed hemorrhagic transformation of infarct lesions. Thirteen of 14 hemorrhagic complications were new ectopic intracranial hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis showed not preoperative cerebral lesions but preoperative low hemoglobin level as the only risk factor for intraoperative hemorrhagic stroke (odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.87; p = 0.03). A preoperative hemoglobin cutoff value of 9.2 g/dL was determined by receiver operating curve analysis. Of 41 patients with preoperative hemoglobin level less than 9.2 g/dL, 9 (22%) had intraoperative new hemorrhage, whereas 4 (5%) of 86 patients with hemoglobin level of at least 9.2 g/dL had ectopic new hemorrhage. Intraoperative hemorrhagic stroke was not rare, and ectopic hemorrhagic stroke, associated with preoperative anemia, was more prevalent than hemorrhagic transformation of existing cerebral lesions. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation, Atherosclerotic Risk Factors, and Stroke Risk in Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Sabine; Fullerton, Heather J.; Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy; Weathers, Rita E.; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Goldsby, Robert E.; Packer, Roger J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Bowers, Daniel C.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. Results: During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Conclusion: Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively

  2. Association between Factor V Gene Polymorphism and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazzani, Adel Ali; Kumar, Amit; Selim, Magdy

    2018-02-22

    Ischemic stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disease. Reports on relationship between Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism and ischemic stroke have revealed inconsistent results. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to determine the role of Factor V single nucleotide gene polymorphism in ischemic stroke. We searched the literature using academic electronic databases that is, PubMed, Trip Data Base, EBSCO, and Google Scholar, last search up to September 2017. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from fixed or random effects models whichever applicable using software STATA version 13 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX). Forty case-control studies met the inclusion criteria, which included 6860 cases and 18,025 controls. Altogether, 19 studies in young adults (age  40). Four studies did not report the mean age at recruitment. Significant association between Factor V G1691A gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke were observed under dominant model (OR 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62, P value analysis suggested substantial association of Factor V gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in cases with onset at young age (OR 1.84; 95% CI: 1.47 to 2.30), but was not statistical significant in cases at old age (>40 years). Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism was associated with risk of ischemic stroke mainly in young adults. Further research with adequately powered prospective studies in homogenous subjects are required to determine the nature of association in young stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of classic risk factors and prothrombotic factor gene mutations in ischemic stroke risk development in young and middle-aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanc, Visnja; Sonicki, Zdenko; Vukasovic, Ines; Solter, Vesna V; Zavoreo, Iris; Kes, Vanja B

    2014-03-01

    In young individuals, a genetically predisposing hypercoagulability and classic modifying risk factors can act synergistically on the ischemic stroke risk development. The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of classic vascular risk factors and polymorphisms of the G20210A coagulation factor II (prothrombin), Arg506Glu coagulation factor V Leiden, C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and the impact of these gene mutations and classic vascular risk factors on the overall stroke risk in individuals aged 55 years or younger. The study included 155 stroke patients aged 55 years or younger and 150 control subjects. Stroke prevalence and odds ratio (OR) were assessed for the following parameters: G20210A prothrombin, Arg506Glu factor V Leiden, C677T MTHFR, and 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphisms; total number of study polymorphisms in a particular subject (genetic sum); and classic vascular risk factors of hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The prevalence of hypertension (P stroke patients. The following parameters were found to act as independent risk factors for ischemic stroke: decreased HDL cholesterol level (P ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged individuals. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Infratentorial posterior circulation stroke in a Nigerian population: Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and predictors of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman Femi Owolabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior circulation stroke (PCS, though less common, differs from stroke in anterior circulation in many aspects. Relatively, it portends a poorer prognosis. However, there is a paucity of data from African countries, in particular, where stroke is a menace. Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the etiology, clinical characteristics, outcome, and predictors of outcome in a cohort of patients with IPCS in Northwestern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Out of 595 patients with stroke, we prospectively analyzed 57 patients with PCS in a Tertiary Care Center in Kano, Northwestern Nigeria. Patients were analyzed for demographic data, risk factors, clinical characteristics, stroke subtypes, mortality, and predictors of mortality. Results: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke accounted for 57 (9.6% of 595 of all strokes seen in the study period. They comprised 44 males (mean age 47.8 ± 17.7 and 13 females (mean age 46.3 ± 13.7. Overall, their age ranged between 24 and 90 (mean age 47.4 ± 16.7. However, 52.7% of the patients were < 45 years of age. The most common site affected was the cerebellum seen in 33 (57.9% patients. Hypertension was the most common risk factor (86%. Headache and vertigo were the most common features accounting for 83.6% and 86.3%, respectively. Thirty-eight (66.7% patients had an ischemic stroke. Twenty-one (36.8% of the patients died during the 1-month period of follow-up. Independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia on admission and hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions: IPCS occurred in a relatively younger age group. Headache and vertigo were the most common symptoms. The independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia at presentation and hemorrhagic stroke.

  5. Risk factors of sleep disorder after stroke: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolin Gu, M M

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate potential risk factors of sleep disorder in stroke patients by conducting a meta-analysis. Relevant articles were searched in PubMed, Medline, Springer, Elsevier, Science Direct, Cochrane Library, and Google scholar database up to May 2014. The effect size of risk factors, including gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking, alcohol use, previous stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and habitual snoring were measured by odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The heterogeneity of effect size across studies was evaluated by applying Cochran's Q-statistic and the I 2 statistic. In addition, Egger's linear regression test was used to evaluate the publication bias. A total of 8 studies, involving 1381 stroke patients (578 patients with sleep disorder, and 803 patients without sleep disorder) were suitable for this meta-analysis. Pooled results showed significant association of sleep disorder risk in stoke patients with diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.09-1.85), alcohol use (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.19-2.12) and habitual snoring (OR = 14.77, 95% CI = 5.52-39.53). No significant association was found between risk of sleep disorder in stoke patients and other factors. Furthermore, heterogeneity was just presented among studies involving gender, hypertension and smoking. Egger's linear regression test showed no statistical publication bias. Diabetes mellitus, alcohol use, and habitual snoring are associated with a significantly increased risk of sleep disorder in stroke patients. (1) Eight studies containing 1381 patients are included in this meta-analysis. (2) Diabetes mellitus was associated with sleep disorder in stroke patients. (3) Alcohol use could increase the risk of sleep disorder in stroke patients. (4) Habitual snoring was obviously associated with sleep disorder in stroke patients.

  6. Specificities of Ischemic Stroke Risk Factors in Arab-Speaking Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Halim; Sissani, Leila; Labreuche, Julien; Arauz, Antonio; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Bryer, Alain; Chamorro, Angel; Fisher, Marc; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M; Hennerici, Michael G; Lavados, Pablo M; Massaro, Ayrton; Mattle, Heinrich P; Munoz Collazos, Mario; Rothwell, Peter M; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Vicaut, Eric; Yamouth, Bassem; Amarenco, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is largely preventable, and therefore, a better understanding of risk factors is an essential step in reducing the population stroke rate and resulting disease burden in Arab countries. We performed 2 separate analyses in 2 similar populations of patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke. This first involved 3,635 patients in the Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular disease (OPTIC) registry (followed for 2 years), with baseline collection of the usual risk factors and 5 socioeconomic variables (unemployment status, residence in rural area, living in fully serviced accommodation, no health-insurance coverage, and low educational level). The second involved patients in the PERFORM trial (n = 19,100 followed up for 2 years), with baseline collection of the usual risk factors and 1 socioeconomic variable (low educational level). The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death. Stroke risk factors were more prevalent in patients in Arab countries. The incidence of major cardiovascular events (MACE; age- and gender-adjusted) was higher in Arab countries (OPTIC, 18.5 vs. 13.3%; PERFORM, 18.4 vs. 9.7%; both p ≤ 0.0001). These results remained significant after adjustment on risk factors and were attenuated in OPTIC after further adjustment on socioeconomic variables (hazard ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.98-1.55; p = 0.07). Key Messages: Patients with ischemic stroke living in Arab countries had a lower mean socioeconomic status, a much higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, and a higher rate of MACE compared with patients from non-Arab countries. This finding is partly explained by a higher prevalence of risk factors and also by a high prevalence of poverty and low educational level. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Multiple risk factors and ischaemic stroke in the elderly Asian population with and without atrial fibrillation. An analysis of 425,600 Chinese individuals without prior stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke risk rises with the increasing cardiovascular risk factors. How atrial fibrillation (AF) incrementally contributes to the risk for ischaemic stroke with increasing age and multiple cardiovascular risk factors is unclear. In an individual patient with AF the mechanism of ischaemic stroke may be related directly to AF itself or to risk factors associated with AF. It was this study's objective to investigate incident ischaemic stroke in relation to age and increasing cardiovascular risk factor(s), and the incremental impact of AF on stroke rates. We studied a 5% random sampling from Chinese medical insurance data covering more than 10 million individuals, for the years 2001 to 2012. The rate of ischaemic stroke was calculated amongst the individuals with no prior history of ischaemic stroke, in relation to age groups (aged ischaemic strokes after 64,834 person-years follow-up. Overall, ischaemic stroke incidence (per 100 person-years) was 0.35 (95%CI 0.34-0.35) in the non-AF population and 1.11 (0.84-1.45) with AF. The AF population age stroke rates were 2.07 (0.86-4.76) and 4.29 (4.08-4.51) in non-AF and AF populations, respectively. The non-AF population age ≥ 65 years with ≥ 2 additional comorbidities (hypertension, vascular disease, diabetic, or heart failure) had ischaemic stroke rates similar to an AF population with CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 4. In both non-AF and AF populations, those with CHA2DS2-VASc =1 had a 1.9 fold increase in stroke risk, and those with CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2 had more than four-fold increased risk for stroke, compared with those with CHA2DS2-VASc=0. In conclusion, an increasing cluster of multiple cardiovascular risk factors (besides AF) contributes to a greater risk for ischaemic stroke, especially in the elderly population. If elderly and with multiple risk factors, non-AF patients may have a risk of incident ischaemic stroke that is comparable or even higher than patients with AF, suggesting that the incremental stroke

  8. Gender-related risk factors for perioperative stroke after carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelągowski, Mirosław; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Bogusiak, Katarzyna; Timler, Dariusz; Łysakowski, Marek; Kaźmierski, Piotr; Pająk, Michał; Szostek, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a surgical procedure used in ischemic brain stroke prevention in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic severe carotid artery stenosis. This study compares perioperative stroke or death rate after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in male and female patients, and determines risk factors for perioperative incidents in women and men. The outcome of surgical treatment of 269 consecutive symptomatic patients (181 men and 88 women) treated from January 2004 to August 2008 in the Department of Vascular, General and Oncologic Surgery was analyzed. Perioperative stroke-death rate (within 30 days after the surgery) in women was 6.8% (6/88) and 3.3% (6/181) in men (p > 0.05). In the female group, none of the analyzed risk factors were associated with a higher risk of periprocedural incident, while in men, only hypercholesterolemia was a significant predictor of perioperative stroke (TC > 240 vs 240 vs 200-240: OR = 6.59; 95% CI: 1.12-38.97; p = 0.0375). In men, hypercholesterolemia significantly increased the risk of perioperative stroke or death, while in females, none of the analyzed factors were determined as the predictors of the incident. The fact that plaque type VI by AHA was significantly more frequent in women and men more frequently were suffering from ischemic heart disease and peripheral artery occlusive disease appeared not to influence the outcome of CEA.

  9. Demographic and geographic vascular risk factor differences in European young adults with ischemic stroke: the 15 cities young stroke study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Jukka; Yesilot, Nilufer; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Vassilopoulou, Sofia; Nardi, Katiuscia; Odier, Celine; Hofgart, Gergely; Engelter, Stefan; Burow, Annika; Mihalka, Laszlo; Kloss, Manja; Ferrari, Julia; Lemmens, Robin; Coban, Oguzhan; Haapaniemi, Elena; Maaijwee, Noortje; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes; Bersano, Anna; Cereda, Carlo; Baron, Pierluigi; Borellini, Linda; Valcarenghi, Caterina; Thomassen, Lars; Grau, Armin J; Palm, Frederick; Urbanek, Christian; Tuncay, Rezzan; Durukan-Tolvanen, Aysan; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Thijs, Vincent; Greisenegger, Stefan; Vemmos, Konstantinos; Lichy, Christoph; Bereczki, Daniel; Csiba, Laszlo; Michel, Patrik; Leys, Didier; Spengos, Konstantinos; Naess, Halvor; Bahar, Sara Zarko; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2012-10-01

    We compared among young patients with ischemic stroke the distribution of vascular risk factors among sex, age groups, and 3 distinct geographic regions in Europe. We included patients with first-ever ischemic stroke aged 15 to 49 years from existing hospital- or population-based prospective or consecutive young stroke registries involving 15 cities in 12 countries. Geographic regions were defined as northern (Finland, Norway), central (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, The Netherlands, Switzerland), and southern (Greece, Italy, Turkey) Europe. Hierarchical regression models were used for comparisons. In the study cohort (n=3944), the 3 most frequent risk factors were current smoking (48.7%), dyslipidemia (45.8%), and hypertension (35.9%). Compared with central (n=1868; median age, 43 years) and northern (n=1330; median age, 44 years) European patients, southern Europeans (n=746; median age, 41 years) were younger. No sex difference emerged between the regions, male:female ratio being 0.7 in those aged young adults-having high rate of modifiable risk factors-should be targeted according to sex and age at continental level.

  10. [Delirium in stroke patients : Critical analysis of statistical procedures for the identification of risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydahl, P; Margraf, N G; Ewers, A

    2017-04-01

    Delirium is a relevant complication following an acute stroke. It is a multifactor occurrence with numerous interacting risk factors that alternately influence each other. The risk factors of delirium in stroke patients are often based on limited clinical studies. The statistical procedures and clinical relevance of delirium related risk factors in adult stroke patients should therefore be questioned. This secondary analysis includes clinically relevant studies that give evidence for the clinical relevance and statistical significance of delirium-associated risk factors in stroke patients. The quality of the reporting of regression analyses was assessed using Ottenbacher's quality criteria. The delirium-associated risk factors identified were examined with regard to statistical significance using the Bonferroni method of multiple testing for forming incorrect positive hypotheses. This was followed by a literature-based discussion on clinical relevance. Nine clinical studies were included. None of the studies fulfilled all the prerequisites and assumptions given for the reporting of regression analyses according to Ottenbacher. Of the 108 delirium-associated risk factors, a total of 48 (44.4%) were significant, whereby a total of 28 (58.3%) were false positive after Bonferroni correction. Following a literature-based discussion on clinical relevance, the assumption of statistical significance and clinical relevance could be found for only four risk factors (dementia or cognitive impairment, total anterior infarct, severe infarct and infections). The statistical procedures used in the existing literature are questionable, as are their results. A post-hoc analysis and critical appraisal reduced the number of possible delirium-associated risk factors to just a few clinically relevant factors.

  11. Ischemic stroke and patent foramen ovale: risk factors and genetic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Maria; Sjöstrand, Christina; Kostulas, Konstantinos

    2013-08-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is considered to be a risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD), especially in young people. However, the potential pathophysiological relevance in ischemic stroke is controversial and in need of further investigation. In this study, we examined the conventional risk factors and the distribution of 100 polymorphisms in 47 suspected susceptibility genes for ICVD in stroke patients with or without a PFO. In the South Stockholm Ischemic Stroke Study, 928 ICVD patients and 602 controls were genotyped for 100 different gene polymorphisms. The stroke patients also underwent relevant investigation and standardized blood tests. Patients who underwent transeosophageal echocardiography as part of their investigation were divided into groups that either had or did not have a PFO. There were no significant differences in the 2 groups with regard to conventional risk factors or blood analyses. Three different polymorphisms located in the prothrombin, F2 (20210G/A), and apolipoprotein-C3 (-641A/C and -455T/A) genes were significantly associated with ICVD and PFO. The strongest association was found for F2 (P = .0049; odds ratio 26.4). We found that F2, which previously has been described as being a possible link between PFO and ICVD, was significantly associated with ICVD and PFO. There was also a trend toward an association between 2 other polymorphisms in the APO-CIII gene and PFO and ICVD. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A STUDY ON RISK FACTORS AND LIPID PROFILE PATTERN IN PATIENTS OF STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawgam Umbon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is usually end result of predisposing conditions that originated years before the ictus. Creating awareness and treatment of its modifiable risk factors will reduce the incidence of stroke. OBJECTIVE To study the risk factors and lipid profile pattern in stroke patients. METHODS Patients with diagnosis of stroke comprising 50 consecutive patients each of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes who were admitted in Jorhat Medical College & Hospital, Assam over a period of 1 year (May 2015 - April 2016 included in the study, while patients on lipid lowering therapy were excluded from the study. History of risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and alcoholism were taken. To determine the subtype of stroke, clinical examination followed by CT scan/MRI of brain were done. A serum sample after 8 hours of overnight fasting was taken on the next day of admission for both groups of patients. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was determined, using enzymatic colorimetric method. RESULTS A total of 100 patients were studied, of whom 66 were males and 34 were females. The mean age for the ischaemic group was 62±12 years and for the haemorrhagic group were 55±14 years. In this study, dyslipidaemia was present in 58 (58% patients. Patients with high total cholesterol - 33 (18 ischaemic, 15 haemorrhagic, high LDL-cholesterol was found in 38 (22 ischaemic, 16 haemorrhagic, high triglycerides in 31 (14 ischaemic, 17 haemorrhagic and low HDL-cholesterol in 47 (29 ischaemic, 18 haemorrhagic. Among 100 patients, 66 had hypertension, 20 had diabetes mellitus, 18 had both diabetes and hypertension, 43 were smokers, 36 consumed alcohol and >2 risk factor were found in 44. CONCLUSION Dyslipidaemia was found in 58% of patients and most striating features were low HDL-cholesterol and elevated triglycerides level, indicating they are independent risk factors for stroke. No

  13. Risk factors for ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke in 22 countries (the INTERSTROKE study): a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M.J.; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Xiufeng, Liu

    2010-01-01

    Background The contribution of various risk factors to the burden of stroke worldwide is unknown, particularly in countries of low and middle income. We aimed to establish the association of known and emerging risk factors with stroke and its primary subtypes, assess the contribution of these risk...... factors to the burden of stroke, and explore the differences between risk factors for stroke and myocardial infarction. Methods We undertook a standardised case-control study in 22 countries worldwide between March 1, 2007, and April 23, 2010. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days...... of symptoms onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls had no history of stroke, and were matched with cases for age and sex. All participants completed a structured questionnaire and a physical examination, and most provided blood and urine samples. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and population...

  14. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Kraywinkel, Klaus; Heidrich, Jan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Wagner, Markus; Berger, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. S...

  15. Stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: risk factors, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim, L C D; Maia, F M; Rodrigues, C E M

    2017-04-01

    Neurologic disorders are among the most common and important clinical manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), mainly those that affect the central nervous system (CNS). Risk of cerebrovascular events in both conditions is increased, and stroke represents one of the most severe complications, with an incidence rate between 3% and 20%, especially in the first five years of diagnosis. This article updates the data regarding the risk factors, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and treatment of stroke in SLE and APS.

  16. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor: a risk factor for carotid plaque, stroke, and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Margaretha; Östling, Gerd; Smith, Gustav; Hamrefors, Viktor; Melander, Olle; Hedblad, Bo; Engström, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the urokinase system could have an important role in atherogenesis and plaque rupture. The relationships among the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), carotid plaque, and incidence of ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease (CAD) events were studied in a prospective cohort. Occurrence of carotid plaque and plasma levels of suPAR were assessed in 5166 men and women, aged 45 to 68 years, participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study. Incidences of ischemic stroke and CAD were monitored during a mean follow-up of 15 years. Subjects with carotid plaque had significantly higher levels of suPAR compared with those without carotid plaque. suPAR was associated with increased incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] for third versus first tertile, 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-2.11) and CAD (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.13-2.13) after adjustment for risk factors. The risk factor-adjusted HR for ischemic stroke was 2.21 (95% CI, 1.52-3.22) in subjects with carotid plaque and high suPAR (ie, third tertile) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.05-2.17) in subjects with carotid plaque and low suPAR compared with those without carotid plaque and low suPAR (reference). High levels of suPAR significantly increased the risk of ischemic stroke and CAD in subjects with carotid plaque. suPAR is associated with increased occurrence of carotid plaque and increased incidence of ischemic stroke and CAD. Presence of both elevated levels of suPAR and carotid plaque increases the risk of ischemic stroke in an additive way.

  17. Circulating Tissue Factor Levels and Risk of Stroke: Findings From the EPICOR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoviello, Licia; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; de Curtis, Amalia; Agnoli, Claudia; Frasca, Graziella; Mattiello, Amalia; Matullo, Giuseppe; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Napoleone, Emanuela; Lorenzet, Roberto; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Panico, Salvatore; Donati, Maria Benedetta

    2015-06-01

    Tissue factor (TF) expression is increased in inflammatory atherosclerotic plaques and has been related to their thrombogenicity. Blood-borne TF has been also demonstrated to contribute to thrombogenesis. However, few studies have evaluated the association of circulating levels of TF with stroke. We investigated the association of baseline circulating levels of TF with stroke events occurred in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Italy cohort. Using a nested case-cohort design, a center-stratified random sample of 839 subjects (66% women; age range, 35-71 years) was selected as subcohort and compared with 292 strokes in a mean follow-up of 9 years. Blood samples were collected at baseline in citrate, plasma was stored in liquid nitrogen and TF was measured by ELISA (IMUBIND, TF ELISA, Instrumentation Laboratory, Milan, Italy). The odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted by relevant confounders (covariates of TF) and stratified by center, were estimated by a Cox regression model using Prentice method. Individuals in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of TF plasma levels had significantly increased risk of stroke (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-3.23). The association was independent from several potential confounders (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.19). No differences were observed between men and women. The increase in risk was restricted to ischemic strokes (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-4.12; fully adjusted model), whereas high levels of TF were not associated with the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (odds ratioIVvsI quartile, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-2.55; fully adjusted model). Our data provide evidence that elevated levels of circulating TF are potential risk factors for ischemic strokes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Risk factors for heart disease and stroke among diabetic persons, by disability status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Catherine A; Denny, Clark H; Greenlund, Kurt J; Benjamin, Stephanie M; Strine, Tara W; Balluz, Lina S; Mokdad, Ali H

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether disabled diabetic persons have a higher prevalence of risk factors for heart disease and stroke than do diabetic persons without disability. RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND METHODS: Data were analyzed for noninstitutionalized adults in 27 states and the District of Columbia that participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 2001 and/or 2003. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the adjusted prevalence and odds ratios of disabled diabetic persons, by sociodemographic characteristics. The logit form of each model was used to estimate conditional marginal probabilities of risk factors for heart disease and stroke among diabetic persons, by disability status. Diabetic persons with disability were more likely than those without disability to have more risk factors for heart disease and stroke, including insufficient leisure-time physical activity or inactivity (adjusted prevalence: 75.2% vs. 63.3%; Pvs. 43.3%; Pvs. 48.4%; P=.038), and hypertension (63.9% vs. 56.6%; Ptwo or more, three or more, and four or more risk factors (97.2% vs. 95.6%, 83.5% vs. 74.0%, 56.5% vs. 41.1%, and 22.2% vs. 13.6%, respectively; Pstroke. Health care guidelines specifically targeting diabetic patients with disability may be needed to aid health care providers in addressing these risk factors.

  19. Preventable risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke amongst ethnic groups in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemic-Stojcevic, N; Dundas, R; Jenkins, S; Rudd, A; Wolfe, C

    2001-05-01

    People of African Caribbean descent have higher mortality rates from stroke than other ethnic groups. However, little is known about the prevalence of stroke risk factors in UK ethnic minority groups. We investigated the prevalence of these risk factors amongst African Caribbeans, black Africans and whites. A random sample of patients aged 45-74 registered with 16 general practices in south London was surveyed in 1995. Main outcome measures were: prevalence of hypertension, mean serum cholesterol, serum fibrinogen and glycosylated haemoglobin AIC. Logistic and linear regressions were used to determine ethnic differences in these measures. Hypertension was more prevalent in black Caribbeans (79.4%) and black Africans (71.6%) than in whites (54.3%) (p Africans had similar rates to black Caribbeans for these risk factors apart from lower triglvceride levels. These differences in risk factors may partially explain the high stroke mortality rates in black Caribbeans and black Africans compared to whites. There was little difference in prevalence of these risk factors between black Caribbean and black African groups. Specific strategies targeted to each ethnic group need to be developed to reduce risk factors.

  20. Rationale and design of INTERSTROKE: a global case-control study of risk factors for stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Diener, C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major global health problem. It is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability. INTERHEART, a global case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries (29,972 participants), identified nine modifiable risk factors that accounted for >90% ...

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea as an Independent Stroke Risk Factor: A Review of the Evidence, Stroke Prevention Guidelines, and Implications for Neuroscience Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sharon; Cuellar, Norma

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability affecting nearly 800,000 people in the United States every year. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is found in over 60% of patients with stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) and identified as an independent stroke risk factor in large epidemiology studies and Canadian Stroke Prevention Guidelines (SPG) but not in the United States. The 2014 Secondary SPG recommend OSA screening and treatment as a consideration only, not a requirement. The twofold purpose of this article is, first, to present the evidence supporting OSA as an independent stroke risk factor in national SPG with mandatory recommendations and, second, to engage neuroscience nurses to incorporate OSA assessment and interventions into the nursing process and thereby promote excellence in stroke/TIA patient care. A systematic literature search was conducted in Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed to identify research from 2003 through 2013 on the independent risk, mortality, and prevalence relationship between OSA and stroke/TIA including recurrence and recovery outcomes with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Twenty-eight research articles were reviewed: 14 observational cohorts, five case-control studies, four cross-sectional studies, and four randomized control trials representing 12 countries and 10,671 subjects. OSA is highly prevalent in patients with stroke/TIA independently increasing stroke risk. CPAP studies revealed reduced stroke recurrence and improved recovery with feasible initiation in stroke units. Patients with stroke/TIA have less OSA-associated daytime sleepiness and obesity, making the usual screening tools insufficient and CPAP adherence challenging. Treating OSA decreases stroke prevalence and mortality. OSA initiatives empower neuroscience nurses to integrate this OSA evidence into clinical practice and improve stroke/TIA patient outcomes.

  2. Trends in vascular risk factors, stroke performance measures, and outcomes in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke in Taiwan between 2000 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Wu, Darren Philbert; Sung, Sheng-Feng

    2017-07-15

    With the aging of the population in Taiwan, the financial burden of stroke on the healthcare system is expected to rise. We aimed to investigate the trends in vascular risk factors, adherence to stroke performance measures, and stroke outcomes based on a nationwide representative sample. Adult patients hospitalized for first-ever ischemic stroke between 2000 and 2012 were identified from a nationwide administrative database. The study period was divided into 1-year intervals. The Cuzick test and the Cochran-Armitage test were used to determine the significance of changes over time. Trends in stroke outcomes as a function of year were assessed using logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, comorbidity, and stroke severity. A total of 11,462 patients (mean age 67.3years, female 40.9%) were hospitalized. Between 2000 and 2012, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and atrial fibrillation increased while the prevalence of coronary artery disease decreased. The proportion of patients taking antihypertensive or antidiabetic medication prior to stroke decreased, whereas the proportion of patients taking lipid lowering medication increased. Adherence to the five selected performance measures significantly improved. A significant decreasing trend in the proportion of recurrent stroke or all-cause death within one year was observed regardless of whether adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, and stroke severity was made. Despite the rising prevalence of vascular risk factors, improved adherence to stroke performance measures was accompanied by better stroke outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipoprotein (a) as a risk factor for ischemic stroke: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Alexander H; Lange, Kristin S; Leonards, Christopher O; Siegerink, Bob; Doehner, Wolfram; Landmesser, Ulf; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Endres, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] harbors atherogenic potential but its role as a risk factor for ischemic stroke remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the relative strength of the association between Lp(a) and ischemic stroke and identify potential subgroup-specific risk differences. A systematic search using the MeSH terms "lipoproteins" OR "lipoprotein a" AND "stroke" was performed in PubMed and ScienceDirect for case-control studies from June 2006 and prospective cohort studies from April 2009 until December 20th 2014. Data from eligible papers published before these dates were reviewed and extracted from previous meta-analyses. Studies that assessed the relationship between Lp(a) levels and ischemic stroke and reported generic data-i.e. odds ratio [OR], hazard ratio, or risk ratio [RR]-were eligible for inclusion. Studies that not distinguish between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and transient ischemic attack were excluded. Random effects meta-analyses with mixed-effects meta-regression were performed by pooling adjusted OR or RR. A total of 20 articles comprising 90,904 subjects and 5029 stroke events were eligible for the meta-analysis. Comparing high with low Lp(a) levels, the pooled estimated OR was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.26-1.57) for case-control studies (n = 11) and the pooled estimated RR was 1.29 (95% CI, 1.06-1.58) for prospective studies (n = 9). Sex-specific differences in RR were inconsistent between case-control and prospective studies. Study populations with a mean age of ≤55 years had an increased RR compared to older study populations. Reported Lp(a) contrast levels and ischemic stroke subtype significantly contributed to the heterogeneity observed in the analyses. Elevated Lp(a) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke and may be especially relevant for young stroke patients. Sex-specific risk differences remain conflicting. Further studies in these subgroups may be warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  4. Risk factors for ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke in 22 countries (the INTERSTROKE study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Xavier, Denis; Liu, Lisheng

    2010-01-01

    an alternate definition of hypertension was used (history of hypertension or blood pressure >160/90 mm Hg), the combined PAR was 90.3% (85.3-93.7) for all stroke. These risk factors were all significant for ischaemic stroke, whereas hypertension, smoking, waist-to-hip ratio, diet, and alcohol intake were...... for all stroke were: history of hypertension (OR 2.64, 99% CI 2.26-3.08; PAR 34.6%, 99% CI 30.4-39.1); current smoking (2.09, 1.75-2.51; 18.9%, 15.3-23.1); waist-to-hip ratio (1.65, 1.36-1.99 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26.5%, 18.8-36.0); diet risk score (1.35, 1.11-1.64 for highest vs lowest tertile...

  5. Vascular risk factors aggravate cognitive impairment in first-ever young ischaemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D; Ren, S; Zhang, J; Sun, D

    2016-05-01

    Young ischaemic stroke patients often suffer from cognitive impairment after stroke. However, the risk factors of cognitive impairment are still unclear. This study examined the impact of vascular risk factors (VRFs) on cognitive impairment in first-ever young ischaemic stroke patients. Subjects were divided into low (0-1 VRF, n = 27), medium (2-3 VRFs, n = 45) and high-risk (≥4 VRFs, n = 12) groups according to their number of VRFs. The following VRFs were collected: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, atrial fibrillation, obesity, smoking, excess alcohol consumption, coronary heart disease and hyperhomocysteinaemia. A battery of cognitive assessments was executed 2 weeks after stroke. Differences of cognitive performances between groups were compared. The correlation between VRFs and cognitive function was investigated with an emphasis on discovering the main VRFs. Eighty-four patients were enrolled in this study eventually. Compared with the low-risk group, the high-risk group had significantly worse performance in most of the cognitive domains. VRFs had a correlation with general cognition, executive function, attention and verbal fluency. After adjusting the covariates, VRFs showed a linear correlation with global cognitive function (R = 0.640, P = 0.000), verbal fluency (R = 0.372, P = 0.000), delayed memory (R = 0.327, P = 0.002), visual attention (R = 0.290, P = 0.007) and executive function (R = 0.266, P = 0.015). Amongst all the VRFs, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking and hyperhomocysteinaemia were the main influencing VRFs. Vascular risk factors aggravate cognitive impairment after young ischaemic stroke. Effective management of VRFs in young adults is urgent and this may reduce the cognitive impairment. © 2016 EAN.

  6. Venous thromboses and thromboembolism in acute stroke: risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke patients among all patients with somatic diseases are at one of the highest risks for venous thromboembolism (VTE. The proven risk factors for venous thrombosis in stroke are prolonged immobilization, elderly age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and inherited coagulopathies. If no drug prevention is done, the course of stroke is complicated by deep vein thrombosis (DVT in 75% of the immobilized patients and pulmonary thromboembolism develops in 20%. At present there are mechanical, pharmacological, and combined DVT prevention strategies that may considerably lower the rate of pulmonary embolism. In stroke patients, the use of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH reduces therisk of DVT, without increasing the risk of hemorrhagic complications. Novel oral anticoagulants used to treat venous thrombosis and VTE in stroke patients are an equivalent alternative to LMWH therapy. Treatment with novel oral anticoagulants to prevent recurrent VTE is effective and safe and may be continued up to 1–2 years.

  7. Interventions for improving modifiable risk factor control in the secondary prevention of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Kate E; Mistri, Amit K; Khunti, Kamlesh; Haunton, Victoria J; Sett, Aung K; Wilson, Andrew D

    2014-05-02

    People with stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk of future stroke and other cardiovascular events. Evidence-based strategies for secondary stroke prevention have been established. However, the implementation of prevention strategies could be improved. To assess the effects of stroke service interventions for implementing secondary stroke prevention strategies on modifiable risk factor control, including patient adherence to prescribed medications, and the occurrence of secondary cardiovascular events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (April 2013), the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Trials Register (April 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to April 2013), EMBASE (1981 to April 2013) and 10 additional databases. We located further studies by searching reference lists of articles and contacting authors of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of organisational or educational and behavioural interventions (compared with usual care) on modifiable risk factor control for secondary stroke prevention. Two review authors selected studies for inclusion and independently extracted data. One review author assessed the risk of bias for the included studies. We sought missing data from trialists. This review included 26 studies involving 8021 participants. Overall the studies were of reasonable quality, but one study was considered at high risk of bias. Fifteen studies evaluated predominantly organisational interventions and 11 studies evaluated educational and behavioural interventions for patients. Results were pooled where appropriate, although some clinical and methodological heterogeneity was present. The estimated effects of organisational interventions were compatible with improvements and no differences in the modifiable risk factors mean systolic blood pressure (mean difference (MD) -2.57 mmHg; 95% confidence

  8. Prevalence of risk factors for the occurrence of strokes in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane de Souza Pinho Costa

    Full Text Available Introduction Stroke (CVA is a multifactorial disease, where the combination of risk factors may be associated with and contribute to its development. Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of risk factors for stroke in the physically independent elderly in the city of Londrina, Brazil. Materials and methods This study was composed of the elderly individuals participating in the EELO project (Age and Ageing Study, Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil. In order to identify the risk factors for stroke, one used a structured questionnaire with information about socio-demographic and anthropometric data as well as lifestyle variables, such as physical inactivity and smoking, presence of comorbidities, and laboratory tests for diagnosis of diabetes and dyslipidemia. Results The study included 454 elderly with mean age of 69.7 years. There was a significant relationship between the number of risk factors and gender (p = 0.01, with higher prevalence among women. In separate analysis, the elderly between 60 and 69 years had a higher incidence of obesity (p = 0.03 and dyslipidemia (p = 0.04. Regarding gender, obesity (p = 0.01, smoking (p = 0.0001, vascular disease (p = 0.0001 and heart disease in the family (p = 0.01 higher incidence was shown in females, according toChi Square’s test. Conclusions It is concluded that elderly people aged less than 70 years and older women were those with the highest number of risk factors for CVA. Therefore, it may be suggested the development of primary care programs in order to promote information on the prevention of these risk factors and thus reduce the occurrence of stroke.

  9. Risk factors associated with injury attributable to falling among elderly population with history of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divani, Afshin A; Vazquez, Gabriela; Barrett, Anna M; Asadollahi, Marjan; Luft, Andreas R

    2009-10-01

    Stroke survivors are at high risk for falling. Identifying physical, clinical, and social factors that predispose stroke patients to falls may reduce further disability and life-threatening complications, and improve overall quality of life. We used 5 biennial waves (1998-2006) from the Health and Retirement Study to assess risk factors associated with falling accidents and fall-related injuries among stroke survivors. We abstracted demographic data, living status, self-evaluated general health, and comorbid conditions. We analyzed the rate ratio (RR) of falling and the OR of injury within 2 follow-up years using a multivariate random effects model. We identified 1174 stroke survivors (mean age+/-SD, 74.4+/-7.2 years; 53% female). The 2-year risks of falling, subsequent injury, and broken hip attributable to fall were 46%, 15%, and 2.1% among the subjects, respectively. Factors associated with an increased frequency of falling were living with spouse as compared to living alone (RR, 1.4), poor general health (RR, 1.1), time from first stroke (RR, 1.2), psychiatric problems (RR, 1.7), urinary incontinence (RR, 1.4), pain (RR, 1.4), motor impairment (RR, 1.2), and past frequency of > or = 3 falls (RR, 1.3). Risk factors associated with fall-related injury were female gender (OR, 1.5), poor general health (OR, 1.2), past injury from fall (OR, 3.2), past frequency of > or = 3 falls (OR, 3.1), psychiatric problems (OR, 1.4), urinary incontinence (OR, 1.4), impaired hearing (OR, 1.6), pain (OR, 1.8), motor impairment (OR, 1.3), and presence of multiple strokes (OR, 3.2). This study demonstrates the high prevalence of falls and fall-related injuries in stroke survivors, and identifies factors that increase the risk. Modifying these factors may prevent falls, which could lead to improved quality of life and less caregiver burden and cost in this population.

  10. Risk Factors For Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, or Death Following Carotid Endarterectomy: Results From the International Carotid Stenting Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doig, D.; Turner, E. L.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R. L.; de Borst, G. J.; Stansby, G.; Beard, J. D.; Engelter, S. T.; Richards, T.; Brown, M. M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J. F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M. F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L. H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A.; Roos, Y. B.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J.; Bruijninckx, C. M.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S.; van Hasselt, B. A.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C.; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J.; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Kort, G. A.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, J.; Gaibar, A. G.; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T. B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E. W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nahser, H. C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is standard treatment for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis but carries a risk of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), or death. This study investigated risk factors for these procedural complications occurring within 30 days of endarterectomy in the

  11. An exploratory cohort study of sensory extinction in acute stroke: prevalence, risk factors, and time course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtchum-Tatuene, Joseph; Allali, Gilles; Saj, Arnaud; Bernati, Thérèse; Sztajzel, Roman; Pollak, Pierre; Momjian-Mayor, Isabelle; Kleinschmidt, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Most studies on sensory extinction have focused on selected patients with subacute and chronic right hemisphere lesions. In studies conducted on acute stroke patients, risk factors and time course were not evaluated. Our aim was to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and time course of sensory extinction in the acute stroke setting. Consecutive patients with acute stroke were tested for tactile, visual, auditory, and auditory-tactile cross-modal extinction, as well as for peripersonal visuospatial neglect (PVN). Tests were repeated at 2, 7, 15, 30, and 90 days after initial examination. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association between sensory extinction and demographic and clinical risk factors. Seventy-three patients (38.4% women) were recruited: 64 with ischemic stroke and nine with haemorrhagic stroke. Mean age was 62.3 years (95% CI 58.8-65.7), mean NIHSS score was 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.1), and mean time to first examination was 4.1 days (95% CI 3.5-4.8). The overall prevalence of all subtypes of sensory extinction was 13.7% (95% CI 6.8-23.8). Tactile extinction was the most frequent subtype with a prevalence of 8.2% (95% CI 3.1-17.0). No extinction was found beyond 15 days after the first examination. After adjustment for age, sex, lesion side, type of stroke, time to first examination and stroke severity, a lesion volume ≥2 mL (adjusted OR = 38.88, p = 0.04), and presence of PVN (adjusted OR = 24.27, p = 0.04) were independent predictors of sensory extinction. The insula, the putamen, and the pallidum were the brain regions most frequently involved in patients with sensory extinction. Extinction is a rare and transient phenomenon in patients with minor stroke. The presence of PVN and lesion volume ≥2 mL are independent predictors of sensory extinction in acute stroke.

  12. Ischemic stroke risk factors during Greek economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Fiolaki, Aidonio; Markou, Sofia; Markoula, Sofia; Kosmidou, Maria; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2016-02-01

    The impact of Greece's economic crisis on healthcare is of great concern. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of economic crisis on the prevention of cerebral ischemic events. Retrospective analysis of patients with ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) admitted to a tertiary neurological department in northwestern Greece during the period 2008-2014. Using 2011 as the transitional year IS/TIA patients were dichotomized according to their admission date in two subgroups: the "before economic crisis" subgroup and the "after economic crisis" subgroup. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictor variables of statin/antihypertensive pretreatment. Patients admitted after the economic crisis outbreak (mean age: 57.6 ± 13.5 years) were found to have lower waist periphery measurements (p = 0.001), lower incidence of diabetes (p = 0.028), hyperlipidemia (p = 0.002) and metabolic syndrome(p period before the crisis, (OR = 0.58, 95%CI: 0.34-0.95, p = 0.032), this association did not retain statistical significance in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR = 1.69, 95%CI = 0.83-3.42, p = 0.143). Our study supports that at present financial crisis has not significantly affected the prevention of cerebrovascular events in the citizens of a provincial city area. Data from other regions and time-periods are needed for the final verdict. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Racial disparities in knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Rafferty, Ann P; Reeves, Mathew J; Zackery, Shannon; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Anderson, Beth

    2009-01-01

    To describe the level of knowledge regarding risk factors and warning signs for stroke and heart attack among White and African American adults in Michigan and to quantify racial disparities. Knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs was assessed by using data from the 2004 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Prevalence estimates of knowledge were generated, and statistical differences in knowledge between Whites and African Americans were assessed. Adequate knowledge was defined as knowing 3 correct warning signs or risk factors. Logistic regression models were used to quantify the racial disparity in knowledge while controlling for potential confounding. Whites had substantially higher levels of adequate knowledge of risk factors (stroke: 31.6% vs 13.8%; heart attack: 52.6% vs 24.3%) and warning signs (stroke: 30.0% vs 17.2%; heart attack: 29.3% vs 13.8%) compared with African Americans (all observed differences were significant at P heart attack: AOR 3.4) and warning signs (stroke: AOR 2.0; heart attack: AOR 2.4) were significantly higher for Whites than for African Americans. A strong racial disparity in the knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs exists among Michigan adults. Communitywide public education programs in conjunction with targeted interventions for at-risk populations are necessary to produce meaningful improvements in the awareness of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

  14. Dominant modifiable risk factors for stroke in Ghana and Nigeria (SIREN: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayowa O Owolabi, ProfDrMed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence, prevalence, and fatality from stroke globally. Yet, only little information about context-specific risk factors for prioritising interventions to reduce the stroke burden in sub-Saharan Africa is available. We aimed to identify and characterise the effect of the top modifiable risk factors for stroke in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: The Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network (SIREN study is a multicentre, case-control study done at 15 sites in Nigeria and Ghana. Cases were adults (aged ≥18 years with stroke confirmed by CT or MRI. Controls were age-matched and gender-matched stroke-free adults (aged ≥18 years recruited from the communities in catchment areas of cases. Comprehensive assessment for vascular, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors was done using standard instruments. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs and population-attributable risks (PARs with 95% CIs. Findings: Between Aug 28, 2014, and June 15, 2017, we enrolled 2118 case-control pairs (1192 [56%] men with mean ages of 59·0 years (SD 13·8 for cases and 57·8 years (13·7 for controls. 1430 (68% had ischaemic stoke, 682 (32% had haemorrhagic stroke, and six (<1% had discrete ischaemic and haemorrhagic lesions. 98·2% (95% CI 97·2–99·0 of adjusted PAR of stroke was associated with 11 potentially modifiable risk factors with ORs and PARs in descending order of PAR of 19·36 (95% CI 12·11–30·93 and 90·8% (95% CI 87·9–93·7 for hypertension, 1·85 (1·44–2·38 and 35·8% (25·3–46·2 for dyslipidaemia, 1·59 (1·19–2·13 and 31·1% (13·3–48·9 for regular meat consumption, 1·48 (1·13–1·94 and 26·5% (12·9–40·2 for elevated waist-to-hip ratio, 2·58 (1·98–3·37 and 22·1% (17·8–26·4 for diabetes, 2·43 (1·81–3·26 and 18·2% (14·1–22·3 for low green leafy vegetable consumption, 1·89 (1·40–2·54 and 11·6% (6·6–16·7

  15. Impact of preventable risk factors on stroke in the EPICOR study: does gender matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkova, Slavica; d'Errico, Angelo; Ricceri, Fulvio; Fasanelli, Francesca; Pala, Valeria; Agnoli, Claudia; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Chiodini, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    The effect of modifiable stroke risk factors in terms of prevented cases remains unclear due to sex-specific disease rate and risk factors prevalence. Our aim was to estimate their impact on stroke by gender through population-attributable fraction (PAF), preventive fraction (PF) and their combination in EPIC-Italian cohort. 43,976 participants, age 34-75, and free of cardiovascular disease at baseline (1993-1998) were followed up for almost 11 years. Adjusted hazard ratios and PAF were estimated using Cox models. We identified 386 cases. In males, the burden for stroke was 17% (95% CI 4-28%) for smoking and 14% (95% CI 5-22%) for alcohol consumption. In females, hypertension was carrying the biggest burden with 18% (95% CI 9-26%) followed by smoking 15% (95% CI 7-22%). Their combination was 46% (95% CI 32-58%) in males and 48% (95% CI 35-59%) in females. PF for current smokers was gender unequal [males 21% (95% CI 15-27%) females 9% (95% CI 1-17%)]. Half of strokes are attributable to potentially modifiable factors. The proportion of prevented cases is gender unbalanced, encouraging sex-specific intervention.

  16. Tooth loss and stroke: results from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance

    2014-10-01

    Strokes are common events of significant morbidity and mortality. Poor oral conditions may share or exacerbate pathways that lead to stroke. This study was a cross-sectional study of 410,939 participants from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Stroke was defined as the participant's response (yes/no) to the survey's question, "Has a doctor, nurse or other health professional ever told you that you had a stroke?" The definition for tooth loss was based upon participant's response to the survey's question, "How many of your permanent teeth have been removed because of tooth decay or gum disease?" Descriptive, Chi Square and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Other variables that are known etiologic factors were also included in the analysis. The participants with increasing numbers of teeth lost had increasing adjusted odds ratios for stroke independent of the other factors. In adjusted logistic regression analysis, the participants who had 1 to 5 missing teeth had an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 1.29 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.17, 1.42), participants who had 6 or more, but not all missing teeth had an AOR of 1.68 (95% CI: 1.50, 1.88), and participants who were edentulous had an AOR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.63, 2.11). Evidence from this cross-sectional study indicates that tooth loss had a potential, although weak positive association as an independent factor in multivariable analysis with stroke. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  17. Comparison of Risk Factor Control in the Year After Discharge for Ischemic Stroke Versus Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravata, Dawn M; Daggy, Joanne; Brosch, Jared; Sico, Jason J; Baye, Fitsum; Myers, Laura J; Roumie, Christianne L; Cheng, Eric; Coffing, Jessica; Arling, Greg

    2018-02-01

    The Veterans Health Administration has engaged in quality improvement to improve vascular risk factor control. We sought to examine blood pressure (stroke or acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We identified patients who were hospitalized (fiscal year 2011) with ischemic stroke, AMI, congestive heart failure, transient ischemic attack, or pneumonia/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The primary analysis compared risk factor control after incident ischemic stroke versus AMI. Facilities were included if they cared for ≥25 ischemic stroke and ≥25 AMI patients. A generalized linear mixed model including patient- and facility-level covariates compared risk factor control across diagnoses. Forty thousand two hundred thirty patients were hospitalized (n=75 facilities): 2127 with incident ischemic stroke and 4169 with incident AMI. Fewer stroke patients achieved blood pressure control than AMI patients (64%; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.67 versus 77%; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.78; P stroke patients (odds ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.51). There were no statistical differences for AMI versus stroke patients in hyperlipidemia ( P =0.534). Among patients with diabetes mellitus, the odds of glycemic control were lower for AMI than ischemic stroke patients (odds ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.96). Given that hypertension control is a cornerstone of stroke prevention, interventions to improve poststroke hypertension management are needed. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies as risk factors for stroke in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Amal Y.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Tjan, G. T.

    2006-01-01

    To explore the role of and report congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies as risk factors for stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children. Children with stroke were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology (Dpn), or were seen as inpatients in the Pediatric Wards at King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Stroke work-up for each suspected case included hemostatic assays, serological, biochemical and neurophysiological tests. Neuroimaging modalities included routine skill x-rays, CT, MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and conventional cerebral angiography. Of 104 children with stroke, congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying risk factor in 7 (6.7%). The patients were evaluated at the DPN at a mean age of 66 months (range = 8 months to 11 years, median = 6 years); and they had stroke at a mean age of 48 months (range = 2 months to 10 years, median = 8 months). Four patients had stroke in association with neurocutaneous syndromes. Two had Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), one had Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome associated with SWS, and the fourth had neurofibromatosis type 1. Two patients had intracranial hemorrhage secondary to ruptured aneurysm. A girl (aged 9 years and 4 months) had left posterior cerebral artery aneurysm. She was diagnosed to have autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease following renal ultrasonography. She died 5 months later despite surgical intervention (clipping of aneurysm). The second child was an 8-months-old boy who presented with subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) following ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. He recovered with no residual symptoms following successful clipping of the aneurysm. Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) caused IVH in a 7-year-old boy who reported to hospital 5 hours

  19. Control of main risk factors after ischaemic stroke across Europe: data from the stroke-specific module of the EUROASPIRE III survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuschmann, Peter U; Kircher, Julia; Nowe, Tim; Dittrich, Ralf; Reiner, Zeljko; Cifkova, Renata; Malojcic, Branko; Mayer, Otto; Bruthans, Jan; Wloch-Kopec, Dorota; Prugger, Christof; Heidrich, Jan; Keil, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Previous cross-sectional surveys in different European countries within the EUROASPIRE programme demonstrated a high prevalence of modifiable risk factors, unhealthy lifestyles and inadequate drug treatment in coronary heart disease patients. Comparable data for ischaemic stroke patients is lacking. A stroke-specific study module was added to the EUROASPIRE III core survey. This cross-sectional multicentre survey included consecutive patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke from four European countries. Data were obtained from medical records, patient interviews and patient examinations within 6-36 months after the stroke event. Control of modifiable risk factors after stroke was evaluated against contemporary European guidelines. A total of 881 patients was recruited. Median age was 66 years, 37.5% were female; average time from the stroke event to interview was 550 days. At the time of the interview, 17.6% of stroke patients smoked cigarettes, 35.5% had a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2), 62.4% showed elevated blood pressure and 75.7% exhibited elevated LDL cholesterol levels. Antiplatelet drugs or oral anticoagulants were used by 87.2%, antihypertensive medication by 84.4% and statins by 56.8% of stroke patients. Among patients using antihypertensive drugs and lipid-lowering medication at the time of the interview, 34.3% and 34.4%, respectively, achieved target blood pressure and total cholesterol values according to current European guidelines. The EUROASPIRE III stroke-specific module shows that secondary prevention and risk factor control in patients after ischaemic stroke need to be improved in four European centres at the time of the study since about half of patients are not achieving risk factor targets defined in European guidelines. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  20. Cardiac diseases as a risk factor for stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah; Ahmed, A.; Kentab, Amal Y.; A-Jarallah, Abdullah S.; Al-Saadi, Muslim M.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective was to ascertain the role of cardiac diseases as a risk factor for stroke in a cohort of Saudi children who were evaluated in a retrospective and prospective study. Children with cardiac diseases were identified from within a cohort of 104 Saudi children who presented with stroke. They were seen as inpatients in the Pediatric Wards or evaluated at the Outpatient Clinics of the Division of Pediatric Neurology (DPN), and the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). A comprehensive form for clinical, neuroimaging, neurophysiological and laboratory data retrieval was designed and completed for each patient. Cardiac evaluation included 12-lead ECG and serial echocardiograms. Cardiac catheterization and 24-hour ambulatory ECG (Holter) were conducted on clinical discretion. Cardiac diseases were the underlying risk factor for stroke in 6 (5.8%) of the 104 children (aged one month to 12 years). The patients (4males and 2 females) were evaluated at the DPN at a mean age of 5.3 years (range=1-8 years; median 6.5 years). Onset of stroke was at a mean age of 34 months (range= 4 months - 8 years; median = 30 months). Five patients had stroke in association with congenital heart disease (CHD), whereas the sixth had restrictive cardiomyopathy. The identified CHD consisted of membranous ventricular septal defect in a 5-year-old boy who had moyamoya syndrome and sickle cell b-thalassemia, asymptomatic patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in a 17-months-old girl, atrioventricular canal defect and PDA in an 8-year-old boy who also had Down syndrome, partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage in a one-year-old boy. The latter patient developed hemiparesis secondary to a septic embolus, which evolved into brain abscess involving the right fronto-preital region. This was successfully managed surgically

  1. Infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system as risk factors for stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Abdel-Gader, Mohamed O.; Gadelrab, Mohamed O.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective was to report on the role of infectious and inflammatory disorders as risk factors for stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children. Children, who presented with stroke, were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Investigations for suspected cases included haemostatic assays, microbiological and serological tests. Neuroimaging included cranial CT, MRI magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scan. Of the 104 Saudi children with stroke, seen during the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory systems were identified risk factors in 18 (17.3%). Five children had stroke following acute bacterial meningitis at ages ranging between 5-21 months. The causative organism was identified in 3 of them and consisted of Haemophilus influenza (in a 5-months-old girl), Streptococcus pneumonia (in a 21-months-old girl complicated by subdural empyema and sinovenous thrombosis), and Staphylococcus aureus in a 6-months-old boy who had an underlying chronic granulomatous disease. Unspecified meningitis/meningoencephalitis affected 4 patients, whereas 3 children had an underlying congenital infection as a cause for their stroke. Two of the latter 3 children were diagnosed to have congenital toxoplasmosis, and the third had congenital rubella syndrome. Two girls had stroke following septicemia at ages of one and 2 months. Neurobrucellosis caused stroke in 2 boys at the ages of 4 1/2 and 4 years. In both patients, neuroimaging revealed lacunar and other infects involving mainly the deep cerebral nuclei, secondary to occlusion of small penetrating end

  2. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  3. Socioeconomic status and stroke incidence in the US elderly: the role of risk factors in the EPESE study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano, Mauricio; Kawachi, Ichiro; Lenthe, Frank J van; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Mackenbach, Johan P; Bos, G A M van den; Fay, Martha E; Berkman, Lisa F

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study assesses the effect of socioeconomic status on stroke incidence in the elderly, and the contribution of risk factors to stroke disparities. METHODS: Data comprised a sample of 2812 men and women aged 65 years and over from the New Haven cohort of the Established

  4. Socioeconomic status and stroke incidence in the US elderly: the role of risk factors in the EPESE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano, Mauricio; Kawachi, Ichiro; van Lenthe, Frank; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; van den Bos, G. A. M.; Fay, Martha E.; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study assesses the effect of socioeconomic status on stroke incidence in the elderly, and the contribution of risk factors to stroke disparities. METHODS: Data comprised a sample of 2812 men and women aged 65 years and over from the New Haven cohort of the Established

  5. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, A.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Benn, M.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials FLG mutations cause atopic dermatitis, previously found to be associated with ischemic stroke. Association between FLG mutations and ischemic stroke was examined in 97 174 Danish individuals. FLG mutations were associated with increased ischemic stroke risk in the general population....... The association was most pronounced in younger individuals, and in current and former smokers. Summary: Background Heritability studies have shown a considerable genetic component to ischemic stroke risk; however, much is unknown as to which genes are responsible. Also, previous studies have found an association...... between atopic dermatitis and increased ischemic stroke risk. Objective To test the hypothesis that FLG loss-of-function mutations, known to be associated with atopic dermatitis, were also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 97 174 individuals, with 3597 cases of ischemic stroke, from...

  6. Pre-hospital Delay after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Central Urban China: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfeng; Yang, Tingting; Gong, Yanhong; Li, Wenzhen; Chen, Yawen; Li, Jing; Wang, Mengdie; Yin, Xiaoxv; Hu, Bo; Lu, Zuxun

    2017-05-01

    Timely thrombolytic treatment is paramount after acute ischemic stroke (AIS); however, a large proportion of patients experience substantial delays in presentation to hospital. This study evaluates the prevalence and risk factors in pre-hospital delays after AIS in central urban China. AIS patients from 66 hospitals in 13 major cities across Hubei Province, between October 1, 2014 and January 31, 2015 were interviewed and their medical records were reviewed to identify those who suffered pre-hospital delays. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were undertaken to determine the prevalence rates and the risk factors associated with pre-hospital delays. A total of 1835 patients were included in the analysis, with 69.3 % patients reportedly arrived at hospital 3 or more hours after onset and 55.3 % patients arrived 6 or more hours after onset. Factors associated with increased pre-hospital delays for 3 or more hours were as follows: patient had a history of stroke (odds ratio (OR), 1.319, P = 0.028), onset location was at home (OR, 1.573, P = 0.002), and patients rather than someone else noticed the symptom onset first (OR, 1.711; P pre-hospital delays. These findings indicate that pre-hospital delays after AIS are common in urban central China, and future intervention programs should be focused on public awareness of stroke and appropriate response.

  7. Traditional risk factors as the underlying cause of racial disparities in stroke: lessons from the half full (empty?) glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; Cushman, Mary; Kissela, Brett M.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; McClure, Leslie A.; Safford, Monika M.; Rhodes, J. David; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Moy, Claudia S.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Howard, Virginia J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Black/white disparities in stroke incidence are well-documented, but few studies have assessed the contributions to the disparity. Here we assess the contribution of “traditional” risk factors. Methods 25,714 black and white men and women, aged 45+ and stroke-free at baseline were followed for an average of 4.4 years to detect stroke. Mediation analysis employing proportional hazards analysis assessed the contribution of “traditional” risk factors to racial disparities. Results At age 45, incident stroke risk was 2.90 (95% CI: 1.72 – 4.89) times more likely in blacks than whites, and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.34 – 2.07) times at age 65. Adjustment for risk factors attenuated these excesses by 40% and 45%, respectively, resulting in relative risks of 2.14 (95% CI: 1.25 – 3.67) and 1.35 (95% CI: 1.08 – 1.71). Approximately one-half of this mediation is attributable to systolic blood pressure. Further adjustment for socioeconomic factors resulted in total mediation of 47% and 53% to relative risks of 2.01 (95% CI: 1.16 – 3.47) and 1.30 (1.03 – 1.65) respectively. Conclusions Between ages 45 to 65 years, approximately half of the racial disparity in stroke risk is attributable to traditional risk factors (primarily systolic blood pressure) and socioeconomic factors, suggesting a critical need to understand the disparity in the development of these traditional risk factors. Because half of the excess stroke risk in blacks is not attributable to traditional risk factors and socioeconomic factors, differential racial susceptibility to risk factors, residual confounding or non-traditional risk factors may also play a role. PMID:21960581

  8. Emerging Risk Factors for Recurrent Vascular Events in Patients With Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuji; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Kuroki, Takuma; Hira, Kenichiro; Kurita, Naohide; Urabe, Takao; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-11-01

    Underlying embolic causes diagnosed by transesophageal echocardiography could be implicated in mechanisms of embolic stroke of undetermined source. We aimed to explore factors, including underlying embolic causes, related to recurrent vascular events in embolic stroke of undetermined source. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for embolic stroke of undetermined source and whose potential embolic sources were examined by transesophageal echocardiography were included. Recurrent vascular events, including ischemic stroke, cardiovascular and peripheral artery diseases, and vascular death, were retrospectively analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to explore factors, including clinical characteristics, embolic causes on transesophageal echocardiography, and the Calcification in the Aortic Arch, Age, Multiple Infarction score (CAM), based on the degree of aortic arch calcification on chest radiograph (0-3 points), age (≥70 years; 1 point), and multiple infarctions on magnetic resonance imaging (multiple infarcts in 1, 2, or ≥3 territories of large intracranial arteries, 1, 2, or 3 points) associated with recurrent vascular events. A total of 177 patients (age, 64.1±14.2 years; 127 men) were enrolled. Thirty-one patients had recurrent vascular events (follow-up, 3.5±2.7 years; annualized rate, 5.0% per person-year). Among embolic causes on transesophageal echocardiography, incidence of recurrent vascular events was high in patients with large aortic arch plaques (7.5% per person-year). Diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio, 2.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-5.32; P=0.012) and CAM score grade (hazard ratio, 2.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-4.72; P=0.026) predicted recurrent vascular events. History of diabetes mellitus and the CAM score could be novel risk factors for recurrent vascular events in embolic stroke of undetermined source. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Age dependence of risk factors for stroke and death in young patients with atrial fibrillation: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgaard, Line; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Skjøth, Flemming; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    2014-05-01

    The risk of stroke and death in patients with atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with age and concomitant comorbidities. The aim of this study was to examine the age dependence of risk factors for stroke and mortality in young patients with atrial fibrillation. This study is a population-based cohort study of 30- to 65-year-old patients with atrial fibrillation and diagnosed during 2000 to 2011, identified by record linkage between nationwide Danish registries. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risk of stroke and mortality according to risk factors within age groups: 30 to 50, 50 to 65, and 65 to 75 years. We identified 73,799 nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients, of which 37,782 (51.2%) were stroke (doubled), vascular disease, age 65-74 and sex category (female) score (CHA2DS2-VASc score) was associated with decreased survival probability in all age groups. The overall incidence of stroke per year for 1 year (5 years) follow-up was 1.2% (0.6%), 3.5% (1.6%), and 5.6% (2.8%), respectively, for the age groups of 30 to 50, 50 to 65, and 65 to 75. Overall, risk factors such as previous stroke, heart failure, vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension remained independent predictors of stroke and death in patientsrisk factors apply.

  10. Zinc Serum Level Can Be a Risk Factor In Babol Stroke Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alijan AhmadiAhangar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. The role of zinc as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of stroke was considered. Results: This cross-sectional study on 100 stroke patients in Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital and 100 control group from cohort master plan "Ageing and health projects Amirkola was conducted. Zinc levels Serum simultaneously with other blood tests in the early hours of hospitalization. Zinc serum level was defined 70 to 120 micrograms per deciliter. Findings: The difference in mean of zinc level in patients and control group was not significant (102.6±47.7 in control group vs 100.9±35.8 in patient, p=0.7. Difference in zinc Serum level had statically significant with IHD (under70 0 cases (0, 70 to120 8 cases (24, 120 and upper24 cases (75, p=0.003 and with type of stroke (under70 (3(3.3 hemorrhagic vs 0(0 ischemic, 70 to 120(19(21 vs6 (60, 120 and upper68 (75.6 vs4 (40, p=0.025 and also with patient and control group (under70 (3(3 in patient's vs 20(20 control group, 70 to 120(25(25 vs54 (54, 120 and upper72 (72 vs26 (26, p<0001. In patients group 72(73.5 of cases had zinc serum level above 120. HLP difference was significant in patient and control group (50(50 in control group vs 35(35 in patients, p=0.04. Regression logistic show that IHD (p<0001, OR=30, CI=6-152, HLP (p<0001, OR=4, CI=9.09-1.85, zinc serum level (p<0001, OR=15.5, CI=4-59.8 had significant role. Conclusions: Zinc serum levels, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hyperlipidemia were most risk factor that play role in Babol stroke patients.

  11. Effectiveness of an Intervention to Improve Risk Factor Knowledge in Patients With Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaiya, Muideen T; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Kim, Joosup; Ung, David; Nelson, Mark R; Srikanth, Velandai K; Bladin, Christopher F; Gerraty, Richard P; Fitzgerald, Sharyn M; Phan, Thanh; Frayne, Judith; Thrift, Amanda G

    2017-04-01

    Despite the benefit of risk awareness in secondary prevention, survivors of stroke are often unaware of their risk factors. We determined whether a nurse-led intervention improved knowledge of risk factors in people with stroke or transient ischemic attack. Prospective study nested within a randomized controlled trial of risk factor management in survivors of stroke or transient ischemic attack. 3 nurse education visits and specialist review of care plans. unprompted knowledge of risk factors of stroke or transient ischemic attack at 24 months. Effect of intervention on knowledge and factors associated with knowledge were determined using multivariable regression models. Knowledge was assessed in 268 consecutive participants from the main trial, 128 in usual care and 140 in the intervention. Overall, 34% of participants were unable to name any risk factor. In adjusted analyses, the intervention group had better overall knowledge than controls (incidence risk ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.58). Greater functional ability and polypharmacy were associated with better knowledge and older age and having more comorbidities associated with poorer knowledge. Overall knowledge of risk factors of stroke or transient ischemic attack was better in the intervention group than controls. However, knowledge was generally poor. New and more effective strategies are required, especially in subgroups identified as having poor knowledge. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12608000166370. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Incidence of Depression After Stroke, and Associated Risk Factors and Mortality Outcomes, in a Large Cohort of Danish Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese S. H.; Wium-Andersen, Ida K.; Wium-Andersen, Marie K.

    2016-01-01

    Importance: More than 30 million people live with a stroke diagnosis worldwide. Depression after stroke is frequent, and greater knowledge of associated risk factors and outcomes is needed to understand the etiology and implications of this disabling complication. Objectives: To examine whether......, history of depression, and stroke severity (in patients with stroke). The associations were strongest for the reference population. In both populations, depressed individuals, especially those with new onset, had increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for new-onset depression, 1.89 [95% CI, 1...

  13. Risk Factors for Poststroke Cognitive Decline: The REGARDS Study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deborah A; Wadley, Virginia G; Langa, Kenneth M; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Kabeto, Mohammed U; Giordani, Bruno; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J; Cushman, Mary; Judd, Suzanne E; Galecki, Andrzej T

    2018-04-01

    Poststroke cognitive decline causes disability. Risk factors for poststroke cognitive decline independent of survivors' prestroke cognitive trajectories are uncertain. Among 22 875 participants aged ≥45 years without baseline cognitive impairment from the REGARDS cohort (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke), enrolled from 2003 to 2007 and followed through September 2015, we measured the effect of incident stroke (n=694) on changes in cognitive functions and cognitive impairment (Six-Item Screener score <5) and tested whether patient factors modified the effect. Median follow-up was 8.2 years. Incident stroke was associated with acute declines in global cognition, new learning, verbal memory, and executive function. Acute declines in global cognition after stroke were greater in survivors who were black ( P =0.04), men ( P =0.04), and had cardioembolic ( P =0.001) or large artery stroke ( P =0.001). Acute declines in executive function after stroke were greater in survivors who had stroke was associated with faster declines in global cognition and executive function but not new learning or verbal memory compared with prestroke slopes. Faster declines in global cognition over years after stroke were greater in survivors who were older ( P <0.01), resided outside the Stroke Belt ( P =0.005), or had cardioembolic stroke ( P =0.01). Faster declines in executive function over years after stroke were greater in survivors who were older ( P <0.01) or lacked hypertension ( P =0.03). Incident stroke alters a patient's cognitive trajectory, and this effect is greater with increasing age and cardioembolic stroke. Race, sex, geography, and hypertension status may modify the risk of poststroke cognitive decline. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Risk Factors, Vascular Lesion Distribution, Outcome and Recurrence of Strokes Due to Intracranial Atherosclerosis: One Year Data from Hyderabad Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Raghu; Kaul, Subhash; Alladi, Suvarna; Afshan, Jabeen S; Prabha, T Surya; Kohat, Abhijeet; Tandra, Swetha; Rani, Jyotsna Y

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asian countries and probably in India. The aim of this study was to describe the risk factors, distribution of vascular lesions, recurrence and outcome of stroke due to ICAS. A total of 100 consecutive patients of ischemic stroke due to ICAS were enrolled prospectively from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, and followed for 1 year for treatment compliance and recurrence. The details about demographics, risk factors, and vascular lesions were noted. There were 68 males and 32 females. Hypertension (HTN), diabetes, alcohol, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia was present in 82%, 52%, 34%, 33%, 28%, and 23%, respectively. The number of arteries involved were middle cerebral artery, 53 (37.3%); posterior cerebral artery, 24 (16.9%); internal cerebral artery, 21 (14.8%); vertebral artery, 18 (12.7%); basilar artery, 6 (4.2%); and anterior cerebral artery, 6 (4.2%). Seventeen (17%) patients had a recurrent stroke during 1 year follow-up. The presence of uncontrolled HTN and diabetes mellitus after discharge were significantly associated with stroke recurrence ( P < 0.05). The use of dual antiplatelet agents and statins was found to have a significant effect in the prevention of recurrent stroke ( P < 0.05). Severe stroke at presentation and presence of hemiparesis were the predictors for unfavorable outcome at 3 months ( P < 0.05). Risk factors, distribution of vascular lesions and high recurrence of stroke due to ICAS in this study is similar to that reported from other Asian countries. Aggressive medical management and risk factor control remains the best strategy for preventing recurrence.

  15. Prothrombotic factors do not increase the risk of recurrent ischemic events after cryptogenic stroke at young age: the FUTURE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Mijntje M I; van Alebeek, Mayte E; Arntz, Renate M; Synhaeve, Nathalie E; Maaijwee, Noortje A M M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; van der Vlugt, Maureen J; van Dijk, Ewoud J; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2018-05-01

    The role of hypercoagulable states and preceding infections in the etiology of young stroke and their role in developing recurrent ischemic events remains unclear. Our aim is to determine the prevalence of these conditions in patients with cryptogenic stroke at young age and to assess the long-term risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with and without a hypercoagulable state or a recent pre-stroke infection with Borrelia or Syphilis. We prospectively included patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke, aged 18-50, admitted to our hospital between 1995 and 2010. A retrospective analysis was conducted of prothrombotic factors and preceding infections. Outcome was recurrent ischemic events. Prevalence of prothrombotic factors did not significantly differ between patients with a cryptogenic stroke and with an identified cause (24/120 (20.0%) and 32/174 (18.4%) respectively). In patients with a cryptogenic stroke the long-term risk [mean follow-up of 8.9 years (SD 4.6)] of any recurrent ischemic event or recurrent cerebral ischemia did not significantly differ between patients with and without a hypercoagulable state or a recent infection. In patients with a cryptogenic stroke 15-years cumulative risk of any recurrent ischemic event was 24 and 23% in patients with and without any prothrombotic factor respectively. The prevalence of prothrombotic factors and preceding infections did not significantly differ between stroke patients with a cryptogenic versus an identified cause of stroke and neither is significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic events after cryptogenic stroke.

  16. Relationship between risk factors and activities of daily living using modified Shah Barthel Index in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningsih, W.; Rachmayanti, S.; Werdhani, R. A.

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors of stroke. The study aimed to determine the relationship between hypertension and diabetes mellitus risk factors and dependence on assistance with activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. The study used an analytical observational cross-sectional design. The study’s sample included 44 stroke patients selected using the quota sampling method. The relationship between the variables was analyzed using the bivariate chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression. Based on the chi-squared test, the relationship between the Modified Shah Barthel Index (MSBI) score and hypertension and diabetes mellitus as stroke risk factors, were p = 0.122 and p = 0.002, respectively. The logistic regression results suggest that hypertension and diabetes mellitus are stroke risk factors related to the MSBI score: p = 0.076 (OR 4.076; CI 95% 0.861-19.297) and p = 0.007 (OR 22.690; CI 95% 2.332-220.722), respectively. Diabetes mellitus is the most prominent risk factor of severe dependency on assistance with activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients.

  17. [Drinking/smoking habits and knowledge regarding heavy drinking/ smoking as a risk factor of stroke among Japanese general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Akiko; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Okamura, Tomonori; Nakayama, Hirohumi; Morinaga, Miho; Toyota, Akihiro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Hata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2010-10-01

    We examined the knowledge regarding heavy drinking and smoking as risk factors of stroke according to drinking/smoking habits among randomly selected Japanese general population. The Japan Stroke Association and co-researchers have performed a large-scale educational intervention to improve knowledge concerning stroke from 2006 to 2008. Prior to above-mentioned intervention, we conducted mail-surveillance on knowledge about stroke in 11,306 randomly selected residents aged 40 to 74. We assessed the relationship between drinking/smoking habits and knowledge regarding heavy drinking and smoking as risk factors by using the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, area, employment, living situation, history of stroke and other stroke related diseases, history of liver disease, family history of stroke and drinking (non-drinker / ex-drinker / occasional drinker / habitual drinker) / smoking habits (non-smoker / ex-smoker / current smoker). Total 5,540 subjects (49.0%) participated in this study. Ex-smokers and current smokers had better knowledge regarding smoking as a risk factor of stroke than non-smokers (odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 1.89, 1.55-2.31, 1.76, 1.45-2.12, respectively). There was no difference between habitual drinkers and non-drinkers in their knowledge, whereas current smokers had greater knowledge regarding smoking than nonsmokers. Accordingly, it is suggested that it will be necessary for habitual drinkers to be enlightened regarding heavy drinking as a risk factor of stroke and for current smokers to be provided with information regarding not only these risks but also the specific strategies for invoking behavioral changes.

  18. Efficacy of Tai Chi and qigong for the prevention of stroke and stroke risk factors: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Peng, Wenbo; Ferguson, Caleb; Cramer, Holger; Frawley, Jane; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David

    2017-11-01

    This review aims to summarize the evidence of Tai Chi and qigong interventions for the primary prevention of stroke, including the effects on populations with major stroke risk factors. A systematic literature search was conducted on January 16, 2017 using the PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases. Randomized controlled trials examining the efficacy of Tai Chi or qigong for stroke prevention and stroke risk factors were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Twenty-one trials with n = 1604 patients with hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, overweight or obesity, or metabolic syndrome were included. No trials were found that examined the effects of Tai Chi/qigong on stroke incidence. Meta-analyses revealed significant, but not robust, benefits of Tai Chi/qigong over no interventions for hypertension (systolic blood pressure: -15.55 mm Hg (95% CI: -21.16; -9.95); diastolic blood pressure: -10.66 mm Hg (95% CI: -14.90, -6.43); the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index (-2.86%; 95% CI: -5.35, -0.38) and fasting blood glucose (-9.6 mg/dL; 95% CI: -17.28, -1.91), and for the body mass index compared with exercise controls (-1.65 kg/m; 95% CI: -3.11, -0.20). Risk of bias was unclear or high for the majority of trials and domains, and heterogeneity between trials was high. Only 6 trials adequately reported safety. No recommendation for the use of Tai Chi/qigong for the prevention of stroke can be given. Although Tai Chi and qigong show some potential more robust studies are required to provide conclusive evidence on the efficacy and safety of Tai Chi and qigong for reducing major stroke risk factors.

  19. Risk Factors for Pregnancy-Associated Stroke in Women With Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eliza C; Gatollari, Hajere J; Too, Gloria; Boehme, Amelia K; Leffert, Lisa; Marshall, Randolph S; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Willey, Joshua Z

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia affects 3% to 8% of pregnancies and increases risk of pregnancy-associated stroke (PAS). Data are limited on which women with preeclampsia are at highest risk for PAS. Using billing data from the 2003 to 2012 New York State Department of Health inpatient database, we matched women with preeclampsia and PAS 1:3 to preeclamptic controls based on age and race/ethnicity. Pre-defined PAS risk factors included pregnancy complications, infection present on admission, vascular risk factors, prothrombotic states, and coagulopathies. We constructed multivariable conditional logistic regression models to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for independent risk factors for PAS. Among women aged 12 to 55 years admitted to New York State hospitals for any reason during the study period (n=3 373 114), 88 857 had preeclampsia, and 197 of whom (0.2%) had PAS. In multivariable analysis, women with preeclampsia and stroke were more likely than controls to have severe preeclampsia or eclampsia (OR, 7.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6-11.3), infections present on admission (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.6-5.8), prothrombotic states (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.2), coagulopathies (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.3-7.1), or chronic hypertension (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.8-5.5). Additional analyses matched and stratified by severity of preeclampsia confirmed these results. Infections, chronic hypertension, coagulopathies, and underlying prothrombotic conditions increase PAS risk in women with preeclampsia. These women may warrant closer monitoring. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. MAJOR RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND THEIR CONTROL IN PATIENTS LIVING IN A SMALL TOWN OF THE MOSCOW REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kozyaykin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluation of prevalence and degree of control of leading risk factors for stroke among population of various regions of the Russian Federation enables rational planning of preventive activities.Aim: To analyze prevalence of the leading stroke risk factors, to assess efficacy of their control and to determine their impact on outcomes.Materials and methods: We examined and treated 129 patients with primary and repeated cerebral accidents living in a small town of the Moscow region.Results: The most prevalent stroke risk factor was arterial hypertension (94.6%. During 6 months before the stroke, target levels of systolic blood pressure had been achieved in 36/122 patients with arterial hypertension and those of diastolic blood pressure, in 4/122 patients. During the last 2 years preceding the index stroke, 48.8% of patients had hypertensive crises. More than half of the patients (71/122 either had not been taking their antihypertensive medications, or had not taken them regularly. There was a positive correlation between duration of arterial hypertension and degree of stroke-related disability, assessed by NIHSS (r = 0.263, p = 0.003, as well as between duration of arterial hypertension and functional activity index on Rankin scale at manifestation of stroke (r = 0.268, p = 0.003. Other prevalent risk factors were smoking (51.9% of patients, alcohol use (67.44%, diabetes mellitus (23.26%. Hypercholesterolemia that was diagnosed in 102/129 of the stroke patients, did not significantly affect any parameter of stroke severity (p > 0.05. There were weak positive correlations between body mass index and difference in NIHSS scores at admission and at discharge (r = 0.204, p = 0.049, between body mass and difference in NIHSS scores at admission and at discharge (r = 0.227, p = 0.028, as well as between body mass and difference in Rankin scale scores at admission and at discharge (r = 0.247, p = 0.016. Chronic stress situation (depression

  1. Association of cardiovascular emerging risk factors with acute coronary syndrome and stroke: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Linares, José Manuel; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco Manuel; Salgado Parreño, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we estimated the risk of acute coronary syndrome and stroke associated with several emerging cardiovascular risk factors. This was a case-control study, where an age - and sex-matched acute coronary syndrome group and stroke group were compared with controls. Demographic and clinical data were collected through patient interviews, and blood samples were taken for analysis. In the bivariate analysis, all cardiovascular risk factors analyzed showed as predictors of acute coronary syndrome and stroke, except total cholesterol and smoking. In the multivariate logistic regression model for acute coronary syndrome, hypertension and body mass index, N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A were independent predictors. For stroke, the predictors were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide. Controlling for age, sex, and classical cardiovascular risk factors, N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A were independent emerging cardiovascular risk factors for acute coronary syndrome, but pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A was not for stroke. High levels of cardiovascular risk factors in individuals with no episodes of cardiovascular disease requires the implementation of prevention programs, given that at least half of them are modifiable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Risk factors for stroke and use of echocardiography in diagnosis: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a prevalent disease in many communities. Cardiologists consultation and cardiac investigations are frequently requested to rule out cardiac source of embolic manifestations. The heart has been reported to account for 20% of ischaemic strokes in the Western community. Objective: To review risk ...

  3. Risk factors for burn-out in caregivers of stroke patients, and possibilities for intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, ETP; de Witte, LP; Schure, LM; Sanderman, R; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To identify which caregivers of stroke patients living at home experience the highest levels of strain and are at risk of burn-out, and to investigate how support for caregivers of stroke patients could best be organized, and when this support should be offered. Design and setting:

  4. Moyamoya syndrome as a risk factor for stroke in Saudi children: Novel and usual associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Amal Y.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Elgamal, Essam A.; Al-Salman, Mussaad M.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Othman, Saleh A.; El-Desouki, Mahmoud I.; Maldergem, L. V.

    2006-01-01

    To report on moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as a risk factor for stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children. The usual and novel associations of MMS in this cohort will also be described. Children with stroke were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology at King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February201 to March 2003 (retrospective study). Investigations for suspected cases included hemostatic assays, biochemical, and serological tests. Neuroimaging included CT, MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), single photon computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scan and conventional cerebral angiography. Moyamoya syndrome was the underlying risk factor for stroke in 6 (5.8%) of the 104 children (aged one month to 12 years). They were 4 females and 2 males. Their first cerebral ischemic event occurred at a mean age of 45 months (median = 44 months, range 17-66 months). In all 6 cases, MMS was associated with an underlying hematologic abnormality or other diseases. Protein C deficiency was identified in one girl and protein S deficiency in another. Two patients had retrospectively, sickle cell disease (SCD) and sickle cell-b-thalassemia (Sb-thalssemia), which had been associated in the latter with membranous ventricular septal defect. Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS, OMIM 100300) was associated with MMS in an 18-month-old girl. A 4-year-old boy had wrinkly skin syndrome (WWS, OMIM 278250) phenotype. The association of MMS and protein C deficiency was first reported in this cohort of patients, whereas the association of the syndrome with WWS and AOS has not, hitherto, been described. The 3 patients who had MMS associated with protein C deficiency, SCD, and AOS underwent successful revascularization surgery in the form of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis. Moyamoya syndrome constitutes an important risk factor of

  5. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rezvani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD and Ischemic Stroke (IS was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Results: Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000 respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020. Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Conclusion: Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occur r ence of IS and IHD.

  6. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Ghandehari, Kavian

    2012-10-01

    The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Ischemic Stroke (IS) was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males) with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000) respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020). Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occurrence of IS and IHD.

  7. Frequency of risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. a study of 100 cases in naseer teaching hospital, peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safeer, M.; Tariq, M.; Rehman, U.U.

    2008-01-01

    To study the risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. It is a descriptive hospital based study conducted at the Department of Medicine, Naseer Teaching Hospital, Peshawar from January 2005 to December 2005. One hundred patients of stroke with cerebral infarction confirmed on C.T. scan brain and more than twenty years of age were included. Risk factors for cerebral infarction were defined in terms of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, smoking, dyslipidaemia, TIAs (transient ischemic attacks), carotid artery stenosis and family history of stroke. Data of 100 cases with cerebral infarction was recorded. Most of the patients had more than one risk factors for cerebral infarction. hypertension was commonest risk factor (55%), smoking (30%), ischemic heart disease (34%), diabetes mellitus) (26%), hyperlipedaemia (30%), atrial fibrillation (25%), carotid artery stenosis (27%), obesity (15%) and family history of stroke (12%). 39% of patients had physical inactivity. Males were slightly predominant than females (51% vs 49%) and mean age was 50 years. females were rather older with mean age of 53 years. Cerebral infarction accounts for 80% to 85% of cases of stroke, which is a common neurological disorder. It increases a burden of disability and misery for patients and their families. Most of the risk factors of cerebral infarction are modifiable, its prevention should be the main cause of concern for the community. (author)

  8. Lifestyle risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in young adults in the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Sarnowski, Bettina; Putaala, Jukka; Grittner, Ulrike; Gaertner, Beate; Schminke, Ulf; Curtze, Sami; Huber, Roman; Tanislav, Christian; Lichy, Christoph; Demarin, Vida; Basic-Kes, Vanja; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Rothwell, Peter M; Dichgans, Martin; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Heuschmann, Peter U; Kaps, Manfred; Norrving, Bo; Rolfs, Arndt; Kessler, Christof; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Although many stroke patients are young or middle-aged, risk factor profiles in these age groups are poorly understood. The Stroke in Young Fabry Patients (sifap1) study prospectively recruited a large multinational European cohort of patients with cerebrovascular events aged 18 to 55 years to establish their prevalence of Fabry disease. In a secondary analysis of patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, we studied age- and sex-specific prevalences of various risk factors. Among 4467 patients (median age, 47 years; interquartile range, 40-51), the most frequent well-documented and modifiable risk factors were smoking (55.5%), physical inactivity (48.2%), arterial hypertension (46.6%), dyslipidemia (34.9%), and obesity (22.3%). Modifiable less well-documented or potentially modifiable risk factors like high-risk alcohol consumption (33.0%) and short sleep duration (20.6%) were more frequent in men, and migraine (26.5%) was more frequent in women. Women were more often physically inactive, most pronouncedly at ages young patients with acute ischemic cerebrovascular events, modifiable risk factors were highly prevalent, particularly in men and older patients. These data emphasize the need for vigorous primary and secondary prevention measures already in young populations targeting modifiable lifestyle vascular risk factors.

  9. Therapeutic interventions and success in risk factor control for secondary prevention of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Sabin, Jose; Quintana, Manuel; Hernandez-Presa, Miguel Angel; Alvarez, Carlos; Chaves, Jose; Ribo, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the success rates in achieving preventive therapeutic goals in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke (IS) and compare them with those achieved in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This was an observational multicenter case-control study (3 patients with IS and one control subject with CAD) performed in 1444 primary health centers in Spain. Preventive therapeutic objectives according to American Heart Association guidelines were predefined. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, and success/failure in achievement of objectives were recorded and compared between patients with IS and CAD. A total of 5458 patients were included, 4098 (75.1%) had IS and 1360 (24.9%) had CAD. Although more than 90% of patients with hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia were under specific drug regimens, only about 25% achieved the recommended therapeutic objective for each risk factor. Success rate was especially low among patients with IS compared with CAD: hypertension (23.8% v 27.2%; P = .028); dyslipidemia (13.6% v 20.3%; P risk factors under control, compared with 5.6% of those with CAD (P = .006). For all patients, multivariate logistic regression model showed that independent predictors of full risk factor control were: presence of CAD as compared with IS (odds ratio [OR] 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-3.29; P = .001), older age (OR 1.02; 95% CI 1.00-1.04; P = .028), and having less than 3 risk factors (OR 16.98; 95% CI 9.02-31.97; P risk factor control.

  10. Low socioeconomic status is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke: a case-control study in North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Manya; Kathuria, Prachi; Nair, Pallavi; Pandit, Awadh Kishor; Sahu, Jitendra K; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a multifactorial disease and is influenced by complex environmental interactions. The contribution of various risk factors to the burden of stroke worldwide is not well known, particularly in developing countries. The present case-control study is aimed at exploring the association between a low socioeconomic status and the risk of ischemic stroke among the North Indian population. The study design was a hospital-based, case-control study. Age- and sex-matched controls were included. The demographic characteristics and risk factor variables were documented by means of a personal interview through a standardized case record form. The household asset index for determining the socioeconomic status (HAISS) was used for the assessment of the socioeconomic status of the population. HAISS was validated with the widely used Kuppuswamy scale for measurement of socioeconomic status. The multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio associated with stroke. In all, 224 ischemic stroke patients and 224 controls were recruited between February 2009 and February 2012. The mean age of cases and controls was 53.47 ± 14 and 52.92 ± 13.4, respectively. The low economic status was independently associated with the risk of ischemic stroke after adjustment for demographic and risk factor variables (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.2-6.3). Our findings suggest that there is a significant association between a low socioeconomic status and the risk of ischemic stroke risk in North Indian population. Well-designed studies embedded with long-term prospective cohorts are required for confirming the results. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Diastolic Blood Pressure is a Risk Factor for Peri-procedural Stroke Following Carotid Endarterectomy in Asymptomatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waard, D D; de Borst, G J; Bulbulia, R; Huibers, A; Halliday, A

    2017-05-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) prevents future stroke, but this benefit depends on detection and control of high peri-operative risk factors. In symptomatic patients, diastolic hypertension has been causally related to procedural stroke following CEA. The aim was to identify risk factors causing peri-procedural stroke in asymptomatic patients and to relate these to timing of surgery and mechanism of stroke. In the first Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial (ACST-1), 3,120 patients with severe asymptomatic carotid stenosis were randomly assigned to CEA plus medical therapy or to medical therapy alone. In 1,425 patients having their allocated surgery, baseline patient characteristics were analysed to identify factors associated with peri-procedural (procedural period, resulting in a stroke/death rate of 2.9% (42/1,425). Diastolic blood pressure at randomisation was the only significant risk factor in univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 1.34 per 10 mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.72; p = .02) and this remained so in multivariate analysis when corrected for sex, age, lipid lowering therapy, and prior infarcts or symptoms (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.05-1.72; p = .02). In patients with diastolic hypertension (> 90 mmHg) most strokes occurred during the procedure (67% vs. 20%; p = .02). In ACST-1, diastolic blood pressure was the only independent risk factor associated with peri-procedural stroke or death. While the underlying mechanisms of the association between lower diastolic blood pressure and peri-procedural risk remain unclear, good pre-operative control of blood pressure may improve procedural outcome of carotid surgery in asymptomatic patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk of stroke in young women and two prothrombotic mutations: factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene variant (G20210A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longstreth, W. T.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Siscovick, D. S.; Vos, H. L.; Schwartz, S. M.; Psaty, B. M.; Raghunathan, T. E.; Koepsell, T. D.; Reitsma, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Factor V Leiden and a prothrombin gene variant, G20210A, are mutations associated with a thrombotic risk. The aim of our study was to assess whether these mutations increase the risk of stroke in women under 45 years of age. We conducted a case-control study in western Washington state. Case

  13. Outdoor air pollution as a possible modifiable risk factor to reduce mortality in post-stroke population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desikan, Anita

    2017-03-01

    Outdoor air pollution is a known risk factor for mortality and morbidity. The type of air pollutant most reliably associated with disease is particulate matter (PM), especially finer particulate matter that can reach deeper into the lungs like PM 2.5 (particulate matter diameter pollution. This review focuses on one subgroup, long-term stroke survivors, and the emerging evidence suggesting that survivors of a stroke may be at a higher risk from the deleterious effects of PM pollution. While the mechanisms for mortality are still under debate, long-term stroke survivors may be vulnerable to similar mechanisms that underlie the well-established association between PM pollution and cardiovascular disease. The fact that long-term stroke survivors of ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, strokes appear to be more vulnerable to the risk of death from higher PM pollution may also bolster the connection to ischemic heart disease. Survivors of an ischemic stroke may be more vulnerable to dying from higher concentrations of PM pollution than the general population. The clinical implications of this association suggest that reduced exposure to PM pollution may result in fewer deaths amongst stroke survivors.

  14. Outdoor air pollution as a possible modifiable risk factor to reduce mortality in post-stroke population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Desikan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor air pollution is a known risk factor for mortality and morbidity. The type of air pollutant most reliably associated with disease is particulate matter (PM, especially finer particulate matter that can reach deeper into the lungs like PM2.5 (particulate matter diameter < 2.5 μm. Some subpopulations may be particularly vulnerable to PM pollution. This review focuses on one subgroup, long-term stroke survivors, and the emerging evidence suggesting that survivors of a stroke may be at a higher risk from the deleterious effects of PM pollution. While the mechanisms for mortality are still under debate, long-term stroke survivors may be vulnerable to similar mechanisms that underlie the well-established association between PM pollution and cardiovascular disease. The fact that long-term stroke survivors of ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, strokes appear to be more vulnerable to the risk of death from higher PM pollution may also bolster the connection to ischemic heart disease. Survivors of an ischemic stroke may be more vulnerable to dying from higher concentrations of PM pollution than the general population. The clinical implications of this association suggest that reduced exposure to PM pollution may result in fewer deaths amongst stroke survivors.

  15. Family history as a risk factor for early-onset stroke/transient ischemic attack among adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvundura, Mercy; McGruder, Henraya; Khoury, Muin J; Valdez, Rodolfo; Yoon, Paula W

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and death in the United States. We tested the association between familial risk for stroke and prevalence of the disease among US adults and assessed the use of family history of stroke as a risk assessment tool for the disease. Using data from the 2005 HealthStyles survey (n = 4,819), we explored the association between familial stroke risk (stratified as high, moderate or low) and the prevalence of stroke and related health conditions. We evaluated the clinical validity (sensitivity, specificity) of family history of stroke as an indicator of stroke risk. Stroke and the related medical conditions were self-reported. Independent of other risk factors, people with a high familial risk for stroke were 4 times more likely to have had a stroke (95% confidence interval, CI, 2.6-6.0) than people with moderate or low familial risk. They were also 1.3 times (95% CI 1.1-1.6) more likely to have high blood pressure and 1.5 times (95% CI 1.3-2.0) more likely to have congestive heart failure. The sensitivity and specificity of using family history alone, high blood pressure alone or both risk factors to estimate stroke risk were 52 and 83%, 53 and 74%, and 29 and 95%, respectively. Despite several limitations typical of self-reported surveys, we find that in this sample of US adults, family history of stroke was significantly associated with the risk for stroke and high blood pressure as well as related conditions. Family history of stroke, alone or combined with other risk factors, can be a useful tool in assessing stroke risk among US adults. Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The left atrial septal pouch as a risk factor for stroke: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachinaru, Mihai; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose; Verbeet, Thierry; Gazagnes, Marie-Dominique

    2017-04-01

    The left atrial septal pouch (LASP) is formed by incomplete fusion of the septum primum and septum secundum, leaving a cavity open towards the left atrium, but without interatrial shunting. There is no recommendation concerning strategy in the presence of a LASP, especially in the setting of stroke. The aim of this review was to determine whether the LASP could be incriminated as the aetiology of a stroke. We included all pertinent publications on the subject, and calculated hazard ratios for ischaemic stroke and cryptogenic stroke. There were only five case-control studies concerning the LASP, involving 516 stroke patients and 779 controls. Overall LASP prevalence was 21%, with a slightly higher prevalence in the cryptogenic stroke group (26%), but this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.27). In a random-effects meta-analysis, there was no difference between controls and patients with ischaemic stroke (hazard ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.53; P=0.14). Cryptogenic stroke appeared more frequently in patients with LASP (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.07-2.24; P=0.02), but this was driven by only one severely underpowered study. The published case reports demonstrated that thrombus formation inside the pouch can occur in the presence of major predisposing factors. The LASP can be a site for thrombus formation, leading to embolic events, but its presence does not correlate with an increased incidence of stroke. Associated factors should be taken into consideration in the setting of stroke. Further studies are necessary to validate a possible relationship with cryptogenic stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in the distribution of risk factors for stroke among the high-risk population in urban and rural areas of Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Te; Sun, Shangwen; Du, Yifeng; Guo, Shougang; Cong, Lin; Cao, Mingfeng; Sun, Qinjian; Sun, Yi; Qu, Chuanqiang

    2016-05-01

    Considering the program of screening for risk factors of stroke in Eastern China, the aim of this study was to compare the distribution differences in risk factors for stroke among the high-risk population living in urban and rural areas. A total of 231,289 residents were screened and basic information collected. Risk factors for stroke among the high-risk population were compared between the urban and rural groups. A total of 117,776 high-risk residents from urban areas and 113,513 from rural areas were included in the analysis. The prevalence of hypertension was much higher in rural areas (73.3%) than that in urban areas (64.1%). Dyslipidemia (48.9% vs. 26.9%), sport lack (46.6% vs. 31.6%), diabetes mellitus (21.3% vs. 16.5%), and atrial fibrillation (18.7% vs. 9.8%) were more prevalent in the urban group, while smoking (26.5% vs. 28.8%), previous stroke (10.1% vs. 16.9%), and transient ischemic attack (20.9% vs. 24.6%) were less prevalent. Among the population at high risk of stroke, there were significant differences in the distribution of the following risk factors between the urban and rural groups: hypertension, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia, lack of physical exercise, and a previous stroke.

  18. Global and regional effects of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with acute stroke in 32 countries (INTERSTROKE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Chin, Siu Lim; Rangarajan, Sumathy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke in different regions of the world, and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes......-based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke, and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks (PARs) were...... calculated, with 99% confidence intervals. FINDINGS: Between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015, 26 919 participants were recruited from 32 countries (13 447 cases [10 388 with ischaemic stroke and 3059 intracerebral haemorrhage] and 13 472 controls). Previous history of hypertension or blood pressure of 140...

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies genetic risk factors for stroke in African-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L.; Keene, Keith L.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F.; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C.; Kittner, Steven J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H.; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, YongMei; Sale, Michèle M.; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, WT; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B.; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African-Americans despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population genome-wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Methods Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14,746 African-Americans (1,365 ischemic and 1,592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested SNPs with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. Results The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613, P=3.9×10−8) in African-Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/ mRNA pre-splicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. Conclusions We identified a novel SNP associated with total stroke in African-Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African-Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. PMID:26089329

  20. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Risk Factors for Stroke in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L; Keene, Keith L; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C; Kittner, Steven J; Rich, Stephen S; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Langefeld, Carl D; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, Yongmei; Sale, Michèle M; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, W T; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African Americans, despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14 746 African Americans (1365 ischemic and 1592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested genetic variants with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613; P=3.9×10(-8)) in African Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/mRNA presplicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, and IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. We identified a novel genetic variant associated with total stroke in African Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [Neonatal arterial ischemic stroke: Which thrombotic biological risk factors to investigate and which practical consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, T; Valentin, J B; Saliba, E; Gruel, Y

    2017-09-01

    All biological risk factors that have been previously identified to increase the risk of thrombosis in adults, have also been studied in neonates with arterial Ischemic Stroke (NAIS), but most studies were retrospective and included relatively low numbers of affected children. We therefore could not suggest recommendations with a strong level of evidence and only expert proposals potentially useful for clinical practice will be presented in this text. Despite these limitations, the extensive analysis of published data supported that factor V Leiden (FVL) and increased levels of Lp(a) could be significant risk factors for NAIS. Importantly, these 2 risk factors cannot be considered as having provoked NAIS, and moreover, they do not influence the prognosis and the immediate treatment. However, since the FVL may have an impact for the prescription of a thromboprophylaxis when the neonate will become adult, to look for its presence in affected patients may be justified. For clinical practice, the following propositions can be applied: 1. Routine testing for thrombophilia (AT, PC PS deficiency, FV Leiden or FII20210A) or for detecting other biological risk factors such as antiphospholipid antibodies, high FVIII, homocystein or Lp(a) levels, MTHFR thermolabile variant, should not be considered in neonates with NAIS. 2. Testing for FV Leiden can be performed in case of documented family history of venous thromboembolic disease. 3. Testing neonates for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) is mandatory in case of clinical events suggesting antiphospholipid syndrome in the mother (vascular thrombosis, and/or pregnancy morbidity). 4. Routine testing for thrombophilia is not proposed in both parents in case of early death of the neonate, apart from APA in the mother. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  2. Vascular Risk Factors and Diseases Modulate Deficits of Reward-Based Reversal Learning in Acute Basal Ganglia Stroke.

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    Ulla K Seidel

    Full Text Available Besides motor function, the basal ganglia have been implicated in feedback learning. In patients with chronic basal ganglia infarcts, deficits in reward-based reversal learning have previously been described.We re-examined the acquisition and reversal of stimulus-stimulus-reward associations and acquired equivalence in eleven patients with acute basal ganglia stroke (8 men, 3 women; 57.8±13.3 years, whose performance was compared eleven healthy subjects of comparable age, sex distribution and education, who were recruited outside the hospital. Eleven hospitalized patients with a similar vascular risk profile as the stroke patients but without stroke history served as clinical control group.In a neuropsychological assessment 7±3 days post-stroke, verbal and spatial short-term and working memory and inhibition control did not differ between groups. Compared with healthy subjects, control patients with vascular risk factors exhibited significantly reduced performance in the reversal phase (F[2,30] = 3.47; p = 0.044; post-hoc comparison between risk factor controls and healthy controls: p = 0.030, but not the acquisition phase (F[2,30] = 1.01; p = 0.376 and the acquired equivalence (F[2,30] = 1.04; p = 0.367 tasks. In all tasks, the performance of vascular risk factor patients closely resembled that of basal ganglia stroke patients. Correlation studies revealed a significant association of the number of vascular risk factors with reversal learning (r = -0.33, p = 0.012, but not acquisition learning (r = -0.20, p = 0.121 or acquired equivalence (r = -0.22, p = 0.096.The previously reported impairment of reward-based learning may be attributed to vascular risk factors and associated diseases, which are enriched in stroke patients. This study emphasizes the necessity of appropriate control subjects in cognition studies.

  3. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

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    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk.

  4. Risk factors associated with falls in adult patients after stroke living in the community: baseline data from a stroke cohort in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Elen Beatriz; Nascimento, Carla; Marinho, Camila; Oliveira, Ilana; Monteiro, Maiana; Castro, Mayra; Myllane-Fernandes, Paula; Ventura, Laís M G B; Maso, Iara; Lopes, Antonio Alberto; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with stroke have a high risk of falling, and their fall predictors may differ from those of other populations. To estimate fall frequency and identify factors related to fall occurrence in a sample of patients with stroke residing in the community. Clinical data were collected from 150 consecutive stroke patients with independent gait, and the following scales were applied: modified Barthel Index (mBI), Timed Up & Go Test (TUG), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Univariate analysis was performed; variables with possible association (P stroke onset (OR, 1.012 for every month increase; 95% CI, 1.002-1.021; P = .015) remained predictors. When we grouped individuals according to affected cerebral hemisphere, both hemispheres had similar accuracy, but TUG cutoff point was lower in individuals with right- versus left-hemisphere lesions. Patients with poor TUG performance, longer times since stroke onset, and right-hemisphere injury have particularly high fall rates, and TUG cutoff points for fall prediction vary according to cerebral hemisphere.

  5. Increased visceral adipose tissue as a potential risk factor in patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS.

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    Antti T Muuronen

    Full Text Available The etiology of an ischemic stroke remains undetermined in 20-35% of cases and many patients do not have any of the conventional risk factors. Increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT is a suggested new risk factor for both carotid artery atherosclerosis (CAA and atrial fibrillation (AF, but its role in the remaining stroke population is unknown. We assessed the amount of VAT in patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS after excluding major-risk cardioembolic sources, occlusive atherosclerosis, and lacunar stroke.Altogether 58 patients (mean age 57.7 ± 10.2 years, 44 men with ischemic stroke of unknown etiology but without CAA, known AF or small vessel disease underwent computed tomography angiography and assessment of VAT. For comparison VAT values from three different reference populations were used. Conventional risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, increased total and LDL-cholesterol, decreased HDL-cholesterol were also registered.Mean VAT area was significantly higher in stroke patients (205 ± 103 cm2 for men and 168 ± 99 cm2 for women compared to all reference populations (P < 0.01. 50% of male and 57% of female patients had an increased VAT area. In male patients, VAT was significantly higher despite similar body mass index (BMI. Increased VAT was more common than any of the conventional risk factors.Increased VAT was found in over half of our patients with ESUS suggesting it may have a role in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism in this selected group of patients.

  6. Age- and Gender-Specific Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in 40 102 Patients With First-Ever Ischemic Stroke A Nationwide Danish Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Andersen, Z. J.; Olsen, T. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose—We describe the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors at stroke onset in men and women of all ages. Methods—A registry started in 2001, designed to register all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds 40 102 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. Patients...... patients with stroke (70 to 80 years), the decrease being generally more pronounced in men than in women. Conclusion—Cardiovascular risk factors were generally more prevalent in men. Lifestyle cardiovascular risk factors were more common in the young. Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary...... underwent evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, intermittent arterial claudication, previous myocardial infarction, body mass index, smoking, and alcohol consumption. We estimated...

  7. Age- and Gender-Specific Prevalence of Risk Factors in Patients with First-Ever Ischemic Stroke in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ying Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidences are accumulating that age and gender have great impact on the distribution of stroke risk factors. Such data are lacking in Chinese population. Methods. 1027 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke (IS were recruited and divided into young adult (80 years groups according to stroke onset ages. Vascular risk factors were collected and compared among groups. Results. Female patients were globally older than male patients at stroke onset and having higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM, heart diseases, and atrial fibrillation (AF. However, females were less likely to drink heavily or smoke than males. Young patients had a much higher proportion of smoking and drinking than middle-aged and very old patients and the highest family history of hypertension, while very old patients had the highest prevalence of heart diseases and AF but lowest proportion of positive family history of vascular diseases. Hypertension and DM were equally frequent among three groups. Conclusion. Our study showed that vascular risk factors had a specific age and gender distribution pattern in Chinese IS patients. Secondary prevention strategy should emphasize on the control of different risk factors based on patient’s age and gender.

  8. Risk Factors for Stroke among Young-Old and Old-Old Community-Dwelling Adults in Japan: The Ohasama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Hosaka, Miki; Matsuda, Ayako; Nomura, Kyoko; Murakami, Takahisa; Kikuya, Masahiro; Metoki, Hirohito; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have addressed stroke risk factors in older populations, particularly among the old-old. We examined differences in traditional risk factors for stroke among the old-old compared with the young-old in community-dwelling Japanese adults. We followed 2,065 residents aged ≥ 60 years who had no history of stroke. Traditional risk factors for stroke were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire at baseline. We classified participants into two age categories, 60-74 years (n=1,502) and ≥ 75 years (n=563), and assessed whether traditional risk factors were differentially associated with stroke incidence according to age category. Hazard ratios were calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for confounding factors and competing risk of death. During a median follow-up of 12.8 and 7.9 years, 163 and 111 participants aged 60-74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, developed a first stroke. Hypertension was consistently associated with increased risk of stroke, regardless of age category. Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased risk of stroke in those aged 60-74 years (hazard ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.25), but not in those aged ≥ 75 years (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.29), with significant interaction by age (P=0.035). No traditional risk factor other than hypertension was associated with stroke among those aged ≥ 75 years. Those with hypertension had significantly higher stroke risk among old people, while diabetes mellitus was differentially associated with stroke according to age category. Our findings indicate the importance of different prevention strategies for stroke incidence according to age category.

  9. Characteristics and risk factors of cerebrovascular accidents after percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with history of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Feng, Li-qun; Bi, Qi; Wang, Yu-ping

    2010-06-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a well-established method for managing coronary diseases. However, the increasing use of PCI has led to an increased incidence of acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) related to PCI. In this study, we investigated the characteristics and risk factors of CVA after PCI in patients with known stroke history. Between January 1, 2005 and March 1, 2009, 621 patients with a history of stroke underwent a total of 665 PCI procedures and were included in this retrospective study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, previous medications, procedures, neurologic deficits, location of lesion and in-hospital clinical outcomes of patients who developed a CVA after the cardiac catheterization laboratory visit and before discharge were reviewed. Acute CVA was diagnosed in 53 (8.5%) patients during the operation or the perioperative period. Seventeen patients suffered from transient ischemic attack, thirty-four patients suffered from cerebral infarction and two patients suffered from cerebral hemorrhage. The risk factors for CVA after PCI in stroke patients were: admission with an acute coronary syndrome, use of an intra-aortic balloon pump, urgent or emergency procedures, diabetes mellitus, and poor left ventricular systolic function, arterial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and no/irregular use of anti-platelet medications. The incidence of CVA during and after PCI in patients with history of stroke is much higher than that in patients without history of stroke. Patients with atrial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and no or irregular use of anti-platelet medications were at higher risk for recurrent stroke. This study showed a strong association between acute coronary syndromes and in-hospital stroke after PCI.

  10. The performance of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors as screening tests for ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M R; Wald, N J; Morris, J K

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarises the main evidence and conclusions relating to using blood pressure measurement as a screening test to identify people who will develop ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke, as recently published in a Health Technology Assessment report. While blood pressure is recognised as an important cause of stroke and IHD, and lowering blood pressure can substantially lower the risk of these diseases, the measurement of blood pressure is a poor screening test. It is not good in distinguishing those who will and will not develop these diseases. The poor screening performance is illustrated by the findings that in the largest cohort study, persons in the top 10% of the distribution of systolic blood pressure experienced only 21% of all IHD events and 28% of all strokes at a given age. Using several cardiovascular risk factors in combination does not add materially to the poor screening performance of blood pressure alone. Among persons in a specified age group, the 5% at highest risk experience 17% of all heart disease deaths with risk computation based on blood pressure alone, 22% when based on blood pressure and apolipoprotein B (or LDL cholesterol) in combination, and only 28% using these two, smoking and three other cardiovascular risk factors all in combination. Identifying patients at the time of hospital discharge following myocardial infarction or stroke is the most effective screening test to identify those who will die of cardiovascular disease. In patients with a history of myocardial infarction or stroke the cardiovascular death rate in the absence of treatment is about 5% per year, a risk that persists for at least 15 years. In the absence of treatment, about half of all deaths from heart disease in a population occur after hospital discharge following the first infarct. Among persons with no history of cardiovascular disease, age is a better screening test than the reversible risk factors, and the best policy is to offer treatment to all

  11. Differences Between New Immigrants From the Former Soviet Union and Veteran Residents in Knowledge, Perception, and Risk Factors of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Semyon; Itzhaki, Michal; Koton, Silvia

    Stroke is the fourth most common cause of death in developed countries and a leading cause of acquired disability in adults. Awareness of risk factors and warning signs for stroke has a considerable impact on early arrival at the hospital and early thrombolytic treatment. Delays in seeking medical treatment following the onset of stroke symptoms have been shown to be more common among ethnic minorities. The aim of the current study was to examine stroke awareness and knowledge among new immigrants from the Former Soviet Union (IFSUs) compared with veteran residents (VRs). The study was conducted by students of the nursing master of arts program. Data were collected during March 2010 and June 2014. Trained registered nurses conducted interviews, using a structured, pretested, open-ended questionnaire. Participants were recruited by a snowball method from among the interviewers' friends and family members, 40 years or older with no history of stroke. A total of 643 Israelis, 420 VRs (65.3%) and 223 IFSUs (34.7%), were interviewed; 40.7% were men, with a mean age of 52.6 (SD, 9.3) years. Compared with VRs, IFSUs were more likely to report previous myocardial infarction (P = .022), hypertension (P Soviet Union were more aware of strategies for the prevention of stroke than VRs (P = .02). The preferred sources of information about stroke for IFSUs, as distinguished from VRs, were personal doctors (P = .001) and radio programs (P = .03). Veteran residents showed lower levels of knowledge about stroke. Educational campaigns aimed at increasing knowledge of stroke among Israel's general population in Israel, as well as culturally targeting specific subgroups, are recommended.

  12. Sex Differences in Outcomes and Associated Risk Factors After Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients: A Prospective Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Tao; Lou, Yongzhong; Guo, Xiaofei; Gu, Hongfei; Zhu, Yanxia; Ning, Xianjia; Wang, Jinghua; Tu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women. However, sex differences in outcome and factors associated with outcome among elderly patients are unknown. From January 2009 to December 2011, 810 patients with acute ischemic stroke aged 75 years or older were recruited in China. Clinical profile and risk factors were recorded. Outcomes and associated risk factors at 12 and 36 months after stroke were assessed by sex. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemias, and obesity prevalence rates were higher in women than in men; opposite trends were found for smoking and alcohol consumption. The mortality rate at 12 months after stroke was significantly greater in men than in women (23.3% versus 16.6%, P = .015). Large-artery atherothrombotic and cardioembolic stroke subtypes were risk factors for mortality, recurrence, and dependency in both sexes. In men, atrial fibrillation was a risk factor of mortality at 12 months after stroke (relative ratio [RR], 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-3.27), but obesity was a protective factor of mortality at 36 months after stroke (RR, .30; 95% CI, .10-.94). However, in women, atrial fibrillation was a risk factor of recurrence at 12 months (RR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.31-4.12) and dependency at 36 months after stroke (RR, 7.68; 95% CI, 1.60-36.82). We assessed sex differences in stroke outcomes and associated risk factors at 12 and 36 months after stroke in a large hospital-based stroke registry of elderly patients from Northern China. Thus, it is crucial to emphasize risk management to elderly patients to reduce mortality, recurrence, and dependency after stroke. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Risk factors for ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke in 22 countries (the INTERSTROKE study): a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, M.J.; Serpault, Damien Xavier; Xiufeng, Liu

    2010-01-01

    an alternate definition of hypertension was used (history of hypertension or blood pressure >160/90 mm Hg), the combined PAR was 90.3% (85.3-93.7) for all stroke. These risk factors were all significant for ischaemic stroke, whereas hypertension, smoking, waist-to-hip ratio, diet, and alcohol intake were...... for all stroke were: history of hypertension (OR 2.64, 99% CI 2.26-3.08; PAR 34.6%, 99% CI 30.4-39.1); current smoking (2.09, 1.75-2.51; 18.9%, 15.3-23.1); waist-to-hip ratio (1.65, 1.36-1.99 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26.5%, 18.8-36.0); diet risk score (1.35, 1.11-1.64 for highest vs lowest tertile...

  14. Guidelines for the preventive treatment of ischaemic stroke and TIA (I). Update on risk factors and life style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B; Gállego, J; Gil-Nuñez, A; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Roquer, J; Segura, T; Tejada, J; Lago, A; Díez-Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; García Pastor, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Nombela, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Rubio, F; Serena, J; Simal, P; Vivancos, J

    2012-01-01

    To update the ad hoc Committee of the Cerebrovascular Diseases Study Group of The Spanish Neurological Society guidelines on prevention of ischaemic stroke (IS) and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We reviewed available evidence on risk factors and means of modifying them to prevent ischaemic stroke and TIA. Levels of evidence and recommendation grades are based on the classification of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. This first section summarises the recommendations for action on the following factors: blood pressure, diabetes, lipids, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity, cardio-embolic diseases, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives, hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombotic states and sleep apnea syndrome. Changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia, according to criteria of primary and secondary prevention, are recommended for preventing ischemic stroke. © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Gerds, Thomas A.; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Although the relation between stroke risk factors and stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been extensively examined, only few studies have explored the association of AF and the risk of ischaemic stroke/systemic thromboembolism/transient ischaemic attack (stroke....../TE/TIA) in the presence of concomitant stroke risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: From nationwide registries, all persons who turned 50, 60, 70, or 80 from 1997 to 2011 were identified. Persons receiving warfarin were excluded. The absolute risk of stroke/TE/TIA was reported for a 5-year period, as was the absolute risk...... ratios for AF vs. no AF according to prior stroke and the number of additional risk factors. The study cohort comprised of 3 076 355 persons without AF and 48 189 with AF. For men aged 50 years, with no risk factors, the 5-year risk of stroke was 1.1% (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1); with AF alone 2...

  16. Vascular Risk Factor Profiles Differ Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Subtypes of Younger-Onset Lacunar Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Markus, Hugh S

    2017-09-01

    Differing associations of vascular risk factors with lacunar infarct have been reported, which is likely because of diagnostic differences and possible heterogeneity in the pathogenesis underlying lacunar infarction. In a large magnetic resonance imaging-verified cohort of lacunar infarct patients, we investigated the risk factor profile of lacunar infarction and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics. One thousand twenty-three patients with lacunar infarction (mean age, 56.7; SD, 8.5) were recruited from 72 stroke centers throughout the United Kingdom as part of the UK Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Study. Risk factor profiles were compared with 1961 stroke-free population controls with similar age. Furthermore, we tested risk factor profiles of lacunar stroke patients for association with the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and location of the acute lacunar infarct. Hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.85-2.64), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.61-2.73), hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.46-2.07), and smoking (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.39-1.96) were independently associated in lacunar infarct patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with multiple lacunar infarcts were more likely to be men (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.81-3.53) and have hypertension (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04) compared with patients with a single lacunar infarct, independent of other vascular risk factors. The presence of moderate-to-severe WMH versus no or mild WMH was independently associated with increased age (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04), hypertension (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.44-2.95), and impaired renal function (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98). In this magnetic resonance imaging-verified lacunar stroke population, we identified a distinct risk factor profile in the group as a whole. However, there were differing risk factor profiles according to the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts and confluent WMH. The

  17. Sleeping over a sleep disorder - Awareness of obstructive sleep apnoea as a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and stroke: A survey among health care professionals and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA syndrome is an established and modifiable but under recognized risk factor for common disorders like stroke and hypertension. Objective: To assess awareness level of health care practitioners and medical students about OSA as a risk factor for stroke and hypertension. Methods: Questionnaire based survey with multiple response type and fill in the blanks type questions. The data was compiled and analyzed using SPSS version 19. Results: 180 participants completed the survey questionnaire. Only 24 (13.3% identified OSA as a reversible risk factor for ischemic stroke. 11 (6% participants only could answer OSA as an identified risk factor for hypertension as per Seventh Joint National Committee report. Poor awareness extended over all categories of participants (medical students, trained doctors and nursing staff . Conclusion: This study reveals dismal level of awareness, among health professionals and medical students, about OSA being an established and modifiable risk factor for hypertension and ischemic stroke.

  18. Stroke Risk Perception in Atrial Fibrillation Patients is not Associated with Clinical Stroke Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournaise, Anders; Skov, Jane; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Leppin, Anja

    2015-11-01

    Clinical risk stratification models, such as the CHA2DS2-VASc, are used to assess stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. No study has yet investigated whether and to which extent these patients have a realistic perception of their personal stroke risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the association between AF patients' stroke risk perception and clinical stroke risk. In an observational cross-sectional study design, we surveyed 178 AF patients with a mean age of 70.6 years (SD 8.3) in stable anticoagulant treatment (65% treatment duration >12 months). Clinical stroke risk was scored through the CHA2DS2-VASc, and patients rated their perceived personal stroke risk on a 7-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between clinical stroke risk assessment and patients' stroke risk perception (rho = .025; P = .741). Approximately 60% of the high-risk patients had an unrealistic perception of their own stroke risk, and there was no significant increase in risk perception from those with a lower compared with a higher risk factor load (χ(2) = .010; P = .522). Considering possible negative implications in terms of lack of motivation for lifestyle behavior change and adequate adherence to the treatment and monitoring of vitamin K antagonist, the apparent underestimation of risk by large subgroups warrants attention and needs further investigation with regard to possible behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. γ-Glutamyl Transferase as a Risk Factor for All-Cause or Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among 5912 Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Qiang; Cao, Jian-Lei; Zhao, Sheng-Jie; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Deng, Ai-Jun

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of the measurement of serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) concentrations at admission with 1-year all-cause or cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This prospective, multicenter cohort study was conducted in 4 stroke centers in China. Baseline GGT measurements were tested. The relationship of GGT to the risk of death from all-cause or CVD was examined among 1-year follow-up patients. We recorded results from 5912 patients with stroke. In those patients, 51.0% were men, and the median age was 61 years. In both men and women, high GGT was significantly associated with total mortality from all-cause or CVD ( P mortality from all-cause and CVD, respectively. With an area under the curve of 0.69 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.73), GGT showed a significantly greater discriminatory ability to predict all-cause mortality as compared with others factors. GGT improved the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (area under the curve of the combined model, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.78]; P mortality in patients with ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Similarities and differences between coronary heart disease and stroke in the associations with cardiovascular risk factors: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masaaki; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Kentaro; Li, Yuanying; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Tanabe, Naohito; Wada, Yasuhiko; Wang, Chaochen; Ota, Atsuhiko; Tamakoshi, Koji; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2017-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke have common risk factors, but some of these differ in the magnitude or direction of associations between CHD and stroke. We assessed whether the impact of each risk factor differed between CHD and stroke mortality in Asians. In total, 104 910 subjects aged 40-79 years without histories of cancer, CHD and stroke at baseline were followed between 1988 and 2009. Competing-risks analysis was used to test for differences in the associations of each risk factor with two endpoints (CHD and stroke). Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were also calculated for these endpoints to estimate the population impact of each risk factor. During a median 19.1-year follow-up, 1554 died from CHD and 3163 from stroke. The association of hypertension with CHD was similar to that with stroke in terms of the magnitude and direction (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for CHD: 1.63 vs. stroke: 1.73 in men and 1.70 vs. 1.66 in women). Conversely, the magnitude of these associations differed for smoking (CHD: 1.95 vs. stroke: 1.23 in men and 2.45 vs. 1.35 in women) and diabetes (1.49 vs. 1.09 in men and 2.08 vs. 1.39 in women). The highest PAF for CHD was caused by smoking in men and by hypertension in women; that for stroke was caused by hypertension in both sexes. Hypertension associations and PAFs were consistent between CHD and stroke, but not for other risk factors. These findings may be useful to optimize public health intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence, Incidence, Prognosis, Early Stroke Risk, and Stroke-Related Prognostic Factors of Definite or Probable Transient Ischemic Attacks in China, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiological characteristics of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs in China are unclear. In 2013, we conducted a nationally representative, door-to-door epidemiological survey on TIA in China using a complex, multistage, probability sampling design. Results showed that the weighted prevalence of TIA in China was 103.3 [95% confidence interval (CI: 83.9–127.2] per 100,000 in the population, 92.4 (75.0–113.8 per 100,000 among men, and 114.7 (87.2–151.0 per 100,000 among women. The weighted incidence of TIA was 23.9 (17.8–32.0 per 100,000 in the population, 21.3 (14.3–31.5 per 100,000 among men, and 26.6 (17.0–41.7 per 100,000 among women. No difference in average prognosis was found between TIA and stroke in the population. Weighted risk of stroke among TIA patients was 9.7% (6.5–14.3%, 11.1% (7.5–16.1%, and 12.3% (8.4–17.7% at 2, 30, and 90 days, respectively. The risk of stroke was higher among male patients with a history of TIA than among female patients with a history of TIA (OR: 2.469; 95% CI: 1.172–5.201; P = 0.018, and higher among TIA patients with hypertension than among TIA patients without hypertension (OR: 2.671; 1.547–4.613; P < 0.001. It can be concluded that there are an estimated 1.35 million TIA patients nationwide, with 0.31 million new cases of TIA annually in China. TIA patients were not better managed prior to a stroke event. Early risk of stroke among TIA patients is high. Sex and hypertension may be stroke-associated prognostic factors among TIA patients. TIA clinics and surveillance should be integrated into the national health-care system.

  2. Role of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and other risk factors in intracranial and extracranial artery occlusion in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dan; Deng, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong; Li, Ji-mei; Zhang, Yong-bo

    2015-10-01

    A retrospective case-control study to identify stroke-associated risk factors and quantify serum C-reactive protein in patients with ischaemic stroke, with or without intracranial and/or extracranial artery occlusion (IEAO). Patients with ischaemic stroke and internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO), middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), ICAO + MCAO, or no IEAO (control patients) were retrospectively recruited. Data regarding stroke-associated risk factors were retrieved from medical records. High sensitivity (hs)-CRP was quantified within 3 days of hospital admission. Patients with ICAO (n = 89), MCAO (n = 74) and ICAO + MCAO (n = 29) had significantly higher serum hs-CRP concentrations, and were significantly more likely to have coronary heart disease, a history of stroke, and more than three stroke-associated risk factors than control patients (n = 84). Coronary heart disease and a history of stroke are risk factors for ischaemic stroke with IEAO. Hs-CRP may be used as a marker for IEAO. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Vascular disease and stroke risk in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease (including myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease) has been proposed as a less well-validated risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. We investigated whether vascular disease is an independent risk factor of stroke/thromboembolism in atrial...... fibrillation and whether adding vascular disease improves Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age 75 years, Diabetes, previous Stroke (CHADS(2)) risk stratification....

  4. [Association of obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors with stroke the Japan Arteriosclerosis Longitudinal Study--Existing Cohorts Combined (JALS-ECC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Sato, Shinichi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kitamura, Akihiko; Saito, Isao; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kawano, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Ando, Takashi; Taguri, Masataka; Haradai, Akiko; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2011-12-01

    To assess the relationship between metabolic risk factors and the incidence of stroke stratified by obesity, by conducting a meta-analysis using individual participant data from prospective cohort studies. A total of 19,173 individuals from 10 cohort studies participated at baseline after 1985. Metabolic risk factors were defined using the established criteria in Japan. Participants were subdivided into five categories according to the levels of risk factors and obesity defined by BMI > or = 25 (kg/m2). Multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for the incidence of stroke and the population attributable risk (PAR) were estimated by Poisson regression. During an average 7.1-year follow-up period, 374 stroke events occurred. Hypertension was highest among the risk factors not concerned with BMI stratification. The HR for stroke was 2.48 (95% CI: 1.75-3.5) for BMI or = 25 with 0 or 1 factor and 3.26 (2.11-5.02) with 2 or more. The HR was significantly elevated in all categories with one or more risk factors. The PAR was highest in the category of BMI or = 25 with 0 or 1 and 2 or more risk factors were 8.1% and 8.0%. Similar results were found from the analyses of different stroke subtypes. The HR was found to be significantly elevated with the number of risk factors both with and without obesity. The attributable risk for stroke was larger in the non-obese group. Therefore, public health intervention based only on obesity may miss many of those at high risk of stroke so the focus should not only be on obesity but also cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  6. Sleeping over a sleep disorder - Awareness of obstructive sleep apnoea as a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and stroke: A survey among health care professionals and medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sushma; Srijithesh, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome is an established and modifiable but under recognized risk factor for common disorders like stroke and hypertension. Objective: To assess awareness level of health care practitioners and medical students about OSA as a risk factor for stroke and hypertension. Methods: Questionnaire based survey with multiple response type and fill in the blanks type questions. The data was compiled and analyzed using SPSS version 19. Results: 180 participant...

  7. Trends in the incidence of stroke and cardiovascular risk factors on the isolated island of Okinawa: the Miyakojima study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Chikako; Isa, Katsunori; Okumura, Koichiro; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Kinjo, Kozen; Ohya, Yusuke

    2013-10-01

    Rapid deterioration of cardiovascular risk control, especially obesity, has occurred in Okinawa; this may affect cardiovascular disease incidence, including stroke. Cross-sectional field studies were conducted in 2 periods, 1988-1991 as the first period, and 2002-2005 as the second period, in the isolated island of Okinawa, Miyakojima. To evaluate population backgrounds related to cardiovascular risk factors, data from the health checkup programs conducted in 1987 and 2001 were surveyed. Total of 257 patients in the first period and 370 in the second were diagnosed with first-time stroke. The age-adjusted annual incidence rate of first-time stroke of the first and second periods was 124 and 144 per 100,000 standard population of Japan. The age-adjusted annual incidence rate showed an upward trend for brain infarction (50 to 73) and downward trend for brain hemorrhage (61 to 54); however, those trends were not significant. The health checkup surveys illustrated that blood pressure decreased in all age groups during the second survey period. However, the body mass index increased in patients aged 50 years or more. Fasting blood glucose levels of patients aged 30-79 years and non-HDL cholesterol levels of patients aged 50-79 years significantly increased. In Miyakojima, the incidence of first-time stroke and all of its subtypes did not change significantly between two periods, even though blood pressure decreased significantly in the second period. Metabolic deterioration may be associated with the upward trend in incidence of brain infarction. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between Factor V Leiden Gene Variant and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Misra, Shubham; Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Arun K; Talwar, Pumanshi; Raj, Ritesh; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2017-01-01

    Factor V Leiden is the most common genetic variation among the blood coagulation pathway which leads to prothrombotic state, therefore, is considered an important gene for understating the stroke mechanism. The aim of the present study is to determine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism at G1691A position of Factor V gene and risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in North Indian population. In a retrospective case-control study, 250 patients with IS and 250 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled in the period of October 2012 to September 2014 from in- and out-patient department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Deoxyribonucleic acid for each case and control was isolated from peripheral blood using phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to determine the polymorphism. Data were analyzed using STATA Software Version 13. The mean age of IS patient was 52.8 ± 12.5 years and in control group was 50.97 ± 12.7 years. Genotypic frequency distributions were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and controls. As expected hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, heavy alcohol intake, family history of stroke, and poor economic status were significantly associated with the risk of IS. Multivariate analysis revealed 5.17 times higher odds for developing the risk of large vessel subtype of IS in patients carrying Factor V Leiden G1691A gene variation as compared to control subjects (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 1.32-20.3, P = 0.01). The present study suggests that Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism may be significantly associated with the risk of large vessel subtype of IS. Large sample size studies using prospective cohort designs are required to corroborate the present findings.

  9. Relationship between Factor V Leiden Gene Variant and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: A Case–Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Misra, Shubham; Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Arun K; Talwar, Pumanshi; Raj, Ritesh; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Factor V Leiden is the most common genetic variation among the blood coagulation pathway which leads to prothrombotic state, therefore, is considered an important gene for understating the stroke mechanism. Aim: The aim of the present study is to determine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism at G1691A position of Factor V gene and risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case–control study, 250 patients with IS and 250 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled in the period of October 2012 to September 2014 from in- and out-patient department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Deoxyribonucleic acid for each case and control was isolated from peripheral blood using phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used to determine the polymorphism. Data were analyzed using STATA Software Version 13. Results: The mean age of IS patient was 52.8 ± 12.5 years and in control group was 50.97 ± 12.7 years. Genotypic frequency distributions were in accordance with Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and controls. As expected hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking, heavy alcohol intake, family history of stroke, and poor economic status were significantly associated with the risk of IS. Multivariate analysis revealed 5.17 times higher odds for developing the risk of large vessel subtype of IS in patients carrying Factor V Leiden G1691A gene variation as compared to control subjects (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 1.32–20.3, P = 0.01). Conclusion: The present study suggests that Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism may be significantly associated with the risk of large vessel subtype of IS. Large sample size studies using prospective cohort designs are required to corroborate the present findings. PMID:28904463

  10. Atrial Septal Aneurysm and Patent Foramen Ovale as Risk Factors for Cryptogenic Stroke in Patients Less Than 55 Years of Age: A Study using Transesophageal Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, L.; Mas, J. L.; Cohen, A.; Amarenco, P.; Cabanes, P. A.; Oubary, P.; Chedru, F.; Guerin, F.; Bousser, M. G.; deRecondo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: An association between atrial septal aneurysm and embolic events has been suggested. Atrial septal aneurysm has been shown to be associated with patent foramen ovale and,.in some reports, with mitral valve prolapse. These two latter cardiac disorder; have been identified as potential risk factors for ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the role of atrial septal aneurysm as an independent risk factor for stroke, especially for cryptogenic stroke. Methods: We studied the prevalence of atrial septal aneurysm, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve prolapse in 100 consecutive patients stroke who underwent extensive etiological investigations. We compared these results with those in a control group of 50 consecutive patients. The diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale relied on transesophageal echocardiography with a contrast study and that of mitral valve prolapse, on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Results: Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that atrial septal aneurysm (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 14.6; P=.01) and patent foramen ovale (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 10; P=.003) but not mitral valve prolapse were significantly associated with the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke. The stroke odds of a patient with both atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale were 33.3 times (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 270) the stroke odds of a patient with neither of these cardiac disorders. For a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of >lo-mm excursion, the stroke odds were approximately 8 times the stroke odds of a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of stroke and that their association has a marked synergistic effect. Atrial septal aneurysms of >lo-mm excursion are associated with a higher risk of stroke. (Stroke. 1993;24:1865-1873.) KEY WORDS aneurysm echocardiography foramen ovale, patent mitral valve prolapse o young adults

  11. Atrial Septal Aneurysm and Patent Foramen Ovale as Risk Factors for Cryptogenic Stroke in Patients Less Than 55 Years of Age: A Study using Transesophageal Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, L.; Mas, J. L.; Cohen, A.; Amarenco, P.; Cabanes, P. A.; Oubary, P.; Chedru, F.; Guerin, F.; Bousser, M. G.; deRecondo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: An association between atrial septal aneurysm and embolic events has been suggested. Atrial septal aneurysm has been shown to be associated with patent foramen ovale and,.in some reports, with mitral valve prolapse. These two latter cardiac disorder; have been identified as potential risk factors for ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the role of atrial septal aneurysm as an independent risk factor for stroke, especially for cryptogenic stroke. Methods: We studied the prevalence of atrial septal aneurysm, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve prolapse in 100 consecutive patients ischemic stroke who underwent extensive etiological investigations. We compared these results with those in a control group of 50 consecutive patients. The diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale relied on transesophageal echocardiography with a contrast study and that of mitral valve prolapse, on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Results: Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that atrial septal aneurysm (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 14.6; P=.01) and patent foramen ovale (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 10; P=.003) but not mitral valve prolapse were significantly associated with the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke. The stroke odds of a patient with both atrial septal aneurysm and patent foramen ovale were 33.3 times (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 270) the stroke odds of a patient with neither of these cardiac disorders. For a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of >lo-mm excursion, the stroke odds were approximately 8 times the stroke odds of a patient with atrial septal aneurysm of stroke and that their association has a marked synergistic effect. Atrial septal aneurysms of >lo-mm excursion are associated with a higher risk of stroke. (Stroke. 1993;24:1865-1873.) KEY WORDS aneurysm echocardiography foramen ovale, patent mitral valve prolapse o young adults

  12. The analysis of hyper-homocysteine incidence rate and multi-risk factors in 200 patients with cerebral stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiudong; Yang Jianghui; Huo Aimei; Wang Yan; Chu Yanchuang; Dong Mei

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the hyperhomocysteine incidence rate and clinical significance in 200 patients with cerebral stroke, the serum homocysteine, fibrinogen, C-reaction protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels in 200 patients with cerebral stroke and 100 normal healthy controls were detected. The results showed that both serum homocysteine and plasma FIB levels in patients with cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). The hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cerebral stoke, and hyperhomocysteine may lead to the increase of Fibrinogen level, which is one of the important reasons for the high blood viscosity in the cerebral infarction patients. (authors)

  13. Global burden of stroke and risk factors in 188 countries, during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery L; Roth, Gregory A; Naghavi, Mohsen; Parmar, Priya; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Chugh, Sumeet; Mensah, George A; Norrving, Bo; Shiue, Ivy; Ng, Marie; Estep, Kara; Cercy, Kelly; Murray, Christopher J L; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of modifiable risk factors to the increasing global and regional burden of stroke is unclear, but knowledge about this contribution is crucial for informing stroke prevention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) to estimate the population-attributable fraction (PAF) of stroke-related disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) associated with potentially modifiable environmental, occupational, behavioural, physiological, and metabolic risk factors in different age and sex groups worldwide and in high-income countries and low-income and middle-income countries, from 1990 to 2013. We used data on stroke-related DALYs, risk factors, and PAF from the GBD 2013 Study to estimate the burden of stroke by age and sex (with corresponding 95% uncertainty intervals [UI]) in 188 countries, as measured with stroke-related DALYs in 1990 and 2013. We evaluated attributable DALYs for 17 risk factors (air pollution and environmental, dietary, physical activity, tobacco smoke, and physiological) and six clusters of risk factors by use of three inputs: risk factor exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level. For most risk factors, we synthesised data for exposure with a Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR) or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. We based relative risks on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks, such as high body-mass index (BMI), through other risks, such as high systolic blood pressure (SBP) and high total cholesterol. Globally, 90·5% (95% UI 88·5-92·2) of the stroke burden (as measured in DALYs) was attributable to the modifiable risk factors analysed, including 74·2% (95% UI 70·7-76·7) due to behavioural factors (smoking, poor diet, and low physical activity). Clusters of metabolic factors (high SBP, high BMI, high

  14. Heat stroke in dogs: A retrospective study of 54 cases (1999-2004) and analysis of risk factors for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Klement, Eyal; Saragusty, Joseph; Finkeilstein, Efrat; Kass, Philip; Aroch, Itamar

    2006-01-01

    The medical records of 54 dogs presented to the Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and diagnosed with heat stroke were retrospectively reviewed. Data abstracted included history, clinical and clinicopathological signs at admission, treatment, disease progression, and outcome. Exertional and environmental heat stroke were present in 63% (34 of 54) and 37% (20 of 54) of the dogs, respectively, and 78% (42 of 54) were examined between June and August. The mean temperature and heat discomfort index in the particular days of heat stroke were significantly increased (P dogs the body temperature was > or = 41 degrees C (105.8 degrees F). Belgian Malinois (15%, odds ratio [OR] = 24, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 8.2-64.5), Golden and Labrador Retrievers (21%, OR = 2.08, CI95% 0.95-4.2), and brachycephalic breeds (25%, OR = 1.7, CI95%], 0.81-3.21) were overrepresented, whereas small breeds (dogs) and prolongation of the prothrombin (PT) and activated thromboplastin (aPTT) times (27 of 47 dogs) were recorded during hospitalization. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (P = .013) and acute renal failure (P = .008), diagnosed in 28 of 54 and 18 of 54 of the cases, respectively, were risk factors for death. The overall mortality rate was 50%. Hypoglycemia (18 seconds, P = .05), and aPTT (>30 sec, P 1.5 mg/dL (P = .003) after 24 hours, delayed admission (>90 minutes, P = .032), seizures (P = .02), and obesity (P = .04) were also risk factors for death. Heat stroke in dogs results in serious complications and high fatality rate despite appropriate treatment.

  15. Gingivitis and periodontitis as a risk factor for stroke: A case-control study in the Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Afshar, Afsaneh Jahanshahi; Borna, Roya; Seddighi, Behnas; Motamedi, Amin

    2013-09-01

    Periodontitis and gingivitis are one of the most infectious diseases in human. Several studies have been carried out on dependence of periodontitis and stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the gingivitis and periodontitis as a risk factor for stroke in Iranian population. A case-control study was conducted on 100 patients suffering from stroke as case group, and 100 hospitalized patients as control group. The case group included 42 males and 58 females, and in control group there were 44 males and 56 females. Using a University of North Carolina-15 manual probe, the clinical attachment level, the distance between the cemento-enamel junction and the probed base of the periodontal pocket, were recorded by gingival and periodontal indexes. The data were analyzed by multiple logistic regressions, Chi-square test, Fisher's test, t-test, Man Whitney, and SPSS11.5 software program. P > 0.05 was considered as significant. The case group included 42 males and 58 females, and in control group 44 males and 56 females were included. In this investigation, the average of gingival index in men and women of case group was 1.22 ± 0.55 and 1.31 ± 0.55, respectively. This study showed that the average of gingival index in case group was more than control group. Periodontal index in both groups in men was more than women. The moderate and severe periodontitis in case group were more than that of control group (P = 0.003, P = 0.001). The result of this study shows that there is a significant relation between stroke and periodontal index; however, there isn't any significant relation between stroke and gingival index.

  16. Demographics, socio-economic characteristics, and risk factor prevalence in patients with non-cardioembolic ischaemic stroke in low- and middle-income countries: the OPTIC registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Halim; Labreuche, Julien; Arauz, Antonio; Bryer, Alan; Lavados, Pablo G; Massaro, Ayrton; Munoz Collazos, Mario; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Yamout, Bassem I; Vicaut, Eric; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    There is a paucity of data on patients with stroke/transient ischaemic attack in low- and middle-income countries. We sought to describe the characteristics and management of patients with an ischaemic stroke and recent transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic strokes in low- or middle-income countries. The Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular disease registry is an international, prospective study. Patients ≥ 45 years who required secondary prevention of stroke (either following an acute transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic strokes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ischaemic stroke) were enrolled in 17 countries in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. The main measures of interest were risk factors, comorbidities, and socio-economic variables. Between January 2007 and December 2008, 3635 patients were enrolled in Latin America (n = 1543), the Middle East (n = 1041), North Africa (n = 834), and South Africa (n = 217). Of these, 63% had a stable, first-ever ischaemic stroke (median delay from symptom onset to inclusion, 25 days interquartile range, 7-77); 37% had an acute transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic stroke (median delay, two-days; interquartile range, 0-6). Prevalence of diabetes was 46% in the Middle East, 29% in Latin America, 35% in South Africa, and 38% in North Africa; 72% had abdominal obesity (range, 65-78%; adjusted P disease in 7.6%, and coronary artery disease in 13%. Overall, 24% of patients had no health insurance and 27% had a low educational level. In this study, patients in low- and middle-income countries had a high burden of modifiable risk factors. High rates of low educational level and lack of health insurance in certain regions are potential obstacles to risk factor control. The Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular disease registry is supported by Sanofi-Aventis, Paris, France. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Pathological Sub-Types, Risk Factors And Outcome Of Stroke At The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy five patients (93.8%) were discharged and four (5%) died in hospital. All patients who died had anterior circulation ischaemic stroke as per Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke is the most common pathological sub-type observed in this study.

  18. Risk of Stroke in Migraineurs Using Triptans. Associations with Age, Sex, Stroke Severity and Subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albieri, Vanna; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2016-01-01

    for a first stroke were identified in the Danish Registries. Information on stroke severity/subtype and cardiovascular risk factors was available for stroke patients. FINDINGS: Of the 49,711 patients hospitalized for a first stroke, 1084 were migraineurs using triptans. Adjusting for age, sex, income......, and educational level, risk for stroke was higher among migraineurs in respect to all strokes (RR 1.07; CI 1.01-1.14) and ischemic strokes (RR 1.07; CI 1.00-1.14). Risk for hemorrhagic stroke was increased but only in women (RR 1.41; CI 1.11-1.79). Risk was for mild strokes (RR 1.31; CI 1.16-1.48) while risk...

  19. Echocardiographic Risk Factors for Stroke and Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Anticoagulated With Apixaban or Warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinereanu, Dragos; Lopes, Renato D; Mulder, Hillary; Gersh, Bernard J; Hanna, Michael; de Barros E Silva, Pedro G M; Atar, Dan; Wallentin, Lars; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H

    2017-12-01

    Few data exist on the long-term outcomes of patients with spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), left atrial/left atrial appendage (LA/LAA) thrombus, and complex aortic plaque (CAP), in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving oral anticoagulation. We explored the relationship between these 3 echocardiographic findings and clinical outcomes, and the comparative efficacy and safety of apixaban and warfarin for each finding. Patients from the ARISTOTLE trial (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation) with SEC, LA/LAA thrombus, or CAP diagnosed by either transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography were compared with patients with none of these findings on transesophageal echocardiography. A total of 1251 patients were included: 217 had SEC, 127 had LA/LAA thrombus, 241 had CAP, and 746 had none. The rates of stroke/systemic embolism were not significantly different among patients with and without these echocardiographic findings (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-3.60 for SEC; hazard ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-6.86 for LA/LAA thrombus; hazard ratio, 2.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6.85 for CAP). Rates of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular death, and all-cause death were also not different between patients with and without these findings. For patients with either SEC or CAP, there was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin. For patients with LA/LAA thrombus, there was also no significant interaction, with the exception of all-cause death and any bleeding where there was a greater benefit of apixaban compared with warfarin among patients with no LA/LAA thrombus. In anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation and risk factors for stroke, echocardiographic findings do not seem to add to the risk of thromboembolic events. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00412984. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Polygenic Risk for Depression Increases Risk of Ischemic Stroke: From the Stroke Genetics Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Qi, Qibin; Dave, Tushar; Mitchell, Braxton D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Liu, Simin; Park, Ki; Salinas, Joel; Dunn, Erin C; Leira, Enrique C; Xu, Huichun; Ryan, Kathleen; Smoller, Jordan W

    2018-03-01

    Although depression is a risk factor for stroke in large prospective studies, it is unknown whether these conditions have a shared genetic basis. We applied a polygenic risk score (PRS) for major depressive disorder derived from European ancestry analyses by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium to a genome-wide association study of ischemic stroke in the Stroke Genetics Network of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Included in separate analyses were 12 577 stroke cases and 25 643 controls of European ancestry and 1353 cases and 2383 controls of African ancestry. We examined the association between depression PRS and ischemic stroke overall and with pathogenic subtypes using logistic regression analyses. The depression PRS was associated with higher risk of ischemic stroke overall in both European ( P =0.025) and African ancestry ( P =0.011) samples from the Stroke Genetics Network. Ischemic stroke risk increased by 3.0% (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.05) for every 1 SD increase in PRS for those of European ancestry and by 8% (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.13) for those of African ancestry. Among stroke subtypes, elevated risk of small artery occlusion was observed in both European and African ancestry samples. Depression PRS was also associated with higher risk of cardioembolic stroke in European ancestry and large artery atherosclerosis in African ancestry persons. Higher polygenic risk for major depressive disorder is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke overall and with small artery occlusion. Additional associations with ischemic stroke subtypes differed by ancestry. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. The cardiac model of rehabilitation for reducing cardiovascular risk factors post transient ischaemic attack and stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hayden; Kersten, Paula; Crawford, Pamela; Keens, Angela; Ashburn, Ann; Conway, Joy

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a standard National Health Service cardiac rehabilitation programme on risk factor reduction for patients after a minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Cardiac rehabilitation classes. Twenty-four patients. All participants received standard care. In addition, the intervention group undertook an eight-week cardiac rehabilitation programme consisting of weekly exercise and education classes. Cardiovascular disease risk score; lipid profiles; resting blood pressure; C-reactive protein (measured with a high sensitive assay) and fibrinogen levels; blood glucose; obesity; physical activity levels; subjective health status (SF-36); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Group comparison with independent t-tests showed a significantly greater improvement in the cardiovascular disease risk score for participants in the intervention group compared to standard care (intervention 25.7 ± 22.8 to 23.15 ± 18.3, control 25.03 ± 15.4 to 27.12 ± 16.1, t = -1.81, P rehabilitation programmes are a feasible and effective means of reducing the risk of future cardiovascular events for patients after minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack.

  2. The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary heart disease and stroke events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki A; Laatikainen, Tiina; Philpot, Benjamin; Janus, Edward D; Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie; Dunbar, James A

    2011-01-03

    To model the impact of both population and high-risk strategies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. A CVD risk-factor survey was carried out in rural south-eastern Australia from 2004 to 2006. Using a stratified random sample, data for 1116 participants aged 35-74 years were analysed. Applying the Framingham risk equations to risk-factor data, 5-year probabilities of a coronary heart disease event, stroke and cardiovascular event were calculated. The effect of different changes in risk factors were modelled to assess the extent to which cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by changing the risk factors at a population level (population strategy), among the high-risk individuals (high-risk strategy) or both. Among men, a population strategy could reduce cardiovascular events by 19.3% (193 per 1000 per 5 years), the high-risk strategy by 12.6% (126 per 1000) and a combined strategy by 24.1% (241 per 1000); and among women, by 21.9% (219 per 1000), 19.0% (190 per 1000) and 28.7% (287 per 1000), respectively. For prevention of CVD in Australia, it is important both to treat high-risk individuals and to reduce the mean risk-factor levels in the population. We show how risk-factor survey data can be used to set targets for prevention and to monitor progress in line with the recommendations of the National Preventative Health Taskforce.

  3. Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes Associated With Neonatal Hemorrhagic Stroke: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lauran; Dewey, Deborah; Letourneau, Nicole; Kaplan, Bonnie J; Chaput, Kathleen; Gallagher, Clare; Hodge, Jacquie; Floer, Amalia; Kirton, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Hemorrhage into the brain of term newborns often results in major injury and lifelong disability. The clinical epidemiology of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke (NHS) remains undefined, hindering the development of strategies to improve outcomes. To characterize the incidence, types, presentations, associated factors, and outcomes of neonatal hemorrhagic stroke. Population-based, nested case-control study. The Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project, a provincial registry, ascertained NHS cases using exhaustive diagnostic code searching (1992-2010, >2500 medical record reviews). Prospective cases were captured through the Calgary Pediatric Stroke Program (2007-2014). Participants included term neonates with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed NHS including primary and secondary intracerebral hemorrhage, hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic injury, and presumed perinatal hemorrhagic stroke. Control infants with common data were recruited from a population-based study (4 to 1 ratio). Infants with NHS underwent structured medical record review using data-capture forms and blinded scoring of neuroimaging. Clinical risk factor common data elements were explored using logistic regression. Provincial live births were obtained from Statistics Canada. Outcomes were extrapolated to the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure. We identified 86 cases: 51 infants (59%) with NHS, of which 32 (67%) were idiopathic, 30 (35%) were hemorrhagic transformation of primary ischemic injuries (14 with neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, 11 with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, and 5 with neonatal arterial ischemic stroke), and 5 were presumed perinatal hemorrhagic stroke. Sixty-two percent were male. Incidence of pure NHS was 1 in 9500 live births and 1 in 6300 for all forms. Most presented in the first week of life with seizures and encephalopathy. Acute neurosurgical intervention was rare (3 of 86 total cases; 3.5%). Temporal lobe was the most common NHS location (16 of 51 pure NHS cases; 31%). A

  4. Primary preventive potential for stroke by avoidance of major lifestyle risk factors: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Heidelberg cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikk, Kaja; Sookthai, Disorn; Monni, Stefano; Gross, Marie-Luise; Lichy, Christoph; Kloss, Manja; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Because primary prevention of stroke is a priority, our aim was to assess the primary preventive potential of major lifestyle risk factors for stroke in middle-aged women and men. Among 23,927 persons, 551 (195 women and 356 men) had a first diagnosis of stroke during an average follow-up of 12.7 years. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated the associations of adiposity, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and diet with risk of developing stroke. A competing risk model built from cause-specific proportional hazards models accounting for concurrent risk of death was used to calculate relative and absolute reductions in stroke occurrences that could have been achieved by maintaining a healthy lifestyle pattern. Obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, and physical inactivity were each identified as modifiable lifestyle risk factors for stroke. About 38% of stroke cases were estimated as preventable through adherence to a healthy lifestyle profile (never smoking, maintaining optimal body mass index and waist circumference, performing physical exercise, consuming a moderate quantity of alcohol, and following a healthy dietary pattern). Age-specific estimates of 5-year incidence rates for stroke in the actual cohort and in a hypothetical, comparable cohort of individuals following a healthy lifestyle would be reduced from 153 to 94 per 100,000 women and from 261 to 161 per 100,000 men for the age group 60 to 65 years. Our analysis confirms the strong primary prevention potential for stroke based on avoidance of excess body weight, smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Minority race and male sex as risk factors for non-beneficial gastrostomy tube placements after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigle, Roland; Carrese, Joseph A; Cooper, Lisa A; Urrutia, Victor C; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2018-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes are widely used for enteral feeding after stroke; however, PEG tubes placed in patients in whom death is imminent are considered non-beneficial. We sought to determine whether placement of non-beneficial PEG tubes differs by race and sex. In this retrospective cohort study, inpatient admissions for stroke patients who underwent palliative/withdrawal of care, were discharged to hospice, or died during the hospitalization, were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between race and sex with PEG placement. Of 36,109 stroke admissions who underwent palliative/withdrawal of care, were discharge to hospice, or experienced in-hospital death, a PEG was placed in 2,258 (6.3%). Among PEG recipients 41.1% were of a race other than white, while only 22.0% of patients without PEG were of a minority race (prace was associated with PEG placement compared to whites (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.57-1.96), and men had 1.27 times higher odds of PEG compared to women (95% CI 1.16-1.40). Racial differences were most pronounced among women: ethnic/racial minority women had over 2-fold higher odds of a PEG compared to their white counterparts (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.81-2.41), while male ethnic/racial minority patients had 1.44 increased odds of a PEG when compared to white men (95% CI 1.24-1.67, p-value for interaction race and male sex are risk factors for non-beneficial PEG tube placements after stroke.

  6. Risk Factors and Cognitive Relevance of Cortical Cerebral Microinfarcts in Patients With Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolu; van Veluw, Susanne J; Wong, Adrian; Liu, Wenyan; Shi, Lin; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Yunyun; Lau, Alexander; Biessels, Geert Jan; Mok, Vincent C T

    2016-10-01

    It was recently demonstrated that cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs) can be detected in vivo using 3.0 tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors, and the longitudinal cognitive consequence of cortical CMIs on 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging, in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 231 patients undergoing 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging were included. Montreal Cognitive Assessment was used to evaluate global cognitive functions and cognitive domains (memory, language, and attention visuospatial and executive functions). Cognitive changes were represented by the difference in Montreal Cognitive Assessment score between baseline and 28-month after stroke/transient ischemic attack. The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between cortical CMIs and cognitive functions were explored using ANCOVA and regression models. Cortical CMIs were observed in 34 patients (14.7%), including 13 patients with acute (hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging) and 21 with chronic CMIs (isointense on diffusion-weighted imaging). Atrial fibrillation was a risk factor for all cortical CMIs (odds ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-14.9; P=0.007). Confluent white matter hyperintensities was associated with chronic CMIs (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-7.8; P=0.047). The presence of cortical CMIs at baseline was associated with worse visuospatial functions at baseline and decline over 28-month follow-up (β=0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-1.0; P=0.008, adjusting for brain atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, and microbleeds). Cortical CMIs are a common finding in patients with stroke/transient ischemic attack. Associations between CMI with atrial fibrillation and white matter hyperintensities suggest that these lesions have a heterogeneous cause, involving microembolism and cerebral small vessel disease. CMI seemed to preferentially impact visuospatial functions as assessed by a

  7. Self-Reported Stroke Risk Stratification: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; McClure, Leslie A; Moy, Claudia S; Howard, Virginia J; Judd, Suzanne E; Yuan, Ya; Long, D Leann; Muntner, Paul; Safford, Monika M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-07-01

    The standard for stroke risk stratification is the Framingham Stroke Risk Function (FSRF), an equation requiring an examination for blood pressure assessment, venipuncture for glucose assessment, and ECG to determine atrial fibrillation and heart disease. We assess a self-reported stroke risk function (SRSRF) to stratify stroke risk in comparison to the FSRF. Participants from the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) were evaluated at baseline and followed for incident stroke. The FSRF was calculated using directly assessed stroke risk factors. The SRSRF was calculated from 13 self-reported questions to exclude those with prevalent stroke and assess stroke risk. Proportional hazards analysis was used to assess incident stroke risk using the FSRF and SRSRF. Over an average 8.2-year follow-up, 939 of 23 983 participants had a stroke. The FSRF and SRSRF produced highly correlated risk scores ( r Spearman =0.852; 95% confidence interval, 0.849-0.856); however, the SRSRF had higher discrimination of stroke risk than the FSRF (c SRSRF =0.7266; 95% confidence interval, 0.7076-0.7457; c FSRF =0.7075; 95% confidence interval, 0.6877-0.7273; P =0.0038). The 10-year stroke risk in the highest decile of predicted risk was 11.1% for the FSRF and 13.4% for the SRSRF. A simple self-reported questionnaire can be used to identify those at high risk for stroke better than the gold standard FSRF. This instrument can be used clinically to easily identify individuals at high risk for stroke and also scientifically to identify a subpopulation enriched for stroke risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Age-specific trends of atrial fibrillation-related ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack, anticoagulant use and risk factor profile in Chinese population: a 15-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Yannie; Chan, Nathan; Leung, Kam Tat; Chen, Xiang-Yan; Mok, Vincent; Wong, Lawrence; Leung, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing globally, and the fivefold increase in stroke risk constitutes significant healthcare burden. We aim to evaluate the trends of AF-related stroke and transient ischaemic attack (AF-stroke/TIA), prior anticoagulant use and their risk factors in different age groups in Chinese population. Data were retrieved from the stroke registry at Prince of Wales Hospital. We compared the data at 5-year intervals over a 15-year period (years 1999, 2004, 2009 and 2014). A total of 3894 patients were included, 712 patients had AF-stroke/TIA. Over the 15 years, the total number of ischaemic stroke/TIA fluctuated slightly during the period from year 1999 to 2009, and increased by 21.5% in the year 2014. While AF-stroke/TIA increased continuously with time by 282.1%. Increasing trend of AF-stroke/TIA was observed in all age groups. Absolute growth was highest in patients aged ≥80 years; relative growth was most pronounced in those between 65 and 72 years (>3.5 fold increase). Throughout the 15 years, >70% of AF-stroke/TIA occurred in non-anticoagulated patients, and this proportion increased with age. Increasing trends in both hypertension and ischaemic heart disease were also observed in patients with AF aged ≥73 years. AF-stroke/TIA has increased continuously by >2.5 fold in Chinese population over a 15-year period, with the majority of AF-stroke/TIA occurring in non-anticoagulated patients. Strategic planning is needed to optimise anticoagulant use, particularly non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in elderly patients, low-income group and those with ischaemic heart disease requiring concomitant antiplatelet therapy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Global burden of stroke and risk factors in 188 countries, during 1990-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigin, Valery L; Roth, Gregory A; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    -quarters of the global stroke burden. Air pollution has emerged as a significant contributor to global stroke burden, especially in low-income and middle-income countries, and therefore reducing exposure to air pollution should be one of the main priorities to reduce stroke burden in these countries. FUNDING: Bill...... & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Heart Association, US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Columbia University, Health Research Council of New Zealand, Brain Research New Zealand Centre of Research Excellence, and National Science Challenge, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment of New...

  10. Correlation between risk factors, functional recovery, and the health-related quality of life of stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Milan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective It has been estimated that 50% of strokes are preventable through the control of modifiable risk factors. The objective of the paper was to determine the correlation between the risk factors, functional status, and the health-related quality of life (HRQOL of stroke survivors. Method The prospective cohort study was used. The study included 136 patients 30–79 years old. Functional recovery was assessed using the Barthel index (BI and the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS. The HRQOL was evaluated by the generic Short Form 36 (SF-36 questionnaire. BI and mRS were determined at admission at the rehabilitation, one, three and six months after the stroke. The SF-36 was filled out at the same time. The analysis of the repeated measure variance (Repeated Measures ANOVA was applied, as well as the correlation analysis and Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation. Results A total number of 136 patients [66 (48.5% male and 70 (51.5% female] completed the questionnaire. The average age of stroke survivors was 63.72 ± 8.73. At admission, mRS was 4.75 ± 0.55, and six months after the stroke onset it decreased to 2.60 ± 1.08. The average value of BI at admission was 25 ± 24.66, and within six months it increased to 83.75 ± 18.59 (p = 0.001. The ANOVA showed that the values of mRS significantly decreased (p < 0.001 and the values of BI significantly increased (ANOVA: p < 0.001. All domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, except for the pain domain, significantly increased (p < 0.001. The physical function (r = 0.238; p < 0. 01, physical role (r = 0.199; p < 0.05, and emotional role (r = 0.237; p < 0.01 were significantly lower among alcohol addicts (r = 0.199; p < 0.05. Mental health (r = 0.244; p < 0.01 and social relationships domains were significantly lower among smokers (r = 0.272; p < 0.01. The general health (r = -0.290; p < 001 and health condition change domains were significantly lower among smokers (r = 0.225; p < 0

  11. Smoking and the risk of a stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, B.A.; Ambrose, J.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective study has been undertaken of 236 men and women with a stroke investigated by computed tomography and, where indicated, cerebral angiography. An excess of cigarette smokers has been found where the stroke was the result of ischaemia. Results indicate that continued smoking increases the risk of sustaining cerebral infarction by a factor of 1.9 for men and 2.4 for women. Smoking does not appear to be a risk factor in primary intracerebral haemorrhage, unlike subarachnoid haemorrhage where smokers carry a relative risk approaching four times that of non-smokers. (Author)

  12. [Stroke and transient ischemic attack-mimicking conditions: a prospective analysis of risk factors and clinical profiles at a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moncó, J C; Marrodán, A; Foncea Beti, N; Gómez Beldarrain, M

    2002-01-01

    Nonvascular structural entities can simulate stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA) in a variable percentage, but this issue has not been properly addressed in our environment. Their differentiation is important, since the management of patients with a true cerebrovascular accident differs considerably from that of mimicking conditions. To analyze prospectively those structural disorders that mimic stroke and TIA in the department of neurology of a general hospital and to determine if there are any distinctive risk factors and/or clinical presentations that would allow for their separation from true stroke and TIA. All patients admitted to our Department of Neurology with stroke or TIA were evaluated prospectively for a 4-year period. Those in whom a mimicking condition was disclosed were the subjects of this study. Their clinical features and vascular risk factors were compared with a sample of randomly selected patients with true stroke or TIA admitted during the same period. A total of 28 patients comprised the stroke-TIA mimicking group, 21 of them had a stroke-like syndrome and 7 a TIA-like syndrome. The mimicking group represented a 1.9% (2% of strokes and 1.6% of TIA) of all the patients with true cerebrovascular disorders admitted during the same period. Cancer, either primary or metastatic, was the single most frequent mimicking condition, accounting for two-thirds of the cases. Risk factors for stroke and TIA were significantly more frequent in the true stroke-TIA group without differences in age or sex, while the opposite is true in terms of prior or concurrent cancer. No single clinical profile allowed for a distinction between the two groups, although vertebrobasilar dysfunction suggested true ischemia, and vomiting, isolated dysarthria and dysarthria-clumsy hand occurred only in the true stroke-TIA group. Nonvascular conditions can cause signs and symptoms indistinguishable from true stroke and TIA, representing about 2% of the patients admitted

  13. Predicting Risk Factors of Working Aged Hemorrhagic Stroke Patients in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Chiang Mai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphannee Triamvisit

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Thailand accounting for a significant and increasing share of hospital costs. The purpose of this project is to study the epidemiology of the prevalence and its predicting factors of working aged hemorrhagic stroke (HS patients admitted at a tertiary teaching hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand. We conducted a five-year retrospective descriptive study. The subjects in this study were patients diagnosed with HS, between 15-59 years of age, and admitted to a tertiary teaching hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand from January 2009 to December 2013. A total of 404 working aged adults who had HS were admitted to the hospital during this review period; 60.9% males and 39.1% females. Nearly 70% of patients were between 46-59 years of age (M = 47.5, SD = 9.8. Of the patients admitted to the hospital, 76.7% were transferred there from other hospitals. Intracerebral hemorrhage was present in 59.7% of patients. Severe HS occurred in 35.9% of the patients with a Glasgow Coma Score from 3-8. Approximately 69% of the working aged HS patients required surgery. The top five identified risk factors for HS were hypertension (83.4%, hyperlipidemia (38.9%, alcohol consumption (21.5%, smoking (15.3 %, and drug non-adherence (14.9%. We found significantly associated risk factors in working-aged HS by multivariate analysis among male gender (p < .001, drug non-adherence (p = .047, and hypertension (p = .048. Raising awareness to reduce risk behavior and health promotion in the community are the keynotes for health care providers in working-aged HS prevention.

  14. Effectiveness of a Stroke Risk Self-Management Intervention for Adults with Prehypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Young Song, RN, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that the stroke risk self-management intervention is feasible and associated with improvement in self-management of stroke risk factors for primary stroke prevention among a prehypertensive population.

  15. Snoring as a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and stroke in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Koskenvuo, M; Kaprio, J; Telakivi, T; Partinen, M; Heikkilä, K; Sarna, S

    1987-01-01

    The association of snoring with ischaemic heart disease and stroke was studied prospectively in 4388 men aged 40-69. The men were asked, in a questionnaire sent to them, whether they snored habitually, frequently, occasionally, or never. Hospital records and death certificates were checked for the next three years to establish how many of the men developed ischaemic heart disease or stroke: the numbers were 149 and 42, respectively. Three categories of snoring were used for analysis: habitual...

  16. The relationship between dietary magnesium intake, stroke and its major risk factors, blood pressure and cholesterol, in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lucy K M; Myint, Phyo K; Jennings, Amy; Lentjes, Marleen A H; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Welch, Ailsa A

    2015-10-01

    Dietary magnesium could modify the major stroke risk factors, high blood pressure (BP) and cholesterol, but has been understudied in both sexes in a single population. This study aimed to investigate if dietary magnesium intake was associated with BP, total cholesterol (TC) and incident stroke risk in an adult population. We conducted cross-sectional analyses in a case-cohort study of 4443, men and women aged 40-75, representative of 25,639 participants years of the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer)-Norfolk cohort. The cohort included 928 stroke cases (42,556.5 person years). Dietary data from 7 day food diaries were analysed using multivariate regression to assess associations between quintiles or data-derived categories of dietary magnesium intake and BP, TC and stroke risk, adjusted for relevant confounders. We observed differences of -7 mmHg systolic BP (P trend ≤ 0.01) and -3.8 mmHg diastolic BP (P trend=0.01) between extreme intakes of magnesium in men, a significant inverse association with TC was observed (P trend=0.02 men and 0.04 women). Compared to the bottom 10%, the top 30% of magnesium intake was associated with a 41% relative reduction in stroke risk (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.38-0.93) in men. Lower dietary magnesium intake was associated with higher BP and stroke risk, which may have implications for primary prevention. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Evidence of perceived psychosocial stress as a risk factor for stroke in adults: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Joanne; Connelly, Lesley; Lawrence, Maggie; Chalmers, Campbell; Joice, Sara; Becker, Clarissa; Dougall, Nadine

    2015-11-12

    Several studies suggest that perceived psychosocial stress is associated with increased risk of stroke; however results are inconsistent with regard to definitions and measurement of perceived stress, features of individual study design, study conduct and conclusions drawn and no meta-analysis has yet been published. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing association between perceived psychosocial stress and risk of stroke in adults.The results of the meta-analysis are presented. Systematic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were undertaken between 1980 and June 2014. Data extraction and quality appraisal was performed by two independent reviewers. Hazard ratios (HR) and odds ratios (OR) were pooled where appropriate. 14 studies were included in the meta-analysis, 10 prospective cohort, 4 case-control design. Overall pooled adjusted effect estimate for risk of total stroke in subjects exposed to general or work stress or to stressful life events was 1.33 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.17, 1.50; P psychosocial stress to be associated with increased risk of fatal stroke (HR 1.45 95 % CI, 1.19,1.78; P = 0.0002), total ischaemic stroke (HR 1.40 95 % CI, 1.00,1.97; P = 0.05) and total haemorrhagic stroke (HR 1.73 95 % CI, 1.33,2.25; P > 0.0001).A sex difference was noted with higher stroke risk identified for women (HR 1.90 95 % CI, 1.4, 2.56: P psychosocial stress is independently associated with increased risk of stroke.

  18. Demographic And Technical Risk Factors Of 30-Day Stroke, Myocardial Infarction, And/Or Death In Standard And High Risk Patients Who Underwent Carotid Angioplasty And Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Yousefi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS is an accepted treatment to prevent stroke in patients with carotid artery stenosis. The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors for major complications after carotid angioplasty and stenting. Methods and Material: This is a prospective study conducted at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in southern Iran from March 2011 to June 2014. Consecutive patients undergoing carotid angioplasty and stenting were enrolled. Both standard risk and high risk patients for endarterectomy were enrolled. Demographic data, atherosclerotic risk factors, site of stenosis, degree of stenosis, and data regarding technical factors were recorded. 30-day stroke, myocardial infarction, and/or death were considered as the composite primary outcome of the study. Results:  two hundred and fifty one patients were recruited (mean age: 71.1+ 9.6 years, male: 65.3%.  One hundred and seventy eight (70.9% patients were symptomatic; 73 (29.1%, 129 (51.4%, 165 (65.7% and 62 (24.7% patients were diabetic, hyperlipidemic, hypertensive and smoker respectively. CAS performed for left ICA in 113 (45.4% patients. 14 (5.6% patients had Sequential bilateral stenting. Mean stenosis of operated ICA was 80.2 +13.8 %. Embolic protection device was used in 203 (96.2% patients. Predilation and post-dilation were performed in 39 (18.5% and 182 (86.3% patients respectively. Composite outcome was observed in 3.6% (3.2% stroke, 0% myocardial infarction and 1.2% death. Left sided lesions and presence of DM was significantly associated with poor short term outcome. (P value: 0.025 and 0.020, respectively Conclusion: There was a higher risk of short term major complications in diabetic patients and left carotid artery intervention.

  19. Disparities in adult African American women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology: an analysis of 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Cumba, Marites T; McCullough, Joel Emery; Barlow, Erika Laverne; Lipsky, Martin S

    2008-06-01

    Heart disease and stroke are the first and third leading causes of death of American women, respectively. African American women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women and are also more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. As knowledge is a first step in seeking care, this study examined the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among African American women. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data. A composite heart attack and stroke knowledge score was computed for each respondent from the 13 heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge questions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using low scores on the heart attack and stroke knowledge questions as the dependent variable. Twenty percent of the respondents were low scorers, and 23.8% were high scorers. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult African American women who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to be aged 18-34 (OR = 1.36, CI 1.35, 1.37), be uninsured (OR = 1.32, CI 1.31, 1.33), have an annual household income heart attack and stroke symptoms varied significantly among African American women, depending on socioeconomic variables. Targeting interventions to African American women, particularly those in lower socioeconomic groups, may increase knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms, subsequently improving preventive action taken in response to these conditions.

  20. Increased Risk of Pregnancy Complications After Stroke : The FUTURE Study (Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alebeek, Mayte E; de Vrijer, Myrthe; Arntz, Renate M; Maaijwee, Noortje A M M; Synhaeve, Nathalie E; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie; van der Vlugt, Maureen J; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Heus, Roel; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The study goal was to investigate the prevalence of pregnancy complications and pregnancy loss in women before, during, and after young ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack. METHODS: In the FUTURE study (Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and

  1. A Targeted Self-Management Approach for Reducing Stroke Risk Factors in African American Men Who Have Had a Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Welter, Elisabeth; Colon-Zimmermann, Kari; Blixen, Carol; Perzynski, Adam T; Amato, Shelly; Cage, Jamie; Sams, Johnny; Moore, Shirley M; Pundik, Svetlana; Sundararajan, Sophia; Modlin, Charles; Sila, Cathy

    2018-02-01

    This study compared a novel self-management (TargetEd MAnageMent Intervention [TEAM]) versus treatment as usual (TAU) to reduce stroke risk in African American (AA) men. Six-month prospective randomized controlled trial with outcomes evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Academic health center. Thirty-eight (age 60 were randomly assigned to TEAM (n = 19) or TAU (n = 19). Self-management training, delivered in 1 individual and 4 group sessions (over 3 months). Blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), lipids, medication adherence, weight, and standardized measures of health behaviors (diet, exercise, smoking, substances), depression, and quality of life. Qualitative assessments evaluated the perspectives of TEAM participants. T tests for paired differences and nonparametric tests. Thematic content qualitative analysis. Mean age was 52.1 (standard deviation [SD] = 7.4) and mean body mass index was 31.4 (SD = 7.4). Compared to TAU, TEAM participants had significantly lower mean systolic blood pressure by 24 weeks, and there was also improvement in HbA 1c and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ( P = .03). Other biomarker and health behaviors were similar between groups. Qualitative results suggested improved awareness of risk factors as well as positive effects of group support.

  2. Factores de riesgo de los ictus arteriales isquémicos en la infancia Risk factors of arterial ischemic strokes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vargas Díaz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Los ictus isquémicos infantiles pueden ocurrir en territorio arterial, la mayoría de ellos en la zona carotídea. Menos frecuentemente se presentan obstrucciones senovenosas, cuyo diagnóstico requiere adecuados índices de sospecha y técnicas de diagnóstico por la imagen capaces de detectarlas. Existen múltiples factores de riesgo genéticos y adquiridos relacionados con los ictus isquémicos. Las enfermedades cardíacas, los trastornos de la coagulación sanguínea, la anemia de células falciformes, las infecciones, el síndrome moyamoya, la disección arterial y otros trastornos genéticos infrecuentes, están entre los factores de riesgo más frecuentemente documentados. Las obstrucciones senovenosas parecen estar más relacionadas con infecciones de la cabeza o cuello, deshidratación, complicaciones perinatales y trastornos de la coagulación. Existe además la posibilidad de que varios de estos factores actúen al unísono en un paciente con ictus. La identificación y posible control de los factores de riesgo de los ictus infantiles son motivo de intensa investigación multicéntrica, en un intento de esclarecer la fisiopatogenia y verdadera relación causal de estos.Ischemic stroke in children may occur in the arterial area, most of them in the carotid zone. The sinovenous obstructions, whose diagnosis requires proper rates of suspicion and imaging diagnostic techniques capable of detecting them are less common. There are many genetic and acquired risk factors related to ischemic stroke. Cardiac diseases, blood coagulation disorders, sickle cell anemia, infections, moyamoya syndrome, arterial dissection, and other rare genetic disorders, are among the most frequent documented risk factors. Sinovenous obstructions seem to be connected with head or neck infections, dehydratation, perinatal complications, and coagulation disorders. There is also the possibility that many of these factors act at the same time on the patient with

  3. Calcifications of Vertebrobasilar Arteries on CT: Detailed Distribution and Relation to Risk Factors in 245 Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaven Pikija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intracranial atherosclerosis is responsible for a substantial proportion of strokes worldwide but its detailed morphology in the vertebrobasilar arteries (VBA is unknown. Subject and Methods. Cases with ischemic strokes were retrospectively sought from the hospital database. Native CT scans were assessed for vessel area and intracranial artery calcifications (ICACs in VBA. The calcifications were classified as focal (FCs, crescent, and circular. Results. 245 patients (mean age: years, 57.6% females had visible ICACs. Calcifications were found in 75.9%, 63.3%, and 17.1% in the left vertebral artery (LVA, the right vertebral artery (RVA, and the basilar artery (BA, respectively. FCs were present in 91.0%, 90.3%, and 100.0%; crescents in 30.3%, 29.0%, and 7.1%, and circulars in 6.4%, 4.8%, and 0.0% of the RVA, LVA, and BA, respectively. FCs in dorsolateral quadrant were least prevalent in both vertebral arteries (VAs: 46 (29.8% and 46 (27.4% for RVA and LVA, respectively. Risk factors associated with vertical dispersion of ICACs were male gender (OR : 2.69, 1.38–5.28 and diabetes (OR : 2.28, 1.04–4.99. Conclusions. FCs in VAs are least prevalent in dorsolateral quadrants. The vertical dispersion of ICACs seems to be associated with the male gender and diabetes.

  4. Depression in survivors of stroke : a community-based study at prevalence, risk factors and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, A T F; Penninx, B W J H; Deeg, DJH; Ormel, J; Braam, AW; van Tilburg, W

    1998-01-01

    Depression in survivors of stroke is both common and clinically relevant. It is associated with excess suffering, handicap, suicidal ideation and mortality and it hampers rehabilitation. Most of the data currently available are derived from clinical studies. The objective of the present study was to

  5. Genetic risk factors for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (the METASTROKE collaboration)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traylor, Matthew; Farrall, Martin; Holliday, Elizabeth G

    2012-01-01

    Various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been done in ischaemic stroke, identifying a few loci associated with the disease, but sample sizes have been 3500 cases or less. We established the METASTROKE collaboration with the aim of validating associations from previous GWAS and identify...

  6. Absent collateral function of the circle of Willis as risk factor for ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoksbergen, A. W. J.; Legemate, D. A.; Csiba, L.; Csáti, G.; Síró, P.; Fülesdi, B.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Autopsy studies show a higher prevalence of circle of Willis anomalies in brains with signs of ischemic infarction. Our goal was to examine the collateral function of the circle of Willis in ischemic stroke patients and to assess in a case-control study if a collateral deficient circle

  7. Randomized controlled trial of a coordinated care intervention to improve risk factor control after stroke or transient ischemic attack in the safety net: Secondary stroke prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic care model teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Cheng, Eric M; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; McCreath, Heather; Sanossian, Nerses; Dutta, Tara; Mehta, Bijal; Bryg, Robert; Rao, Neal; Song, Shlee; Razmara, Ali; Ramirez, Magaly; Sivers-Teixeira, Theresa; Tran, Jamie; Mojarro-Huang, Elizabeth; Montoya, Ana; Corrales, Marilyn; Martinez, Beatrice; Willis, Phyllis; Macias, Mireya; Ibrahim, Nancy; Wu, Shinyi; Wacksman, Jeremy; Haber, Hilary; Richards, Adam; Barry, Frances; Hill, Valerie; Mittman, Brian; Cunningham, William; Liu, Honghu; Ganz, David A; Factor, Diane; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-02-06

    Recurrent strokes are preventable through awareness and control of risk factors such as hypertension, and through lifestyle changes such as healthier diets, greater physical activity, and smoking cessation. However, vascular risk factor control is frequently poor among stroke survivors, particularly among socio-economically disadvantaged blacks, Latinos and other people of color. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an effective framework for multi-component interventions aimed at improving care processes and outcomes for individuals with chronic disease. In addition, community health workers (CHWs) have played an integral role in reducing health disparities; however, their effectiveness in reducing vascular risk among stroke survivors remains unknown. Our objectives are to develop, test, and assess the economic value of a CCM-based intervention using an Advanced Practice Clinician (APC)-CHW team to improve risk factor control after stroke in an under-resourced, racially/ethnically diverse population. In this single-blind randomized controlled trial, 516 adults (≥40 years) with an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or intracerebral hemorrhage within the prior 90 days are being enrolled at five sites within the Los Angeles County safety-net setting and randomized 1:1 to intervention vs usual care. Participants are excluded if they do not speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean or if they are unable to consent. The intervention includes a minimum of three clinic visits in the healthcare setting, three home visits, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Program group workshops in community venues. The primary outcome is blood pressure (BP) control (systolic BP control of other vascular risk factors including lipids and hemoglobin A1c, (3) inflammation (C reactive protein [CRP]), (4) medication adherence, (5) lifestyle factors (smoking, diet, and physical activity), (6) estimated relative reduction in risk for recurrent stroke or myocardial

  8. Clinical and angiographic risk factors for stroke and death within 30 days after carotid endarterectomy and stent-protected angioplasty: a subanalysis of the SPACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingele, Robert; Berger, Jürgen; Alfke, Karsten; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Fraedrich, Gustav; Allenberg, Jens; Hartmann, Marius; Ringleb, Peter A; Fiehler, Jens; Bruckmann, H; Hennerici, M; Jansen, O; Klein, G; Kunze, A; Marx, P; Niederkorn, K; Schmiedt, W; Solymosi, L; Zeumer, H; Hacke, W

    2008-03-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS) are used to prevent ischaemic stroke in patients with stenosis of the internal carotid artery. Better knowledge of risk factors could improve assignment of patients to these procedures and reduce overall risk. We aimed to assess the risk of stroke or death associated with CEA and CAS in patients with different risk factors. We analysed data from 1196 patients randomised to CAS or CEA in the Stent-Protected Angioplasty versus Carotid Endarterectomy in Symptomatic Patients (SPACE) trial. The primary outcome event was death or ipsilateral stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) with symptoms that lasted more than 24 h between randomisation and 30 days after therapy. Six predefined variables were assessed as potential risk factors for this outcome: age, sex, type of qualifying event, side of intervention, degree of stenosis, and presence of high-grade contralateral stenosis or occlusion. The SPACE trial is registered at Current Controlled Trials, with the international standard randomised controlled trial number ISRCTN57874028. Risk of ipsilateral stroke or death increased significantly with age in the CAS group (p=0.001) but not in the CEA group (p=0.534). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the age that gave the greatest separation between high-risk and low-risk populations who had CAS was 68 years: the rate of primary outcome events was 2.7% (8/293) in patients who were 68 years old or younger and 10.8% (34/314) in older patients. Other variables did not differ between the CEA and CAS groups. Of the predefined covariates, only age was significantly associated with the risk of stroke and death. The lower risk after CAS versus CEA in patients up to 68 years of age was not detectable in older patients. This finding should be interpreted with caution because of the drawbacks of post-hoc analyses.

  9. Magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    study was aimed to assess the magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients attended the medical department of ... Methods: An institution based cross sectional study was conducted among 427 adult (≥30 years old) stroke patient records in June ... risk of mortality, about 85% of all strokes are ischemic. (1-3).

  10. Risk factors for stroke and thromboembolism in relation to age among patients with atrial fibrillation: the loire valley atrial fibrillation project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Fauchier, Laurent; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-01-01

    According to the latest European guidelines on the management of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), all patients aged ≥ 65 years should be treated with oral anticoagulation (if not contraindicated). Therefore, stroke risk factors should be investigated exclusively in patients with NVAF aged...

  11. Associations of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA and hair mercury with the risk of incident stroke in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Roya; Kurl, Sudhir; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K

    2016-05-28

    PUFA have been associated with lower risk of CVD, but less is known about their association with stroke risk. Fish, a major source of n-3 PUFA, may also contain methylmercury, which has been associated with higher risk of CVD and attenuation of the benefits of long-chain n-3 PUFA. We investigated the associations of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA and hair Hg with risk of stroke in men. A total of 1828 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989 were studied. Cox regression models were used for the analyses. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred, of which 153 were ischaemic strokes. After adjustment for age and examination year, the only statistically significant association among the n-3 and n-6 PUFA was observed between the n-3 PUFA α-linolenic acid and risk of haemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio in the highest v. the lowest quartile 0·33; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·86; P trend=0·03). However, further adjustments attenuated the association to statistically non-significant. Hair Hg was not associated with stroke risk, but among those with hair Hg above the median level, higher serum long-chain n-3 PUFA concentrations were associated with a higher risk of ischaemic stroke. In our cohort of men, serum n-3 or n-6 PUFA or hair Hg were not associated with stroke risk; however, the interaction between Hg and long-chain n-3 PUFA with regard to ischaemic stroke risk warrants further investigation.

  12. Gastrointestinal Bowel Obstruction in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in a U.S. Nationwide Analysis of 3,998,667 Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Kumar, Ashwath S; Mittal, Manoj K

    2017-10-01

    The prognosis from acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is worsened by poststroke medical complications. The incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of gastrointestinal bowel obstruction (GIBO) in AIS are not known. We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2002-2011) to identify all patients with a primary diagnosis of AIS and subsets with and without a secondary diagnosis of GIBO without hernia. Multivariable analysis was utilized to identify risk factors for GIBO in AIS patients and the association between GIBO, in-hospital complications, and outcomes. We identified 16,987 patients with GIBO (.43%) among 3,988,667 AIS hospitalizations and 4.2% of these patients underwent surgery. In multivariable analysis, patients with 75+ years of age were two times as likely to suffer GIBO compared to younger patients (P Stroke patients with pre-existing comorbidities (coagulopathy, cancer, blood loss anemia, and fluid/electrolyte disorder) were more likely to experience GIBO (all P risk factors identified in this study aim to encourage the monitoring of patients at highest risk for GIBO. The predominant form of stroke-related GIBO is nonmechanical obstruction, although the causative relationship remains unknown. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity are risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes is increasing. While brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV and ankle-brachial index (ABI are known to be associated with ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, whether these measures predict the risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in diabetic patients remains unclear. 117 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study. According to the results of head magnetic resonance imaging, the patients were divided into a diabetes-only group (n = 55 and a diabetes and ischemic stroke group (n = 62. We then performed ABI and BaPWV examinations for all patients. Compared with the diabetes-only group, we found decreased ABI and increased BaPWV in the diabetes and ischemic stroke group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BaPWV and ABI were risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our findings indicate that decreased ABI and increased BaPWV are objective indicators of increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Short-term Outcome of Ischemic Stroke, in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Data from a Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanksha, William G; Paramdeep, Kaur; Gagandeep, Singh; Rajinder, Bansal; Birinder, S Paul; Monika, Singla; Shavinder, Singh; Clarence, J Samuel; Shweta, J Verma; Sharma, Meenakshi; Jeyaraj, D Pandian

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder associated with stroke. This study was done to describe risk factors, clinical features, and short-term outcomes of stroke patients with AF. This study was a part of the Indian Council of Medical Research funded "Ludhiana urban population based Stroke Registry." Data were collected using WHO STEPS stroke method. All patients ≥18 years of age, who developed ischemic stroke between March 26, 2011, and March 25, 2013, were included in this study. Data about demographic details, clinical features, and risk factors were collected. The outcome was assessed at 28 days using modified Rankin scale (mRs) (good outcome: mRS ≤2; poor outcome >2). The statistical measures calculated were descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, Fischer's exact test, and independent t -test. Of the total 7199 patients enrolled in the registry, data of 1942 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria were analyzed, and AF was seen in 203 (10%) patients. AF patients were older (AF 62 ± 14 vs. non-AF 60 ± 15 years, P = 0.01), had more hypertension (AF 176 [87%] vs. non-AF 1396 [80%], P = 0.03), hyperlipidemia (AF 60 [32%] vs. non-AF 345 [21%], P = 0.001), coronary artery disease (AF 60 [30%] vs. non-AF 195 [11%], P 2; AF 90 [50%] vs. non-AF 555 [37%], P = 0.001). Ten percent of stroke patients had AF. They were older, had multiple risk factors and worse outcome. There was no gender difference in this large cohort.

  15. Global and regional effects of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with acute stroke in 32 countries (INTERSTROKE): a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Martin J; Chin, Siu Lim; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Xavier, Denis; Liu, Lisheng; Zhang, Hongye; Rao-Melacini, Purnima; Zhang, Xiaohe; Pais, Prem; Agapay, Steven; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Damasceno, Albertino; Langhorne, Peter; McQueen, Matthew J; Rosengren, Annika; Dehghan, Mahshid; Hankey, Graeme J; Dans, Antonio L; Elsayed, Ahmed; Avezum, Alvaro; Mondo, Charles; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Czlonkowska, Anna; Pogosova, Nana; Weimar, Christian; Iqbal, Romaina; Diaz, Rafael; Yusoff, Khalid; Yusufali, Afzalhussein; Oguz, Aytekin; Wang, Xingyu; Penaherrera, Ernesto; Lanas, Fernando; Ogah, Okechukwu S; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Iversen, Helle K; Malaga, German; Rumboldt, Zvonko; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Al Hussain, Fawaz; Magazi, Daliwonga; Nilanont, Yongchai; Ferguson, John; Pare, Guillaume; Yusuf, Salim

    2016-08-20

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke in different regions of the world, and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes of stroke. We completed a standardised international case-control study in 32 countries in Asia, America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East, and Africa. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days of symptom onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls were hospital-based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke, and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks (PARs) were calculated, with 99% confidence intervals. Between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015, 26 919 participants were recruited from 32 countries (13 447 cases [10 388 with ischaemic stroke and 3059 intracerebral haemorrhage] and 13 472 controls). Previous history of hypertension or blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or higher (OR 2·98, 99% CI 2·72-3·28; PAR 47·9%, 99% CI 45·1-50·6), regular physical activity (0·60, 0·52-0·70; 35·8%, 27·7-44·7), apolipoprotein (Apo)B/ApoA1 ratio (1·84, 1·65-2·06 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26·8%, 22·2-31·9 for top two tertiles vs lowest tertile), diet (0·60, 0·53-0·67 for highest vs lowest tertile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index [mAHEI]; 23·2%, 18·2-28·9 for lowest two tertiles vs highest tertile of mAHEI), waist-to-hip ratio (1·44, 1·27-1·64 for highest vs lowest tertile; 18·6%, 13·3-25·3 for top two tertiles vs lowest), psychosocial factors (2·20, 1·78-2·72; 17·4%, 13·1-22·6), current smoking (1·67, 1·49-1·87; 12·4%, 10·2-14·9), cardiac causes (3·17, 2·68-3·75; 9·1%, 8·0-10·2), alcohol consumption (2·09, 1·64

  16. Some risk factors of stroke in dwellers of the Republic of Tyva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Doronin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the opinion of dwellers in the Republic of Tyva on the formation of a healthy lifestyle in order to prevent stroke.Patients and methods. A survey was conducted among 302 patients (125 men and 177 women; mean age, 56.68±2.85 years admitted to the Department of Neurology, Republican Hospital One, with a diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular accident, encephalopathy, consequences of acute cerebrovascular accident, or vegetative vascular dystonia.Results. The survey showed that 17.55% of the patients found it difficult to answer the question of what constituted a healthy lifestyle. None of the respondents constantly went to sports sections constantly, 11.26% did rarely. 47.35% were smokers; 14.62% were alcohol abusers. 7.95% of the respondents were regularly engaged in physical exercises. Only 8.61% consumed vegetables and fruits every day. The majority of respondents ate not more than once every two months. Only 8.61% of the respondents walked a distance of more than 5 km every distance; 17.88% were engaged in daily physical activity.Conclusion. To introduce the principles of a healthy lifestyle in the Republic of Tyva, it is necessary to implement targeted preventive measures.

  17. Incidence, outcome, risk factors, and long-term prognosis of cryptogenic transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin; Yiin, Gabriel S; Geraghty, Olivia C; Schulz, Ursula G; Kuker, Wilhelm; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    A third of transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and ischaemic strokes are of undetermined cause (ie, cryptogenic), potentially undermining secondary prevention. If these events are due to occult atheroma, the risk-factor profile and coronary prognosis should resemble that of overt large artery events. If they have a cardioembolic cause, the risk of future cardioembolic events should be increased. We aimed to assess the burden, outcome, risk factors, and long-term prognosis of cryptogenic TIA and stroke. In a population-based study in Oxfordshire, UK, among patients with a first TIA or ischaemic stroke from April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2014, we compared cryptogenic events versus other causative subtypes according to the TOAST classification. We compared markers of atherosclerosis (ie, risk factors, coronary and peripheral arterial disease, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, and 10-year risk of acute coronary events) and of cardioembolism (ie, risk of cardioembolic stroke, systemic emboli, and new atrial fibrillation [AF] during follow-up, and minor-risk echocardiographic abnormalities and subclinical paroxysmal AF at baseline in patients with index events between 2010 and 2014). Among 2555 patients, 812 (32%) had cryptogenic events (incidence of cryptogenic stroke 0·36 per 1000 population per year, 95% CI 0·23-0·49). Death or dependency at 6 months was similar after cryptogenic stroke compared with non-cardioembolic stroke (23% vs 27% for large artery and small vessel subtypes combined; p=0·26) as was the 10-year risk of recurrence (32% vs 27%; p=0·91). However, the cryptogenic group had fewer atherosclerotic risk factors than the large artery disease (pdisease (p=0·001), and cardioembolic (p=0·008) groups. Compared with patients with large artery events, those with cryptogenic events had less hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0·41, 95% CI 0·30-0·56; pdisease (0·27, 0·17-0·45; pdisease (adjusted OR 0·64, 95% CI 0·37-1·11; p=0·11) or acute coronary

  18. [Retrospective analysis of risk factors in 900 patients with ischemic cerebral stroke of wind-phlegm collateral obstruction syndrome and qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome in Wuhan District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xin; Wang, Kai-xin; Chen, Guo-hua

    2011-11-01

    To analyze the correlation between risk factors and ischemic cerebral stroke of wind-phlegm collateral obstruction syndrome and qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome. Totally 900 patients of the two syndrome types were recruited. Risk factors correlated to ischemic cerebral stroke such as gender, age, time of onset, site of infarction, tongue proper, tongue fur, pulse picture, hypertension, diabetes, past stroke history, hyperlipidemia, hematocrit, smoking, drinking, genetic factor, blood type, complications were analyzed using Chi-square test and non-conditional Logistic regression analysis. Statistical significance existed between the two syndrome types in age (X2 = 8.2392, P = 0.0413), hyperlipidemia (X2 = 4.8386, P = 0.0278), tongue proper (X2 = 7.9470, P = 0.0048), and tongue fur (X2 = 4.3298, P = 0.0375). Statistical significance existed between the two syndrome types in hyperlipidemia, tongue proper, and tongue fur, and their OR value was 0.699 (P = 0.0282), 0.332 (P =0.0071), and 0.667 (P = 0.0382) respectively. The OR value of the past stroke history was 3.226 (P = 0.0314), that of complications 0.203 (P = 0.0705), and that of anterior circulation infarction 0.214 (P = 0.0098). Among different ages groups, the constituent ratio of qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome was obviously higher than that of wind-phlegm collateral obstruction syndrome. Besides, patients of qi deficiency blood stasis syndrome were liable to suffer from hyperlipidemia, anterior circulation infarction, and complications. The age, blood lipid levels, site of infarction, complications are closely correlated with Chinese syndrome types of ischemic cerebral stroke, which can provide objective indices for typing ischemic cerebral stroke.

  19. Comparison of Risk Factors of Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in Patients 15 to 45 Years in Affiliated Hospitals of Babol University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alijan Ahmadi Ahangar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Myocardial infarction (MI and stroke are the second and third leading causes of death in the world. By identifying the risk factors we can take the necessary measures to prevent the occurrence of these diseases. Methods In this retrospective study, 90 MI patients and 90 stroke patients 15 - 45 year admitted to hospitals of Babol University of Medical Sciences that randomly arranged by the time of hospitalization conducted. Demographics, laboratory test and risk factors were collected using check list. The data analyzed with McNemar and Npar tests by using SPSS 21 version software. Results The most common risk factor in young patient was a history of cerebrovascular disease that in stroke was 31 cases (34% And in MI was 33 cases (37%. History of cerebrovascular disease with MI was significant 33 (37%, 57(63%, P = 0.047. A history of cardiovascular disease with stroke was significant (20 (22%, 70 (68, P = 0.001. A history of addiction with MI was significant (23 (26%, 67 (74%, P < 0.001. In stroke patients 52 cases (% 57 low-density lipoprotein (LDL was high and in 66 cases (73.1% high-density lipoprotein (HDL was low. In patients with MI in 46 patients (51% LDL was high and the 66 patients (73% HDL was low. Conclusions Young peoples with a history of cerebrovascular, cardiovascular disease and addictions should be considering as target society. Primary health care system must identify high-risk individuals, and policy barriers that prevent implementation of programs to lower death rate.

  20. Relationship between Risk Factor Control and Compliance with a Lifestyle Modification Program in the Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Tanya N; Al Kasab, Sami; Nizam, Azhar; Lynn, Michael J; Harrell, Jamie; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Janis, L Scott; Lane, Bethany F; Montgomery, Jean; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2018-03-01

    Lifestyle modification programs have improved the achievement of risk factor targets in a variety of clinical settings, including patients who have previously suffered a stroke or transient ischemic attack and those with multiple risk factors. Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) was the first vascular disease prevention trial to provide a commercially available lifestyle modification program to enhance risk factor control. We sought to determine the relationship between compliance with this program and risk factor control in SAMMPRIS. SAMMPRIS aggressive medical management included a telephonic lifestyle modification program provided free of charge to all subjects (n = 451) during their participation in the study. Subjects with fewer than 3 expected lifestyle-coaching calls were excluded from these analyses. Compliant subjects (n = 201) had  greater than or equal to 78.5% of calls (median % of completed/expected calls). Noncompliant subjects (n = 200) had less than 78.5% of calls or refused to participate. Mean risk factor values or % in-target for each risk factor was compared between compliant versus noncompliant subjects, using t tests and chi-square tests. Risk factor changes from baseline to follow-up were compared between the groups to account for baseline differences. Compliant subjects had better risk factor control throughout follow-up for low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure (SBP), hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c), non-high-density lipoprotein, nonsmoking, and exercise than noncompliant subjects, but there was no difference for body mass index. After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups, compliant subjects had a greater change from baseline than noncompliant subjects for SBP did at 24 months and HgA1c at 6 months. SAMMPRIS subjects who were compliant with the lifestyle modification program had better risk factor control during the study for almost

  1. Incidence and Risk Factors of Stroke or Systemic Embolism in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iguchi, Moritake; Tezuka, Yuji; Ogawa, Hisashi

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, but the effect of the type and severity of HF on the incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (SE) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is unclear.Methods and Results:The Fushimi AF Registry is a community-based prospective survey of AF ...... of HF in patients with AF. The incidence of stroke/SE was markedly increased in the 30 days after admission for HF, but compensated 'stable' HF did not appear to confer an independent risk.......BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous syndrome, but the effect of the type and severity of HF on the incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (SE) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is unclear.Methods and Results:The Fushimi AF Registry is a community-based prospective survey of AF....... On multivariate analysis, the incidence of stroke/SE was not associated with pre-existing HF (hazard ratio (HR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.64) or each criterion for the definition of pre-existing HF, but was associated with high B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP levels (above...

  2. Risk factors for death, stroke, and bleeding in 28,628 patients from the GARFIELD-AF registry: Rationale for comprehensive management of atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Bassand

    Full Text Available The factors influencing three major outcomes-death, stroke/systemic embolism (SE, and major bleeding-have not been investigated in a large international cohort of unselected patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF.In 28,628 patients prospectively enrolled in the GARFIELD-AF registry with 2-year follow-up, we aimed at analysing: (1 the variables influencing outcomes; (2 the extent of implementation of guideline-recommended therapies in comorbidities that strongly affect outcomes. Median (IQR age was 71.0 (63.0 to 78.0 years, 44.4% of patients were female, median (IQR CHA2DS2-VASc score was 3.0 (2.0 to 4.0; 63.3% of patients were on anticoagulants (ACs with or without antiplatelet (AP therapy, 24.5% AP monotherapy, and 12.2% no antithrombotic therapy. At 2 years, rates (95% CI of death, stroke/SE, and major bleeding were 3.84 (3.68; 4.02, 1.27 (1.18; 1.38, and 0.71 (0.64; 0.79 per 100 person-years. Age, history of stroke/SE, vascular disease (VascD, and chronic kidney disease (CKD were associated with the risks of all three outcomes. Congestive heart failure (CHF was associated with the risks of death and stroke/SE. Smoking, non-paroxysmal forms of AF, and history of bleeding were associated with the risk of death, female sex and heavy drinking with the risk of stroke/SE. Asian race was associated with lower risks of death and major bleeding versus other races. AC treatment was associated with 30% and 28% lower risks of death and stroke/SE, respectively, compared with no AC treatment. Rates of prescription of guideline-recommended drugs were suboptimal in patients with CHF, VascD, or CKD.Our data show that several variables are associated with the risk of one or more outcomes, in terms of death, stroke/SE, and major bleeding. Comprehensive management of AF should encompass, besides anticoagulation, improved implementation of guideline-recommended therapies for comorbidities strongly associated with outcomes, namely CHF, VascD, and

  3. How Can Diet Influence the Risk of Stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Medeiros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are the second cause of mortality in the world, and hypertension is considered a main risk factor for occurrence of stroke. The mechanisms responsible for the increased stroke risk remain unclear. However, dietary interventions have been applied in the management and treatment of their risk factors, which include increased blood pressure levels, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Further studies should be conducted to assess the effects of carotenoids, flavonoids, n-3 polyunsaturated fats, and lower salt and high glycemic index intake in risk of stroke.

  4. POST-STROKE COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT – PHENOMENOLOGY AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Danovska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke patients are at higher risk of developing cognitive impairment. Cognitive dysfunctions, especially progressive ones, worsen stroke prognosis and outcome. A longitudinal follow-up of cognitive disorders, however, is rendered difficult by their heterogeneity and the lack of definitions generally agreed upon. Stroke is a major cause of cognitive deficit. The identification of risk factors, clinical determinants and laboratory markers of post-stroke cognitive deficit may help detect patients at increased risk of cognitive deterioration, and prevent or delay the occurrence of post-stroke cognitive impairments. Though inflammatory processes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke, their role in the complex pathophysiological mechanisms of post-stroke cognitive impairment is not completely understood. Evidence suggests that elevated serum C-reactive protein is associated with both the increased risk of stroke and post-stroke cognitive deficit. The hypothesis of a possible relationship between markers of systemic inflammation and cognitive dysfunctions raises the question of how rational the option of applying non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a proper therapeutic window will be, especially during the acute phase of stroke, to prevent cognitive decline and dementia.

  5. Increased stroke risk in Bell's palsy patients without steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C-C; Su, Y-C; Chien, S-H; Ho, H-C; Hung, S-K; Lee, M-S; Chou, P; Chiu, B C-H; Huang, Y-S

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the risk of stroke development following a diagnosis of Bell's palsy in a nationwide follow-up study. Information on Bell's palsy and other factors relevant for stroke was obtained for 433218 eligible subjects without previous stroke who had ambulatory visit in 2004. Of those, 897 patients with Bell's palsy were identified. Over a median 2.9 years of follow-up, 4581 incident strokes were identified. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI] with Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, co-morbidities, and important risk factors. Standardized incidence ratio of stroke amongst patients with Bell's palsy was analyzed. Compared with non-Bell's palsy patients, patients with Bell's palsy had a 2.02-times (95% CI, 1.42-2.86) higher risk of stroke. The adjusted HR of developing stroke for patients with Bell's palsy treated with and without systemic steroid were 1.67 (95% CI, 0.69-4) and 2.10 (95%, 1.40-3.07), respectively. Patients with Bell's palsy carry a higher risk of stroke than the general population. Our data suggest that these patients might benefit from a more intensive stroke prevention therapy and regular follow-up after initial diagnosis. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  6. Carotid IMT is more associated with stroke than risk calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, M O; Akpa, O M; Agunloye, A M

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether a natural marker of atherosclerosis (carotid intima-media thickness: CIMT) or calculated risk score is more associated with stroke. We therefore comparatively examined the relationship between CIMT as well as two cardiovascular risk calculators (Omnibus Risk Score -ORS and Framingham Risk Score- FRS) and the occurrence of stroke among hypertensive African patients. CIMT was measured in 555 consecutive consenting hypertensive adults (377 stroke patients and 178 stroke-free subjects). The 10-year cardiovascular risk was calculated for each participant with the FRS and ORS. The strengths of association between FRS, ORS, CIMT, and stroke occurrence were examined using logistic regression. The discriminative capacity of FRS, ORS, and CIMT for stroke occurrence was assessed with c-statistics. Higher average CIMT (OR 11.71; 95% CI 1.65-83.07; P = 0.01) was strongly associated with stroke after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and blood sugar. Neither the FRS (OR: 1.03; CI: 0.89-1.19, P = 0.68) nor the ORS (OR: 1.08; CI: 0.90-1.30; P = 0.41) was significantly associated with stroke. CIMT had a higher c-statistic for differentiating stroke patients from hypertensive controls (right: c = 0.63, P < 0.001; left: c = 0.67, P < 0.001; average: c = 0.66, P < 0.001) than some conventional risk factors. Neither FRS (P = 0.39) nor ORS (P = 0.55) was able to independently differentiate between stroke and hypertensive patients. CIMT, but neither FRS nor ORS, is independently associated with stroke among Nigerian African hypertensive patients. CIMT may be a better tool for estimating the overall risk of stroke than FRS or ORS in this population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Relationship between weather factors and heat stroke in Ningbo city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, S H; Wang, A H; Bian, G L; He, T F; Yi, B; Lu, B B; Li, X H; Xu, G Z

    2016-08-10

    To explore the main effects of weather factors on heat stroke. Data from case report on heat stroke was collected in Ningbo city during 2011 to 2014. Temperature threshold, lag effects and interaction of weather factors on heat stroke had been analyzed, using the piecewise regression model, distributed lag non-linear model, response surface model and other methods. RESULTS showed that temperature and humidity were more correlated with heat stroke than other weather-related factors. Through different models, daily average temperature always presented a better role in predicting the heat stroke, rather than maximum or minimum temperature. Positive association between daily average temperature and heat stroke was obvious, especially at lag 0-1 days, with its threshold as 29.1 (95% CI: 28.7-29.5) ℃ . The cumulative RR of heat stroke at 90(th) percentile of daily average temperature versus 10(th) percentile was 14.05 (95% CI: 7.23-27.31) in lag 0-1 days. The effects of daily relative humidity on heat stroke appeared nonlinear, with low humidity showing a negative effect on heat stroke and could lag for 1-4 days. However, the effect of high humidity was not significant, with the cumulative RR of low humidity and high humidity as 2.35 (95%CI: 1.27-4.33) and 0.86 (95%CI: 0.40-1.85) in lag of 0-4 days, respectively. We also noticed that there was an interactive effect of both temperature and humidity on heat stroke. Under high temperature and low humidity, the risk of heat stroke showed the highest. Temperature and humidity showed obvious relationship with heat stroke in Ningbo city, with the threshold temperature as 29.1 ℃. Under high temperature and low humidity, the risk of heat stroke became the highest.

  8. Is the Population Detected by Screening in China Truly at High Risk of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Juan; Liang, Xuan; Li, Xin; Lu, Wenli

    2018-04-09

    The Chinese Stroke Screening and Prevention Project (CSSPP) considers patients with 3 or more risk factors to be at high risk of stroke, and does not quantitatively assess the risk for stroke. However, to detect high-risk groups more efficiently, a health risk appraisal (HRA) model should be used to assess individual risk of stroke. The odds ratios for the 8 risk factors for stroke were pooled and the data were used to develop an HRA model to predict individuals' risks of developing stroke in the next 5 years. The Chinese screening project and HRA screening strategies were then compared. We assessed 4196 Chinese individuals who received checkups in 2015. The average 5-year risk of stroke was 5.81‰, with men being at higher risk of stroke than women over that period. The average 5-year risk of stroke also increased with the number of risk factors. 932 individuals (22.2%) were identified as being at high risk of stroke according to CSSPP, whereas 318 individuals with fewer than 3 risk factors were considered being at low risk despite having a 5-year risk of stroke greater than 4.0% by our assessment. Notably, among patients with hypertension and diabetes who were classified as being at low risk of stroke by the CSSPP, the HRA recognized 15.9% and 14.3% as being at high risk of stroke, respectively. All 8 major risk factors affect stroke risk differently, and the efficiency of clustering these risk factors might be improved by considering the relative risk of each factor with an HRA model. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Long term risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke: influence of duration of follow-up over four decades of mortality surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G David; Shipley, Martin; Smith, George Davey; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-09-01

    While cohort studies have revealed a range of risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke, the extent to which the strength of these associations varies according to duration of follow-up in studies with extended disease surveillance is unclear. This was the aim of the present study. Initiated in 1967/70, the original Whitehall study is an on-going cohort study of 15,402 male UK government workers free of coronary heart disease when they took part in a baseline medical examination during which a range of standard risk factors was measured. In analyses in which we stratified by duration of follow-up, there was evidence of time-dependency for most risk factor-disease relationships. Thus, the associations of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and cigarette smoking with coronary heart disease and stroke diminished in strength with increasing duration of follow-up, whereas the magnitude of the body mass index-coronary heart disease relation was unchanged. For example, the age-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for cigarette smoking (versus never smoked) in relation to coronary heart disease were: 2.49 (1.80, 3.44), 1.65 (1.34, 2.03), 1.36 (1.15, 1.61) and 1.32 (1.10, 1.58) for follow-up periods 0-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30+ years, respectively. Despite a general diminution in the strength of effect over time, even in the fourth decade of follow-up, classic risk factors retained some predictive capacity for coronary heart disease and, to a lesser degree, stroke. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  10. Plasma Magnesium and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarolo-Anthony, Sally N.; Jiménez, Monik C.; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Spiegelman, Donna; Willett, Walter C.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lower plasma magnesium levels may be associated with higher blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction, but sparse prospective data are available for stroke. Methods Among 32,826 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who provided blood samples in 1989–1990, incident ischemic strokes were identified and confirmed by medical records through 2006. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 459 cases, matched 1:1 to controls on age, race/ethnicity, smoking status, date of blood draw, fasting status, menopausal status and hormone use. We used conditional logistic regression models to estimate the multivariable adjusted association of plasma magnesium and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes. Results Median magnesium levels did not differ between ischemic stroke cases and controls (median=0.86 mmol/l for both; p-value=0.14). Conditional on matching factors, women in the lowest magnesium quintile had a relative risk (RR) of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–2.10, p trend=0.13) for total ischemic stroke, compared to women in the highest quintile. Additional adjustment for risk factors and confounders did not substantially alter the risk estimates for total ischemic stroke. Women with magnesium levels magnesium levels ≥0.82 mmol/l. No significant effect modification was observed by age, body mass index, hypertension or diabetes. Conclusions Lower plasma magnesium levels may contribute to higher risk of ischemic stroke among women. PMID:25116874

  11. Risks and causes of death in a community-based stroke population : 1 month and 3 years after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, Henriette; Groenier, KH; Limburg, M; Schuling, J; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1999-01-01

    We performed a community-based study on a cohort of 221 stroke patients followed for 3 years. In this paper, we tried to answer the following questions: Is the risk of dying increased throughout the first 3 years after stroke? What a re the causes of death after the ist month! What factors at stroke

  12. Obesity increases risk of ischemic stroke in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew B; Cole, John W; McArdle, Patrick F; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Ryan, Kathleen A; Sparks, Mary J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Body mass index has been associated with ischemic stroke in older populations, but its association with stroke in younger populations is not known. In light of the current obesity epidemic in the United States, the potential impact of obesity on stroke risk in young adults deserves attention. A population-based case-control study design with 1201 cases and 1154 controls was used to investigate the relationship of obesity and young onset ischemic stroke. Stroke cases were between the ages of 15 and 49 years. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between body mass index and ischemic stroke with and without adjustment for comorbid conditions associated with stroke. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, and ethnicity, obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) was associated with an increased stroke risk (odds ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-1.94) although this increased risk was highly attenuated and not statistically significant after adjustment for smoking, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. These results indicate that obesity is a risk factor for young onset ischemic stroke and suggest that this association may be partially mediated through hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or other variables associated with these conditions. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Declining Incidence of Ischemic Stroke: What Is the Impact of Changing Risk Factors? The Tromsø Study 1995 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangen-Lønne, Anne M; Wilsgaard, Tom; Johnsen, Stein Harald; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Njølstad, Inger; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B

    2017-03-01

    It is proposed that 20% to 40% of the decline in first-ever stroke incidence is attributed to the improvement of risk factor control. We estimated the impact of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors on the changing incidence of ischemic stroke (IS) between 1995 and 2012, using individual person data from repeated surveys in a general population. The proportion of the IS incidence decline explained by change in each risk factor over time was estimated from 1995 to 2012 by Poisson regression among 26 329 participants who attended the fourth Tromsø survey in 1994 to 1995. Hazard ratios for IS were estimated with Cox proportional hazards regression among 27 936 participants who attended at least 1 of the Tromsø surveys in 1994 to 1995, 2001, or 2007 to 2008. Age- and sex-adjusted means or prevalences of risk factors over time were estimated by generalized estimating equations. There were 1226 first-ever IS during 367 636 person-years of follow-up. Changes in cardiovascular risk factors accounted for 57% of the decrease in IS incidence from 1995 to 2012. The most important contributors were decreasing mean systolic blood pressure and smoking prevalence, accounting for 26% and 17% of the observed decline, respectively. Conversely, increasing diabetes mellitus prevalence contributed negatively to the declining IS incidence. Changes in cardiovascular risk factors explained 57% of the decrease in IS incidence from 1995 to 2012. Reduction in systolic blood pressure and prevalence of smoking were the most important contributors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Better understanding and controlling factors associated will improve the prevention of the disease. This study reviews records of patients with ischemic stroke in Central Africa. Material and methods: Patients of Bantu ethnicity with clinical ...

  15. Perioperative stroke risk in nonvascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macellari, Federica; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative stroke is an ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident that can arise intraoperatively or from 3 to 30 days after surgery. This relatively rare complication deserves attention because of its high mortality and serious disability, the latter of which can lead to prolonged hospital stay as well as discharge to long-term care facilities. The aim of this article was to review the literature on perioperative stroke in general surgery, excluding carotid and cardiac surgeries because these have already been thoroughly investigated in previous papers. A search strategy was designed to identify all relevant studies on perioperative stroke in the English language. This search was restricted to papers published up to December 5, 2011. Studies were initially identified from the Medline/PubMed database, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database using the search terms 'surgery', 'perioperative stroke', 'risk factors', 'anticoagulation treatment' and 'antiplatelet treatment'. The incidence of perioperative stroke among patients who undergo nonvascular surgery is reported to be about 0.08-0.7%. This depends on the type and complexity of the surgical procedure along with patient risk factors. The reported perioperative mortality is 18-26%. One of the main issues is the management of patients taking anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs, as the risk of bleeding has to be counterbalanced with the risk of arterial thrombosis due to discontinuation. Additionally, the presence of symptomatic carotid stenosis should be taken into account in the risk evaluation. To date, current guidelines are incomplete regarding the management of patients with vascular disease undergoing nonvascular surgery. It is recommended to stop oral anticoagulation approximately 5 days before major surgery to adequately allow the INR to normalize, and at the same time subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or intravenous unfractionated heparin should be started. Regarding new anticoagulants

  16. Job strain and the risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Eleonor I; Nyberg, Solja T; Heikkilä, Katriina

    2015-01-01

    studies to investigate the association between job strain, a measure of work-related stress, and incident stroke. RESULTS: In 1.8 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up 9.2 years), 2023 first-time stroke events were recorded. The age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for job strain relative to no job....... CONCLUSION: Job strain may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, but further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting job strain would reduce stroke risk beyond existing preventive strategies....

  17. Long-Term Risk of Dementia among Survivors of Ischemic or Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corraini, Priscila; Henderson, Victor; Ording, Anne Gulbech

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a risk factor for dementia, but the risk of dementia after different stroke types is poorly understood. We examined the long-term risk of dementia among survivors of any first-time stroke and of first-time ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid...... 303 survivors of unspecified stroke types. Patients were aged ≥18 years and survived for at least 3 months after diagnosis. We formed a comparison cohort from the general population (1 075 588 patients without stroke, matched to stroke patients by age and sex). We computed absolute risks and hazard...... ratios of dementia up to 30 years after stroke. RESULTS: The 30-year absolute risk of dementia among stroke survivors was 11.5% (95% confidence interval, 11.2%-11.7%). Compared with the general population, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for dementia among stroke survivors was 1.80 (1...

  18. Social network, social support, and risk of incident stroke: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Iso, Hiroyasu; Mosley, Thomas H; Rose, Kathryn M; Lutsey, Pamela L

    2014-10-01

    Having a small social network and lack of social support have been associated with incident coronary heart disease; however, epidemiological evidence for incident stroke is limited. We assessed the longitudinal association of a small social network and lack of social support with risk of incident stroke and evaluated whether the association was partly mediated by vital exhaustion and inflammation. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study measured social network and social support in 13 686 men and women (mean, 57 years; 56% women; 24% black; 76% white) without a history of stroke. Social network was assessed by the 10-item Lubben Social Network Scale and social support by a 16-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-Short Form. During a median follow-up of 18.6 years, 905 incident strokes occurred. Relative to participants with a large social network, those with a small social network had a higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.44 [1.02-2.04]) after adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic variables, marital status, behavioral risk factors, and major stroke risk factors. Vital exhaustion, but not inflammation, partly mediated the association between a small social network and incident stroke. Social support was unrelated to incident stroke. In this sample of US community-dwelling men and women, having a small social network was associated with excess risk of incident stroke. As with other cardiovascular conditions, having a small social network may be associated with a modestly increased risk of incident stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha gene promoter, circulating TNF-alpha level, and cardiovascular risk factor for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guanglin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is one of the most typical pro-inflammatory cytokines with both beneficial and destructive properties for the central nervous system. Increasing evidences have demonstrated the important role of TNF-α in the development of ischemic stroke, but studies examining the possible association with stroke or direct functional effects of polymorphisms in TNF-α have been contradictory. Findings In this study, a 2-kb length of the proximal promoter of the TNF-α was screened and four polymorphisms were investigated in the case–control study. Our data confirmed the association between -308G/A variant with stroke in 1,388 stroke patients and 1,027 controls and replicated in an independent population of 961 stroke patients and 821 controls (odds ratio (OR = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI =1.02 to 1.77 and OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.09 to 2.23, respectively. To reconcile the association between polymorphisms and stroke and to give a comprehensive picture of the genetic architecture of this important gene, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 published studies in an Asian population. Our results demonstrated an association between rs1800629 and ischemic stroke (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.69. Another meta-analysis results of 14 studies demonstrated that ischemic stroke patients have higher serum TNF-α level than the control subjects (standardized mean difference (SMD = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.85 to 2.81. In vitro evaluation of potential interaction between variants of the TNF-α gene (−308G/A, -857C/T, and -1031T/C demonstrated that these three polymorphisms could interact together to determine the overall activity of the TNF-α gene. Conclusions These findings strongly implicate the involvement of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of stroke.

  20. CITY-LEVEL ADULT STROKE PREVALENCE IN RELATION TO REMOTE SENSING DERIVED PM2.5 ADJUSTING FOR UNHEALTHY BEHAVIORS AND MEDICAL RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the use of PM2.5 gird derived from remote sensing for assessing the effect of long-term exposure to PM2.5 (ambient air pollution of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less on stroke, adjusting for unhealthy behaviors and medical risk factors. Health data was obtained from the newly published CDC “500 Cities Project” which provides city- and census tract-level small area estimates for chronic disease risk factors, and clinical preventive service use for the largest 500 cities in the United States. PM2.5 data was acquired from the “The Global Annual PM2.5 Grids from MODIS, MISR and SeaWiFS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD, V1 (1998–2012” datasets. Average PM2.5 were calculated for each city using a GIS zonal statistics function. Map data visualization and pattern comparison, univariate linear regression, and a multivariate linear regression model fitted using a generalized linear model via penalized maximum likelihood found that long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 may increase the risk of stroke. Increasing physical activity, reducing smoking and body weight, enough sleeping, controlling diseases such as blood pressure, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cholesterol, may mitigate the effect. PM2.5 grids derived from moderate resolution satellite remote sensing imagery may offer a unique opportunity to fill the data gap due to limited ground monitoring at broader scales. The evidence of raised stroke prevalence risk in high PM2.5 areas would support targeting of policy interventions on such areas to reduce pollution levels and protect human health.

  1. ABO Blood Type and Stroke Risk: The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Neil A.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Alexander, Kristine; McClure, Leslie A.; Kissela, Brett M.; Howard, George; Cushman, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background ABO blood type is an inherited trait associated with coagulation factor levels and vascular outcomes. Objectives To assess the association of blood type with stroke and whether blood type contributes to racial disparities in stroke in the United States. Patients and Methods The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study recruited 30,239 participants between 2003-07. Using a case-cohort design, blood type was genotyped in 646 participants with stroke and a 1,104 participant cohort random sample. Cox models adjusting for Framingham stroke risk factors assessed the association of blood type with stroke. Results Over 5.8 years of follow-up, blood types A or B versus type O were not associated with stroke. Blood type AB versus O was associated with an increased risk of stroke (adjusted HR 1.83; 95% CI 1.01, 3.30). The association of blood type AB versus O was greater in those without diabetes (adjusted HR 3.33; 95% CI 1.61, 6.88) than those with diabetes (adjusted HR 0.49; 95% CI 0.17, 1.44) (p-interaction = 0.02). Factor VIII levels accounted for 60% (95% CI 11%, 98%) of the association of AB blood type and stroke risk. Conclusion Blood type AB is associated with an increased risk of stroke that is not attenuated by conventional stroke risk factors and factor VIII levels were associated with 60% of the association. While blood type AB is rare in the U.S. population, it is a significant stroke risk factor and may play an important role in stroke risk in these individuals. PMID:24444093

  2. Preeclampsia and Stroke: Risks during and after Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Bushnell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia and stroke are significantly related, both pathologically and temporally (across the life span in women. Cerebrovascular events can complicate preeclampsia, and can also manifest later in life. A history of preeclampsia is associated with long-term risk for hypertension, stroke, and heart disease. Cerebrovascular complications occur in only a small proportion of women with severe preeclampsia, but with high morbidity and mortality. Endothelial dysfunction and impaired cerebral autoregulation, and severe hypertension in the setting of preeclampsia are likely the cause of many strokes during pregnancy. The relationship between preeclampsia and stroke involves shared risk factors for both disorders, including chronic endothelial dysfunction and increased risk for long-term hypertension following preeclampsia (one of the major risk factors for stroke. This overlap provides insights into underlying pathophysiology and potential preventive strategies for both preeclampsia and stroke. For example, aspirin may prevent both disorders. The current review will describe the current data regarding these relationships and suggest future research to investigate remaining knowledge gaps. These are important topics for neurologists, who are likely to be involved with the care of severely ill preeclamptic patients with neurologic complications, as well as women at increased risk of stroke due to a history of preeclampsia.

  3. A Survey of the Perceived Risk for Stroke among Community Residents in Western Urban China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Juan; Zheng, Min; Chen, Shuqun; Ou, Shu; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ni; Cao, Yingying; Miao, Qiaoqiao; Zhang, Xingxiu; Hao, Ling; Lou, Jinhe; Guo, Huijuan; Li, Nan; Wang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Persons who perceive their risk for stroke can promote the intervention of stroke risk factors and reduce the risk of stroke occurrence. Our purpose was to assess the knowledge of stroke risk factors and the level of perceived risk for stroke. METHODS: In 2011, a population-based face-to-face interview survey was conducted in Yuzhong district, Chongqing. A total of 1500 potential participants aged ≥18 years old were selected using a multi-stage sampling method. The kno...

  4. Assessment of cerebral small vessel disease predicts individual stroke risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.F. Poels (Mariëlle); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R.G. Wieberdink (Renske); A. Hofman (Albert); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Despite several known risk factors it is still difficult to foresee who will develop a stroke and who will not. Vascular brain damage, visualised with MRI, reflects how the brain tolerates the effects of vascular risk factors and may therefore be relevant in predicting

  5. Outcome and Risk Factors Presented in Old Patients Above 80 Years of Age Versus Younger Patients After Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Line; Christensen, Louisa; Christensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    patients received stroke unit care in accordance with the guidelines. The population was dichotomized into patients aged less than 80 years and 80 years of age or older. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score and Barthel Index (BI) were used to assess 3-month and 1-year outcome. RESULTS: Patients 80 years...... of age or older presented with significantly more severe strokes than younger patients, median Scandinavian Stroke Scale score 39 vs 42 (P = .003). Median mRS score before stroke was significantly higher in patients aged 80 years or older (P

  6. Perception of Recurrent Stroke Risk among Black, White and Hispanic Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Survivors: The SWIFT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Carman, Heather; Moran, Megan; Doyle, Margaret; Paik, Myunghee C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Risk modification through behavior change is critical for primary and secondary stroke prevention. Theories of health behavior identify perceived risk as an important component to facilitate behavior change; however, little is known about perceived risk of vascular events among stroke survivors. Methods The SWIFT (Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment) study includes a prospective population-based ethnically diverse cohort of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors. We investigate the baseline relationship between demographics, health beliefs, and knowledge on risk perception. Regression models examined predictors of inaccurate perception. Results Only 20% accurately estimated risk, 10% of the participants underestimated risk, and 70% of the 817 study participants significantly overestimated their risk for a recurrent stroke. The mean perceived likelihood of recurrent ischemic stroke in the next 10 years was 51 ± 7%. We found no significant differences by race-ethnicity with regard to accurate estimation of risk. Inaccurate estimation of risk was associated with attitudes and beliefs [worry (p risk factors. Conclusion This paper provides a unique perspective on how factors such as belief systems influence risk perception in a diverse population at high stroke risk. There is a need for future research on how risk perception can inform primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894045

  7. Neuroserpin polymorphisms and stroke risk in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Barney J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroserpin, primarily localized to CNS neurons, inhibits the adverse effects of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA on the neurovascular unit and has neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke. We sought to evaluate the association of neuroserpin polymorphisms with risk for ischemic stroke among young women. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-matched control subjects (43.1% African-American. Neuroserpin single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs chosen through HapMap were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke. Results Of the five SNPs analyzed, the A allele (frequency; Caucasian = 0.56, African-American = 0.42 of SNP rs6797312 located in intron 1 was associated with stroke in an age-adjusted dominant model (AA and AT vs. TT among Caucasians (OR = 2.05, p = 0.023 but not African-Americans (OR = 0.71, p = 0.387. Models adjusting for other risk factors strengthened the association. Race-specific haplotype analyses, inclusive of SNP rs6797312, again demonstrated significant associations with stroke among Caucasians only. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that neuroserpin is associated with early-onset ischemic stroke among Caucasian women.

  8. Neighborhood cohesion is associated with reduced risk of stroke mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cari Jo; Guo, Hongfei; Lunos, Scott; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Beck, Todd; Evans, Denis A; Mendes de Leon, Carlos; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2011-05-01

    Greater social cohesion is related to lower rates of coronary heart disease, but its relation to stroke risk is unstudied. This study examined whether neighborhood social cohesion was protective against stroke mortality and incidence. Data come from 5789 participants (60% female; 62% black; mean age, 74.7 years) in a longitudinal study of chronic diseases in the elderly. Stroke mortality, ascertained through December 31, 2007, was verified through the National Death Index; 186 stroke deaths were identified in 11 years of follow-up. Stroke incidence was determined in a subset (N=3816) with linkage to Medicare claims files; 701 first-ever strokes were identified. Cohesion was measured by 6 items assessing frequency of contact and social interactions with neighbors; items were z-scored and averaged. Individual scores were averaged across 82 census block groups, forming a neighborhood-level measure of social cohesion. Marginal Cox proportional hazard models tested the association of neighborhood-level cohesion with stroke mortality and incidence. Each 1-point increase in cohesion related to a 53% reduced risk of stroke mortality (hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.90), adjusting for relevant covariates, including sociodemographics, known stroke risk factors, and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status. A race×cohesion interaction (P=0.04) revealed cohesion was protective in whites (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.67) but not blacks (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.35 to 3.86). Cohesion was unrelated to stroke incidence (P>0.5). Neighborhood-level social cohesion was independently protective against stroke mortality. Research is needed to further examine observed race differences and pathways by which cohesion is health-protective.

  9. Are we overestimating the stroke risk related to contraceptive pills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompel, Anne; Plu-Bureau, Genevieve

    2014-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are used by million of women worldwide. Ischemic stroke is one of the major harmful effects of hormonal contraceptives, but remains a very uncommon disease before menopause. The increased risk of stroke under third and fourth-generation contraceptive pills and nonoral contraceptives has been recently highlighted. Given the benefits associated with combined hormonal contraceptives (COCs), it is important to properly evaluate their risks in order to provide a better benefit/risk balance to young women. Scarce studies addressing the rates of stroke in young women suggest that the fraction attributable to the contraceptive pill remains low. In contrast, there is abundant literature on the relative risks of stroke under COCs. The risk of arterial disease seems to be similar among users of second and third-generation pills, drospirenone-containing pills and nonoral hormonal contraceptives. Progestin-only contraceptives do not appear to be associated with an increased risk of stroke. New formulations of hormonal contraceptives are not safer than second-generation COCs. Even if the absolute numbers of strokes attributable to hormonal contraceptives is very low, stringent selection of patients should help to reduce the events still more, and progestin-only contraceptives/nonhormonal methods should be preferred in cases of associated risk factors.

  10. Smoking and Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markidan, Janina; Cole, John W; Cronin, Carolyn A; Merino, Jose G; Phipps, Michael S; Wozniak, Marcella A; Kittner, Steven J

    2018-05-01

    There is a strong dose-response relationship between smoking and risk of ischemic stroke in young women, but there are few data examining this association in young men. We examined the dose-response relationship between the quantity of cigarettes smoked and the odds of developing an ischemic stroke in men under age 50 years. The Stroke Prevention in Young Men Study is a population-based case-control study of risk factors for ischemic stroke in men ages 15 to 49 years. The χ 2 test was used to test categorical comparisons. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio for ischemic stroke occurrence comparing current and former smokers to never smokers. In the first model, we adjusted solely for age. In the second model, we adjusted for potential confounding factors, including age, race, education, hypertension, myocardial infarction, angina, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index. The study population consisted of 615 cases and 530 controls. The odds ratio for the current smoking group compared with never smokers was 1.88. Furthermore, when the current smoking group was stratified by number of cigarettes smoked, there was a dose-response relationship for the odds ratio, ranging from 1.46 for those smoking ischemic stroke among young men. Although complete smoking cessation is the goal, even smoking fewer cigarettes may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke in young men. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Healthy lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in treatment-resistant hypertension: the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Keith M; Booth, John N; Calhoun, David A; Irvin, Marguerite R; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-09-01

    Few data exist on whether healthy lifestyle factors are associated with better prognosis among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension, a high-risk phenotype of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of healthy lifestyle factors with cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular mortality among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. We studied participants (n=2043) from the population-based Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg despite the use of 3 antihypertensive medication classes or the use of ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication regardless of blood pressure control). Six healthy lifestyle factors adapted from guidelines for the management of hypertension (normal waist circumference, physical activity ≥4 times/week, nonsmoking, moderate alcohol consumption, high Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet score, and low sodium-to-potassium intake ratio) were examined. A greater number of healthy lifestyle factors were associated with lower risk for cardiovascular events (n=360) during a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios [HR (95% confidence interval)] for cardiovascular events comparing individuals with 2, 3, and 4 to 6 versus 0 to 1 healthy lifestyle factors were 0.91 (0.68-1.21), 0.80 (0.57-1.14), and 0.63 (0.41-0.95), respectively (P-trend=0.020). Physical activity and nonsmoking were individual healthy lifestyle factors significantly associated with lower risk for cardiovascular events. Similar associations were observed between healthy lifestyle factors and risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, healthy lifestyle factors, particularly physical activity and nonsmoking, are associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular events and mortality among individuals with apparent treatment

  12. MEAN PLATELET VOLUME AND RISK OF THROMBOTIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha Kumar Thankappan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is a major cause of long term morbidity and mortality. Several factors are known to increase the liability to stroke. Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications, contributing to thrombus formation. Platelet size (mean platelet volume, MPV is a marker and possible determinant of platelet function, large platelets being potentially more reactive. Hence an attempt has-been made to study the association if any between mean platelet volume and thrombotic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between Mean Platelet Volume (MPV and thrombotic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study is a case control study and data was collected at Government Medical College Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala a tertiary care referral centre. The study was carried out among fifty patients diagnosed with thrombotic stroke and presenting to the hospital within forty eight hours of onset of symptoms. Fifty age group and sex matched controls were also recruited. Mean platelet volume was obtained using a SYSMEX automated analyser. RESULTS This study has shown a statistically significant relation between mean platelet volume and risk of thrombotic stroke but no statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume. CONCLUSION This study has shown an elevation of MPV in acute phase of thrombotic stroke. Platelet mass was found to be more or less a constant. This study did not find a statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume.

  13. Estudio de factores de riesgo de la enfermedad cerebrovascular en el Policlínico Docente "Doctor Carlos J. Finlay" Study of risk factors in the stroke at "Dr. Carlos J. Finlay" Teaching Polyclinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Fernández Cherkásova

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo reporta los resultados de un estudio analítico realizado en Marianao con el objetivo de establecer la relación entre determinados factores de riesgo y la enfermedad cerebrovascular (ECV. La muestra, compuesta por 82 pacientes con ECV, y el grupo control, de 82 pacientes sin ECV, fueron seleccionados a partir de las historias clínicas familiares. Los datos se completaron con un cuestionario creado al efecto. La información recogida fue sometida a un análisis de regresión logística multivariable. Se comparó la frecuencia de determinados factores de riesgo entre los 2 grupos, y se detectó que era mayor la del hábito de fumar, los antecedentes patológicos familiares y personales de ECV, la hipertensión arterial, la cardiopatía isquémica, la diabetes mellitus, la dislipidemia y la obesidad en los enfermos con ECV. Se obtuvo una asociación estadísticamente significativa de la ECV con la hipertensión arterial y la obesidad. La ausencia de obesidad se comportó como un factor protector. La frecuencia de ECV aumentó con la edad y predominó en pacientes del sexo masculino y de la raza negra.The present article reports the results of an analytical study conducted in Marianao aimed at establishing the relation between certain risk factors and stroke. The sample, which was composed of 82 patients with stroke and the control group, that was made up of 82 patients without stroke, were selected starting from the family medical histories. Data were completed with a questionnaire created to this end. The collected information was subjected to a multivariable logistic regression analysis. The frequency of certain risk factors was compared between the 2 groups, and it was proved that the frequency of smoking, the family and personal pathological history of stroke, arterial hypertension, ishcemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, dislipidemia and obesity was higher in those suffering from stroke. A statistically significant

  14. Psychological factors determine depressive symptomatology after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mierlo, Maria L.; Van Heugten, Caroline M.; Post, Marcel W.; De Kort, Paul L.; Visser-Meily, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify psychological factors related to poststroke depressive symptoms. Design Cross-sectional study, with patients assessed at 2 months poststroke. Setting Patients with stroke from 6 general hospitals. Participants Stroke patients (N=344; mean age ± SD, 66.9±12.3y). Interventions

  15. Psychological Factors Determine Depressive Symptomatology After Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, Maria L.; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Post, Marcel W.; de Kort, Paul L.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M.

    Objective: To identify psychological factors related to poststroke depressive symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional study, with patients assessed at 2 months poststroke. Setting: Patients with stroke from 6 general hospitals. Participants: Stroke patients (N=344; mean age +/- SD, 66.9 +/- 12.3y).

  16. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. From 2.5 million children (aged hemorrhagic strokes and randomly selected age- and facility-matched stroke-free controls (3 per case). We determined exposure to CHD (diagnosed before stroke) and used conditional logistic regression to analyze stroke risk factors. CHD was identified in 15 of 412 cases (4%) versus 7 of 1236 controls (0.6%). Cases of childhood stroke (occurring between ages 29 days to 20 years) with CHD had 19-fold (odds ratio, 19; 95% confidence interval 4.2-83) increased stroke risk compared to controls. History of CHD surgery was associated with >30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding perioperative strokes, the history of CHD surgery still increased the childhood stroke risk (odds ratio, 13; confidence interval 1.5-114). The majority of children with stroke and CHD were outpatients at the time of stroke, and almost half the cases who underwent cardiac surgery had their stroke >5 years after the most recent procedure. An estimated 7% of ischemic and 2% of hemorrhagic childhood strokes in the population were attributable to CHD. CHD is an important childhood stroke risk factor. Children who undergo CHD surgery remain at elevated risk outside the perioperative period and would benefit from optimized long-term stroke prevention strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Primary prevention of stroke by a healthy lifestyle in a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Åkesson, Agneta; Wolk, Alicja

    2015-06-02

    To examine the impact of a healthy lifestyle on stroke risk in men at higher risk of stroke because of other cardiovascular diseases or conditions. Our study population comprised 11,450 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men who had a history of hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart failure, or atrial fibrillation. Participants had completed a questionnaire about diet and lifestyle and were free from stroke and ischemic heart disease at baseline (January 1, 1998). We defined a healthy lifestyle as a low-risk diet (≥5 servings/d of fruits and vegetables and 0 to ≤30 g/d). Ascertainment of stroke cases was accomplished through linkage with the National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, we ascertained 1,062 incident stroke cases. The risk of total stroke and stroke types decreased with increasing number of healthy lifestyle factors. The multivariable relative risk of total stroke for men who achieved all 5 healthy lifestyle factors compared with men who achieved 0 or 1 factor was 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.14-0.55). The corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.31 (0.15-0.66) for ischemic stroke and 0.32 (0.04-2.51) for hemorrhagic stroke. A healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially reduced risk of stroke in men at higher risk of stroke. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennery, M.; Dupont, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the development of risk management in the gas sector business: why a risk factor legal mention must precede any published financial information? Do gas companies have to face new risks? Is there specific risks bound to gas activities? Why companies want to master their risks? Is it mandatory or just a new habit? Do they expect a real benefit in return? These are the risk management questions that are analyzed in this article which is based on the public communication of 15 gas companies randomly selected over the world. The information comes from their annual reports or from documents available on their web sites. The intention of this document is not to be exhaustive or to make statistics but only to shade light on the risk factors of the gas sector. (J.S.)

  19. Dietary patterns are associated with incident stroke and contribute to excess risk of stroke in Black Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Newby, PK; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J; Locher, Julie L; Kissela, Brett M; Shikany, James M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Black Americans and residents of the Southeastern United States, are at increased risk of stroke. Diet is one of many potential factors proposed that might explain these racial and regional disparities. Methods Between 2003–2007, the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study enrolled 30,239 black and white Americans aged 45 years or older. Dietary patterns were derived using factor analysis and foods from food frequency data. Incident strokes were adjudicated using medical records by a team of physicians. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk of stroke. Results Over 5.7 years, 490 incident strokes were observed. In a multivariable-adjusted analysis, greater adherence to the Plant-based pattern was associated with lower stroke risk (HR=0.71; 95% CI=0.56–0.91; ptrend=0.005). This association was attenuated after addition of income, education, total energy intake, smoking, and sedentary behavior. Participants with a higher adherence to the Southern pattern experienced a 39% increased risk of stroke (HR=1.39; 95% CI=1.05, 1.84), with a significant (p = 0.009) trend across quartiles. Including Southern pattern in the model mediated the black-white risk of stroke by 63%. Conclusions These data suggest that adherence to a Southern style diet may increase the risk of stroke while adherence to a more plant-based diet may reduce stroke risk. Given the consistency of finding a dietary impact on stroke risk across studies, discussing nutrition patterns during risk screening may be an important step in reducing stroke. PMID:24159061

  20. New assessment for the risk of ischemic stroke or carotid artery stenosis. Prognostic factor analysis in hypercholesterolemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Daisuke

    2008-01-01

    Concise and non-invasive methods to detect the risk of cerebrovascular disease in high risk patients are considered useful. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the contribution to ischemic cerebrovascular risk of the Revised Atherosclerotic Index (RAI) which is calculated from the Atherogenic Index (AI), patient's age and number of risk factors of atherosclerotic disease. I studied retrospectively the serum lipid levels, carotid stenosis measured by ultrasonography and cerebral infarction diagnosed from the symptoms and CT in 56 hypercholesterolemic outpatients. I assessed the relation between the RAI and carotid stenoic findings, history of cerebral infarction, and type of cerebral infarction. I also assessed the relation between the RAI and changes in LDL-cholesterol level before and after atorvastatin administration. The RAI was significantly increased in patients with carotid lesions and cerebral infarction, but the AI was not. While the odds ratio of the AI for carotid lesions was high but not significantly so, that of the RAI increased with statistical significance. The odds ratio for cerebral infarction was high for the RAI but not for the AI. Furthermore, the RAI was significantly high in patients with aortic thrombotic cerebral infarction as compared to that in patients without any infarction. The serum lipids were well controlled under administration of atorvastatin and the mean RAI was also significantly decreased; however, more comprehensive control of risk factors might be necessary. The AI adjusted for patient's age and number of risk factors might be useful for assessing the risk of carotid lesion atherosclerosis and aortic thrombotic cerebral infarction. (author)

  1. Churg-Strauss Syndrome as an Unusual Aetiology of Stroke with Haemorrhagic Transformation in a Patient with No Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Sairanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We present here a case of haemorrhagic brain infarction in a middle-aged and physically active male, who had never smoked. This case report aims to remind the internist and neurologist to bear in mind unusual aetiologies of brain infarcts in patients without classical cardiovascular risk factors. Case Description: A 49-year-old male with pulmonary asthma and a prior history of nasal polyps had a wake-up stroke with left-sided symptoms and speech disturbance. A head MRI and MR angiography revealed a recent haemorrhagic infarct in the right putamen and corona radiata. The left hemiparesis progressed to sensory-motor hemiplegia on the 4th day. In the head CT, it was shown that the haemorrhagic infarct had progressed to a large haematoma. A pansinusitis was also diagnosed. The aetiological investigations revealed a minor atrial septal defect (ASD with shunting and a heterozygotic clotting factor V R506Q mutation. A remarkable blood eosinophilia of 9.80 E9/l (42% together with fever, sinusitis, wide-spread bilateral nodular pulmonary infiltrates that did not respond to wide-spectrum antimicrobial treatment, positive anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies, a high myeloperoxidase antibody level and slightly positive anti-proteinase 3 antibodies suggested the diagnosis of Churg-Strauss syndrome. These inflammatory symptoms and findings promptly responded to treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Conclusions: Even after the concomitant findings of the low risk factors, i.e. small ASD and heterozygotic clotting factor mutation, continued search for the final aetiology of stroke revealed Churg-Strauss syndrome, which was the key to the treatment.

  2. Premature menopause or early menopause and risk of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Miller, Virginia M.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The general consensus has been that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS). We reviewed new observational studies that challenge this simple conclusion. Methods This was a review of observational studies of the association of premature or early menopause with stroke or IS published in English from 2006 through 2010. Results Three cohort studies showed an increased risk of all stroke in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy compared with women who conserved their ovaries before age 50 years. The increased risk of stroke was reduced by hormonal therapy (HT) in one of the studies, suggesting that estrogen deprivation is involved in the association. Four additional observational studies showed an association of all stroke or IS with the early onset of menopause or with a shorter lifespan of ovarian activity. In three of the seven studies, the association was restricted to IS. Age at menopause was more important than type of menopause (natural vs induced). Conclusions The findings from seven recent observational studies challenge the consensus that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for IS and can be reconciled by a unifying timing hypothesis. We hypothesize that estrogen is protective for IS before age 50 years and may become a risk factor for IS after age 50 years or, possibly, after age 60 years. These findings are relevant to women who experienced premature or early menopause, or to women considering prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of natural menopause. PMID:21993082

  3. Stroke in Indigenous Africans, African Americans, and European Americans: Interplay of Racial and Geographic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa; Sarfo, Fred; Howard, Virginia J; Irvin, Marguerite R; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Akinyemi, Rufus; Bennett, Aleena; Armstrong, Kevin; Tiwari, Hemant K; Akpalu, Albert; Wahab, Kolawole W; Owolabi, Lukman; Fawale, Bimbo; Komolafe, Morenikeji; Obiako, Reginald; Adebayo, Philip; Manly, Jennifer M; Ogbole, Godwin; Melikam, Ezinne; Laryea, Ruth; Saulson, Raelle; Jenkins, Carolyn; Arnett, Donna K; Lackland, Daniel T; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Howard, George

    2017-05-01

    The relative contributions of racial and geographic factors to higher risk of stroke in people of African ancestry have not been unraveled. We compared stroke type and contributions of vascular risk factors among indigenous Africans (IA), African Americans (AA), and European Americans (EA). SIREN (Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network) is a large multinational case-control study in West Africa-the ancestral home of 71% AA-whereas REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) is a cohort study including AA and EA in the United States. Using harmonized assessments and standard definitions, we compared data on stroke type and established risk factors for stroke in acute stroke cases aged ≥55 years in both studies. There were 811 IA, 452 AA, and 665 EA stroke subjects, with mean age of 68.0±9.3, 73.0±8.3, and 76.0±8.3 years, respectively ( P stroke was more frequent among IA (27%) compared with AA (8%) and EA (5.4%; P strokes were more prevalent in IA (47.1%), followed by AA (35.1%) and then EA (21.0%; P risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle may contribute to the higher proportion of ischemic stroke in AA compared with IA, whereas racial factors may contribute to the higher proportion of hypertension and diabetes mellitus among stroke subjects of African ancestry. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Blood microRNAs in Low or No Risk Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Rong Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a multi-factorial disease where some patients present themselves with little or no risk factors. Blood microRNA expression profiles are becoming useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. We therefore investigated the blood microRNA profiles in young stroke patients who presented with minimal or absence of risk factors for stroke such as type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Blood microRNA profiles from these patients varied with stroke subtypes as well as different functional outcomes (based on modified Rankin Score. These microRNAs have been shown to target genes that are involved in stroke pathogenesis. The findings from our study suggest that molecular mechanisms in stroke pathogenesis involving low or no risk ischemic stroke patients could differ substantially from those with pre-existing risk factors.

  5. THE PREVALENCE OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AS ONE OF THE LEADING FACTORS OF THE STROKE RISK IN THE MOSCOW REGION ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE SMALL REGIONAL SETTLEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kоzyaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the clinical-and-epidemiological parameters of the stroke was carried out and the prevalence of arterial hypertension was studied as one of the leading factors of stroke development among the residents of the small regional settlement of the Moscow Region. The epidemiological data obtained are indicative of the high stroke morbidity. A significant prevalence of the arterial hypertension was found in the population studied as well as an insufficient control and low understanding by patients of the necessity of regular taking antihypertensive drugs.

  6. Methodological Factors in Determining Risk of Dementia After Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke: (III) Applicability of Cognitive Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, Sarah T; Klaus, Stephen P; Thomson, Ross J; Mehta, Ziyah; Wharton, Rose M; Rothwell, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive assessment is recommended after stroke but there are few data on the applicability of short cognitive tests to the full spectrum of patients. We therefore determined the rates, causes, and associates of untestability in a population-based study of all transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke. Patients with TIA or stroke prospectively recruited (2002-2007) into the Oxford Vascular Study had ≥1 short cognitive test (mini-mental state examination, telephone interview of cognitive status, Montreal cognitive assessment, and abbreviated mental test score) at baseline and on follow-up to 5 years. Among 1097 consecutive assessed survivors (mean: age/SD, 74.8/12.1 years; 378 TIA), numbers testable with a short cognitive test at baseline, 1, 6, 12, and 60 months were 835/1097 (76%), 778/947 (82%), 756/857 (88%), 692/792 (87%), and 472/567 (83%). Eighty-eight percent (331/378) of assessed patients with TIA were testable at baseline compared with only 46% (133/290) of major stroke (Pstroke effects at baseline (153/262 [58%]: dysphasia/anarthria/hemiparesis=84 [32%], drowsiness=58 [22%], and acute confusion=11 [4%]), whereas sensory deficits caused relatively more problems with testing at later time points (24/63 [38%] at 5 years). Substantial numbers of patients with TIA and stroke are untestable with short cognitive tests. Future studies should report data on untestable patients and those with problems with testing in whom the likelihood of dementia is high. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Risk of ischemic stroke after atrial fibrillation diagnosis: A national sample cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyoung Son

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke and associated with a 5-fold higher risk of stroke. In this retrospective cohort study, the incidence of and risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with AF were identified. All patients (≥30 years old without previous stroke who were diagnosed with AF in 2007-2013 were selected from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. To identify factors that influenced ischemic stroke risk, Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted. During a mean follow-up duration of 3.2 years, 1022 (9.6% patients were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. The overall incidence rate of ischemic stroke was 30.8/1000 person-years. Of all the ischemic stroke that occurred during the follow-up period, 61.0% occurred within 1-year after AF diagnosis. Of the patients with CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≥2, only 13.6% were receiving warfarin therapy within 30 days after AF diagnosis. Relative to no antithrombotic therapy, warfarin treatment for >90 days before the index event (ischemic stroke in stroke patients and death/study end in non-stroke patients associated with decreased ischemic stroke risk (Hazard Ratio = 0.41, 95%confidence intervals = 0.32-0.53. Heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus associated with greater ischemic stroke risk. AF patients in Korea had a higher ischemic stroke incidence rate than patients in other countries and ischemic stroke commonly occurred at early phase after AF diagnosis. Long-term (>90 days continuous warfarin treatment may be beneficial for AF patients. However, warfarin treatment rates were very low. To prevent stroke, programs that actively detect AF and provide anticoagulation therapy are needed.

  8. Dietary fibre intake and risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in the UK Women's Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threapleton, D E; Burley, V J; Greenwood, D C; Cade, J E

    2015-04-01

    Stroke risk is modifiable through many risk factors, one being healthy dietary habits. Fibre intake was associated with a reduced stroke risk in recent meta-analyses; however, data were contributed by relatively few studies, and few examined different stroke types. A total of 27,373 disease-free women were followed up for 14.4 years. Diet was assessed with a 217-item food frequency questionnaire and stroke cases were identified using English Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality records. Survival analysis was applied to assess the risk of total, ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke in relation to fibre intake. A total of 135 haemorrhagic and 184 ischaemic stroke cases were identified in addition to 138 cases where the stroke type was unknown or not recorded. Greater intake of total fibre, higher fibre density and greater soluble fibre, insoluble fibre and fibre from cereals were associated with a significantly lower risk for total stroke. For total stroke, the hazard ratio per 6 g/day total fibre intake was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals: 0.81-0.99). Different findings were observed for haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke in healthy-weight or overweight women. Total fibre, insoluble fibre and cereal fibre were inversely associated with haemorrhagic stroke risk in overweight/obese participants, and in healthy-weight women greater cereal fibre was associated with a lower ischaemic stroke risk. In non-hypertensive women, higher fibre density was associated with lower ischaemic stroke risk. Greater total fibre and fibre from cereals are associated with a lower stroke risk, and associations were more consistent with ischaemic stroke. The different observations by stroke type, body mass index group or hypertensive status indicates potentially different mechanisms.

  9. Genetic risk factors for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (the METASTROKE collaboration): a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, Matthew; Farrall, Martin; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sudlow, Cathie; Hopewell, Jemma C; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Fornage, Myriam; Ikram, M Arfan; Malik, Rainer; Bevan, Steve; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Nalls, Mike A; Longstreth, Wt; Wiggins, Kerri L; Yadav, Sunaina; Parati, Eugenio A; Destefano, Anita L; Worrall, Bradford B; Kittner, Steven J; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Reiner, Alex P; Helgadottir, Anna; Achterberg, Sefanja; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Abboud, Sherine; Schmidt, Reinhold; Walters, Matthew; Chen, Wei-Min; Ringelstein, E Bernd; O'Donnell, Martin; Ho, Weang Kee; Pera, Joanna; Lemmens, Robin; Norrving, Bo; Higgins, Peter; Benn, Marianne; Sale, Michele; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Doney, Alexander S F; Vicente, Astrid M; Delavaran, Hossein; Algra, Ale; Davies, Gail; Oliveira, Sofia A; Palmer, Colin N A; Deary, Ian; Schmidt, Helena; Pandolfo, Massimo; Montaner, Joan; Carty, Cara; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kostulas, Konstantinos; Ferro, Jose M; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Valdimarsson, Einar; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Lindgren, Arne; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Saleheen, Danish; Paré, Guillaume; Berger, Klaus; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hofman, Albert; Mosley, Thomas H; Mitchell, Braxton D; Furie, Karen; Clarke, Robert; Levi, Christopher; Seshadri, Sudha; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Psaty, Bruce M; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Stefansson, Kari; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-11-01

    Various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been done in ischaemic stroke, identifying a few loci associated with the disease, but sample sizes have been 3500 cases or less. We established the METASTROKE collaboration with the aim of validating associations from previous GWAS and identifying novel genetic associations through meta-analysis of GWAS datasets for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes. We meta-analysed data from 15 ischaemic stroke cohorts with a total of 12 389 individuals with ischaemic stroke and 62 004 controls, all of European ancestry. For the associations reaching genome-wide significance in METASTROKE, we did a further analysis, conditioning on the lead single nucleotide polymorphism in every associated region. Replication of novel suggestive signals was done in 13 347 cases and 29 083 controls. We verified previous associations for cardioembolic stroke near PITX2 (p=2·8×10(-16)) and ZFHX3 (p=2·28×10(-8)), and for large-vessel stroke at a 9p21 locus (p=3·32×10(-5)) and HDAC9 (p=2·03×10(-12)). Additionally, we verified that all associations were subtype specific. Conditional analysis in the three regions for which the associations reached genome-wide significance (PITX2, ZFHX3, and HDAC9) indicated that all the signal in each region could be attributed to one risk haplotype. We also identified 12 potentially novel loci at pischaemic stroke when compared with controls, all associations we were able to confirm are specific to a stroke subtype. This finding has two implications. First, to maximise success of genetic studies in ischaemic stroke, detailed stroke subtyping is required. Second, different genetic pathophysiological mechanisms seem to be associated with different stroke subtypes. Wellcome Trust, UK Medical Research Council (MRC), Australian National and Medical Health Research Council, National Institutes of Health (NIH) including National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA

  10. Ischemic stroke risk, smoking, and the genetics of inflammation in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, John W; Brown, David W; Giles, Wayne H; Stine, Oscar C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Sorkin, John D; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Sparks, Mary J; Dobbins, Mark T; Shoffner, Latasha T; Zappala, Nancy K; Reinhart, Laurie J; Kittner, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Although cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for vascular disease, the genetic mechanisms that link cigarette smoking to an increased incidence of stroke are not well understood. Genetic variations within the genes of the inflammatory pathways are thought to partially mediate this risk. Here we evaluate the association of several inflammatory gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with ischemic stroke risk among young women, further stratified by curre...

  11. Assessment of left atrial appendage function by transthoracic pulsed Doppler echocardiography: Comparing against transesophageal interrogation and predicting echocardiographic risk factors for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Shin Hnin; Kyu, Kyu; Galupo, Mary Joyce; Songco, Geronica G; Kong, William K F; Lee, Chi Hang; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Poh, Kian Keong

    2017-10-01

    Transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) findings of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus, spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), and LAA dysfunction are established risk factors of cardioembolic stroke. The semi-invasive nature of TEE limits its utility as a routine risk stratification tool. We aim to correlate TEE and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) pulsed Doppler measurements of LAA flow velocities and use TTE measurements to predict TEE findings. We prospectively measured pulsed Doppler LAA flow velocities in 103 consecutive patients on TEE and TTE. There was a strong correlation between TEE and TTE LAA emptying velocity (LAA E) (r = .88, P TTE LAA E predicted the presence of thrombus or SEC independent of atrial fibrillation (AF). To predict the presence of thrombus or SEC, the optimal TTE LAA E cutoff was ≤30 cm/s in all patients (75% sensitive, 90% specific) and ≤31 cm/s in AF patients (80% sensitive, 79% specific). To predict LAA dysfunction (TEE E ≤ 20 cm/s), the optimal TTE LAA E cutoff was ≤27 cm/s (100% sensitive, 89% specific in all patients and 100% sensitive, 74% specific in AF patients). TTE assessment of LAA function is feasible and correlates well with the more invasive TEE method. It predicts the presence of thrombus, SEC, and LAA dysfunction on TEE. TTE LAA assessment has incremental value in thromboembolic risk stratification and should be utilized more frequently. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Heart rate as a predictor of stroke in high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Berge, Eivind; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Julius, Stevo; Holzhauer, Björn; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Hua, Tsushung A

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for first stroke are well established, but less is known about risk factors for recurrent stroke. In the present analysis, we aimed to assess the effect of heart rate and other possible predictors of stroke in a hypertensive population with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-Term Use Evaluation trial was a multicentre, double-masked, randomized controlled, parallel group trial comparing the effects of an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan) and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) in patients with hypertension and high cardiovascular risk. We used Cox proportional hazard models to investigate the effect of baseline variables on the risk of stroke. Quadratic terms of the continuous variables were entered in the models to test for linearity. Of 15,245 patients included in the trial, 3014 had a previous stroke or TIA at baseline and were included in the present analysis. Stroke recurrence occurred in 239 patients (7.9%) during a median of 4.5 years of follow-up. Resting heart rate (per 10 beats per minute; hazard ratio [HR], 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-6.58) and diabetes mellitus at baseline (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.03-2.10) were significantly associated with an increased risk of stroke recurrence in the multivariable analysis. In high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or TIA, resting heart rate was the strongest predictor of recurrent stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of social status inconsistency on cardiovascular risk factors, myocardial infarction and stroke in the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Silke

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social inequalities in cardiovascular diseases are well documented. Yet, the relation of social status inconsistency (having different ranks in two or more status indicators like education, occupational position or income and medical conditions of heart or vessels is not clear. Status inconsistency (SI is assumed to be stressful, and the association of psychosocial distress and health is well known. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the relationship between cardiovascular diseases (CVD and status inconsistency. Another target was to assess the influence of behaviour related risk factors on this association. Methods 8960 men and 6070 women, aged 45-65 years, from the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition were included. Socio-economic status was assessed by education/vocational training and occupational position at recruitment. During a median follow-up of 8.7 years, information on CVD was collected. Results Compared to status consistent subjects, men who were in a higher occupational position than could be expected given their educational attainment had a nearly two-fold increased incidence of CVD (Odds Ratio (OR = 1.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI = 1.5; 2.4, adjusted for age. Smoking behaviour and BMI differed significantly between those who had adequate occupational positions and those who did not. Yet, these lifestyle factors, as opposed to age, did not contribute to the observed differences in CVD. No association of cardiovascular diseases and status inconsistency was found for women or in cases where education exceeded occupational position. Conclusions Status inconsistent men (occupational position > education had a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than status consistent men. However, harmful behaviour did not explain this relationship.

  14. The risk of ischaemic stroke in primary antiphospholipid syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radin, M; Schreiber, K; Cecchi, I

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The most common neurological manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is ischaemic stroke. Identifying patients with APS at high risk for developing any thrombotic event remains a major challenge. In this study, the aim was to identify predictive factors of ischaemic...

  15. Genetic risk factors for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (the METASTROKE Collaboration): a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, Matthew; Farrall, Martin; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sudlow, Cathie; Hopewell, Jemma C; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Fornage, Myriam; Ikram, M Arfan; Malik, Rainer; Bevan, Steve; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Nalls, Mike A; Longstreth, WT; Wiggins, Kerri L; Yadav, Sunaina; Parati, Eugenio A; DeStefano, Anita L; Worrall, Bradford B; Kittner, Steven J; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Reiner, Alex P; Helgadottir, Anna; Achterberg, Sefanja; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Abboud, Sherine; Schmidt, Reinhold; Walters, Matthew; Chen, Wei-Min; Ringelstein, E Bernd; O'Donnell, Martin; Ho, Weang Kee; Pera, Joanna; Lemmens, Robin; Norrving, Bo; Higgins, Peter; Benn, Marianne; Sale, Michele; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Doney, Alexander S F; Vicente, Astrid M; Delavaran, Hossein; Algra, Ale; Davies, Gail; Oliveira, Sofia A; Palmer, Colin N A; Deary, Ian; Schmidt, Helena; Pandolfo, Massimo; Montaner, Joan; Carty, Cara; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kostulas, Konstantinos; Ferro, Jose M; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Valdimarsson, Einar; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Lindgren, Arne; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Saleheen, Danish; Paré, Guillaume; Berger, Klaus; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hofman, Albert; Mosley, Thomas H; Mitchell, Braxton D; Furie, Karen; Clarke, Robert; Levi, Christopher; Seshadri, Sudha; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Psaty, Bruce M; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Stefansson, Kari; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been done in ischaemic stroke, identifying a few loci associated with the disease, but sample sizes have been 3500 cases or less. We established the METASTROKE collaboration with the aim of validating associations from previous GWAS and identifying novel genetic associations through meta-analysis of GWAS datasets for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes. Methods We meta-analysed data from 15 ischaemic stroke cohorts with a total of 12 389 individuals with ischaemic stroke and 62 004 controls, all of European ancestry. For the associations reaching genome-wide significance in METASTROKE, we did a further analysis, conditioning on the lead single nucleotide polymorphism in every associated region. Replication of novel suggestive signals was done in 13 347 cases and 29 083 controls. Findings We verified previous associations for cardioembolic stroke near PITX2 (p=2·8×10−16) and ZFHX3 (p=2·28×10−8), and for large-vessel stroke at a 9p21 locus (p=3·32×10−5) and HDAC9 (p=2·03×10−12). Additionally, we verified that all associations were subtype specific. Conditional analysis in the three regions for which the associations reached genome-wide significance (PITX2, ZFHX3, and HDAC9) indicated that all the signal in each region could be attributed to one risk haplotype. We also identified 12 potentially novel loci at pstroke when compared with controls, all associations we were able to confirm are specific to a stroke subtype. This finding has two implications. First, to maximise success of genetic studies in ischaemic stroke, detailed stroke subtyping is required. Second, different genetic pathophysiological mechanisms seem to be associated with different stroke subtypes. Funding Wellcome Trust, UK Medical Research Council (MRC), Australian National and Medical Health Research Council, National Institutes of Health (NIH) including National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the

  16. Increased risk of posterior circulation infarcts among ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chi; Chung, Chia-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Chang, Wei-Han; Tang, Simon FT; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical spondylosis is one of the extrinsic factors causing vertebral artery stenosis. Several case studies have reported compression of the vertebral artery induced by cervical osteophytes that has resulted in posterior circulation infarcts (POCI). However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have yet analyzed differences in the risk factors and stroke subtypes between ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis and those without. Purpose In the case-controlled study reported here, we analyzed the risk factors and stroke subtypes in ischemic stroke patients with and without cervical spondylosis. Characteristics in all the recruited patients with POCI and non-POCI were further compared to extract other risk factors that could predict the occurrence of POCI. Methods and patients We filtered out ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis (“Stroke+C” group) by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. We analyzed the data of 38 subjects in the Stroke+C group and 152 sex- and age-comparable ischemic stroke patients without cervical spondylosis (“Stroke−C” group). We recorded the demographic characteristics including sex and age, and stroke risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habits. The stroke classifications were defined by the Oxford Community Stroke Project classification. All subjects were further categorized into POCI or non-POCI groups. The ultrasound findings of the vertebral arteries (extracranial and intracranial) in the Stroke+C group were also recorded. Results More patients in the Stroke+C group tended to have POCI (34.2%) than patients in the Stroke−C group (17.5%) (odds ratio [OR] =2.41, Pspondylosis (OR=2.41, Pspondylosis are more prone to POCI than those without cervical spondylosis. Hypertension is another identified risk factor for POCI in ischemic stroke patients. The occurrence of POCI should be highlighted for patients

  17. Revised Framingham Stroke Risk Score, Nontraditional Risk Markers, and Incident Stroke in a Multiethnic Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueckiger, Peter; Longstreth, Will; Herrington, David; Yeboah, Joseph

    2018-02-01

    Limited data exist on the performance of the revised Framingham Stroke Risk Score (R-FSRS) and the R-FSRS in conjunction with nontraditional risk markers. We compared the R-FSRS, original FSRS, and the Pooled Cohort Equation for stroke prediction and assessed the improvement in discrimination by nontraditional risk markers. Six thousand seven hundred twelve of 6814 participants of the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) were included. Cox proportional hazard, area under the curve, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination increment analysis were used to assess and compare each stroke prediction risk score. Stroke was defined as fatal/nonfatal strokes (hemorrhagic or ischemic). After mean follow-up of 10.7 years, 231 of 6712 (3.4%) strokes were adjudicated (2.7% ischemic strokes). Mean stroke risks using the R-FSRS, original FSRS, and Pooled Cohort Equation were 4.7%, 5.9%, and 13.5%. The R-FSRS had the best calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit, χ 2 =6.55; P =0.59). All risk scores were predictive of incident stroke. C statistics of R-FSRS (0.716) was similar to Pooled Cohort Equation (0.716), but significantly higher than the original FSRS (0.653; P =0.01 for comparison with R-FSRS). Adding nontraditional risk markers individually to the R-FSRS did not improve discrimination of the R-FSRS in the area under the curve analysis, but did improve category-less net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination increment for incident stroke. The addition of coronary artery calcium to R-FSRS produced the highest category-less net reclassification improvement (0.36) and integrated discrimination increment (0.0027). Similar results were obtained when ischemic strokes were used as the outcome. The R-FSRS downgraded stroke risk but had better calibration and discriminative ability for incident stroke compared with the original FSRS. Nontraditional risk markers modestly improved the discriminative ability of the R-FSRS, with

  18. Loneliness and social isolation as risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtorta, Nicole K; Kanaan, Mona; Gilbody, Simon; Ronzi, Sara; Hanratty, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The influence of social relationships on morbidity is widely accepted, but the size of the risk to cardiovascular health is unclear. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between loneliness or social isolation and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. Sixteen electronic databases were systematically searched for longitudinal studies set in high-income countries and published up until May 2015. Two independent reviewers screened studies for inclusion and extracted data. We assessed quality using a component approach and pooled data for analysis using random effects models. Of the 35 925 records retrieved, 23 papers met inclusion criteria for the narrative review. They reported data from 16 longitudinal datasets, for a total of 4628 CHD and 3002 stroke events recorded over follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 21 years. Reports of 11 CHD studies and 8 stroke studies provided data suitable for meta-analysis. Poor social relationships were associated with a 29% increase in risk of incident CHD (pooled relative risk: 1.29, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.59) and a 32% increase in risk of stroke (pooled relative risk: 1.32, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.68). Subgroup analyses did not identify any differences by gender. Our findings suggest that deficiencies in social relationships are associated with an increased risk of developing CHD and stroke. Future studies are needed to investigate whether interventions targeting loneliness and social isolation can help to prevent two of the leading causes of death and disability in high-income countries. CRD42014010225. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  20. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35–54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16–2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55–64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56–1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  1. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown.......Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown....

  2. Association of Osteopontin, Neopterin, and Myeloperoxidase With Stroke Risk in Patients With Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attacks: Results of an Analysis of 13 Biomarkers From the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Peter; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Bao, Weihang; Preston, Gregory M; Welch, K Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Established risk factors do not fully identify patients at risk for recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels) evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on stroke risk in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease. This analysis explored the relationships between 13 plasma biomarkers assessed at trial enrollment and the occurrence of outcome strokes. We conducted a case-cohort study of 2176 participants; 562 had outcome strokes and 1614 were selected randomly from those without outcome strokes. Time to stroke was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. There was no association between time to stroke and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 , monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, resistin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, or soluble CD40 ligand. In adjusted analyses, osteopontin (hazard ratio per SD change, 1.362; P strokes. After adjustment for the Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II and treatment, osteopontin, neopterin, and myeloperoxidase remained independently associated with outcome strokes. The addition of these 3 biomarkers to Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II increased the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve by 0.023 ( P =0.015) and yielded a continuous net reclassification improvement (29.1%; P stroke and improved risk classification when added to a clinical risk algorithm. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00147602. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. PO-06 - Cancer and the risk of venous thromboembolism in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corraini, P; Ording, A G; Henderson, V W

    2016-01-01

    was matched to the stroke patients by date of diagnosis, year of birth, sex, and specific comorbidities using the Charlson Comorbidity Index and other VTE risk factors. We computed VTE cumulative risks, rates and rate ratios, as well as the interaction with comorbidity (as the excess VTE rates not explained......INTRODUCTION: The impact of comorbidity and in particular cancer on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after stroke is poorly understood. AIM: We aimed to determine the impact of comorbidity, in particular cancer, on the risk of venous thromboembolism in stroke patients as the excess VTE...... by stroke and comorbidity alone) during five years of follow-up. RESULTS: Five-year VTE risks were 2.16% and 1.85% in the stroke and general population comparison cohorts, respectively. Three-month VTE rate ratios peaked at a 6-fold increase (95% confidence interval: 4.9;6.2) in stroke patients and remained...

  4. Cardiovascular Disease Burden: Evolving Knowledge of Risk Factors in Myocardial Infarction and Stroke through Population-Based Research and Perspectives in Global Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gustavo B F; Avezum, Alvaro; Roever, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Current knowledge and research perspectives on the top ranking causes of mortality worldwide, i.e., ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases have developed rapidly. In fact, until recently, the evidence describing the incidence of acute myocardial infarction, the underlying risk factors, and the clinical outcomes of those who have this acute ischemic coronary event has largely been based on studies conducted in developed countries, with limited data for women and usually of low-ethnic diversity. Recent reports by the WHO have provided striking public health information, i.e., the global burden of cardiovascular mortality for the next decades is expected to predominantly occur among developing countries. Therefore, multiethnic population-based research including prospective cohorts and, when appropriate, case-control studies, is warranted. These studies should be specifically designed to ascertain key public health measures, such as geographic variations in non-communicable diseases, diagnosis of traditional and potential newly discovered risk factors, causes of death and disability, and gaps for improvement in healthcare prevention (both primary and secondary) and specific treatments. As an example, a multinational, multiethnic population-based cohort study is the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology study, which is the largest global initiative of nearly 200,000 adults aged 35-70 years, looking at environmental, societal, and biological influences on obesity and chronic health conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, stroke, and cancer among urban and rural communities in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, with national, community, household, and individual-level data. Implementation of population-based strategies is crucial to optimizing limited health system resources while improving care and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Dietary fibre intake and risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in the UK Women’s Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Threapleton, DE; Burley, VJ; Greenwood, DC; Cade, JE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke risk is modifiable through many risk factors, one being healthy dietary habits. Fibre intake was associated with a reduced stroke risk in recent meta-analyses; however, data were contributed by relatively few studies, and few examined different stroke types. METHODS: A total of 27 373 disease-free women were followed up for 14.4 years. Diet was assessed with a 217-item food frequency questionnaire and stroke cases were identified using English Hospital Episode Statistics an...

  6. The relationship between knowledge and risk for heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cameron; Vinson, Seth; Shofer, Frances; Brice, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) represent 2 of the leading causes of death in the United States. The early recognition of risk factors and event symptoms allows for the mitigation of disability or death. We sought to compare subject knowledge of stroke and MI, assess subject risk for cardiovascular disease, and determine if an association exists between knowledge and risk. In this cross-sectional survey, adult, non-health care professionals were presented with a written knowledge test and risk assessment tool. Subjects were classified into 3 categories of cardiovascular risk. Associations were then calculated between knowledge, risk, and population demographics. Of 500 subjects approached, 364 were enrolled. The subjects were mostly white, middle-aged, and high school educated. Gender and income were evenly distributed. Forty-eight (14%) subjects were identified as ideal risk, 130 (38%) as low risk, and 168 (49%) as moderate/high risk. MI and stroke knowledge scores decreased as cardiovascular risk increased (85%, 79%, and 73% for ideal, low, and moderate/high risk groups, respectively; P heart attack knowledge scores. Knowledge about stroke and MI was modest, with knowledge of MI exceeding that of stroke at every level of risk. Subjects with higher risk were less knowledgeable about the stroke signs, symptoms, and risk factors than those of MI. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug Abuse as an Emanating Risk for Stroke in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulena; Sharma, Anjani Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Drug abuse is a substantial risk factor for stroke among patients under 45 years of age and ranks second among the most commonly identified potential risk factors. Drug abusers aged 15 to 44 years are 6.5 times more likely to have a stroke than non drug users. Stroke occurring in persons under 45 years of age accounts for only 4% of all strokes but causes an enormous toll in personal suffering, lost productivity, and health care costs. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for stroke in a population of Southern Brazil Prevalência e fatores de risco para AVC numa população do sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Copstein

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of death in many countries of Latin America. Population studies are necessary in this region. Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of stroke and its risk factors in a population of vulnerable communities of southern Brazil. Methods: Population-based crosssectional study with systematic sampling. Individuals aged 20 and over were included (n=3,391. Individuals with previous diagnosis of stroke or identified by a validate stroke questionnaire were compared with those without stroke in many variables. Results: 285 individuals (8.4% had previous stroke. The group without stroke showed greater average of years of study than the group with stroke (p≪0.001. Multivariable analysis identified as risk factors for stroke (p≪0.05: age from 40 to 59, age from 60 to 79, widowhood, present smoking, previous smoking, hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Conclusion: The findings in this population indicate the need of preventive cost-effective public health policies in Brazil.O acidente vascular cerebral (AVC é a principal causa de morte em muitos países da América Latina. Objetivos: Avaliar prevalência e fatores de risco para AVC em população de comunidades vulneráveis no sul do Brasil. Métodos: Estudo transversal de base populacional com amostragem sistemática. Foram incluídos os indivíduos a partir de 20 anos de idade (n=3.391. Indivíduos com prévio diagnóstico de AVC ou identificados por questionário validado para AVC foram comparados àqueles sem AVC em diversas variáveis. Resultados: 285 indivíduos (8,4% referiram AVC prévio. O grupo sem AVC teve maior média de anos de estudo que o grupo com AVC (p≪0,001. Foram identificados como fatores de risco para AVC (p≪0,05: idade de 40 a 59 anos, idade de 60 a 79 anos, viuvez, tabagismo no presente, tabagismo no passado, hipertensão arterial sistêmica e doença isquêmica do coração. Conclusão: São necessárias no Brasil políticas de saúde p

  9. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults with Moyamoya Disease: Prognostic Factors for Stroke Recurrence and Functional Outcome after Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Deng, Xiaofeng; Gao, Faliang; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Jizong

    2017-07-01

    Stroke in young adults is uncommon and rarely described. Moyamoya disease is one of the leading causes of stroke in young adults. We aimed to study the prognostic factors for stroke recurrences and functional outcomes in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease after revascularization. We reviewed 696 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease admitted to our hospital from 2009-2015 and identified patients aged 18-45 years with first-ever stroke. Follow-up was conducted via face-to-face or structured telephone interviews. Outcome measures were recurrent stroke events and unfavorable functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale >2). We included 121 young patients with moyamoya disease suffering from stroke (initial presentation age, 35.4 ± 7.5 years). All patients underwent revascularization after the acute phase of initial stroke events as the secondary prevention for recurrences. During follow-up (median, 40 months), 9 patients (7.4%) experienced recurrent strokes and 8 of them (6.6%) suffered unfavorable functional outcomes. In the multivariate analysis, diabetes was an independent predictor for stroke recurrences (hazard ratio 6.76; 95% confidence interval 1.30-35.11; P = 0.02) and was significantly associated with unfavorable functional outcomes (odds ratio 7.87; 95% confidence interval 1.42-38.74; P = 0.01). We identified diabetes as an independent risk factor for recurrent strokes and unfavorable functional outcomes after revascularization in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardioprotective medication use and risk factor control among US adults with unrecognized myocardial infarction: the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan EB

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Emily B Levitan,1 Christopher Gamboa,1 Monika M Safford,2 Dana V Rizk,3 Todd M Brown,4 Elsayed Z Soliman,5 Paul Muntner11Department of Epidemiology, 2Division of Preventive Medicine, 3Division of Nephrology, 4Division of Cardiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 5Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USABackground: Individuals with unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI have similar risks for cardiovascular events and mortality as those with recognized myocardial infarction (RMI. The prevalence of cardioprotective medication use and blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control among individuals with UMI is unknown.Methods: Participants from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS study who were recruited between May 2004 and October 2007 received baseline twelve-lead electrocardiograms (n = 21,036. Myocardial infarction (MI status was characterized as no MI, UMI (electrocardiogram abnormalities consistent with MI without self-reported history; n = 949; 4.5%, and RMI (self-reported history of MI; n = 1574; 7.5%.Results: For participants with no MI, UMI, and RMI, prevalence of use was 38.4%, 44.4%, and 75.7% for aspirin; 18.0%, 25.8%, and 57.2% for beta blockers; 31.7%, 38.7%, and 55.0% for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers; and 28.1%, 33.9%, and 64.1% for statins, respectively. Participants with RMI were 35% more likely to have low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dL than participants with UMI (prevalence ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.19–1.52. Blood pressure control (<140/90 mmHg was similar between RMI and UMI groups (prevalence ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.93–1.13.Conclusion: Although participants with UMI were somewhat more likely to use cardioprotective medications than those with no MI, they were less likely to use

  11. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, AFib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Aug ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  12. Intakes of Vegetables and Fruits are Negatively Correlated with Risk of Stroke in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Mitra; Darvishi, Leila; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Khorvash, Fariborz; Aghaei, Mahmud; Iraj, Bijan; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza

    2013-05-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death. Current therapeutic strategies have been unsuccessful. Several studies have reported benefits on reducing stroke risk and improving the poststroke associated functional declines in patients who ate foods rich in fruits and vegetables. Their potential protective effects may be due to their antioxidants, calcium, potassium, riboflavine, peridoxin, riboflavin contents. Folic acid, peridoxin, and riboflavin are all cofactors in hyperhomocysteinemia as a stroke risk factor.Studies suggest that oxidative stress plays important roles in pathogenesis of ischemic cerebral injury and higher intake of antioxidants has been associated with a lower stroke risk. The aim of this study was to examine if the dietary intake of vegetables and fruits in patients with stroke were comparatively worse than those in patients without stroke. In this case control study, 93 stroke patients admitted to Alzahra hospital were matched for age and sex with 60 patients who were not affected with acute cerebrovascular diseases and did not have a history of stroke. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire.Food intakes were compared between two groups and with recommended value. Mean daily intake of vegetable and fruits was more in male with stroke than male without stroke as well as calorie intake from vegetables and fruit was higher in male with stroke.Mean daily intake of vegetable and fruits were lower in women with stroke than women without stroke as well as calorie intake from vegetables and fruit was lower in women with stroke. Our findings suggest that increased vegetable and fruits intake may be associated with decreased risk of stroke.

  13. The Stroke RiskometerTM App: Validation of a data collection tool and stroke risk predictor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Parmar (Priya); R. Krishnamurthi (Rita); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); A. Hofman (Albert); S.S. Mirza (Saira); Y. Varakin (Yury); M. Kravchenko (Michael); M. Piradov (Michael); A.G. Thrift (Amanda G.); B. Norrving (Bo); W. Wang (Wenzhi); D.K. Mandal (Dipes Kumar); S. Barker-Collo (Suzanne); R. Sahathevan (Ramesh); S.M. Davis (Stephen); G. Saposnik (Gustavo); M. Kivipelto (Miia); S. Sindi (Shireen); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); M. Giroud (Maurice); Y. Béjot (Yannick); M. Brainin (Michael); R. Poulton (Richie); K.M.V. Narayan (K. M. Venkat); M. Correia (Manuel); A. Freire (António); Y. Kokubo (Yoshihiro); D. Wiebers (David); F.K.F. Mensah (Fane ); N.F. Bindhim (Nasser F.); P.A. Barber (P. Alan); N.G. Pandian (Natesa); G.J. Hankey (Graeme); M.M. Mehndiratta (Man Mohan); S. Azhagammal (Shobhana); N.M. Ibrahim (Norlinah Mohd); M. Abbott (Max); E. Rush (Elaine); P. Hume (Patria); T. Hussein (Tasleem); R. Bhattacharjee (Rohit); M. Purohit (Mitali); V.L. Feigin (V.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The greatest potential to reduce the burden of stroke is by primary prevention of first-ever stroke, which constitutes three quarters of all stroke. In addition to population-wide prevention strategies (the 'mass' approach), the 'high risk' approach aims to identify

  14. TTC7B emerges as a novel risk factor for ischemic stroke through the convergence of several genome-wide approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Tiago; Gabriel, João Paulo; Taipa, Ricardo; Fonseca, Benedita V; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Manso, Helena; Gouveia, Liliana O; Sobral, João; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Rabionet, Raquel; Ferro, José M; Montaner, Joan; Vicente, Astrid M; Silva, Mário Rui; Matos, Ilda; Lopes, Gabriela; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2012-06-01

    We hereby propose a novel approach to the identification of ischemic stroke (IS) susceptibility genes that involves converging data from several unbiased genetic and genomic tools. We tested the association between IS and genes differentially expressed between cases and controls, then determined which data mapped to previously reported linkage peaks and were nominally associated with stroke in published genome-wide association studies. We first performed gene expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 20 IS cases and 20 controls. Sixteen differentially expressed genes mapped to reported whole-genome linkage peaks, including the TTC7B gene, which has been associated with major cardiovascular disease. At the TTC7B locus, 46 tagging polymorphisms were tested for association in 565 Portuguese IS cases and 520 controls. Markers nominally associated in at least one test and defining associated haplotypes were then examined in 570 IS Spanish cases and 390 controls. Several polymorphisms and haplotypes in the intron 5-intron 6 region of TTC7B were also associated with IS risk in the Spanish and combined data sets. Multiple independent lines of evidence therefore support the role of TTC7B in stroke susceptibility, but further work is warranted to identify the exact risk variant and its pathogenic potential.

  15. Risk of stroke among patients with post-traumatic stress disorder: nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Pan, Tai-Long; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Lee, Ying-Chiao; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2015-04-01

    Previous evidence has shown positive associations between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus, which are all risk factors for stroke, but the role of PTSD in the subsequent development of stroke is still unknown. To investigate the temporal association between PTSD and the development of stroke. Identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 5217 individuals aged ≥18 years, with PTSD but with no history of stroke, and 20 868 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled between 2002 and 2009, and followed up until the end of 2011 to identify the development of stroke. Individuals with PTSD had an increased risk of developing any stroke (hazard ratio (HR) 3.37, 95% CI 2.44-4.67) and ischaemic stroke (HR = 3.47, 95% CI 2.23-5.39) after adjusting for demographic data and medical comorbidities. Sensitivity tests showed consistent findings (any stroke HR = 3.02, 95% CI 2.13-4.28; ischaemic stroke HR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.79-4.66) after excluding the first year of observation. Individuals with PTSD have an increased risk of developing any stroke and ischaemic stroke. Further studies are required to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  16. Renal dysfunction as a predictor of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: validation of the R(2)CHADS(2) index in the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily, oral, direct factor Xa inhibition Compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation) and ATRIA (AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation) study cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Stevens, Susanna R; Chang, YuChiao; Singer, Daniel E; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Go, Alan S; Patel, Manesh R; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Halperin, Jonathan L; Breithardt, Günter; Hankey, Graeme J; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C; Nessel, Christopher C; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M

    2013-01-15

    We sought to define the factors associated with the occurrence of stroke and systemic embolism in a large, international atrial fibrillation (AF) trial. In ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily, oral, direct factor Xa inhibition Compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation), 14 264 patients with nonvalvular AF and creatinine clearance ≥30 mL/min were randomized to rivaroxaban or dose-adjusted warfarin. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify factors at randomization independently associated with the occurrence of stroke or non-central nervous system embolism based on intention-to-treat analysis. A risk score was developed in ROCKET AF and validated in ATRIA (AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation), an independent AF patient cohort. Over a median follow-up of 1.94 years, 575 patients (4.0%) experienced primary end-point events. Reduced creatinine clearance was a strong, independent predictor of stroke and systemic embolism, second only to prior stroke or transient ischemic attack. Additional factors associated with stroke and systemic embolism included elevated diastolic blood pressure and heart rate, as well as vascular disease of the heart and limbs (C-index 0.635). A model that included creatinine clearance (R(2)CHADS(2)) improved net reclassification index by 6.2% compared with CHA(2)DS(2)VASc (C statistic=0.578) and by 8.2% compared with CHADS(2) (C statistic=0.575). The inclusion of creatinine clearance <60 mL/min and prior stroke or transient ischemic attack in a model with no other covariates led to a C statistic of 0.590.Validation of R(2)CHADS(2) in an external, separate population improved net reclassification index by 17.4% (95% confidence interval, 12.1%-22.5%) relative to CHADS(2). In patients with nonvalvular AF at moderate to high risk of stroke, impaired renal function is a potent predictor of stroke and systemic embolism. Stroke risk stratification in patients

  17. Association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and recurrent stroke risk in patients with different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Ruihao; Song, Bo; Tan, Song; Gao, Yuan; Fang, Hui; Lu, Jie; Xu, Yuming

    2015-07-01

    The association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence remains unclear, and may be influenced by different subtypes of ischemic stroke. We aimed to investigate whether atherogenic dyslipidemia contributed to stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients and in those with certain subtypes of ischemic stroke. We conducted a prospective hospital-based study enrolling patients with acute ischemic stroke. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was defined as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence was analyzed by using multivariable Cox regression model. In the 510 ischemic stroke patients, 64 patients (12·5%) had atherogenic dyslipidemia, and 66 patients (12·9%) experienced stroke recurrence events within 24 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that stroke recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia than those without in all the stroke patients (20·3% vs. 11·9%; P = 0·048), and more evident in those of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (31·0% vs. 14·1%; P = 0·014), but not in the other subtypes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that atherogenic dyslipidemia was associated with higher stroke recurrence risk among stroke patients of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (hazard ratio, 2·79; 95% confidence interval, 1·24-6·28), but not significant in all the stroke patients (hazard ratio, 1·69; 95% confidence interval, 0·85-3·37). Atherogenic dyslipidemia is associated with higher risk of stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Such association might be more pronounced in large-artery atherosclerosis subtype and needs further investigation to establish such relationship. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Tooth loss, hypertension and risk for stroke in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Heon; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Ji Wan; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sang-Yi; Jee, Sun Ha

    2009-04-01

    Tooth loss has been suggested as a potential risk factor for stroke. We conducted a prospective cohort study of stroke in Korea on hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and tooth loss to characterize their independent effects and interactions. The overall risk of stroke and the risk of different subtypes of stroke were evaluated in relation to tooth loss using Cox proportional hazards models among 867,256 Korean men and women, aged 30-95 years, who received health insurance from the National Health Insurance Corporation and were medically evaluated between 1992 and 1995, with tooth loss measured. The overall prevalence of having at least one tooth removed among the people in the study was 29.8% (31.9% for men and 22.3% for women). During a 14-year follow-up, 28,258 strokes with 5105 fatal strokes occurred. For men and women, tooth loss was associated with total stroke and stroke subtypes. In a multivariable model adjusting for selected covariates, a graded association between higher tooth loss and higher risk of total stroke was observed in men [> or =7 lost teeth versus 0 (hazard ratio (HR)=1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-1.4)] and in women (HR=1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3). The HRs for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were also similar in men and women. There was evidence of interaction of hemorrhagic stroke risk with hypertension and tooth loss. Tooth loss is independently associated with increased risk of stroke and hypertension does interact antagonistically, particularly for hemorrhagic stroke.

  19. Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at high risk. SERMS may cause side effects , such as hot flashes , so they are not often used for prevention of cancer. See the PDQ summary on Breast Cancer Prevention for more information. Finasteride has been ...

  20. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association ( P =6×10 - 4 ) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at P risk and stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P =1.2×10 - 9 , 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke subtypes assessed four OCSP (Oxfordshire Communi-. African Health Sciences Vol 15 Issue 1, March 2015. 68. 69 ty Stroke Project Classification) subtypes classification. 13 was used with lacunar circulation infarct (LACI) and total anterior (TACI), partial anterior (PACI), posterior. (POCI) circulation infarcts as non ...

  2. Patent foramen ovale and the risk of ischemic stroke in a multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Marco R; Sacco, Ralph L; Sciacca, Robert R; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi

    2007-02-20

    We sought to assess the risk of ischemic stroke from a patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the multiethnic prospective cohort of northern Manhattan. Patent foramen ovale has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, mainly in case-control studies. The actual PFO-related stroke risk in the general population is unclear. The presence of PFO was assessed at baseline by using transthoracic 2-dimensional echocardiography with contrast injection in 1,100 stroke-free subjects older than 39 years of age (mean age 68.7 +/- 10.0 years) from the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS). The presence of atrial septal aneurysm (ASA) also was recorded. Subjects were followed annually for outcomes. We assessed PFO/ASA-related stroke risk after adjusting for established stroke risk factors. We detected PFO in 164 subjects (14.9%); ASA was present in 27 subjects (2.5%) and associated with PFO in 19 subjects. During a mean follow-up of 79.7 +/- 28.0 months, an ischemic stroke occurred in 68 subjects (6.2%). After adjustment for demographics and risk factors, PFO was not found to be significantly associated with stroke (hazard ratio 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87 to 3.09). The same trend was observed in all age, gender, and race-ethnic subgroups. The coexistence of PFO and ASA did not increase the stroke risk (adjusted hazard ratio 1.25, 95% CI 0.17 to 9.24). Isolated ASA was associated with elevated stroke incidence (2 of 8, or 25%; adjusted hazard ratio 3.66, 95% CI 0.88 to 15.30). Patent foramen ovale, alone or together with ASA, was not associated with an increased stroke risk in this multiethnic cohort. The independent role of ASA needs further assessment in appositely designed and powered studies.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β1 (C509T, G800A, and T869C) gene polymorphisms and risk of ischemic stroke in North Indian population: A hospital-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Misra, Shubham; Kumar, Amit; Faruq, Mohammad; Shakya, Sunil; Vardhan, Gyan; Vivekanandhan, Subiah; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2017-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional pleiotropic cytokine involved in inflammation and pathogenesis of cerebrovascular diseases. There is limited information on the association between variations within the TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms and risk of ischemic stroke (IS). The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the TGF-β1 gene (C509T, G800A, and T869C) polymorphisms, and their haplotypes with the risk of IS in North Indian population. A total of 250 IS patients and 250 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. IS was classified using the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the strength of association between TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms and risk of IS. Genotyping was performed using SNaPshot method. Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, alcohol, smoking, family history of stroke, sedentary lifestyle, and low socioeconomic status were found to be associated with the risk of IS. The distribution of C509T, G800A and T869C genotypes was consistent with Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in the IS and control groups. Adjusted conditional logistic regression analysis showed a significant association of TGF-β1 C509T (odds ratio [OR], 2.1; 95% CI; 1.2-3.8; P = 0.006), G800A (OR, 4.4; 95% CI; 2.1-9.3; P population.

  4. Hyperuricaemia as a prognostic factor for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Naranjo, F H; Saavedra Santana, P; González Hernández, A; Fabre Pi, O; Sosa-Henríquez, M

    2018-03-08

    Recent studies on uric acid as a biomarker for the prognosis of acute stroke have found conflicting results. We collected blood samples from 600 consecutively admitted patients at our tertiary hospital and analysed the relationship between uric acid levels and functional prognosis (measured using the modified Rankin Scale [mRS]). Patients who had received reperfusion therapy were excluded since this may have influenced uric acid levels. A total of 73% of patients had mRS scores ≤2; the mean uric acid level was 5.22mg/dL. We found a nonlinear relationship between functional prognosis at discharge and serum uric acid levels at admission when the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was excluded from the analysis. Serum uric acid levels in patients with acute ischaemic stroke are significantly associated with functional prognosis at discharge, although this relationship is nonlinear. In fact, poorer prognosis is associated both with very low and with very high concentrations of uric acid. This suggests a dual role of uric acid in relation to stroke: on the one hand, as an associated risk factor, and on the other, as a possible neuroprotective factor due to its antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Abnormal P-Wave Axis and Ischemic Stroke: The ARIC Study (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Ankit; Norby, Faye L; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Koene, Ryan J; Rooney, Mary R; O'Neal, Wesley T; Alonso, Alvaro; Chen, Lin Y

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal P-wave axis (aPWA) has been linked to incident atrial fibrillation and mortality; however, the relationship between aPWA and stroke has not been reported. We hypothesized that aPWA is associated with ischemic stroke independent of atrial fibrillation and other stroke risk factors and tested our hypothesis in the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities), a community-based prospective cohort study. We included 15 102 participants (aged 54.2±5.7 years; 55.2% women; 26.5% blacks) who attended the baseline examination (1987-1989) and without prevalent stroke. We defined aPWA as any value outside 0 to 75° using 12-lead ECGs obtained during study visits. Each case of incident ischemic stroke was classified in accordance with criteria from the National Survey of Stroke by a computer algorithm and adjudicated by physician review. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of aPWA with stroke. During a mean follow-up of 20.2 years, there were 657 incident ischemic stroke cases. aPWA was independently associated with a 1.50-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.85) increased risk of ischemic stroke in the multivariable model that included atrial fibrillation. When subtyped, aPWA was associated with a 2.04-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.42-2.95) increased risk of cardioembolic stroke and a 1.32-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.71) increased risk of thrombotic stroke. aPWA is independently associated with ischemic stroke. This association seems to be stronger for cardioembolic strokes. Collectively, our findings suggest that alterations in atrial electric activation may predispose to cardiac thromboembolism independent of atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Mendelian Genes and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Small-Vessel Ischemic Stroke in Sporadic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Michael; O'Donnell, Martin; Thijs, Vincent; Dans, Antonio; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Mondo, Charles; Czlonkowska, Anna; Skowronska, Marta; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Yusuf, Salim; Paré, Guillaume

    2017-08-01

    Mendelian strokes are rare genetic disorders characterized by early-onset small-vessel stroke. Although extensively studied among families with syndromic features, whether these genes affect risk among sporadic cases is unknown. We sequenced 8 genes responsible for Mendelian stroke in a case-control study of sporadic stroke cases (≤70 years). Participants included 1251 primary stroke cases of small-vessel pathology (637 intracerebral hemorrhage and 614 small-vessel ischemic stroke cases) and 1716 controls from the INTERSTROKE study (Study of the Importance of Conventional and Emerging Risk Factors of Stroke in Different Regions and Ethnic Groups of the World). Overall, the prevalence of canonical disease-causing mutations was 0.56% in cases and 0.23% in controls (odds ratio=1.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-7.57; P =0.33). CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathies with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathies) mutations were more frequent among cases (0.48%) than controls (0.23%) but were not significantly associated with stroke risk (odds ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-8.02; P =0.27). Next, we included all rare nonsynonymous mutations to investigate whether other types of mutations may contribute to stroke risk. Overall, 13.5% of cases and 14.2% of controls were carriers of at least one rare nonsynonymous mutation among the 8 Mendelian stroke genes. Mutation carriers were not at elevated risk of stroke (odds ratio=0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.16; P =0.55). In the absence of syndromic features and family history of stroke, screening for Mendelian mutations among small-vessel stroke patients is unlikely to have high diagnostic utility. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Old Stroke as an Independent Risk Etiology for Todd's Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenichiro; Arai, Noritoshi; Hida, Ayumi; Takeuchi, Sousuke

    2017-08-01

    Todd's paralysis (TP) is a well-known postictal paresis in which patients present with transient weakness in their limb(s) after seizures. Although recognized as a stroke mimic in clinical practice, the pathophysiological mechanism and clinical features of TP remain unknown. Furthermore, its diagnosis can be erroneous in neurological emergency practice. We aimed to illustrate the clinical features and identify factors associated with TP. This single-center, retrospective observational study included consecutive adult patients who presented with convulsive seizure and were referred to an urban tertiary care emergency department between August 2010 and April 2016. The diagnosis of TP was set as the primary outcome measure. Clinical and laboratory variables were evaluated. Of 1381 eligible convulsive seizures in 1187 patients, TP was observed in 89 seizures (6.4%) in 75 patients. Patients with TP were significantly older, more likely to have convulsive status epilepticus, and had a longer duration of convulsion than patients without TP. TP was found in 19.7% (39 of 198) of convulsive seizures with remote etiologies including those due to old stroke. These etiologies were identified as independent significant risk factors for TP compared with seizures with cryptogenic etiology. The positive likelihood ratio of TP seizures was 11.2 for remote seizure etiologies. Our results indicated that the diagnosis of TP highly suggests premorbid or comorbid structural lesions in the central nervous system, including old stroke. This consideration in seizure etiology may help in reducing the risk of misdiagnosis of acute stroke in emergency settings and further antiepileptic treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk factors ... do smoke, quit. Controlling your cholesterol through diet, exercise, and medicines . Controlling high blood pressure through diet, ...

  9. Magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    Thus, improving personal behaviour/ life style/ and early screening are important to prevent stroke in the study area. [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2016;30(3):129-134]. Key words: Stroke, factor, Felege Hiwot Hospital, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Background. Stroke or cerebrovascular accident is defined as the abrupt onset of neurologic ...

  10. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive...... use, and health services utilization.The risk (odds ratio [OR]) of ICH among migraineurs was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.5), and of SAH was (1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.5). The association with ICH was stronger for migraine diagnosed ≥20 years prior to ICH (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.4), but not with SAH...... (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.6-2.1). In analyses stratified by migraine type and gender, the OR of ICH in women with migraine with aura was 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-3.4) and the corresponding OR of SAH in women was 1.2 (95% CI 0.6-2.3). CONCLUSION: No clear increased risk of ICH or SAH was observed in migraineurs....

  11. Predicted risk of stroke and bleeding and use of oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dukanovic, Alexandar; Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    Introduction, materials and methods We used Danish nationwide registries to examine temporal trends in the predicted stroke and bleeding risks (mean CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores per year, respectively) as well as the combination of selected stroke and bleeding risk factors per year among atrial...... dabigatran initiators. In the study period, apixaban initiators in general had the highest frequency of prior stroke and age ≥ 75 years. Conclusions Danish AF patients receiving standard dose dabigatran had the lowest and decreasing predicted stroke and bleeding risks during almost all study years. Patients...... receiving reduced dose apixaban had rather stable predicted risk of stroke during the study period and the highest mean CHA2DS2-VASc score in 2016....

  12. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  13. Factors Associated With Ischemic Stroke Survival and Recovery in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winovich, Divya Thekkethala; Longstreth, William T; Arnold, Alice M; Varadhan, Ravi; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Cushman, Mary; Newman, Anne B; Odden, Michelle C

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about factors that predispose older adults to poor recovery after a stroke. In this study, we sought to evaluate prestroke measures of frailty and related factors as markers of vulnerability to poor outcomes after ischemic stroke. In participants aged 65 to 99 years with incident ischemic strokes from the Cardiovascular Health Study, we evaluated the association of several risk factors (frailty, frailty components, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and cystatin C) assessed before stroke with stroke outcomes of survival, cognitive decline (≥5 points on Modified Mini-Mental State Examination), and activities of daily living decline (increase in limitations). Among 717 participants with incident ischemic stroke with survival data, slow walking speed, low grip strength, and cystatin C were independently associated with shorter survival. Among participants stroke. Inflammation, kidney function, and frailty also seemed to be determinants of survival and recovery after an ischemic stroke. These markers of vulnerability may identify targets for differing pre and poststroke medical management and rehabilitation among older adults at risk of poor stroke outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Family History and Stroke Risk in China: Evidence from a Large Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Yu, Canqing; Lv, Jun; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Zhengming; Hu, Zhibin; Li, Liming

    2017-05-01

    Large cohort studies on relationship between family history of stroke (FHS) and stroke risk are lacking in Asians. We aimed to systematically evaluate the association of FHS with stroke risk in a cohort study of 0.5 million Chinese adults. Information about FHS was self-reported. The median follow-up time was 7.16 years and the end-point of follow-up was incident stroke, which was entered directly into the China Kadoorie Biobank system. Multivariate analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards model, and interaction analyses were carried using likelihood-ratio tests. Compared with participants without FHS, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval, CI) of stroke for participants with FHS was 1.50 (1.46-1.55). The HRs increased with the number of first degree relatives with stroke (HRs=1.41, 1.98 and 2.47 for 1, 2 and ≥3 relatives, respectively, P trend history and parental history, respectively. Similar associations with offspring stroke risk were observed between paternal history (HR=1.48, 95% CI: 1.43-1.54) and maternal history (HR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.43-1.55). Moreover, significant interactions were detected between FHS and health-risk behaviors (tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking). FHS is an independent risk factor for stroke in Chinese. The more first degree relatives are affected by stroke, the higher are individuals' risk of suffering from stroke. The management of the health-risk behaviors for reducing stroke should be highlighted, especially for the individuals with FHS.

  15. Impact of Libido at 2 Weeks after Stroke on Risk of Stroke Recurrence at 1-Year in a Chinese Stroke Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Jing Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: One out of three stroke patients in mainland China has decreased libido at 2 weeks after stroke. Decreased libido is a protective factor for stroke recurrence at 1-year, which is more prominent among older male patients.

  16. Serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor Is Probably Associated With 3-Month Prognosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengbao; Xu, Tan; Guo, Daoxia; Huangfu, Xinfeng; Zhong, Chongke; Yang, Jingyuan; Wang, Aili; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Peng, Yanbo; Xu, Tian; Wang, Jinchao; Sun, Yingxian; Peng, Hao; Li, Qunwei; Ju, Zhong; Geng, Deqin; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Yonghong; He, Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is positively associated with poor prognosis of heart failure and myocardial infarction, and it can also predict the risk of ischemic stroke in population. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between serum HGF and prognosis of ischemic stroke. A total of 3027 acute ischemic stroke patients were included in this post hoc analysis of the CATIS (China Antihypertensive Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke). The primary outcome was composite outcome of death or major disability (modified Rankin Scale score ≥3) within 3 months. After multivariate adjustment, elevated HGF levels were associated with an increased risk of primary outcome (odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.03; P trend =0.015) when 2 extreme quartiles were compared. Each SD increase of log-transformed HGF was associated with 14% (95% confidence interval, 2%-27%) increased risk of primary outcome. Adding HGF quartiles to a model containing conventional risk factors improved the predictive power for primary outcome (net reclassification improvement: 17.50%, P stroke at baseline, and elevated HGF levels were probably associated with 3-month poor prognosis independently of stroke severity among ischemic stroke patients, especially in those without heparin pre-treatment. Further studies from other samples of ischemic stroke patients are needed to validate our findings. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and the Risk of Stroke in Urban and Rural Tanzania: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mast, Q. de; Molhoek, J.E.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Gray, W.K.; Groot, P.G. de; Jusabani, A.; Mugusi, F.; Urbanus, R.T.; Walker, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The burden of stroke is high in sub-Saharan Africa, and improved knowledge of risk factors is needed. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a common acquired stroke risk factor in young individuals. Antiphospholipid antibodies may be induced by infectious diseases. Sub-Saharan

  18. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and the Risk of Stroke in Urban and Rural Tanzania : A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mast, Quirijn; Molhoek, Jessica E; van der Ven, André J; Gray, William K; de Groot, Philip G; Jusabani, Ahmed; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Urbanus, Rolf T; Walker, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The burden of stroke is high in sub-Saharan Africa, and improved knowledge of risk factors is needed. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a common acquired stroke risk factor in young individuals. Antiphospholipid antibodies may be induced by infectious diseases. Sub-Saharan

  19. Anxiety disorders and risk of stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Piñar, M; Ayerbe, L; González, E; Mathur, R; Foguet-Boreu, Q; Ayis, S

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problem worldwide. However, the evidence on the association between anxiety disorders and risk of stroke is limited. This systematic review and meta-analysis presents a critical appraisal and summary of the available evidence on the association between anxiety disorders and risk of stroke. Cohort studies reporting risk of stroke among patients with anxiety disorders were searched in PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus, and the Web of Science, from database inception to June 2016. The quality of the studies was assessed using standard criteria. A meta-analysis was undertaken to obtain pooled estimates of the risk of stroke among patients with anxiety disorders. Eight studies, including 950,759 patients, from the 11,764 references initially identified, were included in this review. A significantly increased risk of stroke for patients with anxiety disorders was observed, with an overall hazard ratio: 1.24 (1.09-1.41), P=0.001. No significant heterogeneity between studies was detected and the funnel plot suggested that publication bias was unlikely. Limited evidence suggests that the risk of stroke is increased shortly after the diagnosis of anxiety and that risk of stroke may be higher for patients with severe anxiety. Anxiety disorders are a very prevalent modifiable condition associated with risk of stroke increased by 24%. This evidence could inform the development of interventions for the management of anxiety and the prevention of stroke. Further studies on the risk of stroke in patients with anxiety, and the explanatory factors for this association, are required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates for stroke: evidence from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry (AuSCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Kilkenny, Monique F; Levi, Christopher R; Lannin, Natasha A; Thrift, Amanda G; Kim, Joosup; Grabsch, Brenda; Churilov, Leonid; Dewey, Helen M; Hill, Kelvin; Faux, Steven G; Grimley, Rohan; Castley, Helen; Hand, Peter J; Wong, Andrew; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Gill, Melissa; Crompton, Douglas; Middleton, Sandy; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-05-01

    Hospital data used to assess regional variability in disease management and outcomes, including mortality, lack information on disease severity. We describe variance between hospitals in 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs) for stroke, comparing models that include or exclude stroke severity as a covariate. Cohort design linking Australian Stroke Clinical Registry data with national death registrations. Multivariable models using recommended statistical methods for calculating 30-day RAMRs for hospitals, adjusted for demographic factors, ability to walk on admission, stroke type, and stroke recurrence. Australian hospitals providing at least 200 episodes of acute stroke care, 2009-2014. Hospital RAMRs estimated by different models. Changes in hospital rank order and funnel plots were used to explore variation in hospital-specific 30-day RAMRs; that is, RAMRs more than three standard deviations from the mean. In the 28 hospitals reporting at least 200 episodes of care, there were 16 218 episodes (15 951 patients; median age, 77 years; women, 46%; ischaemic strokes, 79%). RAMRs from models not including stroke severity as a variable ranged between 8% and 20%; RAMRs from models with the best fit, which included ability to walk and stroke recurrence as variables, ranged between 9% and 21%. The rank order of hospitals changed according to the covariates included in the models, particularly for those hospitals with the highest RAMRs. Funnel plots identified significant deviation from the mean overall RAMR for two hospitals, including one with borderline excess mortality. Hospital stroke mortality rates and hospital performance ranking may vary widely according to the covariates included in the statistical analysis.

  1. Impact of Age on the Importance of Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressures for Stroke Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram, Julie K K; Borglykke, Anders; Andreasen, Anne H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates age-related shifts in the relative importance of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures as predictors of stroke and whether these relations are influenced by other cardiovascular risk factors. Using 34 European cohorts from the MOnica, Risk, Genetics, Archiving......, and Monograph (MORGAM) Project with baseline between 1982 and 1997, 68 551 subjects aged 19 to 78 years, without cardiovascular disease and not receiving antihypertensive treatment, were included. During a mean of 13.2 years of follow-up, stroke incidence was 2.8%. Stroke risk was analyzed using hazard ratios...

  2. Test Your Stroke Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9-1-1. Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? High blood pressure Heart disease Smoking High cholesterol Diabetes Show Answer All of these are risk factors for stroke. If you smoke - quit. If you have high ...

  3. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  4. Pre-stroke apathy symptoms are associated with an increased risk of delirium in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimiec, Elzbieta; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Pasinska, Paulina; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Szyper, Aleksandra; Pera, Joanna; Slowik, Agnieszka; Dziedzic, Tomasz

    2017-08-09

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms can be interrelated to delirium. We aimed to investigate an association between pre-stroke neuropsychiatric symptoms and the risk of delirium in stroke patients. We included 606 patients (median age: 73, 53% female) with stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted within 48 hours from symptoms onset. We assessed delirium on a daily basis during the first 7 days of hospitalization. To make diagnosis of delirium we used DSM-5 criteria. We used Neuropsychiatric Inventory to assess neuropsychiatric symptoms occurring within 4 weeks prior to stroke. We diagnosed delirium in 28.2% of patients. On univariate analysis, higher score of pre-stroke depression (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.04-2.40, P = 0.03), apathy (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.44-3.45, P delirium. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, stroke severity, right hemisphere lesion, pre-stroke cognitive decline, pre-stroke disability and infections, higher apathy score (OR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.17-3.50, P = 0.01), but no other neuropsychiatric symptoms, remained independent predictor of delirium. We conclude that pre-stroke apathy symptoms are associated with increased risk of delirium in stroke patients.

  5. Association of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor gene polymorphisms with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Zeng, F; Zhang, N; Huang, T; Meng, Q; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    To explore the association between polymorphisms of the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF) gene and ischaemic stroke. The SREBF1c 54G>C and SREBPF2 1784G>C genotypes were assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 446 Han Chinese ischaemic stroke patients and 355 Han Chinese control subjects without cerebrovascular disease. The frequencies of the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype and the C allele were significantly higher in the ischaemic stroke group than in controls. Patients with ischaemic stroke who had the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, compared with ischaemic stroke patients and control subjects with the GC or GG genotypes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between SREBF2 1784G>C and ischaemic stroke; an inverse association was observed between HDL level and risk of ischaemic stroke. The CC genotype of the SREBF2 1784G>C polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, possibly through decreasing the HDL level, which was inversely associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke.

  6. Risk of Stroke with Various Types of Menopausal Hormone Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Keiding, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Double-blind randomized studies on the effects of oral postmenopausal hormone therapies were stopped mainly because of increased risk of stroke. We aimed to assess the risk of all strokes and various subtypes associated with hormone therapy and explore the influence of reg...

  7. The effect of medical treatments on stroke risk in asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alice; Shipley, Martin; Markus, Hugh

    2013-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests current best medical treatment may be sufficient to prevent stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. If this is the case, then it is important to determine risk reduction provided by treatments. Using Asymptomatic Carotid Emboli Study (ACES) prospective data, the effect of current treatment and risk factors on future stroke and transient ischemic attack risk were determined. Four-hundred seventy-seven patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis were followed-up every 6 months for 2 years. Changes in risk factors and stroke prevention therapies were reviewed at each visit. Using time-dependent Cox regression, the relationship between current treatment over time was determined and presented as hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for risk of stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cardiovascular death end points. On multivariate analysis, antiplatelets (P=0.001) and lower mean blood pressure (P=0.002) were independent predictors of reduced risk of ipsilateral stroke and transient ischemic attack. Antiplatelets (Pstroke or cardiovascular death. Antiplatelet therapy and blood pressure control are the most important factors in reducing short-term stroke and cardiovascular risk in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. More prospective data are required for medical treatments in asymptomatic carotid stenosis in particular for current statin usage.

  8. Combined Effects of Socioeconomic Position, Smoking, and Hypertension on Risk of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Combined effects of socioeconomic position and well-established risk factors on stroke incidence have not been formally investigated. METHODS: In a pooled cohort study of 68 643 men and women aged 30 to 70 years in Denmark, we examined the combined effect and interaction...... between socioeconomic position (ie, education), smoking, and hypertension on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence by the use of the additive hazards model. RESULTS: During 14 years of follow-up, 3613 ischemic strokes and 776 hemorrhagic strokes were observed. Current smoking and hypertension were...... more prevalent among those with low education. Low versus high education was associated with greater ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, stroke incidence. The combined effect of low education and current smoking was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic stroke incidence...

  9. Factor V Leiden does not have a role in cryptogenic ischemic stroke among Iranian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Ehsan; Pourhossein, Meraj; Amini, Gilda; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Different risk factors have been suggested for ischemic stroke in young adults. In a group of these patients despite of extensive diagnostic work-up, the primary cause remains unknown. Coagulation tendency is accounted as a possible cause in these patients. Previous studies on factor V Leiden (FVL) as the main cause of inherited thrombophilia for clarifying the role of FVL in stroke have resulted in controversial findings. The current study investigates the role of this factor in ischemic stroke among Iranians. This case-control study was performed between September 2007 and December 2008 in Isfahan, Iran. The case group comprised of 22 patients of which 15 were males and 7 were females with age range of ≤50 years, diagnosed as ischemic stroke without classic risk factors and the control group consisted of 54 healthy young adults. After filling consent form, venous blood samples were obtained and sent to the laboratory for genetic examination. No FVL mutation was found in the case group. There was one carrier of the mutation as heterozygous in the control group (relative frequency = 1.85%). Based on our study, FVL might not be considered as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke in Iranian individuals who are not suffering from other risk factors of ischemic stroke.

  10. Risk of Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attack or Myocardial Infarction with Herpes Zoster: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanting; Luo, Ganfeng; Huang, Yuanwei; Yu, Qiuyan; Wang, Li; Li, Ke

    2017-08-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that herpes zoster (HZ) may increase the risk of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) or myocardial infarction (MI), but the results are inconsistent. We aim to explore the relationship between HZ and risk of stroke/TIA or MI and between herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) and stroke. We estimated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with the meta-analysis. Cochran's Q test and Higgins I 2 statistic were used to check for heterogeneity. HZ infection was significantly associated with increased risk of stroke/TIA (RR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.17-1.46) or MI (RR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.07-1.30). The risk of stroke after HZO was 1.91 (95% CI 1.32-2.76), higher than that after HZ. Subgroup analyses revealed increased risk of ischemic stroke after HZ infection but not hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of stroke was increased more at 1 month after HZ infection than at 1-3 months, with a gradual reduced risk with time. The risk of stroke after HZ infection was greater with age less than 40 years than 40-59 years and more than 60 years. Risk of stroke with HZ infection was greater without treatment than with treatment and was greater in Asia than Europe and America but did not differ by sex. Our study indicated that HZ infection was associated with increased risk of stroke/TIA or MI, and HZO infection was the most marked risk factor for stroke. Further studies are needed to explore whether zoster vaccination could reduce the risk of stoke/TIA or MI. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Big Five personality factors and psychological well-being following stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwan, Toni; Ownsworth, Tamara

    2017-12-22

    To identify and appraise studies investigating the relationship between the Big Five personality factors and psychological well-being following stroke and evidence for personality change. Systematic searches of six databases (PsychINFO, CINAHL, Ovid Medline, Cochrane, PubMed, and Web of Science) were conducted from inception to June 2017. Studies involving adult stroke samples that employed a validated measure of at least one of the Big Five personality factors were included. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of studies. Eleven studies were identified that assessed associations between personality and psychological well-being after stroke (nine studies) or post-stroke personality change (two studies). A consistent finding was that higher neuroticism was significantly related to poorer psychological well-being. The evidence for the other Big Five factors was mixed. In terms of personality change, two cross-sectional studies reported high rates of elevated neuroticism (38-48%) and low extraversion (33-40%) relative to normative data. Different questionnaires and approaches to measuring personality (i.e., self vs. informant ratings, premorbid personality vs. current personality) complicated comparisons between studies. People high on neuroticism are at increased risk of poor psychological well-being after stroke. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to address the limited research on post-stroke personality change. Implications for rehabilitation High neuroticism is associated with poorer psychological well-being after stroke. Assessing personality characteristics early after stroke may help to identify those at risk of poor psychological outcomes.

  12. Commentary on a GWAS: HDAC9 and the risk for ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacke Werner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Modifiable risk factors like obesity, hypertension, smoking, physical inactivity or atrial fibrillation account for a significant proportion of the risk for ischaemic stroke, but genetic variation is also believed to contribute to the risk, although few genetic risk variants were identified to date. Common clinical subtypes of stroke are caused by cardiac embolism, large artery atherosclerosis and small cerebral vessel disease. Each of these underlying pathologies may have a specific genetic architecture. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS showed association of variants near PITX2 and ZFHX3 with atrial fibrillation and stroke. ANRIL (antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus (harboring the CDKN2A/B genes variants were related to a variety of vascular diseases (myocardial infarction, aortic and intracranial aneurysm, including ischaemic stroke. Now a recent GWAS published in Nature Genetics confirmed these previous associations, analyzed the specificity of the previous associations with particular stroke subtypes and identified a new association between HDAC9 and large vessel stroke. The findings suggest that well-recognized clinical stroke subtypes correspond to distinct aetiological entities. However, the molecular pathways that are affected by the identified genetic variants are not yet pinpointed, and the observed associations apply only for some, but not all victims of a specific stroke aetiology.

  13. Commentary on a GWAS: HDAC9 and the risk for ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Werner; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar

    2012-07-09

    Modifiable risk factors like obesity, hypertension, smoking, physical inactivity or atrial fibrillation account for a significant proportion of the risk for ischaemic stroke, but genetic variation is also believed to contribute to the risk, although few genetic risk variants were identified to date. Common clinical subtypes of stroke are caused by cardiac embolism, large artery atherosclerosis and small cerebral vessel disease. Each of these underlying pathologies may have a specific genetic architecture.Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) showed association of variants near PITX2 and ZFHX3 with atrial fibrillation and stroke. ANRIL (antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus (harboring the CDKN2A/B genes)) variants were related to a variety of vascular diseases (myocardial infarction, aortic and intracranial aneurysm), including ischaemic stroke. Now a recent GWAS published in Nature Genetics confirmed these previous associations, analyzed the specificity of the previous associations with particular stroke subtypes and identified a new association between HDAC9 and large vessel stroke. The findings suggest that well-recognized clinical stroke subtypes correspond to distinct aetiological entities. However, the molecular pathways that are affected by the identified genetic variants are not yet pinpointed, and the observed associations apply only for some, but not all victims of a specific stroke aetiology.

  14. Stroke After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: What Is the Risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Erin; Hanna, Timothy P.; Zaza, Khaled; Peng, Yingwei; Hall, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted to determine the risk of ischemic stroke with respect to time, associated with curative radiation therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: On the basis of data from the Ontario Cancer Registry and regional cancer treatment centers, 14,069 patients were identified with diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx who were treated for cure between 1990 and 2010. Hazards of stroke and time to stroke were examined, accounting for the competing risk of death. Stroke risk factors identified through diagnostic and procedural administrative codes were adjusted for in the comparison between treatment regimens, which included surgery alone versus radiation therapy alone and surgery alone versus any exposure to radiation therapy. Results: Overall, 6% of patients experienced an ischemic stroke after treatment, with 5% experiencing a stroke after surgery, 8% after radiation therapy alone, and 6% after any exposure to radiation therapy. The cause-specific hazard ratios of ischemic stroke after radiation therapy alone and after any exposure to radiation therapy compared with surgery were 1.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41-2.05) and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.23-1.73), respectively, after adjustment for stroke risk factors, patient factors, and disease-related factors. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke compared with surgery alone: for both radiation therapy alone and after all treatment modalities that included any radiation treatment were combined. Because of a shift toward a younger HNSCC patient population, our results speak to the need for adequate follow-up and survivorship care among patients who have been treated with radiation therapy. Advances in treatment that minimize chronic morbidity also require further evaluation.

  15. Stroke After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: What Is the Risk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Erin [Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hanna, Timothy P. [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Zaza, Khaled [Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Peng, Yingwei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hall, Stephen F., E-mail: sfh@queensu.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted to determine the risk of ischemic stroke with respect to time, associated with curative radiation therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: On the basis of data from the Ontario Cancer Registry and regional cancer treatment centers, 14,069 patients were identified with diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx who were treated for cure between 1990 and 2010. Hazards of stroke and time to stroke were examined, accounting for the competing risk of death. Stroke risk factors identified through diagnostic and procedural administrative codes were adjusted for in the comparison between treatment regimens, which included surgery alone versus radiation therapy alone and surgery alone versus any exposure to radiation therapy. Results: Overall, 6% of patients experienced an ischemic stroke after treatment, with 5% experiencing a stroke after surgery, 8% after radiation therapy alone, and 6% after any exposure to radiation therapy. The cause-specific hazard ratios of ischemic stroke after radiation therapy alone and after any exposure to radiation therapy compared with surgery were 1.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41-2.05) and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.23-1.73), respectively, after adjustment for stroke risk factors, patient factors, and disease-related factors. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke compared with surgery alone: for both radiation therapy alone and after all treatment modalities that included any radiation treatment were combined. Because of a shift toward a younger HNSCC patient population, our results speak to the need for adequate follow-up and survivorship care among patients who have been treated with radiation therapy. Advances in treatment that minimize chronic morbidity also require further evaluation.

  16. The Stroke Assessment of Fall Risk (SAFR): predictive validity in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisinger, Terry P; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Niyonkuru, Christian; Terhorst, Lauren; Campbell, Grace B

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate relative accuracy of a newly developed Stroke Assessment of Fall Risk (SAFR) for classifying fallers and non-fallers, compared with a health system fall risk screening tool, the Fall Harm Risk Screen. Prospective quality improvement study conducted at an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit at a large urban university hospital. Patients admitted for inpatient stroke rehabilitation (N = 419) with imaging or clinical evidence of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, between 1 August 2009 and 31 July 2010. Not applicable. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve for Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves of both scales' classifications, based on fall risk score completed upon admission to inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A total of 68 (16%) participants fell at least once. The SAFR was significantly more accurate than the Fall Harm Risk Screen (p Fall Harm Risk Screen, area under the curve was 0.56, positive predictive value was 0.19, and negative predictive value was 0.86. Sensitivity and specificity of the SAFR (0.78 and 0.63, respectively) was higher than the Fall Harm Risk Screen (0.57 and 0.48, respectively). An evidence-derived, population-specific fall risk assessment may more accurately predict fallers than a general fall risk screen for stroke rehabilitation patients. While the SAFR improves upon the accuracy of a general assessment tool, additional refinement may be warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here: Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still ... Scientists are working diligently to understand what biological factors contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis. Genetic Risk Scleroderma does ...

  18. Proteinuria, but Not eGFR, Predicts Stroke Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsmark, Danielle K; Messé, Steven R; Zhang, Xiaoming; Roy, Jason; Nessel, Lisa; Lee Hamm, Lotuce; He, Jiang; Horwitz, Edward J; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Kusek, John W; Mohler, Emile R; Porter, Anna; Seliger, Stephen L; Sozio, Stephen M; Townsend, Raymond R; Feldman, Harold I; Kasner, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, the impact of chronic kidney disease on cerebrovascular disease is less well understood. We hypothesized that renal function severity would be predictive of stroke risk, independent of other vascular risk factors. The study population included 3939 subjects enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a prospective observational cohort. Stroke events were reported by participants and adjudicated by 2 vascular neurologists. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare measures of baseline renal function with stroke events. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for key covariates. In 3939 subjects, 143 new stroke events (0.62 events per 100 person-years) occurred over a mean follow-up of 6.4 years. Stroke risk was increased in subjects who had worse baseline measurements of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate and total proteinuria or albuminuria). When adjusted for variables known to influence stroke risk, total proteinuria or albuminuria, but not estimated glomerular filtration rate, were associated with an increased risk of stroke. Treatment with blockers of the renin-angiotensin system did not decrease stroke risk in individuals with albuminuria. Proteinuria and albuminuria are better predictors of stroke risk in patients with chronic kidney disease than estimated glomerular filtration rate. The impact of therapies targeting proteinuria/albuminuria in individuals with chronic kidney disease on stroke prevention warrants further investigation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Combined effect of educational status and cardiovascular risk factors on the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in European cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Ferrario, Marco M

    2017-01-01

    Background The combined effect of social status and risk factors on the absolute risk of cardiovascular disease has been insufficiently investigated, but results provide guidance on who could benefit most through prevention. Methods We followed 77,918 cardiovascular disease-free individuals aged ...

  20. Growth differentiation factor 15, a marker of oxidative stress and inflammation, for risk assessment in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Lars; Hijazi, Ziad; Andersson, Ulrika; Alexander, John H; De Caterina, Raffaele; Hanna, Michael; Horowitz, John D; Hylek, Elaine M; Lopes, Renato D; Asberg, Signild; Granger, Christopher B; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2014-11-18

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), high-sensitivity troponin, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels are predictive of death and cardiovascular events in healthy elderly subjects, patients with acute coronary syndrome, and patients with heart failure. High-sensitivity troponin I and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide are also prognostic in patients with atrial fibrillation. We evaluated the prognostic value of GDF-15 alone and in addition to clinical characteristics and other biomarkers in patients with atrial fibrillation. The Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial randomized 18 201 patients with atrial fibrillation to apixaban or warfarin. Biomarkers were measured at randomization in 14 798 patients. Efficacy and safety outcomes during 1.9 years of follow-up were compared across quartiles of GDF-15 by use of Cox analyses adjusted for clinical characteristics, randomized treatment, and other biomarkers. The GDF-15 level showed a median of 1383 ng/L (interquartile range, 977-2052 ng/L). Annual rates of stroke or systemic embolism ranged from 0.9% to 2.03% (P<0.001); of major bleeding, from 1.22% to 4.53% (P<0.001); and of mortality, from 1.34% to 7.19% (P<0.001) in the lowest compared with the highest GDF-15 quartile. The prognostic information provided by GDF-15 was independent of clinical characteristics and clinical risk scores. Adjustment for the other cardiac biomarkers attenuated the prognostic value for stroke, whereas the prognostic value for mortality and major bleeding remained. Apixaban consistently reduced stroke, mortality, and bleeding, regardless of GDF-15 levels. GDF-15 is a risk factor for major bleeding, mortality, and stroke in atrial fibrillation. The prognostic value for major bleeding and death remained even in the presence of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin I. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier

  1. Stroke Mortality, Clinical Presentation and Day of Arrival: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. O'Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies report that acute stroke patients who present to the hospital on weekends have higher rates of 28-day mortality than similar patients who arrive during the week. However, how this association is related to clinical presentation and stroke type has not been systematically investigated. Methods and Results. We examined the association between day of arrival and 28-day mortality in 929 validated stroke events in the ARIC cohort from 1987–2004. Weekend arrival was defined as any arrival time from midnight Friday until midnight Sunday. Mortality was defined as all-cause fatal events from the day of arrival through the 28th day of followup. The presence or absence of thirteen stroke signs and symptoms were obtained through medical record review for each event. Binomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR; 95% CI for the association between weekend arrival and 28-day mortality for all stroke events and for stroke subtypes. The overall risk of 28-day mortality was 9.6% for weekday strokes and 10.1% for weekend strokes. In models controlling for patient demographics, clinical risk factors, and event year, weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day mortality (0.87; 0.51, 1.50. When stratified by stroke type, weekend arrival was not associated with increased odds of mortality for ischemic (1.17, 0.62, 2.23 or hemorrhagic (0.37; 0.11, 1.26 stroke patients. Conclusions. Presence or absence of thirteen signs and symptoms was similar for weekday patients and weekend patients when stratified by stroke type. Weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day all-cause mortality or differences in symptom presentation for strokes in this cohort.

  2. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-fatal stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A T; Lidegaard, O; Kreiner, S

    1997-01-01

    of hormone use and stroke, on which information was obtained from postal questionnaires, were controlled for by multivariate analyses based on log-linear graphical models. The analyses included data on 1422 cases classified in four subtypes of stroke (160 subarachnoid haemorrhage, 95 intracerebral......BACKGROUND: The effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the risk of subtypes of stroke is as yet unclear. To investigate the effect of oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen therapy on the risk of non-fatal haemorrhagic and thromboembolic stroke, we carried out a case...... to some extent be explained by selection--HRT users being more aware of symptoms than non-users. INTERPRETATION: Unopposed oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen replacement therapy have no influence on the risk of non-fatal thromboembolic or haemorrhagic stroke in women aged 45-64 years....

  3. Poor Long-Term Functional Outcome After Stroke Among Adults Aged 18 to 50 Years: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation (FUTURE) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Synhaeve, N.E.; Arntz, R.M.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Kort, P.L.M. de; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke in young adults has a dramatic effect on life; therefore, we investigated the long-term functional outcome after transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage in adults aged 18 to 50 years. METHODS: We studied 722 young patients with

  4. Poststroke Epilepsy Is Associated With a High Mortality After a Stroke at Young Age: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntz, R.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Poststroke epilepsy is a common complication after a young stroke. We investigated the association between poststroke epilepsy and mortality. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study among 631 patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke,

  5. Increased risk of ischaemic stroke amongst patients with chronic osteomyelitis: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C-H; Chen, J-H; Muo, C-H; Chang, Y-J; Sung, F-C; Hsu, C Y

    2015-04-01

    Inflammatory processes, which kindle endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, may facilitate the development of cardiovascular disease, including ischaemic stroke. Evident stroke risk factors may not be identified in up to 40% of stroke patients, especially in the younger population. Inflammation remains to be established as a stroke risk factor. In this study, it was assessed whether chronic osteomyelitis (COM), an infectious disease with chronic inflammation, increases stroke risk. A national insurance claim data set of 22 million enrollees in Taiwan was used to identify 18 509 patients with COM and 74 034 randomly selected age- and gender-matched controls for a follow-up period of 11 years starting 1 January 2000 and ending 31 December 2010. Stroke risk was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Comorbidities known to increase stroke risk, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease and peripheral arterial disease, were more frequently noted in the COM group who had significantly greater stroke risk than the control cohort. Comparing only those without comorbidities, COM carried greater stroke risk than the control group [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.62, P  65, HR = 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.31). This is the first report linking COM to an increased risk of developing stroke. Results suggest that COM is a significant stroke risk factor and call for closer attention to this group of patients for more rigorous stroke prevention, especially in the younger age group. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  6. Substitution of Linoleic Acid for Other Macronutrients and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venø, Stine K; Schmidt, Erik B; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Bach, Flemming W; Overvad, Kim

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major health problem worldwide, but the influence of dietary factors on stroke risk is not well known. This study aimed to investigate the risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes with a higher intake from linoleic acid and a concomitant lower intake from saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, or glycemic carbohydrates. In the Danish prospective Diet, Cancer, and Health Study of 57 053 participants aged 50 to 64 years at baseline, information on diet was collected using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Information on ischemic stroke was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register, and cases were all validated and subclassified according to the TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) classification. Substitution of linoleic acid for saturated fatty acid, monounsaturated fatty acid, or glycemic carbohydrates was investigated in relation to the risk of ischemic stroke and subtypes. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the associations with ischemic stroke adjusting for appropriate confounders. During 13.5 years of follow-up 1879 participants developed ischemic stroke. A slightly lower risk of ischemic stroke was found with a 5% higher intake of linoleic acid and a concomitant lower intake of saturated fatty acid (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.16), monounsaturated fatty acid (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.02), and glycemic carbohydrates (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.09), although not statistically significant. Similar patterns of association were found for large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel occlusions. This study suggests that replacing saturated fatty acid, glycemic carbohydrate, or monounsaturated fatty acid with linoleic acid may be associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Epigenetics and stroke risk – beyond the static DNA code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsden PA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Charles C Matouk,1 Paul J Turgeon,2 Philip A Marsden2,31Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 3Keenan Research Centre and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, CanadaAbstract: Advances in high-throughput genome sequencing and genome-wide association studies indicate that only a fraction of estimated variability in stroke risk can be explained by genetic variation in protein-coding genes alone. Epigenetics is defined as chromatin-based mechanisms important in the regulation of gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence per se. Epigenetics represents an alternative explanation for how traditional risk factors confer increased stroke risk, provide a newer paradigm to explain heritability not explained by genetic variation, and provide insight into the link between how the environment of a cell can interact with the static DNA code. The nuclear-based mechanisms that contribute to epigenetic gene regulation can be separated into three distinct but highly interrelated processes: DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation; histone density and posttranslational modifications; and RNA-based mechanisms. Together, they offer a newer perspective on transcriptional control paradigms in blood vessels and provide a molecular basis for understanding how the environment impacts the genome to modify stroke susceptibility. This alternative view for transcriptional regulation allows a reassessment of the cis/trans model and even helps explain some of the limitations of current approaches to genetic-based screens. For instance, how does the environment exert chronic effects on gene expression in blood vessels after weeks or years? When a vascular cell divides, how is this information transmitted to daughter cells? This review provides an introduction to epigenetic concepts and a

  8. Ischemic stroke risk, smoking, and the genetics of inflammation in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorkin John D

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for vascular disease, the genetic mechanisms that link cigarette smoking to an increased incidence of stroke are not well understood. Genetic variations within the genes of the inflammatory pathways are thought to partially mediate this risk. Here we evaluate the association of several inflammatory gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with ischemic stroke risk among young women, further stratified by current cigarette smoking status. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-comparable control subjects (43.1% African-American. Several inflammatory candidate gene SNPs chosen through literature review were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke and interaction with smoking status. Results Of the 8 SNPs (across 6 genes analyzed, only IL6 SNP rs2069832 (allele C, African-American frequency = 92%, Caucasian frequency = 55% was found to be significantly associated with stroke using an additive model, and this was only among African-Americans (age-adjusted: OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–5.0, p = 0.049; risk factor adjusted: OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.0–6.5, p = 0.05. When stratified by smoking status, two SNPs demonstrated statistically significant gene-environment interactions. First, the T allele (frequency = 5% of IL6 SNP rs2069830 was found to be protective among non-smokers (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.11–.082, p = 0.02, but not among smokers (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 0.48–5.58, p = 0.43; genotype by smoking interaction (p = 0.036. Second, the C allele (frequency = 39% of CD14 SNP rs2569190 was found to increase risk among smokers (OR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.09–3.86, p = 0.03, but not among non-smokers (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.62–1.39, p = 0.72; genotype by smoking interaction (p = 0.039. Conclusion This study demonstrates

  9. Plasma d-Dimer and Incident Ischemic Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Appiah, Duke; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have documented that plasma d-dimer, a fibrin degradation product, is a risk marker for coronary heart disease, but there is limited prospective evidence for stroke. Given that thrombosis is a key mechanism for many strokes, we studied whether d-dimer is a risk marker for ischemic stroke incidence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We measured d-dimer in 11 415 ARIC participants free of stroke and coronary heart disease in 1992 to 1995. We followed them for stroke, stroke subtype, and coronary heart disease events through 2012. Over a median of 18 years of follow-up, 719 participants had incident strokes (628 ischemic and 91 hemorrhagic). d-dimer was associated positively with risk of total, ischemic, and cardioembolic strokes, with risk elevated primarily for the highest quintile of d-dimer. After adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of d-dimer was 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.67) for total stroke, 1.33 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.73) for ischemic stroke, and 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.95) for cardioembolic stroke. There was no association with hemorrhagic, lacunar, or nonlacunar stroke categories. d-dimer was positively but weakly associated with coronary heart disease incidence. A higher basal plasma d-dimer concentration in the general population is a risk marker for ischemic stroke, especially cardioembolic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Low-grade inflammation is a risk factor for clinical stroke events in addition to silent cerebral infarcts in Japanese older hypertensives: the Jichi Medical School ABPM Study, wave 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Joji; Tamura, Yurie; Hoshide, Satoshi; Eguchi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi

    2007-03-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of inflammation, is associated with atherosclerosis, hypertensive target organ damage, and cardiovascular events. In the general Japanese population, the level of hsCRP is reported to be lower than that in Western countries, and the relationships among hsCRP, silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs), and clinical stroke events in older Japanese hypertensives remain unclear. We conducted brain MRI and measured hsCRP at baseline in 514 older Japanese hypertensives (clinic blood pressure > or =140/90 mm Hg, age > or =50 years old) who were enrolled in the Jichi Medical School ABPM Study, wave 1. They were followed up for an average of 41 months (range: 1 to 68 months, 1751 person-years) and the incidence of subsequent clinical stroke events was evaluated. The subjects with SCIs at baseline (n=257) had a higher hsCRP level than those without SCIs (geometric mean hsCRP [SD range]; 0.19 [0.18 to 0.21] versus 0.14 [0.13 to 0.16] mg/L, P=0.007) after adjustment for confounding factors, and the OR for the presence of SCIs was increased with the quartile of hsCRP levels. In Cox regression analysis, the patients with above median hsCRP level (> or =0.21 mg/L) (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.50, 95% CI: 1.24 to 5.00, P=0.01) and those with SCIs (HR: 4.60, 95% CI: 1.91 to 11.03, P=0.001) at baseline had independently higher risks for clinical stroke events after adjustment for age, smoking status, antihypertensive medication use, and 24-hour systolic blood pressure level. Compared with the patients with below median hsCRP level without SCIs, those with above median hsCRP level and SCIs at baseline had a higher risk for clinical stroke events (HR: 7.32, 95% CI: 2.17 to 24.76, P=0.001), although those with below median hsCRP level and SCIs (HR: 2.46, 95% CI: 0.64 to 9.47, P=0.19) and those with above median hsCRP level without SCIs (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.22 to 5.55, P=0.90) did not have significant risks. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is a

  11. Poor long-term functional outcome after stroke among adults aged 18 to 50 years: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation (FUTURE) study.