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Sample records for stroke rehabilitation unit

  1. Who benefits from treatment and rehabilitation in a stroke Unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Houth, J

    2000-01-01

    The beneficial effects of treatment and rehabilitation of patients with acute stroke in a dedicated stroke unit (SU) are well established. We wanted to examine if these effects are limited to certain groups of patients or if they apply to all patients independent of age, sex, comorbidity......, and initial stroke severity....

  2. Who benefits from treatment and rehabilitation in a stroke Unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Houth, J

    2000-01-01

    The beneficial effects of treatment and rehabilitation of patients with acute stroke in a dedicated stroke unit (SU) are well established. We wanted to examine if these effects are limited to certain groups of patients or if they apply to all patients independent of age, sex, comorbidity, and ini...

  3. Stroke unit care, inpatient rehabilitation and early supported discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Price, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Stroke units reduce death and disability through the provision of specialist multidisciplinary care for diagnosis, emergency treatments, normalisation of homeostasis, prevention of complications, rehabilitation and secondary prevention. All stroke patients can benefit from provision of high-quality basic medical care and some need high impact specific treatments, such as thrombolysis, that are often time dependent. A standard patient pathway should include assessment of neurological impairment, vascular risk factors, swallowing, fluid balance and nutrition, cognitive function, communication, mood disorders, continence, activities of daily living and rehabilitation goals. Good communication and shared decision making with patients and their families are key to high-quality stroke care. Patients with mild or moderate disability, who are medically stable, can continue rehabilitation at home with early supported discharge teams rather than needing a prolonged stay in hospital. National clinical guidelines and prospective audits are integral to monitoring and developing stroke services in the UK. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  4. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stroke rehabilitation outcome variation in Veterans Affairs rehabilitation units: accounting for case-mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, D M; O'Donnell, J C; Hamilton, B B

    1998-07-01

    To assess variation in stroke outcomes and create a case-mix adjustment model for stroke rehabilitation in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Observational Within Veteran's Health Administration hospitals, there are 63 acute rehabilitation bedservice units that care for approximately 2,000 stroke patients annually. Functional gain in FIM points, length of stay (LOS), LOS efficiency (FIM gain/LOS). Significant variation in average patient functional gain, LOS, and LOS efficiency was observed among the 37 highest-volume rehabilitation units. Using analysis of covariance, a model was developed that adjusted functional gain and LOS (logged LOS) unit means using 10 potential covariates identified in a literature review and in pilot studies. Four and six covariates, respectively, were retained in the final models for FIM gain and LOS. The R2 for FIM gain and LOS accounted for by rehabilitation unit alone increased from .07 to .31 (FIM gain) and from .13 to .34 (logLOS) with the addition of the significant covariates to each model. As much as 24% of the variation in two important stroke rehabilitation outcomes is attributable to largely immutable patient and system characteristics (eg, patient function on admission, age, days since stroke onset, year of discharge, marital status, and referral source). Hence, controlling for case-mix is critical for accurate comparison of unit outcomes. Further, the variation in LOS efficiency between VA rehabilitation units suggests a large potential for cost and resource utilization savings system-wide.

  6. Quality of stroke care at an Irish Regional General Hospital and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Robust international data support the effectiveness of stroke unit (SU) care. Despite this, most stroke care in Ireland are provided outside of this setting. Limited data currently exist on the quality of care provided. AIM: The aim of this study is to examine the quality of care for patients with stroke in two care settings-Regional General Hospital (RGH) and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit (SRU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the stroke records of consecutive patients admitted to the SRU between May-November 2002 and April-November 2004 was performed applying the UK National Sentinel Audit of Stroke (NSAS) tool. RESULTS: The results of the study reveal that while SRU processes of care was 74% compliant with standards; compliance with stroke service organisational standards was only 15 and 43% in the RGH and SRU, respectively. CONCLUSION: The quality of stroke care in our area is deficient. Comprehensive reorganisation of stroke services is imperative.

  7. Physical Activity Patterns of Acute Stroke Patients Managed in a Rehabilitation Focused Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive stroke unit care, incorporating acute care and rehabilitation, may promote early physical activity after stroke. However, previous information regarding physical activity specific to the acute phase of stroke and the comprehensive stroke unit setting is limited to one stroke unit. This study describes the physical activity undertaken by patients within 14 days after stroke admitted to a comprehensive stroke unit. Methods. This study was a prospective observational study. Behavioural mapping was used to determine the proportion of the day spent in different activities. Therapist reports were used to determine the amount of formal therapy received on the day of observation. The timing of commencement of activity out of bed was obtained from the medical records. Results. On average, patients spent 45% (SD 25 of the day in some form of physical activity and received 58 (SD 34 minutes per day of physiotherapy and occupational therapy combined. Mean time to first mobilisation out of bed was 46 (SD 32 hours post-stroke. Conclusions. This study suggests that commencement of physical activity occurs earlier and physical activity is at a higher level early after stroke in this comprehensive stroke unit, when compared to studies of other acute stroke models of care.

  8. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  9. Inequities in access to rehabilitation: exploring how acute stroke unit clinicians decide who to refer to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Elizabeth A; Luker, Julie A; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Hillier, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    Less than half of the patients with stroke in Australian hospitals are assessed by rehabilitation specialists. We sought to explore how clinicians working in acute stroke units (ASUs) determine which patients to refer to rehabilitation services. Qualitative descriptive study. Team meetings were observed and medical records were reviewed over four weeks at two ASUs. Focus groups were conducted with staff from eight ASUs in two states of Australia. Rehabilitation was mentioned in team meetings for 50/64 patients (78%) during the observation period. Rehabilitation referrals were organised for 47 patients (94%) for whom rehabilitation was discussed (74% of the sample); and for no patients when rehabilitation was not discussed. Factors identified that influenced whether referrals were organised included the anticipated discharge destination; severity of stroke; staff expectations of the patient's recovery; and if there was advocacy by families about rehabilitation. Clinicians tended to refer the patients they considered would be accepted by the rehabilitation service. Staff at two ASUs expressed concern that referring all patients with stroke-related deficits to rehabilitation would be unfavourable with rehabilitation providers. Decisions made by ASU staff regarding who to refer to stroke rehabilitation are often not solely based on patients' rehabilitation requirements. Implications for Rehabilitation Not all patients on acute stroke units (ASUs) who may have benefited from rehabilitation were offered rehabilitation referrals. Criteria for rehabilitation referrals need to be made explicit and discussed openly with consumers, ASU clinicians and rehabilitation specialists. A change in rehabilitation assessment practices is required to provide data regarding the unmet rehabilitation needs of patients with stroke. New models of rehabilitation service delivery or increased rehabilitation services may be required to meet the rehabilitation needs of all patients with stroke.

  10. Treatment and rehabilitation on a stroke unit improves 5-year survival. A community-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported a marked reduction in mortality up to 1 year after treatment and rehabilitation on a stroke unit versus on general neurological and medical wards in unselected stroke patients. In the present study we wanted to test the hypothesis that this mortality-reducing effect...

  11. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  12. [Application of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-min; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jie; Luo, Dan-hong; Shen, Wang-ming

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction. 77 acute cerebral infarction patients were randomly assigned to stroke rehabilitation unit group and 73 to ordinary group. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), activities of daily living (ADL) Barthel index and average hospitalized time were compared in two groups before and after the treatment. The average NIHSS in two groups before treatment were 9.26 and 9.12 respectively (P > 0.05) but became 2.62 and 7.64 after treatment (P 0.05) but 87.26 and 64.20 after the treatment (P rehabilitation unit being applied in the acute phase of cerebral infarction, it showed positive results in the following aspects as: improving the neurological function, capabilities of managing daily life, and also shortening the days of hospitalization.

  13. Characterization of patients treated by rehabilitation service after establishing of an acute stroke unit in a Brazilian hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gameiro, Mônica de Oliveira Orsi; Schelp, Arthur Oscar; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Ribeiro, Priscila Watson; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study aimed to characterize patients treated by rehabilitation section after establishment of an acute stroke unit. [Subjects and Methods] Medical consultation records of individuals with ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively, excluding individuals with hemorrhagic stroke, thrombolysis, previous Modified Rankin Scale ≥ 1, prior stroke, structural bone deformities, associated neurological disease, and prior cognitive deficit. The data evaluated were age, gender, etiology, ...

  14. [The prevalence and signs of Dysphagia among stroke patients in rehabilitation units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Hui; Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Huang, Shun-Te

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia, a very common post-stroke symptom, has been linked to aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and increased length of hospitalization. While patients are typically monitored for dysphagia continuously following their transfer to a rehabilitation unit, little is known about the results of dysphagia reassessments. This study investigates the prevalence and signs of dysphagia among stroke patients in rehabilitation units. We analyzed patients with stroke admitted to a rehabilitation unit of a medical center in southern Taiwan. The procedure included chart review, the repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST), and the modified water swallowing test (MWST). Dysphagia was defined as either RSST or MWST abnormal. JMP 9.0 was used to perform descriptive statistics, t-test, chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. At clinical examination, 53.61% of the study subjects demonstrated dysphagia. Chi-square analysis showed that five abnormal signs (could not close mouth with water, without mastication, food stuck in the throat, obvious sputum sound, and choking after swallowing) are all associated with dysphagia. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed choking is a significant predictor variable of dysphagia. Over half of the rehabilitation unit stroke patients in this study had dysphagia. Nurses are the primary care providers for dysphagia patients. Therefore, there is a need for ward nurses to have skills to assess, recognize, and manage dysphagia and to enhance patient safety.

  15. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  16. Occurrence and temporal evolution of upper limb spasticity in stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Keng H; Lee, Jeanette; Chua, Karen S

    2012-01-01

    To document the temporal development and evolution of upper limb spasticity, and to establish clinical correlates and predictors of upper limb spasticity in a cohort of stroke patients. Prospective cohort study. A rehabilitation unit. Patients (N=163) with a first-ever ischemic stroke. Not applicable. Ashworth Scale for measuring upper limb spasticity, Motor Assessment Scale for upper limb activity, Motricity Index for upper limb strength, and Modified Barthel Index for self-care. Upper limb spasticity was defined as an Ashworth Scale score of 1 or greater. Upper limb spasticity occurred in 54 patients (33%) at 3 months after stroke. Development of spasticity at later stages of the stroke was infrequent, occurring in only 28 patients (17%). In patients with mild spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 1) at 3 months after stroke, worsening of spasticity occurred in only 1 patient. On the other hand, almost half of the patients with moderate spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 2) at 3 months progressed to severe spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 3). Poor upper limb activity was the most important correlate of "moderate to severe spasticity" (Ashworth Scale score ≥2) (PAshworth Scale score of 2 or greater at 3 months after stroke, and in patients with severe upper limb weakness on admission to rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The post-stroke depression and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients of a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaricai, Elena; Poenaru, Dan V

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and a major public health problem. To determine frequency and degree of post-stroke depression (PSD) and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit. The study included 72 stroke patients (aged 29-59 years) who were attending rehabilitation. The patients were assessed for depressive symptoms by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and their functioning by using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Forty-eight patients had different degrees of depression: borderline clinical depression (13.8%), moderate depression (34.7%), severe depression (15.2%) or extreme depression (2.9%). There were no significant differences of BDI scores in 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years groups. Statistically significant correlations were between BDI score and SIS score, between BDI score and ADL index, and between SIS score and ADL index in men, women and total study patients. More than half of the PSD patients had a moderate degree of depression. Significant correlations were noticed between depressive symptoms and functional status evaluated both by an instrument of assessing stroke impact upon general health and an instrument for assessing the everyday activities.

  18. Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... negotiate the provision of reasonable accommodations in the workplace. When can a stroke patient begin rehabilitation? Rehabilitation ... at home gives people the advantage of practicing skills and developing compensatory strategies in the context of ...

  19. Characterization of patients treated by rehabilitation service after establishing of an acute stroke unit in a Brazilian hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gameiro, Mônica de Oliveira Orsi; Schelp, Arthur Oscar; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Ribeiro, Priscila Watson; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study aimed to characterize patients treated by rehabilitation section after establishment of an acute stroke unit. [Subjects and Methods] Medical consultation records of individuals with ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively, excluding individuals with hemorrhagic stroke, thrombolysis, previous Modified Rankin Scale ≥ 1, prior stroke, structural bone deformities, associated neurological disease, and prior cognitive deficit. The data evaluated were age, gender, etiology, localization, treatment received, ictus onset, hospitalization time, discharge date, and date of first evaluation at the rehabilitation center. The Modified Rankin Scale in 90 days after ictus was utilized to measure functional incapacity with the individuals divided into two groups, before and after acute stroke unit implementation (2010). Functional incapacity was compared between before and after acute stroke unit implementation by the Mann-Whitney test, χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test. [Results] The medical records of 170 patients were evaluated. In the group evaluated after 2010, the patients were significantly older and presented a shorter time between hospitalization and discharge, shorter time until the first evaluation in rehabilitation, and increased percentage of mild incapacity (Modified Rankin Scale = 0 to 2). [Conclusion] After acute stroke unit implementation, the patients treated in the rehabilitation section presented a shorter hospitalization time and rehabilitation delay and less functional incapacity. PMID:26355915

  20. Results of Clinicians Using a Therapeutic Robotic System in an Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreca Susan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical rehabilitation is an area where robotics could contribute significantly to improved motor return for individuals following a stroke. This paper presents the results of a preliminary randomized controlled trial (RCT of a robot system used in the rehabilitation of the paretic arm following a stroke. Methods The study's objectives were to explore the efficacy of this new type of robotic therapy as compared to standard physiotherapy treatment in treating the post-stroke arm; to evaluate client satisfaction with the proposed robotic system; and to provide data for sample size calculations for a proposed larger multicenter RCT. Twenty clients admitted to an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit were randomly allocated to one of two groups, an experimental (robotic arm therapy group or a control group (conventional therapy. An occupational therapist blinded to patient allocation administered two reliable measures, the Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI-7 and the Chedoke McMaster Stroke Assessment of the Arm and Hand (CMSA at admission and discharge. For both groups, at admission, the CMSA motor impairment stage of the affected arm was between 1 and 3. Results Data were compared to determine the effectiveness of robot-assisted versus conventional therapy treatments. At the functional level, both groups performed well, with improvement in scores on the CAHAI-7 showing clinical and statistical significance. The CAHAI-7 (range7-49 is a measure of motor performance using functional items. Individuals in the robotic therapy group, on average, improved by 62% (95% CI: 26% to 107% while those in the conventional therapy group changed by 30% (95% CI: 4% to 61%. Although performance on this measure is influenced by hand recovery, our results showed that both groups had similar stages of motor impairment in the hand. Furthermore, the degree of shoulder pain, as measured by the CMSA pain inventory scale, did not worsen for

  1. Results of Clinicians Using a Therapeutic Robotic System in an Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical rehabilitation is an area where robotics could contribute significantly to improved motor return for individuals following a stroke. This paper presents the results of a preliminary randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a robot system used in the rehabilitation of the paretic arm following a stroke. Methods The study's objectives were to explore the efficacy of this new type of robotic therapy as compared to standard physiotherapy treatment in treating the post-stroke arm; to evaluate client satisfaction with the proposed robotic system; and to provide data for sample size calculations for a proposed larger multicenter RCT. Twenty clients admitted to an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit were randomly allocated to one of two groups, an experimental (robotic arm therapy) group or a control group (conventional therapy). An occupational therapist blinded to patient allocation administered two reliable measures, the Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI-7) and the Chedoke McMaster Stroke Assessment of the Arm and Hand (CMSA) at admission and discharge. For both groups, at admission, the CMSA motor impairment stage of the affected arm was between 1 and 3. Results Data were compared to determine the effectiveness of robot-assisted versus conventional therapy treatments. At the functional level, both groups performed well, with improvement in scores on the CAHAI-7 showing clinical and statistical significance. The CAHAI-7 (range7-49) is a measure of motor performance using functional items. Individuals in the robotic therapy group, on average, improved by 62% (95% CI: 26% to 107%) while those in the conventional therapy group changed by 30% (95% CI: 4% to 61%). Although performance on this measure is influenced by hand recovery, our results showed that both groups had similar stages of motor impairment in the hand. Furthermore, the degree of shoulder pain, as measured by the CMSA pain inventory scale, did not worsen for either group over the

  2. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  3. Early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godecke, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions. Trials in this early time window are few. Although the seminal AVERT trial suggests that a cautious approach is necessary immediately (stroke, early mobility training and mobilization appear well tolerated, with few reasons to delay initiating some rehabilitation within the first week. The results of large clinical trials of early aphasia therapy are on the horizon, and examples of targeted upper limb treatments with better patient selection are emerging. Early rehabilitation trials are complex, particularly those that intervene across acute and rehabilitation care settings, but these trials are important if we are to optimize recovery potential in the critical window for repair. Concerted efforts to standardize 'early' recruitment, appropriately stratify participants and implement longer term follow-up is needed. Trial standards are improving. New recommendations from a recent Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable will help drive new research.

  4. Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation after a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation After a Stroke Past ... to help them recover successfully. What is post-stroke rehabilitation? Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills lost to ...

  5. The associations between insomnia and health-related quality of life in rehabilitation units at 1month after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Hyoung; Jung, Han-Young; Choi, Ha-Yoon; Park, Chan-Hyuk; Kim, Eun-Suk; Lee, Sook-Joung; Ko, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Joa, Kyung-Lim

    2017-05-01

    The principal objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between insomnia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the early stage of stroke rehabilitation. The subjects were 214 first-time stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit at one of three Korean hospitals. Within 7days after stroke, functions were evaluated using; the Berg Balance Scale, the Modified Barthel Index, the Mini Mental State Examination, the Frontal Assessment Battery, Screening Tests for Aphasia and Neurologic-Communication Disorders, and the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Insomnia, depression, anxiety, and HRQoL were investigated at one month after stroke. Insomnia was defined as presence of at least one of the four following; difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and non-restorative sleep. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form Health survey SF-8. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between insomnia and HRQoL. The prevalence of insomnia at one month after stroke was 59.5%. Patients with insomnia were more likely to be older and female and to have depression and anxiety. Patients with insomnia had poorer physical and mental HRQoL. By multivariate analyses, physical HRQoL was significantly associated with type of stroke, hypnotic usage, balancing function, and insomnia. Mental HRQoL was significantly associated with balancing function, depression, and insomnia. Insomnia was found to be negatively associated with physical and mental HRQoL in stroke patients during the early stage of rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Change in cognitive performance is associated with functional recovery during post-acute stroke rehabilitation: a multi-centric study from intermediate care geriatric rehabilitation units of Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Laura Mónica; Inzitari, Marco; Roqué, Marta; Duarte, Esther; Vallés, Elisabeth; Rodó, Montserrat; Gallofré, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Recovery after a stroke is determined by a broad range of neurological, functional and psychosocial factors. Evidence regarding these factors is not well established, in particular influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate whether selective characteristics, including cognitive performance and its change over time, modulate functional recovery with home discharge in stroke survivors admitted to post-acute rehabilitation units. We undertook a multicenter cohort study, including all patients discharged from acute wards to any geriatric rehabilitation unit in Catalonia-Spain during 2008. Patients were assessed for demographics, clinical and functional variables using Conjunt Mínim Bàsic de Dades dels Recursos Sociosanitaris (CMBD-RSS), which adapts the Minimum Data Set tool used in America's nursing homes. Baseline-to-discharge change in cognition was calculated on repeated assessments using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, range 0-6, best-worst cognition). The multivariable effect of these factors was analyzed in relation to the outcome. 879 post-stroke patients were included (mean age 77.48 ± 10.18 years, 52.6% women). A worse initial CPS [OR (95% CI) = 0.851 (0.774-0.935)] and prevalent fecal incontinence [OR (95% CI) = 0.560 (0.454-0.691)] reduced the likelihood of returning home with functional improvement; whereas improvement of CPS, baseline to discharge, [OR (95% CI) = 1.348 (1.144-1.588)], more rehabilitation days within the first 2 weeks [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] and a longer hospital stay [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] were associated with the outcome. In our sample, different clinical characteristics, including cognitive function and its improvement over time, are associated with functional improvement in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. Our results might provide information to further studies aimed at exploring the influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation.

  7. The effects of increased therapy time on cognition and mood in frail patients with a stroke who rehabilitate on rehabilitation units of nursing homes in the Netherlands: a protocol of a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, H.C.M.; Rademaker, A.C.H.J.; van Rooden, P.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recovery after stroke is dependent on how much time can be spent on rehabilitation. Recently, we found that therapy time for older stroke patients on a rehabilitation unit of a nursing home could be increased significantly from 8.6 to at least 13 hours a week. This increase was attained

  8. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  9. Impact of naturalistic lighting on hospitalized stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Anders; Jennum, Poul; Simonsen, Sofie Amalie

    2017-01-01

    regulator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, is mainly controlled by natural daylight, and the blue spectrum is considered the most powerful. During stroke rehabilitation, patients typically are mostly indoors and therefore not exposed to the natural daytime variation in light intensity. Furthermore, several...... rehabilitation hospitals may be exposed to powerful light in the blue spectrum, but at a time that is adversely related to their endogenous circadian phase, for example in the late evening instead of the daytime. Hypothesis: Naturalistic light that mimics the natural daytime spectrum variation will have...... a positive impact on the health of poststroke patients admitted to rehabilitation. We test specifically for improved sleep and less fatigue (questionnaires, polysomnography, Actiwatch), improved well-being (questionnaires), lessen anxiety and depression (questionnaires), improved cognition (tests...

  10. Predictors of intensive care unit admission and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke: investigating the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngen, Belma Doğan; Tunç, Abdulkadir; Aras, Yeşim Güzey; Gündoğdu, Aslı Aksoy; Güngen, Adil Can; Bal, Serdar

    2017-07-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality among stroke patients and the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program on stroke patients. This prospective study enrolled 181 acute ischemic stroke patients aged between 40 and 90 years. Demographical characteristics, laboratory tests, diffusion-weighed magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) time, nutritional status, vascular risk factors, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and modified Rankin scale (MRS) scores were recorded for all patients. One-hundred patients participated in the pulmonary rehabilitation program, 81 of whom served as a control group. Statistically, one- and three-month mortality was associated with NIHSS and MRS scores at admission and three months (pstroke patients. We believe that a pulmonary rehabilitation program, in addition to general stroke rehabilitation programs, can play a critical role in improving survival and functional outcomes. NCT03195907 . Trial registration date: 21.06.2017 'Retrospectively registered'.

  11. [Nursing expertise in post-stroke rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonniaux, Sandrine; Schmid, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The pathway of a patient after a stroke involves a continuation of care, from their admission to the emergency department to their discharge from the rehabilitation unit. Here, a Genevan hospital team shares its experience in the creation of a video of information for the patients and their family about the process of rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Eva Joan; Geoghegan, Sheena Elizabeth; O'Neill, Desmond

    2014-05-01

    stroke is predominantly a disease of older people. While age bias has been demonstrated in studies of pharmacological therapeutic interventions in stroke, the extent of discrimination by age in stroke rehabilitation studies is unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature to assess the extent of ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies. all randomised control trials (RCT) on stroke rehabilitation entered in the Cochrane database which reported mean age were included. Patient gender and exclusion criteria were also recorded. of 241 RCT's identified, 182 were eligible for inclusion. The mean age of all patients was 64.3, almost a decade younger than those seen by stroke physicians in daily practice in global terms, and 11-12 years younger than encountered in hospital practice in the British Isles. Almost half (46%) of trials excluded patients with cognitive impairment, almost one-quarter (23%) patients with dysphasia and one-eighth (13%) excluded patients with multiple strokes. we have identified a clear difference in the mean age of those included in stroke rehabilitation studies compared with the international mean age of stroke. In addition, a quarter of trials excluded dysphasic patients which may indicate omission of more severe strokes. This means that the evidence base for stroke rehabilitation is deficient in terms of matching the characteristics of patients encountered in clinical practice, and a more representative sample of older people and those with significant disability must be included in future trials.

  13. Rehabilitative Games for Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pyae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major problems in medical and healthcare that can cause severe disability and death of patients especially for older population. Rehabilitation plays an important role in stroke therapy. However, most of the rehabilitative exercises are monotonous and tiring for the patients. For a particular time, they can easily get bored in doing these exercises. The role of patient’s motivation in rehabilitation is vital. Motivation and rehabilitative outcomes are strongly related. Digital games promise to help stroke patients to feel motivated and more engaged in rehabilitative training through motivational gameplay. Most of the commercial games available in the market are not well-designed for stroke patients and their motivational needs in rehabilitation. This study aims at understanding the motivational requirements of stroke patients in doing rehabilitative exercises and living in a post-stroke life. Based on the findings from the literature review, we report factors that can influence the stroke patients’ level of motivation such as social functioning, patient-therapist relationship, goal-setting, and music. These findings are insightful and useful for ideating and designing interactive motivation-driven games for stroke patients. The motivational factors of stroke patients in rehabilitation may help the game designers to design motivation-driven game contexts, contents, and gameplay. Moreover, these findings may also help healthcare professionals who concern stroke patient’s motivation in rehabilitative context. In this paper, we reported our Virtual Nursing Home (VNH concept and the games that we are currently developing and re-designing. Based on this literature review, we will present and test out the ideas how we can integrate these motivational factors in our future game design, development, and enhancement.

  14. Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Stroke Association’s Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services Rehabilitation, often referred to as rehab, is an important part of stroke recovery. Through rehab, you:  Re-learn basic skills such ...

  15. Determinants of Length of Stay in Stroke Patients: A Geriatric Rehabilitation Unit Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to identify the predictors of length of stay--the impact of age, comorbidity, and stroke subtype--on the outcome of geriatric stroke patients. One hundred and seventy stroke patients (129 first-ever ischemic, 25 hemorrhagic, and 16 ischemic second strokes) were included in the study. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project…

  16. Nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to role and function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit-A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mia I; Poulsen, Ingrid; Esbensen, Bente A

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nurses' and nurse assistants' beliefs, attitudes and actions related to their function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. BACKGROUND: Several attempts have been made to describe nurses' roles and functions in inpatient neurorehabilitation. However, current...... stroke rehabilitation. We obtained insights into nursing staff's beliefs and attitudes about rehabilitation-as well as their own role and function-and furthermore how the latter affects their actions in daily practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The nursing role and function are still not clearly...... defined. Further education is needed to strengthen the contribution of nursing staff to patients' rehabilitation. Furthermore, focus on developing a professional language and a framework that supports continuity within daily care and rehabilitation is needed....

  17. Stroke Rehabilitation: What Research is Being Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation What Research is Being Done? Past Issues / ... Table of Contents To Find Out More MedlinePlus: Stroke Rehabilitation medlineplus.gov/strokerehabilitation.html National Institute of ...

  18. Stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Satink, Ton; Steultjens, Esther

    2011-01-01

    needs, 3) Physical and non-physical needs, 4) Being personally valued and treated with respect, 5) Collaboration with health care professionals and 6) Assuming responsibility and seizing control. DISCUSSION: The synthesis showed that stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation reflected individual......INTRODUCTION: The aim was to obtain the best available knowledge on stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation. The increase in demands for accountability in health care and acknowledgement of the importance of client participation in health decisions calls for systematic ways of integrating...

  19. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, L

    2012-09-27

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  20. Goal setting practice in services delivering community-based stroke rehabilitation: a United Kingdom (UK) wide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scobbie, Lesley; Duncan, Edward A; Brady, Marian C; Wyke, Sally

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the nature of services providing community-based stroke rehabilitation across the UK, and goal setting practice used within them, to inform evaluation of a goal setting and action planning (G-AP) framework. We designed, piloted and electronically distributed a survey to health professionals working in community-based stroke rehabilitation settings across the UK. We optimised recruitment using a multi-faceted strategy. Responses were analysed from 437 services. Services size, composition and input was highly variable; however, most were multi-disciplinary (82%; n = 335/407) and provided input to a mixed diagnostic group of patients (71%; n = 312/437). Ninety one percent of services (n = 358/395) reported setting goals with "all" or "most" stroke survivors. Seventeen percent (n = 65/380) reported that no methods were used to guide goal setting practice; 47% (n = 148/315) reported use of informal methods only. Goal setting practice varied, e.g. 98% of services (n = 362/369) reported routinely asking patients about goal priorities; 39% (n = 141/360) reported routinely providing patients with a copy of their goals. Goal setting is embedded within community-based stroke rehabilitation; however, practice varies and is potentially sub-optimal. Further evaluation of the G-AP framework is warranted to inform optimal practice. Evaluation design will take account of the diverse service models that exist. Implications for Rehabilitation Community-based stroke rehabilitation services across the UK are diverse and tend to see a mixed diagnostic group of patients. Goal setting is implemented routinely within community-based stroke rehabilitation services; however, practice is variable and potentially sub-optimal. Further evaluation of the G-AP framework is warranted to assess its effectiveness in practice.

  1. New developments in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocksmith, Eugenio R; Reding, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that environmental and neuropharmacologic treatments enhance stroke recovery. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation have significantly broadened our understanding of the neuroanatomic relationships involved in recovery from brain injury due to stroke. These tools have also demonstrated the role for pharmacologic enhancement of cortical plasticity coupled with behavioral interventions. Robot-assisted therapy and partial body weight-supported treadmill gait training have demonstrated the role for technologic intervention in the modern neuro-rehabilitation setting. Current research using hemi-field ocular prisms and patching techniques suggest a role in the rehabilitation of hemianopsia and visual neglect. Finally, many advances have been made in the understanding of common stroke complications, such as depression, dysphagia, venous thromboembolic disease, incontinence, and spasticity.

  2. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbro Birgitta Johansson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, or various kinds of music therapy. Several studies have shown positive effects been reported but to give general recommendation more studies are needed. Patient heterogeneity and the interactions of age, gender, genes and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation.

  3. The effects of increased therapy time on cognition and mood in frail patients with a stroke who rehabilitate on rehabilitation units of nursing homes in the Netherlands: a protocol of a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijben-Schoenmakers, Marleen; Rademaker, Arno; van Rooden, Peter; Scherder, Erik

    2014-05-23

    Recovery after stroke is dependent on how much time can be spent on rehabilitation. Recently, we found that therapy time for older stroke patients on a rehabilitation unit of a nursing home could be increased significantly from 8.6 to at least 13 hours a week. This increase was attained by the implementation of interventions, focused on strength, mobility and balance. Nurses carried out these exercises with the patients during their daily activities. The aim of the present study is to investigate if increased therapy time has a positive effect on cognition, mood (depression and anxiety), and ADL in stroke patients. A comparative single blind controlled study will be applied. Patients suffering from a stroke and staying on one of the rehabilitation units of the nursing homes are eligible for participation. Participants belong to the intervention group if they stay in two nursing homes where four interventions of the Clinical Nursing Rehabilitation Stroke Guideline were implemented. Participants who stay in two nursing homes where therapy is given according to the Dutch stroke Guideline, are included in the control group. Clinical neuropsychologists will assess patients' cognitive functioning, level of depression (mood) and anxiety. Nurses will assess a Barthel Index score on a weekly basis (ADL). These variables are measured at baseline, after 8 weeks and at the moment when participants are discharged from the nursing home. The present study evaluates the effect of increased therapy time on cognition, mood (level of depression and anxiety), and ADL in stroke patients. When positive effects will be found this study can guide policy makers and practitioners on how to implement more therapy time on rehabilitation wards of nursing homes. TNR Our study has been documented in the Dutch Trial Registration, TC = 3871.

  4. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  5. Stroke rehabilitation reaches a threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol E Han

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor training with the upper limb affected by stroke partially reverses the loss of cortical representation after lesion and has been proposed to increase spontaneous arm use. Moreover, repeated attempts to use the affected hand in daily activities create a form of practice that can potentially lead to further improvement in motor performance. We thus hypothesized that if motor retraining after stroke increases spontaneous arm use sufficiently, then the patient will enter a virtuous circle in which spontaneous arm use and motor performance reinforce each other. In contrast, if the dose of therapy is not sufficient to bring spontaneous use above threshold, then performance will not increase and the patient will further develop compensatory strategies with the less affected hand. To refine this hypothesis, we developed a computational model of bilateral hand use in arm reaching to study the interactions between adaptive decision making and motor relearning after motor cortex lesion. The model contains a left and a right motor cortex, each controlling the opposite arm, and a single action choice module. The action choice module learns, via reinforcement learning, the value of using each arm for reaching in specific directions. Each motor cortex uses a neural population code to specify the initial direction along which the contralateral hand moves towards a target. The motor cortex learns to minimize directional errors and to maximize neuronal activity for each movement. The derived learning rule accounts for the reversal of the loss of cortical representation after rehabilitation and the increase of this loss after stroke with insufficient rehabilitation. Further, our model exhibits nonlinear and bistable behavior: if natural recovery, motor training, or both, brings performance above a certain threshold, then training can be stopped, as the repeated spontaneous arm use provides a form of motor learning that further bootstraps performance and

  6. Improving Stroke Management through Specialized Stroke Units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rehabilitation of the stroke patient. The establishment of stroke units has been found to improve the survival of patients and significantly reduce disability by rendering holistic care. Early intervention to rapidly restore and maintain blood supply to the ischemic area in the brain, minimize brain damage and hence impairment ...

  7. Rehabilitation of a patient with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Barman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a significant cause of long-term disability world-wide. The post-stroke disabilities are due to loss of locomotion, activity of daily living, cognition and communication skills. Rehabilitation is an integral part of medical management and continues longitudinally through acute care, post-acute care and community reintegration. The objectives of stroke rehabilitation are to maximize the functional independence, minimize the disabilities, reintegrate back into the home and community and improve the self-esteem of patient. A comprehensive stroke rehabilitation service should provide early assessment of impairments and disabilities, management and prevention of complications and well-organized rehabilitation program in both in-patient and out-patient settings. A multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team approach is necessary to reduce the post-stroke disabilities. It has many members, including physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, orthotist, psychotherapists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation therapists, rehabilitation nurse, patients, families and other caregivers. Physicians caring for patients with stroke during rehabilitation must be aware of potential medical complications, as well as a number of special problems that may complicate recovery, including cognitive deficits, aphasia, dysphagia, urinary incontinence, shoulder pain, spasticity, falls and depression. Involvement of patient and caregivers in the rehabilitation process is essential. This article outlines the salient features of the early comprehensive rehabilitation after stroke.

  8. Post-stroke disposition from a geriatric-rehabilitative stroke care area: an Italian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of stroke patients cannot be discharged at home. Studies on post stroke disposition have low validity outside the country in which they are carried out because healthcare systems offer different rehabilitative and long-term facilities. Moreover absolute selection criteria for admission to rehabilitation are not available yet. Few studies on post-stroke disposition from Italian stroke units are available. Authors evaluated data of a 18-month period from a geriatric managed stroke care area where comprehensive multi-professional assessment and discharge planning are routinely carried out. Only patients discharged with diagnosis related to acute stroke were considered. Baseline characteristics, clinical, neurological and functional conditions according to the structured multidimensional assessment were prospectively collected in the stroke unit registry. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression were performed to identify independent variables associated with three discharge settings: home, rehabilitation and skilled long-term ward. Out of 188 patients evaluated, 56.4% were discharged home, 18.6% to rehabilitation and 25.0% to long-term ward. Data showed an efficient disposition to intermediate settings with a shorter length of stay compared to other international studies. Factors associated with post-stroke disposition were age, dysphagia, neurological impairment on admission (NIH-SS≥6, after stroke functional status (mRankin≥3, poor pre-stroke functional level (mRankin≥3 and hemorrhagic stroke. Dysphagia, severe neurological impairment and post-stroke disability were associated with discharge to rehabilitation and long term ward. These two settings differed in age and pre-stroke functional condition. Patients discharged to long-term wards were about 10 years older than those admitted to rehabilitative ward. Only 5% of patients discharged to rehabilitation had a pre-stroke mRankin score ≥3. Disposition to a skilled

  9. Practice variation in the structure of stroke rehabilitation in four rehabilitation centres in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; Meesters, Jorit J. L.; Arwert, Henk J.; Roux-Otter, Nienke; Ribbers, Gerard M.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Goossens, Paulien H.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.

    2016-01-01

    To describe practice variation in the structure of stroke rehabilitation in 4 specialized multidisciplinary rehabilitation centres in the Netherlands. A multidisciplinary expert group formulated a set of 23 elements concerning the structure of inpatient and outpatient stroke rehabilitation,

  10. Achieving a holistic perspective in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Lund, Hans; Jones, Dorrie

    2015-01-01

    was collected from participants’ medical records and analysed using deductive content analysis until saturation was reached. Data were generated in four settings that encompass the general Danish health care service to adult stroke patients in hospitals and community-based settings. Results: Patient data were......Background/Aims: Holistic, multidisciplinary rehabilitation is often the most appropriate for stroke patients. The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a comprehensive conceptual framework and systematic terminology used...... by health professionals worldwide. The purpose of this study was to explore how the components of the ICF were addressed by physiotherapists and occupational therapists in stroke rehabilitation. Methods: A prospective cohort study, including all service levels within Danish stroke rehabilitation...

  11. Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate E; Lange, Belinda; George, Stacey; Deutsch, Judith E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Crotty, Maria

    2017-11-20

    Virtual reality and interactive video gaming have emerged as recent treatment approaches in stroke rehabilitation with commercial gaming consoles in particular, being rapidly adopted in clinical settings. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published first in 2011 and then again in 2015. Primary objective: to determine the efficacy of virtual reality compared with an alternative intervention or no intervention on upper limb function and activity.Secondary objectives: to determine the efficacy of virtual reality compared with an alternative intervention or no intervention on: gait and balance, global motor function, cognitive function, activity limitation, participation restriction, quality of life, and adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (April 2017), CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and seven additional databases. We also searched trials registries and reference lists. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of virtual reality ("an advanced form of human-computer interface that allows the user to 'interact' with and become 'immersed' in a computer-generated environment in a naturalistic fashion") in adults after stroke. The primary outcome of interest was upper limb function and activity. Secondary outcomes included gait and balance and global motor function. Two review authors independently selected trials based on pre-defined inclusion criteria, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements when required. The review authors contacted investigators to obtain missing information. We included 72 trials that involved 2470 participants. This review includes 35 new studies in addition to the studies included in the previous version of this review. Study sample sizes were generally small and interventions varied in terms of both the goals of treatment and the virtual reality devices used. The risk of bias present in many studies was unclear due to poor reporting. Thus, while there are a large

  12. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  13. Medical phenomenology and stroke rehabilitation: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This issue of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation explores the theme of medical phenomenology and stroke rehabilitation through open peer commentary format. The theme is introduced by a brief summary and overview of phenomenology as a branch of philosophy whose focus is the development of methodology for describing and ordering human experience. The application of this philosophical approach to medicine in general and stroke rehabilitation in particular is then considered. An approach to patients informed by both phenomenology and science provides a more complete, holistic, and humanistic framework than science alone. Phenomenology helps the clinician to understand the importance of narrative, the process of adaptation at the level of the integrated whole person, and the important role of context in determining how recovery unfolds. Embodiment is presented as an organizing principle that links the nature of conscious experience in the lived body and the basic transformation in experience and function associated with an acquired pathology such as stroke. Finally, the nature of open peer commentary is considered and introduced in terms of how it has been specifically implemented in this issue of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation.

  14. What aspects of rehabilitation provision contribute to self-reported met needs for rehabilitation one year after stroke--amount, place, operator or timing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tistad, Malin; von Koch, Lena; Sjöstrand, Christina

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To a large extent, people who have suffered a stroke report unmet needs for rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to explore aspects of rehabilitation provision that potentially contribute to self-reported met needs for rehabilitation 12 months after stroke...... with consideration also to severity of stroke. METHODS: The participants (n = 173) received care at the stroke units at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden. Using a questionnaire, the dependent variable, self-reported met needs for rehabilitation, was collected at 12 months after stroke. The independent...... variables were four aspects of rehabilitation provision based on data retrieved from registers and structured according to four aspects: amount of rehabilitation, service level (day care rehabilitation, primary care rehabilitation and home-based rehabilitation), operator level (physiotherapist, occupational...

  15. The Stroke Assessment of Fall Risk (SAFR): predictive validity in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisinger, Terry P; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Niyonkuru, Christian; Terhorst, Lauren; Campbell, Grace B

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate relative accuracy of a newly developed Stroke Assessment of Fall Risk (SAFR) for classifying fallers and non-fallers, compared with a health system fall risk screening tool, the Fall Harm Risk Screen. Prospective quality improvement study conducted at an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit at a large urban university hospital. Patients admitted for inpatient stroke rehabilitation (N = 419) with imaging or clinical evidence of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, between 1 August 2009 and 31 July 2010. Not applicable. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve for Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves of both scales' classifications, based on fall risk score completed upon admission to inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A total of 68 (16%) participants fell at least once. The SAFR was significantly more accurate than the Fall Harm Risk Screen (p Fall Harm Risk Screen, area under the curve was 0.56, positive predictive value was 0.19, and negative predictive value was 0.86. Sensitivity and specificity of the SAFR (0.78 and 0.63, respectively) was higher than the Fall Harm Risk Screen (0.57 and 0.48, respectively). An evidence-derived, population-specific fall risk assessment may more accurately predict fallers than a general fall risk screen for stroke rehabilitation patients. While the SAFR improves upon the accuracy of a general assessment tool, additional refinement may be warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. The Stroke Assessment of Fall Risk (SAFR): predictive validity in inpatient stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisinger, Terry P; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Niyonkuru, Christian; Terhorst, Lauren; Campbell, Grace B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate relative accuracy of a newly developed Stroke Assessment of Fall Risk (SAFR) for classifying fallers and non-fallers, compared with a health system fall risk screening tool, the Fall Harm Risk Screen. Design and setting Prospective quality improvement study conducted at an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit at a large urban university hospital. Participants Patients admitted for inpatient stroke rehabilitation (N = 419) with imaging or clinical evidence of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, between 1 August 2009 and 31 July 2010. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measure(s) Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve for Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves of both scales’ classifications, based on fall risk score completed upon admission to inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Results A total of 68 (16%) participants fell at least once. The SAFR was significantly more accurate than the Fall Harm Risk Screen (p stroke rehabilitation patients. While the SAFR improves upon the accuracy of a general assessment tool, additional refinement may be warranted. PMID:24849795

  17. Stroke rehabilitation at home before and after discharge reduced disability and improved quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Østergaard, Ann; Kjær, Pia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if home-based rehabilitation of inpatients improved outcome compared to standard care. DESIGN: Interventional, randomised, safety/efficacy open-label trial. SETTING: University hospital stroke unit in collaboration with three municipalities. SUBJECTS: Seventy-one eligible...... stroke patients (41 women) with focal neurological deficits hospitalised in a stroke unit for more than three days and in need of rehabilitation. INTERVENTIONS: Thirty-eight patients were randomised to home-based rehabilitation during hospitalization and for up to four weeks after discharge to replace...... part of usual treatment and rehabilitation services. Thirty-three control patients received treatment and rehabilitation following usual guidelines for the treatment of stroke patients. MAIN MEASURES: Ninety days post-stroke the modified Rankin Scale score was the primary endpoint. Other outcome...

  18. Feasibility and effectiveness of circuit training in acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Dorian; Paris, Trevor; Crews, Erin; Wu, Samuel S; Sun, Anqi; Behrman, Andrea L; Duncan, Pamela

    2011-02-01

    Task-specificity, repetition and progression are key variables in the acquisition of motor skill however they have not been consistently implemented in post-stroke rehabilitation. To evaluate the effectiveness of a stroke rehabilitation plan of care that incorporated task-specific practice, repetition and progression to facilitate functional gain compared to standard physical therapy for individuals admitted to an inpatient stroke unit. Individuals participated in either a circuit training (CTPT) model (n = 72) or a standard (SPT) model (n = 108) of physical therapy, 5 days/week. Each 60 minute circuit training session, delivered according to severity level, consisted of four functional mobility tasks. Daily exercise logs documented both task repetition and progression. The CTPT model was successfully implemented in an acute rehabilitation setting. The CTPT group showed a significantly greater improved change in gait speed from hospital admission to discharge than the SPT group (0.21 ± 0.25 m/sec vs. 0.13 ± 0.22 m/sec; p = 0.03). The difference between groups occurred primarily among those who were ambulatory upon admission. There were no significant differences between the two cohorts at 90 days post-stroke as measured by the FONE-FIM, SF-36 and living location. Therapy focused on systematically progressed functional tasks can be successfully implemented in an inpatient rehabilitation stroke program. This circuit-training model resulted in greater gains in gait velocity over the course of inpatient rehabilitation compared to the standard model of care. Community-based services following hospital discharge to maintain these gains should be included in the continuum of post-stroke care.

  19. Serious Games for Home-based Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Raoul; Hiesel, Patrick; Peters, Sebastian; Siewiorek, Daniel P; Smailagic, Asim; Brügge, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    On average, two thousand residents in the United States experience a stroke every day. These circumstances account for $28 billion direct costs annually and given the latest predictions, these costs will more than triple by 2030. In our research, we propose a portfolio of serious games for home-based stroke rehabilitation. The objective of the game approach is to enrich the training experience and establish a higher level of compliance to prescribed exercises, while maintaining a supportive training environment as found in common therapy sessions. Our system provides a collection of mini games based on rehabilitation exercises used in conventional physical therapy, monitors the patient's performance while exercising and provides clinicians with an interface to personalize the training. The clinician can set the current state of rehabilitation and change the playable games over time to drive diversification. While the system still has to be evaluated, an early stage case study with one patient offered positive indications towards this concept.

  20. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring

  1. Rehabilitacija bolnikov po možganski kapi: Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation: Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation:

    OpenAIRE

    Goljar, Nika

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of post-stroke rehabilitation, the evidence base remains weaker than in other areas of stroke management. European Stroke Organization (ESO) published (in 2008) its Guidelines for Management of Ischaemic Stroke (updated in 2009). They cover the whole spectrum of ischaemic stroke, including rehabilitation. Following the systematic literature search, the selected articles were screened for data relevance and quality, and the evidence base for post-stroke...

  2. Understanding nursing practice in stroke units: a Q-methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J; Holt, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Nurses represent the largest professional group working with stroke-survivors, but there is limited evidence regarding nurses' involvement in post-stroke rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore the perspectives of nurses and other multidisciplinary stroke team members on nurses' practice in stroke rehabilitation. Q-methodological study with 63 multidisciplinary stroke unit team members and semi-structured interviews with 27 stroke unit team members. Irrespective of their professional backgrounds, participants shared the view that nurses can make an active contribution to stroke rehabilitation and integrate rehabilitation principles in routine practice. Training in stroke rehabilitation skills was viewed as fundamental to effective stroke care, but nurses do not routinely receive such training. The view that integrating rehabilitation techniques can only occur when nursing staffing levels were high was rejected. There was also little support for the view that nurses are uniquely placed to co-ordinate care, or that nurses have an independent rehabilitation role. The contribution that nurses with stroke rehabilitation skills can make to effective stroke care was understood. However, realising the potential of nurses as full partners in stroke rehabilitation is unlikely to occur without introduction of structured competency-based multidisciplinary training in rehabilitation skills. Implications for Rehabilitation Multidisciplinary rehabilitation in stroke units is a cornerstone of effective stroke care. Views of stroke unit team members on nurses' involvement in rehabilitation have not been reported previously. Nurses can routinely incorporate rehabilitation principles in their care. Specialist competency-based stroke rehabilitation training needs to be provided for nurses as well as for allied health professionals.

  3. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available.

  4. Object and event recognition for stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Ahmed; Cunningham, Andrew S.; Pridmore, Tony P.

    2003-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and health care expenditure around the world. Existing stroke rehabilitation methods can be effective but are costly and need to be improved. Even modest improvements in the effectiveness of rehabilitation techniques could produce large benefits in terms of quality of life. The work reported here is part of an ongoing effort to integrate virtual reality and machine vision technologies to produce innovative stroke rehabilitation methods. We describe a combined object recognition and event detection system that provides real time feedback to stroke patients performing everyday kitchen tasks necessary for independent living, e.g. making a cup of coffee. The image plane position of each object, including the patient"s hand, is monitored using histogram-based recognition methods. The relative positions of hand and objects are then reported to a task monitor that compares the patient"s actions against a model of the target task. A prototype system has been constructed and is currently undergoing technical and clinical evaluation.

  5. Stroke units benefit from work of nutrition assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carol

    2009-07-07

    As a support service manager in the stroke and rehabilitation unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, I manage a team of band 3 nutrition assistants working effectively to meet the nutritional needs of all our patients (letters July 1).

  6. Unfulfilled rehabilitation needs and dissatisfaction with care 12 months after a stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tistad, Malin; Tham, Kerstin; von Koch, Lena

    2012-01-01

    a questionnaire. Stroke severity, domains of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC) and socio demographic factors were used as independent variables in four logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Unfulfilled needs for rehabilitation at 12 months were predicted by strength (SIS) (odds......BACKGROUND: People who have suffered a stroke commonly report unfulfilled need for rehabilitation. Using a model of patient satisfaction, we examined characteristics in individuals that at 3 months after stroke predicted, or at 12 months were associated with unmet need for rehabilitation...... or dissatisfaction with health care services at 12 months after stroke. METHODS: The participants (n = 175) received care at the stroke units at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden. The dependent variables "unfulfilled needs for rehabilitation" and "dissatisfaction with care" were collected using...

  7. Facilities of Early Rehabilitation post Stroke in Poland 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opara, Jozef; Langhorne, Peter; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    ? Aims - Growing costs of health care are encouraging healthcare planners to look for new organizational solutions of services which could enable rehabilitation as early as possible after disease onset. Early post-stroke rehabilitation consists of many elements that provide for early onset rehabilitation...... admission from neurological wards to rehabilitation departments, about the number of sessions per day, the time duration of one session, the number of sessions per week, the average length of stay in department, the methods of outcome measurement etc. Analysis - We sent out 375 questionnaire and received......-stroke, i.e. within 3 months of stroke. Comment - Taking into account that about half of stroke survivors will need rehabilitation (30 days after stroke onset), the current facilities of early post-stroke rehabilitation in Poland cannot meet this need. We should do our best to introduce rehabilitation...

  8. Rehabilitation of cortical blindness secondary to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Tarek A-Z K

    2010-01-01

    Cortical blindness is a rare complication of posterior circulation stroke. However, its complex presentation with sensory, physical, cognitive and behavioural impairments makes it one of the most challenging. Appropriate approach from a rehabilitation standpoint was never reported. Our study aims to discuss the rehabilitation methods and outcomes of a cohort of patients with cortical blindness. The notes of all patients with cortical blindness referred to a local NHS rehabilitation service in the last 6~years were examined. Patients' demographics, presenting symptoms, scan findings, rehabilitation programmes and outcomes were documented. Seven patients presented to our service, six of them were males. The mean age was 63. Patients 1, 2 and 3 had total blindness with severe cognitive and behavioural impairments, wandering and akathisia. All of them failed to respond to any rehabilitation effort and the focus was on damage limitation. Pharmacological interventions had a modest impact on behaviour and sleep pattern. The 3 patients were discharged to a nursing facility. Patients 4, 5, 6 and 7 had partial blindness with variable severity. All of them suffered from significant memory impairment. However, none suffered from any behavioural, physical or other cognitive impairment. Rehabilitation efforts on 3 patients were carried out collaboratively between brain injury occupational therapists and sensory disability officers. All patients experienced significant improvement in handicap and they all maintained community placements. This small cohort of patients suggests that the rehabilitation philosophy and outcomes of these 2 distinct groups of either total or partial cortical blindness differ significantly.

  9. Shorter length of stay in the stroke unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tistad, Malin; Ytterberg, Charlotte; Sjöstrand, Christina

    2012-01-01

    was seen at 6 or 12 months post stroke. CONCLUSION: It seems possible to reduce the number of days spent in the stroke unit after mild to moderate stroke and instead spend days in a rehabilitation unit, and yet achieve similar patient satisfaction and faster recovery in ADL....... the first year post stroke in 2 groups of patients with mild to moderate stroke who received care in the same stroke unit. METHOD: The patients (1993/96, n=40; 2006/07, n=43) in this study received care in the stroke unit at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. Data on LOS and on the use...... unit was shorter in the 2006-2007 group (median 8 days) compared to the 1993-1996 group (13 days) (P post stroke in the 2006-2007 group, but no difference...

  10. Rehabilitation of stroke patients needs a family-centred approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Meily, Anne; Post, Marcel; Gorter, Jan Willem; Berlekom, Steven Berdenis V.; van den Bos, Trudi; Lindeman, Eline

    2006-01-01

    To highlight the importance of the spouse in stroke rehabilitation. Stroke not only affects the patients, but also their families, but rehabilitation practice is still primarily focused on the patient only. Analysis of the position of the spouse and possible consequences of stroke for the spouse,

  11. Facilities of Early Rehabilitation after Stroke in Poland 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Jozef A.; Langhorne, Peter; Larsen, Torben; Mehlich, Krzysztof; Szczygiel, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to survey the contemporary facilities for early post-stroke rehabilitation in Poland. The main research questions were as follows: what is the availability of inpatient rehabilitation for post-stroke patients in neurological departments and in rehabilitation departments? The growing costs of healthcare are encouraging…

  12. A feminist perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvigne, Kari; Kirkevold, M.

    2002-01-01

    and female sufferers may in part be explained by the fact that rehabilitation services are designed primarily to meet the needs of men. de Beauvoir's feminist theory maintains that one's body is fundamental in creating the person, which is a lifelong process. Traditionally, the female body has been exposed......The dominant view of women has changed radically during the last century. These changes have had an important impact on the way of life of women in general and, undoubtedly, on women as patients. So far, gender differences have received little attention when developing healthcare services. Stroke...... to alienation and oppression through life. This has led women to develop a life in immanence. This we feel can be of significance in connection with rehabilitation after a stroke, particularly for elderly women. In this article we will discuss how de Beauvoir's theory can throw new light on the experiences...

  13. The King's College Hospital Acute Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, P; Butterworth, R J; Soo, J; Kerr, J E

    1996-01-01

    The King's College Hospital (KCH) Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) was set up in January 1994 in order to provide acute management for patients admitted with stroke and to undertake biomedical research. Of 206 patients admitted to KCH with a stroke or suffering an in-hospital stroke, 141 (68%) patients were admitted to the ASU over its first 6 months of operation: 120 (85%) were from the Accident and Emergency Department and 21 (15%) from other wards. Management included resuscitation and medical stabilisation, investigation, prevention of stroke complications (including aspiration, venous thrombosis, and pressure sores), rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy), nutrition (dietetics) and initiation of secondary prevention measures (aspirin or anticoagulation, blood pressure and lipid lowering, and carotid endarterectomy). All aspects of management are driven by agreed guidelines. Patients remain under the care of the admitting physician but specific stroke management and guidance is provided by two research doctors and the unit's nurses, therapists and dietician. The unit also facilitates research into stroke pathophysiology and acute therapeutic interventions. Our experience suggests that an ASU is relatively easy to set up and may contribute to improved care. Whether ASUs improve patient survival and functional outcome, and are cost-effective, requires further study.

  14. A comparison of stroke rehabilitation; data from two national cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bērziņa, G; Vētra, A; Sunnerhagen, K S

    2016-10-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation is a commonly used complex intervention to improve a person's independence after stroke. Evaluation and comparison of the effects of routine clinical practice could provide a contribution towards optimization of stroke care. The aim of this study is to describe results of inpatient rehabilitation as a complex intervention for persons after stroke and explore possible differences between two countries. Data from 1055 Latvian and 1748 Swedish adult patients after stroke receiving inpatient rehabilitation, during 2011-2013, were used for this retrospective cohort study. Qualitative description of systems, as well as information on basic medical and sociodemographic information, and organizational aspects were reported. Change in the Functional Independence Measure during rehabilitation was investigated. In six domains of the instrument, the shifts for three levels of dependence were analysed using ordinal regression analysis. The components of stroke care seem to be similar in Latvia and Sweden. However, the median time since stroke onset until the start of rehabilitation was 13 weeks in Latvia and 2 weeks in Sweden. The median length of rehabilitation was 12 and 49 days, respectively. The level of dependency at start, time since stroke onset and length of the period had an impact on the results of the rehabilitation. Although components of the rehabilitation are reported as being the same, characteristics and the outcome of the inpatient rehabilitation are different. Therefore, comparison of stroke rehabilitation between countries requires caution. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Geriatric rehabilitation of stroke patients in nursing homes: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Buijck, Bianca I; Zuidema, Sytse U; Voncken, Frans L M; Geurts, Alexander C H; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2010-03-27

    Geriatric patients are typically underrepresented in studies on the functional outcome of rehabilitation after stroke. Moreover, most geriatric stroke patients do probably not participate in intensive rehabilitation programs as offered by rehabilitation centers. As a result, very few studies have described the successfulness of geriatric stroke rehabilitation in nursing home patients, although it appears that the majority of these patients are being discharged back to the community, rather than being transferred to residential care. Nevertheless, factors associated with the successfulness of stroke rehabilitation in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities are largely unknown. The primary goal of this study is, therefore, to assess the factors that uniquely contribute to the successfulness of rehabilitation in geriatric stroke patients that undergo rehabilitation in nursing homes. A secondary goal is to investigate whether these factors are similar to those associated with the outcome of stroke rehabilitation in the literature. This study is part of the Geriatric Rehabilitation in AMPutation and Stroke (GRAMPS) study in the Netherlands. It is a longitudinal, observational, multicenter study in 15 nursing homes in the Southern part of the Netherlands that aims to include at least 200 patients. All participating nursing homes are selected based on the existence of a specialized rehabilitation unit and the provision of dedicated multidisciplinary care. Patient characteristics, disease characteristics, functional status, cognition, behavior, and caregiver information, are collected within two weeks after admission to the nursing home. The first follow-up is at discharge from the nursing home or one year after inclusion, and focuses on functional status and behavior. Successful rehabilitation is defined as discharge from the nursing home to an independent living situation within one year after admission. The second follow-up is three months after discharge in

  16. Building a Knowledge to Action Program in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Richardson, Marina; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge to action (KTA) process proposed by Graham et al (2006) is a framework to facilitate the development and application of research evidence into clinical practice. The KTA process consists of the knowledge creation cycle and the action cycle. The Evidence Based Review of Stroke Rehabilitation is a foundational part of the knowledge creation cycle and has helped guide the development of best practice recommendations in stroke. The Rehabilitation Knowledge to Action Project is an audit-feedback process for the clinical implementation of best practice guidelines, which follows the action cycle. The objective of this review was to: (1) contextualize the Evidence Based Review of Stroke Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Knowledge to Action Project within the KTA model and (2) show how this process led to improved evidence-based practice in stroke rehabilitation. Through this process, a single centre was able to change clinical practice and promote a culture that supports the use of evidence-based practices in stroke rehabilitation.

  17. The place of robotics in post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Giulio

    2010-11-01

    Reducing the impact of stroke on the independence of elderly patients during daily life is becoming a primary societal goal in developed countries owing to population aging and to the incidence of stroke in elderly people. Rehabilitation plays a fundamental role in reducing the residual motor deficits of stroke patients, both during hospitalization (acute/subacute phase, inpatient rehabilitation) and after discharge (chronic phase, ambulatory/home rehabilitation). Since 1995, when the first pioneering robotic system for rehabilitation was presented, the use of robotics in post-stroke rehabilitation has been investigated intensely, and positive, although not yet fully satisfactory, clinical results were obtained. This article presents the most recent developments in this young research field, outlining the state of the art and the prospective role of robotics in post-stroke rehabilitation.

  18. VISTA-Rehab: a resource for stroke rehabilitation trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Ashburn, Ann; Bowen, Audrey; Brodie, Eric; Corr, Susan; Drummond, Avril; Edmans, Judi; Gladman, John; Kalra, Lalit; Langhorne, Peter; Lees, Kennedy R; Lincoln, Nadina; Logan, Pip; Mead, Gillian; Patchick, Emma; Pollock, Alex; Pomeroy, Val; Sackley, Catherine; Sunnerhagen, Katherina S; van Vliet, Paulette; Walker, Marion; Brady, Marian

    2010-12-01

    Stroke rehabilitation is a complex intervention. Many factors influence the interaction between the patient and the elements of the intervention. Rehabilitation interventions are aimed at altering different domains of patient outcome including body functions, activity and participation. As a consequence, randomised clinical trials in this area are difficult to design. We developed an archive of stroke rehabilitation trials (VISTA-Rehab) to act as a resource to help trialists model and design future rehabilitation studies. We developed specific eligibility criteria for the entry of stroke rehabilitation trials into the archive. We established a Steering Committee to oversee projects and publications and commenced the recruitment of rehabilitation trials into this resource. As of August 2009, VISTA-Rehab contains data from 23 stroke rehabilitation trials (>3400 patients). Demographic data, including age [median=73, interquartile range (63,79)], gender (male=53%) and initial dependency [median baseline Barthel index score=6, interquartile range (9,19)], are available for all patients. Outcome measures include the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index, Rivermead Motor Assessment, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, General Health Questionnaire and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale. VISTA-Rehab expands the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive to include rehabilitation trials. Anonymised data can be used to examine questions specific to stroke rehabilitation and to generate novel hypotheses. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2010 World Stroke Organization.

  19. Robotic arm skate for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chee Kit; Jordan, Kimberlee; King, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Upper limb paresis after stroke greatly affects the performance of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Unfortunately, rehabilitation for upper limb impairment can have poor results. The current robot-assisted devices are expensive and not readily accessible for homecare. This paper presents the development of a low-cost tabletop robotic device for upper limb rehabilitation. Conceptually, patients perform computer-based goal-directed tasks using the robotic platform. Their progress is monitored and intervention, in the form of assistance or resistance, is introduced accordingly. A prototype platform is described. Experiments demonstrate the ability of the device to provide the necessary forces during movement exercises, in relation to task completion progress, device and target location. Appropriate exercises need to be developed before clinical trials can proceed. © 2011 CROWN

  20. Cognitive-communication disorder following right hemisphere stroke: exploring rehabilitation access and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewetson, Ronelle; Cornwell, Petrea; Shum, David

    2017-07-01

    Rehabilitation positively influences return to activities and social roles in people with aphasia. The cognitive-communication disorder (CCD) found following a right hemisphere stroke has been less extensively researched with rehabilitation access and outcomes yet to be determined. To document rehabilitation access and outcomes for people with CCD post-stroke; and compare outcomes based on presence (viz CCD; aphasia) or absence of communication impairment. A retrospective chart audit was completed for patients with first onset unilateral stroke, with a hospital length of stay (LOS) of at least two days and a communication assessment by a speech pathologist. Data extracted included presence and severity of communication impairment, access to and LOS in a rehabilitation unit, and functional outcome measures recorded at rehabilitation discharge. The majority of the 115 patients who met inclusion criteria were living independently (n = 112, 97.4%) at the time of stroke. CCD (66%) was diagnosed with similar frequency to aphasia (68%). The presence of communication impairment did not result in significant differences in rehabilitation LOS and discharge destination when compared to hemispheric strokes without communication impairment. Severity of CCD was an independent predictor of functional gain by rehabilitation discharge. People with CCD require comparable access to rehabilitation as people with aphasia, and severity of CCD should be considered in determining rehabilitation LOS. A large number of people are discharged with ongoing CCD which warrants exploration of potential participation restrictions created by the communication impairment.

  1. Nursing practice in stroke rehabilitation: systematic review and meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J

    2014-05-01

    To identify and synthesise the available research evidence in order to generate an explanatory framework for nursing practice in stroke rehabilitation. Although nurses are the largest professional group working with stroke survivors, there is limited understanding of nursing practice in stroke units. In particular, there is currently very little evidence in respect of nurses' involvement in poststroke rehabilitation. Meta-ethnography. A systematic review was undertaken. The review question was: 'What is the nature of nursing practice in the care and rehabilitation of inpatient stroke survivors?' Searches of 12 electronic databases identified 14,655 publications, and after screening, 778 remained; 137 papers were obtained and 54 retained for mapping. Sixteen qualitative studies were included in the meta-ethnography. Nurses' involvement in poststroke rehabilitation was limited. Contextual factors impacted on nurses' perceptions and practice. Nurses' integration of rehabilitation skills was perceived to be contingent on adequate nurse staffing levels and management of demands on nurses' time. Team working practices and use of the built environment indicated separation of nursing and therapy work. Physical care and monitoring were prioritised. Stroke-specific education and training was evident, but not consistent in content or approach. Stroke survivors and families needed help to understand nurses' role in rehabilitation. The review provides compelling evidence that there is an need to re-examine the role of nurses in contributing to poststroke rehabilitation, including clarifying when this process can safely begin and specifying the techniques that can be integrated in nurses' practice. Integrating stroke-specific rehabilitation skills in nurses' practice could contribute substantially to improving outcomes for stroke survivors. The explanatory framework developed from the review findings identifies issues which will need to be addressed in order to maximise nurses

  2. Post-stroke rehabilitation in Italy: inconsistencies across regional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, D; Spallazzi, M; Baldereschi, M; Di Carlo, A; Ferro, S; Rota E Morelli, N; Immovilli, P; Toni, D; Polizzi, B M; Inzitari, D

    2014-06-01

    Remarkable differences among European countries have been found in stroke rehabilitation models, owing to the fact that stroke rehabilitation services are embedded in health care systems. Comprehensive data on service utilization by stroke survivors in Italy are lacking, but would be instrumental in improving efficiency and effectiveness of post-acute stroke care, and consequently, in containing costs and improving outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to survey the Italian regional legislations in order to examine the provision of rehabilitation services for stroke survivors in Italy. This is a cross-sectional, observational study. Post-stroke intra- and extra-hospital rehabilitation. All decrees and resolutions as to post-acute stroke rehabilitation were collected from each Italian region. All decrees and resolutions were examined by the means of a check list including quantitative and qualitative characteristics, selected in accordance with national official recommendations. Each completed check list was then sent to each regional reference person, who filled in the section on the implementation of the indications and compliance. The study was carried out from November 2009 to September 2010. The documents were collected from 19 out of the 20 Italian regions. The results of the study indicate that there are many, remarkable regional variations in health policies concerning post-stroke care. Instruments for evaluation and criteria for allocating stroke patients to proper rehabilitation setting vary across regions, but data on the potential impact of these variations on clinical outcomes are still lacking. The study highlights the issue that, in Italy, delivery of post-stroke rehabilitation services is not uniform nation-wide and varies substantially across regions. The lack of a comprehensive post-acute stroke strategy is a major obstacle to service availability. The study results advocate the need for a consistent and comprehensive strategic planning of

  3. Prevention, management, and rehabilitation of stroke in low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijing L. Yan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although stroke incidence in high-income countries (HICs decreased over the past four decades, it increased dramatically in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. In this review, we describe the current status of primary prevention, treatment, and management of acute stroke and secondary prevention of and rehabilitation after stroke in LMICs. Although surveillance, screening, and accurate diagnosis are important for stroke prevention, LMICs face challenges in these areas due to lack of resources, awareness, and technical capacity. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, such as no tobacco use, healthful diet, and physical activity are important strategies for both primary and secondary prevention of stroke. Controlling high blood pressure is also critically important in the general population and in the acute stage of hemorrhagic stroke. Additional primary prevention strategies include community-based education programs, polypill, prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, and digital health technology. For treatment of stroke during the acute stage, specific surgical procedures and medications are recommended, and inpatient stroke care units have been proven to provide high quality care. Patients with a chronic condition like stroke may require lifelong pharmaceutical treatment, lifestyle maintenance and self-management skills, and caregiver and family support, in order to achieve optimal health outcomes. Rehabilitation improves physical, speech, and cognitive functioning of disabled stroke patients. It is expected that home- or community-based services and tele-rehabilitation may hold special promise for stroke patients in LMICs.

  4. Task-oriented training in rehabilitation after stroke : systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Marijke; Schuurmans, Marieke; Lindeman, Eline; Hafsteinsdottir, Thora

    Task-oriented training in rehabilitation after stroke: systematic review. This paper is a report of a review conducted to provide an overview of the evidence in the literature on task-oriented training of stroke survivors and its relevance in daily nursing practice. Stroke is the second leading

  5. Cochrane review: virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, K; George, S; Thomas, S; Deutsch, J E; Crotty, M

    2012-09-01

    Virtual reality and interactive video gaming are innovative therapy approaches in the field of stroke rehabilitation. The primary objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of virtual reality on motor function after stroke. The impact on secondary outcomes including activities of daily living was also assessed. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared virtual reality with an alternative or no intervention were included in the review. The authors searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, electronic databases, trial registers, reference lists, Dissertation Abstracts, conference proceedings and contacted key researchers and virtual reality manufacturers. Search results were independently examined by two review authors to identify studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Nineteen studies with a total of 565 participants were included in the review. Variation in intervention approaches and outcome data collected limited the extent to which studies could be compared. Virtual reality was found to be significantly more effective than conventional therapy in improving upper limb function (standardised mean difference, SMD) 0.53, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.25 to 0.81)) based on seven studies, and activities of daily living (ADL) function (SMD 0.81, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.22) based on three studies. No statistically significant effects were found for grip strength (based on two studies) or gait speed (based on three studies). Virtual reality appears to be a promising approach however, further studies are required to confirm these findings.

  6. Understanding significant others' experience of aphasia and rehabilitation following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallé, Marie-Christine; Le Dorze, Guylaine

    2014-01-01

    It is currently unknown how rehabilitation services contribute to significant others' adjustment to stroke with aphasia since their experience of rehabilitation has not been studied before. The purpose of this study was thus to understand significant others' experience of aphasia rehabilitation within the context of post-stroke rehabilitation. Individual interviews were carried out with 12 significant others of persons who became aphasic as a result of a stroke and were discharged from rehabilitation in the past 3 months. Data were analyzed with a grounded theory approach. "Being centered on the aphasic person" was the core category triggered by the significant other's perception of the stroke survivor's vulnerability and his/her feelings of attachment towards that person. Through their interactions with professionals, significant others assumed that rehabilitation was also centered on the aphasic person; a perspective that was reinforced. Consequently, significant others participated in rehabilitation as caregivers and expected rehabilitation to meet their caregiver needs but not other personal and relational needs. Their appraisal of rehabilitation was thus related to the satisfaction or not of caregiver needs. With a greater sensitivity to significant others who focus on the stroke survivor and disregard their own needs, rehabilitation professionals and especially speech-language therapists, can assist families in reestablishing communication and satisfying relationships which are affected because of aphasia. This qualitative study shows that significant others of aphasic stroke survivors experience rehabilitation as services focused on the person who had the stroke. Significant others' satisfaction with rehabilitation is not related to the fulfillment of their personal (e.g. resuming their activities) and relational needs (e.g. good communication with the person with aphasia). When offering interventions targeting significant others' needs, rehabilitation

  7. Research progress of new technologies in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin MENG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of stroke commonly experience a different range of dysfunction, and recovery can be slow and incomplete, which lead to a serious and long-term impact on patients themselves and their families. Although the treatment of stroke patients relies mainly on rehabilitation intervention, but the rehabilitation needs of discharged patients are not fully met due to lots of restrictions, such as the lack of professional rehabilitation services, the difficulty and inconvenience in transportation from home to hospital, therefore their prognosis of rehabilitation are affected. At present a number of new rehabilitation technologies, including telerehabilitation (TR, virtual reality (VR, robotics, electronic textiles (E-textiles, etc., are coming into being and may solve these problems. This article tries to discuss the research progress of these new rehabilitation technologies, and provide a new perspective for the rehabilitation intervention of stroke patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.03.003

  8. Effectiveness of home rehabilitation for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakaratee Chaiyawat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop and examine the effectiveness of an individual home rehabilitation program for patients with ischemic stroke. This was a randomized controlled trial in 60 patients with recent middle cerebral artery infarction. After hospital discharge for acute stroke care, they were randomly assigned to receive either a home rehabilitation program for three months (intervention group or usual care (control group. We collected outcome data over three months after their discharge from the hospital. The Barthel Index (BI, the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, the health-related quality-of-life index (EQ-5D, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression score (HADs, and the Thai Mental State Examination (TMSE were used to analyze the outcomes. In the intervention group, all outcomes were significantly better (p<0.05 than in the control group, except in the case of TMSE. A favorable outcome, which was defined as minimal or no disability as measured by BI (score 95-100, was achieved by 93.33% of patients in the intervention group, and 90% had favorable scores (0 or 1 on the MRS. This showed a benefit in reducing disability, with two being the number of patients considered as needed-to-treat (NNT (95% CI, 1.0-1.2. All dimensions of EQ-5D in the intervention group were significantly better for quality of life and generic health status than in the control group (p=0.001. Depression was found in one patient (3.33% in the intervention group and in two patients (6.67% in the control group. Dementia was found in three patients (10% in the intervention group and in four patients (13.33% in the control group. We concluded that an early home rehabilitation program for patients with ischemic stroke in the first three-month period provides significantly better outcomes in improving function, reducing disability, increasing quality of life, and reducing depression than a program of usual care does.

  9. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients.

  10. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  11. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  12. The impact of patient's weight on post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Alperovitch-Najenson, Deborah; Treger, Iuly

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of patient's weight on rehabilitation outcomes in first-event stroke patients. Design Retrospective, observational comparative study. 102 first-time stroke male and female patients admitted to the 52-bed neurology rehabilitation department in a rehabilitation hospital were included in the study. Body mass index (BMI), Functional Independence Measure (FIM) on admission and at discharge, as well as the delta-FIM (FIM on admission - FIM at discharge) were evaluated. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the FIM and the NIHSS scores between BMI groups (normal, overweight, moderate and severe obesity). Results A statistically significant negative correlation (rho = -0.20, p = 0.049) was found between FIM change and BMI, that remained significant after adjustments for age, sex and hospitalisation days. No difference was found between groups in FIM or NIHSS change between BMI groups. Conclusions In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. Further investigations are needed to identify the functional parameters affected by the patients' BMI. Implications for Rehabilitation In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. New rehabilitation strategies should be designed to improve the functional outcomes of rehabilitation of obese patients.

  13. Virtual immersion for post-stroke hand rehabilitation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoupikova, Daria; Stoykov, Nikolay S; Corrigan, Molly; Thielbar, Kelly; Vick, Randy; Li, Yu; Triandafilou, Kristen; Preuss, Fabian; Kamper, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. Impairment of upper extremity function is a common outcome following stroke, often to the detriment of lifestyle and employment opportunities. While the upper extremity is a natural target for therapy, treatment may be hampered by limitations in baseline capability as lack of success may discourage arm and hand use. We developeda virtual reality (VR) system in order to encourage repetitive task practice. This system combined an assistive glove with a novel VR environment. A set of exercises for this system was developed to encourage specific movements. Six stroke survivors with chronic upper extremity hemiparesis volunteered to participate in a pilot study in which they completed 18 one-hour training sessions with the VR system. Performance with the system was recorded across the 18 training sessions. Clinical evaluations of motor control were conducted at three time points: prior to initiation of training, following the end of training, and 1 month later. Subjects displayed significant improvement on performance of the virtual tasks over the course of the training, although for the clinical outcome measures only lateral pinch showed significant improvement. Future expansion to multi-user virtual environments may extend the benefits of this system for stroke survivors with hemiparesis by furthering engagement in the rehabilitation exercises.

  14. Geriatric rehabilitation of stroke patients in nursing homes : a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit-van Eijk, M.; Buijck, B.I.; Zuidema, S.U.; Voncken, F.L.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Geriatric patients are typically underrepresented in studies on the functional outcome of rehabilitation after stroke. Moreover, most geriatric stroke patients do probably not participate in intensive rehabilitation programs as offered by rehabilitation centers. As a result, very few

  15. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of patients with apraxia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andy J; Burgard, Emily; Radel, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Stroke-induced paresis commands much attention during rehabilitation; other stroke-related consequences receive less consideration. Apraxia is a stroke disorder that may have important implications for rehabilitation and recovery. To investigate association of apraxia with stroke rehabilitation outcomes during inpatient rehabilitation. This cohort study compared patients with and without apraxia after a first left hemispheric stroke. All study patients received standard of care. Clinical measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) administered upon admission and at discharge. Length of stay was also documented. Florida Apraxia Battery subtests were used to classify patients with apraxia. Fifteen patients were included in this study, 10 of whom had apraxia. Data analysis revealed that patients with apraxia exhibited improvement from admission to discharge in clinical measures; however, admission FIM score was significantly lower compared to patients without apraxia. There was no statistically significant difference between groups on FMA score, length of stay, or amount of change on clinical measures. This study of acute patients found those with apraxia to be significantly less independent upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation compared to patients without apraxia. Although both groups improved a similar amount during rehabilitation, patients with apraxia discharged at a level of independence comparable to patients without apraxia upon admission. Such disparity in independence is of concern, and apraxia as a factor in stroke rehabilitation and recovery deserves further attention.

  16. A questionnaire to assess carers' experience of stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Amy; Morris, Reg; Darwin, Cressida

    2012-01-01

    To establish the validity and reliability of a questionnaire measuring the experience of informal carers of patients with stroke through acute and rehabilitation hospital treatment. The settings were 6 stroke units in the United Kingdom. Participants were relatives of patients with stroke. The Stroke Carer Experience Questionnaire (SCEQ) asks about specific elements of care and was constructed using qualitative analyses. Convergent and discriminant validity were assessed by correlations with other questionnaires and variables. Criterion validity was examined by correlations with indices derived from qualitative data. Temporal stability was assessed by correlation with a repeated administration. The performance of the questionnaire was compared with that of the Carer Hospital Satisfaction Questionnaire (Carer HospSat). Seventy-two (49%) of 147 questionnaires were returned. Test-retest reliability, assessed by a questionnaire mailed 7 days after the first completion, was 0.77. The correlation with the Carer HospSat was 0.57, indicating convergent validity. The SCEQ did not correlate with demographic variables or functional ability, which indicated discriminant validity. Significant correlations with indices derived from carers' qualitative descriptions evidenced criterion validity. The SCEQ detected specific negative experiences among carers with high global satisfaction scores on the Carer HospSat. In general, the SCEQ items were not strongly intercorrelated; only 6% of the intercorrelations were strong to moderate (30.6). The SCEQ is preferable to existing questionnaires for carers of patients with stroke, because it has established validity and reliability and assesses service characteristics important to carers. It also identifies experiences in services that elude global satisfaction ratings. It is a promising instrument for identifying service strengths and unmet needs.

  17. The potential power of robotics for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukelow, Sean P

    2017-01-01

    Two decades of research on robots and upper extremity rehabilitation has resulted in recommendations from systematic reviews and guidelines on their use in stroke. Robotics are often cited for their ability to encourage mass practice as a means to enhance recovery of movement. Yet, stroke recovery is a complex process occurring across many aspects of neurologic function beyond movement. As newer devices are developed and enhanced assessments are integrated into treatment protocols, the potential of robotics to advance rehabilitation will continue to grow.

  18. Sexual function in post-stroke patients: considerations for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Talli; Vadas, Dor; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    While the rehabilitation goals of post-stroke patients include improving quality of life and returning to functional activities, the extent to which sexual activity is addressed as part of the standard rehabilitation process is unknown. Moreover, the specific sexual concerns of stroke patients, including the effect of stroke on intimate relationships and sexuality of the partner, the ability to physically engage in sex, and the effect of psychological components such as role identity, depression, and anxiety on sexuality, all warrant examination by rehabilitation professionals. The aim of this study is to examine the existing literature on sexuality and stroke patients in order to better understand how the sexual lives of stroke patients and their partners are affected and to provide recommendations to rehabilitation professionals for addressing sexuality as part of treatment. Narrative review, PubMed, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2012) were searched for the key words "stroke," "sexual dysfunction," "sexuality," "quality of life," and their combination. All relevant articles in English and secondary references were reviewed. We report the results of the literature review. Sexual dysfunction and decreased sexual satisfaction are common in the post-stroke population and are related to physical, psychosocial, and relational factors. However, they are not adequately addressed in post-stroke rehabilitation. As sexual function is an important component to quality of life and activities of daily living, physicians and rehabilitation specialists, including physical, occupational, and speech therapists, should receive training in addressing sexuality in the treatment of post-stroke patients. Sexologists and sex therapists should be an integral part of the rehabilitation team. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. A qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework to investigate why patients were or were not assessed for rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Elizabeth A; Luker, Julie A; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Fryer, Caroline E; Hillier, Susan L

    2017-07-01

    To explore the factors perceived to affect rehabilitation assessment and referral practices for patients with stroke. Qualitative study using data from focus groups analysed thematically and then mapped to the Theoretical Domains Framework. Eight acute stroke units in two states of Australia. Health professionals working in acute stroke units. Health professionals at all sites had participated in interventions to improve rehabilitation assessment and referral practices, which included provision of copies of an evidence-based decision-making rehabilitation Assessment Tool and pathway. Eight focus groups were conducted (32 total participants). Reported rehabilitation assessment and referral practices varied markedly between units. Continence and mood were not routinely assessed (4 units), and people with stroke symptoms were not consistently referred to rehabilitation (4 units). Key factors influencing practice were identified and included whether health professionals perceived that use of the Assessment Tool would improve rehabilitation assessment practices (theoretical domain 'social and professional role'); beliefs about outcomes from changing practice such as increased equity for patients or conversely that changing rehabilitation referral patterns would not affect access to rehabilitation ('belief about consequences'); the influence of the unit's relationships with other groups including rehabilitation teams ('social influences' domain) and understanding within the acute stroke unit team of the purpose of changing assessment practices ('knowledge' domain). This study has identified that health professionals' perceived roles, beliefs about consequences from changing practice and relationships with rehabilitation service providers were perceived to influence rehabilitation assessment and referral practices on Australian acute stroke units.

  20. Prevalence of apraxia among patients with a first left hemisphere stroke in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Ende, E. van den; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Deelman, B.G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of apraxia in patients with a first left hemisphere stroke. SUBJECTS: Left hemisphere stroke patients staying at an inpatient care unit of a rehabilitation centre or nursing home and receiving occupational therapy (n = 600). MEASURES: A short questionnaire on general patient characteristics and stroke-related aspects was completed by occupational therapists for every left hemisphere stroke patient they treated. A diagnosis of apraxia or nonapraxia was ...

  1. Current clinical practices in stroke rehabilitation: regional pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Oelschlager, Ashley; Agah, Arvin; Pohl, Patricia S; Ahmad, S Omar; Liu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the current physical and occupational therapy practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Midwest. The insights gained from this pilot study will be used in a future study aimed at understanding stroke rehabilitation practices across the nation. Researchers and clinicians in the field of stroke rehabilitation were interviewed, and past studies in the literature were analyzed. Through these activities, we developed a 37-item questionnaire that was sent to occupational and physical therapists practicing in Kansas and Missouri who focus on the care of people who have had a stroke (n = 320). A total of 107 respondents returned a com pleted questionnaire, which gives a response rate of about 36%. The majority of respondents had more than 12 years of experience treating patients with stroke. Consensus of 70% or more was found for 80% of the items. The preferred approaches for the rehabilitation of people who have had a stroke are the Bobath and Brunnstrom methods, which are being used by 93% and 85% of the physical and occupational therapists, respectively. Even though some variability existed in certain parts of the survey, in general clinicians agreed on different treatment approaches in issues dealing with muscle tone, weakness, and limited range of motion in stroke rehabilitation. Some newer treatment approaches that have been proven to be effective are practiced only by a minority of clinicians. The uncertainty among clinicians in some sections of the survey reveals that more evidence on clinical approaches is needed to ensure efficacious treatments.

  2. Age-related rehabilitation outcome in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimmanakorn, Nuttaset; Arrayawichanon, Preeda; Wattanapun, Pattra; Nuntharuksa, Chompilai; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2008-03-01

    Patients who survive a stroke usually have residual neurological deficits. Consequently, a rehabilitation program is valuable for improving their quality of life (QOL). However, age is a known factor that needs qualification vis-à-vis rehabilitation outcomes among Thai patients. To study the functional and psychological outcomes and the QOL before and after rehabilitation program among three age groups of Thai stroke patients ( or = 65 years of age). Prospective, analytical study. Three hundred and twenty seven stroke patients were measured using the Barthel index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the WHO QOL BREF questionnaire before and after undergoing an in-patient rehabilitation program. Data were collected from nine sites around Thailand. Functional and psychological outcomes and the quality of life score improved after the rehabilitation program. The youngest group of stroke victims showed the greatest improvement in functional outcome and QOL score in both the physical and social domains. No significant difference was found regarding anxiety and depression among the three groups. An in-patient rehabilitation program was of benefit to Thai stroke patients but age significantly determined rehabilitation outcomes.

  3. Caregiver availability for severe stroke results in improved functional ability at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkowski, Magdalena; Pereira, Shelialah; Janzen, Shannon; Mehta, Swati; Meyer, Matthew; McClure, Andrew; Speechley, Mark; Teasell, Robert

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the predictive capacity of caregiver availability on functional ability at time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation in individuals with severe first-time stroke. A retrospective chart review was conducted of severe stroke inpatients admitted to a stroke rehabilitation unit between April 2005 and December 2009. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with patients to determine caregiver availability at time of discharge. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was performed to assess the predictive capacity of caregiver availability on functional ability at discharge from an inpatient rehabilitation unit after controlling for covariates. Data from 180 individuals were included in the analysis. Individuals with a caregiver had significantly higher levels of functional ability at discharge compared to those without (85.8 ± 23.6 versus 72.9 ± 20.3; p availability explained 1.3% of additional variance, with the final model explaining 41.3% of total variance for functional ability at discharge (F (5,174) = 26.21, p availability of a caregiver at time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation is predictive of improved functional ability at discharge in individuals with severe stroke. The presence of an available caregiver positively influences the functional recovery of individuals with severe stroke and may be an important element to successful rehabilitation.

  4. EMG based FES for post-stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyus, Ceethal K.; Anjaly Cherian, V.; Nageswaran, Sharmila

    2017-11-01

    Annually, 15 million in world population experiences stroke. Nearly 9 million stroke survivors every year experience mild to severe disability. The loss of upper extremity function in stroke survivors still remains a major rehabilitation challenge. The proposed EMG Abstract—Annually, 15 million in world population experiences stroke. Nearly 9 million stroke survivors every year experience mild to severe disability. The loss of upper extremity function in stroke survivors still remains a major rehabilitation challenge. The proposed EMG based FES system can be used for effective upper limb motor re-education in post stroke upper limb rehabilitation. The governing feature of the designed system is its synchronous activation, in which the FES stimulation is dependent on the amplitude of the EMG signal acquired from the unaffected upper limb muscle of the hemiplegic patient. This proportionate operation eliminates the undesirable damage to the patient’s skin by generating stimulus in proportion to voluntary EMG signals. This feature overcomes the disadvantages of currently available manual motor re-education systems. This model can be used in home-based post stroke rehabilitation, to effectively improve the upper limb functions.

  5. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation outcomes of stroke patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multidisciplinary rehabilitation can be implemented to address disability post stroke. The aim of this study was to determine outcomes of stroke patients managed by a multidisciplinary team at a step-down facility in the Western Cape. A longitudinal observational study was used to measure outcomes at baseline and ...

  6. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Anemia on the Functional Outcomes of the Stroke Patients and the Efficiency of their Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tik; Ganasekaran, Ganesh

    2015-06-01

    There has been limited study focusing on the functional outcomes of stroke patients' after rehabilitation, such as functional improvement and discharge destination, length of stay (LOS), and complication rate. A retrospective study was conducted on 123 consecutive patients who were admitted to The Prince Charles Hospital Rehabilitation Unit from January 2011 to December 2012 with clinically defined stroke syndromes. Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score was used to measure the functional improvement. Anemia is defined by using the World Health Organization's criteria (hemoglobin concentration in men types of stroke were all comparable in both anemic and nonanemic groups. It was found that, when selecting only the patients with ischemic stroke for comparison (103 patients), there was a significantly higher FIM score improvement (discharge FIM - admission FIM) in nonanemic group (P = .042). FIM efficiency (FIM change/LOS) was also significantly higher in the nonanemic group (P = .027). Higher percentage of patients were discharged home in nonanemic group (94.3% versus 73.3%, P = .006). In addition, higher rate of complications was found in anemic group (60% versus 39%, P = .049). Anemia appears to have a significant effect on the functional improvement and discharge outcomes for patients who had an ischemic stroke. Anemia may also increase the complication rate and affect the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation for those patients. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The importance of rehabilitation nursing care of stroke patiens

    OpenAIRE

    Drahošová, Radka

    2010-01-01

    ANOTATION Author: Marie Kynštová Institution: Ústav sociálního lékařství LF UK v Hradci Králové Oddělení ošetřovatelství Title of thesis: The importance of rehabilitation nursing care of stroke patients Thesis' supervisor: Jaroslava Pečenková Number of pages: 121 Number of attachments: 8 Year of examination: 2012 Abstract: This thesis deals with the importance of rehabilitation nursing care of patients with stroke. Theoretical part approaches the issue of stroke and the importance of early tr...

  9. Natural history of post-stroke apathy during acute rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Juliana M.; Granato, Dora A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the natural history of post-stroke apathy, the authors tested 96 patients undergoing acute rehabilitation for stroke using the Apathy Inventory (AI). 28% of patients had apathy, and their AI scores improved on average 1 point by week 2 and 2 points by week 3 with the majority apathetic at discharge. Apathy severity correlated with aphasia, weakness, and impaired cognition, but not with depression. The findings suggest that acute rehabilitation is an optimal setting for clinical trials for post-stroke apathy because apathy is associated with poor outcomes and shows only a small degree of spontaneous improvement. PMID:26185903

  10. Virtual reality applications for motor rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, Sue Ann; Forrest, Gail F; Glendinning, Diana

    2002-01-01

    Hemiparesis is the primary physical impairment underlying functional disability after stroke. A goal of rehabilitation is to enhance motor skill acquisition, which is a direct result of practice. However, frequency and duration of practice are limited in rehabilitation. Virtual reality (VR) is a computer technology that simulates real-life learning while providing augmented feedback and increased frequency, duration, and intensity of practiced tasks. The rate and extent of relearning of motor tasks could affect the duration, effectiveness, and cost of patient care. The purpose of this article is to review the use of VR training for motor rehabilitation after stroke.

  11. Transthyretin Concentrations in Acute Stroke Patients Predict Convalescent Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Naofumi; Imamura, Yuki; Ohmura, Keiko; Ueda, Norihide; Kawabata, Shinji; Furuse, Motomasa; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2017-06-01

    For stroke patients, intensive nutritional management is an important and effective component of inpatient rehabilitation. Accordingly, acute care hospitals must detect and prevent malnutrition at an early stage. Blood transthyretin levels are widely used as a nutritional monitoring index in critically ill patients. Here, we had analyzed the relationship between the transthyretin levels during the acute phase and Functional Independence Measure in stroke patients undergoing convalescent rehabilitation. We investigated 117 patients who were admitted to our hospital with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke from February 2013 to October 2015 and subsequently transferred to convalescent hospitals after receiving acute treatment. Transthyretin concentrations were evaluated at 3 time points as follows: at admission, and 5 and 10 days after admission. After categorizing patients into 3 groups according to the minimum transthyretin level, we analyzed the association between transthyretin and Functional Independence Measure. In our patients, transthyretin levels decreased during the first 5 days after admission and recovered slightly during the subsequent 5 days. Notably, Functional Independence Measure efficiency was significantly associated with the decrease in transthyretin levels during the 5 days after admission. Patients with lower transthyretin levels had poorer Functional Independence Measure outcomes and tended not to be discharged to their own homes. A minimal transthyretin concentration (stroke patients undergoing convalescent rehabilitation. In particular, an early decrease in transthyretin levels suggests restricted rehabilitation efficiency. Accordingly, transthyretin levels should be monitored in acute stroke patients to indicate mid-term rehabilitation prospects. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Current trends in stroke rehabilitation. A review with focus on brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, B B

    2011-03-01

    Current understanding of brain plasticity has lead to new approaches in ischemic stroke rehabilitation. Stroke units that combine good medical and nursing care with task-oriented intense training in an environment that provides confidence, stimulation and motivation significantly improve outcome. Repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are applied in rehabilitation of motor function. The long-term effect, optimal way of stimulation and possibly efficacy in cognitive rehabilitation need evaluation. Methods based on multisensory integration of motor, cognitive, and perceptual processes including action observation, mental training, and virtual reality are being tested. Different approaches of intensive aphasia training are described. Recent data on intensive melodic intonation therapy indicate that even patients with very severe non-fluent aphasia can regain speech through homotopic white matter tract plasticity. Music therapy is applied in motor and cognitive rehabilitation. To avoid the confounding effect of spontaneous improvement, most trials are preformed ≥3 months post stroke. Randomized controlled trials starting earlier after strokes are needed. More attention should be given to stroke heterogeneity, cognitive rehabilitation, and social adjustment and to genetic differences, including the role of BDNF polymorphism in brain plasticity. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Effects of information and training provision in satisfaction of patients and carers in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirrezabal, Aizpea; Duarte, Esther; Rueda, Nohora; Cervantes, Cristina; Marco, Ester; Escalada, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Active information and training improves patient and carer knowledge of stroke and aspects of patient satisfaction, as well as reduces patient depression. To evaluate the effect of a post-stroke information and carer training intervention provided in the rehabilitation hospital setting on patient and carers' satisfaction. Nonrandomized, controlled trial with 241 patients consecutively admitted in a post-stroke rehabilitation unit and their carers. The first 140 underwent a standard rehabilitation program (control group) and the 131 following attended an additional class (intervention group). Satisfaction was assessed with the Satisfaction Pound Scale administered by telephone 6 months after stroke in 74 patients and 85 carers from the control group and in 76 patients and 73 carers from the intervention group. Over 80% of patients in both groups were satisfied with information, care and therapy during hospitalization. The amount of therapy and support at discharge were the issues that arouse greater dissatisfaction. Patient and carers' satisfaction with information, support and accessibility to rehabilitation team after hospital discharge improved after the intervention (p patients and carers improves satisfaction with stroke rehabilitation programs and support received after hospital discharge.

  14. Rehabilitation of the Upper Extremity after Stroke: Current Practice As a Guide for Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylene Schriner PhD, OTR/L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States and a top diagnosis for occupational therapy (OT services among neurological conditions. Academic programs teach OT students neurological frames of reference (FORs to provide a foundation for future practice. To meet accreditation standards, entry-level curricula must reflect current practice and evidence-based interventions. A survey of OT practitioners working in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation was conducted to investigate current clinical practice in a variety of treatment settings. Survey questions probed the use of motor rehabilitation techniques exclusive to one of six neurological FORs: Brunnstrom, Constraint-induced Movement Therapy, Neurodevelopmental Treatment, Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation, Rood, and Task-Oriented. Responses from 167 OT professionals indicated interventions representing all six FORs are currently being utilized in stroke rehabilitation. Techniques from the Task-Oriented and Neurodevelopmental Treatment approaches were used most frequently; however, the Rood–based techniques were used much less than interventions from the other FORs. No single neurological approach was found to dominate practice regardless of the number of years of experience in stroke rehabilitation or years since graduation from an entry-level program. A majority of participants appear to employ techniques from multiple approaches frequently, suggesting contemporary OT practice in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation is eclectic in nature.

  15. Developing a Wearable Ankle Rehabilitation Robotic Device for in-Bed Acute Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Yang, Chung-Yong; Xu, Tao; Harvey, Richard L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2017-06-01

    Ankle movement training is important in motor recovery post stroke and early intervention is critical to stroke rehabilitation. However, acute stroke survivors receive motor rehabilitation in only a small fraction of time, partly due to the lack of effective devices and protocols suitable for early in-bed rehabilitation. Considering the first few months post stroke is critical in stroke recovery, there is a strong need to start motor rehabilitation early, mobilize the ankle, and conduct movement therapy. This study seeks to address the need and deliver intensive passive and active movement training in acute stroke using a wearable ankle robotic device. Isometric torque generation mode under real-time feedback is used to guide patients in motor relearning. In the passive stretching mode, the wearable robotic device stretches the ankle throughout its range of motion to the extreme dorsiflexion forcefully and safely. In the active movement training mode, a patient is guided and motivated to actively participate in movement training through game playing. Clinical testing of the wearable robotic device on 10 acute stroke survivors over 12 sessions of feedback-facilitated isometric torque generation, and passive and active movement training indicated that the early in-bed rehabilitation could have facilitated neuroplasticity and helped improve motor control ability.

  16. Physical Therapists' Guideline Adherence on Early Mobilization and Intensity of Practice at Dutch Acute Stroke Units A Country-Wide Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, Nicoline M.; van der Wees, Philip J.; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Clinical practice guidelines for patients with stroke recommend early stroke rehabilitation at acute hospital stroke units. The present study aimed to (1) explore the organization of early stroke rehabilitation; (2) investigate current practice with respect to early

  17. Spatial cognitive rehabilitation and motor recovery after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, A.M.; Muzaffar, Tufail

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Stroke rehabilitation needs to take major steps forward to reduce functional disability for survivors. In this article, we suggest that spatial retraining might greatly increase the efficiency and efficacy of motor rehabilitation, directly addressing the burden and cost of paralysis after stroke. Recent findings Combining motor and cognitive treatment may be practical, as well as addressing needs after moderate–to-severe stroke. Spatial neglect could suppress motor recovery and reduce motor learning, even when patients receive appropriate rehabilitation to build strength, dexterity, and endurance. Spatial neglect rehabilitation acts to promote motor as well as visual-perceptual recovery. These findings, and previous underemphasized studies, make a strong case for combining spatial neglect treatment with traditional exercise training. Spatial neglect therapies might also help people who cannot participate in intensive movement therapies because of limited strength and endurance after stroke. Summary Spatial retraining, currently used selectively after right brain stroke, may be broadly useful after stroke to promote rapid motor recovery. PMID:25364954

  18. Stroke treatment outcomes in hospitals with and without Stroke Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Ignacio García, E; Mira Solves, J J; Ollero Ortiz, A; Vidal de Francisco, D; López-Mesonero, L; Bestué, M; Albertí, O; Acebrón, F; Navarro Soler, I M

    2017-10-23

    Organisational capacity in terms of resources and care circuits to shorten response times in new stroke cases is key to obtaining positive outcomes. This study compares therapeutic approaches and treatment outcomes between traditional care centres (with stroke teams and no stroke unit) and centres with stroke units. We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental study (without randomisation of the units analysed) to draw comparisons between 2 centres with stroke units and 4 centres providing traditional care through the neurology department, analysing a selection of agreed indicators for monitoring quality of stroke care. A total of 225 patients participated in the study. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were used to collect patients' evaluations of the service and healthcare received. Centres with stroke units showed shorter response times after symptom onset, both in the time taken to arrive at the centre and in the time elapsed from patient's arrival at the hospital to diagnostic imaging. Hospitals with stroke units had greater capacity to respond through the application of intravenous thrombolysis than centres delivering traditional neurological care. Centres with stroke units showed a better fit to the reference standards for stroke response time, as calculated in the Quick study, than centres providing traditional care through the neurology department. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Socially assistive robotics for post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarić, Maja J; Eriksson, Jon; Feil-Seifer, David J; Winstein, Carolee J

    2007-02-19

    Although there is a great deal of success in rehabilitative robotics applied to patient recovery post stroke, most of the research to date has dealt with providing physical assistance. However, new rehabilitation studies support the theory that not all therapy need be hands-on. We describe a new area, called socially assistive robotics, that focuses on non-contact patient/user assistance. We demonstrate the approach with an implemented and tested post-stroke recovery robot and discuss its potential for effectiveness. We describe a pilot study involving an autonomous assistive mobile robot that aids stroke patient rehabilitation by providing monitoring, encouragement, and reminders. The robot navigates autonomously, monitors the patient's arm activity, and helps the patient remember to follow a rehabilitation program. We also show preliminary results from a follow-up study that focused on the role of robot physical embodiment in a rehabilitation context. We outline and discuss future experimental designs and factors toward the development of effective socially assistive post-stroke rehabilitation robots.

  20. Post-stroke apathy and hypersomnia lead to worse outcomes from acute rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ari L.; Elder, Jessica; Schiff, Nicholas D.; Victor, Jonathan D.; Goldfine, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Apathy and hypersomnia occur after stroke and, by definition, reduce participation in rehabilitation, but their effect on outcome from acute rehabilitation is not known. We performed a retrospective review of 213 patients admitted to a stroke-specialized acute rehabilitation unit in the United States. All patients had ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and no dementia or dependence on others pre-stroke. We diagnosed apathy and hypersomnia using standardized documentation by treating therapists. We used multiple regression analysis to control for overall impairment (combination of strength, cognitive and sensory measures), age, time since stroke, and stroke type (ischemic or hemorrhagic). 44 (21%) of patients had persistent apathy, and 12 (5.6%) had persistent hypersomnia. Both groups were more impaired in cognition, sustained attention, and more likely to be treated for depression. Patients with apathy were 2.4 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 12 points below the mean. Patients with hypersomnia were 10 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 16 points below the mean. These findings indicate that studies to prospectively define these clinical factors and potential confounds using standardized tools are indicated, and if confirmed, justify studies to identify these patients early and develop targeted interventions. PMID:24323716

  1. Post-stroke apathy and hypersomnia lead to worse outcomes from acute rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ari L; Elder, Jessica; Schiff, Nicholas D; Victor, Jonathan D; Goldfine, Andrew M

    2014-04-01

    Apathy and hypersomnia occur after stroke and, by definition, reduce participation in rehabilitation, but their effect on outcome from acute rehabilitation is not known. We performed a retrospective review of 213 patients admitted to a stroke-specialized acute rehabilitation unit in the United States. All patients had ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and no dementia or dependence on others pre-stroke. We diagnosed apathy and hypersomnia using standardized documentation by treating therapists. We used multiple regression analysis to control for overall impairment (combination of strength, cognitive and sensory measures), age, time since stroke, and stroke type (ischemic or hemorrhagic). Forty-four (21%) of the patients had persistent apathy, and 12 (5.6%) had persistent hypersomnia. Both groups were more impaired in cognition, sustained attention, and more likely to be treated for depression. Patients with apathy were 2.4 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 12 points below the mean. Patients with hypersomnia were ten times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 16 points below the mean. These findings indicate that studies to prospectively define these clinical factors and potential confounds using standardized tools are indicated, and if confirmed, justify studies to identify these patients early and develop targeted interventions.

  2. Prevalence of apraxia among patients with a first left hemisphere stroke in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M; Dekker, J; van den Ende, E; Stehmann-Saris, J. C.; Deelman, B. G.

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of apraxia in patients with a first left hemisphere stroke. Subjects. Left hemisphere stroke patients staying at an inpatient care unit of a rehabilitation centre or nursing home and receiving occupational therapy (n = 600). Measures: A short questionnaire on

  3. Prevalence of apraxia among patients with a first left hemisphere stroke in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Ende, E. van den; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Deelman, B.G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of apraxia in patients with a first left hemisphere stroke. SUBJECTS: Left hemisphere stroke patients staying at an inpatient care unit of a rehabilitation centre or nursing home and receiving occupational therapy (n = 600). MEASURES: A short questionnaire on

  4. Place attachment in stroke rehabilitation: A transdisciplinary encounter between cultural geography, environmental psychology and rehabilitation medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nanninga, Christa S.; Meijering, Louise; Schonherr, Marleen C.; Postema, Klaas; Lettinga, Ant T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To increase understanding of stroke survivor's needs to successfully re-establish attachment to meaningful places at home and in the community. Methods: Qualitative research methodology including in-depth interviews with stroke survivors in the clinical, post-discharge and reintegration phases of the rehabilitation process. Results: Participants longed for recovery and domestic places in the clinical phase, for pre-stroke activities and roles in the post-discharge phase, and for reco...

  5. Prevalence of apraxia among patients with a first left hemisphere stroke in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, M; Dekker, J; van den Ende, E; Stehmann-Saris, J C; Deelman, B G

    2000-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of apraxia in patients with a first left hemisphere stroke. Left hemisphere stroke patients staying at an inpatient care unit of a rehabilitation centre or nursing home and receiving occupational therapy (n = 600). A short questionnaire on general patient characteristics and stroke-related aspects was completed by occupational therapists for every left hemisphere stroke patient they treated. A diagnosis of apraxia or nonapraxia was made in every patient, on the basis of a set of clinical criteria. The prevalence of apraxia among 492 first left hemisphere stroke patients in rehabilitation centres was 28% (96/338) and in nursing homes 37% (57/154). No relationship was found between the prevalence of apraxia and age, gender or type of stroke (haemorrhage or infarct). This study shows that approximately one-third of left hemisphere stroke patients has apraxia.

  6. Stroke rehabilitation and patients with multimorbidity: a scoping review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L.A. Nelson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke care presents unique challenges for clinicians, as most strokes occur in the context of other medical diagnoses. An assessment of capacity for implementing “best practice” stroke care found clinicians reporting a strong need for training specific to patient/system complexity and multimorbidity. With mounting patient complexity, there is pressure to implement new models of healthcare delivery for both quality and financial sustainability. Policy makers and administrators are turning to clinical practice guidelines to support decision-making and resource allocation. Stroke rehabilitation programs across Canada are being transformed to better align with the Canadian Stroke Strategy’s Stroke Best Practice Recommendations. The recommendations provide a framework to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based best practices in stroke across the continuum of care. However, given the increasing and emerging complexity of patients with stroke in terms of multimorbidity, the evidence supporting clinical practice guidelines may not align with the current patient population. To evaluate this, electronic databases and gray literature will be searched, including published or unpublished studies of quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methods research designs. Team members will screen the literature and abstract the data. Results will present a numerical account of the amount, type, and distribution of the studies included and a thematic analysis and concept map of the results. This review represents the first attempt to map the available literature on stroke rehabilitation and multimorbidity, and identify gaps in the existing research. The results will be relevant for knowledge users concerned with stroke rehabilitation by expanding the understanding of the current evidence.

  7. Rehabilitation Of Stroke Aphasia: Topics Of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Yadegari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke may result in aphasia, an acquired language disorder which affects receptive and expressive language. The symptoms are observed in the auditory-verbal processing, oral expression, written expression and written language processing. As spoken language is the strongest tool of human communication, loss of it may cause great destructive consequences in the social and personal life of the affected individual. People with aphasia (PWA and their carers seek rehabilitation in an effort to remove or reduce the effects. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs are professional in offering such service. This paper aims at addressing new approaches and current research questions about the factors affecting the therapy. Main points: The issues which aphasia therapy research and reviews have addressed are the ones that are asked frequently in clinical settings and research areas. These include the intensity of treatment, the best post-onset time to start, quality of individualized treatment, efficacy of newly-introduced interventions, and the interventions based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF model with emphasis on activity/participation. Findings: The results of studies have revealed that compact therapy in a short period of time might result in better recovery of aphasia. Studies also indicated that starting treatments very early with intensive programs leads to the best therapy results. Chronic stage is good for some intervention strategies as well; however, the effectiveness of these interventions requires further investigations. Moreover, better treatment results could be attained by tailoring the program to match with individual needs. Manipulation of word frequency, personal relevance, and considering reaction time are among important factors in tailor-made therapies. Besides, the conceptual model of ICF which incorporates impairment (body structure and function, activity and participation

  8. Gamified In-Home Rehabilitation for Stroke Survivors: Analytical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Tamayo-Serrano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A stroke is a life-changing event that may end up as a disability, with repercussions on the patient’s quality of life. Stroke rehabilitation therapies are helpful to regain some of the patient’s lost functionality. However, in practice stroke patients may suffer from a gradual loss of motivation. Gamified systems are used to increase user motivation, hence, gamified elements have been implemented into stroke rehabilitation therapies in order to improve patients’ engagement and adherence. This review work focuses on selecting and analyzing developed and validated gamified stroke rehabilitation systems published between 2009 and 2017 to identify the most important features of these systems. After extensive research, 32 articles have met the selection criteria, resulting in a total of 28 unique works. The works were analyzed and a total of 20 features were identified. The features are explained, making emphasis on the works that implement them extensively. Finally, a classification of features based on objectives is proposed, which was used to identify the relationships between features and implementation gaps. It was found that there is a tendency to develop low-cost solutions as in-home therapy systems and provide a variety of games. This review allowed the definition of the opportunities for future research direction such as systems addressing the three rehabilitation areas; data analytics to make decisions; motivational content identification based on automatic engagement detection and emotion recognition; and alert systems for patient´s safety.

  9. Neuroplasticity in the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimyan, Michael A.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with stroke exhibit persistent disability after the initial cerebrovascular episode, with motor impairments accounting for most poststroke disability. Exercise and training have long been used to restore motor function after stroke. Better training strategies and therapies to enhance the effects of these rehabilitative protocols are currently being developed for poststroke disability. The advancement of our understanding of the neuroplastic changes associated with poststroke motor impairment and the innate mechanisms of repair is crucial to this endeavor. Pharmaceutical, biological and electrophysiological treatments that augment neuroplasticity are being explored to further extend the boundaries of poststroke rehabilitation. Potential motor rehabilitation therapies, such as stem cell therapy, exogenous tissue engineering and brain–computer interface technologies, could be integral in helping patients with stroke regain motor control. As the methods for providing motor rehabilitation change, the primary goals of poststroke rehabilitation will be driven by the activity and quality of life needs of individual patients. This Review aims to provide a focused overview of neuroplasticity associated with poststroke motor impairment, and the latest experimental interventions being developed to manipulate neuroplasticity to enhance motor rehabilitation. PMID:21243015

  10. Robotic Technologies and Rehabilitation: New Tools for Stroke Patients’ Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Poli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The role of robotics in poststroke patients’ rehabilitation has been investigated intensively. This paper presents the state-of-the-art and the possible future role of robotics in poststroke rehabilitation, for both upper and lower limbs. Materials and Methods. We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, and PeDRO databases using as keywords “robot AND stroke AND rehabilitation.” Results and Discussion. In upper limb robotic rehabilitation, training seems to improve arm function in activities of daily living. In addition, electromechanical gait training after stroke seems to be effective. It is still unclear whether robot-assisted arm training may improve muscle strength, and which electromechanical gait-training device may be the most effective for walking training implementation. Conclusions. In the field of robotic technologies for stroke patients’ rehabilitation we identified currently relevant growing points and areas timely for developing research. Among the growing points there is the development of new easily transportable, wearable devices that could improve rehabilitation also after discharge, in an outpatient or home-based setting. For developing research, efforts are being made to establish the ideal type of treatment, the length and amount of training protocol, and the patient’s characteristics to be successfully enrolled to this treatment.

  11. Robotic Technologies and Rehabilitation: New Tools for Stroke Patients' Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Patrizia; Morone, Giovanni; Rosati, Giulio; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The role of robotics in poststroke patients' rehabilitation has been investigated intensively. This paper presents the state-of-the-art and the possible future role of robotics in poststroke rehabilitation, for both upper and lower limbs. Materials and Methods. We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, and PeDRO databases using as keywords “robot AND stroke AND rehabilitation.” Results and Discussion. In upper limb robotic rehabilitation, training seems to improve arm function in activities of daily living. In addition, electromechanical gait training after stroke seems to be effective. It is still unclear whether robot-assisted arm training may improve muscle strength, and which electromechanical gait-training device may be the most effective for walking training implementation. Conclusions. In the field of robotic technologies for stroke patients' rehabilitation we identified currently relevant growing points and areas timely for developing research. Among the growing points there is the development of new easily transportable, wearable devices that could improve rehabilitation also after discharge, in an outpatient or home-based setting. For developing research, efforts are being made to establish the ideal type of treatment, the length and amount of training protocol, and the patient's characteristics to be successfully enrolled to this treatment. PMID:24350244

  12. Community-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Stroke Survivors' Rehabilitation Participation and Functional Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Xiaojuan; Dai, Hong; Jiang, Bin; Li, Ninghua; Zhao, Xingquan; Hong, Zhen; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based rehabilitation appropriate technique (CRAT) intervention program in increasing rehabilitation participation and improving functional recovery of stroke survivors. This study followed a quasi-experimental design. In each of 5 centers servicing approximately 50,000 individuals, 2 communities were designated as either the intervention or control community. A CRAT intervention program, including 2-year rehabilitation education and 3-month CRAT treatment, was regularly implemented in the intervention communities, whereas there was no special intervention in the control community. Two sampling surveys, at baseline and after intervention, were administered to evaluate the rehabilitation activity undertaken. In intervention communities, stroke survivor's motor function, daily activity, and social activity were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment, using the Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment, Barthel index, and Social Functional Activities Questionnaire. The proportion of individuals participating in rehabilitation-related activity was increased significantly (P rehabilitation (P 0.05). Community-based rehabilitation appropriate technique increases rehabilitation participation rates and enhances motor function, daily activity, and social activity of stroke survivors.

  13. Coding of significant comorbidities and complications for stroke in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joanne; Pfeiffer, Rhonda; Scholten, Ingrid

    2017-09-01

    Comorbidities and complications of stroke have implications for level of care and hospital resources. It is critical, therefore, that hospital morbidity data accurately reflect the prevalence of these additional diagnoses. This study aimed to measure and describe the concordance between stroke clinicians/researchers and medical record coders when recording stroke and related diagnoses. Diagnoses recorded prospectively, according to defined criteria by a clinical research team, were compared with the coding of stroke comorbidities and complications as per the Australian Coding Standards (ACS) from the separations of 100 inpatients from three rehabilitation facilities in South Australia. Percentage agreement, kappa coefficient, sensitivity and specificity values were calculated. Kappa coefficients for agreement of prospective diagnoses with coding ranged from 0.08 to 0.819. The diagnoses with the highest agreement were stroke, aspiration pneumonia (nil cases), aphasia and dysphagia. The diagnoses with the lowest agreement were apraxia, cognitive impairment, constipation and dehydration. Not all stroke comorbidities are represented accurately in hospital morbidity datasets. Education of stroke clinicians about the current ACS may clarify expectations about medical record documentation for coding purposes which in turn may result in more accurate morbidity data and therefore costings for the rehabilitation sector.

  14. Innovative technologies applied to sensorimotor rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, I; Bakhti, K; Coroian, F; van Dokkum, L; Mottet, D; Schweighofer, N; Froger, J

    2014-11-01

    Innovative technologies for sensorimotor rehabilitation after stroke have dramatically increased these past 20 years. Based on a review of the literature on "Medline" and "Web of Science" between 1990 and 2013, we offer an overview of available tools and their current level of validation. Neuromuscular electric stimulation and/or functional electric stimulation are widely used and highly suspected of being effective in upper or lower limb stroke rehabilitation. Robotic rehabilitation has yielded various results in the literature. It seems to have some effect on functional capacities when used for the upper limb. Its effectiveness in gait training is more controversial. Virtual reality is widely used in the rehabilitation of cognitive and motor impairments, as well as posture, with admitted benefits. Non-invasive brain stimulation (rTMS and TDCS) are promising in this indication but clinical evidence of their effectiveness is still lacking. In the same manner, these past five years, neurofeedback techniques based on brain signal recordings have emerged with a special focus on their therapeutic relevance in rehabilitation. Technological devices applied to rehabilitation are revolutionizing our clinical practices. Most of them are based on advances in neurosciences allowing us to better understand the phenomenon of brain plasticity, which underlies the effectiveness of rehabilitation. The acceptation and "real use" of those devices is still an issue since most of them are not easily available in current practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Robotics in Lower-Limb Rehabilitation after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Yue, Zan; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    With the increase in the elderly, stroke has become a common disease, often leading to motor dysfunction and even permanent disability. Lower-limb rehabilitation robots can help patients to carry out reasonable and effective training to improve the motor function of paralyzed extremity. In this paper, the developments of lower-limb rehabilitation robots in the past decades are reviewed. Specifically, we provide a classification, a comparison, and a design overview of the driving modes, training paradigm, and control strategy of the lower-limb rehabilitation robots in the reviewed literature. A brief review on the gait detection technology of lower-limb rehabilitation robots is also presented. Finally, we discuss the future directions of the lower-limb rehabilitation robots.

  16. Robotics in Lower-Limb Rehabilitation after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in the elderly, stroke has become a common disease, often leading to motor dysfunction and even permanent disability. Lower-limb rehabilitation robots can help patients to carry out reasonable and effective training to improve the motor function of paralyzed extremity. In this paper, the developments of lower-limb rehabilitation robots in the past decades are reviewed. Specifically, we provide a classification, a comparison, and a design overview of the driving modes, training paradigm, and control strategy of the lower-limb rehabilitation robots in the reviewed literature. A brief review on the gait detection technology of lower-limb rehabilitation robots is also presented. Finally, we discuss the future directions of the lower-limb rehabilitation robots.

  17. Orodental status and medical problems of stroke inpatients undergoing rehabilitation at a rehabilitation hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Omichi, Shiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Many stroke patients may have oral problems and systemic diseases, but clinical information on treatment provided to stroke patients for dental problems during inpatient rehabilitation is rare. The objective of this study was to research stroke inpatients' requirements for dental treatment and the accompanying risks. We included 165 stroke patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation at Morinomiya Hospital during the year 2010 and researched the causes of stroke and the patients' orodental status, underlying diseases, antithrombotic drugs prescribed and special considerations or difficulties in the treatment. Cerebral infarction was the most common causes of stroke. Many patients had hypertension, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and 54.5% had been prescribed antithrombotic drugs. Dentists diagnosed 57.0% patients with untreated dental cavities. Approximately 30% did not use dentures despite having a requirement. In total, 142 patients underwent dental treatment including periodontal treatment, prosthetic treatment and tooth extraction under management of circulation and haemostasis such as monitoring vital signs and surgical splints in cases of the difficult extraction. The current study revealed a high requirement for dental treatment among stroke patients and demonstrated the effectiveness of performing dental treatment during inpatient rehabilitation of these patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Early versus late rehabilitation for stroke survivors: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshiur Rahman Khasru

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the optimum time of rehabilitation initiation after stroke in terms of disabilities, mobility and fall risk assessment. Data were collected prospectively at seven tertiary level health care centers in Bangladesh during the 36 months period from 2013 to 2016. All respondents were divided into four groups based on the initiation of rehabilitation as: a 0-24 hours, b 25-72 hours, c 4-7 days and d 8-60 days. Results show that significant improvement on stroke recovery, disabilities reduction, improvement in mobility restriction and reduction of fall risks in all the four groups but more improvement was observed in 0-24 hour’s group during follow-up after 3 and 12 weeks. On multinomial logistic regression analysis, the independent factors shows the mobility restriction and fall risk were more in the younger patients, male gender, married, hemorrhagic lesion and bilateral stroke.

  19. Action research in rehabilitation with chronic stroke recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene; Bundgaard, Tina H; Zeeman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    for these patients. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this project is to describe the use of a specialized neuroplastic approach in combination with an already existing training program. METHODS: The project is designed as an action research project concerning four participants with chronic stroke. Through ten intervention......BACKGROUND: Chronic stroke patients are primarily referred to general rehabilitation, rather than to specific neurorehabilitation. Currently, there are no Danish clinical guidelines for chronic stroke, but recent research in neuroplasticity has contributed to possible rehabilitation interventions......, a neuroplastic focus has been added to their group training program including daily home training. Participants were tested before and after the intervention with MAS, DGI, 6MWT, SSQLS. RESULTS: All four participants improved their functional levels and their quality of life following the intervention...

  20. Evaluation of evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Persson, Dennis; Nygren, Carita

    2010-01-01

    therapy intervention related to the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within stroke rehabilitation. Design: Systematic searches of research studies published in English during 2000-2007 in peer-reviewed journals were undertaken. Thirty-nine articles and one Cochrane review were...... after rehabilitation. There is also considerable evidence for the use of everyday life occupations in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy was evaluated as an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation improving outcomes in everyday life occupations including activities of daily living (ADL......) and participation. Discussion: As research of relevance for the profession to a large extent includes qualitative research it gives rise to reflection on including more tools than the evidence hierarchy while evaluating evidence within occupational therapy....

  1. A review: Motor rehabilitation after stroke with control based on human intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Xu, Guanghua; Xie, Jun; Chen, Chaoyang

    2018-02-01

    Strokes are a leading cause of acquired disability worldwide, and there is a significant need for novel interventions and further research to facilitate functional motor recovery in stroke patients. This article reviews motor rehabilitation methods for stroke survivors with a focus on rehabilitation controlled by human motor intent. The review begins with the neurodevelopmental principles of motor rehabilitation that provide the neuroscientific basis for intuitively controlled rehabilitation, followed by a review of methods allowing human motor intent detection, biofeedback approaches, and quantitative motor rehabilitation assessment. Challenges for future advances in motor rehabilitation after stroke using intuitively controlled approaches are addressed.

  2. Gait post-stroke: Pathophysiology and rehabilitation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaert, C; Vasa, R; Frykberg, G E

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed neural control and biomechanical description of gait in both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects. In addition, we reviewed most of the gait rehabilitation strategies currently in use or in development and observed their principles in relation to recent pathophysiology of post-stroke gait. In both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects, motor control is organized on a task-oriented basis using a common set of a few muscle modules to simultaneously achieve body support, balance control, and forward progression during gait. Hemiparesis following stroke is due to disruption of descending neural pathways, usually with no direct lesion of the brainstem and cerebellar structures involved in motor automatic processes. Post-stroke, improvements of motor activities including standing and locomotion are variable but are typically characterized by a common postural behaviour which involves the unaffected side more for body support and balance control, likely in response to initial muscle weakness of the affected side. Various rehabilitation strategies are regularly used or in development, targeting muscle activity, postural and gait tasks, using more or less high-technology equipment. Reduced walking speed often improves with time and with various rehabilitation strategies, but asymmetric postural behaviour during standing and walking is often reinforced, maintained, or only transitorily decreased. This asymmetric compensatory postural behaviour appears to be robust, driven by support and balance tasks maintaining the predominant use of the unaffected side over the initially impaired affected side. Based on these elements, stroke rehabilitation including affected muscle strengthening and often stretching would first need to correct the postural asymmetric pattern by exploiting postural automatic processes in various particular motor tasks secondarily beneficial to gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Virtual reality in stroke rehabilitation: still more virtual than real.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, J H; Lennon, S; Basford, J R; McDonough, S M

    2007-07-30

    To assess the utility of virtual reality (VR) in stroke rehabilitation. The Medline, Proquest, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsychInfo databases were electronically searched from inception/1980 to February 2005, using the keywords: Virtual reality, rehabilitation, stroke, physiotherapy/physical therapy and hemiplegia. Articles that met the study's inclusion criteria were required to: (i) be published in an English language peer reviewed journal, (ii) involve the use of VR in a stroke rehabilitation setting; and (iii) report impairment and/or activity oriented outcome measures. Two assessors independently assessed each study's quality using the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) grading system. Eleven papers met the inclusion criteria: Five addressed upper limb rehabilitation, three gait and balance, two cognitive interventions, and one both upper and lower limb rehabilitation. Three were judged to be AACPDM Level I/Weak, two Level III/Weak, three Level IV/Weak and three Level V quality of evidence. All articles involved before and after interventions; three randomized controlled trials obtained statistical significance, the remaining eight studies found VR-based therapy to be beneficial. None of the studies reported any significant adverse effects. VR is a potentially exciting and safe tool for stroke rehabilitation but its evidence base is too limited by design and power issues to permit a definitive assessment of its value. Thus, while the findings of this review are generally positive, the level of evidence is still weak to moderate, in terms of research quality. Further study in the form of rigorous controlled studies is warranted.

  4. Inertial Sensing Based Assessment Methods to Quantify the Effectiveness of Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ta Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In clinical settings, traditional stroke rehabilitation evaluation methods are subjectively scored by occupational therapists, and the assessment results vary individually. To address this issue, this study aims to develop a stroke rehabilitation assessment system by using inertial measurement units. The inertial signals from the upper extremities were acquired, from which three quantitative indicators were extracted to reflect rehabilitation performance during stroke patients’ movement examination, i.e., shoulder flexion. Both healthy adults and stroke patients were recruited to correlate the proposed quantitative evaluation indices and traditional rehab assessment scales. Especially, as a unique feature of the study the weight for each of three evaluation indicators was estimated by the least squares method. The quantitative results demonstrate the proposed method accurately reflects patients’ recovery from pre-rehabilitation, and confirm the feasibility of applying inertial signals to evaluate rehab performance through feature extraction. The implemented assessment scheme appears to have the potential to overcome some shortcomings of traditional assessment methods and indicates rehab performance correctly.

  5. Rehabilitation Robots: Concepts and Applications in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi-Pajouh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Robotics is a tool to assist human in different applications from industry to medicine. There are many reasons that human tends to use these machines. They are very reliable in repetitive, high precision, preprogrammed and high risk jobs in which human is not too good enough. In medicine, robotic applications are evolving so fast that in near future nobody can imagine a surgery without a robot involved. In Rehabilitation we have the same scenario; there are commercialized robots to assist disable people to eat and perform daily activities. There are also clinical rehabilitation robots which can train handicaps. They can help subjects as a passive tool that improves low level impairments such as rigidity. On the other hand robots can train brain as an active tool to have a better movement again. We will see how robots can help therapist to apply repetitive passive movements in quadriplegic subject (i.e. in Brunnstrom stages 1 to 3. On the other hand they can teach subjects how to complete a task in an active manner (i.e. in stages 5 and 6 which can facilitate neuroplasticity. There are different robots designed for different organs; for example rehabilitation of upper extremities (e.g. Gloreha or lower extremities (e.g. Lokomat. There are also exoskeleton robots to help subjects to grip objects and perform ADLs easily (e.g. Bioservo or help paraplegic patient to walk again (e.g. Rewalk. In this talk, we will also discuss about how robots are helping rehab specialist to improve standard protocols. For example we will show how action observation therapy, bimanual therapy, assistive active therapy, proprioceptive facilitation and passive mobilization therapy are realized using an upper extremity rehabilitation robot. Robotics is the future of technology and rehabilitation needs this technology. Be part of this technology!

  6. Rehabilitation Robots: Concepts and Applications in Stroke Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi-Pajouh

    2017-01-01

    Robotics is a tool to assist human in different applications from industry to medicine. There are many reasons that human tends to use these machines. They are very reliable in repetitive, high precision, preprogrammed and high risk jobs in which human is not too good enough. In medicine, robotic applications are evolving so fast that in near future nobody can imagine a surgery without a robot involved. In Rehabilitation we have the same scenario; there are commercialized robots to assist dis...

  7. The mirror neuron system in post-stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Different treatments for stroke patients have been proposed; among them the mirror therapy and motion imagery lead to functional recovery by providing a cortical reorganization. Up today the basic concepts of the current literature on mirror neurons and the major findings regarding the use of mirror therapy and motor imagery as potential tools to promote reorganization and functional recovery in post-stroke patients. Bibliographic research was conducted based on publications over the past thirteen years written in English in the databases Scielo, Pubmed/MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge. The studies showed how the interaction among vision, proprioception and motor commands promotes the recruitment of mirror neurons, thus providing cortical reorganization and functional recovery of post-stroke patients. We conclude that the experimental advances on Mirror Neurons will bring new rational therapeutic approaches to post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:24134862

  8. Length of Stay in In-Patient Rehabilitation after Stroke in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loganathan Venkatachalm

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the factors predicting length of stay in a stroke patient rehabilitation unit at Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC in Qatar. The medical rehabilitation data of 100 stroke patients discharged from a 15-bed inpatient rehabilitation unit (IPRU were collected retrospectively from medical records during the period from September 2004 to April 2007. A questionnaire was developed, and variables included in the study were age of the patient, length of stay in acute care (LOSa, length of stay in rehabilitation (LOSr, functional independence measure on admission and discharge (FIMa and FIMd, modified disability scale, and modified mobility scale. Patients were grouped by impairments defined by cause as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and right or left body side deficit. A significant negative correlation was observed between LOSr and FIMa (r = −0.44, p = 0.00, and positive correlation between LOSr and LOSa (r = 0.37, p = 0.00. There was no correlation between LOSr and FIMd (r = −0.03, p= 0.76. We observed that low admission FIMa and FIMd were related to extended LOS in both acute and IPRU. Multivariate regression analysis was performed by taking age, LOSa, cause of hemorrhage or ischemia, and FIMa as independent variables, and LOSr as dependent variable. The model could explain only 26% variation for LOSr. This study supports the hypothesis of an association between LOSr, LOSa, and FIMa. Further research is needed to confirm the results of this and other similar studies.

  9. CURRENT PRINCIPLES OF COMPLEX REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH STROKE CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Nemkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to an urgent issue of modern pediatrics and neurology — complex treatment of stroke consequences in children. The article details etiological aspects, pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical peculiarities of stroke consequences in children, the primary among which are asthenic syndrome (73–86% of the patients, movement disorders (33–58%, cognitive disorders (60%, paroxysmal conditions (30%, sensory disorders (14%, emotional-volitional and behavioral disorders (17–38%, vegetative dysfunction syndrome (60–74%, pain syndrome (53–74% and syncopal conditions (12%. The article details the main spheres of complex rehabilitation of children with stroke consequences, including use of innovative medical rehabilitation technologies — kinesitherapy, dynamic proprioceptive correction, mechanotherapy using robotic systems, physiotherapy and drug correction. The article demonstrates that diagnosis and treatment of stroke consequences in children is a difficult problem, which requires a differential complex approach in order to improve effectiveness of both drug therapy and rehabilitation and quality of life of the patients.

  10. Predicting Recovery Potential for Individual Stroke Patients Increases Rehabilitation Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Cathy M; Byblow, Winston D; Ackerley, Suzanne J; Barber, P Alan; Smith, Marie-Claire

    2017-04-01

    Several clinical measures and biomarkers are associated with motor recovery after stroke, but none are used to guide rehabilitation for individual patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of upper limb predictions in stroke rehabilitation, by combining clinical measures and biomarkers using the Predict Recovery Potential (PREP) algorithm. Predictions were provided for patients in the implementation group (n=110) and withheld from the comparison group (n=82). Predictions guided rehabilitation therapy focus for patients in the implementation group. The effects of predictive information on clinical practice (length of stay, therapist confidence, therapy content, and dose) were evaluated. Clinical outcomes (upper limb function, impairment and use, independence, and quality of life) were measured 3 and 6 months poststroke. The primary clinical practice outcome was inpatient length of stay. The primary clinical outcome was Action Research Arm Test score 3 months poststroke. Length of stay was 1 week shorter for the implementation group (11 days; 95% confidence interval, 9-13 days) than the comparison group (17 days; 95% confidence interval, 14-21 days; P =0.001), controlling for upper limb impairment, age, sex, and comorbidities. Therapists were more confident ( P =0.004) and modified therapy content according to predictions for the implementation group ( P rehabilitation efficiency after stroke without compromising clinical outcome. URL: http://anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12611000755932. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinases in Patients With Stroke During Intensive Rehabilitation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feifei; Rodriguez, Susana; Buxo, Xavi; Morancho, Anna; Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Carrera, Ana; Bustamante, Alejandro; Giralt, Dolors; Montaner, Joan; Martinez, Carmen; Bori, Immaculada; Rosell, Anna

    2016-11-01

    To study plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as potential markers of recovery during intensive rehabilitation therapy (IRT) after stroke. Prospective and descriptive 3-month follow-up study. Rehabilitation unit and research center. Patients with first-ever ischemic stroke (n=15) enrolled to IRT (≥3h/d and 5d/wk) and healthy volunteers (n=15) (N=30). Not applicable. The primary outcome was to measure plasma MMP3, MMP12, and MMP13 levels and evaluate potential associations with motor/functional scales using a battery of tests (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin scale, Barthel Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Functional Ambulation Categories, Medical Research Council scale, Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory, and the 10-m walk test) before IRT and at 1- and 3-month follow-ups. The secondary outcome was to evaluate the use of these MMPs as biomarkers as predictors of patient's outcome. MMP levels remained stable during the study period and were similar to those in the healthy volunteer group. However, baseline MMP12 and MMP13 levels were strongly associated with stroke severity and were found to be elevated in those patients with the poorest outcomes. Interestingly, plasma MMP3 was independent of baseline stroke characteristics but was found to be increased in patients with better motor/functional recovery and in patients with larger improvements during rehabilitation. MMPs might act as biologic markers of recovery during rehabilitation therapy related to their roles in both injury and tissue remodeling. Future confirmatory investigations in multicenter studies are warranted by our data. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. External validity of post-stroke interventional gait rehabilitation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafri, Michal; Dickstein, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Gait rehabilitation is a major component of stroke rehabilitation, and is supported by extensive research. The objective of this review was to examine the external validity of intervention studies aimed at improving gait in individuals post-stroke. To that end, two aspects of these studies were assessed: subjects' exclusion criteria and the ecological validity of the intervention, as manifested by the intervention's technological complexity and delivery setting. Additionally, we examined whether the target population as inferred from the titles/abstracts is broader than the population actually represented by the reported samples. We systematically researched PubMed for intervention studies to improve gait post-stroke, working backwards from the beginning of 2014. Exclusion criteria, the technological complexity of the intervention (defined as either elaborate or simple), setting, and description of the target population in the titles/abstracts were recorded. Fifty-two studies were reviewed. The samples were exclusive, with recurrent stroke, co-morbidities, cognitive status, walking level, and residency being major reasons for exclusion. In one half of the studies, the intervention was elaborate. Descriptions of participants in the title/abstract in almost one half of the studies included only the diagnosis (stroke or comparable terms) and its stage (acute, subacute, and chronic). The external validity of a substantial number of intervention studies about rehabilitation of gait post-stroke appears to be limited by exclusivity of the samples as well as by deficiencies in ecological validity of the interventions. These limitations are not accurately reflected in the titles or abstracts of the studies.

  13. Non-invasive brain stimulation in early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesneag, A V; Popa, L; Stan, A D

    2015-01-01

    The new tendency in rehabilitation involves non-invasive tools that, if applied early after stroke, promote neurorecovery. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation may correct the disruption of cortical excitability and effectively contribute to the restoration of movement and speech. The present paper analyses the results of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) trials, highlighting different aspects related to the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation frequency, transcranial direct current stimulation polarity, the period and stimulation places in acute and subacute ischemic strokes. The risk of adverse events, the association with motor or language recovery specific training, and the cumulative positive effect evaluation are also discussed.

  14. The role of nursing in the rehabilitation of stroke survivors: an extended theoretical account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkevold, Marit

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a critique and theoretical extension of a work that sought to describe the contribution of nurses to stroke rehabilitation. At the time, the role of nursing was considered important but therapeutically nonspecific. Stroke nursing research has increased significantly and so has research focusing on the patient experiences of the adjustment and rehabilitation processes following a stroke. These developments provide significant new insights that may refine and extend the original understanding of the role of nursing in stroke rehabilitation. This article proposes an extended theoretical framework of the role of nursing in stroke recovery and rehabilitation.

  15. Exercise rehabilitation immediately following ischemic stroke exacerbates inflammatory injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengwu; Pendy, John T; Ding, Jessie N; Peng, Changya; Li, Xiaorong; Shen, Jiamei; Wang, Sainan; Geng, Xiaokun

    2017-06-01

    The rehabilitative benefits of physical exercise after stroke appear to be contingent upon exercise initiation timing. The present study assessed the hypothesis that very early post-stroke exercise would amplify cellular stress and increases expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, while exercise initiated later would limit the inflammation associated with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Adult rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and subsequently assigned to one of seven groups: one sham injury control group, three stroke groups subjected to exercise initiated after 6, 24 hours, or 3 days of reperfusion, and three stroke groups not subjected to exercise. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were examined 3 and 24 hours after completion of exercise regimens (and at corresponding time points in non-exercise controls). Heat shock protein-70 (Hsp70) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression levels were also compared between exercise and non-exercise groups. Early post-stroke exercise was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, TNF-α, and IL-1β) and increased expression of cell stress markers (Hsp70 and HIF-1α). Exercise initiated after 3 days of reperfusion was associated with decreased expression of these molecules. Post-stroke exercise, if too early, may result in elevated levels of cell stress and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may amplify the tissue damage associated with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The results shed light on the manner in which exercise initiation timing may affect post-stroke rehabilitation.

  16. Perceived Unmet Rehabilitation Needs 1 Year After Stroke: An Observational Study From the Swedish Stroke Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullberg, Teresa; Zia, Elisabet; Petersson, Jesper; Norrving, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Met care demands are key aspects in poststroke quality of care. This study aimed to identify baseline predictors and 12-month factors that were associated with perceived unmet rehabilitation needs 1 year poststroke. Data on patients who were independent in activities of daily living, hospitalized for acute stroke during 2008 to 2010, and followed up 1 year poststroke through a postal questionnaire were obtained from the Swedish stroke register. Patients reporting fulfilled rehabilitation needs were compared with those with unmet needs (Chi square test). The study included 37 383 patients, 46% female. At 12 months, 8019 (21.5%) patients reported unmet rehabilitation needs. Compared with those with met rehabilitation needs, patients reporting unmet rehabilitation needs were older (75.4 versus 72.4 years; Prehabilitation needs at 12 months in an age-adjusted model were severe stroke (odds ratio [OR]=3.04; confidence interval [CI]: 2.39-3.87), prior stroke (OR=1.63; CI: 1.53-1.75), female sex (OR=1.14; CI: 1.07-1.20), diabetes mellitus (OR=1.24; CI: 1.15-1.32), stroke other than ischemic (OR=1.26; CI: 1.20-1.32), and atrial fibrillation (OR=1.19; CI: 1.12-1.27). Unfulfilled rehabilitation needs 1 year poststroke are common and associated with high age, dependency, pain, and depression. Long-term follow-up systems should, therefore, be comprehensive and address multiple domains of poststroke problems, rather than having a single-domain focus. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Care path of person with stroke: from onset to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana da Conceição Alves; Martins, Maria Manuela Ferreira Pereira da Silva; Schoeller, Soraia Dornelles; Matos, Leandro Oliveira de

    2017-01-01

    to describe the care path of the person with stroke goes through and to identify the important events in this path. qualitative descriptive exploratory research, using the semi-structured interview technique based on Meleis's Middle-Range Theory. The sample was composed of 13 people who became dependent after a stroke and were admitted to two hospital units in the region of Vale do Ave, Portugal. Data were collected between January and October 2013. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. The data revealed that the person's care path goes from recognition of the symptoms to preparation for hospital discharge. Adapting to the new situation of dependence brings the need for new competencies. The research aims to contribute to the improvement of nursing care regarding care for people with stroke including onset, recovery and rehabilitation, and home care. Descrever o percurso da pessoa com Acidente Vascular Encefálico e identificar os acontecimentos significativos neste percurso. Abordagem qualitativa e natureza exploratória- descritiva, valeu-se da técnica de entrevista semiestruturada baseada na Teoria de Médio Alcance de Meleis. Participaram 13 pessoas que se tornaram dependentes devido à Acidente Vascular Encefálico e recorreram a duas Unidades da região do Vale do Ave, Portugal. A colheita de dados deu-se durante Janeiro a Outubro de 2013. Para análise dos dados foi utilizada a análise de conteúdo. Os dados revelaram que o trajeto da pessoa vai desde o reconhecimento dos sintomas até à preparação da alta hospitalar. A dependência traz a necessidade de adquirir competências para se adaptar à nova situação. Espera-se contribuir para a melhoria dos cuidados de enfermagem no atendimento das pessoas acometidas com Acidente Vascular Encefálico, desde o acometimento, recuperação e reabilitação, até aos cuidados domiciliares.

  18. Postacute Stroke Rehabilitation Utilization: Are There Differences between Rural-Urban Patients and Taxonomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Cowper, Diane C.; Tang, Yuhong; Litt, Eric; Wilson, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between Veterans Affairs (VA) stroke patients' poststroke rehabilitation utilization and their residential settings by using 2 common rural-urban taxonomies. Methods: This retrospective study included all VA stroke inpatients in 2001 and 2002. Rehabilitation utilization referred to rehabilitation therapy received…

  19. Iterative learning control for electrical stimulation and stroke rehabilitation

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Chris T; Burridge, Jane H; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Meadmore, Katie L

    2015-01-01

    Iterative learning control (ILC) has its origins in the control of processes that perform a task repetitively with a view to improving accuracy from trial to trial by using information from previous executions of the task. This brief shows how a classic application of this technique – trajectory following in robots – can be extended to neurological rehabilitation after stroke. Regaining upper limb movement is an important step in a return to independence after stroke, but the prognosis for such recovery has remained poor. Rehabilitation robotics provides the opportunity for repetitive task-oriented movement practice reflecting the importance of such intense practice demonstrated by conventional therapeutic research and motor learning theory. Until now this technique has not allowed feedback from one practice repetition to influence the next, also implicated as an important factor in therapy. The authors demonstrate how ILC can be used to adjust external functional electrical stimulation of patients’ mus...

  20. Use of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation in the transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    Relevance: Stroke is one of the major chronic diseases leading to long-term disability. Stroke treatment has improved and in-hospital stays have been reduced, leading to increasing emphasis on home-based rehabilitation. The transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation is critical, as vital...... are vague. Purpose: The purpose was to examine the use of outcome measures used in clinical practice in the transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation. Methods/Analysis: A questionnaire were sent to the heads of 26 hospitals discharging patients with stroke and 52 municipalities' health services...... rehabilitation, especially in the transition between hospital and home-based rehabilitation. A nationwide, interprofessional and intersectional group is currently discussing recommendations for the use of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation. Results from this group will be presented at the conference...

  1. Dysarthria following stroke: the patient's perspective on management and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Marian C; Clark, Alexander M; Dickson, Sylvia; Paton, Gillian; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2011-10-01

    To explore the perceptions of people with stroke-related dysarthria in relation to the management and rehabilitation of dysarthria. Qualitative semi-structured interviews. Community setting Subjects: Twenty-four people with an acquired dysarthria as a result of a stroke in the previous three years. All were living at home at the time of the interview. None exhibited a co-existing impairment (for example, aphasia, apraxia or cognitive impairment) that might have contributed to their communicative experiences. Participants described the considerable efforts they made to maximize their communicative effectiveness prior to, and during, communicative interactions. Activities described included careful articulation and vocal projection as well as more inconspicuous strategies including pre-planning interactions, focused, effortful speech and word substitution. Communication was facilitated by a range of strategies including drafting, rehearsal, manoeuvring and ongoing monitoring and repair. Self-led speech rehabilitation activities were functionally based and often undertaken regularly. Some novel reading-aloud and speaking-aloud activities were described. The quantity and nature of inconspicuous, internalized, cognitive activities people with dysarthria engage in to maximize their communicative effectiveness should be considered in evaluating the impact of dysarthria following stroke. Focusing upon externally observable characteristics alone is insufficient. Challenging, functionally relevant, patient-focused activities, materials and targets are more likely to be perceived by the patient as relevant and worthwhile and are thus more likely to ensure adherence to recommended rehabilitation activities.

  2. Place attachment in stroke rehabilitation: a transdisciplinary encounter between cultural geography, environmental psychology and rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Christa S; Meijering, Louise; Schönherr, Marleen C; Postema, Klaas; Lettinga, Ant T

    2015-01-01

    To increase understanding of stroke survivor's needs to successfully re-establish attachment to meaningful places at home and in the community. Qualitative research methodology including in-depth interviews with stroke survivors in the clinical, post-discharge and reintegration phases of the Rehabilitation process. Participants longed for recovery and domestic places in the clinical phase, for pre-stroke activities and roles in the post-discharge phase, and for recognition and a sense of belonging in the reintegration phase. The participants' selves had changed, while the spatial and social contexts of their homes had remained the same. Their spatial scope became smaller in both a social and a geographical sense. It was difficult to achieve a feeling of being at home in their bodies and own living environments again. The complexities that needed to be dealt with to engage with the outside world, turned participants unintentionally inwards. In particular, family members of participants with cognitive problems, longed for support and recognition in dealing with the changed personality of their spouses. Rehabilitation should put greater effort into supporting stroke survivors and their families in home-making and community reintegration processes, and help them to re-own and renegotiate their disabled bodies and changed identities in real life. Implications for Rehabilitation The experienced self-body split, identity confusion and related mourning process should be foregrounded in the post-discharge phase rather than functional recovery, in order to help stroke survivors understand and come to terms with their changed bodies and selves. In the post-discharge and reintegration phases stroke survivors should be coached in rebuilding meaningful relations to their bodies, home and communities again. This home-making process should start at real-life sites where stroke survivors wish to (inter)act.

  3. Use of a pneumatic glove for hand rehabilitation following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Lauri; Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Jia, Yicheng; Toro, Maria L; Kenyon, Robert V; Kamper, Derek G

    2009-01-01

    Hand impairment is common following stroke and is often resistant to traditional therapy methods. Successful interventions have stressed the importance of repeated practice to facilitate rehabilitation. Thus, we have developed a servo-controlled glove to assist extension of individual digits to promote practice of grasp-and-release movements with the hand. This glove, the PneuGlove, permits free movement of the arm throughout its workspace. A novel immersive virtual reality environment was created for training movement in conjunction with the device. Seven stroke survivors with chronic hand impairment participated in 18 training sessions with the PneuGlove over 6 weeks. Overall, subjects displayed a significant 6-point improvement in the upper extremity score on the Fugl-Meyer assessment and this increase was maintained at the evaluation held one month after conclusion of all training (p training of hand movements after stroke.

  4. Psychophysiological responses to robotic rehabilitation tasks in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Domen; Ziherl, Jaka; Olensek, Andrej; Milavec, Maja; Podobnik, Janez; Mihelj, Matjaz; Munih, Marko

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the analysis of four psychophysiological responses in post-stroke upper extremity rehabilitation. The goal was to determine which psychophysiological responses would provide the most reliable information about subjects' psychological states during rehabilitation. Heart rate, skin conductance, respiration, and skin temperature were recorded in a stroke group and a control group during two difficulty levels of a pick-and-place task performed in a virtual environment using a haptic robot and during a cognitive task. Psychophysiological measurements were correlated with results of a self-report questionnaire. All four responses showed significant changes in response to the different tasks. Skin conductance differentiated between the two difficulty levels and was correlated with self-reported arousal in both stroke and control groups. Skin temperature differentiated between the two difficulty levels for the control group, but provided poor results for the stroke group. Heart rate and respiration increased during tasks, but their connection to psychological state was unclear. Results suggest that, of the four measured responses, skin conductance offers the most potential as a psychological state indicator, with other measures providing supplementary information. Psychophysiological measurements could thus be used in closed-loop biocooperative systems that would detect the user's psychological state and change the course of therapy accordingly.

  5. The sensory side of post-stroke motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognini, Nadia; Russo, Cristina; Edwards, Dylan J

    2016-04-11

    Contemporary strategies to promote motor recovery following stroke focus on repetitive voluntary movements. Although successful movement relies on efficient sensorimotor integration, functional outcomes often bias motor therapy toward motor-related impairments such as weakness, spasticity and synergies; sensory therapy and reintegration is implied, but seldom targeted. However, the planning and execution of voluntary movement requires that the brain extracts sensory information regarding body position and predicts future positions, by integrating a variety of sensory inputs with ongoing and planned motor activity. Neurological patients who have lost one or more of their senses may show profoundly affected motor functions, even if muscle strength remains unaffected. Following stroke, motor recovery can be dictated by the degree of sensory disruption. Consequently, a thorough account of sensory function might be both prognostic and prescriptive in neurorehabilitation. This review outlines the key sensory components of human voluntary movement, describes how sensory disruption can influence prognosis and expected outcomes in stroke patients, reports on current sensory-based approaches in post-stroke motor rehabilitation, and makes recommendations for optimizing rehabilitation programs based on sensory stimulation.

  6. Applicability of a motor rehabilitation system in stroke victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Izzadora Souza Carneiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The recovery of stroke patients is long and boring due to the repetitive nature of the exercises used and the length of treatment. Thus, we started using virtual reality as an alternative and, because of its advantages, health professionals are adapting video games for physical therapy. However, there are some limitations, such as the fact that games are designed for entertainment and not for therapeutic purposes. Objective: In order to mitigate gaps in assistive devices for physical therapy, this study describes the development and applicability of a computer support system for motor rehabilitation - Ikapp - in stroke victims. Methods: Twenty-seven stroke patients filled out a socioeconomic questionnaire, tested Ikapp during five minutes and answered a usability and satisfaction questionnaire about handling the tool. The chi-square test was used to analyze any association between sociodemographic factors and the features of the system. Results: The Ikapp system can be an excellent device to assist neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients, as participants questionnaires showed that 85.2% were satisfied in regard to motivation and inclusion of Ikapp in physiotherapy and 77.8% relative to ease of interaction with the tool. Conclusion: The Ikapp system proved to be an easy-to-use and accessible computer support system for patients with functional limitations.

  7. Virtual reality rehabilitation for stroke patients: Recent review and research issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arip, Eza Surya Mohd; Ismail, Waidah; Nordin, Md Jan; Radman, Abduljalil

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is one of the main causes of disability in the world. In order for stroke survivors to reduce their disability, they need to go through a rehabilitation process to regain back their independence and improve their quality of life. To guide patients in their rehabilitation process and improve their receptiveness in performing repetitive exercises, a new rehabilitation training program using Virtual Reality (VR) technology has been introduced. This has attracted many researchers to explore more on VR technology as a new tool for stroke patient's rehabilitation. This paper presents a review on existing VR systems that have been developed for stroke rehabilitation. First, recent VR systems utilized for rehabilitation after stroke are delineated and categorized. Each of these categories concludes with a discussion on limitations and any issues that arise from it. Finally, a concise summary with significant findings and future possibilities in VR rehabilitation research is presented in table format.

  8. Impact of spatial neglect on stroke rehabilitation: evidence from the setting of an inpatient rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peii; Hreha, Kimberly; Kong, Yekyung; Barrett, A M

    2015-08-01

    To examine the impact of spatial neglect on rehabilitation outcome, risk of falls, and discharge disposition in stroke survivors. Inception cohort. Inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF). Individuals with unilateral brain damage after their first stroke (N=108) were assessed at IRF admission and discharge. At admission, 74 of them (68.5%) demonstrated symptoms of spatial neglect as measured using the Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (KF-NAP). Usual and standard IRF care. The FIM, Conley Scale, number of falls, length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition. The greater the severity of spatial neglect (higher KF-NAP scores) at IRF admission and the lower the FIM scores at admission as well as at discharge. Higher KF-NAP scores also correlated with greater LOS and lower FIM improvement rate. The presence of spatial neglect (KF-NAP score>0), but not Conley Scale scores, predicted falls such that participants with spatial neglect fell 6.5 times more often than those without symptoms. More severe neglect, indicated by KF-NAP scores at IRF admission, reduced the likelihood of returning home at discharge. A model that took spatial neglect and other demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors into account predicted home discharge. Rapid FIM improvement during IRF stay and lower annual income level were significant predictors of home discharge. Spatial neglect after a stroke is a prevalent problem and may negatively affect rehabilitation outcome, risk of falls, and LOS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The combined perceptions of people with stroke and their carers regarding rehabilitation needs 1 year after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstam, Lisa; Johansson, Ulla; Guidetti, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to explore the associations between the dyad's (person with stroke and informal caregiver) perception of the person with stroke's rehabilitation needs and stroke severity, personal factors (gender, age, sense of coherence), the use of rehabilitation services...... and qualitative data and analyses. SETTING: Data were mainly collected in the participants' homes. OUTCOME MEASURES: Data were collected through established instruments and open-ended interviews. The dyad's perceptions of the person with stroke's rehabilitation needs were assessed by the persons with stroke......, amount of informal care and caregiver burden. Further, the aim was to explore the personal experience of everyday life changes among persons with stroke and their caregivers and their strategies for handling these 1 year after stroke. DESIGN: A mixed methods design was used combining quantitative...

  10. Malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in a stroke rehabilitation centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, Bas; Brinkman-Zijlker, HG; Dijkstra, PU; Postema, K

    Purpose. To analyse prevalence of malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in stroke rehabilitation patients because little is known about these prevalence's. Stroke patients have an increased risk for developing eating difficulties, feeding dependence and malnutrition because of

  11. Strategies of Daily Living Rehabilitative Activities for Post Stroke Patients at Minia University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, Hend Elham Mohamed; EL-Lateef Mohammad, Zienab Abd; EL-Labban, Abdou Saad Taha; Ahmed, Gahen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation aims to hasten and maximize recovery from stroke by treating the disabilities caused by the stroke. Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of…

  12. Stroke treatment in Stroke Unit: from scientific evidences to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Stornello

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In themanagement of stroke disease, evidences fromthe literature demonstrate that the introduction of stroke units, hospital wards with dedicated beds providing intensive care within 48 hours of symptoms’ onset, produced a real improvement in the outcome, reducing in-hospital fatality cases and increasing the proportion of patients independently living in long term follow-up. Discussion: The article focuses on stroke disease-management, suggesting a stroke integrated approach for the admission of patients on dedicated beds, in order to extend the ‘‘stroke care’’ approach outcomes to as many hospitals as possible in Italy. This approach implies the set up of a stroke network for an effective patients’ stratification according to the severity of the illness at debut; the set up of an integrated team of specialists in hospital management of the acute phase (first 48 hours and a timely rehabilitation treatment. Ultimately the hospital should be organized according to department’s semi-intensive areas in order to assure to the patients, in the early stage of the disease, a timely high intensity care aimed to improve the long term outcome.

  13. Functional gain following rehabilitation of recurrent ischemic stroke in the elderly: experience of a post-acute care rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, E H; Fleissig, Y; Arad, M; Adunsky, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether rehabilitation of patients with recurrent ischemic strokes is associated with functional gain. We studied a total of 919 consecutive post-acute ischemic stroke elderly patients admitted for rehabilitation. 22% out of the patients had recurrent stroke on index day. Functional outcomes of first-ever stroke patients and recurrent ischemic stroke patients were assessed by the Functional Independence Measurement scale (FIM™) at admission and discharge. Data was analyzed by t-test, Chi-square test and by multiple linear regression analysis. There were 716 patients with first ever stroke and 203 patients with recurrent stroke. Total and motor FIM scores at admission and total, motor, gain and Montebello Rehabilitation Factor (RFG) FIM scores at discharge were similar in the two groups. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that age (beta=-0.13, p=0.001) length of stay (beta=0.21, pstroke admitted to rehabilitation ward, showed similar FIM gain scores at discharge, compared with first-ever stroke patients. It is concluded that recurrent stroke should not be considered as adversely affecting the short-term functional outcomes of patients in a post-acute rehabilitation setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A sensorimotor stimulation program for rehabilitation of chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Cristina; Puig, Silvia; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study is that intensive therapy by means of a sensory and motor stimulation program of the upper limb in patients with chronic hemiparesis and severe disability due to stroke increases mobility and sensibility, and improves the use of the affected limb in activities of daily living (ADL). The program consists of 16 sessions of sensory stimulation and functional activity training in the rehabilitation center, and daily sessions of tactile stimulation, mental imaginery and practice of ADL at home, during 8 weeks. An experimental group (EG) of 12 patients followed this program, compared with a control group (CG) of 9 patients under standard rehabilitation. The efficacy of the program was evaluated by Fugl Meyer Assessment (FMA), Motor Activity Log (MAL) and Stroke Impact Scale-16 (SIS-16) scores, and a battery of sensory tests. The results show that in both groups, the motor FMA and the SIS-16 improved during the 8 weeks, this improvement being higher in the EG. Significant improvements were observed for the sensory tests in the EG. The intensive sensorimotor stimulation program for the upper extremity may be an efficacious method for improving function and use of the affected limb in ADL in chronic stroke patients.

  15. Developing complex interventions: lessons learned from a pilot study examining strategy training in acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Dawson, Deirdre R; Whyte, Ellen M; Butters, Meryl A; Dew, Mary Amanda; Grattan, Emily S; Becker, James T; Holm, Margo B

    2014-04-01

    To examine the feasibility of a strategy training clinical trial in a small group of adults with stroke-related cognitive impairments in inpatient rehabilitation, and to explore the impact of strategy training on disability. Non-randomized two-group intervention pilot study. Two inpatient rehabilitation units within an academic health centre. Individuals with a primary diagnosis of acute stroke, who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation and demonstrated cognitive impairments were included. Individuals with severe aphasia; dementia; major depressive disorder, bipolar, or psychotic disorder; recent drug or alcohol abuse; and anticipated length of stay less than five days were excluded. Participants received strategy training or an attention control session in addition to usual rehabilitation care. Sessions in both groups were 30-40 minutes daily, five days per week, for the duration of inpatient rehabilitation. We assessed feasibility through participants' recruitment and retention; research intervention session number and duration; participants' comprehension and engagement; intervention fidelity; and participants' satisfaction. We assessed disability at study admission, inpatient rehabilitation discharge, 3 and 6 months using the Functional Independence Measure. Participants in both groups (5 per group) received the assigned intervention (>92% planned sessions; >94% fidelity) and completed follow-up testing. Strategy training participants in this small sample demonstrated significantly less disability at six months (M (SE) = 117 (3)) than attention control participants (M(SE) = 96 (14); t 8 = 7.87, P = 0.02). It is feasible and acceptable to administer both intervention protocols as an adjunct to acute inpatient rehabilitation, and strategy training shows promise for reducing disability.

  16. Adherence of physical therapy with clinical practice guidelines for the rehabilitation of stroke in an active inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M S, Ajimsha; Kooven, Smithesh; Al-Mudahka, Noora

    2018-03-09

    Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to help practitioners and patients to make decisions about appropriate health care. Clinical practice guideline adherence analysis is the best way to fine tune the best practices in a health care industry with international benchmarks. To assess the physical therapist's adherence to structured stroke clinical practice guidelines in an active inpatient rehabilitation center in Qatar. Department of Physical therapy in the stroke rehabilitation tertiary referral hospital in Qatar. A retrospective chart audit was performed on the clinical records of 216 stroke patients discharged from the active inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit with a diagnosis of stroke in 2016. The audit check list was structured to record the adherence of the assessment, goal settings and the management domains as per the "Physical Therapy After Acute Stroke" (PAAS) guideline. Of the 216 case files identified during the initial search, 127 files were ultimately included in the audit. Overall adherence to the clinical practice guideline was 71%, a comparable rate with the studies analyzing the same in various international health care facilities. Domains which were shared by interdisciplinary teams than managed by physical therapy alone and treatments utilizing sophisticated technology had lower adherence with the guideline. A detailed strength and weakness breakdown were then conducted. This audit provides an initial picture of the current adherence of physical therapy assessment and management with the stroke physical therapy guideline at a tertiary rehabilitation hospital in the state of Qatar. An evaluation of the guideline adherence and practice variations helps to fine tune the physical therapy care to a highest possible standard of practice. Implications for Rehabilitation  • An evaluation of the guideline adherence and practice variations helps to fine tune the rehabilitation care to the highest possible standard

  17. Stroke rehabilitation at home before and after discharge reduced disability and improved quality of life: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Østergaard, Ann; Kjær, Pia; Skerris, Anja; Skou, Christina; Christoffersen, Jane; Seest, Line Skou; Poulsen, Mai Bang; Rønholt, Finn; Overgaard, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate if home-based rehabilitation of inpatients improved outcome compared to standard care. Interventional, randomised, safety/efficacy open-label trial. University hospital stroke unit in collaboration with three municipalities. Seventy-one eligible stroke patients (41 women) with focal neurological deficits hospitalised in a stroke unit for more than three days and in need of rehabilitation. Thirty-eight patients were randomised to home-based rehabilitation during hospitalization and for up to four weeks after discharge to replace part of usual treatment and rehabilitation services. Thirty-three control patients received treatment and rehabilitation following usual guidelines for the treatment of stroke patients. Ninety days post-stroke the modified Rankin Scale score was the primary endpoint. Other outcome measures were the modified Barthel-100 Index, Motor Assessment Scale, CT-50 Cognitive Test, EuroQol-5D, Body Mass Index and treatment-associated economy. Thirty-one intervention and 30 control patients completed the study. Patients in the intervention group achieved better modified Rankin Scale score (Intervention median = 2, IQR = 2-3; Control median = 3, IQR = 2-4; P=0.04). EuroQol-5D quality of life median scores were improved in intervention patients (Intervention median = 0.77, IQR = 0.66-0.79; Control median = 0.66, IQR = 0.56 - 0.72; P=0.03). The total amount of home-based training in minutes highly correlated with mRS, Barthel, Motor Assessment Scale and EuroQol-5D™ scores (P-values ranging from Prehabilitation reduced disability and increased quality of life. Compared to standard care, home-based stroke rehabilitation was more cost-effective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. [The importance of neuronal networks for motor rehabilitation after a stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, F C

    2017-08-01

    Every year in Europe 1.5 million patients suffer a new stroke. Despite the further developments in acute therapy with nationwide stroke units, thrombolysis, thrombectomy and post-acute neurorehabilitation, only a small proportion of patients recover to a satisfactory degree allowing them to return to their normal social and professional life. This makes stroke the main cause of long-term disability with a corresponding impact on patient lives, socioeconomics and the healthcare system. Thus, the concepts of neurorehabilitation have to be extended to enhance the effects of rehabilitative treatment strategies. To achieve this, an understanding of the prediction of the course of recovery, the mechanisms underlying functional recovery and factors influencing recovery have to be enhanced for the development towards patient-tailored precision medicine approaches. A central point towards this is the understanding of stroke as a disease, which not only influences the damaged area but also the associated network. This is crucial for the understanding of the stroke-induced deficits, for prediction of recovery and options for interventional treatment strategies, which can target different areas in this network (e.g. primary motor cortex and secondary motor regions) based on individual factors of the patient. The present article discusses the importance of network alterations for motor neurorehabilitation after a stroke and which novel options, concepts and consequences could arise from this for neurorehabilitation.

  19. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  20. Stochastic Estimation of Arm Mechanical Impedance During Robotic Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Jerome J.; Ferraro, Mark; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Lynch, Daniel; Volpe, Bruce T.; Hogan, Neville

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a stochastic method to estimate the multijoint mechanical impedance of the human arm suitable for use in a clinical setting, e.g., with persons with stroke undergoing robotic rehabilitation for a paralyzed arm. In this context, special circumstances such as hypertonicity and tissue atrophy due to disuse of the hemiplegic limb must be considered. A low-impedance robot was used to bring the upper limb of a stroke patient to a test location, generate force perturbations, and measure the resulting motion. Methods were developed to compensate for input signal coupling at low frequencies apparently due to human–machine interaction dynamics. Data was analyzed by spectral procedures that make no assumption about model structure. The method was validated by measuring simple mechanical hardware and results from a patient's hemiplegic arm are presented. PMID:17436881

  1. Clinical effects of using HEXORR (Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot) for movement therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sasha Blue; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2013-11-01

    The goals of this pilot study were to quantify the clinical benefits of using the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot for hand rehabilitation after stroke and to determine the population best served by this intervention. Nine subjects with chronic stroke (one excluded from analysis) completed 18 sessions of training with the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot and a preevaluation, a postevaluation, and a 90-day clinical evaluation. Overall, the subjects improved in both range of motion and clinical measures. Compared with the preevaluation, the subjects showed significant improvements in range of motion, grip strength, and the hand component of the Fugl-Meyer (mean changes, 6.60 degrees, 8.84 percentage points, and 1.86 points, respectively). A subgroup of six subjects exhibited lower tone and received a higher dosage of training. These subjects had significant gains in grip strength, the hand component of the Fugl-Meyer, and the Action Research Arm Test (mean changes, 8.42 percentage points, 2.17 points, and 2.33 points, respectively). Future work is needed to better manage higher levels of hypertonia and provide more support to subjects with higher impairment levels; however, the current results support further study into the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot treatment.

  2. HandTutor™ enhanced hand rehabilitation after stroke--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Eli; Peleg, Sara; Bartur, Gadi; Elbo, Enbal; Vatine, Jean-Jacques

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the potential therapeutic benefi t of using HandTutor™ in combination with traditional rehabilitation in a post-stroke sub-acute population. The study compares an experimental group receiving traditional therapy combined with HandTutorTM treatment, against a control group receiving only traditional therapy. An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled pilot trial, was conducted in the Reuth rehabilitation unit in Israel. Thirty-one stroke patients in the sub-acute phase, were randomly assigned to one of the two groups (experimental or control) in sets of three. The experimental group (n = 16) underwent a hand rehabilitation programme using the HandTutorTM combined with traditional therapy. The control group (n = 15) received only traditional therapy. The treatment schedules for both groups were of similar duration and frequency. Improvements were evaluated using three indicators: 1) The Brunnström-Fugl-Meyer (FM) test, 2) the Box and Blocks (B&B) test and 3) improvement parameters as determined by the HandTutorTM software. Following 15 consecutive treatment sessions, a signifi cant improvement was observed within the experimental group (95% confi dence intervals) compared with the control group: B&B p = 0.015; FM p = 0.041, HandTutor™ performance accuracy on x axis and performance accuracy on y axis p hand function rehabilitation.

  3. Using mental practice in stroke rehabilitation: a framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Susy; Kleynen, Melanie; Schols, Jos; Schack, Thomas; Beurskens, Anna; Wade, Derick

    2008-07-01

    Motor imagery and mental practice are getting increased attention in neurological rehabilitation. Several different mental practice intervention protocols have been used in studies on its effect on recovery in stroke rehabilitation. The content of the intervention protocols itself is rarely discussed or questioned. To give a practical framework of how mental practice could be integrated into therapy, drawing on available evidence and theory. The aim of the treatment programme described is to enhance both the patient's physical performance and their empowerment and self-determination. Based on evidence from sports rehabilitation and our own experiences the framework will eventually be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Five steps are described to teach and upgrade the patient's imagery technique: (1) assess mental capacity to learn imagery technique; (2) establish the nature of mental practice; (3) teach imagery technique; (4) embed and monitor imagery technique; (5) develop self-generated treatments. The description is not, however, a recipe that should be followed precisely. It leaves enough room to tailor the mental practice intervention to the specific individual possibilities, skills and needs of the patient in accordance with evidence-based practice. Different aspects of the described protocol are discussed and compared with experiences from sports and evidence available in rehabilitation.

  4. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients’ places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey – interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey – a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing

  5. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  6. Time use of stroke patients with stroke admitted for rehabilitation in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Chantal J A H R; Buijck, Bianca I; van der Stegen, John C G H; van Eijk, Monica Spruit-; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B

    2013-01-01

    To describe the time use of patients with stroke in five Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) in the Netherlands, focusing on the time spent on therapeutic activities, nontherapeutic activities, interaction with others, and the location where the activities took place. Evidence suggest that task-oriented interventions are the most effective for patients with stroke and that some of these interventions are relevant and feasible for use by nurses. The question arises to what extent elderly patients who had a stroke and rehabilitate in a SNF receive therapeutic training and engage in therapeutic activities. Descriptive, observational design. Therapeutic and nontherapeutic activities of patients were observed at 10-minute intervals during one weekday (8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) using behavioral mapping. Forty-two patients with stroke with a mean age of 76 years participated in the study. The patients spent 56% of the day on therapeutic activities, whereas 44% of the day was spent on nontherapeutic activities. Most therapeutic time was spent on nursing care (9%) and physical therapy (4%). Patients stayed an average 41% of the day in their own room and were alone 49% of the day. Therapeutic time use was significantly related to improved functional status, patients with higher functional status spent more time on therapeutic activities. Patients spent more than half of the day on therapeutic activities. Nurses are faced with the challenge of activating patients with stroke and to assist them to engage in purposeful task-oriented exercises including daily activities. Thereby better rehabilitation results and recovery of patients may be reached. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  7. Characteristics of Inpatient Care and Rehabilitation for Acute First-Ever Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. Materials and Methods This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. Results A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Conclusion Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke. PMID:25510773

  8. Efficiency of drug therapy in complex rehabilitation of patients in late recovery period of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Dilshod Sagatov

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and neurological studies in 73 patients (44 men and 29 women) with the consequences of ischemic stroke in late recovery period were performed. Dopplerographic and electroencephalographic parameters before and after the rehabilitation measures were examined. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic effect of nootropics in drug rehabilitation with the inclusion of Nootropil and Cavinton Forte in late stroke recovery period.

  9. Stroke patients' experiences with Wii Sports® during inpatient rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celinder, Dora; Peoples, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Commercial virtual reality games have been used as adjunct therapy for stroke rehabilitation, mainly after patients have been discharged. The aim of this study was to explore stroke patients' experiences with Wii Sports® as a supplement to conventional occupational therapy in a cont...... therapy services may benefit patient rehabilitation directly or provide motivation for alternative leisure activities....

  10. Breaking bad news in stroke rehabilitation: a consultation with a community stroke team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J; Kneebone, I I; Taverner, B

    2013-04-01

    Within stroke care clinicians are frequently required to break bad news to patients, however, formal training and guidance remains limited. This article provides a case example of a multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation team consultation, and aims to contribute towards an evidence base and a model of training for breaking bad news (BBN) in stroke care. The stroke rehabilitation team requested clinical psychology consultation to help with difficulties they were experiencing in BBN to patients. The consultation comprised an assessment of the request, development of a proposal, delivery of a workshop on BBN and an evaluation of consultation impact. A collaborative consultation model underpinned the work, which aimed to empower and facilitate the team to generate solutions by drawing upon their existing expertise. The consultation was found to meet the team's expectations and needs. Consultees reported increased confidence to communicate difficult messages to patients and rated the consultation highly. A follow-up review indicated the consultation had led to changes in practice. Communication skills are central to BBN effectively. Clinicians may be supported to recognize their existing skill set and increase confidence in their ability to break bad news through a process of collaborative team consultation.

  11. Time to rethink long-term rehabilitation management of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasell, Robert; Mehta, Swati; Pereira, Shelialah; McIntyre, Amanda; Janzen, Shannon; Allen, Laura; Lobo, Liane; Viana, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    It has long been assumed that stroke patients plateau in their recovery within 3 to 6 months of their stroke, and evidence for rehabilitation during the chronic stage is limited. As a consequence, rehabilitation resources for the management of chronic stroke are minimal. The primary objective was to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) across the continuum of stroke rehabilitation for interventions initiated 6 months or more following the onset of stroke. The secondary objective was to determine whether treatments provided post 6 moths are effective in improving outcomes among stroke survivors. Multiple databases were used to identify all RCTs published from 1970 to June 2012 in English language where the stroke interventions were initiated more than 6 months after the onset of the stroke. Data abstraction was performed using standardized data abstraction form that included general citation information, study participant characteristics, methodology, outcomes accessed, and overall findings. The results of our analysis revealed 339 RCTs. The mean number of subjects per study was 73. Two hundred fifty-six RCTs were related to motor recovery, 39 to cognitive function, and only 19 to psychosocial issues and community reintegration. The majority of the RCT s demonstrated a significant positive benefit. There is a robust evidence-base for stroke rehabilitation interventions in chronic stroke. This research synthesis reveals a paradox, whereby an impressive evidence-base contrasts with the limited optimism and resources available for rehabilitation in chronic stroke.

  12. Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: findings from focus group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors. PMID:24606911

  13. Application progress of virtual reality rehabilitation technology in upper limb dysfunction after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-jie LI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available  Virtual reality (VR rehabilitation technology is a kind of integrated technology which simulates the real world via computer. It has three characteristics: immersion, interaction and imagination. It is widely used in the field of stroke rehabilitation. This review briefly describes the application of virtual reality rehabilitation technology in upper limb dysfunction after stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.04.002

  14. Self-management: challenges for allied healthcare professionals in stroke rehabilitation--a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satink, T.J.; Cup, E.H.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Self-management has become an important concept in stroke rehabilitation. This study explored allied healthcare professionals' (AHPs) perceptions and beliefs regarding the self-management of stroke survivors and their knowledge and skills regarding stroke self-management interventions.

  15. Acute-phase predictors of 6-month functional outcome in Italian stroke patients eligible for In-Hospital Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Marco; Fugazzaro, Stefania; Agosti, Maurizio; Sola, Carlotta; Di Carlo, Antonio; Cecconi, Lorenzo; Ferro, Salvatore

    2018-01-23

    to assess early post-stroke prognostic factors in patients admitted for post-acute phase rehabilitation. a one-year multicenter prospective project was conducted in four Italian regions on 352 patients who were hospitalized after a first stroke and were eligible for post-acute rehabilitation. Clinical data were collected in the Stroke or Acute Care Units (acute phase), then in Rehabilitation Units (post-acute phase) and, subsequently, after a 6-month post-stroke period (follow-up). Clinical outcome measures were represented using the Barthel Index (BI) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the most important prognostic index. mRS score, minor neurologic impairment and early out-of-bed mobilization (within 2 days after the stroke) proved to be important factors related to a better recovery according to BI (power of prediction = 37%). Similarly, age, pre-morbid mRS score and early out-of-bed mobilization were seen to be significant factors in achieving better overall participation and activity according to the mRS (power of prediction = 48%). BI at admission and certain comorbidities were also significant prognostic factors correlated with a better outcome. according to the BI and mRS, early mobilization is an early predictor of favorable outcome.

  16. [The effectiveness of physical therapy methods (Bobath and motor relearning program) in rehabilitation of stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutulyte, Grazina; Kimtys, Algimantas; Krisciūnas, Aleksandras

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether two different physiotherapy regimes caused any differences in outcome in the rehabilitation after stroke. We examined 240 patients with stroke. Examination was carried out at the Rehabilitation Center of Kaunas Second Clinical Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Bobath method was applied to the first (I) group (n=147), motor relearning program (MRP) method was applied to the second (II) group (n=93). In every group of patients we established samples according to sex, age, hospitalization to rehab unit as occurrence of CVA degree of disorder (hemiplegia, hemiparesis). The mobility of patients was evaluated according to European Federation for Research in Rehabilitation (EFRR) scale. Activities of daily living were evaluated by Barthel index. Analyzed groups were evaluated before physical therapy. When preliminary analysis was carried out it proved no statically reliable differences between analyzed groups (reliability 95%). The same statistical analysis was carried out after physical therapy. The results of differences between patient groups were compared using chi(2) method. Bobath method was applied working with the first group of patients. The aim of the method is to improve quality of the affected body side's movements in order to keep both sides working as harmoniously as possible. While applying this method at work, physical therapist guides patient's body on key-points, stimulating normal postural reactions, and training normal movement pattern. MRP method was used while working with the second group patients. This method is based on movement science, biomechanics and training of functional movement. Program is based on idea that movement pattern shouldn't be trained; it must be relearned. CONCLUSION. This study indicates that physiotherapy with task-oriented strategies represented by MRP, is preferable to physiotherapy with facilitation/inhibition strategies, such the Bobath programme, in the

  17. Modified Approach to Stroke Rehabilitation (MAStR): feasibility study of a method to apply procedural memory concepts to transfer training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavol, Marykay A; Bassile, Clare C; Lehman, Jennifer R; Harmon, Emma; Ferreira, Nancy; Shinn, Brittany; St James, Nancy; Callender, Jacqueline; Stein, Joel

    2018-04-03

    Training and implementation for a multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation method emphasizing procedural memory. Current practice in stroke rehabilitation relies on explicit memory, often compromised by stroke, failing to capitalize on better-preserved procedural memory skills. Recruitment of procedural memory requires consistency and practice, characteristics difficulty to promote on inpatient rehabilitation units. We designed a method Modified Approach to Stroke Rehabilitation (MAStR) to maximize consistency and practice for transfer training with stroke patients. Phase I, single-group study. MAStR has two innovations: (1) simplification of instructions to only three words, other direction provided non-verbally; (2) having all rehabilitation staff apply the same approach for transfers. Staff training in MAStR included review of written material describing the rationale for MAStR and demonstration of a transfer using MAStR. Enrolled patients completed each transfer with MAStR in addition to standard rehabilitation therapy. The MAStR method was taught to a large, multidisciplinary rehabilitation staff (n = 31). Training and certification required 15 min per staff member. Five stroke patients were enrolled. No transfers with MAStR resulted in injury, no negative feedback was received from staff or patients. Staff reported satisfaction with the brief MAStR training and reported transfers were easier to complete with the MAStR method. Feasibility was demonstrated for an innovative application of procedural memory concepts to stroke rehabilitation. All rehabilitation disciplines were successfully trained. MAStR was well-tolerated and liked by rehabilitation staff and patients. These results support pursuit of a Phase II pilot study.

  18. Survivors of chronic stroke - participant evaluations of commercial gaming for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Kate; Crawley, Jamie; Harris, Jocelyn E; Horton, Sean

    2016-10-01

    There has been an increase in research on the effect that virtual reality (VR) can have on physical rehabilitation following stroke. However, research exploring participant perceptions of VR for post-stroke rehabilitation has been limited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 chronic stroke participants (10 males, mean age = 72.1, mean time since injury = 38.6 mos.) who had recently completed an upper extremity VR stroke rehabilitation programme. Four main themes emerged: 'the VR experience,' 'functional outcomes,' 'instruction,' and the 'future of VR in stroke rehabilitation,' along with nine sub-themes. Participants illustrated the positive impact that VR training had on their functional abilities as well as their confidence towards completing activities of daily living (ADL). Participants also expressed the need for increased rehabilitation opportunities within the community. Overall, participants were optimistic about their experience with VR training and all reported that they had perceived functional gain. VR is an enjoyable rehabilitation tool that can increase a stroke survivor's confidence towards completing ADL. Implications for Rehabilitation Although there is an increase in rehabilitation programmes geared towards those with chronic stroke, we must also consider the participants' perception of those programmes. Incorporating participant feedback may increase enjoyment and adherence to the rehabilitation programmes. The VR experience, as well as provision of feedback and instruction, are important aspects to consider when developing a VR programme for stroke survivors. VR for rehabilitation may be a feasible tool for increasing the survivors' confidence in completing ADL post-stroke.

  19. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  20. Effect of stress hyperglycemia and intensive rehabilitation therapy in non-diabetic hemorrhagic stroke: Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J A; Kim, D Y; Sohn, M K; Lee, J; Lee, S-G; Lee, Y-S; Han, E Y; Joo, M C; Oh, G-J; Han, J; Lee, S W; Park, M; Chang, W H; Shin, Y-I; Kim, Y-H

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effect of stress hyperglycemia on the functional outcomes of non-diabetic hemorrhagic stroke. In addition, we investigated the usefulness of intensive rehabilitation for improving functional outcomes in patients with stress hyperglycemia. Non-diabetic hemorrhagic stroke patients were recruited and divided into two groups: intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) (n = 165) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (n = 156). Each group was divided into non-diabetics with or without stress hyperglycemia. Functional assessments were performed at 7 days and 3, 6 and 12 months after stroke onset. The non-diabetic with stress hyperglycemia groups were again divided into two groups who either received or did not receive intensive rehabilitation treatment. Serial functional outcome was compared between groups. For the ICH group, patients with stress hyperglycemia had worse modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Functional Ambulatory Category and Korean Mini-Mental State Examination scores than patients without stress hyperglycemia. For the SAH group, patients with stress hyperglycemia had worse scores on all functional assessments than patients without stress hyperglycemia at all time-points. After intensive rehabilitation treatment of patients with stress hyperglycemia, the ICH group had better scores on Functional Ambulatory Category and the SAH group had better scores on all functional assessments than patients without intensive rehabilitation treatment. Stress hyperglycemia affects the long-term prognosis of non-diabetic hemorrhagic stroke patients. Among stress hyperglycemia patients, intensive rehabilitation can enhance functional improvement after stroke. © 2016 EAN.

  1. Efficacy of Occupational Therapy Task-oriented Approach in Upper Extremity Post-stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almhdawi, Khader A; Mathiowetz, Virgil G; White, Matthew; delMas, Robert C

    2016-12-01

    There is a need for more effective rehabilitation methods for individuals post-stroke. Occupational Therapy Task-Oriented (TO) approach has not been evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate functional and impairment efficacies of TO approach on the more-affected Upper Extremity (UE) of persons post-stroke. A randomized single-blinded cross-over trial recruited 20 participants post-stroke (mean chronicity = 62 months) who demonstrated at least 10° active more-affected shoulder flexion and abduction and elbow flexion-extension. Participants were randomized into immediate (n = 10) and delayed intervention (n = 10) groups. Immediate group had 6 weeks of 3 hr/week TO intervention followed by 6 weeks of no-intervention control. Delayed intervention group underwent the reversed order. Functional measures included Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Impairment measures included UE Active Range of Motion (AROM) and handheld dynamometry strength. Measurements were obtained at baseline, cross over, and end of the study. TO intervention showed statistically higher functional change scores. COPM performance and satisfaction scores were 2.83 and 3.46 units greater respectively (p post-stroke rehabilitation approach inducing clinically meaningful functional improvements. More studies are needed with larger samples and specific stroke chronicity and severity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Clinical evaluation of a non-immersive virtual environment in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmans, Judi; Gladman, John; Hilton, Dave; Walker, Marion; Sunderland, Alan; Cobb, Sue; Pridmore, Tony; Thomas, Shirley

    2009-02-01

    We describe our attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of a virtual environment developed to rehabilitate stroke patients in the task of making a hot drink. Single case studies were performed in 13/138 (9%) stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in a UK stroke unit. Participants in AB/BA (n = 5) and ABA (n = 2) design studies received 5 one-hour sessions of attention control training (A phase) and 5 one-hour sessions of virtual environment training (B phase). An AB design with random duration of A and B phases (minimum duration of A and B phases 3 and 5 days respectively, with total duration of 3 weeks) was used in 6 participants. Visual inspection of scores across all cases showed a trend towards improvement over time in both real and virtual hot drink making ability in both control and intervention phases. There was no significant difference (Wilcoxon, p > 0.05) in the improvements in real and virtual hot drink making ability during all control and intervention phases in the 13 cases. Ceiling effects limited the evaluation of effectiveness in 5 of the 8 cases in which daily performance measures were used. Few people in this setting were suitable for this intervention. The case studies showed no evidence of a strong effect of this intervention, but we had great difficulty in performing single case studies. We conclude that more testing and development of this system is required before it is subjected to rigorous testing of clinical effectiveness.

  3. Improving patient and carer communication, multidisciplinary team working and goal-setting in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, J; Channell, K; McDowell, D; Sharma, A K

    2005-03-01

    To determine the extent to which three forms of multidisciplinary team (MDT) care in stroke rehabilitation meet the standards set by the United Kingdom National Service Framework (NSF). Consecutive assessment of the three forms of care was completed. The study included three groups of 25 stroke inpatients on the stroke rehabilitation ward. (1) A standard weekly MDT meeting using a standard form for documentation; (2) a standard MDT meeting using a newly devised form; and (3) a novel MDT ward round using the new form, and attended by doctors. MDT ward rounds result in significantly better consideration of patients' needs (median 7 per patient compared with 0 and 5 in phases one and two), enhanced SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time framed) goal-setting (median 3 per patient compared to 1 in phases one and two); greater patient involvement (12 patients compared to 0 and 4 in phases one and two); and improved team working (measured using the team climate inventory) than do MDT meetings. In the present study, standard weekly MDT meetings did not meet the standards set for MDT care by the NSF. The use of a MDT ward round allows these standards to be achieved.

  4. Applications of Brain-Machine Interface Systems in Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2014-06-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability, significantly impacting the quality of life (QOL) in survivors, and rehabilitation remains the mainstay of treatment in these patients. Recent engineering and technological advances such as brain-machine interfaces (BMI) and robotic rehabilitative devices are promising to enhance stroke neu-rorehabilitation, to accelerate functional recovery and improve QOL. This review discusses the recent applications of BMI and robotic-assisted rehabilitation in stroke patients. We present the framework for integrated BMI and robotic-assisted therapies, and discuss their potential therapeutic, assistive and diagnostic functions in stroke rehabilitation. Finally, we conclude with an outlook on the potential challenges and future directions of these neurotechnologies, and their impact on clinical rehabilitation.

  5. Applications of Brain–Machine Interface Systems in Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Gerard E.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability, significantly impacting the quality of life (QOL) in survivors, and rehabilitation remains the mainstay of treatment in these patients. Recent engineering and technological advances such as brain-machine interfaces (BMI) and robotic rehabilitative devices are promising to enhance stroke neu-rorehabilitation, to accelerate functional recovery and improve QOL. This review discusses the recent applications of BMI and robotic-assisted rehabilitation in stroke patients. We present the framework for integrated BMI and robotic-assisted therapies, and discuss their potential therapeutic, assistive and diagnostic functions in stroke rehabilitation. Finally, we conclude with an outlook on the potential challenges and future directions of these neurotechnologies, and their impact on clinical rehabilitation. PMID:25110624

  6. Using a complex adaptive system lens to understand family caregiving experiences navigating the stroke rehabilitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazzawi, Andrea; Kuziemsky, Craig; O'Sullivan, Tracey

    2016-10-01

    Family caregivers provide the stroke survivor with social support and continuity during the transition home from a rehabilitation facility. In this exploratory study we examined family caregivers' perceptions and experiences navigating the stroke rehabilitation system. The theories of continuity of care and complex adaptive systems were integrated to examine the transition from a stroke rehabilitation facility to the patient's home. This study provides an understanding of the interacting complexities at the macro and micro levels. A convenient sample of family caregivers (n = 14) who provide care for a stroke survivor were recruited 4-12 weeks following the patient's discharge from a stroke rehabilitation facility in Ontario, Canada. Interviews were conducted with family caregivers to examine their perceptions and experiences navigating the stroke rehabilitation system. Directed and inductive content analysis and the theory of Complex Adaptive Systems were used to interpret the perceptions of family caregivers. Health system policies and procedures at the macro-level determined the types and timing of information being provided to caregivers, and impacted continuity of care and access to supports and services at the micro-level. Supports and services in the community, such as outpatient physiotherapy services, were limited or did not meet the specific needs of the stroke survivors or family caregivers. Relationships with health providers, informational support, and continuity in case management all influence the family caregiving experience and ultimately the quality of care for the stroke survivor, during the transition home from a rehabilitation facility.

  7. Modern stroke rehabilitation through e-health-based entertainment

    CERN Document Server

    Krukowski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a new, “e-Health” approach to stroke rehabilitation.  The authors propose an alternative approach that combines state of the art ICT technologies ranging from Augmented and Virtual Reality gaming environments to latest advances in immersive user interfaces for delivering a mixed-reality training platform, along with advanced embedded micro sensing and computing devices exhibiting enhanced power autonomy by using the latest Bluetooth Smart communication interfaces and energy saving approaches. These technologies are integrated under the umbrella of an online Personal Health Record (PHR) services allowing for delivery of personalized, patient-centric medical services whether at home, in a clinic or on the move. Describes innovative ways for achieving mixed-reality gaming environments; Enhances immersive experience by combining virtual projections with user interfaces based on body motion analysis; Offers cost-effective body motion capture by hybridizing wearable sensor data; Utilizes e...

  8. Access to Rehabilitation at Six Months Post Stroke: A Profile from the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Patricia; Williams, David; Hickey, Anne; Brewer, Linda; Mellon, Lisa; Dolan, Eamon; Kelly, Peter J; Shelley, Emer; Horgan, N Frances

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability. Few studies have assessed the profile and adequacy of access to rehabilitation services after ischaemic stroke both in the inpatient and community setting. The objectives of the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) study were to assess the disability and rehabilitation profile, adherence with rehabilitation recommendations and needs of patients 6 months following hospital admission for stroke. A rehabilitation prescription was completed before hospital discharge for each participant, and adherence to this prescription was assessed at 6 months to determine whether patients received their recommended rehabilitation needs. Two hundred and fifty six patients were recruited to ASPIRE-S. The average age was 69 (SD 12.8). A majority (n = 221, 86%) were referred to the hospital multidisciplinary team, 59% (n = 132) were referred to all services (physiotherapy (PT), occupational therapy (OT), speech and language therapy (SLT)). Fifty-four percent (n = 119) of patients (seen by the multidisciplinary team) were referred for further rehabilitation in the community on discharge. Of these 119 patients, 112 (95%) recalled receiving community rehabilitation services. However, while most (68%) patients were referred for several disciplines (PT, OT, SLT), the most commonly recalled therapy (55%) was from a single discipline. The most commonly recommended frequency of therapy required was on a weekly basis. Sixty-one patients (51%) reported a delay in services, with some still awaiting services at 6 months. Results from this prospective study revealed that a significant number of patients (57%) did not receive the therapy recommended on discharge. Future initiatives should include the development of policies, which support more effective, equitable multidisciplinary rehabilitation for stroke patients in the community. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of rehabilitation in patients after stroke with executive dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Agnieszka; Klimkiewiaz, Robert; Krekora, Katarzyna; Klimkiewiaz, Paulina; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Executive dysfunction (DES) in the form of disturbances of conscious and flexible programming, organization and control of their own actions as part of the clinical picture of stroke. impairment of the executive mechanism may reduce the efficacy of treatment of patient. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of rehabilitation on improving executive functions in patients after stroke. The study involved 90 patients after a stroke. The study group comprised 45 patients, resident in the Department of Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine USK of Medical University in Lodz, which was implemented in 5 week rehabilitation program including: kinesiotherapy, physiotherapy, speech therapy classes and psychological consultation and psychotherapy. The control group consisted of patients waiting for admission to the Department of Rehabilitation. The study was conducted twice: the first time, before the start of rehabilitation, the second time at the end of five weeks of the rehabilitation process. Executive functions were assessed by means of: Test of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Trail Making Test (TMT-A, TMT-B), Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). In patients after stroke rehabilitation in the hospital was significantly greater improvement in executive function compared to those rehabilitated in environmental conditions. Comprehensive rehabilitation in the hospital has a significant impact on improving executive functions in patients after stroke.

  10. A Personalized Self-Management Rehabilitation System with an Intelligent Shoe for Stroke Survivors: A Realist Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Susan; Nasr, Nasrin; Parker, Jack; Davies, Richard; Zheng, Huiru; Mountain, Gail

    2016-01-07

    In the United Kingdom, stroke is the most significant cause of adult disability. Stroke survivors are frequently left with physical and psychological changes that can profoundly affect their functional ability, independence, and social participation. Research suggests that long-term, intense, task- and context-specific rehabilitation that is goal-oriented and environmentally enriched improves function, independence, and quality of life after a stroke. It is recommended that rehabilitation should continue until maximum recovery has been achieved. However, the increasing demand on services and financial constraints means that needs cannot be met through traditional face-to-face delivery of rehabilitation. Using a participatory design methodology, we developed an information communication technology-enhanced Personalized Self-Managed rehabilitation System (PSMrS) for stroke survivors with integrated insole sensor technology within an "intelligent shoe.". The intervention model was based around a rehabilitation paradigm underpinned by theories of motor relearning and neuroplastic adaptation, motivational feedback, self-efficacy, and knowledge transfer. To understand the conditions under which this technology-based rehabilitation solution would most likely have an impact on the motor behavior of the user, what would work for whom, in what context, and how. We were interested in what aspects of the system would work best to facilitate the motor behavior change associated with self-managed rehabilitation and which user characteristics and circumstances of use could promote improved functional outcomes. We used a Realist Evaluation (RE) framework to evaluate the final prototype PSMrS with the assumption that the intervention consists of a series of configurations that include the Context of use, the underlying Mechanisms of change and the potential Outcomes or impacts (CMOs). We developed the CMOs from literature reviews and engagement with clinicians, users, and

  11. Rehabilitation after Stroke using Immersive User Interfaces in 3D Virtual and Augmented Gaming Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vogiatzaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of most common diseases of our modern societies with high socio-economic impact. Hence, rehabilitation approach involving patients in their rehabilitation process while lowering costly involvement of specialised human personnel is needed. This article describes a novel approach, offering an integrated rehabilitation training for stroke patients using a serious gaming approach based on a Unity3D virtual reality engine combined with a range of advanced technologies and immersive user interfaces. It puts patients and caretakers in control of the rehabilitation protocols, while leading physicians are enabled to supervise the progress of the rehabilitation via Personal Health Record. Possibility to perform training in a familiar home environment directly improves the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. The work presented herein has been conducted within the "StrokeBack" project co-funded by the European Commission under the Framework 7 Program in the ICT domain.

  12. [The rehabilitation treatment of patients with motor and cognitive disorders after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, V Iu; Isanova, V A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the possibility of using the rehabilitative pneumatic suit "Atlant" in stroke outpatients. Material and methods. We studied 11 stroke patients who wore the pneumatic suit in the early rehabilitation period. A comparison group included 13 patients. The high effectiveness of complex treatment with using the suit "Atlant" was shown. The motor activity was improved in 71.4% of patients, the recovery of speech was found in 33.3% patients. Conclusion. Continuity of rehabilitation in outpatients with stroke promotes the recovery of functional activity, motor, cognitive and speech functions and positively impacts on the emotional state of the patient.

  13. Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Pui Hing; Tang, Maria W S; Yeung, Fannie; Chan, Tsz Wai; Cheng, Joanna O Y; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap. The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline) between those using short-term residential care (intervention group) and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group), and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group. 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline. The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital. Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate. Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score) of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel Index score) of the patients could be further improved after 4 months up to 1 year. Meanwhile, insignificant between-group difference in rehabilitation outcomes was observed. The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%). Short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation promoted improvements in rehabilitation outcomes comparable with, if not better than, the usual

  14. Cocaine-associated stroke: three cases and rehabilitation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolat, R D; O' Dell, M W; Golamco-Estrella, S P; Avella, H

    2000-04-01

    Cocaine-associated stroke (CAS) is an important cause of disability, especially among younger adults. Improved management has increased survival but little has been discussed about rehabilitation, including medication management. Therefore, experience and therapeutic drug management are described during inpatient rehabilitation with three patients with CAS. Case 14 is a 50-year-old male with a history of hypertension who presented with right hemiparesis, aphasia and depression. He was treated with paroxetine for depression and bromocriptine for poor initiation with a good response, improving by 50 FIM points in 44 days. Case 2 is a 44 year-old female with quadriparesis, aphasia, and deficits in attention and initiation. Methylphenidate for attention deficits and bromocriptine for poor initiation was associated with an excellent functional gain (50 FIM points in 37 days). She eventually returned to work. Case 3 is a 46-year-old female with a history of hypertension who presented with right hemiparesis, aphasia and depression. Without neuropharmacologic intervention, she gained 35 FIM points during an uneventful 47 day rehabilitation stay. Acutely, cocaine can induce cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebrovascular spasm, cerebral vasculitis and intracerebral haemorrhage. Chronic use depletes and destroys dopaminergic pathways, which may be a major factor in depression, and attention and initiation deficits-all observed in these cases. Generally, rapid improvements were seen in mood and cognition in two cases where medication was used. Based on the current literature and pathophysiology of CAS, it is suggested that trials of dopaminergic agents for cognition and extremely cautious use of buproprion for depression may be warrented. Details of the above cases and the practical and theoretical issues of neuropharmacologic intervention in CAS are discussed.

  15. Upper limb rehabilitation robotics after stroke: a perspective from the University of Padua, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Carraro, Elena; Ferraro, Claudio; Gallina, Paolo; Rossi, Aldo; Rosati, Giulio

    2009-11-01

    Rehabilitation robotics is an emerging research field that aims to employ leading-edge robotic technology and virtual reality systems in the rehabilitation treatment of neuro-logical patients. In post-stroke patients with upper limb impairment, clinical trials have so far shown positive results in terms of motor recovery, but poor efficacy in terms of functional outcome. Much work is needed to develop a new generation of rehabilitation robots and clinical protocols that will be more effective in helping patients to regain their abilities in activities of daily living. This paper presents some key issues in the future perspective of upper limb robotic rehabilitation after stroke.

  16. Mexican Americans Receive Less Intensive Stroke Rehabilitation Than Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Lewis B; Sais, Emma; Fuentes, Michael; Ifejika, Nneka L; Jiang, Xiaqing; Horn, Susan D; Case, Erin; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-06-01

    Mexican Americans (MAs) have worse neurological, functional, and cognitive outcomes after stroke. Stroke rehabilitation is important for good outcome. In a population-based study, we sought to determine whether allocation of stroke rehabilitation services differed by ethnicity. Patients with stroke were identified as part of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project, TX, USA. Cases were validated by physicians using source documentation. Patients were followed prospectively for 3 months after stroke to determine rehabilitation services and transitions. Descriptive statistics were used to depict the study population. Continuous baseline variables were compared using 2 sample t tests or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests by ethnicity. Categorical baseline variables were compared using χ 2 tests. Ethnic comparisons of rehabilitation services were compared using χ 2 tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression. Seventy-two subjects (50 MA and 22 non-Hispanic white [NHW]) were followed. Mean age, NHW-69 (SD 13), MA-66 (SD 11) years, sex (NHW 55% male, MA 50% male) and median presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale did not differ significantly. There were no ethnic differences among the proportion of patients who were sent home without any rehabilitation services ( P =0.9). Among those who received rehabilitation, NHWs were more likely to get inpatient rehabilitation (73%) compared with MAs (30%), P =0.016. MAs (51%) were much more likely to receive home rehabilitation services compared with NHWs (0%) ( P =0.0017). In this population-based study, MAs were more likely to receive home-based rehabilitation, whereas NHWs were more likely to get inpatient rehabilitation. This disparity may, in part, explain the worse stroke outcome in MAs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Health professionals' perceptions of cultural influences on stroke experiences and rehabilitation in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omu, Onutobor; Reynolds, Frances

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of health professionals who treat stroke patients in Kuwait regarding cultural influences on the experience of stroke and rehabilitation in Kuwait. Health professionals interviewed were from a variety of cultural backgrounds thus providing an opportunity to investigate how they perceived the influence of culture on stroke recovery and rehabilitation in Kuwait. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 12 health professionals with current/recent stroke rehabilitation experience in Kuwait, followed by thematic analysis of the verbatim transcripts. The health professionals identified several features of the Kuwaiti culture that they believed affected the experiences of stroke patients. These were religious beliefs, family involvement, limited education and public information about stroke, prevailing negative attitudes toward stroke, access to finances for private treatment, social stigma and the public invisibility of disabled people, difficulties identifying meaningful goals for rehabilitation, and an acceptance of dependency linked with the widespread presence of maids and other paid assistants in most Kuwaiti homes. To offer culturally sensitive care, these issues should be taken into account during the rehabilitation of Kuwaiti stroke patients in their home country and elsewhere.

  18. Symptoms of Poststroke Depression among Stroke Survivors: An Appraisal of Psychiatry Needs and Care during Physiotherapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Chidi Ibeneme

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify stroke survivors with symptoms of poststroke depression and the extent of psychiatry needs and care they have received while on physiotherapy rehabilitation. Participants. Fifty stroke survivors (22 females and 28 males at the outpatient unit of Physiotherapy Department, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, who gave their informed consent, were randomly selected. Their age range and mean age were 26–66 years and 54.76±8.79 years, respectively. Method. A multiple case study of 50 stroke survivors for symptoms of poststroke depression was done with Beck’s Depression Inventory, mini mental status examination tool, and Modified Motor Assessment Scale. The tests were performed independently by the participants except otherwise stated and scored on a scale of 0–6. Data were analyzed using Z-test for proportional significance and chi-square test for determining relationship between variables, at p<0.05. Results. Twenty-one (42.0% stroke survivors had symptoms of PSD, which was significantly dependent on duration of stroke (χ2 = 21.680, df = 6, and p=0.001, yet none of the participants had a psychiatry review. Conclusions. Symptoms of PSD may be common in cold compared to new cases of stroke and may need psychiatry care while on physiotherapy rehabilitation.

  19. The efficacy of interactive, motion capture-based rehabilitation on functional outcomes in an inpatient stroke population: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, John; Jovic, Emelyn; Rathjen, Amy; Lane, Kylie; Tyson, Anna M; Callisaya, Michele L; Smith, Stuart T; Ahuja, Kiran Dk; Bird, Marie-Louise

    2018-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of novel interactive, motion capture-rehabilitation software to usual care stroke rehabilitation on physical function. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Two subacute hospital rehabilitation units in Australia. In all, 73 people less than six months after stroke with reduced mobility and clinician determined capacity to improve. Both groups received functional retraining and individualized programs for up to an hour, on weekdays for 8-40 sessions (dose matched). For the intervention group, this individualized program used motivating virtual reality rehabilitation and novel gesture controlled interactive motion capture software. For usual care, the individualized program was delivered in a group class on one unit and by rehabilitation assistant 1:1 on the other. Primary outcome was standing balance (functional reach). Secondary outcomes were lateral reach, step test, sitting balance, arm function, and walking. Participants (mean 22 days post-stroke) attended mean 14 sessions. Both groups improved (mean (95% confidence interval)) on primary outcome functional reach (usual care 3.3 (0.6 to 5.9), intervention 4.1 (-3.0 to 5.0) cm) with no difference between groups ( P = 0.69) on this or any secondary measures. No differences between the rehabilitation units were seen except in lateral reach (less affected side) ( P = 0.04). No adverse events were recorded during therapy. Interactive, motion capture rehabilitation for inpatients post stroke produced functional improvements that were similar to those achieved by usual care stroke rehabilitation, safely delivered by either a physical therapist or a rehabilitation assistant.

  20. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  1. Best practise use in stroke rehabilitation: from trials and tribulations to solutions!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anita; Bitensky, Nicol Korner; Straus, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the use of best practises among stroke rehabilitation professionals, salient barriers that influence their knowledge uptake/application and effective knowledge translation (KT) strategies that meet the needs of this clinician group. Relevant literature on evidence-based practise in stroke rehabilitation and the use of KT strategies among rehabilitation professionals is summarised and discussed. Although adherence to rehabilitation guidelines translates into improved patient outcomes, best practises are not routinely applied by clinicians when treating individuals with a stroke. Lack of protected work time to search and appraise the research literature is by far the largest organisational barrier to knowledge uptake/application. Personal barriers, such as the lack of confidence and skills to interpret, synthesise and apply research findings, also limit clinicians' uptake of best practises. Studies involving rehabilitation professionals found that active KT strategies were more effective than passive strategies to produce change in their evidence-based knowledge and practise behaviours. As such, interactive e-learning resources are likely to be a relevant KT solution to meet rehabilitation professionals' specific learning needs, guide their clinical decision-making and ultimately increase their best practise behaviours. We have the knowledge of best practises in stroke rehabilitation, a means to disseminate that knowledge internationally through interactive e-learning resources, and information about effective KT interventions. With these opportunities in place, rehabilitation professionals can expand their capacity by adopting stroke best practises and producing better outcomes for patients.

  2. Effects of professional rehabilitation training on the recovery of neurological function in young stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-jin-zi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Young stroke patients have a strong desire to return to the society, but few studies have been conducted on their rehabilitation training items, intensity, and prognosis. We analyzed clinical data of young and middle-aged/older stroke patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Capital Medical University, China from February 2014 to May 2015. Results demonstrated that hemorrhagic stroke (59.6% was the primary stroke type found in the young group, while ischemic stroke (60.0% was the main type detected in the middle-aged/older group. Compared with older stroke patients, education level and incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia were higher in younger stroke patients, whereas, incidences of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease were lower. The average length of hospital stay was longer in the young group than in the middle-aged/older group. The main risk factors observed in the young stroke patients were hypertension, drinking, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, diabetes, previous history of stroke, and heart disease. The most accepted rehabilitation program consisted of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, acupuncture and moxibustion. Average rehabilitation training time was 2.5 hours/day. Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale scores were increased at discharge. Six months after discharge, the degree of occupational and economic satisfaction declined, and there were no changes in family life satisfaction. The degrees of other life satisfaction (such as friendship improved. The degree of disability and functional status improved significantly in young stroke patients after professional rehabilitation, but the number of patients who returned to society within 6 months after stroke was still small.

  3. Kettle test--a brief measure of cognitive functional performance. Reliability and valdity in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman-Maeir, Adina; Harel, Hagit; Katz, Noomi

    2009-01-01

    We examined the reliability and validity of the Kettle Test, a brief performance measure based on a complex everyday task designed to tap into basic and higher level cognitive processes. Participants included 21 people attending stroke rehabilitation and 4 occupational therapists for the reliability analysis, 36 people at discharge from stroke rehabilitation, and 36 age-matched healthy control participants for the validity analyses. Instruments included a battery of conventional cognitive measures and functional outcomes. Interrater reliability was found to be high. Stroke survivors at discharge from rehabilitation were found to require significantly more assistance on the Kettle Test than control participants (p Kettle Test were significantly and moderately correlated with the conventional cognitive and functional outcome measures. The results support the reliability and validity of the Kettle Test as a top-down measure of cognition-in-function in people at discharge from stroke rehabilitation.

  4. Use of Occupational Performance Coaching for stroke survivors (OPC-Stroke in late rehabilitation: A descriptive case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danika Belliveau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability in adults. Following stroke, 60% of people report needing help with everyday activities, and 80% report having very few meaningful activities. These restrictions often continue for years. This study explored the efficacy of Occupational Performance Coaching for stroke survivors (OPC-Stroke on the participation level of adults in the later stage of stroke rehabilitation. Method: A descriptive case study design was used. One participant in the later stages of rehabilitation was recruited. Outcome measures for participation, goal performance and satisfaction, and emotional well-being were administered pre and postintervention to observe for direction of change. A semi-structured interview was carried out postintervention to explore the participant’s experiences of the intervention. Results: The participant who took part in the study reported improvement with his goal performance and satisfaction. However, the level of participation did not improve and emotional well-being decreased. Qualitative data revealed an appreciation of the intervention and a recommendation of the intervention for others. Conclusion: OPC-Stroke was valued by the participant and shows promise for improving goal performance and satisfaction. Further research is necessary to determine the potential efficacy of OPC-Stroke in later stages of rehabilitation.

  5. Virtual Reality Rehabilitation from Social Cognitive and Motor Learning Theoretical Perspectives in Stroke Population

    OpenAIRE

    Imam, Bita; Jarus, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To identify the virtual reality (VR) interventions used for the lower extremity rehabilitation in stroke population and to explain their underlying training mechanisms using Social Cognitive (SCT) and Motor Learning (MLT) theoretical frameworks. Methods. Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and Cochrane databases were searched up to July 11, 2013. Randomized controlled trials that included a VR intervention for lower extremity rehabilitation in stroke population were included. The Physiothera...

  6. [Stroke rehabilitation in nursing homes: intensity of and motivation for physiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissink, K S; Spruit-van Eijk, M; Buijck, B I; Koopmans, R T C M; Zuidema, S U

    2014-06-01

    Stroke is a frequent and potential invalidating disease, of which recovery can be improved by rehabilitation. In The Netherlands old and frail stroke patients are rehabilitated in nursing homes. Probably, the intensity of and motivation for physiotherapy are important for successful discharge. The aim was to determine (1) therapy intensity of and motivation for physical therapy of geriatric stroke patients (2) its correlates and (3) the effect on discharge destination. Data were obtained from the 'GRAMPS'-study, a longitudinal observational study of stroke rehabilitation in 15 Dutch nursing homes. Direct time spent on physiotherapy was registered during admission. Motivation was measured by the Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Participation Scale (PRPS). Data of 84 patients were analysed using uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Patients received an average 109 min of physiotherapy per week. 69 patients (82%) were good motivated for physiotherapy (had all PRPS scores 4 or higher). Therapy intensity was positively associated with the presence of a partner and good motivation. No significant independent variables of motivation were found. Therapy-intensity was positively related to discharge to prior living situation. Intensity of physiotherapy of stroke rehabilitation is an independent variable of successful discharge and is higher when the patient has a partner or is better motivated. These findings stress the importance of high motivation and therapy intensity in geriatric stroke rehabilitation.

  7. Exercise after Stroke: Patient Adherence and Beliefs after Discharge from Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristine K; Porter, Rebecca E; DeBaun-Sprague, Erin; Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Schmid, Arlene A

    2017-03-01

    Most people complete post-stroke rehabilitation within the first 6 months after stroke even though benefits from exercise are believed to persist well beyond 6 months. Physical and Occupational therapists provide home exercise programs (HEP) to instruct patients on exercises to continue after discharge from rehabilitation. Unfortunately, there is little known about HEP adherence rates in adults with stroke. The objectives of this project were to (1) determine the adherence rate with post-rehabilitation HEP and reasons for non-adherence, (2) assess for interactions between HEP adherence and self-report of depression and fatigue, and (3) determine patient beliefs about the benefit of exercise during stroke recovery. This was a cross-sectional, survey study. A survey was developed and distributed during stroke support group meetings to determine adherence rates with post rehabilitation HEP, reasons for non-adherence, and patient beliefs about the benefit of exercise. Eighty-nine percent of participants reported receiving a HEP and 65.3% of those reported being adherent with at least part of the HEP. Several reasons for non-adherence were identified, including 'doing different exercises than the ones given by the physical therapist', as the most frequently given reason. Study participants identified positive roles of exercise in their recovery from stroke. Patient adherence with HEP after discharge from rehabilitation is less than ideal. Reasons for non-adherence are varied. Rehabilitation therapists need to be able to identify and help patients manage barriers to HEP adherence to promote management of residual deficits.

  8. Discourses in stroke rehabilitation as they present themselves in current physiotherapy and occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Præstegaard, Jeanette; Ytterberg, Charlotte

    2017-02-01

    Aim This study aims to discuss current perceptions of rehabilitation and how present rehabilitation practice is affected by dominating discourses in Danish society by exploring discourses expressed in official publications and the constructed journal notes of occupational and physiotherapists' practice of stroke rehabilitation. Method The frame of reference is Fairclough's critical discourse analysis. The analysis comprises seven official documents relevant to stroke rehabilitation provided in Danish health services in 2012-2013. Also, notes written by occupational therapists and physiotherapists in medical records of 10 patients with a stroke diagnosis admitted to hospital in 2012. The documents included were read thoroughly. The texts were analyzed deductively, focusing on discursive practice on articulated understandings of rehabilitation, health practice approaches, and social practice. Results The dominating discourses seem to be Western neoliberalism organizational, medical and ethical discourses. The macro level of discourses consisted of political documents addressing rehabilitation nationally. The meso level mainly concerned medical discourses within stroke rehabilitation whereas the micro level represented local medical and ethical discourses. Conclusion The neoliberal discourse supports the medical discourse with strong emphasis on evidence-based interventions. In contrast to ethical discourses, documentation of rehabilitation practice marked more attention being paid to facilitating the patient's independence than to enabling the regaining of meaningful activities and participation. Implications for Rehabilitation Individualized rehabilitation must be organized with flexibility as it is a complex process Critical reflectiveness among health professionals is needed to provide individualized rehabilitation of high quality A broader range of stake holders, including patient organizations, are in demand within health policy making The discourses that

  9. A rehabilitation device to improve the hand grasp function of stroke patients using a patient-driven approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wanjoo; Jeong, Wookjin; Kwon, Gyu-Hyun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Laehyun

    2013-06-01

    This paper proposes a robotic hand rehabilitation device for grasp training. The device is designed for stroke patients to train and recover their hand grasp function in order to undertake activities of daily living (ADL). The device consists of a control unit, two small actuators, an infrared (IR) sensor, and pressure sensors in the grasp handle. The advantages of this device are that it is small in size, inexpensive, and available for use at home without specialist's supervision. In addition, a novel patient-driven strategy based on the patient's movement intention detected by the pressure sensors without bio-signals is introduced. Once the system detects a patient's movement intention, it triggers the robotic device to move the patient's hand to form the normal grasping behavior. This strategy may encourage stroke patients to participate in rehabilitation training to recover their hand grasp function and it may also enhance neural plasticity. A user study was conducted in order to investigate the usability, acceptability, satisfaction, and suggestions for improvement of the proposed device. The results of this survey included positive reviews from therapists and a stroke patient. In particular, therapists expected that the proposed patient-driven mode can motivate patients for their rehabilitation training and it can be effective to prevent a compensational strategy in active movements. It is expected that the proposed device will assist stroke patients in restoring their grasp function efficiently.

  10. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N.; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E.; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Objectives Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. Methods An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Results Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Conclusions Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance. PMID:23949045

  11. An Annotated Bibliography of Current Literature Dealing with Stroke Education Programs in a Physical Rehabilitation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Ann Teresa

    This study makes available to nurses and other rehabilitation team members pertinent information to meet stroke patients' educational needs. The study was conducted to support the theory that those patients and families who actively participate in a stroke education program will more positively cope with the losses resulting from the disability…

  12. The Use of Motion Tracking Technologies in Serious Games to Enhance Rehabilitation in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew M.; Liu, Hao; Battersby, Steven; Brown, David; Sherkat, Nasser; Standen, Penny; Walker, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of long term disability worldwide. Of those surviving, more than half will fail to regain functional usage of their impaired upper limb. Typically stroke upper limb rehabilitation exercises consist of repeated movements, which when tracked can form the basis of inputs to games. This paper discusses two systems utilizing…

  13. Review of Self-Awareness and Its Clinical Application in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Daniel P. K.; Liu, Karen P. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to explore, following a literature review, the concepts of self-awareness, its assessment, and intervention for self-awareness deficits, as well as its clinical significance in stroke rehabilitation; and (ii) to apply the concepts of self-awareness in the context of a rehabilitation program. The search was…

  14. Developing a User Interface for the iPAM Stroke Rehabilitation System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemna, Stephanie; Culmer, Peter R.; Jackson, Andrew E.; Makower, Sophie; Gallagher, Justin F.; Holt, Ray; Cnossen, Fokie; Cozens, J. Alastair; Levesley, Martin C.; Bhakta, Bipin B.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing population of older people is leading to growing healthcare demands. Stroke is the commonest cause of severe disability in developed countries leaving one third of patients with long term disability. Rehabilitation is the cornerstone of recovery. Lack of rehabilitation manpower

  15. The effects of repeated rehabilitation “Tune-Ups” on functional recovery after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Jared; Mala, Hana; Windle, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: For the vast majority of stroke survivors, rehabilitation (i.e. physiotherapy and occupational therapy) is the only treatment option available. Following an initial phase of rehabilitation, many patients are sent home and return periodically for brief periods of therapy … often lasting...... recovery have been modeled in experimental stroke using a combination of enriched environment and rehabilitation (Biernaskie & Corbett, 2001), it remains uncertain if a secondary therapeutic intervention, such as a return to enrichment/rehabilitation ("Tune-Up"), can produce beneficial changes in brain...... and rehabilitative reaching (i.e. “enriched/rehab”). Following 9 weeks of treatment, all animals were placed in standard housing for 5 weeks, after which they received 2 weeks of intensive therapy consisting of enhanced enriched environments and structured sensorimotor/cognitive rehabilitative activities (i.e. “Tune...

  16. Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau PH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pui Hing Chau,1 Maria WS Tang,2 Fannie Yeung,2 Tsz Wai Chan,1 Joanna OY Cheng,1 Jean Woo2 1School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China Background: Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap. Objectives: The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline between those using short-term residential care (intervention group and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group, and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group. Participants: 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline. Intervention: The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital. Measurements: Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate. Results: Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel

  17. Harnessing the potential of the Kinect sensor for psychiatric rehabilitation for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M

    2016-03-04

    Dominques et al. in their recent article described how low-cost sensors, such as Microsoft Kinect could be utilized for the measurement of various anthropometric measures. With the recent advances in sensors and sensor based technology, along with the rapid advancement in E-health, Microsoft Kinect has been increasingly recognized by researchers and bioengineers to be a low-cost sensor that could help in the collation of various measurements and various data. A recent systematic review done by Da Gama et al. (2015) have looked into the potential of Kinect in terms of motor rehabilitation. The systematic review highlighted the tremendous potential of the sensors and has clearly stated that there is a need for further studies evaluating its potential for rehabilitation. Zhang et al. (2015) in their recent article have advocated several reasons as to why biosensors are pertinent for stroke rehabilitation. Of note, recent studies done by the World Health Organization have highlighted that stroke is a growing epidemic. Aside to the utilization of smartphone based sensors for stroke rehabilitation, as proposed by Zhang et al. (2015), researchers have also investigated the use of other low cost alternatives, such as Kinect, to facilitate the rehabilitation of stroke survivors. Whilst it may seemed like that has been quite extensive evaluation of the Kinect sensor for stroke rehabilitation, one core area that bio-engineers and researchers have not looked into is that of the psychiatric and mental health issues that might at times arise following a stroke. It is thus the aim of this letter to address how such a sensor could be tapped upon for psychiatric rehabilitation amongst stroke survivors. To this end, the authors have thus conceptualized a game that could help in the cognitive remediation for stroke survivors using low cost Kinect sensors.

  18. Design and development of a hand robotic rehabilitation device for post stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashedi, E; Mirbagheri, A; Taheri, B; Farahmand, F; Vossoughi, G R; Parnianpour, M

    2009-01-01

    Robot-mediated rehabilitation is a rapidly advancing discipline that seeks to develop improved treatment procedures using new technologies, e.g., robotics, coupled with modern theories in neuroscience and rehabilitation. A robotic device was designed and developed for rehabilitation of upper limbs of post stroke patients. A novel force feedback bimanual working mode provided real-time dynamic sensation of the paretic hand. Results of the preliminary clinical tests revealed a quantitative evaluation of the patient's level of paresis and disability.

  19. Rehabilitation Treatment In Aphasia Caused By Stroke(Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvane Rahimifar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia is a relatively common language disorder, occurring in about 25% of all stroke patients. The ultimate aim of aphasia treatment is to improve patients oral and written language abilities and to facilitate their participation in everyday communication. Over the last decades, a range of approaches in aphasia therapy have been introduced, based on cognitive neuropsychological models, psycholinguistic theories, and socio-pragmatic approaches. In view of the range of different approaches and findings of therapy studies, the challenge for therapists is to decide which approach is the most appropriate one for an aphasic individual at a specific stage of recovery. The Findings showed that, therapy plan for aphasic individuals involves selecting the therapeutic approach most appropriate for dealing with a particular type of disorder, degree of severity, stage of recovery and the extent of the patient's participation in social life. A framework of aphasia treatment is outlined which considers the rehabilitation process at the various stages of recovery, and Different approaches are combined into a comprehensive treatment regimen which differentiates three stages of recovery: the acute, post-acute, and chronic stage. Also ,The intensive therapy in the treatment of language disorders have a great effect, and Brain imaging studies have shown that the linguistic reorganization of a damaged brain is aided by intensive speech therapy even in the chronic phase.

  20. Socially assistive robotics for stroke and mild TBI rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarić, Maja; Tapus, Adriana; Winstein, Carolee; Eriksson, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an interdisciplinary research project aimed at developing and evaluating effective and user-friendly non-contact robot-assisted therapy, aimed at in-home use. The approach stems from the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience that seeks to understand phenomena in terms of interactions between the social, cognitive, and neural levels of analysis. This technology-assisted therapy is designed to be safe and affordable, and relies on novel human-robot interaction methods for accelerated recovery of upper-extremity function after lesion-induced hemiparesis. The work is based on the combined expertise in the science and technology of non-contact socially assistive robotics and the clinical science of neurorehabilitation and motor learning, brought together to study how to best enhance recovery after stroke and mild traumatic brain injury. Our approach is original and promising in that it combines several ingredients that individually have been shown to be important for learning and long-term efficacy in motor neurorehabilitation: (1) intensity of task specific training and (2) engagement and self-management of goal-directed actions. These principles motivate and guide the strategies used to develop novel user activity sensing and provide the rationale for development of socially assistive robotics therapy for monitoring and coaching users toward personalized and optimal rehabilitation programs.

  1. Post Stroke Fatigue; Point Prevalence, Characterization, Associations and Radiological Correlation in a Rehabilitation Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, A

    2017-11-01

    Post stroke fatigue (PSF) is a frequently reported symptom by stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. This cross sectional observational study was undertaken in a rehabilitation facility to look at its prevalence and relationship with various variables like personal factors, type of stroke, social context, hemispheric involvement on CT scan and mobility status. The results showed that PSF was present in 83% (25 out of 30) of the patients included in the study. No clear association could be established between PSF, social, radiological and functional characteristics.

  2. Predicting the Grade of Disability 1 Year After Stroke Following Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jau-Hong Lin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of grades of disability at least 1 year after stroke rehabilitation therapy. We recruited stroke patients from the inpatient rehabilitation department of a university hospital. The degree of disability was graded using the disability evaluation at least 1 year after stroke onset. Functional ability was evaluated using the Functional Independence Measure instrument on admission, on discharge from the inpatient rehabilitation program, and at the 6-month follow-up visit after discharge. Major sociodemographic, medical, and rehabilitative factors were also collected during the hospitalization period. Of the 109 patients surveyed, 64 (58.7% had severe or very severe grades of disability. The correlates of severe or very severe disability in logistic regression analyses were bilaterally affected (odds ratio, OR, 10.8, impaired orientation (OR, 3.6, and poorer functional ability at discharge (OR, 7.6. Based on the significant predictors identified, the logistic regression model correctly classified severe or very severe disability in 68.0% of subjects. The higher frequency of severe or very severe disability in this study may have been due to the relatively more severely affected stroke patient population in the inpatient rehabilitation service and the use of unique disability evaluation criteria. These results may provide information useful in planning continuous rehabilitation care and setting relevant socio-welfare policies for stroke victims.

  3. Concise Arm and Hand Rehabilitation Approach in Stroke (CARAS: A practical and evidence-based framework for clinical rehabilitation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan A. Franck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The volume of information on new treatment techniques supporting the restoration of arm-hand function (AHF and arm-hand skill performance (ASHP in stroke survivors overwhelms therapists in everyday clinical practice when choosing the appropriate therapy. The Concise Arm and Hand Rehabilitation Approach in Stroke (CARAS is designed for paramedical staff to structure and implement training of AHF and AHSP in stroke survivors. The CARAS is based on four constructs: (a stratification according to the severity of arm–hand impairment (using the Utrecht Arm/Hand -Test [UAT], (b the individual’s rehabilitation goals and concomitant potential rehabilitation outcomes, (c principles of self-efficacy, and (d possibilities to systematically incorporate (new technology and new evidence-based training elements swiftly. The framework encompasses three programs aimed at treating either the severely (UAT 0-1, moderately (UAT 2-3, or mildly (UAT 4-7 impaired arm-hand. Program themes are: taking care of the limb and prevention of complications (Program 1, task-oriented gross motor grip performance (Program 2, and functional AHSP training (Program 3. Each program is preceded and followed by an assessment. Training modularity facilitates rapid interchange/adaptation of sub-elements. Proof-of-principle in clinical rehabilitation has been established. The CARAS facilitates rapid structured design and provision of state-of-the-art AHF and ASHP treatment in stroke patients.

  4. [The Determinants of Dysphagia in Patients With Stroke During Hospitalized Rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Li-Yun; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Tseng, Su-Mei; Huang, Tzu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    Stroke was the third leading cause of death in Taiwan in 2014. A study found that 53.61% of stroke patients suffered from dysphagia disorder during the rehabilitation phase, which may result in lung aspiration and death. The determinants of dysphagia among nationally hospitalized-rehabilitation stroke patients have not been explored comprehensively. To explore the incidence of dysphagia among hospitalized-rehabilitation stroke patients and the related determinants of dysphagia. This descriptive and correlational research design employed a convenience sample of 130 hospitalized stroke patients from rehabilitation wards at a northern regional hospital in Taiwan. A questionnaire and functional assessment were used to collect data. Instruments used included personal and clinical characteristics data questionnaire, the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Standardization Swallowing Assessment (SSA), and Acute Stroke Dysphagia Screening (ASDS). Data analyses contained descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The incidence of stroke dysphagia was 63.8% (SSA) and 64.6% (ASDS), respectively. Age, marital status, stroke site, stroke severity (NIHSS), and cognitive status (MMSE) were identified as significant determinants of dysphagia in bivariate logistic regression, whereas stroke severity and cognitive status were identified as significant independent determinants of dysphagia in multivariate logistic regression. Two-thirds of the participant sample were affected by dysphagia, for which NIHSS and cognitive status were identified as significant determinants. Thus, nurses may conduct early screening for high risk populations based on patients' clinical characteristics in order to reduce aspiration pneumonia problems and to improve the quality of clinical care for dysphagia patients.

  5. A Framework for (Tele-) Monitoring of the Rehabilitation Progress in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, V.; Haller, M.; Kotzian, S.; Hofmann, M.; Schlossarek, S.; Eichholzer, K.; Winkler, M.; Frohner, M.; Reichel, M.; Mayr, W.; Rafolt, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preservation of mobility in conjunction with an independent life style is one of the major goals of rehabilitation after stroke. Objectives The Rehab@Home framework shall support the continuation of rehabilitation at home. Methods The framework consists of instrumented insoles, connected wirelessly to a 3G ready tablet PC, a server, and a web-interface for medical experts. The rehabilitation progress is estimated via automated analysis of movement data from standardized assessment tests which are designed according to the needs of stroke patients and executed via the tablet PC application. Results The Rehab@Home framework’s implementation is finished and ready for the field trial (at five patients’ homes). Initial testing of the automated evaluation of the standardized mobility tests shows reproducible results. Conclusions Therefore it is assumed that the Rehab@Home framework is applicable as monitoring tool for the gait rehabilitation progress in stroke patients. PMID:26767068

  6. Robotic upper limb rehabilitation after acute stroke by NeReBot: evaluation of treatment costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Masiero; Patrizia, Poli; Mario, Armani; Ferlini, Gregorio; Rizzello, Roberto; Rosati, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the first cause of disability. Several robotic devices have been developed for stroke rehabilitation. Robot therapy by NeReBot is demonstrated to be an effective tool for the treatment of poststroke paretic upper limbs, able to improve the activities of daily living of stroke survivors when used both as additional treatment and in partial substitution of conventional rehabilitation therapy in the acute and subacute phases poststroke. This study presents the evaluation of the costs related to delivering such therapy, in comparison with conventional rehabilitation treatment. By comparing several NeReBot treatment protocols, made of different combinations of robotic and nonrobotic exercises, we show that robotic technology can be a valuable and economically sustainable aid in the management of poststroke patient rehabilitation.

  7. Acceptability of robotic technology in neuro-rehabilitation: preliminary results on chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Turchetti, Giuseppe; Palla, Ilaria; Posteraro, Federico; Dario, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    During the last decade, different robotic devices have been developed for motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors. These devices have been shown to improve motor impairment and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms underlying motor recovery after a stroke. The assessment of the robotic technology for rehabilitation assumes great importance. The aim of this study is to present preliminary results on the assessment of the acceptability of the robotic technology for rehabilitation on a group of thirty-four chronic stroke patients. The results from questionnaires on the patients' acceptability of two different robot-assisted rehabilitation scenarios show that the robotic approach was well accepted and tolerated by the patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Properties and outcomes of spinal rehabilitation units in four countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromovich-Amit, Y; Biering-Sørensen, F; Baskov, V

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Compare rehabilitation after spinal cord lesions (SCL) in different countries. DESIGN: Multicenter comparative study. SETTING: Four spinal rehabilitation units, in Denmark, Russia, Lithuania and Israel. SUBJECTS: 199 SCL patients. INTERVENTIONS: Information was collected about unit...... properties, rehabilitation objectives, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale and spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) assessments, and patient data. chi (2)-test, t-test, ANOVA and ANCOVA were used for statistical analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from lesion onset to admission...... for rehabilitation (TAR), length of stay in rehabilitation (LOS), SCIM and spinal cord ability realization measurement index (SCI-ARMI) scores, SCIM gain, SCI-ARMI gain and rehabilitation efficiency (RE). RESULTS: Differences were found between the units in rehabilitation objectives, facilities and special equipment...

  9. The Rehabilitation Activities Profile: a validation study of its use as a disability index with stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bennekom, C. A.; Jelles, F.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates the criterion, content, and construct validity of the Rehabilitation Activities Profile (RAP) in patients with stroke. This instrument is constructed for screening, monitoring, and prognosis purposes to assist clinical rehabilitation. It consists of 21 activities, covering the

  10. Stroke Survivors' Experiences of Physical Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Julie; Lynch, Elizabeth; Bernhardsson, Susanne; Bennett, Leanne; Bernhardt, Julie

    2015-09-01

    To report and synthesize the perspectives, experiences, and preferences of stroke survivors undertaking inpatient physical rehabilitation through a systematic review of qualitative studies. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO were searched from database inception to February 2014. Reference lists of relevant publications were searched. All languages were included. Qualitative studies reporting stroke survivors' experiences of inpatient stroke rehabilitation were selected independently by 2 reviewers. The search yielded 3039 records; 95 full-text publications were assessed for eligibility, and 32 documents (31 studies) were finally included. Comprehensiveness and explicit reporting were assessed independently by 2 reviewers using the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research framework. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Data regarding characteristics of the included studies were extracted by 1 reviewer, tabled, and checked for accuracy by another reviewer. All text reported in studies' results sections were entered into qualitative data management software for analysis. Extracted texts were inductively coded and analyzed in 3 phases using thematic synthesis. Nine interrelated analytical themes, with descriptive subthemes, were identified that related to issues of importance to stroke survivors: (1) physical activity is valued; (2) bored and alone; (3) patient-centered therapy; (4) recreation is also rehabilitation; (5) dependency and lack of control; (6) fostering autonomy; (7) power of communication and information; (8) motivation needs nurturing; and (9) fatigue can overwhelm. The thematic synthesis provides new insights into stroke survivors' experiences of inpatient rehabilitation. Negative experiences were reported in all studies and include disempowerment, boredom, and frustration. Rehabilitation could be improved by increasing activity within formal therapy and in free time, fostering patients' autonomy through genuinely patient

  11. Stroke rehabilitation evidence and comorbidity: a systematic scoping review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michelle L A; McKellar, Kaileah A; Yi, Juliana; Kelloway, Linda; Munce, Sarah; Cott, Cheryl; Hall, Ruth; Fortin, Martin; Teasell, Robert; Lyons, Renee

    2017-07-01

    Most strokes occur in the context of other medical diagnoses. Currently, stroke rehabilitation evidence reviews have not synthesized or presented evidence with a focus on comorbidities and correspondingly may not align with current patient population. The purpose of this review was to determine the extent and nature of randomized controlled trial stroke rehabilitation evidence that included patients with multimorbidity. A systematic scoping review was conducted. Electronic databases were searched using a combination of terms related to "stroke" and "rehabilitation." Selection criteria captured inpatient rehabilitation studies. Methods were modified to account for the amount of literature, classified by study design, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were abstracted. The database search yielded 10771 unique articles. Screening resulted in 428 included RCTs. Three studies explicitly included patients with a comorbid condition. Fifteen percent of articles did not specify additional conditions that were excluded. Impaired cognition was the most commonly excluded condition. Approximately 37% of articles excluded patients who had experienced a previous stroke. Twenty-four percent excluded patients one or more Charlson Index condition, and 83% excluded patients with at least one other medical condition. This review represents a first attempt to map literature on stroke rehabilitation related to co/multimorbidity and identify gaps in existing research. Existing evidence on stroke rehabilitation often excluded individuals with comorbidities. This is problematic as the evidence that is used to generate clinical guidelines may not match the patient typically seen in practice. The use of alternate research methods are therefore needed for studying the care of individuals with stroke and multimorbidity.

  12. Community Stroke Rehabilitation: How Do Rural Residents Fare Compared With Their Urban Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Laura; McIntyre, Amanda; Janzen, Shannon; Richardson, Marina; Meyer, Matthew; Ure, David; Teasell, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rural living has been demonstrated to have an effect on a person's overall health status, and rural residing individuals often have decreased access to health and specialized rehabilitation services. The aim of this study was to determine if there are differences in recovery from stroke between urban and rural-dwelling stroke survivors accessing an in-home, community-based, interdisciplinary, stroke rehabilitation program. Data from a cohort of 1222 stroke survivors receiving care from the Community Stroke Rehabilitation Teams between January 2009 and June 2013 was analyzed. This program delivers stroke rehabilitation care directly in a person's home and community. Functional and psychosocial outcomes were evaluated at baseline, discharge, and six -month follow-up. A series of multiple linear regression analyses was performed to determine if rural versus urban status was a significant predictor of discharge and 6-month health outcomes. The mean age of the rural cohort was 68.8 (±13.1) years (53.6% male), and the urban cohort was 68.4 (±13.0) years (44.8% male). A total of 278 (35.4%) individuals were classified as living in a rural area using the Rurality Index for Ontario. In multivariate linear regression analysis, no significant differences on the Functional Independence Measure, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, or the Reintegration to Normal Living Index were found between urban and rural cohorts. When provided with access to a home-based, specialized stroke rehabilitation program, rural dwelling stroke survivors make and maintain functional gains comparable to their urban-living counterparts.

  13. Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy in Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation: A Literature Review of Basic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina M. Chavez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO as an alternative and complementary strategy for stroke treatment and for improving stroke care. Clinical trial and meta-analysis findings have demonstrated the efficacy of acupuncture in improving balance function, reducing spasticity, and increasing muscle strength and general well-being post-stroke. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review, summarize the current known mechanisms in ischemic stroke rehabilitation through acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA therapy, and to detail the frequently used acupoints implicated in these effects. The evidence in this review indicates that five major different mechanisms are involved in the beneficial effects of acupuncture/EA on ischemic stroke rehabilitation: (1 Promotion of neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the central nervous system (CNS; (2 Regulation of cerebral blood flow in the ischemic area; (3 Anti-apoptosis in the ischemic area; (4 Regulation of neurochemicals; and, (5 Improvement of impaired long-term potentiation (LTP and memory after stroke. The most frequently used acupoints in basic studies include Baihui (GV20, Zusanli (ST36, Quchi (LI11, Shuigou (GV26, Dazhui (GV14, and Hegu (LI4. Our findings show that acupuncture exerts a beneficial effect on ischemic stroke through modulation of different mechanisms originating in the CNS.

  14. Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy in Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation: A Literature Review of Basic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Lina M; Huang, Shiang-Suo; MacDonald, Iona; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lee, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2017-10-28

    Acupuncture is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an alternative and complementary strategy for stroke treatment and for improving stroke care. Clinical trial and meta-analysis findings have demonstrated the efficacy of acupuncture in improving balance function, reducing spasticity, and increasing muscle strength and general well-being post-stroke. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review, summarize the current known mechanisms in ischemic stroke rehabilitation through acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) therapy, and to detail the frequently used acupoints implicated in these effects. The evidence in this review indicates that five major different mechanisms are involved in the beneficial effects of acupuncture/EA on ischemic stroke rehabilitation: (1) Promotion of neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the central nervous system (CNS); (2) Regulation of cerebral blood flow in the ischemic area; (3) Anti-apoptosis in the ischemic area; (4) Regulation of neurochemicals; and, (5) Improvement of impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory after stroke. The most frequently used acupoints in basic studies include Baihui (GV20), Zusanli (ST36), Quchi (LI11), Shuigou (GV26), Dazhui (GV14), and Hegu (LI4). Our findings show that acupuncture exerts a beneficial effect on ischemic stroke through modulation of different mechanisms originating in the CNS.

  15. Changes in serum growth factors in stroke rehabilitation patients and their relation to hemiparesis improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hideto; Beppu, Hidehiko; Mizutani, Kenmei; Okamoto, Sayaka; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Predicting recovery from hemiparesis after stroke is important for rehabilitation. A few recent studies reported that the levels of some growth factors shortly after stroke were positively correlated with the clinical outcomes during the chronic phase. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the serum levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I], and hepatocyte growth factor [HGF]) and improvement in hemiparesis in stroke patients who received rehabilitation in a postacute rehabilitation hospital. Subjects were 32 stroke patients (cerebral infarction: 21 and intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH]: 11). We measured serum levels of VEGF, IGF-I, and HGF and 5 items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) for hemiparesis on admission and at discharge. Age-matched healthy subjects (n=15) served as controls. Serum levels of VEGF and HGF in cerebral infarct patients on admission were higher than those in control subjects, and the serum levels of IGF-I in stroke patients were lower than those in controls. The level of HGF in ICH patients on admission was negatively correlated with gains in SIAS, and higher outliers in HGF concentration were correlated with lower gains in SIAS. Focusing on the extremely high levels of these factors may be a predictor of the low recovery from hemiparesis after stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Benchmarking rehabilitation practice in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Anna; Stevenson, Matt; Harlow, Stephanie Km

    2015-02-01

    Early rehabilitation in critically ill patients has been demonstrated to be safe and is associated with many positive outcomes. Despite this, there are inconsistencies in the early active rehabilitation that patients receive on intensive care units. The aims of this study were to quantify the amount of active rehabilitation provided for patients in a District General Hospital intensive care unit and to identify specific barriers encountered. Data were collected over a six-week period during March and April 2013. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit at St Peter's Hospital for more than 48 h were included. For every treatment session, the treating physiotherapist recorded what type of treatment took place. Treatments were classified as either non-active or active rehabilitation. Non-active rehabilitation included chest physiotherapy, passive range of movement exercises and hoisting to a chair. Active rehabilitation was defined as any treatment including active/active-assisted exercises, sitting on the edge of the bed, sitting to standing, standing transfers, marching on the spot or ambulation. Classification of rehabilitation was based upon internationally agreed intensive care unit activity codes and definitions. All barriers to active rehabilitation were also recorded. The study included 35 patients with a total of 194 physiotherapy treatment sessions. Active rehabilitation was included in 51% of all treatment sessions. The median time to commencing active rehabilitation from intensive care unit admission was 3 days (range 3-42 [IQR 3-7]). The most frequent barriers to active rehabilitation were sedation and endotracheal tubes, which together accounted for 50% of the total barriers. The study provides useful benchmarking of current rehabilitation activity in a District General Hospital intensive care unit and highlights the most common barriers encountered to active rehabilitation. Longer duration studies incorporating larger sample sizes are

  17. Meaningful task-specific training (MTST) for stroke rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Verma, Rajesh; Garg, R K; Sharma, V P; Agarwal, Monika; Aggarwal, G G

    2012-01-01

    The upper extremity motor deficit is one of the functional challenges in post stroke patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the meaningful task-specific training (MTST) on the upper extremity motor recovery during the subacute phase after a stroke. This was a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial in the neurology department of a university hospital and occupational therapy unit of a rehabilitation institute. A convenience sample of 103 people, 4 to 24 weeks (mean, 12.15 weeks) after the stroke, was randomized into 2 groups (MTST, 51; standard training group, 52). Subjects in the Brunnstrom stage of arm recovery of 2 to 5 were included in the study. Ninety-five participants completed the 8-week follow-up. Participants were assigned to receive either the MTST or dose-matched standard training program based on the Brunnstrom stage and Bobath neurodevelopmental technique, 4 to 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Graded Wolf Motor Function Test (GWMFT), and Motor Activity Log (MAL) were outcome measures The MTST group showed a positive improvement in the mean scores on the outcome measures at post and follow-up assessments in comparison to the control group. Further, statistically significant differences were observed in changes between the groups at post and follow-up assessment for FMA, ARAT, GWMFT, and MAL. The MTST produced statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements in the upper extremity motor recovery of the patients who had a subacute stroke.

  18. Rehabilitation robotics : stimulating restoration of arm function after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prange, Grada Berendina

    2009-01-01

    A cerebrovascular accident, or stroke, is major cause of mortality or permanent disability. Stroke can be defined as a neurological deficit due to damage to the blood supply of the brain. A stroke causes a destruction of brain tissue in areas that are subjected to blood deprivation. This can result

  19. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q 25 , 75 ) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men ( P stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Choice of Human-Computer Interaction Mode in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Hondori, Hossein; Khademi, Maryam; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; Lopes, Cristina V; Cramer, Steven C

    2016-03-01

    Advances in technology are providing new forms of human-computer interaction. The current study examined one form of human-computer interaction, augmented reality (AR), whereby subjects train in the real-world workspace with virtual objects projected by the computer. Motor performances were compared with those obtained while subjects used a traditional human-computer interaction, that is, a personal computer (PC) with a mouse. Patients used goal-directed arm movements to play AR and PC versions of the Fruit Ninja video game. The 2 versions required the same arm movements to control the game but had different cognitive demands. With AR, the game was projected onto the desktop, where subjects viewed the game plus their arm movements simultaneously, in the same visual coordinate space. In the PC version, subjects used the same arm movements but viewed the game by looking up at a computer monitor. Among 18 patients with chronic hemiparesis after stroke, the AR game was associated with 21% higher game scores (P = .0001), 19% faster reaching times (P = .0001), and 15% less movement variability (P = .0068), as compared to the PC game. Correlations between game score and arm motor status were stronger with the AR version. Motor performances during the AR game were superior to those during the PC game. This result is due in part to the greater cognitive demands imposed by the PC game, a feature problematic for some patients but clinically useful for others. Mode of human-computer interface influences rehabilitation therapy demands and can be individualized for patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. An interactive distance solution for stroke rehabilitation in the home setting - A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmcrantz, Susanne; Borg, Jörgen; Sommerfeld, Disa; Plantin, Jeanette; Wall, Anneli; Ehn, Maria; Sjölinder, Marie; Boman, Inga-Lill

    2017-09-01

    In this study an interactive distance solution (called the DISKO tool) was developed to enable home-based motor training after stroke. The overall aim was to explore the feasibility and safety of using the DISKO-tool, customized for interactive stroke rehabilitation in the home setting, in different rehabilitation phases after stroke. Fifteen patients in three different stages in the continuum of rehabilitation after stroke participated in a home-based training program using the DISKO-tool. The program included 15 training sessions with recurrent follow-ups by the integrated application for video communication with a physiotherapist. Safety and feasibility were assessed from patients, physiotherapists, and a technician using logbooks, interviews, and a questionnaire. Qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics were used in the analysis. Fourteen out of 15 patients finalized the training period with a mean of 19.5 minutes spent on training at each session. The DISKO-tool was found to be useful and safe by patients and physiotherapists. This study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of the DISKO-tool and provides guidance in further development and testing of interactive distance technology for home rehabilitation, to be used by health care professionals and patients in different phases of rehabilitation after stroke.

  2. The stroke impact scale: performance as a quality of life measure in a community-based stroke rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Marina; Campbell, Nerissa; Allen, Laura; Meyer, Matthew; Teasell, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Data was derived from a study assessing a community-based stroke rehabilitation program. Patients were administered the SIS and Euroqol-5D (EQ-5D-5L) on admission to the study, and at six month and 12 month follow-up. The psychometric performance of each domain of the SIS was assessed at each time point. A total of 164 patients completed outcome measures at baseline, 108 patients at six months and 37 patients at 12 months. Correlation of the SIS domains with the EQ-5D-5L suggested that the dimensions of health contributing to a patient's perception of health-related quality of life changes over time. The SIS performed well in a sample of patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation in the community. Our findings suggest that the multidimensionality of the SIS may allow health professionals to track patient progress and tailor rehabilitation interventions to target the dimensions of health that are most important to a patient's overall health and perceived quality of life over time. Implications for Rehabilitation There is an increased need for valid and reliable measures to evaluate the outcomes of patients recovering from stroke in the community. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) measures multiple domains of health and is well-suited for use in patients recovering from stroke in the community. There is a high level of internal consistency in the eight SIS domains with no evidence of floor effects; ceiling effects were noted for several domains. Correlation of the SIS with the Euroqol-5D suggested that the dimensions of health contributing to a patient's perception of health related quality of life changes over time.

  3. Location of the ischemic focus in rehabilitated stroke patients with impairment of executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Agnieszka M; Klimkiewicz, Robert; Kubsik, Anna; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Śmigielski, Janusz; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-08-01

    Executive dysfunctions are part of the clinical symptoms of a stroke and can inhibit the process of rehabilitation. Patients with impaired executive functions may manifest aggression, impulsiveness, impaired thinking and planning. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the ischemic focus location on the effectiveness of physiotherapy in improving the executive functions in patients after stroke. Ninety patients after unilateral ischemic cerebral stroke were studied. We studied 45 patients treated at the Department of Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine of the WAM University Hospital of Lodz for 5 weeks. The rehabilitation program included: kinesitherapy, physiotherapy, speech therapy, psychological consultations and psychotherapy. The control group consisted of patients who were waiting for admission to the Department of Rehabilitation. The patients in both groups were divided into three subgroups with different locations of stroke: front, back and subcortical. Executive functions were measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the trail making test (TMT - A, TMT - B), the verbal fluency test (VFT). Patients rehabilitated in the hospital with the front and subcortical lesion location reported improvement in executive functions in terms of a greater number of the analyzed indicators of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) than those with the back lesion location. Patients rehabilitated at home with the subcortical lesion location did not experience a significant improvement in executive functions in any of the analyzed indicators of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Most of the indicators, with the exception of the total errors of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and TMT B, have not been modified by the location of stroke. Executive dysfunction occurs not only in patients with an anterior location of the stroke, but also in the posterior and subcortical locations. Patients with a subcortical location of the stroke require more

  4. Art participation for psychosocial wellbeing during stroke rehabilitation: a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqui H; Kelly, Chris; Joice, Sara; Kroll, Thilo; Mead, Gillian; Donnan, Peter; Toma, Madalina; Williams, Brian

    2017-08-30

    To examine the feasibility of undertaking a pragmatic single-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a visual arts participation programme to evaluate effects on survivor wellbeing within stroke rehabilitation. Stroke survivors receiving in-patient rehabilitation were randomised to receive eight art participation sessions (n = 41) or usual care (n = 40). Recruitment, retention, preference for art participation and change in selected outcomes were evaluated at end of intervention outcome assessment and three-month follow-up. Of 315 potentially eligible participants 81 (29%) were recruited. 88% (n = 71) completed outcome and 77% (n = 62) follow-up assessments. Of eight intervention group non-completers, six had no preference for art participation. Outcome completion varied between 97% and 77%. Running groups was difficult because of randomisation timing. Effectiveness cannot be determined from this feasibility study but effects sizes suggested art participation may benefit emotional wellbeing, measured on the positive and negative affect schedule, and self-efficacy for Art (d = 0.24-0.42). Undertaking a RCT of art participation within stroke rehabilitation was feasible. Art participation may enhance self-efficacy and positively influence emotional wellbeing. These should be outcomes in a future definitive trial. A cluster RCT would ensure art groups could be reliably convened. Fewer measures, and better retention strategies are required. Implications for Rehabilitation This feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) showed that recruiting and retaining stroke survivors in an RCT of a visual arts participation intervention within stroke rehabilitation was feasible. Preference to participate in art activities may influence recruitment and drop-out rates, and should be addressed and evaluated fully. Art participation as part of rehabilitation may improve some aspects of post-stroke wellbeing, including positive affect and self-efficacy for art

  5. Adherence to postacute rehabilitation guidelines is associated with functional recovery in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Pamela W; Horner, Ronnie D; Reker, Dean M; Samsa, Gregory P; Hoenig, Helen; Hamilton, Byron; LaClair, Barbara J; Dudley, Tara K

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if compliance with poststroke rehabilitation guidelines was associated with better functional outcomes. An inception cohort of 288 stroke patients in 11 Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Centers hospitalized between January 1998 and March 1999 were followed prospectively for 6 months. Data were abstracted from medical records and telephone interviews. The primary study outcome was the Functional Independence Motor Score (FIM). Secondary outcomes included Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), SF-36 physical functioning, and the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Acute and postacute rehabilitation guideline compliance scores (range 0 to 100) were derived from an algorithm. All outcomes were adjusted for case-mix. Average compliance scores in acute and postacute care settings were 68.2% (SD 14) and 69.5% (SD 14.4), respectively. After case-mix adjustment, level of compliance with postacute rehabilitation guidelines was significantly associated with FIM motor, IADL, and the SIS physical domain scores. SF-36 physical function was not associated with guideline compliance. Level of compliance with rehabilitation guidelines in acute settings was unrelated to any of the outcome measures. Greater levels of adherence to postacute stroke rehabilitation guidelines were associated with improved patient outcomes. Compliance with guidelines may be viewed as a quality-of-care indicator with which to evaluate new organizational and funding changes involving postacute stroke rehabilitation.

  6. Acute stroke unit improves stroke management-four years on from INASC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, E; Keenan, R; Cunningham, N; O'Malley, G; O'Connor, M; Lyons, D; Peters, C

    2015-02-01

    The Irish Heart Foundation carried out the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC) in 2008. Management practices were significantly poorer than those in the UK Sentinel audits. Since then an acute stroke unit has been established in University Hospital Limerick. A stroke database was established. 12 key indicators of stroke management audited by INASC were identified. Results were compared to those in INASC. 89 stroke patients were admitted. 8 of the 12 key indicators scored significantly better than in INASC. 92.5% had a brain scan within 24hrs (INASC-40%, p = strokes received anti-thrombotics (INASC-85%, p = 0.001). 94% had rehab goals agreed by MDT (22% in INASC p = 0.0000). 55% were treated in stroke unit (2% in INASC, p = 0.0000). MDT input improved with regard to physiotherapy (87% vs 43% in INASC, p = Stroke management has significantly improved from 2008, however some deficiencies remain.

  7. The cost of pediatric stroke care and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Warren; Zamel, Khaled; Ponnappa, Kavita; Allen, Antoni; Chisolm, Deena; Tang, Monica; Kerlin, Bryce; Yeates, Keith O

    2008-01-01

    There is little data regarding the cost of pediatric stroke care or the elements that contribute to these costs. We examined costs for poststroke care during the first year after diagnosis and compared these costs with the volume of the cerebral infarct and the level of neurological and functional outcome. We identified 39 children who sustained nontraumatic ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes and confirmed the diagnoses by review of medical and radiology records. Medical costs were tabulated for the year after the diagnosis of stroke. Cerebral infarct volumes were measured from MRI or CT scans. Neurological outcome was assessed by telephone with a modification of the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM), and functional outcomes were assessed with a standardized quality-of-life measure. The median cost for poststroke care during the year after diagnosis was $42,338 for the entire group. The cost for stroke care was higher for hemorrhagic stroke than for ischemic stroke. Cost had a significant positive correlation with neurological impairment. The modified PSOM score positively correlated with impairments of physical, emotional, social, and school function. The cost of stroke care may be one measure of stroke severity, with more extensive strokes resulting in greater medical costs. In addition, stroke appears to impair children's social ability along with their neurological function.

  8. Fight like a ferret: a novel approach of using art therapy to reduce anxiety in stroke patients undergoing hospital rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khalid; Gammidge, Tony; Waller, Diane

    2014-06-01

    The holistic aspect of stroke rehabilitation to include psychological well-being is currently neglected, with more emphasis placed on physical recovery despite anxiety and depression being common poststroke. From the limited amount of current literature, it seems that creative strategies such as art therapy (AT) can be beneficial in reducing isolation and anxiety among stroke patients. Stroke patients (able to consent) in a hospital rehabilitation unit were invited to participate in two weekly AT sessions for 6 weeks, facilitated by an art psychotherapist using paints, crayons, clay, a camera and an iPad. Hospital anxiety and depression scales (HAD) and therapy outcome measures (TOM) were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Six male patients were recruited, average age 69 years (38-85). Group discussions allowed patients to express openly feelings of frustration as well as hope for physical and emotional recovery: 'fight like a ferret', an expression used by a group member. The group produced several art objects and photographic images that were collated using stop-frame animation to produce a 10 min film. Median HAD score for the group was eight points upon entering the study and six points on finishing the study. There is little attention to the emotional needs of stroke patients in rehabilitation. Properly designed research studies exploring the role of AT in addressing anxiety and depression poststroke are needed. Our study showed that AT was a feasible intervention that helped patients explore the sequel of stroke in an open supportive environment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Nitrogen balance in patients with hemiparetic stroke during the subacute rehabilitation phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, A; Kawakami, M; Otsuka, T; Aoki, H; Anzai, A; Yamada, Y; Liu, F; Otaka, E; Akaboshi, K; Liu, M

    2017-06-01

    In highly invasive diseases, metabolism commonly changes. Hypercatabolism is frequent in acute stroke, and nitrogen balance tends to be negative. However, there has been no study describing nitrogen balance in subacute and chronic stroke patients. The present study aimed to examine nitrogen balance in the subacute and chronic phases and to identify the factors related to it. Nitrogen balance was calculated from the collected urine of 56 patients with subacute stroke [mean (SD) 53.8 (18.4) days post-stroke] who were admitted for rehabilitation for their first-ever ischaemic or nonsurgical haemorrhagic stroke. In the first experiment, their nitrogen balance was measured during the rehabilitation phase, and factors (type, severity of hemiparesis, activities of daily living, dysphagia and malnutrition status) related to it were evaluated. The second experiment was performed to describe the time course of nitrogen balance in 31 consecutive patients, with assessments made at admission and at discharge. Nitrogen balance was positive in all patients in the subacute phase. A significant difference was seen in nitrogen balance between high and low fat-free mass in male patients. In the chronic phase, nitrogen balance was positive in 96% of the patients. There was no significant difference in nitrogen balance between discharge and admission. In the subacute and chronic phases of stroke, it was confirmed that hypercatabolism had resolved and that intensive rehabilitation is possible in the convalescent period of stroke. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Impact of state Medicaid coverage on utilization of inpatient rehabilitation facilities among patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Burke, James F; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Meurer, William J; Adelman, Eric E; Kerber, Kevin A; Callaghan, Brian C; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2014-08-01

    Poststroke rehabilitation is associated with improved outcomes. Medicaid coverage of inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) admissions varies by state. We explored the role of state Medicaid IRF coverage on IRF utilization among patients with stroke. Working age ischemic stroke patients with Medicaid were identified from the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Medicaid coverage of IRFs (yes versus no) was ascertained. Primary outcome was discharge to IRF (versus other discharge destinations). We fit a logistic regression model that included patient demographics, Medicaid coverage, comorbidities, length of stay, tissue-type plasminogen activator use, state Medicaid IRF coverage, and the interaction between patient Medicaid status and state Medicaid IRF coverage while accounting for hospital clustering. Medicaid did not cover IRFs in 4 (TN, TX, SC, WV) of 42 states. The impact of State Medicaid IRF coverage was limited to Medicaid stroke patients (P for interaction stroke patients in states with Medicaid IRF coverage, Medicaid stroke patients hospitalized in states without Medicaid IRF coverage were less likely to be discharged to an IRF of 11.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.5%-14.7%) versus 19.5% (95% confidence interval, 18.3%-20.8%), Pstroke patients with Medicaid. Given the increasing stroke incidence among the working age and Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, careful attention to state Medicaid policy for poststroke rehabilitation and analysis of its effects on stroke outcome disparities are warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Properties and outcomes of spinal rehabilitation units in four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromovich-Amit, Y; Biering-Sørensen, F; Baskov, V; Juocevicius, A; Hansen, H V; Gelernter, I; Hart, J; Baskov, A; Dreval, O; Terese, P; Catz, A

    2009-08-01

    Compare rehabilitation after spinal cord lesions (SCL) in different countries. Multicenter comparative study. Four spinal rehabilitation units, in Denmark, Russia, Lithuania and Israel. 199 SCL patients. Information was collected about unit properties, rehabilitation objectives, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale and spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) assessments, and patient data. chi (2)-test, t-test, ANOVA and ANCOVA were used for statistical analysis. Time from lesion onset to admission for rehabilitation (TAR), length of stay in rehabilitation (LOS), SCIM and spinal cord ability realization measurement index (SCI-ARMI) scores, SCIM gain, SCI-ARMI gain and rehabilitation efficiency (RE). Differences were found between the units in rehabilitation objectives, facilities and special equipment for rehabilitation. Staff/bed ratio was 1.7 in Lithuania and Denmark, 1.1 in Israel and 0.9 in Russia. Russian patients were the youngest and had the most severe lesions among participating units. Admission SCIM and SCI-ARMI were the lowest in Israel: 25.1+/-17.2 and 34.3+/-17.3. TAR was highest in Russia (12.4 month) and lowest in Israel (2 weeks; PSCIM score at the end of rehabilitation was highest in Denmark (67.3+/-23). SCIM gain and SCI ARMI gain were highest in Israel (36.9+/-18.3 and 38.5+/-19.4, respectively) and lowest in Russia (P<0.001). RE was highest in Lithuania and lowest in Denmark (P<0.001). In the participating units, SCL rehabilitation outcomes depend on SCL severity and unit-specific properties. A moderately delayed rehabilitation with long LOS achieved high functioning, and early or slightly delayed rehabilitation combined with shorter LOS achieved high functional gain or efficiency.

  12. A knowledge translation intervention to enhance clinical application of a virtual reality system in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Glegg, Stephanie M N; Sveistrup, Heidi; Colquhoun, Heather; Miller, Patricia A; Finestone, Hillel; DePaul, Vincent; Harris, Jocelyn E; Velikonja, Diana

    2016-10-06

    Despite increasing evidence for the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR)-based therapy in stroke rehabilitation, few knowledge translation (KT) resources exist to support clinical integration. KT interventions addressing known barriers and facilitators to VR use are required. When environmental barriers to VR integration are less amenable to change, KT interventions can target modifiable barriers related to therapist knowledge and skills. A multi-faceted KT intervention was designed and implemented to support physical and occupational therapists in two stroke rehabilitation units in acquiring proficiency with use of the Interactive Exercise Rehabilitation System (IREX; GestureTek). The KT intervention consisted of interactive e-learning modules, hands-on workshops and experiential practice. Evaluation included the Assessing Determinants of Prospective Take Up of Virtual Reality (ADOPT-VR) Instrument and self-report confidence ratings of knowledge and skills pre- and post-study. Usability of the IREX was measured with the System Usability Scale (SUS). A focus group gathered therapist experiences. Frequency of IREX use was recorded for 6 months post-study. Eleven therapists delivered a total of 107 sessions of VR-based therapy to 34 clients with stroke. On the ADOPT-VR, significant pre-post improvements in therapist perceived behavioral control (p = 0.003), self-efficacy (p = 0.005) and facilitating conditions (p =0.019) related to VR use were observed. Therapist intention to use VR did not change. Knowledge and skills improved significantly following e-learning completion (p = 0.001) and was sustained 6 months post-study. Below average perceived usability of the IREX (19 th percentile) was reported. Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to VR use. A decrease in frequency of perceived barriers to VR use was not significant (p = 0.159). Two therapists used the IREX sparingly in the 6 months following the study. Therapists reported

  13. Need for cognitive rehabilitation for children with sickle cell disease and strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison A; DeBaun, Michael R; White, Desiree A

    2008-02-01

    Stroke is a significant cause of morbidity among children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Approximately 30% of children with sickle cell anemia will have either an overt stroke or silent infarct (an injury to the brain that does not have any focal neurological findings or a history of focal neurological deficits). Despite the strong association between stroke and cognitive deficits and poor educational attainment, few interventions have been developed to address this vulnerable population of children. A cognitive rehabilitation program was piloted to improve the memory and educational achievement of children with sickle cell disease and stroke. While the intervention was feasible, additional research is needed to establish efficacy. Ongoing studies are designed to improve the cognitive impairment for children with SCD and stroke. The health and educational systems will need to work as partners to improve the cognitive and educational outcomes of these children after they suffer from stroke.

  14. Upper limb movements and cerebral plasticity in post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Carraro, Elena

    2008-04-01

    Rehabilitative interventions for the plegic/paretic upper limb of stroke survivors are more effective if they are early, intensive, and provide multisensory stimulation. Various rehabilitative approaches have been proposed to date, but little has been published on clinical efficacy. The mechanism underlying recovery of neurological injury after stroke is still incompletely understood, but more than one process is probably involved and cerebral plasticity undoubtedly plays a key role. The goal of this review was to identify which movements and type of therapeutic arm exercises may influence cerebral plasticity in plegic/paretic stroke survivors. Evidence suggests that plasticity is stimulated more by the arm's movement trajectory than by its final position in space. Rehabilitation should be based on simple, repetitive, unidirectional or, better still, complex and multidirectional movements in all spatial planes, such as circular or spiral movements. It should also incorporate a feedback system, since this seems to bring about earlier and better motor and functional outcomes.

  15. The combined perceptions of people with stroke and their carers regarding rehabilitation needs 1 year after stroke: a mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstam, Lisa; Johansson, Ulla; Guidetti, Susanne; Eriksson, Gunilla; Ytterberg, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to explore the associations between the dyad’s (person with stroke and informal caregiver) perception of the person with stroke’s rehabilitation needs and stroke severity, personal factors (gender, age, sense of coherence), the use of rehabilitation services, amount of informal care and caregiver burden. Further, the aim was to explore the personal experience of everyday life changes among persons with stroke and their caregivers and their strategies for handling these 1 year after stroke. Design A mixed methods design was used combining quantitative and qualitative data and analyses. Setting Data were mainly collected in the participants’ homes. Outcome measures Data were collected through established instruments and open-ended interviews. The dyad's perceptions of the person with stroke’s rehabilitation needs were assessed by the persons with stroke and their informal caregivers using a questionnaire based on Ware’s taxonomy. The results were combined and classified into three groups: met, discordant (ie, not in agreement) and unmet rehabilitation needs. To assess sense of coherence (SOC) in persons with stroke, the SOC-scale was used. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregiver Burden Scale. Data on the use of rehabilitation services were obtained from the computerised register at the Stockholm County Council. Participants 86 persons with stroke (mean age 73 years, 38% women) and their caregivers (mean age 65 years, 40% women). Results Fifty-two per cent of the dyads perceived that the person with stroke’s need for rehabilitation was met 12 months after stroke. Met rehabilitation needs were associated with less severe stroke, more coping strategies for solving problems in everyday activities and less caregiver burden. Conclusions Rehabilitation interventions need to focus on supporting the dyads’ process of psychological and social adaptation after stroke. Future studies need to explore and evaluate

  16. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  17. Increasing the amount of usual rehabilitation improves activity after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Schneider

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Questions: In people receiving rehabilitation aimed at reducing activity limitations of the lower and/or upper limb after stroke, does adding extra rehabilitation (of the same content as the usual rehabilitation improve activity? What is the amount of extra rehabilitation that needs to be provided to achieve a beneficial effect? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults aged 18 years or older that had a diagnosis of stroke. Intervention: Extra rehabilitation with the same content as usual rehabilitation aimed at reducing activity limitations of the lower and/or upper limb. Outcome measures: Activity measured as lower or upper limb ability. Results: A total of 14 studies, comprising 15 comparisons, met the inclusion criteria. Pooling data from all the included studies showed that extra rehabilitation improved activity immediately after the intervention period (SMD = 0.39, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.71, I2 = 66%. When only studies with a large increase in rehabilitation (> 100% were included, the effect was greater (SMD 0.59, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.94, I2 = 44%. There was a trend towards a positive relationship (r = 0.53, p = 0.09 between extra rehabilitation and improved activity. The turning point on the ROC curve of false versus true benefit (AUC = 0.88, p = 0.04 indicated that at least an extra 240% of rehabilitation was needed for significant likelihood that extra rehabilitation would improve activity. Conclusion: Increasing the amount of usual rehabilitation aimed at reducing activity limitations improves activity in people after stroke. The amount of extra rehabilitation that needs to be provided to achieve a beneficial effect is large. Trial registration: PROSPERO CRD42012003221. [Schneider EJ, Lannin NA, Ada L, Schmidt J (2016 Increasing the amount of usual rehabilitation improves activity after stroke: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 62: 182–187

  18. Rehabilitation of stroke patients using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbritt, David; van der Riet, Pamela; Dedkhard, Saowapa; Srithong, Kannapatch

    2012-07-01

    To determine quantitatively if a unique rehabilitation program using traditional Thai massage, herbal treatments and physical therapies could improve activities of daily living, mood and sleep patterns, and pain intensity of stroke patients over time. This was a prospective cohort study, conducted over a three-month period. Patients were recruited from a 42-bed rehabilitation centre in Northern Thailand, which admits mainly stroke, head injury and spinal patients for rehabilitation. There were 62 patients enrolled in the study, with 55% being male. The average age of patients was 59 years and 63% were married. The average time since the initial stroke was 15 months. At baseline, the average Barthel Index score was 50.7, and the average emotion, pain and sleep scores were 2.6, 3.1, and 3.2, respectively. After adjusting for age, gender and time since initial stroke in the longitudinal model, the Barthel Index significantly improved by 6.1 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 14.2 points after three months (P<0.01); emotion significantly improved by 0.7 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.9 points after three months (P<0.01); pain significantly improved by 0.5 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.5 points after three months (P<0.01); sleep significantly improved by 0.5 points after one month (P<0.01) and by 0.6 points after three months (P<0.01). This unique stroke rehabilitation program has produced significant improvements in activities of daily living, mood, pain and sleep patterns of stroke patients. These findings warrant the need for further research to compare patients undergoing this program of rehabilitation with patients undergoing more conventional rehabilitation programs.

  19. Stroke rehabilitation and risk of mortality: a population-based cohort study stratified by age and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Ni, Cheng-Hua; Li, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Lin, Li-Fong; Shen, Hsiu-Nien

    2015-06-01

    To determine the survival of patients with stroke for up to 10 years after a first-time stroke and to investigate whether stroke rehabilitation within the first 3 months reduced long-term mortality in these patients. We used the medical claims data for a random sample of 1 million insured Taiwanese registered in the year 2000. A total of 7767 patients admitted for a first-time stroke between 2000 and 2005; 1285 (16.7%) received rehabilitation within the first 3 months after stroke admission. The other 83.3% of patients served as a comparison cohort. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk of mortality in relation to the rehabilitation intervention. In all, 181 patients with rehabilitation and 1123 controls died, representing respective mortality rates of 25.0 and 32.7 per 1000 person-years. Rehabilitation was significantly associated with a lower risk of mortality (hazard ratio .68, 95% confidence interval .58-.79). Such a beneficial effect tended to be more obvious as the frequency of rehabilitation increased (P for the trend Stroke rehabilitation initiated in the first 3 months after a stroke admission may significantly reduce the risk of mortality for 10 years after the stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. On-line 'automatic pilot' training for hand and arm motor rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinhua; Sun, Yaoru; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    As stroke being one of the most leading causes of death worldwide, even stroke survivors have to suffer from dysfunctions of limb controls and inabilities of speech or vision. Cognitive neuroscientists have found various forms of automatic behaviours in healthy people, which generally cover motor components of upper limbs and are essential for coordination and mobility relevant activities. Meanwhile, the robot-assisted therapy and functional electrical stimulation have become prominent rehabilitation techniques for patients' rehabilitation after stroke. With the integration of robot-aided therapeutic systems and the functional electrical stimulation, the on-line 'automatic pilot' training of the visual inspired stimulation for upper limbs can offer a feasible treatment for patients after stroke to recover motor performance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stroke patient's experiences with Wii Sport® during inpatient rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celinder, Dora; Peoples, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Commercial virtual reality games have been used as adjunct therapy for stroke rehabilitation, mainly after patients have been discharged. The aim of this study was to explore stroke patients' experiences with Wii Sports® as a supplement to conventional occupational therapy...... were confirmed by field notes that included observations of engagement and challenges. DISCUSSION: Stroke patients in hospital settings may experience Wii Sports® as a beneficial and challenging occupation for both rehabilitation and leisure. Incorporation of Wii Sports® into conventional occupational...... in a controlled hospital setting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study had a qualitative triangulation design that included semi-structured interviews and field notes. Nine Danish stroke patients participated, receiving between one and nine interventions with Wii Sports® during a three-week period. Responses were...

  2. Investigations into Brain-Computer Interfacing for Stroke Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Leamy, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    A stroke is the loss of brain function following the cessation of blood supply to a region of the brain caused by either a blockage or haemorrhage in the vasculature. It is a leading cause of death worldwide but survival rates have increased significantly in the past 25 years with recent estimates putting the number of worldwide stroke survivors at 33 million. Stroke survivors live with lasting effects such as limb weakness, limb paralysis, loss of speech, loss of comprehens...

  3. Tailor-made rehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb robots for acute stroke patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Takashi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Saita, Kazuya; Hyakutake, Koichi; Watanabe, Junko; Shiota, Etsuji; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    This article investigated the feasibility of a tailor-made neurorehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robots for acute stroke patients. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent rehabilitation using the HAL robots. The Brunnstrom stage, Barthel index (BI), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated at baseline and when patients were transferred to a rehabilitation facility. Scores were compared between the multiple-robot rehabilitation and single-robot rehabilitation groups. Nine hemiplegic acute stroke patients (five men and four women; mean age 59.4 ± 12.5 years; four hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using multiple types of HAL robots for 19.4 ± 12.5 days, and 14 patients (six men and eight women; mean age 63.2 ± 13.9 years; nine hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using a single type of HAL robot for 14.9 ± 8.9 days. The multiple-robot rehabilitation group showed significantly better outcomes in the Brunnstrom stage of the upper extremity, BI, and FIM scores. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first pilot study demonstrating the feasibility of rehabilitation using multiple exoskeleton robots. The tailor-made rehabilitation approach may be useful for the treatment of acute stroke.

  4. The efficacy of mirror therapy combined with conventional stroke rehabilitation program on motor and functional recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Kuzgun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A variety of methods is used in the treatment of upper extremity functional impairment after stroke.In recent years, a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of stroke rehabilitation is the mirror therapy.The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of mirror therapy,which is applied through motor imagination training, combined with conventional stroke rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in patients with subacute stroke. MATERIAL and METHODS: This is a randomized,prospective,controlled single-blind trial.The study included 20 patients who were diagnosed with stroke.Patients were randomly divided into two groups:first group received conventional rehabilitation program and the second group received conventional rehabilitation program plus mirror therapy on nonparetic upper extremity consisting of wrist extension daily 4 times for 15minutes per session. Both groups received the conventional rehabilitation program for 4 weeks, 5 days a week and daily 1-2h. All patients were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the treatment(week 4.The evaluations were performed by using Brunnstrom Staging, Fugl Meyer Motor Function Scale(FM,Barthel Index(BI and goniometric measurement of wrist extension. RESULTS: The Brunnstrom stage(p<0.01, total score on FM and BI scores (p<0.01 were improved at week 4 compared to the baseline, whereas wrist subscore on FM and the goniometric measurements of the wrist and wrist extension were significantly improved only in group II.The two treatment groups were not statistically different in terms of posttreatment evaluation parameters. CONCLUSION: In our study,the mirror therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation program was not superior to conventional rehabilitation program alone in terms of upper extremity motor and functional recovery.

  5. Detecting Movement Intent from Scalp EEG in a Novel Upper Limb Robotic Rehabilitation System for Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Francisco, Gerard E.; O’Malley, Marcia K.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke can be a source of significant upper extremity dysfunction and affect the quality of life (QoL) in survivors. In this context, novel rehabilitation approaches employing robotic rehabilitation devices combined with brain-machine interfaces can greatly help in expediting functional recovery in these individuals by actively engaging the user during therapy. However, optimal training conditions and parameters for these novel therapeutic systems are still unknown. Here, we present preliminary findings demonstrating successful movement intent detection from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) during robotic rehabilitation using the MAHI Exo-II in an individual with hemiparesis following stroke. These findings have strong clinical implications for the development of closed-loop brain-machine interfaces to robotic rehabilitation systems. PMID:25570900

  6. Rehabilitation of motor function after stroke: a multiple systematic review focused on techniques to stimulate upper extremity recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Hatem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes for disability worldwide. Motor function deficits due to stroke affect the patients’ mobility, their limitation in daily life activities, their participation in society and their odds of returning to professional activities. All of these factors contribute to a low overall quality of life. Rehabilitation training is the most effective way to reduce motor impairments in stroke patients. This multiple systematic review focuses both on standard treatment methods and on innovating rehabilitation techniques used to promote upper extremity motor function in stroke patients. A total number of 5712 publications on stroke rehabilitation was systematically reviewed for relevance and quality with regards to upper extremity motor outcome. This procedure yielded 270 publications corresponding to the inclusion criteria of the systematic review. Recent technology-based interventions in stroke rehabilitation including non-invasive brain stimulation, robot-assisted training and virtual reality immersion are addressed. Finally, a decisional tree based on evidence from the literature and characteristics of stroke patients is proposed.At present, the stroke rehabilitation field faces the challenge to tailor evidence-based treatment strategies to the needs of the individual stroke patient. Interventions can be combined in order to achieve the maximal motor function recovery for each patient. Though the efficacy of some interventions may be under debate, motor skill learning and some new technological approaches give promising outcome prognosis in stroke motor rehabilitation.

  7. Rehabilitation of Motor Function after Stroke: A Multiple Systematic Review Focused on Techniques to Stimulate Upper Extremity Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, Samar M.; Saussez, Geoffroy; della Faille, Margaux; Prist, Vincent; Zhang, Xue; Dispa, Delphine; Bleyenheuft, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes for disability worldwide. Motor function deficits due to stroke affect the patients' mobility, their limitation in daily life activities, their participation in society and their odds of returning to professional activities. All of these factors contribute to a low overall quality of life. Rehabilitation training is the most effective way to reduce motor impairments in stroke patients. This multiple systematic review focuses both on standard treatment methods and on innovating rehabilitation techniques used to promote upper extremity motor function in stroke patients. A total number of 5712 publications on stroke rehabilitation was systematically reviewed for relevance and quality with regards to upper extremity motor outcome. This procedure yielded 270 publications corresponding to the inclusion criteria of the systematic review. Recent technology-based interventions in stroke rehabilitation including non-invasive brain stimulation, robot-assisted training, and virtual reality immersion are addressed. Finally, a decisional tree based on evidence from the literature and characteristics of stroke patients is proposed. At present, the stroke rehabilitation field faces the challenge to tailor evidence-based treatment strategies to the needs of the individual stroke patient. Interventions can be combined in order to achieve the maximal motor function recovery for each patient. Though the efficacy of some interventions may be under debate, motor skill learning, and some new technological approaches give promising outcome prognosis in stroke motor rehabilitation. PMID:27679565

  8. Challenges in integrating international evidence relating to stroke rehabilitation: experiences from a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Pauline; Baer, Gillian; Choo, Pei Ling; Forster, Anne; Morris, Jacqui; Pomeroy, Valerie M; Langhorne, Peter

    2014-12-01

    There are many randomized controlled trials relating to stroke rehabilitation being carried out in China, which are often published in Chinese-language journals. A recent update to our Cochrane systematic review of physical rehabilitation to improve function and mobility after stroke included 96 trials; over half (51) were conducted in China; 37 of these included studies were published in Chinese. Analyses within this Cochrane review support the conclusion that physical rehabilitation, using a mix of components from different approaches, is effective for the recovery of function and mobility after stroke. The inclusion of the Chinese studies had a substantial impact on the volume of evidence and, consequently, the conclusions. In this paper, we explore whether it is appropriate to draw implications for clinical practice throughout the world from evidence relating to a complex rehabilitation intervention delivered within one particular geographical healthcare setting. We explore the unique challenges associated with incorporating the body of evidence from China, particularly the Chinese-language publications, and identify the ongoing debate about the quality of Chinese research publications. We conclude that the growing body of evidence from China has important implications for future systematic reviews and evidence-based stroke care, but analysis and interpretation raise challenges, and improved reporting is critical. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  9. Protocol for audit of current Filipino practice in rehabilitation of stroke inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Consuelo B; Dizon, Janine Margarita R; Grimmer, Karen; Estrada, Myrna S; Liao, Lauren Anne S; Malleta, Anne-Rochelle D; Tan, Ma Elena R; Marfil, Vero; Versales, Cristina S; Suarez, Jimah L; So, Kleon C; Uyehara, Edgardo D

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading medical conditions in the Philippines. Over 500,000 Filipinos suffer from stroke annually. Provision of evidence-based medical and rehabilitation management for stroke patients has been a challenge due to existing environmental, social, and local health system issues. Thus, existing western guidelines on stroke rehabilitation were contextualized to draft recommendations relevant to the local Philippine setting. Prior to fully implementing the guidelines, an audit of current practice needs to be undertaken, thus the purpose of this audit protocol. A clinical audit of current practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Philippines will be undertaken. A consensus list of data items to be captured was identified by the audit team during a 2-day meeting in 2012. These items, including patient demographics, type of stroke, time to referral for rehabilitation management, length of hospital stay, and other relevant descriptors of stroke management were included as part of the audit. Hospitals in the Philippines will be recruited to take part in the audit activity. Recruitment will be via the registry of the Philippine Academy of Rehabilitation Medicine, where 90% of physiatrists (medical doctors specialized in rehabilitation medicine) are active members and are affiliated with various hospitals in the Philippines. Data collectors will be identified and trained in the audit process. A pilot audit will be conducted to test the feasibility of the audit protocol, and refinements to the protocol will be undertaken as necessary. The comprehensive audit process will take place for a period of 3 months. Data will be encoded using MS Excel(®). Data will be reported as means and percentages as appropriate. Subgroup analysis will be undertaken to look into differences and variability of stroke patient descriptors and rehabilitation activities. This audit study is an ambitious project, but given the "need" to conduct the audit to identify "gaps" in current

  10. The effect of a therapeutic regimen of Traditional Chinese Medicine rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Lin, Zhengkun; Wang, Qin; Liu, Feiwen; Liu, Jiao; Fang, Yunhua; Chen, Shanjia; Zhou, Xiaoxuan; Hong, Wenjun; Wu, Jinsong; Madrigal-Mora, Natalia; Zheng, Guohua; Yang, Shanli; Tao, Jing; Chen, Lidian

    2015-06-16

    Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) lessens quality of life, restricts the rehabilitation of stroke, and increases the social and economic burden stroke imposes on patients and their families. Therefore effective treatment is of paramount importance. However, the treatment of PSCI is very limited. The primary aim of this protocol is to propose a lower cost and more effective therapy, and to confirm the long-term effectiveness of a therapeutic regimen of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) rehabilitation for PSCI. A prospective, multicenter, large sample, randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A total of 416 eligible patients will be recruited from seven inpatient and outpatient stroke rehabilitation units and randomly allocated into a therapeutic regimen of TCM rehabilitation group or cognitive training (CT) control group. The intervention period of both groups will last 12 weeks (30 minutes per day, five days per week). Primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at baseline, 12 weeks (at the end of the intervention), and 36 weeks (after the 24-week follow-up period). This protocol presents an objective design of a multicenter, large sample, randomized controlled trial that aims to put forward a lower cost and more effective therapy, and confirm the long-term effectiveness of a therapeutic regimen of TCM rehabilitation for PSCI through subjective and objective assessments, as well as highlight its economic advantages. This trial was registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (identifier: ChiCTR-TRC-14004872 ) on 23 June 2014.

  11. Using the ICF to clarify team roles and demonstrate clinical reasoning in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempest, Stephanie; McIntyre, Anne

    2006-05-30

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is advocated as a tool to structure rehabilitation and a universal language to aid communication, within the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). The ICF may also facilitate clarification of team roles and clinical reasoning for intervention. This article aims to explore both factors in stroke rehabilitation. Following a review of the literature, a summary was presented and discussed with clinicians working within stroke rehabilitation, to gather expert opinions. The discussions were informal, being part of service development and on-going education. The clinicians summarised key themes for the potential use of the ICF within clinical practice. Two key themes emerged from the literature and expert opinion for the potential use of the ICF in stroke rehabilitation: (i) to aid communication and structure service provision, (ii) to clarify team roles and aid clinical reasoning. Expert opinion was that clarification of team roles needs to occur at a local level due to the skill mix, particular interests, setting and staffing levels within individual teams. The ICF has the potential to demonstrate/facilitate clinical reasoning, especially when different MDT members are working on the same intervention. There is potential for the ICF to be used to clarify team roles and demonstrate clinical reasoning within stroke rehabilitation. Further experiential research is required to substantiate this view.

  12. Using commercial video games for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: is this the way of the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Eva; Cotea, Cristina; Pullman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of people living with poststroke sequelae has stimulated the search for novel ways of providing poststroke rehabilitation without putting additional stress on overburdened health care systems. One of them is the use of commercially available technology and off-the-shelf video games for hemiparetic upper limb rehabilitation. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched using key word synonyms for stroke, upper limb, and video games. Included studies investigated upper limb stroke rehabilitation using commercially available consoles and video games, reported outcomes that included measures of upper limb functionality, and were published in a peer-reviewed journal written in English. Thirteen studies were identified - 6 published as full articles and 7 as abstracts. Studies were generally small and only 3 were randomized. The gaming systems investigated were the Nintendo Wii (n = 10), EyeToy PlayStation (n = 2), and CyWee Z (n = 1). The Nintendo Wii appears to provide the greatest benefits to patients, with improvements seen in upper extremity function measures such as joint range of motion, hand motor function, grip strength, and dexterity. Three studies indicate that video therapy appears to be safe and that long-term improvements continue at follow-up. At present, the evidence that the use of commercial video games in rehabilitation improves upper limb functionality after stroke is very limited. However, this approach has the potential to provide easily available and affordable stroke rehabilitation therapy in settings where access to therapy is limited by geographical or financial constraints.

  13. Factors Affecting the Ability of the Stroke Survivor to Drive Their Own Recovery outside of Therapy during Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Sandra G.; Kuys, Suzanne S.; Lord, Matthew; Hayward, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To explore factors affecting the ability of the stroke survivor to drive their own recovery outside of therapy during inpatient rehabilitation. Method. One-on-one, in-depth interviews with stroke survivors (n = 7) and their main carer (n = 6), along with two focus groups with clinical staff (n = 20). Data was thematically analysed according to group. Results. Stroke survivors perceived “dealing with loss,” whilst concurrently “building motivation and hope” for recovery affected their ability to drive their own recovery outside of therapy. In addition, they reported a “lack of opportunities” outside of therapy, with subsequent time described as “dead and wasted.” Main carers perceived stroke survivors felt “out of control … at everyone's mercy” and lacked knowledge of “what to do and why” outside of therapy. Clinical staff perceived the stroke survivor's ability to drive their own recovery was limited by the lack of “another place to go” and the “passive rehab culture and environment.” Discussion. To enable the stroke survivor to drive their own recovery outside of therapy, there is a need to increase opportunities for practice and promote active engagement. Suggested strategies include building the stroke survivor's motivation and knowledge, creating an enriched environment, and developing daily routines to provide structure outside of therapy time. PMID:24800104

  14. Factors Affecting the Ability of the Stroke Survivor to Drive Their Own Recovery outside of Therapy during Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Wen Eng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To explore factors affecting the ability of the stroke survivor to drive their own recovery outside of therapy during inpatient rehabilitation. Method. One-on-one, in-depth interviews with stroke survivors (n=7 and their main carer (n=6, along with two focus groups with clinical staff (n=20. Data was thematically analysed according to group. Results. Stroke survivors perceived “dealing with loss,” whilst concurrently “building motivation and hope” for recovery affected their ability to drive their own recovery outside of therapy. In addition, they reported a “lack of opportunities” outside of therapy, with subsequent time described as “dead and wasted.” Main carers perceived stroke survivors felt “out of control … at everyone’s mercy” and lacked knowledge of “what to do and why” outside of therapy. Clinical staff perceived the stroke survivor’s ability to drive their own recovery was limited by the lack of “another place to go” and the “passive rehab culture and environment.” Discussion. To enable the stroke survivor to drive their own recovery outside of therapy, there is a need to increase opportunities for practice and promote active engagement. Suggested strategies include building the stroke survivor’s motivation and knowledge, creating an enriched environment, and developing daily routines to provide structure outside of therapy time.

  15. Requirements Elicitation and Prototyping of a Fully Immersive Virtual Reality Gaming System for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maram AlMousa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke rehabilitation plays an important role in recovering the lifestyle of stroke survivors. Although existing research proved the effectiveness and engagement of nonimmersive virtual reality- (VR- based rehabilitation systems, limited research is available on the applicability of fully immersive VR-based rehabilitation systems. In this paper, we present the elicited requirements of a fully immersive VR-based rehabilitation system that will be designed for domestic upper limb stroke patients; we will also provide an initial conceptual prototype of the proposed system.

  16. A Poincare map based analysis of stroke patients' walking after a rehabilitation by a robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Mohsen; Moghaddam, Majid M; Fallah, Davoud

    2018-03-05

    Since the past decade, rehabilitation robots have become common technologies for recovering gait ability after a stroke. Nevertheless, it is believed that these robots can be further enhanced. Hence, several researches are making progress in optimizing gait rehabilitation robots. However, most of these researches have only assessed the robots and their controllers in improving spatiotemporal and kinetic features of walking. There are not many researchers have focused on the robots' controllers' effects on the central nervous or neuromuscular systems. On the other hand, recently computational methods have been utilized to investigate the rehabilitations of neural disorders, through developing neuromechanical models. However, these methods have neither studied the robot-assisted gait rehabilitation, nor have they theoretically proved why rehabilitation exercises enhance patients' walking ability. Therefore, this paper merged a theoretical approach into a computational method to investigate the effects of gait rehabilitation robots on post-stroke neuromuscular system. To this end, a neuromechanical model of gait has been developed and thereby, the Poincare maps of intact and stroke people have been obtained. Comparison of these maps revealed why a stroke reduces the stability of walking. Then, the effect of an impedance controller, which is used in a rehabilitative robot, is scrutinized in stabilizing a walking motion. Obtaining the Poincare map of this close-loop system, proved that this controller improves motion stability. Finally, the effect of this controller is investigated by simulations and experiments. The experimental tests are performed by Arman rehabilitative robot. Clinical Reference Number: IR.TMU.REC.1394.254. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Grasps Recognition and Evaluation of Stroke Patients for Supporting Rehabilitation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, Beatriz; Basteris, Angelo; Infarinato, Francesco; Sale, Patrizio; Nijenhuis, Sharon; Prange, Gerdienke; Amirabdollahian, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors often suffer impairments on their wrist and hand. Robot-mediated rehabilitation techniques have been proposed as a way to enhance conventional therapy, based on intensive repeated movements. Amongst the set of activities of daily living, grasping is one of the most recurrent. Our aim is to incorporate the detection of grasps in the machine-mediated rehabilitation framework so that they can be incorporated into interactive therapeutic games. In this study, we developed and tes...

  18. Embolic stroke of undetermined source: a retrospective analysis from an Italian Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The new clinical construct of embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS suggests that many cryptogenic strokes are related to minor-risk covert embolic cardiac sources or to embolus from non-occlusive plaques in the aortic arch or in the cerebral arteries. The authors analyzed the prevalence of ESUS in a real-life condition in Italy and compared the recurrence rates in cryptogenic strokes, cardioembolic strokes, and ESUS. The authors retrospectively reassessed according to ESUS criteria 391 consecutive admissions in a stroke unit where extensive diagnostic search was routinely performed. Recurrences in each stroke type within a 3-year follow-up period (mean time: 25.44 months - standard deviation: 9.42 were also compared. The prevalence of ESUS in the aforementioned cohort was 10.5%. All ESUS patients received antiplatelet agents. Warfarin was prescribed in 56.9% of cardioembolic strokes. The recurrence rate in ESUS patients was 4.4% per year, slightly higher than in cardioembolic strokes (3.5% and significantly higher than in cryptogenic non-ESUS (1.2% (P<0.0001. This is the first description of a cohort of ESUS patients in an Italian stroke unit. Patients with ESUS have a significantly higher risk of recurrence than in those with non-ESUS cryptogenic strokes, and slightly higher than in those with cardioembolic strokes. Results support the hypothesis of a more extensive diagnostic evaluation in cryptogenic strokes and the feasibility of such approach.

  19. An oral hygiene protocol improves oral health for patients in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joanne; Scholten, Ingrid

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether a simple oral hygiene protocol improves the oral health of inpatients in stroke rehabilitation. Poor oral health can lead to serious complications, such as pneumonia. The comorbidities associated with stroke, such as dysphagia, hemiparesis and cognitive impairment, can further impede independent oral care. International stroke guidelines recommend routine oral care but stop short of detailing specific regimes. The oral health assessment tool (OHAT) was conducted by speech-language pathologists with 100 patients with and without dysphagia in three metropolitan inpatient stroke rehabilitation facilities. A simple nurse-led oral hygiene regime was then implemented with all participants, which included twice daily tooth brushing and mouth rinsing after lunch, and oral health was measured again one week later. Initially, dysphagia was negatively associated with OHAT scores, and independence for oral hygiene was positively associated with oral health. After one week of a simple oral hygiene regime, the OHAT scores available for 89 participants indicated an improvement on average for all participants. In particular, 59% of participants with dysphagia had an improvement of 1 or more points. None of the participants developed pneumonia. A simple, inexpensive oral hygiene regime resulted in positive outcomes for patients with and without dysphagia in inpatient stroke rehabilitation settings. Oral health assessments and oral hygiene regimes that are simple to implement by the interdisciplinary team can be incorporated into standard stroke care with positive effect. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Association of Leukoaraiosis With Convalescent Rehabilitation Outcome in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Joe; Ito, Keiichi; Kotake, Tomomitsu; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Hideo; Kadono, Izumi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the factors influencing inpatient convalescent rehabilitation outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke, particularly severity of leukoaraiosis on magnetic resonance imaging. Participants included 520 patients with ischemic stroke (317 men and 203 women; mean age, 72.8±8.4 years) who were transferred from acute care hospitals for inpatient convalescent rehabilitation. Ischemic stroke subtypes included lacunar infarction (n=41), atherothrombosis (n=223), artery-to-artery embolism (n=67), cardiogenic embolism (n=97), undetermined embolism (n=76), and uncategorized ischemic stroke (n=16). Leukoaraiosis was graded according to periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and deep white matter hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging. Functional Independence Measure scores were assessed on admission and at discharge. Multiple regression analysis revealed that rehabilitation outcomes, measured as total Functional Independence Measure scores, were significantly associated with leukoaraiosis estimated by PVH grade. This association was observed after adjustment for factors such as severity, age, and poststroke history. In all patients, PVH grades were associated with Functional Independence Measure motor scores (Prehabilitation outcome in patients with ischemic stroke. Furthermore, the PVH grade was associated with motor function outcome, whereas the deep white matter hyperintensity grade correlated with cognitive function outcome, likely because the progression patterns and anatomic backgrounds of PVH and deep white matter hyperintensity differ according to ischemic stroke subtype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Mobile Game-based Virtual Reality Program for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2018-03-08

    Stroke rehabilitation requires repetitive, intensive, goal-oriented therapy. Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to satisfy these requirements. Game-based therapy can promote patients' engagement in rehabilitation therapy as a more interesting and a motivating tool. Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs can provide personalized home-based therapy with interactive communication between patients and clinicians. In this study, a mobile VR upper extremity rehabilitation program using game applications was developed. The findings from the study show that the mobile game-based VR program effectively promotes upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. In addition, patients completed two weeks of treatment using the program without adverse effects and were generally satisfied with the program. This mobile game-based VR upper extremity rehabilitation program can substitute for some parts of the conventional therapy that are delivered one-on-one by an occupational therapist. This time-efficient, easy to implement, and clinically effective program would be a good candidate tool for tele-rehabilitation for upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. Patients and therapists can collaborate remotely through these e-health rehabilitation programs while reducing economic and social costs.

  2. Effect of lower limb rehabilitation robot on lower limb motor function of hemiplegic patients after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-liang LU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the rehabilitation effect of lower limb rehabilitation robot training on the lower limb motor function of hemiplegic patients after stroke. Methods A total of 60 stroke patients (duration < 6 months accepted conventional rehabilitation training combined with body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT group, N = 30 or conventional rehabilitation training combined with lower limb rehabilitation robot training (Robot group, N = 30. Fugl - Meyer Assessment Scale for Lower Extremity (FMA-LE was used to evaluate lower limb motor function. Berg Balance Scale (BBS was used to evaluate balance function. Lower limb rehabilitation robot torque feedback system was used to evaluate lower limb muscle strength. All evaluations were performed before and after 8-week training.   Results Compared with before training, the FMA-LE score (P = 0.000, BBS score (P = 0.000, hemiplegic side of hip joint feedback torque value (HJTV, P = 0.000 and knee joint feedback torque value (KJTV, P = 0.000 were increased in both groups after 8-week training. Compared with BWSTT group, the hemiplegic side of HJTV (P = 0.000 and KJTV (P = 0.000 were increased in Robot group after 8-week training, while the FMA-LE score (P = 0.118 and BBS score (P = 0.159 had no statistically significant difference between 2 groups.  Conclusions The lower limb rehabilitation robot or body weight support treadmill training combined with conventional rehabilitation training could improve the lower limb motor function of hemiplegic patients after stroke. The lower limb rehabilitation robot training was better than body weight support treadmill training on the recovery of lower limb muscle strength. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.004  

  3. A systematic review of nursing rehabilitation of stroke patients with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poslawsky, Irina E; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Lindeman, Eline; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B

    2010-01-01

    To explore the evidence on rehabilitation of stroke patients with aphasia in relation to nursing care, focusing on the following themes: (1) the identification of aphasia, (2) the effectiveness of speech-language interventions. Patients with poststroke aphasia have higher mortality rates and worse functional outcome than patients without aphasia. Nurses are well aware of aphasia and the associated problems for patients with stroke because they have daily contact with them. The challenge is to provide evidence-based care directed at the aphasia. Although rehabilitation stroke guidelines are available, they do not address the caregiving of nurses to patients with aphasia. Systematic review. Published studies were reviewed, focusing on identification and treatment of aphasic patients after stroke in terms of the consequences for nursing care. Also, data concerning effective speech-language interventions were extrapolated into nursing practice with respect to the classification of nursing interventions. Intensive speech-language therapy, which was initiated in the acute stage post stroke, showed the best rehabilitation outcomes. Trained persons other than speech-language therapists provided effective speech-language interventions. Speech-language therapy included several types of intervention that met nursing intervention classifications. The contribution of nursing to the rehabilitation of patients with aphasia is relevant. The use of screening instruments by nurses can increase early detection of aphasia, a precondition for initiating timely speech-language therapy. Collaboration between speech-language therapists and nurses is of the utmost importance for increasing the intensity and functionality of speech-language exercises, which may enhance the quality of treatment. The findings of this study can be used to develop nursing rehabilitation guidelines for stroke patients with aphasia. Further research is necessary to explore the feasibility of using such guidelines

  4. Benefits of virtual reality based cognitive rehabilitation through simulated activities of daily living: a randomized controlled trial with stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana Lúcia; Andrade, Andreia; Soares, Luísa; I Badia, Sergi Bermúdez

    2016-11-02

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of acquired disability, leaving numerous adults with cognitive and motor impairments, and affecting patients' capability to live independently. There is substancial evidence on post-stroke cognitive rehabilitation benefits, but its implementation is generally limited by the use of paper-and-pencil methods, insufficient personalization, and suboptimal intensity. Virtual reality tools have shown potential for improving cognitive rehabilitation by supporting carefully personalized, ecologically valid tasks through accessible technologies. Notwithstanding important progress in VR-based cognitive rehabilitation systems, specially with Activities of Daily Living (ADL's) simulations, there is still a need of more clinical trials for its validation. In this work we present a one-month randomized controlled trial with 18 stroke in and outpatients from two rehabilitation units: 9 performing a VR-based intervention and 9 performing conventional rehabilitation. The VR-based intervention involved a virtual simulation of a city - Reh@City - where memory, attention, visuo-spatial abilities and executive functions tasks are integrated in the performance of several daily routines. The intervention had levels of difficulty progression through a method of fading cues. There was a pre and post-intervention assessment in both groups with the Addenbrooke Cognitive Examination (primary outcome) and the Trail Making Test A and B, Picture Arrangement from WAIS III and Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 (secondary outcomes). A within groups analysis revealed significant improvements in global cognitive functioning, attention, memory, visuo-spatial abilities, executive functions, emotion and overall recovery in the VR group. The control group only improved in self-reported memory and social participation. A between groups analysis, showed significantly greater improvements in global cognitive functioning, attention and executive functions when comparing VR to

  5. A feminist perspective on stroke rehabilitation: the relevance of de Beauvoir's theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The thoughts of Simone de Beauvoir have retained an important place in feminist scholarship. In this Norwegian paper, de Beauvoir's ideas on the different experiences of men and women are applied to the case of stroke rehabilitation. The authors argue that traditional approaches to rehabilitation, which often place it in the context of athletic activity, are less appropriate for women than for men. Indeed, they discuss one Norwegian study in which women patients stayed by their beds reading, while men roamed the corridors discussing their athletic and hunting exploits. The authors argue that such evidence should challenge healthcare professionals to devise rehabilitation regimes which take gender-based preferences into account. 48 references.

  6. Systematic review of telestroke for post-stroke care and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark N; Wellik, Kay E; Channer, Dwight D; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2013-08-01

    Telemedicine for acute stroke care is supported by a literature base. It remains unclear whether or not the use of telemedicine for other phases of stroke care is beneficial. The authors conducted a systematic review of the published literature on telemedicine for the purposes of providing post-stroke care. Studies were included if the title or abstract expressed use of two-way audio/video communication for post-stroke care. From an initial yield of 1,405 potentially eligible hits, two reviewers ultimately identified 24 unique manuscripts to undergo functionality, application, technology, and evaluative (F.A.T.E.) scoring. Each article was classified using a scoring rubric to assess the functionality, application, technology, and evaluative stage. It was found that most post-stroke telemedicine studies evaluated rehabilitation of adults. All primary data manuscripts were small and preliminary in scope and evaluative phase, and median F.A.T.E. score for primary data was 2. The use of telemedicine for post-stroke care is nascent and is primarily focused on post-stroke rehabilitation.

  7. An exploration of physiotherapists' experiences of robotic therapy in upper limb rehabilitation within a stroke rehabilitation centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andrew; Stephens, John

    2018-04-01

    Strokes are the world's leading cause of adult disability, with movement impairment being more common in the upper limb (UL). Robotic therapy (RT) is identified as an effective adjunct to promote movement but with limited effect on functional capabilities. There is currently limited research in user experience of RT, specifically that of physiotherapists. This study sought to explore physiotherapists' experience of using RT in rehabilitation of the UL, within a stroke rehabilitation centre in the north of England. Physiotherapists (n = 6) shared their experiences of working with the InMotion2 robot through semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was employed to interpret data, identify emergent themes and interdependent relationships between them. Five interdependent themes were identified focused around individualized care, influenced by evidence for practice, human relationships, skill mix, and resources and resource management. All physiotherapists valued the use of RT as an adjunct to conventional therapy, although barriers to successful implementation seemed to dominate the views of some. RT was perceived positively by physiotherapists, regarded as an adjunct to conventional therapy. A framework to summarize the relationships of participants' views and experiences is proposed in an attempt to understand the influences on the clinical use of RT. Implications for Rehabilitation Robotic therapy (RT) is valued as an adjunct to (conventional) person-centred rehabilitation. Resource management and skill mix are viewed as two key challenges to the successful implementation of RT. The production of evidence-based guidelines would be a useful development in the advancement.

  8. Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Using Wii Gaming Technology in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Teasell, Robert; Mamdani, Muhammad; Hall, Judith; McIlroy, William; Cheung, Donna; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Bayley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hemiparesis resulting in functional limitation of an upper extremity is common among stroke survivors. Although existing evidence suggests that increasing intensity of stroke rehabilitation therapy results in better motor recovery, limited evidence is available on the efficacy of virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation. Methods In this pilot, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial with 2 parallel groups involving stroke patients within 2 months, we compared the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of virtual reality using the Nintendo Wii gaming system (VRWii) versus recreational therapy (playing cards, bingo, or “Jenga”) among those receiving standard rehabilitation to evaluate arm motor improvement. The primary feasibility outcome was the total time receiving the intervention. The primary safety outcome was the proportion of patients experiencing intervention-related adverse events during the study period. Efficacy, a secondary outcome measure, was evaluated with the Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test, and Stroke Impact Scale at 4 weeks after intervention. Results Overall, 22 of 110 (20%) of screened patients were randomized. The mean age (range) was 61.3 (41 to 83) years. Two participants dropped out after a training session. The interventions were successfully delivered in 9 of 10 participants in the VRWii and 8 of 10 in the recreational therapy arm. The mean total session time was 388 minutes in the recreational therapy group compared with 364 minutes in the VRWii group (P=0.75). There were no serious adverse events in any group. Relative to the recreational therapy group, participants in the VRWii arm had a significant improvement in mean motor function of 7 seconds (Wolf Motor Function Test, 7.4 seconds; 95% CI, −14.5, −0.2) after adjustment for age, baseline functional status (Wolf Motor Function Test), and stroke severity. Conclusions VRWii gaming technology represents a safe, feasible, and potentially effective

  9. The H2 robotic exoskeleton for gait rehabilitation after stroke: early findings from a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortole, Magdo; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Zhu, Fangshi; Moreno, Juan C; Francisco, Gerard E; Pons, Jose L; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2015-06-17

    Stroke significantly affects thousands of individuals annually, leading to considerable physical impairment and functional disability. Gait is one of the most important activities of daily living affected in stroke survivors. Recent technological developments in powered robotics exoskeletons can create powerful adjunctive tools for rehabilitation and potentially accelerate functional recovery. Here, we present the development and evaluation of a novel lower limb robotic exoskeleton, namely H2 (Technaid S.L., Spain), for gait rehabilitation in stroke survivors. H2 has six actuated joints and is designed to allow intensive overground gait training. An assistive gait control algorithm was developed to create a force field along a desired trajectory, only applying torque when patients deviate from the prescribed movement pattern. The device was evaluated in 3 hemiparetic stroke patients across 4 weeks of training per individual (approximately 12 sessions). The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Houston. The main objective of this initial pre-clinical study was to evaluate the safety and usability of the exoskeleton. A Likert scale was used to measure patient's perception about the easy of use of the device. Three stroke patients completed the study. The training was well tolerated and no adverse events occurred. Early findings demonstrate that H2 appears to be safe and easy to use in the participants of this study. The overground training environment employed as a means to enhance active patient engagement proved to be challenging and exciting for patients. These results are promising and encourage future rehabilitation training with a larger cohort of patients. The developed exoskeleton enables longitudinal overground training of walking in hemiparetic patients after stroke. The system is robust and safe when applied to assist a stroke patient performing an overground walking task. Such device opens the opportunity to study means

  10. Randomized controlled trial of early rehabilitation after intracerebral hemorrhage stroke: difference in outcomes within 6 months of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Andrew, Nadine E; Zeng, Lingxia; Li, Zongfang; Li, Jin; Li, Yan; Yu, Xuewen; Mi, Baibing; Li, Zhe; Xu, Honghai; Chen, Yangjing; Wang, Juan; Yao, Wanxia; Li, Kuo; Yan, Feng; Wang, Jue

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms, acute management, and outcomes for patients who experience intracerebral hemorrhage may differ from patients with ischemic stroke. Studies of very early rehabilitation have been mainly undertaken in patients with ischemic stroke, and it is unknown if benefits apply to those with intracerebral hemorrhage. We hypothesized that early rehabilitation, within 48 hours of stroke, would improve survival and functional outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. This was a multicenter, randomized controlled study, with blinded assessment of outcome at 3 and 6 months. Eligible patients were randomized to receive standard care or standard care plus early rehabilitation. Primary outcome includes survival. Secondary outcomes includes health-related quality of life using the 36-item Short Form Questionnaire, function measured with the modified Barthel Index, and anxiety measured with the Zung Self-Rated Anxiety Scale. Two hundred forty-three of 326 patients were randomized (mean age, 59 years; 56% men). At 6 months, patients receiving standard care were more likely to have died (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-15.87); for morbidity outcomes, a 6-point difference in the Physical Component Summary score of the 36-item Short Form Questionnaire (95% CI, 4.2-8.7), a 7-point difference for the Mental Component Summary score (95% CI, 4.5-9.5), a 13-point difference in Modified Barthel Index scores (95% CI, 6.8-18.3), and a 6-point difference in Self-Rating Anxiety Scale scores (95% CI, 4.4-8.3) was reported in favor of the intervention groups. For the first time, we have shown that commencing rehabilitation within 48 hours of intracerebral hemorrhage improves survival and functional outcomes at 6 months after stroke in hospitalized patients in China. http://www.chictr.org/en. Unique identifier: ChiCTR-TRC-13004039. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Comparing the Comprehensive Stroke Ward Versus Mixed Rehabilitation Ward-The Importance of the Team in the Acute Stroke Care in a Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Marcos C; de Araujo, Tiago F S; Ferreira, Luiz F T; Ducci, Renata D P; Novak, Edison M; Germiniani, Francisco M B; Zetola, Viviane F

    2017-04-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the most frequent causes of death in Brazil. Many measures have been taken to reduce this tragic outcome, and one of those is the implementation of stroke units in hospitals. The aim of the present study is to analyze the in-hospital complications for patients with ischemic stroke admitted in a comprehensive stroke ward (CSW) as compared to patients admitted in a mixed rehabilitation ward (MRW). A retrospective interventional study with historic controls of patients admitted to the Neurology Division between January 2010 and October 2013. Patients admitted between January 2010 and September 2012 were included in the MRW group, and patients admitted from October 2012 until October 2013 were included in the CSW group. Throughout the whole study period, the same team assisted all the patients. Both groups were paired in relation to age and gender. The rate of in-hospital complications, mortality, and independency on discharge were evaluated in both groups. Each group was comprised of 91 patients. There were no statistically significant differences for any of the risk factors analyzed between the 2 groups nor for outcome measures-in-hospital complications, mortality, and independence on discharge. The present study demonstrated that in-hospital complications, independence on discharge, and mortality have similar rates in patients admitted to an MRW compared to patients admitted to a CSW, when the same staff provided them with specialized in-hospital care. Case-control study-Evidence Level 3.

  12. An augmented reality system for upper-limb post-stroke motor rehabilitation: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Gilda Aparecida de; Corrêa, Ana Grasielle Dionísio; Martins, Maria Bernardete Rodrigues; Pedrozo, Wendel Goes; Lopes, Roseli de Deus

    2016-08-01

    To determine the clinical feasibility of a system based on augmented reality for upper-limb (UL) motor rehabilitation of stroke participants. A physiotherapist instructed the participants to accomplish tasks in augmented reality environment, where they could see themselves and their surroundings, as in a mirror. Two case studies were conducted. Participants were evaluated pre- and post-intervention. The first study evaluated the UL motor function using Fugl-Meyer scale. Data were compared using non-parametric sign tests and effect size. The second study used the gain of motion range of shoulder flexion and abduction assessed by computerized biophotogrammetry. At a significance level of 5%, Fugl-Meyer scores suggested a trend for greater UL motor improvement in the augmented reality group than in the other. Moreover, effect size value 0.86 suggested high practical significance for UL motor rehabilitation using the augmented reality system. System provided promising results for UL motor rehabilitation, since enhancements have been observed in the shoulder range of motion and speed. Implications for Rehabilitation Gain of range of motion of flexion and abduction of the shoulder of post-stroke patients can be achieved through an augmented reality system containing exercises to promote the mental practice. NeuroR system provides a mental practice method combined with visual feedback for motor rehabilitation of chronic stroke patients, giving the illusion of injured upper-limb (UL) movements while the affected UL is resting. Its application is feasible and safe. This system can be used to improve UL rehabilitation, an additional treatment past the traditional period of the stroke patient hospitalization and rehabilitation.

  13. Regional variation in post-stroke multidisciplinary rehabilitation care among veteran residents in community nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Vogel, W Bruce; Wang, Xinping; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Hale-Gallardo, Jennifer L; Bates, Barbara E

    2017-01-01

    Effective post-acute multidisciplinary rehabilitation therapy improves stroke survivors' functional recovery and daily living activities. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) places veterans needing post-acute institutional care in private community nursing homes (CNHs). These placements are made under the same rules and regulations across the VA health care system and through individual per diem contracts between local VA facilities and CNHs. However, there is limited information about utilization of these veterans' health services as well as the geographic variation of the service utilization. The aims of this study were to determine rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans with stroke in VA-contracted CNHs and to assess risk-adjusted regional variations in the utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care. This retrospective study included all veterans diagnosed with stroke residing in VA-contracted CNHs between 2006 and 2009. Minimum Dataset (a health status assessment tool for CNH residents) for the study CNHs was linked with veterans' inpatient and outpatient data within the VA health care system. CNHs were grouped into five VA-defined geographic regions: the North Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, Continental, and Pacific regions. A two-part model was applied estimating risk-adjusted utilization probability and average weekly utilization days. Two dependent variables were rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans during their CNH stays. The study comprised 6,206 veterans at 2,511 CNHs. Rates for utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care were 75.7% and 30.1%, respectively. Veterans in North Atlantic and Southeast CNHs were significantly ( p nursing care compared with veterans in all other regions, before and after risk adjustment. The majority of veterans with stroke received rehabilitation therapy, and about one-third had restorative nursing

  14. Strategy training during inpatient rehabilitation may prevent apathy symptoms after acute stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Butters, Meryl A.; Terhorst, Lauren; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Apathy, or lack of motivation for goal-directed activities, contributes to reduced engagement in and benefit from rehabilitation, impeding recovery from stroke. We examined the effects of strategy training, a behavioral intervention used to augment usual inpatient rehabilitation, on apathy symptoms over the first 6 months after stroke. Design Secondary analysis of randomized controlled trial. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation. Participants Participants with acute stroke who exhibited cognitive impairments (Quick Executive Interview Scores ≥ 3) and were admitted for inpatient rehabilitation were randomized to receive strategy training (n=15, one session per day, 5 days per week, in addition to usual inpatient rehabilitation) or reflective listening (n=15, same dose). Methods Strategy training sessions focused on participant-selected goals and participant-derived strategies to address these goals, using a global strategy training method (Goal-Plan-Do-Check). Reflective listening sessions focused on participant reflections on their rehabilitation goals and experiences, facilitated by open-ended questions and active listening skills (attending, following and responding). Main Outcome Measurements Trained raters blinded to group assignment administered the Apathy Evaluation Scale at study admission, 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed with repeated measures fixed-effects models. Results Participants in both groups had similar subsyndromal levels of apathy symptoms at study admission (strategy training, M=25.79, SD=7.62; reflective listening, M=25.18, SD=4.40). A significant group by time interaction (F2,28 =3.61, p =.040) indicated that changes in apathy symptom levels differed between groups over time. The magnitude of group differences in change scores was large (d=−0.99, t28=−2.64, p=.013) at month 3, and moderate to large at month 6 (d=−0.70, t28=−1.86, p=.073). Conclusion Strategy training shows promise as an adjunct to usual rehabilitation

  15. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Tistad, Malin; Koch, Lena von

    2016-01-01

    the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke...... stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading...

  16. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela C. X. Pelicioni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS or functional (FS rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1 and immediately after (P2, 1 month after (P3, and three months after (P4 the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS.

  17. Evaluating a community-based stroke nursing education and rehabilitation programme for patients with mild stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lee; Chen, Chiu-Mei; Liao, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Chun-Yin

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated whether mild stroke patients who received a community-based stroke nursing intervention had better stroke knowledge, behaviour and self-efficacy than those who were exposed to traditional education programmes. The intervention group consisted of sixty five stroke patients randomly selected from seven communities who received three 2-hour stroke interventions per week for 8 weeks. The normal care group consisted of sixty two stroke patients randomly selected from a medical centre who received a general stroke education programme. The stroke patients in two groups were assessed at baseline, after intervention and at the 6-month follow-up. At the 6-month follow-up, the intervention group demonstrated an improvement in the knowledge of stroke risk factors compared with the normal care group. Three months after education, the intervention group exhibited changes in the knowledge of stroke, social participation and self-efficacy compared with those at baseline. Also, self-efficacy was correlated with the knowledge of stroke risk factors after intervention and at the 6-month follow-up; self-efficacy was correlated with social participation after the 6-month follow-up. A community-based stroke nursing intervention might have effects on changes in the knowledge of stroke risk factors, social participation and self-efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Sleep Duration, Sedentary Behavior, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life after Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeugwu, Victor E; Manns, Patricia J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe accelerometer-derived sleep duration, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and quality of life and their association with demographic and clinical factors within the first month after inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Thirty people with stroke (mean ± standard deviation, age: 63.8 ± 12.3 years, time since stroke: 3.6 ± 1.1 months) wore an activPAL3 Micro accelerometer (PAL Technologies, Glasgow, Scotland) continuously for 7 days to measure whole-day activity behavior. The Stroke Impact Scale and the Functional Independence Measure were used to assess quality of life and function, respectively. Sleep duration ranged from 6.6 to 11.6 hours/day. Fifteen participants engaged in long sleep greater than 9 hours/day. Participants spent 74.8% of waking hours in sedentary behavior, 17.9% standing, and 7.3% stepping. Of stepping time, only a median of 1.1 (interquartile range: .3-5.8) minutes were spent walking at a moderate-to-vigorous intensity (≥100 steps/minute). The time spent sedentary, the stepping time, and the number of steps differed significantly by the hemiparetic side (P stroke. There were moderate to strong correlations between the stepping time and the number of steps with gait speed (Spearman r = .49 and .61 respectively, P stroke, and cognition were not significant. People with stroke sleep for longer than the normal duration, spend about three quarters of their waking hours in sedentary behaviors, and engage in minimal walking following stroke rehabilitation. Our findings provide a rationale for the development of behavior change strategies after stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Data Glove System Embedded With Inertial Measurement Units for Hand Function Evaluation in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Hsiao, Pei-Chi; Yang, Shu-Yu; Su, Che-Shih; Lee, I-Jung

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a data glove system integrated with six-axis inertial measurement unit sensors for evaluating the hand function of patients who have suffered a stroke. The modular design of this data glove facilitates its use for stroke patients. The proposed system can use the hand's accelerations, angular velocities, and joint angles as calculated by a quaternion algorithm, to help physicians gain new insights into rehabilitation treatments. A clinical experiment was performed on 15 healthy subjects and 15 stroke patients whose Brunnstrom stages (BSs) ranged from 4 to 6. In this experiment, the participants were subjected to a grip task, thumb task, and card turning task to produce raw data and three features, namely, the average rotation speed, variation of movement completion time, and quality of movement; these features were extracted from the recorded data to form 2-D and 3-D scatter plots. These scatter plots can provide reference information and guidance to physicians who must determine the BSs of stroke patients. The proposed system demonstrated a hit rate of 70.22% on average. Therefore, this system can effectively reduce physicians' load and provide them with detailed information about hand function to help them adjust rehabilitation strategies for stroke patients.

  20. Robotic devices and brain-machine interfaces for hand rehabilitation post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Alistair C; Moioli, Renan C; Brasil, Fabricio L; Vallejo, Marta; Corne, David W; Vargas, Patricia A; Stokes, Adam A

    2017-06-28

    To review the state of the art of robotic-aided hand physiotherapy for post-stroke rehabilitation, including the use of brain-machine interfaces. Each patient has a unique clinical history and, in response to personalized treatment needs, research into individualized and at-home treatment options has expanded rapidly in recent years. This has resulted in the development of many devices and design strategies for use in stroke rehabilitation. The development progression of robotic-aided hand physiotherapy devices and brain-machine interface systems is outlined, focussing on those with mechanisms and control strategies designed to improve recovery outcomes of the hand post-stroke. A total of 110 commercial and non-commercial hand and wrist devices, spanning the 2 major core designs: end-effector and exoskeleton are reviewed. The growing body of evidence on the efficacy and relevance of incorporating brain-machine interfaces in stroke rehabilitation is summarized. The challenges involved in integrating robotic rehabilitation into the healthcare system are discussed. This review provides novel insights into the use of robotics in physiotherapy practice, and may help system designers to develop new devices.

  1. A Comparison of Aphasia Therapy Outcomes before and after a Very Early Rehabilitation Programme Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godecke, Erin; Ciccone, Natalie A.; Granger, Andrew S.; Rai, Tapan; West, Deborah; Cream, Angela; Cartwright, Jade; Hankey, Graeme J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Very early aphasia rehabilitation studies have shown mixed results. Differences in therapy intensity and therapy type contribute significantly to the equivocal results. Aims: To compare a standardized, prescribed very early aphasia therapy regimen with a historical usual care control group at therapy completion (4-5 weeks post-stroke)…

  2. Brain-Machine Interface in chronic stroke rehabilitation: A controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Brötz, D.; Rea, M.; Laër, L.; Yilmaz, O.; Brasil, F.L.; Liberati, G.; Curado, M.R.; Garcia Cossio, E.; Vyziotis, A.; Cho, W.; Agostini, M.; Soares, E.; Soekadar, S.R.; Caria, A.; Cohen, L.G.; Birbaumer, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chronic stroke patients with severe hand weakness respond poorly to rehabilitation efforts. Here, we evaluated efficacy of daily brain-machine interface (BMI) training to increase the hypothesized beneficial effects of physiotherapy alone in patients with severe paresis in a double-blind

  3. Frequency of discriminative sensory loss in the hand after stroke in a rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Leeanne M; Matyas, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    Somatosensory loss following stroke is common, with negative consequences for functional outcome. However, existing studies typically do not include quantitative measures of discriminative sensibility. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of stroke patients presenting with discriminative sensory loss of the hand in the post-acute rehabilitation phase. Prospective cohort study of stroke survivors presenting for rehabilitation. Fifty-one consecutive patients admitted to a metropolitan rehabilitation centre over a continuous 12-month period who met selection criteria. Quantitative measures of touch discrimination and limb position sense, with high re-test reliability, good discriminative test properties and objective criteria of abnormality, were employed. Both upper limbs were tested, in counterbalanced order. Impaired touch discrimination was identified in the hand contralateral to the lesion in 47% of patients, and in the ipsilesional hand in 16%. Forty-nine percent showed impaired limb position sense in the contralesional limb and 20% in the ipsilesional limb. Sixty-seven percent demonstrated impairment of at least one modality in the contralesional limb. Ipsilesional impairment was less severe. Discriminative sensory impairment was quantified in the contralesional hand in approximately half of stroke patients presenting for rehabilitation. A clinically significant number also experienced impairment in the ipsilesional "unaffected" hand.

  4. Study protocol of 'Prism adaptation in Rehabilitation' : A randomized controlled trial in stroke patients with neglect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brink, Antonia F.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/180428047; Nijboer, Tanja C W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832421

    2015-01-01

    Background: A frequent disorder after stroke is neglect, resulting in a failure to report or respond to contralesional stimuli. Rehabilitation of neglect is important, given the negative influence on motor recovery, independence in self-care, transfers, and locomotion. Effects of prism adaptation

  5. Recovery of standing balance in postacute stroke patients: a rehabilitation cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haart, Mirjam; Geurts, Alexander C.; Huidekoper, Steven C.; Fasotti, Luciano; van Limbeek, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and interrelate static and dynamic characteristics of the restoration of quiet standing balance in a representative sample of stroke survivors in the Netherlands during their inpatient rehabilitation. DESIGN: Exploratory study using an inception cohort with findings related to

  6. The effectiveness of the Bobath concept in stroke rehabilitation: what is the evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, B.J.; Lennon, S.; Lyons, B.; Wheatley-Smith, L.; Scheper, M.; Buurke, J.H.; Halfens, J.; Geurts, A.C.; Kwakkel, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In the Western world, the Bobath Concept or neurodevelopmental treatment is the most popular treatment approach used in stroke rehabilitation, yet the superiority of the Bobath Concept as the optimal type of treatment has not been established. This systematic review of

  7. Rehabilitation of Older Persons Disabled by Cancer, Stroke, and Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty-Fried, Pamela; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Rehabilitation of older persons disabled by cancer, stroke, or heart disease is discussed. Aspects of each disability are described, and the importance of timely and appropriate intervention with older persons is emphasized. Barriers generally faced by older disabled persons are briefly outlined. (Author)

  8. The effects of virtual reality on stroke rehabilitation: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Pompeu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to perform a systematic review to verify the effects of virtual reality (VR on the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The search was conducted in the electronic databases Medline, Lilacs, Scielo and PubMed, from 2004 to 2012. The keywords selected for the search were: virtual reality, video game, stroke, physiotherapy, rehabilitation. It was found 893 articles, and at the end of selection, nine studies were included. The results showed that training with VR may contribute to the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The selected studies involved the use of seven different VR systems for training of functions: gait, balance, upper limb function, cognition and perception. Furthermore, depending on the function trained, the authors selected different assessment methods. However, even in the studies with similar functions assessed it was found different measurement techniques. The conclusion was that VR can promote positive effects on rehabilitation of post stroke patients. Despite promising results, further studies are needed with larger numbers of subjects and better methodological quality.

  9. Predictors of physical independence at discharge after stroke rehabilitation in a Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brink, Antonia F.; Hajos, Tibor R.S.; Van Bennekom, Coen; Nachtegaal, Janneke; Meulenbelt, Henk E.J.; Fleuren, Judith F.M.; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Luijkx, Marscha M.; Wijffels, Markus P.; Post, Marcel W. M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors, available at admission, of physical independence at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Secondary aims were to identify predictors of functional gain and length of stay (LOS). We included 1310 adult stroke patients who were admitted for

  10. Predictors of physical independence at discharge after stroke rehabilitation in a Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brink, Antonia F; Hajos, Tibor R S; van Bennekom, Coen; Nachtegaal, Janneke; Meulenbelt, Henk E J; Fleuren, Judith F M; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Luijkx, Marscha M; Wijffels, Markus P; Post, Marcel W M

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors, available at admission, of physical independence at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Secondary aims were to identify predictors of functional gain and length of stay (LOS). We included 1310 adult stroke patients who were admitted for

  11. Pitfalls in effectiveness research: a comparative analysis of treatment goals and outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, A.T.; Reynders, K.; Mulder, Th.; Mol, A.M.

    Problem: There is a great diversity of movement therapies in stroke rehabilitation, each of which is treated as a more or less independent system. Objective: To articulate pitfalls in effectiveness research that has been employed to reduce the number of different forms of treatment. Methods: The

  12. Pitfalls in effectiveness research : a comparative analysis of treatment goals and outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, Ant; Reynders, K; Mulder, T; Mol, A

    Problem: There is a great diversity of movement therapies in stroke rehabilitation, each of which is treated as a more or less independent system. Objective: To articulate pitfalls in effectiveness research that has been employed to reduce the number of different forms of treatment. Methods: The

  13. A working model of stroke recovery from rehabilitation robotics practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Hermano Igo; Volpe, Bruce; Hogan, Neville

    2009-02-25

    We reviewed some of our initial insights about the process of upper-limb behavioral recovery following stroke. Evidence to date indicates that intensity, task specificity, active engagement, and focusing training on motor coordination are key factors enabling efficacious recovery. On modeling, experience with over 400 stroke patients has suggested a working model of recovery similar to implicit motor learning. Ultimately, we plan to apply these insights in the development of customized training paradigms to enhance recovery.

  14. The impact of a toolkit on use of standardised measurement tools in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, S F; Burton, L; McGovern, A

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of a toolkit of psychometrically robust measurement tools, the Greater Manchester Assessment for Stroke Rehabilitation (G-MASTER) toolkit, on the use of measurement tools during stroke rehabilitation Mixed methods cohort design using non-participant observation of multi-disciplinary team meetings and semi-structured interviews with members of the team over three months before and three months after implementation of the assessment toolkit. Development and implementation of the toolkit are also described. Ten in-patient stroke services in a large UK city. Members of the participating multi-disciplinary stroke teams. Before implementation standardised measures were seldom used in team meetings. After implementation, use of all measurement tools significantly increased (36% to 81% of occasions, Ptoolkit and felt it enabled more accurate problem identification, effective progress monitoring, timely decision-making, communication and promoted inter-team relationships. A toolkit of standardised measurement tools can be feasibly and acceptably implemented into stroke rehabilitation. It increases the use of measurement tools by the multi-disciplinary team and improves the processes and quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract after stroke: how does rehabilitative training modulate it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiko Okabe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke causes long-term disability, and rehabilitative training is commonly used to improve the consecutive functional recovery. Following brain damage, surviving neurons undergo morphological alterations to reconstruct the remaining neural network. In the motor system, such neural network remodeling is observed as a motor map reorganization. Because of its significant correlation with functional recovery, motor map reorganization has been regarded as a key phenomenon for functional recovery after stroke. Although the mechanism underlying motor map reorganization remains unclear, increasing evidence has shown a critical role for axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract. In this study, we review previous studies investigating axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract after stroke and discuss which mechanisms may underlie the stimulatory effect of rehabilitative training. Axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract can be classified into three types based on the location and the original targets of corticospinal neurons, and it seems that all the surviving corticospinal neurons in both ipsilesional and contralesional hemisphere can participate in axonal remodeling and motor map reorganization. Through axonal remodeling, corticospinal neurons alter their output selectivity from a single to multiple areas to compensate for the lost function. The remodeling of the corticospinal axon is influenced by the extent of tissue destruction and promoted by various therapeutic interventions, including rehabilitative training. Although the precise molecular mechanism underlying rehabilitation-promoted axonal remodeling remains elusive, previous data suggest that rehabilitative training promotes axonal remodeling by upregulating growth-promoting and downregulating growth-inhibiting signals.

  16. Stroke survivors talk while doing: development of a therapeutic framework for continued rehabilitation of hand function post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabini, Rosanna C; Dijkers, Marcel P J M; Raghavan, Preeti

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative study to identify themes and explore mechanisms underlying recovery of hand function post stroke for individuals discharged from rehabilitation services. Post-stroke hemiparesis frequently results in persistent hand dysfunction; the mechanisms of functional recovery are however poorly understood. We assessed the perspectives of community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke on their hand function limitations and recovery to explore the feasibility of developing a theoretical framework for understanding the process of continued post-stroke recovery. Eight subjects with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis were interviewed and videotaped while they performed a battery of 20 upper limb tasks. Qualitative analysis consisted of two investigators independently reviewing the videotapes and reading the transcribed conversations, identifying significant issues and then comparing their observations to determine common themes and develop emerging concepts. Four core themes pertaining to impairment and recovery of task-specific ability emerged: 1) spasticity can be overcome actively through task-specific attempts to use the affected arm and hand; 2) use of the affected arm can be facilitated by adopting positions that reduce the effect of gravity on the arm or enable gravity to act as a natural assist in the movement; 3) task-specific skill can be attained by repeatedly attempting specific component movements of tasks in the context of a variety of different tasks; and 4) frustration impedes task performance but a mental state of 'detached focus' can improve the motivation to use the affected arm. These themes suggest a therapeutic framework for continued upper limb rehabilitation in patients' own environment to maximize functional recovery in individuals long after their stroke, and generate hypotheses which may lead to the development of new therapeutic protocols. NA. Copyright © 2013 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The future of restorative neurosciences in stroke: driving the translational research pipeline from basic science to rehabilitation of people after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeran, Binith; Cohen, Leonardo; Dobkin, Bruce; Ford, Gary; Greenwood, Richard; Howard, David; Husain, Masud; Macleod, Malcolm; Nudo, Randolph; Rothwell, John; Rudd, Anthony; Teo, James; Ward, Nicholas; Wolf, Steven

    2009-02-01

    Major advances during the past 50 years highlight the immense potential for restoration of function after neural injury, even in the damaged adult human brain. Yet, the translation of these advances into clinically useful treatments is painstakingly slow. Here, we consider why the traditional model of a "translational research pipeline" that transforms basic science into novel clinical practice has failed to improve rehabilitation practice for people after stroke. We find that (1) most treatments trialed in vitro and in animal models have not yet resulted in obviously useful functional gains in patients; (2) most clinical trials of restorative treatments after stroke have been limited to small-scale studies; (3) patient recruitment for larger clinical trials is difficult; (4) the determinants of patient outcomes and what patients want remain complex and ill-defined, so that basic scientists have no clear view of the clinical importance of the problems that they are addressing; (5) research in academic neuroscience centers is poorly integrated with practice in front-line hospitals and the community, where the majority of patients are treated; and (6) partnership with both industry stakeholders and patient pressure groups is poorly developed, at least in the United Kingdom where research in the translational restorative neurosciences in stroke depends on public sector research funds and private charities. We argue that interaction between patients, front-line clinicians, and clinical and basic scientists is essential so that they can explore their different priorities, skills, and concerns. These interactions can be facilitated by funding research consortia that include basic and clinical scientists, clinicians and patient/carer representatives with funds targeted at those impairments that are major determinants of patient and carer outcomes. Consortia would be instrumental in developing a lexicon of common methods, standardized outcome measures, data sharing and

  18. [The education influence on effects of rehabilitation in patients after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, Sabina; Winczewski, Piotr; Janczewska, Katarzyna; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2016-11-25

    Patients after stroke face a new situation where some educational and pedagogical actions should be reinitiated. Stroke often causes a break away from the previous lifestyle. It the acute phase it excludes the possibility of employment or performance of household duties that were carried out before or indulging in previously preferred ways of spending free time. Patients often abandon the habits that they developed before stroke, inclusive of hygienic habits. Therefore, it is an important objective of rehabilitation to reinstate in stroke patients behaviours characteristic of their peers, which would mark the beginning of their own care for health. The pedagogic and educational activities should lead to a transformation in the patient. This could be one of the factors in facilitating the patient's return to previous forms of activity. The aim of this study was to analyze progress in patient's rehabilitation and satisfaction, to assess impact of health education on higher satisfaction and better knowledge in stroke patients as well as on their recovery. Another aim was to assess the factors that maximize the patients' chances of returning to the labor market. The study involved 30 patients after stroke, 8 women and 22 men, over 40 years of age, who underwent either early or late rehabilitation, the type of which affected the time of treatment. The minimal duration of the patient's stay was 21 days, in which time an individually tailored way of education, rehabilitation, treatment and care was implemented. The study used a questionnaire and the Bartel and the Rankin scales. The subject of the analysis consisted of 22 questions that were based on hypotheses. They assessed the facts, the sources of information, knowledge and subjective feelings of the patients concerning the education carried out by the rehabilitation team and its impact on the patients' rehabilitation. A highly significant (peducation has an effect on the scope of the patients' knowledge during and

  19. Overcoming practical challenges to conducting clinical research in the inpatient stroke rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grace B; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Whyte, Ellen M; Matthews, Judith T

    2015-10-01

    There is a shortage of published empirical studies conducted in acute inpatient stroke rehabilitation, though such studies are greatly needed in order to shed light on the most efficacious inpatient stroke rehabilitation interventions. The inherent challenges of inpatient research may dissuade researchers from undertaking this important work. This paper describes our institution's experience devising practical solutions to research barriers in this setting. Through concentrated efforts to overcome research barriers, such as by cultivating collaborative relationships and capitalizing on unanticipated benefits, we successfully facilitated conduct of five simultaneous inpatient stroke studies. Tangible benefits realized include increased effectiveness of research participant identification and enrollment, novel collaborative projects, innovative clinical care initiatives, and enhanced emotional and practical support for patients and their families. We provide recommendations based on lessons learned during our experience, and discuss benefits of this collaboration for our research participants, clinical staff, and the research team.

  20. Mental Practice Combined with Motor Rehabilitation to Treat Upper Limb Hemiparesis of Post-Stroke Patients: Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Rocha, Nuno B.F.; Nardi, Antonio E.; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Mura, Gioia; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Carta, Mauro G.; Campos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability in the world. Due to the extended lifetime of the world's population, the number of people affected by stroke has increased substantially over the last years. Stroke may lead to sensorimotor deficits, usually causing hemiplegia or hemiparesia. In order to reduce motor deficits and accelerate functional recovery, MP combined with motor rehabilitation was introduced to the rehabilitation process of post-stroke patients. Evidence has shown that MP combining with motor rehabilitation based on activities of daily living was more effective than conventional motor rehabilitation used per se. This combination proved very useful and effective, with significant results in improvement of motor deficits in post-stroke patients. However, further studies must be conducted to determine specific parameters, such as type of imagery, frequency or duration. PMID:27346996

  1. Effectiveness of a fall-risk reduction programme for inpatient rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goljar, Nika; Globokar, Daniel; Puzić, Nataša; Kopitar, Natalija; Vrabič, Maja; Ivanovski, Matic; Vidmar, Gaj

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate effectiveness of fall-risk-assessment-based fall prevention for stroke rehabilitation inpatients. A consecutive series of 232 patients admitted for the first time to a subacute stroke-rehabilitation ward during 2010-2011 was studied in detail. The Assessment Sheet for Fall Prediction in Stroke Inpatients (ASFPSI by Nakagawa et al.) was used to assess fall-risk upon admission. Association of ASFPSI score and patient characteristics with actual falls was statistically tested. Yearly incidence of falls per 1000 hospital days (HD) was retrospectively audited for the 2006-2014 period to evaluate effectiveness of fall-risk reduction measures. The observed incidence of falls over the detailed-study-period was 3.0/1000 HD; 39% of the fallers fell during the first week after admission. ASFPSI score was not significantly associated with falls. Longer hospital stay, left body-side affected and non-extreme FIM score (55-101) were associated with higher odds of fall. Introduction of fall-risk reduction measures followed by compulsory fall-risk assessment lead to incidence of falls dropping from 7.1/1000 HD in 2006 to 2.8/1000 HD in 2011 and remaining at that level until 2014. The fall-risk-assessment-based measures appear to have led to decreasing falls risk among post-stroke rehabilitation inpatients classified as being at high risk of falls. The fall prevention programme as a whole was successful. Patients with non-extreme level of functional independence should receive enhanced fall prevention. Implications for Rehabilitation Recognising the fall risk upon the patient's admission is essential for preventing falls in rehabilitation wards. Assessing the fall risk is a team tasks and combines information from various sources. Assessing fall risk in stroke patients using the assessment sheet by Nakagawa et al. immediately upon admission systematically draws attention to the risk of falls in each individual patient.

  2. Design considerations for a theory-driven exergame-based rehabilitation program to improve walking of persons with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüest, Seline; van de Langenberg, Rolf; de Bruin, Eling D

    2014-01-01

    Virtual rehabilitation approaches for promoting motor recovery has attracted considerable attention in recent years. It appears to be a useful tool to provide beneficial and motivational rehabilitation conditions. Following a stroke, hemiparesis is one of the most disabling impairments and, therefore, many affected people often show substantial deficits in walking abilities. Hence, one of the major goals of stroke rehabilitation is to improve patients' gait characteristics and hence to regain their highest possible level of walking ability. Because previous studies indicate a relationship between walking and balance ability, this article proposes a stroke rehabilitation program that targets balance impairments to improve walking in stroke survivors. Most currently, available stroke rehabilitation programs lack a theory-driven, feasible template consistent with widely accepted motor learning principles and theories in rehabilitation. To address this hiatus, we explore the potential of a set of virtual reality games specifically developed for stroke rehabilitation and ordered according to an established two-dimensional motor skill classification taxonomy. We argue that the ensuing "exergame"-based rehabilitation program warrants individually tailored balance progression in a learning environment that allows variable practice and hence optimizes the recovery of walking ability.

  3. Changes in arm-hand function and arm-hand skill performance in patients after stroke during and after rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Johan Anton; Smeets, Rob Johannes Elise Marie; Seelen, Henk Alexander Maria

    2017-01-01

    Arm-hand rehabilitation programs applied in stroke rehabilitation frequently target specific populations and thus are less applicable in heterogeneous patient populations. Besides, changes in arm-hand function (AHF) and arm-hand skill performance (AHSP) during and after a specific and well-described rehabilitation treatment are often not well evaluated. This single-armed prospective cohort study featured three subgroups of stroke patients with either a severely, moderately or mildly impaired AHF. Rehabilitation treatment consisted of a Concise_Arm_and_hand_ Rehabilitation_Approach_in_Stroke (CARAS). Measurements at function and activity level were performed at admission, clinical discharge, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after clinical discharge. Eighty-nine stroke patients (M/F:63/23; mean age:57.6yr (+/-10.6); post-stroke time:29.8 days (+/-20.1)) participated. All patients improved on AHF and arm-hand capacity during and after rehabilitation, except on grip strength in the severely affected subgroup. Largest gains occurred in patients with a moderately affected AHF. As to self-perceived AHSP, on average, all subgroups improved over time. A small percentage of patients declined regarding self-perceived AHSP post-rehabilitation. A majority of stroke patients across the whole arm-hand impairment severity spectrum significantly improved on AHF, arm-hand capacity and self-perceived AHSP. These were maintained up to one year post-rehabilitation. Results may serve as a control condition in future studies.

  4. Changes in arm-hand function and arm-hand skill performance in patients after stroke during and after rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Anton Franck

    Full Text Available Arm-hand rehabilitation programs applied in stroke rehabilitation frequently target specific populations and thus are less applicable in heterogeneous patient populations. Besides, changes in arm-hand function (AHF and arm-hand skill performance (AHSP during and after a specific and well-described rehabilitation treatment are often not well evaluated.This single-armed prospective cohort study featured three subgroups of stroke patients with either a severely, moderately or mildly impaired AHF. Rehabilitation treatment consisted of a Concise_Arm_and_hand_ Rehabilitation_Approach_in_Stroke (CARAS. Measurements at function and activity level were performed at admission, clinical discharge, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after clinical discharge.Eighty-nine stroke patients (M/F:63/23; mean age:57.6yr (+/-10.6; post-stroke time:29.8 days (+/-20.1 participated. All patients improved on AHF and arm-hand capacity during and after rehabilitation, except on grip strength in the severely affected subgroup. Largest gains occurred in patients with a moderately affected AHF. As to self-perceived AHSP, on average, all subgroups improved over time. A small percentage of patients declined regarding self-perceived AHSP post-rehabilitation.A majority of stroke patients across the whole arm-hand impairment severity spectrum significantly improved on AHF, arm-hand capacity and self-perceived AHSP. These were maintained up to one year post-rehabilitation. Results may serve as a control condition in future studies.

  5. The untapped potential of smartphone sensors for stroke rehabilitation and after-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W; Chew, Poh Yim; Yeo, Leonard L; Ho, Roger C

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing incidences of cerebrovascular disease, as well as the morbidity and mortality associated with it, it is of no surprise that there have been much global governmental interest in the primary prevention of this disorder; or at least in the secondary and tertiary prevention and rehabilitation of individuals who have suffered disabilities arising from a recent cerebrovascular attack. Developers and clinicians have not considered one of the key areas in Stroke prevention and management, which is that of secondary prevention, and in particular that of tapping onto smartphone technologies for stroke rehabilitation. There has been much interest in the development of devices for rehabilitation of stroke patients instead. One of the concerns with regards to conventional bio and mechanical sensors are the costs involved in development, as well as the costs involved when stroke survivors and their caregivers are required to purchase the devices for monitoring and rehabilitation. In view of the current limitations, the S3 Rehab application, which makes use of the smartphone build in sensors, has been conceptualized and has been developed for the two major platforms (Apple and Android platforms). The authors believe that by tapping onto these sensors and by programming a smartphone application that is specifically catered for rehabilitation, it would keep costs minimal for researchers, patients and caregivers. Whilst there is a growing interest in wearable devices and sensors, it is important for developers and researchers to be cognizant that certain interventions, such as rehabilitation could still be done through a smartphone device, instead of investing in new research and development. There are various untapped potential in the smartphone that researchers and developers need to be cognizant of.

  6. Integrative medicine for subacute stroke rehabilitation: a study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jianqiao; Chen, Lifang; Chen, Luni; Wang, Chao; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Ma, Ruijie; Xu, Shouyu; Shen, Laihua; Bao, Yehua; Ji, Conghua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many patients with stroke receive integrative medicine in China, which includes the basic treatment of Western medicine and routine rehabilitation, in conjunction with acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The question of whether integrative medicine is efficacious for stroke rehabilitation is still controversial and very little research currently exists on the integrated approach for this condition. Consequently, we will conduct a multicentre, randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of integrative medicine on stroke rehabilitation. Methods and analysis 360 participants recruited from three large Chinese medical hospitals in Zhejiang Province will be randomly divided into the integrative medicine rehabilitation (IMR) group and the conventional rehabilitation (CR) group in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the IMR group will receive acupuncture and Chinese herbs in addition to basic Western medicine and rehabilitation treatment. The CR group will not receive acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. The assessment data will be collected at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks postrandomisation, and then at 12 weeks’ follow-up. The primary outcome is measured by the Modified Barthel Index. The secondary outcomes are the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the mini-mental state examination and Montreal Cognitive, Hamilton's Depression Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale, and the incidence of adverse events. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from ethics committees of three hospitals. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone, during follow-up calls inquiring on patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number Chinese Clinical Trial Register: ChiCTR-TRC-12001972, http://www.chictr.org/en/proj/show.aspx?proj=2561 PMID:25475247

  7. [Spasmodic hemiplegia after stroke treated with scalp acupuncture, music therapy and rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chengjie; Zhang, Hongru; Ni, Guangxia; Zhang, Yinan; Su, Bin; Xu, Xinlei

    2017-12-12

    To evaluate the differences in the clinical therapeutic effects on spasmodic hemiplegia after stroke among the alliance therapy of scalp acupuncture, music therapy combined with rehabilitation, the simple rehabilitation therapy and the combination of music therapy and rehabilitation. A total of 76 patients of post-stroke spasmodic hemiplegia were randomized into a rehabilitation group (25 cases), a combination group with music therapy and rehabilitation (25 cases) and an alliance therapy group with scalp acupuncture, music therapy and rehabilitation (26 cases). In the rehabilitation group, the routine rehabilitation therapy was applied, including the removal of various incentives that cause spasm, the correction of body position and the physical therapy. In the combination group, the music therapy was added on the basis of the treatment as the rehabilitation group. The music physician used the rhythmic auditory stimulation, the patterned sensory enhancement and the therapeutic instrumental music playing to set up the task in the treatment. In the alliance therapy group, scalp acupuncture was added on the basis of the treatment as the combination group. The anterior oblique line of vertex-tempora (MS 6) and the posterior oblique line of vertex-tempora (MS 7) on the contralateral side were selected and stimulated with penetrating needling technique. The needles were retained. During the needling retaining, the needles were rotated once every 10 min, for 2 min each time. The treatment was given one session a day, totally for 5 sessions a week, continuously for 4 weeks. The Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), Barthel index (BI) and the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) of the affected elbow and the passive knee movement at static condition were observed in the patients before and after treatment. The results of FMA, BI and MAS were not different before treatment in the patients among the three groups (all P >0.05), indicating the comparability among groups. After treatment, FMA

  8. Neuroplastic changes in resting-state functional connectivity after stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-teng eFan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Most neuroimaging research in stroke rehabilitation mainly focuses on the neural mechanisms underlying the natural history of post-stroke recovery. However, connectivity mapping from resting-state fMRI is well suited for different neurological conditions and provides a promising method to explore plastic changes for treatment-induced recovery from stroke. We examined the changes in resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC of the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1 in 10 post-acute stroke patients before and immediately after 4 weeks of robot-assisted bilateral arm therapy (RBAT. Motor performance, functional use of the affected arm, and daily function improved in all participants. Reduced interhemispheric RS-FC between the ipsilesional and contralesional M1 (M1-M1 and the contralesional-lateralized connections were noted before treatment. In contrast, greater M1-M1 functional connectivity and disturbed resting-state networks were observed after RBAT relative to pre-treatment. Increased changes in M1-M1 RS-FC after RBAT were coupled with better motor and functional improvements. Mediation analysis showed the pre-to-post difference in M1-M1 RS-FC was a significant mediator for the relationship between motor and functional recovery. These results show neuroplastic changes and functional recoveries induced by RBAT in post-acute stroke survivors and suggest that interhemispheric functional connectivity in the motor cortex may be a neurobiological marker for recovery after stroke rehabilitation.

  9. No Racial Difference in Rehabilitation Therapy Across All Post-Acute Care Settings in the Year Following a Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Feng, Chunyang; Burke, James F

    2017-12-01

    Black stroke survivors experience greater poststroke disability than whites. Differences in post-acute rehabilitation may contribute to this disparity. Therefore, we estimated racial differences in rehabilitation therapy utilization, intensity, and the number of post-acute care settings in the first year after a stroke. We used national Medicare data to study 186 168 elderly black and white patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of stroke in 2011. We tabulated the proportion of stroke survivors receiving physical, occupational, and speech and language therapy in each post-acute care setting (inpatient rehabilitation facility, skilled nursing facility, and home health agency), minutes of therapy, and number of transitions between settings. We then used generalized linear models to determine whether racial differences in minutes of physical therapy were influenced by demographics, comorbidities, thrombolysis, and markers of stroke severity. Black stroke patients were more likely to receive each type of therapy than white stroke patients. Compared with white stroke patients, black stroke patients received more minutes of physical therapy (897.8 versus 743.4; P rehabilitation therapy utilization or intensity after accounting for patient characteristics. It is unlikely that differences in rehabilitation utilization or intensity are important contributors to racial disparities in poststroke disability. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Moving with music for stroke rehabilitation: a sonification feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Daniel S; Rhode, Sönke; Großbach, Michael; Rollnik, Jens; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-03-01

    Gross-motor impairments are common after stroke, but efficacious and motivating therapies for these impairments are scarce. We present a novel musical sonification therapy especially designed to retrain gross-motor functions. Four stroke patients were included in a clinical pre-post feasibility study and were trained with our sonification training. Patients' upper-extremity functions and their psychological states were assessed before and after training. The four patients were subdivided into two groups, with both groups receiving 9 days of musical sonification therapy (music group, MG) or a sham sonification training (control group, CG). The only difference between these training protocols was that, in the CG, no sound was played back. During the training the patients initially explored the acoustic effects of their arm movements, and at the end of the training the patients played simple melodies by moving their arms. The two patients in the MG improved in nearly all motor function tests after the training. They also reported in the stroke impact scale, which assesses well-being, memory, thinking, and social participation, to be less impaired by the stroke. The two patients in the CG did benefit less from the movement training. Taken together, musical sonification may be a promising therapy for impairments after stroke. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Neuroprotection and Stroke Rehabilitation: Modulation and Enhancement of Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rafael Romero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in research are modifying our view of recovery after nervous system damage. New findings are changing previously held concepts and providing promising avenues for treatment of patients after stroke. This review discusses mechanisms of neuronal injury after brain ischemia and the attempts to study neuroprotection options based on such mechanisms. It also considers measures available at present to improve outcome after stroke and presents new areas of research, particularly stimulation techniques, neurogenesis and trophic factors to enhance recovery. In order to improve outcomes, medications that may be detrimental to recovery should be avoided, while symptomatic therapy of problems such as depression, pain syndromes and spasticity may contribute to better results. Continued surveillance and early treatment of complications associated with acute stroke, along with supportive care remain the mainstay of treatment for stroke patients in the recovery phase. Present research on limiting brain damage and improving recovery and plasticity enhance the prospects for better clinical treatments to improve recovery after stroke.

  12. Rehabilitation needs for older adults with stroke living at home: perceptions of four populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viscogliosi Chantal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people who have suffered a stroke require rehabilitation to help them resume their previous activities and roles in their own environment, but only some of them receive inpatient or even outpatient rehabilitation services. Partial and unmet rehabilitation needs may ultimately lead to a loss of functional autonomy, which increases utilization of health services, number of hospitalizations and early institutionalization, leading to a significant psychological and financial burden on the patients, their families and the health care system. The aim of this study was to explore partially met and unmet rehabilitation needs of older adults who had suffered a stroke and who live in the community. The emphasis was put on needs that act as obstacles to social participation in terms of personal factors, environmental factors and life habits, from the point of view of four target populations. Methods Using the focus group technique, we met four types of experts living in three geographic areas of the province of Québec (Canada: older people with stroke, caregivers, health professionals and health care managers, for a total of 12 groups and 72 participants. The audio recordings of the meetings were transcribed and NVivo software was used to manage the data. The process of reducing, categorizing and analyzing the data was conducted using themes from the Disability Creation Process model. Results Rehabilitation needs persist for nine capabilities (e.g. related to behaviour or motor activities, nine factors related to the environment (e.g. type of teaching, adaptation and rehabilitation and 11 life habits (e.g. nutrition, interpersonal relationships. The caregivers and health professionals identified more unmet needs and insisted on an individualized rehabilitation. Older people with stroke and the health care managers had a more global view of rehabilitation needs and emphasized the availability of resources. Conclusion Better

  13. [The effectiveness of comprehensive rehabilitation after a first episode of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosta, Michał; Niwald, Marta; Miller, Elżbieta

    2015-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is the most common cause of hospitalization in the Department of Neurological Rehabilitation. Comprehensive rehabilitation is essential for regaining lost functional efficiency. The aim of study was to evaluate the effectiveness of specific disorder rehabilitation program in 57 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. The study included 57 patients (27 women, 30 men) aged from 47 to 89. Patients were admitted for comprehensive rehabilitation, lasted an average of 25 days. The treatment program consisted of exercises aimed at reeducation of posture and gait. In addition, physical treatments were used. Evaluation of the effectiveness of rehabilitation was measured using the Activity Daily Living scale, Modified Rankin Scale, Rivermead Measure Assessment (RMA1-global movements, RMA2-lower limb and trunk, RMA3-upper limb) and the psychological tests - Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). As a result of comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, functional status and mental health improvement was observed in relation to the ADL scale by 32% (woman 36%, man 30%), Rankin scale by 22% (woman 22%, man 21%). In the RMA, improvement was observed with the statistical significance of p=0.001 in all of the subscales. The highest rate of improvement affected upper limb function: RMA/3 (41%). In other subscales women have achieved statistically more significant improvement than men (RMA/1-43% versus 25%; RMA/2-41% versus 30%). The results related to the psychological assessment showed statistically significant GDS improvement p 60 years old) in test men (p=0.038). Spearman correlation coefficient showed no relation between mental state and functional improvement (GDS versus ADL; BDI versus ADL). The 25 days comprehensive rehabilitation program during the subacute stroke phase affects mainly the improvement of upper limb function. Women have achieved better functional improvement in all of the parameters. In addition, it was observed

  14. Effects of Transferring to the Rehabilitation Ward on Long-Term Mortality Rate of First-Time Stroke Survivors: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2017-12-01

    To assess the long-term health outcomes of acute stroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Long-term mortality rates of first-time stroke survivors during hospitalization were compared among the following sets of patients: patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward, patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward, and patients receiving no rehabilitation. Retrospective cohort study. Patients (N = 11,419) with stroke from 2005 to 2008 were initially assessed for eligibility. After propensity score matching, 390 first-time stroke survivors were included. None. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess differences in 5-year poststroke mortality rates. Based on adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), the patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward (adjusted HR, 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-3.57) and patients receiving no rehabilitation (adjusted HR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.55-6.27) had significantly higher mortality risk than the patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Mortality rate of the stroke survivors was affected by age ≥65 years (compared with age stroke (adjusted HR, 1.55), stroke severity (Stroke Severity Index [SSI] score≥20, compared with SSI scorestroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward had a 5-year mortality rate 2.2 times lower than those who received rehabilitation without transfer to the rehabilitation ward and 4 times lower than those who received no rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Early versus delayed rehabilitation treatment in hemiplegic patients with ischemic stroke: proprioceptive or cognitive approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Manuela; Marchione, Pasquale; Pili, Antonio; Lauta, Antonella; Castiglia, Stefano F; Spallone, Aldo; Pierelli, Francesco; Giacomini, Patrizia

    2016-02-01

    Early/intensive mobilization may improve functional recovery after stroke but it is not clear which kind of "mobilization" is more effective. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and cognitive therapeutic exercise (CTE) are widespread applied in post-stroke rehabilitation but their efficacy and safety have not been systematically investigated. To compare PNF and CTE methods in a two different time setting (early versus standard approach) in order to evaluate different role of time and techniques in functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke. We designed a prospectical multicenter blinded interventional study of early versus standard approach with two different methods by means of both PNF and CTE. A discrete stroke-dedicated area for out-of-thrombolysis patients, connected with two different comprehensive stroke centres in two different catchment areas. Three hundred and forty consecutive stroke patient with first ever sub-cortical ischemic stroke in the mean cerebral artery (MCA) territory and contralateral hemiplegia admitted within 6 and 24 hours from symptoms onset. All patients were randomly assigned by means of a computer generated randomization sequence in blocks of 4 to one to the 4 interventional groups: early versus delayed rehabilitation programs with Kabat's schemes or Perfetti's technique. Patients in both delayed group underwent to a standard protocol in the acute phase. disability at 3-12 months. Disability measures: modified Rankin Score and Barthel Index. Safety outcome: immobility-related adverse events. Six-Minute Walking Test, Motricity Index, Mini-Mental State Examination, Beck Depression Inventory. Disability was not different between groups at 3 months but Barthel Index significantly changed between early versus delayed groups at 12 months (P=0.01). Six-Minute Walking Test (P=0.01) and Motricity Index in both upper (P=0.01) and lower limbs (P=0.001) increased in early versus delayed groups regardless rehabilitation schedule. A

  16. Powered robotic exoskeletons in post-stroke rehabilitation of gait: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dennis R; Eng, Janice J

    2016-06-08

    Powered robotic exoskeletons are a potential intervention for gait rehabilitation in stroke to enable repetitive walking practice to maximize neural recovery. As this is a relatively new technology for stroke, a scoping review can help guide current research and propose recommendations for advancing the research development. The aim of this scoping review was to map the current literature surrounding the use of robotic exoskeletons for gait rehabilitation in adults post-stroke. Five databases (Pubmed, OVID MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials) were searched for articles from inception to October 2015. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Articles were included if they utilized a robotic exoskeleton as a gait training intervention for adult stroke survivors and reported walking outcome measures. Of 441 records identified, 11 studies, all published within the last five years, involving 216 participants met the inclusion criteria. The study designs ranged from pre-post clinical studies (n = 7) to controlled trials (n = 4); five of the studies utilized a robotic exoskeleton device unilaterally, while six used a bilateral design. Participants ranged from sub-acute (6 months) stroke. Training periods ranged from single-session to 8-week interventions. Main walking outcome measures were gait speed, Timed Up and Go, 6-min Walk Test, and the Functional Ambulation Category. Meaningful improvement with exoskeleton-based gait training was more apparent in sub-acute stroke compared to chronic stroke. Two of the four controlled trials showed no greater improvement in any walking outcomes compared to a control group in chronic stroke. In conclusion, clinical trials demonstrate that powered robotic exoskeletons can be used safely as a gait training intervention for stroke. Preliminary findings suggest that exoskeletal gait training is equivalent to traditional therapy for chronic stroke

  17. Place attachment in stroke rehabilitation : A transdisciplinary encounter between cultural geography, environmental psychology and rehabilitation medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Christa S.; Meijering, Louise; Schonherr, Marleen C.; Postema, Klaas; Lettinga, Ant T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To increase understanding of stroke survivor's needs to successfully re-establish attachment to meaningful places at home and in the community. Methods: Qualitative research methodology including in-depth interviews with stroke survivors in the clinical, post-discharge and reintegration

  18. Lost after stroke: Theory, assessment, and rehabilitation of navigation impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, M.H.G.

    2017-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to better understand the navigation problems that nearly a third of stroke patients are faced with. Insight into these types of problems is currently very limited in this patient group. I adopted four approaches to address this main objective, corresponding

  19. The sensory side of post-stroke motor rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Bolognini, Nadia; Russo, Cristina; Edwards, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary strategies to promote motor recovery following stroke focus on repetitive voluntary movements. Although successful movement relies on efficient sensorimotor integration, functional outcomes often bias motor therapy toward motor-related impairments such as weakness, spasticity and synergies; sensory therapy and reintegration is implied, but seldom targeted. However, the planning and execution of voluntary movement requires that the brain extracts sensory information regarding body...

  20. Motor imagery and stroke rehabilitation : A critical discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sjoerd; Mulder, Theo

    Motor disorders are a frequent consequence of stroke and much effort is invested in the re-acquisition of motor control. Although patients often regain some of their lost function after therapy, most remain chronically disabled. Functional recovery is achieved largely through reorganization

  1. absence of programme outcome in the rehabilitation Stroke a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-18

    Aug 18, 1990 ... to the World Health Organisation's recommendation, as 'a vascular lesion of acute onset resulting in disability ... hospital's medical records retrieval system. Careful case-note review resulted in the exclusion .... stroke is predominantly a disease of the elderly. Survival to I year was calculated at 37%. This·is ...

  2. Stroke outcome in the absence of a structured rehabilitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outcome of acute stroke in 210 hospitalised patients was investigated by retrospective case-note review and household follow-up. The first month was the critical period for survival, with the highest number of fatalities being recorded in the first week (38%). Survival to 1 year was much lower than expected. Functional ...

  3. Developing stroke-specific vocational rehabilitation: a soft systems analysis of current service provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Kathryn; Grant, Mary; Terry, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to clarify the existing service provision of stroke-specific vocational rehabilitation (VR) in one English county, in order to facilitate future service development. Method: Using soft systems methodology, services in Health, Social Care, Department of Work and Pensions, the voluntary and private sectors, which were identified as supporting return to work after stroke, were mapped using a mixed-methodology approach. Results: A lack of a sanctioned VR pathway meant access to support relied on brokered provision and tacit knowledge. The timing of an intervention was complex and there was a substantial degree of unmet need for mild stroke patients. VR was seen as “non-essential” due to competing commissioning priorities. Service providers from all sectors lacked training and cross-sector partnerships were tenuous and provider roles unclear. Conclusions: Stroke-specific VR should be delivered by an integrated, cross-sector multi-disciplinary team and integrated commissioning between health and other sectors is necessary. Although early intervention is important, support later on in the recovery process is also necessary. Service providers need adequate training to meet the needs of stroke survivors wishing to return to work and better awareness of best practice guidelines. Business cases which demonstrate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of VR are vital. Implications for Rehabilitation The timeliness of a vocational rehabilitation (VR) intervention is complex; services need to be responsive to the changing needs of the stroke survivor throughout their recovery process and have better mechanisms to ensure re-entry into the stroke pathway is possible. Return to work is a recognised health outcome; health services need to develop better mechanisms for interagency/cross sector working and liaison with employers and not assume that VR is beyond their remit. Therapists and non-health service providers should receive sufficient training to

  4. Evaluation of a four month rehabilitation program for stroke patients with balance problems and binocular visual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schow, Trine; Harris, Paul; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2016-01-01

    Trine Schow, Paul Harris, Thomas William Teasdale, Morten Arendt Rasmussen. Evaluation of a four month rehabilitation program for stroke patients with balance problems and binocular visual dysfunction. NeuroRehabilitation. 2016 Apr 6;38(4):331-41. doi: 10.3233/NRE-161324.......Trine Schow, Paul Harris, Thomas William Teasdale, Morten Arendt Rasmussen. Evaluation of a four month rehabilitation program for stroke patients with balance problems and binocular visual dysfunction. NeuroRehabilitation. 2016 Apr 6;38(4):331-41. doi: 10.3233/NRE-161324....

  5. Functional Brain Correlates of Upper Limb Spasticity and Its Mitigation following Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundik, Svetlana; Falchook, Adam D.; McCabe, Jessica; Daly, Janis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Arm spasticity is a challenge in the care of chronic stroke survivors with motor deficits. In order to advance spasticity treatments, a better understanding of the mechanism of spasticity-related neuroplasticity is needed. Objective. To investigate brain function correlates of spasticity in chronic stroke and to identify specific regional functional brain changes related to rehabilitation-induced mitigation of spasticity. Methods. 23 stroke survivors (>6 months) were treated with an arm motor learning and spasticity therapy (5 d/wk for 12 weeks). Outcome measures included Modified Ashworth scale, sensory tests, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for wrist and hand movement. Results. First, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with poorer motor function (P = 0.001) and greater sensory deficits (P = 0.003). Second, rehabilitation produced improvement in upper limb spasticity and motor function (P spasticity correlated with higher fMRI activation in the ipsilesional thalamus (rho = 0.49, P = 0.03). Fourth, following rehabilitation, greater mitigation of spasticity correlated with enhanced fMRI activation in the contralesional primary motor (r = −0.755, P = 0.003), premotor (r = −0.565, P = 0.04), primary sensory (r = −0.614, P = 0.03), and associative sensory (r = −0.597, P = 0.03) regions while controlling for changes in motor function. Conclusions. Contralesional motor regions may contribute to restoring control of muscle tone in chronic stroke. PMID:25101190

  6. Grasps recognition and evaluation of stroke patients for supporting rehabilitation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Beatriz; Basteris, Angelo; Infarinato, Francesco; Sale, Patrizio; Nijenhuis, Sharon; Prange, Gerdienke; Amirabdollahian, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors often suffer impairments on their wrist and hand. Robot-mediated rehabilitation techniques have been proposed as a way to enhance conventional therapy, based on intensive repeated movements. Amongst the set of activities of daily living, grasping is one of the most recurrent. Our aim is to incorporate the detection of grasps in the machine-mediated rehabilitation framework so that they can be incorporated into interactive therapeutic games. In this study, we developed and tested a method based on support vector machines for recognizing various grasp postures wearing a passive exoskeleton for hand and wrist rehabilitation after stroke. The experiment was conducted with ten healthy subjects and eight stroke patients performing the grasping gestures. The method was tested in terms of accuracy and robustness with respect to intersubjects' variability and differences between different grasps. Our results show reliable recognition while also indicating that the recognition accuracy can be used to assess the patients' ability to consistently repeat the gestures. Additionally, a grasp quality measure was proposed to measure the capabilities of the stroke patients to perform grasp postures in a similar way than healthy people. These two measures can be potentially used as complementary measures to other upper limb motion tests.

  7. Factors Associated With Intestinal Constipation in Chronic Patients With Stroke Sequelae Undergoing Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Tânia Mara Nascimento de Miranda; Aguiar, Márcia Helena de Assis; Furtado, Íris Aline Brito; Ribeiro, Samile Pereira; de Oliveira, Pérola; Mello, Paulo Andrade; Padula, Marcele Pescuma Capeletti; Beraldo, Paulo Sérgio Siebra

    The objective of this study was to define which stroke-related factors constitute independent variables in the incidence of intestinal constipation (IC) of chronic patients admitted to a hospital rehabilitation program. All patients consecutively admitted for rehabilitation were recruited for the study. In the Poisson multiple regression analysis using a hierarchical model, sociodemographic variables, comorbidities, medication, previous history of constipation, life habits, and stroke-related variables were considered for defining factors associated with IC. A 31% prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25.3-37.1) of IC was detected. Among the factors associated, female gender (adjusted prevalence ratio [PRadjusted] = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.20-2.68), intestinal complaints prior to stroke (PRadjusted = 3.71; 95% CI: 2.60-5.31), intake of less than 800 ml of fluid per day (PRadjusted = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.20- 2.45), age greater than 65 years at brain injury (PRadjusted = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.01-2.75), and partially impaired anterior brain circulation (PRadjusted = 3.35; 95% CI: 1.02-10.97) were associated with IC. Female gender, elderly, prior history of IC, low fluid intake, and partial impairment of anterior brain circulation were factors independently associated with IC in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. These findings require further validation and may serve toward improving bowel retraining programs for this patient group.

  8. Grasps Recognition and Evaluation of Stroke Patients for Supporting Rehabilitation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Leon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke survivors often suffer impairments on their wrist and hand. Robot-mediated rehabilitation techniques have been proposed as a way to enhance conventional therapy, based on intensive repeated movements. Amongst the set of activities of daily living, grasping is one of the most recurrent. Our aim is to incorporate the detection of grasps in the machine-mediated rehabilitation framework so that they can be incorporated into interactive therapeutic games. In this study, we developed and tested a method based on support vector machines for recognizing various grasp postures wearing a passive exoskeleton for hand and wrist rehabilitation after stroke. The experiment was conducted with ten healthy subjects and eight stroke patients performing the grasping gestures. The method was tested in terms of accuracy and robustness with respect to intersubjects’ variability and differences between different grasps. Our results show reliable recognition while also indicating that the recognition accuracy can be used to assess the patients’ ability to consistently repeat the gestures. Additionally, a grasp quality measure was proposed to measure the capabilities of the stroke patients to perform grasp postures in a similar way than healthy people. These two measures can be potentially used as complementary measures to other upper limb motion tests.

  9. Robotic exoskeletons: a perspective for the rehabilitation of arm coordination in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael eJarrassé

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Upper-limb impairment after stroke is caused by weakness, loss of individual joint control, spasticity and abnormal synergies. Upper limb movement frequently involves abnormal, stereotyped and fixed synergies, likely related to the increased use of subcortical networks following the stroke. The flexible coordination of the shoulder and elbow joints is also disrupted. New methods for motor learning, based on the stimulation of activity-dependent neural plasticity have been developed. These include robots that can adaptively assist active movements and generate many movement repetitions. However, most of these robots only control the movement of the hand in space. The aim of the present text is to analyse the potential of robotic exoskeletons to specifically rehabilitate joint motion and particularly inter-joint coordination. Firstly, a review of studies on upper-limb coordination in stroke patients is presented and the potential for recovery of coordination is examined. Secondly, issues relating to the mechanical design of exoskeletons and the transmission of constraints between the robotic and human limbs are discussed. The third section considers the development of different methods to control exoskeletons: existing rehabilitation devices and approaches to the control and rehabilitation of joint coordinations are then reviewed, along with preliminary clinical results available. Finally, perspectives and future strategies for the design of control mechanisms for rehabilitation exoskeletons are discussed.

  10. Determining the needs, priorities, and desired rehabilitation outcomes of young adults who have had a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maggie; Kinn, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Background. Guidelines state that young adults' (aged 18-55 years) rehabilitation needs and priorities following stroke are different from older adults'. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding young adults' perspectives of their needs and priorities. Aim. To gain an understanding of young adults' experience of stroke and associated rehabilitation needs, priorities, and desired outcomes. Methods. A qualitative approach was adopted, based on the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty. Longitudinal data were gathered using unstructured interviews and analysed using phenomenological reduction. Results. Ten young adults took part in up to four interviews over two years. An overarching theme, Embodied Disorientation, and three subthemes: Mortal Body, Situated Body, and Embodied Perception of Difference, described the young adults' experience. A subsequent iterative process enabled tabulation of patient-centred rehabilitation needs, priorities, and outcomes. Conclusion. Rehabilitation professionals can use the evidence-based outcomes table to work with young adults to develop meaningful patient-centred goals and select appropriate interventions which align with identified needs and outcomes throughout the stroke recovery trajectory.

  11. Determining the Needs, Priorities, and Desired Rehabilitation Outcomes of Young Adults Who Have Had a Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Guidelines state that young adults' (aged 18–55 years rehabilitation needs and priorities following stroke are different from older adults'. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding young adults' perspectives of their needs and priorities. Aim. To gain an understanding of young adults' experience of stroke and associated rehabilitation needs, priorities, and desired outcomes. Methods. A qualitative approach was adopted, based on the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty. Longitudinal data were gathered using unstructured interviews and analysed using phenomenological reduction. Results. Ten young adults took part in up to four interviews over two years. An overarching theme, Embodied Disorientation, and three subthemes: Mortal Body, Situated Body, and Embodied Perception of Difference, described the young adults' experience. A subsequent iterative process enabled tabulation of patient-centred rehabilitation needs, priorities, and outcomes. Conclusion. Rehabilitation professionals can use the evidence-based outcomes table to work with young adults to develop meaningful patient-centred goals and select appropriate interventions which align with identified needs and outcomes throughout the stroke recovery trajectory.

  12. Functional Gain After Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation: Correlates and Impact on Long-Term Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Monitillo, Vincenzo; Guida, Pietro; Nardulli, Roberto; Multari, Vincenzo; Monitillo, Francesco; Calabrese, Gianluigi; Fiore, Pietro

    2015-10-01

    Prediction of functional outcome after stroke rehabilitation (SR) is a growing field of interest. The association between SR and survival still remains elusive. We sought to investigate the factors associated with functional outcome after SR and whether the magnitude of functional improvement achieved with rehabilitation is associated with long-term mortality risk. The study population consisted of 722 patients admitted for SR within 90 days of stroke onset, with an admission functional independence measure (FIM) score of stroke onset to rehabilitation admission (PStroke Scale score at rehabilitation admission (P<0.001), and aphasia (P=0.021) were independently associated with FIM gain. The R2 of the model was 0.275. During a median follow-up of 6.17 years, 36.9% of the patients died. At multivariable Cox analysis, age (P<0.0001), coronary heart disease (P=0.018), atrial fibrillation (P=0.042), total cholesterol (P=0.015), and total FIM gain (P<0.0001) were independently associated with mortality. The adjusted hazard ratio for death significantly decreased across tertiles of increasing FIM gain. Several factors are independently associated with functional gain after SR. Our findings strongly suggest that the magnitude of functional improvement is a powerful predictor of long-term mortality in patients admitted for SR. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Robotic Exoskeletons: A Perspective for the Rehabilitation of Arm Coordination in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Proietti, Tommaso; Crocher, Vincent; Robertson, Johanna; Sahbani, Anis; Morel, Guillaume; Roby-Brami, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Upper-limb impairment after stroke is caused by weakness, loss of individual joint control, spasticity, and abnormal synergies. Upper-limb movement frequently involves abnormal, stereotyped, and fixed synergies, likely related to the increased use of sub-cortical networks following the stroke. The flexible coordination of the shoulder and elbow joints is also disrupted. New methods for motor learning, based on the stimulation of activity-dependent neural plasticity have been developed. These include robots that can adaptively assist active movements and generate many movement repetitions. However, most of these robots only control the movement of the hand in space. The aim of the present text is to analyze the potential of robotic exoskeletons to specifically rehabilitate joint motion and particularly inter-joint coordination. First, a review of studies on upper-limb coordination in stroke patients is presented and the potential for recovery of coordination is examined. Second, issues relating to the mechanical design of exoskeletons and the transmission of constraints between the robotic and human limbs are discussed. The third section considers the development of different methods to control exoskeletons: existing rehabilitation devices and approaches to the control and rehabilitation of joint coordinations are then reviewed, along with preliminary clinical results available. Finally, perspectives and future strategies for the design of control mechanisms for rehabilitation exoskeletons are discussed. PMID:25520638

  14. Functional outcomes of inpatient rehabilitation in very elderly patients with stroke: differences across three age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutai, Hitoshi; Furukawa, Tomomi; Wakabayashi, Ayumi; Suzuki, Akihito; Hanihara, Tokiji

    2018-05-01

    Background As the population continues to age rapidly, clarifying the factors affecting the prognosis in very elderly stroke patients is essential to enhance the quality of their rehabilitation. Objectives To compare the functional recovery of elderly stroke patients classified into three age groups and to identify the predictors of functional recovery in the very elderly following acute inpatient rehabilitation. Methods Observational study: We collected data on 461 stroke patients in the neurology and neurosurgery ward and classified them into three age groups (65-74, 75-84, and ≥ 85 years). Functional recovery was compared among groups using the functional independence measure (FIM) at discharge and ADL recovery rate was compared using the Montebello rehabilitation factor score (MRFS). Multiple regression analysis was used to identify and compare the factors associated with functional recovery in each age group. Results Functional recovery in the ≥ 85 years group was lower than that in other age groups. Factors associated with activities of daily living (ADL) status (FIM at discharge) in the ≥ 85 years group were premorbid dependence (β = -0.183, p = 0.011), motor paralysis (β = -0.238, p = 0.001), and cognitive function (β = 0.586, p age increased. Factors associated with ADL recovery rates (MRFS) in the ≥ 85 years group were non-paretic limb function (β = -0.294, p = 0.004) and cognitive function (β = 0.201, p = 0.047). Conclusions This study identified the factors associated with functional recovery among very elderly stroke patients. Effective forms of rehabilitation for very elderly stroke patients that take these factors into consideration need to be investigated.

  15. Motion Rehab AVE 3D: A VR-based exergame for post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Mateus; Bazzanello Henrique, Patrícia Paula; Brum, Manoela Rogofski; Colussi, Eliane Lucia; De Marchi, Ana Carolina Bertoletti; Rieder, Rafael

    2017-11-01

    Recent researches about games for post-stroke rehabilitation have been increasing, focusing in upper limb, lower limb and balance situations, and showing good experiences and results. With this in mind, this paper presents Motion Rehab AVE 3D, a serious game for post-stroke rehabilitation of patients with mild stroke. The aim is offer a new technology in order to assist the traditional therapy and motivate the patient to execute his/her rehabilitation program, under health professional supervision. The game was developed with Unity game engine, supporting Kinect motion sensing input device and display devices like Smart TV 3D and Oculus Rift. It contemplates six activities considering exercises in a tridimensional space: flexion, abduction, shoulder adduction, horizontal shoulder adduction and abduction, elbow extension, wrist extension, knee flexion, and hip flexion and abduction. Motion Rehab AVE 3D also report about hits and errors to the physiotherapist evaluate the patient's progress. A pilot study with 10 healthy participants (61-75 years old) tested one of the game levels. They experienced the 3D user interface in third-person. Our initial goal was to map a basic and comfortable setup of equipment in order to adopt later. All the participants (100%) classified the interaction process as interesting and amazing for the age, presenting a good acceptance. Our evaluation showed that the game could be used as a useful tool to motivate the patients during rehabilitation sessions. Next step is to evaluate its effectiveness for stroke patients, in order to verify if the interface and game exercises contribute into the motor rehabilitation treatment progress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Measure of functional independence dominates discharge outcome prediction after inpatient rehabilitation for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allen W; Therneau, Terry M; Schultz, Billie A; Niewczyk, Paulette M; Granger, Carl V

    2015-04-01

    Identifying clinical data acquired at inpatient rehabilitation admission for stroke that accurately predict key outcomes at discharge could inform the development of customized plans of care to achieve favorable outcomes. The purpose of this analysis was to use a large comprehensive national data set to consider a wide range of clinical elements known at admission to identify those that predict key outcomes at rehabilitation discharge. Sample data were obtained from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation data set with the diagnosis of stroke for the years 2005 through 2007. This data set includes demographic, administrative, and medical variables collected at admission and discharge and uses the FIM (functional independence measure) instrument to assess functional independence. Primary outcomes of interest were functional independence measure gain, length of stay, and discharge to home. The sample included 148,367 people (75% white; mean age, 70.6±13.1 years; 97% with ischemic stroke) admitted to inpatient rehabilitation a mean of 8.2±12 days after symptom onset. The total functional independence measure score, the functional independence measure motor subscore, and the case-mix group were equally the strongest predictors for any of the primary outcomes. The most clinically relevant 3-variable model used the functional independence measure motor subscore, age, and walking distance at admission (r(2)=0.107). No important additional effect for any other variable was detected when added to this model. This analysis shows that a measure of functional independence in motor performance and age at rehabilitation hospital admission for stroke are predominant predictors of outcome at discharge in a uniquely large US national data set. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Tai chi for upper limb rehabilitation in stroke patients: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, Pascal; Kairy, Dahlia; Pan, Shujuan; Corriveau, Hélène; Tousignant, Michel

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed at exploring the perceived benefits and drawbacks of practicing tai chi, an alternative therapy that can be implemented in the community, as part of upper-limb rehabilitation following stroke. Semistructured interviews were carried out with participants with chronic stroke (>6 months). The participants took part in 16 tai chi sessions over 8 weeks. Interviews were conducted in person using an interview guide based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), and a thematic analysis was conducted. Eight interviews were carried out with participants at various stages of motor recovery. Participants perceived a number of physical, functional, and psychological benefits. They found tai chi to be a global exercise, including both physical and mental aspects, and suggested that it can be included as part of rehabilitation for stroke patients. Many participants expressed a desire to continue practicing tai chi after completion of the study because it exceeded their expectations, among other reasons. This study can serve to guide future tai chi interventions and research on tai chi for rehabilitation in terms of the characteristics of the intervention and the various areas to assess in order to measure the overall benefits. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Tai chi was perceived as a good way of integrating various skills learned during rehabilitation. Despite having different functional abilities, all the participants noted various physical, functional, and psychological benefits from participating in the tai chi sessions. Tai chi seems to be a form of exercise that stroke patients would perform more long-term since all the participants in this study expressed the desire to continue practicing tai chi.

  18. Rehabilitation of gait after stroke: a review towards a top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belda-Lois Juan-Manuel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This document provides a review of the techniques and therapies used in gait rehabilitation after stroke. It also examines the possible benefits of including assistive robotic devices and brain-computer interfaces in this field, according to a top-down approach, in which rehabilitation is driven by neural plasticity. The methods reviewed comprise classical gait rehabilitation techniques (neurophysiological and motor learning approaches, functional electrical stimulation (FES, robotic devices, and brain-computer interfaces (BCI. From the analysis of these approaches, we can draw the following conclusions. Regarding classical rehabilitation techniques, there is insufficient evidence to state that a particular approach is more effective in promoting gait recovery than other. Combination of different rehabilitation strategies seems to be more effective than over-ground gait training alone. Robotic devices need further research to show their suitability for walking training and their effects on over-ground gait. The use of FES combined with different walking retraining strategies has shown to result in improvements in hemiplegic gait. Reports on non-invasive BCIs for stroke recovery are limited to the rehabilitation of upper limbs; however, some works suggest that there might be a common mechanism which influences upper and lower limb recovery simultaneously, independently of the limb chosen for the rehabilitation therapy. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS enables researchers to detect signals from specific regions of the cortex during performance of motor activities for the development of future BCIs. Future research would make possible to analyze the impact of rehabilitation on brain plasticity, in order to adapt treatment resources to meet the needs of each patient and to optimize the recovery process.

  19. Allied health weekend service provision in Australian rehabilitation units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Erin L; Kuys, Suzanne S; Brauer, Sandra G

    2018-03-23

    To determine current Australian allied health rehabilitation weekend service provision and to identify perceived barriers to and facilitators of weekend service provision. Senior physiotherapists from Australian rehabilitation units completed an online cross-sectional survey exploring current service provision, staffing, perceived outcomes, and barriers and facilitators to weekend service provision. A total of 179 (83%) eligible units responded, with 94 facilities (53%) providing weekend therapy. A Saturday service was the most common (97%) with the most frequent service providers being physiotherapists (90%). Rehabilitation weekend service was perceived to increase patient/family satisfaction (66%) and achieve faster goal attainment (55%). Common barriers were budgetary restraints (66%) and staffing availability (54%), with facilitators including organisational support (76%), staff availability (62%) and staff support (61%). Despite increasing evidence of effectiveness, only half of Australian rehabilitation facilities provide weekend services. Further efforts are required to translate evidence from clinical trials into feasible service delivery models. © 2018 AJA Inc.

  20. Stroke care: Experiences and clinical research in stroke units in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobindram Arjundas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: S troke is the second commonest cause of death in India with crude overall prevalence rate of 220 per 100,000. With an increasing aging population at risk, the stroke burden in India can be expected to reach epidemic proportions. Materials and Methods: The first protocol-based prospective studies, funded by private agencies was conducted in Madras Institute of Neurology in 1984-86. The results led to establishment of the first stroke unit in Tamil Nadu state, in the institute. The first all-India hospital-based studies in acute stroke was completed as INDIAN COOPERATIVE ACUTE STROKE STUDIES (ICASS I and ICASS II with WHO STEP ONE by members of the Indian Stroke Association between 2000-2005. This has generated very useful data for our country. Results: Mortality in 1984-86 was 40%. Stroke unit in the institute dropped it to 12%. About 10 years later, ICASS studies showed a further fall of mortality to 8%, which is the current international figure in the west. Morbidity pattern showed about half return to their original activities. But about one third are left totally disabled needing prolonged care, for which fiscal, social and rehab provisions have to be done on a national basis. Conclusions: The progress and success of care of Stroke in the last three decades, from treatment in medical and neurology wards to specialized stroke units is presented. The main risk factors are hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease across the country. Hypertension alone or with the other two diseases was present in 72% of cases. Prevention and treatment of these factors will reduce the stroke burden, mortality and morbidity of strokes. The Stroke-team concept can be extended to the smallest hospitals in our country.

  1. Development and Validation of a Predictive Model for Functional Outcome After Stroke Rehabilitation: The Maugeri Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Lanzillo, Bernardo; Guida, Pietro; Mastropasqua, Filippo; Monitillo, Vincenzo; Pusineri, Monica; Formica, Roberto; Russo, Giovanna; Guarnaschelli, Caterina; Ferretti, Chiara; Calabrese, Gianluigi

    2017-12-01

    Prediction of outcome after stroke rehabilitation may help clinicians in decision-making and planning rehabilitation care. We developed and validated a predictive tool to estimate the probability of achieving improvement in physical functioning (model 1) and a level of independence requiring no more than supervision (model 2) after stroke rehabilitation. The models were derived from 717 patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to build each model. Then, each model was prospectively validated in 875 patients. Model 1 included age, time from stroke occurrence to rehabilitation admission, admission motor and cognitive Functional Independence Measure scores, and neglect. Model 2 included age, male gender, time since stroke onset, and admission motor and cognitive Functional Independence Measure score. Both models demonstrated excellent discrimination. In the derivation cohort, the area under the curve was 0.883 (95% confidence intervals, 0.858-0.910) for model 1 and 0.913 (95% confidence intervals, 0.884-0.942) for model 2. The Hosmer-Lemeshow χ 2 was 4.12 ( P =0.249) and 1.20 ( P =0.754), respectively. In the validation cohort, the area under the curve was 0.866 (95% confidence intervals, 0.840-0.892) for model 1 and 0.850 (95% confidence intervals, 0.815-0.885) for model 2. The Hosmer-Lemeshow χ 2 was 8.86 ( P =0.115) and 34.50 ( P =0.001), respectively. Both improvement in physical functioning (hazard ratios, 0.43; 0.25-0.71; P =0.001) and a level of independence requiring no more than supervision (hazard ratios, 0.32; 0.14-0.68; P =0.004) were independently associated with improved 4-year survival. A calculator is freely available for download at https://goo.gl/fEAp81. This study provides researchers and clinicians with an easy-to-use, accurate, and validated predictive tool for potential application in rehabilitation research and stroke management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Gesture Therapy: A Vision-Based System for Arm Rehabilitation after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucar, L. Enrique; Azcárate, Gildardo; Leder, Ron S.; Reinkensmeyer, David; Hernández, Jorge; Sanchez, Israel; Saucedo, Pedro

    Each year millions of people in the world survive a stroke, in the U.S. alone the figure is over 600,000 people per year. Movement impairments after stroke are typically treated with intensive, hands-on physical and occupational therapy for several weeks after the initial injury. However, due to economic pressures, stroke patients are receiving less therapy and going home sooner, so the potential benefit of the therapy is not completely realized. Thus, it is important to develop rehabilitation technology that allows individuals who had suffered a stroke to practice intensive movement training without the expense of an always-present therapist. Current solutions are too expensive, as they require a robotic system for rehabilitation. We have developed a low-cost, computer vision system that allows individuals with stroke to practice arm movement exercises at home or at the clinic, with periodic interactions with a therapist. The system integrates a web based virtual environment for facilitating repetitive movement training, with state-of-the art computer vision algorithms that track the hand of a patient and obtain its 3-D coordinates, using two inexpensive cameras and a conventional personal computer. An initial prototype of the system has been evaluated in a pilot clinical study with promising results.

  3. Assessment of movement quality in robot- assisted upper limb rehabilitation after stroke: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Nurdiana; Xie, Sheng Quan; Wünsche, Burkhard

    2014-09-12

    : Studies of stroke patients undergoing robot-assisted rehabilitation have revealed various kinematic parameters describing movement quality of the upper limb. However, due to the different level of stroke impairment and different assessment criteria and interventions, the evaluation of the effectiveness of rehabilitation program is undermined. This paper presents a systematic review of kinematic assessments of movement quality of the upper limb and identifies the suitable parameters describing impairments in stroke patients. A total of 41 different clinical and pilot studies on different phases of stroke recovery utilizing kinematic parameters are evaluated. Kinematic parameters describing movement accuracy are mostly reported for chronic patients with statistically significant outcomes and correlate strongly with clinical assessments. Meanwhile, parameters describing feed-forward sensorimotor control are the most frequently reported in studies on sub-acute patients with significant outcomes albeit without correlation to any clinical assessments. However, lack of measures in coordinated movement and proximal component of upper limb enunciate the difficulties to distinguish the exploitation of joint redundancies exhibited by stroke patients in completing the movement. A further study on overall measures of coordinated movement is recommended.

  4. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Davide; Imeri, Federico; Gatti, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR) improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19), balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5) and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4). When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1), but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial) and balance (high heterogeneity). Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rehabilitation-triggered cortical plasticity after stroke: in vivo imaging at multiple scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Conti, Emilia; Lai, Stefano; Spalletti, Cristina; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Alia, Claudia; Panarese, Alessandro; Sacconi, Leonardo; Micera, Silvestro; Caleo, Matteo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2017-02-01

    Neurorehabilitation protocols based on the use of robotic devices provide a highly repeatable therapy and have recently shown promising clinical results. Little is known about how rehabilitation molds the brain to promote motor recovery of the affected limb. We used a custom-made robotic platform that provides quantitative assessment of forelimb function in a retraction test. Complementary imaging techniques allowed us to access to the multiple facets of robotic rehabilitation-induced cortical plasticity after unilateral photothrombotic stroke in mice Primary Motor Cortex (Caudal Forelimb Area - CFA). First, we analyzed structural features of vasculature and dendritic reshaping in the peri-infarct area with two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Longitudinal analysis of dendritic branches and spines of pyramidal neurons suggests that robotic rehabilitation promotes the stabilization of peri-infarct cortical excitatory circuits, which is not accompanied by consistent vascular reorganization towards pre-stroke conditions. To investigate if this structural stabilization was linked to functional remapping, we performed mesoscale wide-field imaging on GCaMP6 mice while performing the motor task on the robotic platform. We revealed temporal and spatial features of the motor-triggered cortical activation, shining new light on rehabilitation-induced functional remapping of the ipsilesional cortex. Finally, by using an all-optical approach that combines optogenetic activation of the contralesional hemisphere and wide-field functional imaging of peri-infarct area, we dissected the effect of robotic rehabilitation on inter-hemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity.

  6. Interactive visuo-motor therapy system for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Kynan; Siekierka, Ewa; Pyk, Pawel; Chevrier, Edith; Hauser, Yves; Cameirao, Monica; Holper, Lisa; Hägni, Karin; Zimmerli, Lukas; Duff, Armin; Schuster, Corina; Bassetti, Claudio; Verschure, Paul; Kiper, Daniel

    2007-09-01

    We present a virtual reality (VR)-based motor neurorehabilitation system for stroke patients with upper limb paresis. It is based on two hypotheses: (1) observed actions correlated with self-generated or intended actions engage cortical motor observation, planning and execution areas ("mirror neurons"); (2) activation in damaged parts of motor cortex can be enhanced by viewing mirrored movements of non-paretic limbs. We postulate that our approach, applied during the acute post-stroke phase, facilitates motor re-learning and improves functional recovery. The patient controls a first-person view of virtual arms in tasks varying from simple (hitting objects) to complex (grasping and moving objects). The therapist adjusts weighting factors in the non-paretic limb to move the paretic virtual limb, thereby stimulating the mirror neuron system and optimizing patient motivation through graded task success. We present the system's neuroscientific background, technical details and preliminary results.

  7. [Design of an embedded stroke rehabilitation apparatus system based on Linux computer engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Pengfei; Tian, XueLong; Zhu, Lin

    2014-04-01

    A realizaton project of electrical stimulator aimed at motor dysfunction of stroke is proposed in this paper. Based on neurophysiological biofeedback, this system, using an ARM9 S3C2440 as the core processor, integrates collection and display of surface electromyography (sEMG) signal, as well as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) into one system. By embedding Linux system, the project is able to use Qt/Embedded as a graphical interface design tool to accomplish the design of stroke rehabilitation apparatus. Experiments showed that this system worked well.

  8. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually...... predicted was the need for special living facilities and support at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital, as well as six months later; 53 stroke patients with age median 68 years were included in this prospective study. It was shown that a combination of Barthel Index and CT50 had a stronger predictive...

  9. Neural network remodeling underlying motor map reorganization induced by rehabilitative training after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Naohiko; Shiromoto, Takashi; Himi, Naoyuki; Lu, Feng; Maruyama-Nakamura, Emi; Narita, Kazuhiko; Iwachidou, Nobuhisa; Yagita, Yoshiki; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2016-12-17

    Motor map reorganization is believed to be one mechanism underlying rehabilitation-induced functional recovery. Although the ipsilesional secondary motor area has been known to reorganize motor maps and contribute to rehabilitation-induced functional recovery, it is unknown how the secondary motor area is reorganized by rehabilitative training. In the present study, using skilled forelimb reaching tasks, we investigated neural network remodeling in the rat rostral forelimb area (RFA) of the secondary motor area during 4weeks of rehabilitative training. Following photothrombotic stroke in the caudal forelimb area (CFA), rehabilitative training led to task-specific recovery and motor map reorganization in the RFA. A second injury to the RFA resulted in reappearance of motor deficits. Further, when both the CFA and RFA were destroyed simultaneously, rehabilitative training no longer improved task-specific recovery. In neural tracer studies, although rehabilitative training did not alter neural projection to the RFA from other brain areas, rehabilitative training increased neural projection from the RFA to the lower spinal cord, which innervates the muscles in the forelimb. Double retrograde tracer studies revealed that rehabilitative training increased the neurons projecting from the RFA to both the upper cervical cord, which innervates the muscles in the neck, trunk, and part of the proximal forelimb, and the lower cervical cord. These results suggest that neurons projecting to the upper cervical cord provide new connections to the denervated forelimb area of the spinal cord, and these new connections may contribute to rehabilitation-induced task-specific recovery and motor map reorganization in the secondary motor area. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Feedback control of biomimetic exotendon device for hand rehabilitation in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Many hand exoskeleton devices have recently been developed for hand rehabilitation of stroke survivors, but most hand exoskeletons focused on implementing joint movement driven by individual actuator located at the finger joints rather than considering function of hand muscle-tendons and their coordination. In order to achieve hand rehabilitation targeted on restoration of specific muscle-tendon functions, a biomimetic hand exotendon device (BiomHED) was introduced recently. This paper introduces a ring-type design of exotendon device for easier donning and the design of a feedback control system for controlling posture of the finger. Technical details of the feedback sensor and controller with preliminary experimental results are presented.

  11. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. MEASURES: ADL-observations, Barthel ADL Index, Apraxia Test, Motricity Index. RESULTS: During the study period of 20 weeks, patients showed small improv...

  12. Acute stroke unit improves stroke management-four years on from INASC.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, E

    2015-02-01

    The Irish Heart Foundation carried out the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC) in 2008. Management practices were significantly poorer than those in the UK Sentinel audits. Since then an acute stroke unit has been established in University Hospital Limerick. A stroke database was established. 12 key indicators of stroke management audited by INASC were identified. Results were compared to those in INASC. 89 stroke patients were admitted. 8 of the 12 key indicators scored significantly better than in INASC. 92.5% had a brain scan within 24hrs (INASC-40%, p = < 0.001). 100% of ischaemic strokes received anti-thrombotics (INASC-85%, p = 0.001). 94% had rehab goals agreed by MDT (22% in INASC p = 0.0000). 55% were treated in stroke unit (2% in INASC, p = 0.0000). MDT input improved with regard to physiotherapy (87% vs 43% in INASC, p = < 0.02) and SALT (74% vs 26%, p = < 0.02). Stroke management has significantly improved from 2008, however some deficiencies remain.

  13. Stroke Lesions in a Large Upper Limb Rehabilitation Trial Cohort Rarely Match Lesions in Common Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Matthew A; Wang, Ximing; Liu, Brent; Ding, Li; Lane, Christianne J; Park, Caron; Nelsen, Monica A; Jones, Theresa A; Wolf, Steven L; Winstein, Carolee J; Dromerick, Alexander W

    2017-06-01

    Stroke patients with mild-moderate upper extremity motor impairments and minimal sensory and cognitive deficits provide a useful model to study recovery and improve rehabilitation. Laboratory-based investigators use lesioning techniques for similar goals. To determine whether stroke lesions in an upper extremity rehabilitation trial cohort match lesions from the preclinical stroke recovery models used to drive translational research. Clinical neuroimages from 297 participants enrolled in the Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) study were reviewed. Images were characterized based on lesion type (ischemic or hemorrhagic), volume, vascular territory, depth (cortical gray matter, cortical white matter, subcortical), old strokes, and leukoaraiosis. Lesions were compared with those of preclinical stroke models commonly used to study upper limb recovery. Among the ischemic stroke participants, median infarct volume was 1.8 mL, with most lesions confined to subcortical structures (61%) including the anterior choroidal artery territory (30%) and the pons (23%). Of ICARE participants, stroke patients, but they represent a clinically and scientifically important subgroup. Compared with lesions in general stroke populations and widely studied animal models of recovery, ICARE participants had smaller, more subcortically based strokes. Improved preclinical-clinical translational efforts may require better alignment of lesions between preclinical and human stroke recovery models.

  14. Strengthening the role and functions of nursing staff in inpatient stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mia Ingerslev; Martinsen, Bente; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2017-01-01

    with the framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions by the UK's Medical Research Council (MRC). Based on qualitative methods and using the Behaviour Change Wheel's (BCW) stepwise approach, we sought behaviours related to nursing staffs' roles and functions. RESULTS: We conducted a behavioural......PURPOSE: Over the past two decades, attempts have been made to describe the nurse's role and functions in the inpatient stroke rehabilitation; however, the nursing contribution is neither clear nor well-defined. Previous studies have highlighted the need for research aimed at developing...... interventions in the neuro-nursing area. The objective of this paper was to describe the development of a nursing intervention aimed at optimising the inpatient rehabilitation of stroke patients by strengthening the role and functions of nursing staff. METHOD: A systematic approach was used, consistent...

  15. Which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises?

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xibo; Gao, Qian; Dou, Honglei; Tang, Shujie

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine which is better in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, core stability exercises or conventional exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants with hemiplegia were recruited in the Department of Neurology of Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang between January 2014 and February 2015 and randomly divided into either an experimental or control group. The patients in the control group performed conventional exercises for six weeks, and those ...

  16. Development of a virtual reality system for the rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Jacqueline; McDonough, Suzanne; Lennon, Sheila; McNeill, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) provides a three-dimensional computer representation of a real world or imaginary space through which a person can navigate and interact with objects to carry out specific tasks. One novel application of VR technology is in rehabilitation following stroke, particularly of the upper limb. This paper describes the development of a VR system for use in this field. This system gives the user the ability to interact with objects by touching, grasping and moving their upper limb.

  17. Rehabilitation of stroke patients with apraxia: the role of additional cognitive and motor impairments.

    OpenAIRE

    Heugten, C.M. van; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.G.; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Kinebanian, A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study investigated which additional cognitive and motor impairments were present in stroke patients with apraxia and which of these factors influenced the effects of treatment. METHOD: A group of 33 patients with apraxia were treated according to the guidelines of a therapy programme based on teaching patients strategies to compensate for the presence of apraxia. Patients were treated at occupational therapy departments in general hospitals, rehabilitation centres and nur...

  18. Lesion location associated with balance recovery and gait velocity change after rehabilitation in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun Im; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Yoon, Seo Yeon

    2017-06-01

    Impaired gait function after stroke contributes strongly to overall patient disability. However, the response to rehabilitation varies between individuals. The aims of this study were to identify predictors of gait velocity change and to elucidate lesion location associated with change of balance and gait function. We reviewed 102 stroke patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to gait ability post-rehabilitation, and we analyzed differences in their characteristics, such as demographic information, lesion factors, and initial balance function. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the predictors of rehabilitation response. Lesion location and volume were measured on brain magnetic resonance images. We generated statistical maps of the lesions related to functional gains in gait and balance using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM). The group of patients who regained independent ambulation function showed a smaller lesion size, a shorter duration from stroke onset, and higher initial balance function. In the regression model, gait velocity changes were predicted with the initial Berg balance scale (BBS) and duration post-onset. Absolute BBS changes were also correlated with the duration post-onset and initial BBS, and relative BBS changes were predicted by the baseline BBS. Using VLSM, lesion locations associated with gait velocity changes and balance adjusting for other factors were the insula, internal capsule, and adjacent white matter. Initial balance function as well as the interval between stroke onset and the initiation of therapy might influence balance recovery and gait velocity changes. Damage to the insula and internal capsule also affected gait velocity change after rehabilitation.

  19. BDNF genotype interacts with motor-function to influence rehabilitation responsiveness post-stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine T Shiner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Persistent motor impairment is common but highly heterogeneous post-stroke. Genetic polymorphisms, including those identified on the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and apolipoprotein E (APOE genes, may contribute to this variability by limiting the capacity for use-dependent neuroplasticity, and hence rehabilitation responsiveness.Objective. To determine whether BDNF and APOE genotypes influence motor improvement facilitated by post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation. Methods. BDNF Val66Met and APOE isoform genotypes were determined using leukocyte DNA for 55 community-dwelling patients 2-123 months post-stroke. All patients completed a dose-matched upper-limb rehabilitation program of either Wii-based Movement Therapy or Constraint-induced Movement Therapy. Upper-limb motor-function was assessed pre- and post-therapy using a suite of functional measures. Results. Motor-function improved for all patients post-therapy, with no difference between therapy groups. In the pooled data, there was no significant effect of BDNF or APOE genotype on motor-function at baseline, or following the intervention. However, a significant interaction between the level of residual motor-function and BDNF genotype was identified (p=0.029, whereby post-therapy improvement was significantly less for Met allele carriers with moderate and high, but not low motor-function. There was no significant association between APOE genotype and therapy outcomes. Conclusions. This study identified a novel interaction between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, motor-function status and the magnitude of improvement with rehabilitation in chronic stroke. This polymorphism does not preclude, but may reduce, the magnitude of motor improvement with therapy, particularly for patients with higher but not lower residual motor-function. BDNF genotype should be considered in the design and interpretation of clinical trials.

  20. Functional and motor outcome 5 years after stroke is equivalent to outcome at 2 months: follow-up of the collaborative evaluation of rehabilitation in stroke across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; Verheyden, Geert; Brinkmann, Nadine; Dejaeger, Eddy; De Weerdt, Willy; Feys, Hilde; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Jenni, Walter; Laenen, Annouschka; Lincoln, Nadina; Putman, Koen; Schuback, Birgit; Schupp, Wilfried; Thijs, Vincent; De Wit, Liesbet

    2015-06-01

    Recovery of patients within the first 6 months after stroke is well documented, but there has been little research on long-term recovery. The aim of this study was to analyze functional and motor recovery between admission to rehabilitation centres and 5 years after stroke. This follow-up of the Collaborative Evaluation of Rehabilitation in Stroke Across Europe study, included patients from 4 European rehabilitation centres. Patients were assessed on admission, at 2 and 6 months, and 5 years after stroke, using the Barthel Index, Rivermead Motor Assessment Gross Function, Leg and Trunk function, and Arm function. Linear mixed models were used, corrected for baseline characteristics. To account for the drop-out during follow-up, the analysis is likelihood-based (assumption of missingness at random). A total of 532 patients were included in this study, of which 238 were followed up at 5 years post stroke. Mean age at stroke onset was 69 (±10 SD) years, 53% were men, 84% had ischemic strokes, and 53% had left-sided motor impairment. Linear mixed model analysis revealed a significant deterioration for all 4 outcomes between 6 months and 5 years (Pstroke. Higher age (Pstroke severity on admission (Pstroke severity negatively affected recovery up to 5 years after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Stroke patient's experiences with Wii sports during inpatients rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celinder, Dora Maria; Peoples, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Introduktion: Virtual reality spil har været benyttet sammen med terapi i forbindelse med apopleksi rehabilitering, oftes efter udskrivelse fra hospital. Formålet med dette studie er at udforske apopleksiramtes oplevelse af Wii Sports som et supplement til almindelig ergoterapeutisk genoptræning......) problemer og udfordringer. Resultaterne blev understøttet af felt noterne som registerede tegn på engagement og udfordringer. Diskussion: Indlagte apopleksiramte oplever wii Sport som en gavnlig og udfordernde aktivitet både som led i genoptræning og som fritidsaktivitet.Inklusion af Wii Sports i...

  2. Post-stroke balance rehabilitation under multi-level electrotherapy: a conceptual review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban eDutta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is caused when an artery carrying blood from heart to an area in the brain bursts or a clot obstructs the blood flow thereby preventing delivery of oxygen and nutrients. About half of the stroke survivors are left with some degree of disability. Innovative methodologies for restorative neurorehabilitation are urgently required to reduce long-term disability. The ability of the nervous system to respond to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli by reorganizing its structure, function and connections is called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is involved in post-stroke functional disturbances, but also in rehabilitation. It has been shown that active cortical participation in a closed-loop brain machine interface (BMI can induce neuroplasticity in cortical networks where the brain acts as a controller, e.g., during a visuomotor task. Here, the motor task can be assisted with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES where the BMI will act as a real-time decoder. However, the cortical control and induction of neuroplasticity in a closed-loop brain machine interface is also dependent on the state of brain, e.g., visuospatial attention during visuomotor task performance. In fact, spatial neglect is a hidden disability that is a common complication of stroke and is associated with prolonged hospital stays, accidents, falls, safety problems and chronic functional disability. This hypothesis and theory article presents a multi-level electrotherapy paradigm towards motor rehabilitation in virtual reality that postulates that while the brain acts as a controller in a closed-loop BMI to drive NMES, the state of brain can be can be altered towards improvement of visuomotor task performance with non-invasive brain stimulation. This leads to a multi-level electrotherapy paradigm where a virtual reality-based adaptive response technology is proposed for post-stroke balance rehabilitation. In this article, we present a conceptual review of the related

  3. Post-stroke balance rehabilitation under multi-level electrotherapy: a conceptual review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Lahiri, Uttama; Das, Abhijit; Nitsche, Michael A.; Guiraud, David

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is caused when an artery carrying blood from heart to an area in the brain bursts or a clot obstructs the blood flow thereby preventing delivery of oxygen and nutrients. About half of the stroke survivors are left with some degree of disability. Innovative methodologies for restorative neurorehabilitation are urgently required to reduce long-term disability. The ability of the nervous system to respond to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli by reorganizing its structure, function, and connections is called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is involved in post-stroke functional disturbances, but also in rehabilitation. It has been shown that active cortical participation in a closed-loop brain machine interface (BMI) can induce neuroplasticity in cortical networks where the brain acts as a controller, e.g., during a visuomotor task. Here, the motor task can be assisted with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) where the BMI will act as a real-time decoder. However, the cortical control and induction of neuroplasticity in a closed-loop BMI is also dependent on the state of brain, e.g., visuospatial attention during visuomotor task performance. In fact, spatial neglect is a hidden disability that is a common complication of stroke and is associated with prolonged hospital stays, accidents, falls, safety problems, and chronic functional disability. This hypothesis and theory article presents a multi-level electrotherapy paradigm toward motor rehabilitation in virtual reality that postulates that while the brain acts as a controller in a closed-loop BMI to drive NMES, the state of brain can be can be altered toward improvement of visuomotor task performance with non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). This leads to a multi-level electrotherapy paradigm where a virtual reality-based adaptive response technology is proposed for post-stroke balance rehabilitation. In this article, we present a conceptual review of the related experimental findings. PMID:25565937

  4. Profile of patients at admission into an inpatient stroke rehabilitation programme: cardiorespiratory fitness and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Dina; Tang, Ada; Sibley, Kathryn M; McIlroy, William E

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to characterize the cardiorespiratory capacity of individuals on admission to inpatient rehabilitation following stroke and to examine the relationship between measures of cardiorespiratory capacity and standard indices of neurological deficit and functional status. We recruited 45 patients within the first 10 days of admission to rehabilitation. We performed measures of aerobic fitness (VO(2)peak), functional status (Functional Independence Measure [FIM] and Clinical Outcomes Variable Score [COVS]), and neurological deficit (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] and Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment scale [CMSA]). Nineteen women and 26 men with a mean (SD) age of 65.2 (14.5) years were admitted to rehabilitation 16.2 (11.9) (minimum 3, maximum 62) days post-stroke. Average VO(2)peak was less than half the value expected in age-matched healthy individuals at 11.1 (3.1) ml/kg/min. The associations between VO(2)peak and FIM, NIHSS, and COVS were weak (r = 0.25, -0.12, and 0.26 respectively, p = 0.12, 0.46, and 0.10 respectively). There were no differences in VO(2)peak in higher-functioning individuals with CMSA leg scores of 5 and 6 compared to lower-functioning individuals with scores of 3 and 4 (p = 0.30). Cardiorespiratory capacity is extremely low in individuals during the first 3 months after stroke. Alternative measures of functional or clinical status do not adequately reflect this cardiorespiratory state; thus, routine measurement of cardiorespiratory capacity should be considered, along with a risk-factor profile.

  5. The use of alternative therapies in the Saskatchewan stroke rehabilitation population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefromova Ludmilla

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients use alternative therapies. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of stroke rehabilitation patients in Saskatchewan using alternative therapies, whether patients found these therapies effective in alleviating stroke-related symptoms, how often those patients who used alternative therapies discuss this fact with their primary care doctor and the main reason why patients might not do so. Methods Telephone questionnaire surveys were conducted with 117 patients who had suffered a stroke and undergone inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation at Saskatoon City Hospital. Results The study revealed that 26.5% of 117 stroke rehabilitation patients visited alternative practitioners at least once or used some form of unconventional therapy. Only 16.1% of patients found that alternative therapy made them feel much better. Of those who used alternative therapy, 61.3% did not discuss this fact with their primary physician. Many of the respondents (47.3% who did not inform their physician stated that they did not see the necessity of talking about these treatments and 21.1% did not discuss the issue with their physician because they felt that he or she might disapprove of alternative therapies. Conclusion A relatively small percentage of stroke patients found alternative therapies beneficial. Doctors should be aware that a significant number of patients will try alternative treatment without discussion with their primary care physician or specialist. The current study suggests that after completing routine questioning, doctors should also ask their patients about their use of alternative therapies and, when appropriate, review issues of safety and efficacy.

  6. Social Rehabilitation of Minors in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Barczykowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The United States of America was one of the first countries in the world, which at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth century took to building the justice and social rehabilitation system for minors. To date, many reforms have been made, initiated by a variety of circumstances, with their participation. Currently, due to the increase in juvenile criminality, the high costs and low efficiency, questions are posed about the future of the American social rehabilitation system. Next to the typical social rehabilitation trends, ideas of strict punishment of juveniles, on an equal footing with adults, are being implemented. In light of the above, this article is to show the historical and institutional conditions of actions undertaken towards minors, and an attempt to answer the question of what direction the American juvenile social rehabilitation system is heading.

  7. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized

  8. Using robot fully assisted functional movements in upper-limb rehabilitation of chronic stroke patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimmi, Marco; Chiavenna, Andrea; Scano, Alessandro; Gasperini, Giulio; Giovanzana, Chiara; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo; Molteni, Franco

    2017-06-01

    Robotic rehabilitation is promising to promote function in stroke patients. The assist as needed training paradigm has shown to stimulate neuroplasticity but often cannot be used because stroke patients are too impaired to actively control the robot against gravity. To verify whether a rehabilitation intervention based on robot fully assisted reaching against gravity (RCH) and hand-to-mouth (HTM) can promote upper-limb function in chronic stroke. Cohort study. Chronic stroke outpatients referring to the robotic rehabilitation lab of a rehabilitation centre. Ten chronic stroke patients with mild to moderate upper-limb hemiparesis. Patients underwent 12 sessions (3 per week) of robotic treatment using an end-effector robot Every session consisted of 20 minutes each of RCH and HtM; movements were fully assisted, but patients were asked to try to actively participate. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) was the primary outcome measure; Medical Research Council and Modified Ashworth Scale were the secondary outcome measures. All patients, but one, show functional improvements (FMA section A-D, mean increment 7.2±3.9 points, Probotic intervention based on functional movements, fully assisted, can be effective in promoting function in chronic stroke patients. These results are promising considering the short time of the intervention (1 month) and the time from the stroke event, which was large (27±20 months). A larger study, comprehensive of objective instrumental measures, is necessary to confirm the results. This intervention could be extended even to subacute stroke and other neurological disorders.

  9. Impact of Insurance Precertification on Discharge of Stroke Patients to Acute Rehabilitation or Skilled Nursing Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew L; Kulhari, Ashish; Wolfram, Julie A; Furlan, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the common insurance practice of requiring precertification before a medically ready stroke patient can be discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) or inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) causes a delay in discharge. Eliminating delays in discharge of stroke patients is important given the increasing demands for health-care efficiency after the passage of the Affordable Health Care Act. A retrospective chart review of 1007 patients who were admitted to our comprehensive stroke center with the primary diagnosis of stroke over a 12-month period was performed. Out of the patient pool, 289 patients met the inclusion criterion of a primary diagnosis of stroke that required discharge to a SNF or IRF. All 289 patients were medically cleared for discharge to a SNF or IRF by a board-certified vascular neurologist. Of the 289 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 118 required insurance precertification and 171 did not require precertification before being discharged to a SNF or IRF. All 118 patients who required precertification had private health insurance. The patients who required insurance precertification had an average delay of discharge (DOD) of 1.5 days, and those patients who did not require precertification had an average DOD of .8 days (P value insurance precertification leads to delay in discharge, increased LOS, and increased hospital costs for stroke patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Does English proficiency impact on health outcomes for inpatients undergoing stroke rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah E; Dodd, Karen J; Tu, April; Zucchi, Emiliano; Zen, Stefania; Hill, Keith D

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether English proficiency and/or the frequency of interpreter use impacts on health outcomes for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Retrospective case-control study. People admitted for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A high English proficiency group comprised people with native or near native English proficiency (n = 80), and a low English proficiency group comprised people who preferred a language other than English (n = 80). Length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The low English proficiency group showed a greater improvement in FIM from admission to discharge (p = 0.04). No significant differences were found between groups in LOS, discharge destination and number of encounters with allied health professionals. Increased interpreter usage improved FIM efficiency but did not significantly alter other outcomes. English proficiency does not appear to impact on health outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation with a primarily in-house professional interpreter service. However, there is a need for a larger powered study to confirm these findings. Implications for rehabilitation People with low English proficiency undergoing inpatient stroke rehabilitation in a setting with a primarily in-house professional interpreter service, achieved similar outcomes to those with high English proficiency irrespective of frequency of interpreter usage. A non-significant increase of 4 days length of stay was observed in the low English proficiency group compared to the high English proficiency group. For patients with low English proficiency, greater change in Functional Independence Measure efficiency scores was observed for those with higher levels of interpreter use relative to those with low interpreter use. Clinicians should optimise use of interpreters with patients with low English proficiency when possible.

  11. Effectiveness of Conventional Rehabilitation Therapy on Postural Stability and Clinic in Stroke Patients with Hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Inanir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiviness of conventional rehabilitation in patients with stroke on static and dynamic balance as well as clinical assessment Methods: Twelve patients with stroke, 7 (58.33% of them being male and 5 (41.66% female, ranging from 51 to 75 in age who were treated in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation clinic were involved in this study. The patients were treated with conventional rehabilitation. All individuals were evaluated using balance tests before (Group 1 and after (Group 2 the treatment. Balance level and postural control has been assessed through Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Trunk Control Test (TCT and Biodex Stability System (BSS, motor level through BMIE, ambulation state through Functional Ambulatory Scale (FAS and functional state in daily activities through Functional Independence Measure (FIM. The same tests were repeated while the patients were being discharged. Results: The mean age of the study population was 65,83±4,38 years, the average Body Mas Index (BMI was 30,55±6,94. In the evaluations according to FIM, FAS, TCT and BBS differences between the mean of patients before and after the rehabilitation were significantly higher for the post-treatment (p=0.001, p=0.001, p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. In the evaluations according to Overall Stability Index (OSI, Antero-Posterior Stability Index (APSI and Medio-Lateral Stability Index (MLSI differences between the mean of patients before and after the rehabilitation were significantly higher for the pre-treatment (p=0.001, p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. Conclusion: It can be stated that this approach is effective and useful in restoring static and dynamic balance as well as in obtaining an effective improvement in the treatment of patients with stroke through conventional treatment. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 446-455

  12. Gradually Increased Training Intensity Benefits Rehabilitation Outcome after Stroke by BDNF Upregulation and Stress Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical training is necessary for effective rehabilitation in the early poststroke period. Animal studies commonly use fixed training intensity throughout rehabilitation and without adapting it to the animals' recovered motor ability. This study investigated the correlation between training intensity and rehabilitation efficacy by using a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion surgery. Sixty rats with successful stroke were then randomly assigned into four groups: control (CG, n=15, low intensity (LG, n=15, gradually increased intensity (GIG, n=15, and high intensity (HG, n=15. Behavioral tests were conducted daily to evaluate motor function recovery. Stress level and neural recovery were evaluated via plasma corticosterone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration, respectively. GIG rats significantly (P<0.05 recovered motor function and produced higher hippocampal BDNF (112.87 ± 25.18 ng/g. GIG and LG rats exhibited similar stress levels (540.63 ± 117.40 nM/L and 508.07 ± 161.30 nM/L, resp., which were significantly lower (P<0.05 than that (716.90 ± 156.48 nM/L of HG rats. Training with gradually increased intensity achieved better recovery with lower stress. Our observations indicate that a training protocol that includes gradually increasing training intensity should be considered in both animal and clinical studies for better stroke recovery.

  13. Virtual Reality Rehabilitation from Social Cognitive and Motor Learning Theoretical Perspectives in Stroke Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Imam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To identify the virtual reality (VR interventions used for the lower extremity rehabilitation in stroke population and to explain their underlying training mechanisms using Social Cognitive (SCT and Motor Learning (MLT theoretical frameworks. Methods. Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and Cochrane databases were searched up to July 11, 2013. Randomized controlled trials that included a VR intervention for lower extremity rehabilitation in stroke population were included. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale was used to assess the quality of the included studies. The underlying training mechanisms involved in each VR intervention were explained according to the principles of SCT (vicarious learning, performance accomplishment, and verbal persuasion and MLT (focus of attention, order and predictability of practice, augmented feedback, and feedback fading. Results. Eleven studies were included. PEDro scores varied from 3 to 7/10. All studies but one showed significant improvement in outcomes in favour of the VR group (P<0.05. Ten VR interventions followed the principle of performance accomplishment. All the eleven VR interventions directed subject’s attention externally, whereas nine provided training in an unpredictable and variable fashion. Conclusions. The results of this review suggest that VR applications used for lower extremity rehabilitation in stroke population predominantly mediate learning through providing a task-oriented and graduated learning under a variable and unpredictable practice.

  14. A randomized clinical trial of oral hygiene care programmes during stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruoxi; Lam, Otto L T; Lo, Edward C M; Li, Leonard S W; McGrath, Colman

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of an advanced oral hygiene care programme (AOHCP) and a conventional oral hygiene care programme (COHCP) in improving oral hygiene, and reducing gingival bleeding among patients with stroke during outpatient rehabilitation. Subjects were randomized to receive (i) the COHCP comprising a manual toothbrush, toothpaste, and oral hygiene instruction, or (ii) the AOHCP comprising a powered toothbrush, 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse, toothpaste, and oral hygiene instruction. Dental plaque, gingival bleeding, and other clinical oral health outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of the clinical trial, and the end of observation period. Development of infectious complications was also monitored. Participants of both programmes had a significant reduction in the percentages of sites with moderate to abundant dental plaque (poral hygiene care programmes were effective in terms of plaque and gingival bleeding control, the AOHCP was more effective than the COHCP in reducing dental plaque and gingival bleeding. This study highlighted the value of oral hygiene programmes within stroke outpatient rehabilitation and provides evidence to advocate for the inclusion of oral hygiene care programmes within stroke outpatient rehabilitation for patients with normal cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Serious Game for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation Using Biofeedback and Mirror-Neurons Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnin, Diego João; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos; Cervi Prado, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb stroke rehabilitation requires early, intensive and repetitive practice to be effective. Consequently, it is often difficult to keep patients committed to their rehabilitation regimen. In addition to direct measures of rehabilitation achievable through targeted assessments, other factors can indirectly lead to rehabilitation. Current levels of integration between commodity graphics software, hardware, and body-tracking devices have provided a reliable tool to build what are referred to as serious games, focusing on the rehabilitation paradigm. More specifically, serious games can captivate and engage players for a specific purpose such as developing new knowledge or skills. This paper discusses a serious game application with a focus on upper limb rehabilitation in patients with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. The game makes use of biofeedback and mirror-neurons to enhance the patient's engagement. Results from the application of a quantitative self-report instrument to assess in-game engagement suggest that the serious game is a viable instructional approach rather than an entertaining novelty and, furthermore, demonstrates the future potential for dual action therapy-focused games.

  16. Design and Development of a Bilateral Therapeutic Hand Device for Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhlaquor Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The major cause of disability is stroke. It is the second highest cause of death after coronary heart disease in Australia. In this paper, a post stroke therapeutic device has been designed and developed for hand motor function rehabilitation that a stroke survivor can use for bilateral movement practice. A prototype of the device was fabricated that can fully flex and extend metacarpophalangeal (MCP, proximal interphalangeal (PIP and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the fingers, and interphalangeal (IP, metacarpophalangeal (MCP and trapeziometacarpal (IM joints of the thumb of the left hand (impaired hand, based on movements of the right hand's (healthy hand fingers. Out of 21 degrees of freedom (DOFs of hand fingers, the prototype of the hand exoskeleton allowed fifteen degrees of freedom (DOFs, with three degrees of freedom (DOFs for each finger and three degrees of freedom (DOFs for the thumb. In addition, testing of the device on a healthy subject was conducted to validate the design requirements.

  17. Transcranial brain stimulation (TMS and tDCS for post-stroke aphasia rehabilitation: Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Iracema Zanotto de Mendonça

    Full Text Available Transcranial brain stimulation (TS techniques have been investigated for use in the rehabilitation of post-stroke aphasia. According to previous reports, functional recovery by the left hemisphere improves recovery from aphasia, when compared with right hemisphere participation. TS has been applied to stimulate the activity of the left hemisphere or to inhibit homotopic areas in the right hemisphere. Various factors can interfere with the brain's response to TS, including the size and location of the lesion, the time elapsed since the causal event, and individual differences in the hemispheric language dominance pattern. The following questions are discussed in the present article: [a] Is inhibition of the right hemisphere truly beneficial?; [b] Is the transference of the language network to the left hemisphere truly desirable in all patients?; [c] Is the use of TS during the post-stroke subacute phase truly appropriate? Different patterns of neuroplasticity must occur in post-stroke aphasia.

  18. Self-esteem stability and depressive symptoms in acute stroke rehabilitation: methodological and conceptual expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Chad D; Evans, Clea C; Sepehri, Arash; Jabeen, Linsa N; Gayden, Monee

    2009-08-01

    Explore the relationship of self-esteem level, self-esteem stability, and other moderating variables with depressive symptoms in acute stroke rehabilitation. One hundred twenty participants completed measures of state self-esteem, perceived recovery, hospitalization-based hassles, impairment-related distress, and tendency to overgeneralize negative self-connotations of bad events. Self-report of depressive symptoms was collected at admission and on discharge. Four regression analyses explored the relationship of self-esteem level and stability and each of 4 moderating variables (perceived recovery, hassles, impairment-related distress, and overgeneralization) with depressive symptoms at discharge. Analyses indicated significant 3-way interactions in the 4 regression models. In general, individuals with unstable high self-esteem endorsed greater depressive symptoms under conditions of vulnerability (e.g., lower perceived recovery) than did individuals with stable high self-esteem. Under conditions of vulnerability, participants with stable low self-esteem indicated the highest levels of depressive symptoms. Self-esteem level and stability interact with psychological, environmental, and stroke-specific variables to predict depressive symptoms at discharge from stroke rehabilitation. This suggests the viability of self-esteem stability in exploring depressive symptoms in this setting and the complexity of emotional adjustment early after stroke. (c) 2009 APA

  19. Motor rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury and stroke - Advances in assessment and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Hesse, S.; Mauritz, K.-H.

    1999-01-01

    A long-term goal in motor rehabilitation is that treatment is not selected on the basis of 'schools of thought', but rather, based on knowledge about efficacy and effectiveness of specific interventions for specific situations (e.g. functional syndromes). Motor dysfunction after stroke or TBI can be caused by many different functional syndromes such as paresis, ataxia, deafferentaion, visuo-perceptual deficits, or apraxia. Examples are provided showing that theory-based analysis of motor behavior makes it possible to describe 'syndrome-specific motor deficits'. Its potential implications for motor rehabilitation are that our understanding of altered motor behavior as well as specific therapeutic approaches might be promoted. A methodological prerequisite for clinical trials in rehabilitation is knowledge about test properties of assessment tools in follow-up situations such as test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change. Test-retest reliability assesses whether a test can produce stable measures with test repetition, while sensitivity to change reflects whether a test detects changes that occur over time. Exemplifying these considerations, a reliability and validity study of a kinematic arm movement analysis is summarized. In terms of new therapeutic developments, two examples of clinical therapeutic studies are provided assessing the efficacy of specific inter-ventions for specific situations in arm and gait rehabilitation: the Arm Ability Training for high functioning hemiparetic stroke and TBI patients, and the treadmill training for non-ambulatory hemiparetic patients. In addition, a new technical development, a machine-controlled gait trainer ist introduced.

  20. Motor function recovery of people of mature years after stroke by means of physical rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.E. Khristova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of applying the complex technology of physical rehabilitation are described for patients with cerebral ischemic stroke during the phase of in-patient rehabilitation. The experiment involved 36 male patients aged 45-50 years. The rehabilitation program included treatment by changing position, complex of therapeutic gymnastics (based on sanogenetic approach to the problem of motor function recovery in accordance with the stages of postnatal ontogenesis, magnetic therapy, thermotherapy of large joints of the affected extremities. Findings show that the use of the mentioned methods of treatment leads to increase of the range of motion in the hip and shoulder joints: passive of 15-20%, and active of 10-30%, muscle strength of 10-30%, improvement of motor activity indices (scale of Bobaht and quality of life (scale of Barthel.

  1. The home stroke rehabilitation and monitoring system trial: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Susan M.; Rosenfeldt, Anson B.; Reiss, Aimee; Buchanan, Sharon; Sahu, Komal; Bay, Curtis R.; Wolf, Steven L.; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Because many individuals post-stroke lack access to the quality and intensity of rehabilitation to improve upper extremity (UE) motor function, a home-based robotic-assisted UE rehabilitation device is being paired with an individualized home exercise program (HEP). Aims/Hypothesis The primary aim of this project is to determine the effectiveness of robotic-assisted home therapy compared to a home exercise program on UE motor recovery and health-related quality of life for stroke survivors in rural and underserved locations. The secondary aim is to explore whether initial degree of motor function of the upper limb may be a factor in predicting the extent to which patients with stroke may be responsive to a home therapy approach. The HEP intervention, when enhanced with robotic-assisted therapy will result in significantly better outcomes in motor function and quality of life. Design A total of 96 participants within six months of a single, unilateral ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be recruited in this prospective, single-blind, multi-site randomized clinical trial. Study Outcomes The primary outcome is the change in UE function using the Action Research Arm Test. Secondary outcomes include changes in: UE function (Wolf Motor Function Test), UE impairment (UE portion of the Fugl-Meyer Test), self-reported quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale), and affect (Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale). Discussion Similar or greater improvements in UE function using the combined robotic-HEP intervention compared to HEP alone will be interpreted as evidence that supports the introduction of in-home technology to augment the recovery of function post-stroke. PMID:23280269

  2. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corbetta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Intervention: Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Outcome measures: Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. Results: In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19, balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5 and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4. When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1, but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial and balance (high heterogeneity. Conclusion: Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. [Corbetta D, Imeri F, Gatti R (2015 Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard

  3. Robotic approaches for rehabilitation of hand function after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Peter S; Godfrey, Sasha B; Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Holley, Rahsaan J; Nichols, Diane

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this review was to discuss the impairments in hand function after stroke and present previous work on robot-assisted approaches to movement neurorehabilitation. Robotic devices offer a unique training environment that may enhance outcomes beyond what is possible with conventional means. Robots apply forces to the hand, allowing completion of movements while preventing inappropriate movement patterns. Evidence from the literature is emerging that certain characteristics of the human-robot interaction are preferable. In light of this evidence, the robotic hand devices that have undergone clinical testing are reviewed, highlighting the authors' work in this area. Finally, suggestions for future work are offered. The ability to deliver therapy doses far higher than what has been previously tested is a potentially key advantage of robotic devices that needs further exploration. In particular, more efforts are needed to develop highly motivating home-based devices, which can increase access to high doses of assisted movement therapy.

  4. Slot machines: their use in rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, R R; Fiorino, A J; Soucar, E; Reynolds, D; Smedley, W P; Aronica, M J

    1986-08-01

    A comparative study of a novel and entertaining motor function exercise and traditional motor function exercise was conducted in the therapy of stroke patients. Therapists rated patients in five dependent variables, including range of motion, muscle strength, fine motor coordination, gross motor coordination, and degree of depression in control and experimental groups. Multivariate analysis of the results showed significantly greater progress in the five dependent variables among patients in the experimental group. Follow-up procedures using stepwise discriminant function analysis produced a rank ordering of the impact of each of the five dependent variables. Demographic variables of age, sex, education level, and marital status showed no effect. Correlations between the dependent variables were performed.

  5. Tablet Apps and Dexterity: Comparison Between 3 Age Groups and Proof of Concept for Stroke Rehabilitation.

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    Kizony, Rachel; Zeilig, Gabi; Dudkiewicz, Israel; Schejter-Margalit, Tamara; Rand, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Touch screen tablet technology might be suitable for self-training of impaired dexterity poststroke. We compared performance of app-based hand activities in individuals without a disability from 3-age groups, and assessed the feasibility of using tablet apps in individuals with stroke. Experiment I included 172 Individuals without a disability: 79 young adults (26.2 [3.9] years old), 61 middle-aged adults (55.9 [5.1] years old), and 32 older adults (68.7 [3.0] years old). Experiment II included 20 individuals with stroke, aged 59.3 ± 13.7 years with impairment of the upper extremity. All participants performed the app-based "Tap-it" (tapping) task twice and the Nine Hole Peg Test. The stroke group practiced with additional apps and underwent clinical assessments. Significant differences in the tapping task performance were found between the 3 age groups (dominant hand time: F(2,169) = 30.57; P = 0.0001; and accuracy F(2,169) = 25.20; P = 0.0001; nondominant hand time: F(2,169) = 35.09; P = 0.0001; and accuracy F(2,169) = 19.62; P = 0.0001). Of the 20 individuals with stroke, 15 were able to complete the 2 trials of the tapping task, but all participants reported enjoying the experience and thought the apps may have potential for stroke rehabilitation to improve performance of the stroke-affected hand. Performance of tablet app-based hand activities was affected by impaired hand dexterity in older participants without a disability and in participants with stroke. Tablet apps may potentially provide a way to facilitate self-training of repetitive, task-oriented, isolated finger and hand movements to improve hand dexterity and function after stroke.Video abstract available for additional insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A118).

  6. Virtual Reality Rehabilitation With Functional Electrical Stimulation Improves Upper Extremity Function in Patients With Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie Hyeyoung; Lee, Ji-Yeong; Kim, Mi-Young; Jeon, Yu-Jin; Kim, Suyoung; Shin, Joon-Ho

    2018-03-02

    To compare virtual reality (VR) combined with functional electrical stimulation (FES) with cyclic FES for improving upper extremity function and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic stroke. A pilot, randomized, single-blind, controlled trial. Stroke rehabilitation inpatient unit. Participants (N=48) with hemiplegia secondary to a unilateral stroke for >3 months and with a hemiplegic wrist extensor Medical Research Council scale score ranging from 1 to 3. FES was applied to the wrist extensors and finger extensors. A VR-based wearable rehabilitation device was used combined with FES and virtual activity-based training for the intervention group. The control group received cyclic FES only. Both groups completed 20 sessions over a 4-week period. Primary outcome measures were changes in Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity and Wolf Motor Function Test scores. Secondary outcome measures were changes in Box and Block Test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, and Stroke Impact Scale scores. Assessments were performed at baseline (t0) and at 2 weeks (t1), 4 weeks (t4), and 8 weeks (t8). Between-group comparisons were evaluated using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Forty-one participants were included in the analysis. Compared with FES alone, VR-FES produced a substantial increase in Fugl-Meyer Assessment-distal score (P=.011) and marginal improvement in Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test-gross score (P=.057). VR-FES produced greater, although nonsignificant, improvements in all other outcome measures, except in the Stroke Impact Scale-activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living score. FES with VR-based rehabilitation may be more effective than cyclic FES in improving distal upper extremity gross motor performance poststroke. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mapping the rehabilitation interventions of a community stroke team to the extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Melissa; Hocking, Clare; Kersten, Paula

    2017-12-01

    This study aim was to evaluate whether the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke captured the interventions of a community stroke rehabilitation team situated in a large city in New Zealand. It was proposed that the results would identify the contribution of each discipline, and the gaps and differences in service provision to Māori and non-Māori. Applying the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke in this way would also inform whether this core set should be adopted in New Zealand. Interventions were retrospectively extracted from 18 medical records and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke. The frequencies of linked interventions and the health discipline providing the intervention were calculated. Analysis revealed that 98.8% of interventions provided by the rehabilitation team could be linked to the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke, with more interventions for body function and structure than for activities and participation; no interventions for emotional concerns; and limited interventions for community, social and civic life. Results support previous recommendations for additions to the EICSS. The results support the use of the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke in New Zealand and demonstrates its use as a quality assurance tool that can evaluate the scope and practice of a rehabilitation service. Implications for Rehabilitation The Extended International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke appears to represent the stroke interventions of a community stroke rehabilitation team in New Zealand. As a result, researchers and clinicians may have

  8. How active are patients in setting goals during rehabilitation after stroke? A qualitative study of clinician perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, John G M; Plant, Sarah E; Slark, Julia; Tyson, Sarah F

    2018-02-01

    We investigated stroke rehabilitation clinician's perceptions of the patient as an active partner in setting goals within stroke rehabilitation and factors that influence patient engagement. Semi-structured interviews, subject to general inductive analysis with 20 Clinicians' working in three UK based stroke rehabilitation teams (one in-patient ward and two community based rehabilitation teams). There were three key themes that impacted on the patients active involvement in setting goals for rehabilitation after stroke: Patient barriers to goal setting (knowledge of the patient and family, who is the patient and the stroke's impact); How we work as a team (the role of the patient in setting goals, the effect of clinician attributes on goal setting); and How systems impact goal setting (goal-setting practice, home versus hospital, and professional/funder expectations of clinicians'). Goal setting served a range of different, sometimes conflicting, functions within rehabilitation. Clinicians' identified the integral nature of goals to engage and motivate patients and to provide direction and purpose for rehabilitation. Further, there was an identified need to consider the impact of prioritizing clinician-derived goals at the expense of patient-identified goals. Lastly the reliance on the SMART goal format requires further consideration, both in terms of the proposed benefits and whether they disempower the patient during rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Goal setting is often promoted as a relatively simple, straightforward way to structure interactions with patients Patient-related factors together with resourcing constraints are significant barriers to patient-centered goal setting, particularly during inpatient rehabilitation Clinicians need to have pragmatic tools that can be integrated into practice to ensure that goal-setting practice can be maximized for patients with different intrinsic characteristics.

  9. Functional Status Predicts Acute Care Readmissions from Inpatient Rehabilitation in the Stroke Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Slocum

    Full Text Available Acute care readmission risk is an increasingly recognized problem that has garnered significant attention, yet the reasons for acute care readmission in the inpatient rehabilitation population are complex and likely multifactorial. Information on both medical comorbidities and functional status is routinely collected for stroke patients participating in inpatient rehabilitation. We sought to determine whether functional status is a more robust predictor of acute care readmissions in the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population compared with medical comorbidities using a large, administrative data set.A retrospective analysis of data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation from the years 2002 to 2011 was performed examining stroke patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A Basic Model for predicting acute care readmission risk based on age and functional status was compared with models incorporating functional status and medical comorbidities (Basic-Plus or models including age and medical comorbidities alone (Age-Comorbidity. C-statistics were compared to evaluate model performance.There were a total of 803,124 patients: 88,187 (11% patients were transferred back to an acute hospital: 22,247 (2.8% within 3 days, 43,481 (5.4% within 7 days, and 85,431 (10.6% within 30 days. The C-statistics for the Basic Model were 0.701, 0.672, and 0.682 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. As compared to the Basic Model, the best-performing Basic-Plus model was the Basic+Elixhauser model with C-statistics differences of +0.011, +0.011, and + 0.012, and the best-performing Age-Comorbidity model was the Age+Elixhauser model with C-statistic differences of -0.124, -0.098, and -0.098 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively.Readmission models for the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population based on functional status and age showed better predictive ability than models based on medical comorbidities.

  10. Slacklining and stroke: A rehabilitation case study considering balance and lower limb weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Charles P; Rando, Natalie; Melloh, Markus

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the effectiveness of slacklining as a supplementary therapy for elderly stroke patients who are functionally non-progressing. This case study involved an 18-mo prospective observation of the management of an 87-year-old female stroke-patient of the left hemisphere with reduced balance, reduced lower limb muscular activation, hypertonia, and concurrent postural deficits. This entailed the initial acute care phase through to discharge to home and 18-mo final status in her original independent living setting. The introduction of slacklining as an adjunct therapy was made 12 mo post incident. Slacklining involves balance retention on a tightened band where external environmental changes cause a whole-body dynamic response to retain equilibrium. It is a complex neuromechanical task enabling individualized self-developed response strategies to be learned and adapted. This facilitates the innate process of balance retention, lower-limb and core muscle activation, and stable posture through a combination of learned motor skills and neurological system down regulation. Individuals adopt and follow established sequential motor learning stages where the acquired balance skills are achieved in a challenging composite-chain activity. Slacklining could be considered an adjunct therapy for lower limb stroke rehabilitation where function is compromised due to decreased muscle recruitment, decreased postural control and compromised balance. Initial inpatient rehabilitation involved one-month acute-care, one-month rehabilitation, and one-month transitional care prior to home discharge. A further six months of intensive outpatient rehabilitation was provided with five hourly sessions per week including:supervised and self-managed hydrotherapy, plus one individual and two group falls’ prevention sessions. These were supported by daily home exercises. At 12 mo post incident, recovery plateaued, then regressed following three falls. Rehabilitation was subsequently

  11. A cost analysis of the first year after stroke - early triage and inpatient rehabilitation may reduce long term costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, M-P; Züger, K; Kaspar, K; Haefeli, A; Jenni, W; Leniger, T; Beer, J H

    2008-08-09

    To analyse the costs of stroke in the first year covered by insurance companies and to correlate them with the clinical outcome data. We contacted the insurance companies of 172 consecutive stroke patients of a single institution cohort for a detailed report of the stroke costs. A complete data set over one year was obtained from 131 patients (76%). Severity of stroke was significantly associated with increasing total costs (p = 0.0002). The rehabilitation clinic made up 37% of the total costs followed by nursing home with 21% and acute hospital with 21%. Mean cost of stroke per patient was 31,115 CHF in the first year. Costs per patient for inpatient rehabilitation were similar to those for the nursing home after one year; however, the Barthel-index of patients with inpatient rehabilitation increased by 42 +/- 29 points as compared to patients without inpatient rehabilitation by 23 +/- 26 points (p costs may be significantly reduced by an early and careful triage in the case management after stroke and a case-dependent investment in initial costly appearing inpatient rehabilitation.

  12. A Framework for (Tele-) Monitoring of the Rehabilitation Progress in Stroke Patients: eHealth 2015 Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagos, H; David, V; Haller, M; Kotzian, S; Hofmann, M; Schlossarek, S; Eichholzer, K; Winkler, M; Frohner, M; Reichel, M; Mayr, W; Rafolt, D

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of mobility in conjunction with an independent life style is one of the major goals of rehabilitation after stroke. The Rehab@Home framework shall support the continuation of rehabilitation at home. The framework consists of instrumented insoles, connected wirelessly to a 3G ready tablet PC, a server, and a web-interface for medical experts. The rehabilitation progress is estimated via automated analysis of movement data from standardized assessment tests which are designed according to the needs of stroke patients and executed via the tablet PC application. The Rehab@Home framework's implementation is finished and ready for the field trial (at five patients' homes). Initial testing of the automated evaluation of the standardized mobility tests shows reproducible results. Therefore it is assumed that the Rehab@Home framework is applicable as monitoring tool for the gait rehabilitation progress in stroke patients.

  13. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Straudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE, (ii Box and Block Test (BBT, and (iii Motor Activity Log (MAL. Results. Both groups reported a significant improvement in FMA-UE score after treatment (p<0.01. No significant between-groups differences were found in motor function. However, when the analysis was adjusted for stroke type and duration, a significant interaction effect (p<0.05 was detected, showing that stroke duration (acute versus chronic and type (cortical versus subcortical modify the effect of tDCS and robotics on motor function. Patients with chronic and subcortical stroke benefited more from the treatments than patients with acute and cortical stroke, who presented very small changes. Conclusion. The additional use of bilateral tDCS to RAT seems to have a significant beneficial effect depending on the duration and type of stroke. These results should be verified by additional confirmatory studies.

  14. Does Perturbation Training Prevent Falls after Discharge from Stroke Rehabilitation? A Prospective Cohort Study with Historical Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Danells, Cynthia J; Aqui, Anthony; Aryan, Raabeae; Biasin, Louis; DePaul, Vincent G; Inness, Elizabeth L

    2017-10-01

    Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. Individuals with subacute stroke completed PBT as part of routine inpatient rehabilitation (n = 31). Participants reported falls experienced in daily life for up to 6 months post discharge. Fall rates were compared to a matched historical control group (HIS) who did not complete PBT during inpatient rehabilitation. Five of 31 PBT participants, compared to 15 of 31 HIS participants, reported at least 1 fall. PBT participants reported 10 falls (.84 falls per person per year) whereas HIS participants reported 31 falls (2.0 falls per person per year). When controlled for follow-up duration and motor impairment, fall rates were lower in the PBT group than the HIS group (rate ratio: .36 [.15, .79]; P = .016). These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mirror neurons: action observation treatment as a tool in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, M; Agosti, M; Cantagallo, A; Sale, P; Mancuso, M; Buccino, G

    2010-12-01

    The observation of actions performed by others activate in an observer the same neural structures (including mirror neurons) as when he/she actually performs the same actions. The aim of the present study was to assess whether action observation treatment may improve upper limb motor impairment in chronic stroke patients. This was an observational study. Patients were recruited by three Italian Centres for Neurorehabilitation between 2006 and 2008. Twenty-eight chronic stroke patients with upper limb impairment have undergone for four weeks, five days a week, a rehabilitation treatment based on observation of video-clips presenting hand daily actions, followed by the imitation of those same actions with the affected limb. Functional evaluation by means of Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Frenchay Arm Test (FAT) and Fugl Meyer (FM) was carried out twice before treatment (BT1 and BT2), at an interval of 15 days, then after treatment (AT1) and finally at a two-month follow-up (AT2). Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was applied to test differences between scores obtained from functional scales before and after treatment (BT1 vs. BT2; BT2 vs. AT1; AT1 vs. AT2). In all scales, scores did not differ when comparing BT1 with BT2. Scores improved significantly in all scales at AT1 as compared to BT2 (MBI, P=0.026; FAT, P=0.005; FM, P=0.001). This improvement was still present at the two-month follow-up as testified by no score difference between AT1 and AT2. Action Observation Treatment may become a useful strategy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The present preliminary study suggests that stimulation of neural structures (including mirror neurons), activated when the patients actually perform the same actions as those observed could constitute a good alternative rehabilitative approach in chronic stroke patients.

  16. Functional Brain Correlates of Upper Limb Spasticity and Its Mitigation following Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Pundik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Arm spasticity is a challenge in the care of chronic stroke survivors with motor deficits. In order to advance spasticity treatments, a better understanding of the mechanism of spasticity-related neuroplasticity is needed. Objective. To investigate brain function correlates of spasticity in chronic stroke and to identify specific regional functional brain changes related to rehabilitation-induced mitigation of spasticity. Methods. 23 stroke survivors (>6 months were treated with an arm motor learning and spasticity therapy (5 d/wk for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included Modified Ashworth scale, sensory tests, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for wrist and hand movement. Results. First, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with poorer motor function (P=0.001 and greater sensory deficits (P=0.003. Second, rehabilitation produced improvement in upper limb spasticity and motor function (P<0.0001. Third, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with higher fMRI activation in the ipsilesional thalamus (rho=0.49, P=0.03. Fourth, following rehabilitation, greater mitigation of spasticity correlated with enhanced fMRI activation in the contralesional primary motor (r=-0.755, P=0.003, premotor (r=−0.565, P=0.04, primary sensory (r=−0.614, P=0.03, and associative sensory (r=−0.597, P=0.03 regions while controlling for changes in motor function. Conclusions. Contralesional motor regions may contribute to restoring control of muscle tone in chronic stroke.

  17. [Commercial video games in the rehabilitation of patients with sub-acute stroke: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Manas, M J; Collado-Vazquez, S; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R

    2017-10-16

    Stroke generates dependence on the patients due to the various impairments associated. The use of low-cost technologies for neurological rehabilitation may be beneficial for the treatment of these patients. To determine whether combined treatment using a semi-immersive virtual reality protocol to an interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach, improve balance and postural control, functional independence, quality of life, motivation, self-esteem and adherence to intervention in stroke patients in subacute stage. A longitudinal prospective study with pre and post-intervention evaluation was carried out. Fourteen were recruited at La Fuenfria Hospital (Spain) and completed the intervention. Experimental intervention was performed during eight weeks in combination with conventional treatment of physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Each session was increased in time and intensity, using commercial video games linked to Xbox 360° videoconsole and Kinect sensor. There were statistical significant improvements in modified Rankin scale (p = 0.04), baropodometry (load distribution, p = 0.03; support surface, p = 0.01), Barthel Index (p = 0.01), EQ-5D Questionnaire (p = 0.01), motivation (p = 0.02), self-esteem (p = 0.01) and adherence to the intervention (p = 0.02). An interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach supplemented with semi-immersive virtual reality seems to be useful for improving balance and postural control, functional independence in basic activities of daily living, quality of life, as well as motivation and self-esteem, with excellent adherence. This intervention modality could be adopted as a therapeutic tool in neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients in subacute stage.

  18. Carers' Experiences, Needs, and Preferences During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Julie; Murray, Carolyn; Lynch, Elizabeth; Bernhardsson, Susanne; Shannon, Michelle; Bernhardt, Julie

    2017-09-01

    To report and synthesize the experiences, needs, and preferences of carers of stroke survivors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were searched to March 2016. Reference lists of relevant publications were searched. No language restrictions were applied. Eligible qualitative studies reported the experiences of carers of stroke survivors who underwent inpatient rehabilitation. The search yielded 3532 records; 93 full-text publications were assessed for eligibility, and 34 documents (33 studies) were included. Comprehensiveness of reporting was assessed using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Health Research framework. Data on the characteristics of included studies were independently extracted by 2 authors. Differences in data extraction between authors were resolved through discussion or by a third author. All text in studies' results and discussion sections were extracted for analysis. Extracted texts were analyzed inductively using thematic synthesis. Seven analytical themes were developed that related to the carers' experiences, needs, and preferences: (1) overwhelmed with emotions; (2) recognition as a stakeholder in recovery; (3) desire to be heard and informed; (4) persisting for action and outcomes; (5) being legitimate clients; (6) navigating an alien culture and environment; and (7) managing the transition home. This systematic review provides new insights into the experiences, needs, and preferences of carers of stroke survivors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Carers experienced distress as they navigated a foreign culture and environment without adequate communication and processes in place for their inclusion. We recommend deliberate efforts to provide a more inclusive environment that better supports and prepares carers for their new role. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-ischemic stroke rehabilitation is associated with a higher risk of fractures in older women: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huei Kai; Lin, Shu Man; Yang, Clement Shih Hsien; Liang, Chung Chao; Cheng, Hung Yu

    2017-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve physical activity after stroke. However, patients may be more prone to falls and fractures because of balance and gait deficits. Few reports have studied the relationship between rehabilitation and subsequent fractures after ischemic stroke. To investigate whether post-stroke rehabilitation affects fracture risk. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with a newly diagnosed ischemic stroke between 2000 and 2012 were included. After propensity score matching, a total of 8,384 patients were enrolled. Half of the patients (4,192) received post-stroke rehabilitation within 1 month; the other half did not receive any post-stroke rehabilitation. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for fractures among patients with and without rehabilitation within 1 year after ischemic stroke. Patients were further stratified by sex and age (20-64 and ≥65 years). Patients receiving post-stroke rehabilitation had a higher incidence of fracture (6.2 per 100 person-years) than those who did not (4.1 per 100 person-years) after adjustment for sociodemographic and coexisting medical conditions [HR = 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.25-1.87, p rehabilitation had a significantly higher risk of fracture (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.21-2.17, p = 0.001). Rehabilitation after ischemic stroke is associated with an increased fracture risk in older women.

  20. Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME): a portable, passive hand exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Black, Iian; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2011-08-01

    Stroke patients often have flexor hypertonia and finger extensor weakness, which makes it difficult to open their affected hand for functional grasp. Because of this impairment, hand rehabilitation after stroke is essential for restoring functional independent lifestyles. The goal of this study is to develop a passive, lightweight, wearable device to assist with hand function during performance of activities of daily living. The device, Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME), assists with opening the patient's hand using a series of elastic cords that apply extension torques to the finger joints and compensates for the flexor hypertonia. Device design and calibration are described as well as functional and usability testing with stroke subjects with a wide range of hand impairments. In initial testing with eight stroke subjects with finger flexor hypertonia, use of the HandSOME significantly increased range of motion and functional ability (p=0.002) . There was some decrease in grip strength with the HandSOME device at the subject's ideal setting, however this was not statistically significant (p=0.167) and did not seem to have a significant effect on function. Overall HandSOME shows promise as a training tool to facilitate repetitive task practice for improving hand function in stroke patients. HandSOME can be used as part of a home-based therapy program, or as an orthotic for replacing lost function. © 2011 IEEE

  1. The impact of stroke-related dysarthria on social participation and implications for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Marian C; Clark, Alexander M; Dickson, Sylvia; Paton, Gillian; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2011-01-01

    Each year an estimated 30,000-45,000 UK individuals experience stroke-related dysarthria (impairment of movements required to produce speech). Many will experience persistent dysarthria long after discharge from stroke services. Although we have some insight into the impact of other communication impairments, we have very limited information on the impact of dysarthria on social participation. To explore the impact of dysarthria on social participation following stroke. We report data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with 24 individuals with stroke-related dysarthria. Our findings suggest a complex association between the severity of an individual's dysarthria and the impact on their social participation. Participants' descriptions highlighted their experiences of social participation and isolation. We further suggest that, in some cases, the coping strategies adopted by the participants could be seen to further exacerbate this isolation. These results have important implications for the prioritisation, planning and delivery of therapeutic interventions for people with dysarthria. The impact of stroke-related dysarthria transcends the physiological impairment to impact upon individuals' social participation, which is key to the process of rehabilitation. The development and evaluation of the effectiveness of an intervention that addresses these impacts is the next challenge for therapists and researchers working in this area.

  2. Changes in arm-hand function and arm-hand skill performance in patients after stroke during and after rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Rob Johannes Elise Marie; Seelen, Henk Alexander Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background Arm-hand rehabilitation programs applied in stroke rehabilitation frequently target specific populations and thus are less applicable in heterogeneous patient populations. Besides, changes in arm-hand function (AHF) and arm-hand skill performance (AHSP) during and after a specific and well-described rehabilitation treatment are often not well evaluated. Method This single-armed prospective cohort study featured three subgroups of stroke patients with either a severely, moderately or mildly impaired AHF. Rehabilitation treatment consisted of a Concise_Arm_and_hand_ Rehabilitation_Approach_in_Stroke (CARAS). Measurements at function and activity level were performed at admission, clinical discharge, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after clinical discharge. Results Eighty-nine stroke patients (M/F:63/23; mean age:57.6yr (+/-10.6); post-stroke time:29.8 days (+/-20.1)) participated. All patients improved on AHF and arm-hand capacity during and after rehabilitation, except on grip strength in the severely affected subgroup. Largest gains occurred in patients with a moderately affected AHF. As to self-perceived AHSP, on average, all subgroups improved over time. A small percentage of patients declined regarding self-perceived AHSP post-rehabilitation. Conclusions A majority of stroke patients across the whole arm-hand impairment severity spectrum significantly improved on AHF, arm-hand capacity and self-perceived AHSP. These were maintained up to one year post-rehabilitation. Results may serve as a control condition in future studies. PMID:28614403

  3. The cognitive rehabilitation of limb apraxia in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantagallo, Anna; Maini, Manuela; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2012-01-01

    Apraxia is a higher level motor deficit that occurs when processing a goal-directed action. The apraxic deficit can manifest itself in absence of sensory input deficits or motor output deficits, neglect, frontal inertia or dementia. According to a clinical classification still largely in use, there are two main forms of limb apraxia: ideomotor (IMA) and ideational (IA), observed when a patient is required to imitate a gesture or use an object, respectively. In the present review, we examined only the cognitive treatments of both types of limb apraxia of a vascular aetiology. Despite the high prevalence of limb apraxia caused by left brain damage, and the fact that apraxia has been known for over a century, the literature regarding its rehabilitation is still very limited. This is partly due to the nature of the recovery from the deficit, and in part to the automatic-voluntary dissociation. Here we review those treatments that have proved most successful in helping patients to recover from limb apraxia.

  4. Time use of stroke patients with stroke admitted for rehabilitation in skilled nursing facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.J.; Buijck, B.I.; Stegen, J.C. van der; Eijk, M.S. van; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Hafsteinsdottir, T.B.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the time use of patients with stroke in five Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) in the Netherlands, focusing on the time spent on therapeutic activities, nontherapeutic activities, interaction with others, and the location where the activities took place. Evidence suggest that

  5. Feasibility of a nursing rehabilitation guideline for patients with stroke: evaluating the use by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Varekamp, Rudi; Rensink, Marijke; van Linge, Roland; Lindeman, Eline; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2013-06-01

    To determine the feasibility of the Clinical Nursing Rehabilitation Stroke-guideline (CNRS-guideline) in the care of stroke patients in terms of the experiences, views and attitudes of nurses towards the guideline and their adoption of the guideline and how often the recommendations were used. A four phase cross sectional design was used. Demographic data were collected from nurses (n=30) and patients (n=105). After each test phase the nurses received questionnaires about their experiences of the guideline including questions about their attitude towards the guideline and adoption of the guideline. Also, how often the recommendations were used was registered. The nurses' general impression of the recommendations scored a median of 6.0. A majority of the nurses indicated that the aims of the guideline were clear, that it provided new insights into stroke care. Among the challenges experienced were lack of knowledge and skills and organizational difficulties. Half of the nurses adopted the guideline and the nurses' attitude towards the guideline scored a median of 6.0. The guideline provides nurses with an important means for evidence based care for patients with stroke. The guideline was feasible for nurses to use but various challenges need ongoing attention when planning implementation. • The CNRGS-guideline was found to be feasible for nurses to use in the daily care of patients with stroke, but various challenges, need an ongoing attention. • The CNRGS-guideline is an important step in the stimulation of quality improvement and efficiency and may result in better outcome and satisfaction of patients with stroke. • The CNRGS-guideline provides nurses with an important means to provide evidence based care for patients with stroke.

  6. Rehabilitation Interventions for Improving Social Participation After Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obembe, Adebimpe O; Eng, Janice J

    2016-05-01

    Despite the fact that social participation is considered a pivotal outcome of a successful recovery after stroke, there has been little attention on the impact of activities and services on this important domain. To present a systematic review and meta-analysis from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of rehabilitation interventions on social participation after stroke. A total of 8 electronic databases were searched for relevant RCTs that evaluated the effects of an intervention on the outcome of social participation after stroke. Reference lists of selected articles were hand searched to identify further relevant studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed- and random-effect models. In all, 24 RCTs involving 2042 stroke survivors were identified and reviewed, and 21 were included in the meta-analysis. There was a small beneficial effect of interventions that utilized exercise on social participation (10 studies; SMD = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.09, 0.78;P= .01) immediately after the program ended. Exercise in combination with other interventions (13 studies; SMD = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.10, 0.58;P= .006) also resulted in beneficial effects. No significant effect was observed for interventions that involved support services over 9 studies (SMD = 0.09 [95% CI = -0.04, 0.21];I(2)= 0%;P= .16). The included studies provide evidence that rehabilitation interventions may be effective in improving social participation after stroke, especially if exercise is one of the components. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Neurofeedback as a form of cognitive rehabilitation therapy following stroke: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbles, Alana; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Neurofeedback therapy (NFT) has been used within a number of populations however it has not been applied or thoroughly examined as a form of cognitive rehabilitation within a stroke population. Objectives for this systematic review included: i) identifying how NFT is utilized to treat cognitive deficits following stroke, ii) examining the strength and quality of evidence to support the use of NFT as a form of cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) and iii) providing recommendations for future investigations. Searches were conducted using OVID (Medline, Health Star, Embase + Embase Classic) and PubMed databases. Additional searches were completed using the Cochrane Reviews library database, Google Scholar, the University of Toronto online library catalogue, ClinicalTrials.gov website and select journals. Searches were completed Feb/March 2015 and updated in June/July/Aug 2015. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion in this review. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they: i) were specific to a stroke population, ii) delivered CRT via a NFT protocol, iii) included participants who were affected by a cognitive deficit(s) following stroke (i.e. memory loss, loss of executive function, speech impairment etc.). NFT protocols were highly specific and varied within each study. The majority of studies identified improvements in participant cognitive deficits following the initiation of therapy. Reviewers assessed study quality using the Downs and Black Checklist for Measuring Study Quality tool; limited study quality and strength of evidence restricted generalizability of conclusions regarding the use of this therapy to the greater stroke population. Progression in this field requires further inquiry to strengthen methodology quality and study design. Future investigations should aim to standardize NFT protocols in an effort to understand the dose-response relationship between NFT and improvements in functional outcome. Future investigations should also place a large

  8. Virtual reality in stroke rehabilitation: a meta-analysis and implications for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Levin, Mindy

    2011-05-01

    Approximately two thirds of stroke survivors continue to experience motor deficits of the arm resulting in diminished quality of life. Conventional rehabilitation provides modest and sometimes delayed effects. Virtual reality (VR) technology is a novel adjunctive therapy that could be applied in neurorehabilitation. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the added benefit of VR technology on arm motor recovery after stroke. We searched Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane literature from 1966 to July 2010 with the terms "stroke," "virtual reality," and "upper arm/extremity." We evaluated the effect of VR on motor function improvement after stroke. From the 35 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria totaling 195 participants. Among them, there were 5 randomized clinical trials and 7 observational studies with a pre-/postintervention design. Interventions were delivered within 4 to 6 weeks in 9 of the studies and within 2 to 3 weeks in the remaining 3. Eleven of 12 studies showed a significant benefit toward VR for the selected outcomes. In the pooled analysis of all 5 randomized controlled trials, the effect of VR on motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer) was OR=4.89 (95% CI, 1.31 to 18.3). No significant difference was observed for Box and Block Test or motor function. Among observational studies, there was a 14.7% (95% CI, 8.7%-23.6%) improvement in motor impairment and a 20.1% (95% CI, 11.0%-33.8%) improvement in motor function after VR. VR and video game applications are novel and potentially useful technologies that can be combined with conventional rehabilitation for upper arm improvement after stroke.

  9. Clinical effectiveness of combined virtual reality and robot assisted fine hand motion rehabilitation in subacute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianwei; Naghdy, Fazel; Naghdy, Golshah; Du, Haiping

    2017-07-01

    Robot-assisted therapy is regarded as an effective and reliable method for the delivery of highly repetitive rehabilitation training in restoring motor skills after a stroke. This study focuses on the rehabilitation of fine hand motion skills due to their vital role in performing delicate activities of daily living (ADL) tasks. The proposed rehabilitation system combines an adaptive assist-as-needed (AAN) control algorithm and a Virtual Reality (VR) based rehabilitation gaming system (RGS). The developed system is described and its effectiveness is validated through clinical trials on a group of eight subacute stroke patients for a period of six weeks. The impact of the training is verified through standard clinical evaluation methods and measuring key kinematic parameters. A comparison of the pre- and post-training results indicates that the method proposed in this study can improve fine hand motion rehabilitation training effectiveness.

  10. Professional groups driving change toward patient-centred care: interprofessional working in stroke rehabilitation in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burau, Viola; Carstensen, Kathrine; Lou, Stina; Kuhlmann, Ellen

    2017-09-16

    Patient-centred care based on needs has been gaining momentum in health policy and the workforce. This creates new demand for interprofessional teams and redefining roles and tasks of professionals, yet little is known on how to implement new health policies more effectively. Our aim was to analyse the role and capacity of health professions in driving organisational change in interprofessional working and patient-centred care. A case study of the introduction of interprofessional, early discharge teams in stroke rehabilitation in Denmark was conducted with focus on day-to-day coordination of care tasks and the professional groups' interests and strategies. The study included 5 stroke teams and 17 interviews with different health professionals conducted in 2015. Professional groups expressed highly positive professional interest in reorganised stroke rehabilitation concerning patients, professional practice and intersectoral relations; individual professional and collective interprofessional interests strongly coincided. The corresponding strategies were driven by a shared goal of providing needs-based care for patients. Individual professionals worked independently and on behalf of the