WorldWideScience

Sample records for stroke prevention implications

  1. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with which you were born Changes to your lifestyle You can change some risk factors for stroke, ... sodium (salt). Read labels and stay away from unhealthy fats. Avoid foods with: Saturated fat Partially-hydrogenated ...

  2. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  3. Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition A healthy diet can reduce your risk for ... Treatment How does a stroke affect eating and nutrition? Stroke can devastate a person's nutritional health because ...

  4. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  5. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS) are committed to reducing that burden through biomedical research. What is a Stroke? A stroke, or "brain ... Testimony Legislative Updates Impact NINDS Contributions to Approved Therapies ... Director, Division of Intramural Research

  6. Chuanxiong preparations for preventing stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xunzhe; Zeng, Xiaoxi; Wu, Taixiang

    2010-01-20

    Stroke is a major healthcare problem and is one of the leading causes of death and serious long-term disability. Prevention of stroke is considered an important strategy. Chuanxiong is traditionally used in China in the treatment and prevention of stroke. In recent years, Chinese researchers have developed new patented Chuanxiong preparations. To assess the effects and safety of Chuanxiong preparations in preventing stroke in high-risk adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to March 2008), EMBASE (1980 to March 2008), AMED (1985 to March 2008), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1975 to March 2008), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1994 to March 2008), and the VIP Database (1989 to March 2008). Trials registers were searched for ongoing studies. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) studying the effects of Chuanxiong preparations in preventing stroke were included. Three reviewers independently selected studies for inclusion and two reviewers independently extracted data. Authors of identified RCTs were telephoned to confirm the randomisation procedure. Outcomes assessed included: stroke, composite cardiovascular outcomes, changes in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular haemodynamic indices and adverse events. Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for dichotomous variables and mean differences for continuous outcomes. Three RCTs (5042 participants) were included. One higher quality study (4415 participants) compared Nao-an capsule with aspirin for primary prevention in high-risk stroke populations. Nao-an capsule appeared to reduce the incidence of stroke compared with aspirin (OR 0.56 95% CI 0.33 to 0.96). One study of low methodological quality indicated that a self-prepared Xifenwan tablet reduced the incidence of stroke in people with transient ischaemia attack (TIA) (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.78). The

  7. Association of various blood pressure variables and vascular phenotypes with coronary, stroke and renal deaths: Potential implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaoui, Brahim; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Milon, Hughes; Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Khettab, Fouad; Mechtouff, Laura; Cassar, Emmanuel; Girerd, Nicolas; Lantelme, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular diseases has been extensively documented. However, the benefit of anti-hypertensive drugs differs according to the type of cardiovascular event. Aortic stiffness is tightly intertwined with BP and aorta cross-talk with small arteries. We endeavored to elucidate which BP component and type of vessel remodeling was predictive of the following outcomes: fatal myocardial infarction (MI), fatal stroke, renal -, coronary- or cerebrovascular-related deaths. Large vessel remodeling was estimated by an aortography-based aortic atherosclerosis score (ATS) while small vessel disease was documented by the presence of a hypertensive retinopathy. We included 1031 subjects referred for hypertension workup and assessed outcomes 30 years later. After adjustment for major risk factors, ATS and pulse pressure (PP) were predictive of coronary events while mean BP (MBP) and retinopathy were not. On the contrary, MBP was predictive of cerebrovascular and renal related deaths while ATS and PP were not. Retinopathy was only predictive of cerebrovascular related deaths. Lastly, the aortic atherosclerosis phenotype and increased PP identified patients prone to develop fatal MI whereas the retinopathy phenotype and increased MBP identified patients at higher risk of fatal stroke. These results illustrate the particular feature of the resistive coronary circulation comparatively to the brain and kidneys' low-resistance circulation. Our results advocate for a rational preventive strategy based on the identification of distinct clinical phenotypes. Accordingly, decreasing MBP levels could help preventing stroke in retinopathy phenotypes whereas targeting PP is possibly more efficient in preventing MI in atherosclerotic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation--an Asian stroke perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Hung-Fat; Wang, Yong-Jun; Ahmed Ai-Abdullah, Moheeb; Pizarro-Borromeo, Annette B; Chiang, Chern-En; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Singh, Balbir; Vora, Amit; Wang, Chun-Xue; Zubaid, Mohammad; Clemens, Andreas; Lim, Paul; Hu, Dayi

    2013-07-01

    Despite relatively lower prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Asians (~1%) than in Caucasians (~2%), Asia has a much higher overall disease burden because of its proportionally larger aged population. For example, on the basis of reported age-adjusted prevalence rates and projected population figures in China, there will be an estimated 5.2 million men and 3.1 million women with AF older than 60 years by year 2050. Stroke is a disabling complication of AF that is of increasing cause for concern in Asians patients. Implementing consensus expert recommendations for managing stroke risk in patients with AF can considerably reduce stroke rates. However, caution is necessary when aligning management of Asian patients with AF to that of their Caucasian counterparts. Current international guidelines and risk stratification tools for AF management are based on findings in predominantly Caucasian populations and may therefore have limited relevance, in certain respects, to Asian patients. Oral anticoagulants play an important role in preventing AF-related stroke. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin is recommended for reducing the risk of stroke and thromboembolism in high-risk patients with nonvalvular AF; however, warfarin interacts with many drugs and food ingredients, which may pose significant challenges in administration and monitoring among Asian patients. Further research is needed to inform specific guidance on the implications of different stroke and bleeding profiles in Asians vs Caucasians. Moreover, there is scope to improve physician perceptions and patient knowledge, as well as considering alternative new oral anticoagulants, for example, direct thrombin inhibitors or factor Xa inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. STROKE PREVENTION IN INTERNIST PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Napalkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke secondary prevention in internist practice is discussed in accordance with up to date guidelines. Modern pharmacotherapy includes antiaggregants or anticoagulants, statins, and antihypertensive drugs. The choice of drugs is mostly founded on the rules of evidence based medicine, which allow adjusting individual treatment depending on clinical conditions. The composition of perindopril and indapamide is a preferred nowadays combination of antihypertensive drugs.

  10. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Charles Esenwa, Jose GutierrezDepartment of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dy...

  11. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  12. Stroke Prevention Trials in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of an International Pediatric Stroke Study launched in 2002, the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP reports a reduction in the number of overt clinical strokes in children with critically high transcranial Doppler velocities (>200 cm/sec who were regularly transfused.

  13. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  14. CDC Vital Signs-Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the September 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Each year, more than 140,000 people die and many survivors face disability. Eighty percent of strokes are preventable. Learn the signs of stroke and how to prevent them.

  15. Stroke survivors' endorsement of a "stress belief model" of stroke prevention predicts control of risk factors for recurrent stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L Alison; Tuhrim, Stanley; Kronish, Ian M; Horowitz, Carol R

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions that stress causes and stress-reduction controls hypertension have been associated with poorer blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension populations. The current study investigated these "stress-model perceptions" in stroke survivors regarding prevention of recurrent stroke and the influence of these perceptions on patients' stroke risk factor control. Stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors (N=600) participated in an in-person interview in which they were asked about their beliefs regarding control of future stroke; BP and cholesterol were measured directly after the interview. Counter to expectations, patients who endorsed a "stress-model" but not a "medication-model" of stroke prevention were in better control of their stroke risk factors (BP and cholesterol) than those who endorsed a medication-model but not a stress-model of stroke prevention (OR for poor control=.54, Wald statistic=6.07, p=.01). This result was not explained by between group differences in patients' reported medication adherence. The results have implications for theory and practice, regarding the role of stress belief models and acute cardiac events, compared to chronic hypertension.

  16. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  17. Role of Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition A healthy diet can reduce your risk for ... Treatment How does a stroke affect eating and nutrition? Stroke can devastate a person's nutritional health because ...

  18. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies.

  19. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esenwa C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Charles Esenwa, Jose GutierrezDepartment of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke, the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies.Keywords: stroke mechanisms, stroke risk, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia

  1. Diabetes and Stroke Prevention: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hewitt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and diabetes mellitus are two separate conditions which share multiple common threads. Both are increasing in prevalence, both are diseases which affect blood vessels, and both are associated with other vascular risk factors, such as hypertension and dyslipidemia. Abnormal glucose regulation, of which diabetes is one manifestation, is seen in up to two-thirds of people suffering from an acute stroke. Surprisingly, aggressive management of glucose after an acute stroke has not been shown to improve outcome or reduce the incidence of further strokes. More encouragingly, active management of other cardiovascular risk factors has been demonstrated to prevent stroke disease and improve outcome following a stroke in the diabetic person. Hypertension should be treated with a target of 140/80 mmHg, as a maximum. The drug of choice would be an ACE inhibitor, although the priority is blood pressure reduction regardless of the medication chosen. Lipids should be treated with a statin whatever the starting cholesterol. Antiplatelet treatment is also essential but there are no specific recommendations for the diabetic person. As these conditions become more prevalent it is imperative that the right treatment is offered for both primary and secondary prevention in diabetic people, in order to prevent disease and minimize disability.

  2. Can readmission after stroke be prevented?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H E; Schultz-Larsen, K; Kreiner, S

    2000-01-01

    that the effect of intervention was strongest for patients with a prolonged inpatient rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: Readmission is common among disabled stroke survivors. Follow-up intervention after discharge seems to be a way of preventing readmission, especially for patients with long inpatient rehabilitation.......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: About 50% of stroke survivors are discharged to their homes with lasting disability. Knowledge, however, of the importance of follow-up services that targets these patients is sparse. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate 2 models of follow-up intervention after...... discharge. The study hypothesis was that intervention could reduce readmission rates and institutionalization and prevent functional decline. We report the results regarding readmission. METHODS: This randomized study included 155 stroke patients with persistent impairment and disability who, after...

  3. Lipid management in the prevention of stroke: a meta-analysis of fibrates for stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yu-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibrates has been extensively used to improve plasma lipid levels and prevent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of fibrates on stroke is unclear at the present time. We therefore carried out a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of fibrates on stroke. Methods We systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings to identify studies for our analysis. We included randomized placebo controlled trials which reported the effects of fibrates on stroke. Relative risk (RR was used to measure the effect of fibrates on the risk of stroke under random effect model. The analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect the treatment effects. Results Overall, fibrate therapy was not associated with a significant reduction on the risk of stroke (RR, 1.02, 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.16, P = 0.78. In the subgroup analyses, we observed that gemfibrozil therapy showed a beneficial effect on stroke (RR, 0.72, 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.98, P = 0.04. Similarly, fibrate therapy comparing to placebo had no effect on the incidence of fatal stroke. Subgroup analysis suggested that fibrate therapy showed an effect on fatal stroke when the Jadad score more than 3 (RR, 0.41, 95% CI, 0.17 to 1.00, P = 0.049. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis indicated that fibrate therapy may play a role in fatal stroke (RR, 0.49, 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.93, P = 0.03 for patients with previous diabetes, cardiovascular disease or stroke. Conclusions Our study indicated that fibrate therapy might play an important role in reducing the risk of fatal stroke in patients with previous diabetes, cardiovascular disease or stroke. However, it did not have an effect on the incidence of stroke.

  4. Preventing Stroke Deaths PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  5. Pleiotropic effects of statins in stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny Yenny

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability, and  contributes substantially to healthcare budgets. The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor or statins, reducing mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. Statins therefore have a place in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effect beyond cholesterol reduction. The cholesterol-independet or “pleiotropic” effects of statin include the upregulation and activation of endothelial nitric acid synthase (eNOS that can increase nitric oxide (NO production. Augmentation of NO production increases cerebral blood flow, which can lead to neuroprotection during brain ischaemia. By inhibiting mevalonate synthesis, statins prevent the formation of several isoprenoids (including farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. Inhibiting geranylgeranylation of RhoA small G proteins increases the stability of eNOS mRNA through the remodeling of endothelial actin microfilamens. Moreover, statins directly increase eNOS activity within minutes by activating the pathway involving phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B. In the secondary prevention of stroke, the use of statins reduces the incidence of either recurrent stroke or other major vascular events and treatment should be initiated soon after the event. The use of statins does not increase hemorrhagic stroke or cancer and may also favor atherosclerotic plaque regression.

  6. Pleiotropic effects of statins in stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability, and contributes substantially to healthcare budgets. The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor or statins, reducing mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. Statins therefore have a place in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effect beyond cholesterol reduction. The cholesterol-independet or “pleiotropic” effects of statin include the upregulation and activation of endothelial nitric acid synthase (eNOS that can increase nitric oxide (NO production. Augmentation of NO production increases cerebral blood flow, which can lead to neuroprotection during brain ischaemia. By inhibiting mevalonate synthesis, statins prevent the formation of several isoprenoids (including farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. Inhibiting geranylgeranylation of RhoA small G proteins increases the stability of eNOS mRNA through the remodeling of endothelial actin microfilamens. Moreover, statins directly increase eNOS activity within minutes by activating the pathway involving phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B. In the secondary prevention of stroke, the use of statins reduces the incidence of either recurrent stroke or other major vascular events and treatment should be initiated soon after the event. The use of statins does not increase hemorrhagic stroke or cancer and may also favor atherosclerotic plaque regression.

  7. Dabigatran experience in primary and secondary prevention of cardioembolic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Alekseyevich Domashenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban in stroke prevention and also own data of administration of dabigatran in primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in 45 patients with cerebrovascular diseases are presented. Most patients received dabigatran 14 days after the first stroke associated with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In other cases dabigatran was used for primary prevention of stroke in patients with chronic forms of cerebrovascular diseases and nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran shows good tolerability and efficacy. Recurrent strokes were diagnosed in 2 patients. The reasons for these events were arterial hypertension in one case and symptomatic atherosclerotic plaque in the other case.

  8. Does Diagnosis of Hypertension Prevent Stroke? A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The present study was designed to determine the relative frequency of previously diagnosed and undiagnosed hypertension in first stroke in order to evaluate if previous diagnosis of hypertension can prevent stroke. Patients and Methods: One hundred and twenty nine first stroke patients presenting at the ...

  9. Stroke Prevention (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Worldwide, strokes are the second leading cause of death among people over 60, and they are among the leading causes of disability. In the U.S., nearly 800,000 people suffer a stroke each year. In this podcast, Dr. Sallyann King discusses ways to prevent strokes.

  10. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F.; Dippel, Diederik Wj; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of disability in high-income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce the incidence of infections and improve

  11. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in patients with acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Vermeij, Frederique; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the main cause of disability in high income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce infections and improve outcome.

  12. Secondary prevention of stroke in Saskatchewan, Canada: hypertension control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Janelle Ann; Teare, Gary F; Neufeld, Anne; Hudema, Nedeene; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2013-10-01

    In the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, stroke is the third leading cause of death as well as the major cause of adult disability. Once a person suffers a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), they are at high risk for having a secondary stroke. Hypertension (elevated blood pressure) is the single most important modifiable risk factor for both first and recurrent stroke, and is thus an important risk factor to be controlled. According to the Canadian Stroke Strategy (CSS) Best Practice Recommendations, blood pressure lowering treatment should be initiated before discharge from hospital for all stroke/TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of medically driven secondary stroke prevention care in Saskatchewan as applied to hypertension control. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop methodology and calculate a secondary stroke process of care measure using available data in Saskatchewan, based on an appropriate hypertension therapy indicator recommendation from the CSS Performance Measurement Manual; (2) examine variation in secondary stroke prevention hypertensive care among the Saskatchewan Regional Health Authorities; and (3) investigate factors associated with receiving evidence-based hypertensive secondary stroke prevention. This multi-year cross-sectional study was an analysis of deidentified health data derived from linkage of administrative health data. A select indicator from the CSS Performance Measurement Manual that measures adherence to a CSS Best Practice Guidelines concerning use of antihypertensive medications for secondary stroke prevention was calculated. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association of patient demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and geographic location of care with receipt of guideline-recommended hypertensive secondary stroke prevention. The target population was all Saskatchewan residents who were hospitalized in Saskatchewan for a stroke or TIA between April 1, 2001

  13. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor Preventing falls Stroke - discharge Swallowing problems Images Brain Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery Stroke Brainstem function Cerebellum - function Circle of Willis Left cerebral hemisphere - ...

  14. Preventive Ceftriaxone in Patients with Stroke Treated with Intravenous Thrombolysis: Post Hoc Analysis of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F.; Roos, Yvo B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a randomized open-label masked endpoint trial, showed that preventive ceftriaxone did not improve functional outcome at 3 months in patients with acute stroke (adjusted common OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.82-1.09). Post-hoc analyses showed that among patients

  15. CDC Vital Signs–Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    This podcast is based on the September 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Each year, more than 140,000 people die and many survivors face disability. Eighty percent of strokes are preventable. Learn the signs of stroke and how to prevent them.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  16. Hemorrhagic stroke in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Szarek, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) study, atorvastatin 80 mg/day reduced the risk of stroke in patients with recent stroke or TIA. Post hoc analysis found this overall benefit included an increase in the numbers of treated patients having......: Of 4,731 patients, 67% had ischemic strokes, 31% TIAs, and 2% hemorrhagic strokes as entry events. In addition to atorvastatin treatment (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.59, p = 0.02), Cox multivariable regression including baseline variables significant in univariable analyses showed that hemorrhagic stroke...... and treatment. Multivariable analyses also found that having Stage 2 (JNC-7) hypertension at the last study visit before a hemorrhagic stroke increased risk (HR 6.19, 95% CI 1.47 to 26.11, p = 0.01), but there was no effect of most recent LDL-cholesterol level in those treated with atorvastatin. CONCLUSIONS...

  17. Stroke Prevention (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-10-29

    Worldwide, strokes are the second leading cause of death among people over 60, and they are among the leading causes of disability. In the U.S., nearly 800,000 people suffer a stroke each year. In this podcast, Dr. Sallyann King discusses ways to prevent strokes.  Created: 10/29/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/29/2014.

  18. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure for stroke prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Loupis, Anastasia M; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with an increased stroke risk, oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the standard treatment for stroke prevention. However, this therapy carries a high risk of major bleeding. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) is suggested as an alt...

  19. Developing a culturally-tailored stroke prevention walking program for Korean immigrant seniors: A focus group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ivy; Chang, Emiley; Araiza, Daniel; Thorpe, Carol Lee; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for stroke. Korean immigrant seniors are one of the most sedentary ethnic groups in the United States. Objectives To gain better understanding of (i) Beliefs and knowledge about stroke; (ii) Attitudes about walking for stroke prevention; and (iii) Barriers and facilitators to walking among Korean seniors for the cultural tailoring of a stroke prevention walking program. Design An explorative study using focus group data. Twenty-nine Korean immigrant seniors (64–90 years of age) who had been told by a doctor at least once that their blood pressure was elevated participated in 3 focus groups. Each focus group consisted of 8–11 participants. Methods Focus group audio tapes were transcribed and analyzed using standard content analysis methods. Results Participants identified physical and psychological imbalances (e.g., too much work and stress) as the primary causes of stroke. Restoring ‘balance’ was identified as a powerful means of stroke prevention. A subset of participants expressed that prevention may be beyond human control. Overall, participants acknowledged the importance of walking for stroke prevention, but described barriers such as lack of personal motivation and unsafe environment. Many participants believed that providing opportunities for socialization while walking and combining walking with health information sessions would facilitate participation in and maintenance of a walking program. Conclusions Korean immigrant seniors believe strongly that imbalance is a primary cause of stroke. Restoring balance as a way to prevent stroke is culturally special among Koreans and provides a conceptual base in culturally tailoring our stroke prevention walking intervention for Korean immigrant seniors. Implications for practice A stroke prevention walking program for Korean immigrant seniors may have greater impact by addressing beliefs about stroke causes and prevention such as physical and

  20. Developing a falls prevention program for community-dwelling stroke survivors in Singapore: client and caregiver perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianma; O'Loughlin, Kate; Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Dean, Catherine; Koh, Gerald

    2017-12-25

    Drawing on the perspectives of stroke survivors, family members and domestic helpers, this study explores participants' experiences of self-perceived fall risk factors after stroke, common fall prevention strategies used, and challenges to community participation after a fall. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in Singapore with community-dwelling stroke survivors with a previous fall (n = 9), family caregivers (n = 4), and domestic helpers (n = 4) who have cared for a stroke survivor with a previous fall. Purposive sampling was used for recruitment; all interviews were audio-recorded with permission and transcribed. Thematic analysis was conducted using NVivo (v10) software. All participants shared their self-perceived intrinsic and extrinsic fall risk factors and main challenges after a fall. For stroke participants and family caregivers, motivational factors in developing safety strategies after a previous fall(s) include social connectedness, independent living and community participation. For family caregivers and domestic helpers, the stroke survivor's safety is their top priority, however this can also lead to over-protective behavior outside of the rehabilitation process. Reducing the risk of falls in community-dwelling stroke survivors seems to be more important than promoting community participation among caregivers. The study findings highlight that a structured and client-centered fall prevention program targeting stroke survivors and caregivers is needed in Singapore. Implications for rehabilitation Falls after stroke can lead to functional decline in gait and mobility and restricted self-care activities. Community-dwelling stroke survivors develop adaptive safety strategies after a fall and want to be socially connected. However, caregivers see the safety of the stroke survivors as their top priority and demonstrate over-protective behaviors. Fall prevention programs for community-dwelling stroke survivors should target both stroke

  1. Comparison of antiplatelet regimens in secondary stroke prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Pallisgaard, Jannik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with ischemic stroke of non-cardioembolic origin, acetylsalicylic acid, clopidogrel, or a combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole are recommended for the prevention of a recurrent stroke. The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of bleeding or recurrent...... stroke associated with these three treatments. METHODS: Patients who were discharged with first-time ischemic stroke from 2007-2010, with no history of atrial fibrillation were identified from Danish nationwide registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 1-year risks of recurrent ischemic stroke and bleeding...... were calculated for each antiplatelet regimen. RESULTS: Among patients discharged after first-time ischemic stroke, 3043 patients were treated with acetylsalicylic acid, 12,295 with a combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole, and 3885 with clopidogrel. Adjusted HRs for clopidogrel versus...

  2. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  3. Costs of secondary prevention of stroke by carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Carsten; Sørensen, Mette; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2012-01-01

    We estimated the costs to the Danish National Health Service of preventing stroke due to carotid artery stenosis by carotid endarterectomy (CEA), including costs of identifying patients, Doppler ultrasound (DUS) examination and CEA.......We estimated the costs to the Danish National Health Service of preventing stroke due to carotid artery stenosis by carotid endarterectomy (CEA), including costs of identifying patients, Doppler ultrasound (DUS) examination and CEA....

  4. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: findings from Tuscan FADOI Stroke Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite vitamin K antagonists (VKAs are considered the first choice treatment for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF, literature shows their underuse in this context. Since data about VKAs use prior and after acute stroke lack, the aim of this study was to focus on management of anticoagulation with VKAs in this context. Data were retrieved from Tuscan FADOI Stroke Registry, an online data bank aimed to report on characteristics of stroke patients consecutively admitted in Internal Medicine wards in 2010 and 2011. In this period 819 patients with mean age 76.5±12.3 years were enrolled. Data on etiology were available for 715 of them (88.1%, 87% being ischemic and 13% hemorrhagic strokes. AF was present in 238 patients (33%, 165 (69.3% having a known AF before hospitalization, whereas 73 patients (31.7% received a new diagnosis of AF. A percentage of 89% of strokes in patients with known AF were ischemic and 11% hemorrhagic. A percentage of 86.7% of patients with known AF had a CHADS2 ≥2, but only 28.3% were on VKAs before hospitalization. A percentage of 78.8% of patients treated with VKAs before stroke had an international normalized ratio (INR ≤2.0; 68.7% of patients with VKAs-related hemorrhagic strokes had INR ≤3.0. Combined endpoint mortality or severe disability in patients with ischemic stroke associated with AF was present in 47%, while it was present in 19.30% and 19.20% of atherothrombotic and lacunar strokes, respectively. At hospital discharge, VKAs were prescribed in 25.9% of AF related ischemic stroke patients. AF related strokes are burdened by severe outcome but VKAs are dramatically underused in patients with AF, even in higher risk patients. Efforts to improve anticoagulation in this stroke subtype are warranted.

  5. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  6. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lemmens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. Since atrial fibrillation can result in ischemic stroke, one might assume that genetic determinants of this cardiac arrhythmia are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Ischemic stroke is a multifactorial, complex disease where multiple environmental and genetic factors interact. Whether genetic variants associated with a risk factor for ischemic stroke also increase the risk of a particular vascular endpoint still needs to be confirmed in many cases. Here we review the current knowledge on the genetic background of atrial fibrillation and the consequences for cerebrovascular disease.

  7. Dietary Polyphenols in the Prevention of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tressera-Rimbau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols have an important protective role against a number of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, brain dysfunction, stroke, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death worldwide: more people die annually from cardiovascular diseases than from any other cause. The most important behavioural risk factors of heart disease and stroke are unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use, and excess alcohol intake. The dietary consumption of polyphenols has shown to be inversely associated with morbidity and mortality by cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. It is well-known that the protective effects of polyphenols in vivo depend on the grade how they are extracted from food and on their intestinal absorption, metabolism, and biological action with target tissues. The aim of this review was to summarise the relation between polyphenols of different plant sources and stroke in human intervention studies, animal models, and in vitro studies.

  8. Dietary Polyphenols in the Prevention of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, M.

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols have an important protective role against a number of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, brain dysfunction, stroke, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death worldwide: more people die annually from cardiovascular diseases than from any other cause. The most important behavioural risk factors of heart disease and stroke are unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use, and excess alcohol intake. The dietary consumption of polyphenols has shown to be inversely associated with morbidity and mortality by cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. It is well-known that the protective effects of polyphenols in vivo depend on the grade how they are extracted from food and on their intestinal absorption, metabolism, and biological action with target tissues. The aim of this review was to summarise the relation between polyphenols of different plant sources and stroke in human intervention studies, animal models, and in vitro studies. PMID:29204249

  9. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Current Strategies and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald V. Naccarelli, MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common complication of atrial fibrillation (AF. Guidelines recommend anticoagulant treatment in patients with CHA2DS2VASc scores of >2. Registry data suggests that almost half of patients who should be on therapeutic anticoagulation for stroke prevention in AF (SPAF are not. Warfarin and more recently developed agents, the “novel anticoagulants” (NOACs reduce the risk of embolic strokes. In addition, the NOACs also reduce intracranial hemorrhage (ICH by over 50% compared to warfarin. Anticoagulation and bridging strategies involving cardioversion, catheter ablation, and invasive/surgical procedures are reviewed. The development of reversal agents for NOACs and the introduction of left atrial appendage occluding devices will evolve the use of newer strategies for preventing stroke in high risk AF patients.

  10. Ethnic differences in ischemic stroke subtypes in young-onset stroke: the Stroke Prevention in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Megh M; Ryan, Kathleen A; Cole, John W

    2015-10-29

    Prior studies indicate that young African-Americans (AA) have a greater frequency of ischemic stroke than similarly aged European-Americans (EA). We hypothesized that differences in stroke subtype frequency mediated through sex and differing risk factor profiles may play a role in ethnicity-specific stroke. Utilizing our biracial young-onset stroke population, we explored these relationships. Fifty nine hospitals in the Baltimore-Washington area participated in a population-based study of young-onset stroke in men (218-AA, 291-EA) and women (219-AA, 222-EA) aged 16-49. Data on age, sex, ethnicity and stroke risk factors (hypertension (HTN) and smoking) were gathered through standardized interview. A pair of vascular neurologists adjudicated each case to determine TOAST subtype. Logistic regression analyses evaluating for differences in stroke risk factors by TOAST subtype were performed. Analyses controlling for age and sex demonstrated that AA were more likely to have a lacunar stroke than EA (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.12-2.32; p = 0.011) when utilizing the other TOAST subtypes as the reference group. This effect was mediated by HTN, which increases the risk of lacunar stroke (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.38-2.98; p = 0.0003) and large artery stroke (OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 1.01-2.88; p = 0.048) when controlling for sex, ethnicity, and age. Cases below age 40 were more likely to have a cardioembolic stroke than those above age 40 (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.15-2.27; p = 0.006), controlling for sex and ethnicity. Lastly, current smokers were more likely to have a large artery stroke than non-smokers (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.08-2.98; p = 0.024). Our population-based data demonstrate ethnic differences in ischemic stroke subtypes. These findings may help clarify mechanisms of stroke in young adults which may in part be driven by ethnic-specific differences in early-onset traditional risk factors, thereby indicating differing emphasis on workup and prevention.

  11. Epigenetic impact of curcumin on stroke prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kalani, Anuradha; Kamat, Pradip K; Kalani, Komal; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic impact of curcumin in stroke and neurodegenerative disorders is curiosity-arousing. It is derived from Curcuma longa (spice), possesses anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-lipidemic, neuro-protective and recently shown to exhibit epigenetic modulatory properties. Epigenetic studies include DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA-based mechanisms which regulate gene expression without altering nucleotide sequences. Curcumin has been shown to affect cancer by altering ...

  12. ANTITHROMBOCYTIC THERAPY IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Approaches to preventing recurrent stroke by antithrombocytic therapy are shown to be as diverse as its causes. The diagnosis of cardioembolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation should not limit the choice of an antithrombocytic agent to only oral (indirect anticoagulants (OAC. If OAC cannot be used, antithrombocytic therapy, including combined (clopidogrel + ASA one, may be considered as a reasonable alternative. Approaches to choosing the optimal antithrombocytic drug in noncardioembolic strokes are intricate since atherosclerosis is a systemic vascular disease and the poststroke period is characterized by a higher risk for not only recurrent stroke, but also for coronary catastrophes. It is concluded that an antithrombocytic agent should be chosen, by taking into account the multifocality of atherosclerosis, associated clinical conditions, diabetes mellitus, intravascular interventions and the individual risk of all cardiovascular events.

  13. Update on the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): a randomised controlled phase 3 clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; van Geloven, Nan; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; van der Poll, Tom; Prins, Jan M.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Vermeij, Frederique H.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. Infections after stroke occur in 30% of stroke patients and are strongly associated with unfavourable outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers infection rate in patients after stroke, however, the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on

  14. Update on the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): A randomised controlled phase 3 clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.F. Westendorp (Willeke); J.-D. Vermeij (Jan-Dirk); N. van Geloven (Nan); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); T. van der Poll (Tom); J.M. Prins (Jan); L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); F.H. Vermeij (Frederique); P.J. Nederkoorn (Paul); D. van de Beek (Diederik)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. Infections after stroke occur in 30% of stroke patients and are strongly associated with unfavourable outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers infection rate in patients after stroke, however, the effect of preventive

  15. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Focus on Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrton R. Massaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, with an estimated prevalence of 1-2% in North America and Europe. The increased prevalence of AF in Latin America is associated with an ageing general population, along with poor control of key risk factors, including hypertension. As a result, stroke prevalence and associated mortality have increased dramatically in the region. Therefore, the need for effective anticoagulation strategies in Latin America is clear. The aim of this review is to provide a contemporary overview of anticoagulants for stroke prevention. The use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, eg, warfarin and aspirin in the prevention of stroke in patients with AF in Latin America remains common, although around one fifth of all AF patients receive no anticoagulation. Warfarin use is complicated by a lack of access to effective monitoring services coupled with an unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile. The overuse of aspirin is associated with significant bleeding risks and reduced efficacy for stroke prevention in this patient group. The non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACbs represent a potential means of overcoming many limitations associated with VKA and aspirin use, including a reduction in the need for monitoring and a reduced risk of hemorrhagic events. The ultimate decision of which anticoagulant drug to utilize in AF patients depends on a multitude of factors. More research is needed to appreciate the impact of these factors in the Latin American population and thereby reduce the burden of AF-associated stroke in this region.

  16. Older Ethnic Minority Women's Perceptions of Stroke Prevention and Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ivy; Bharmal, Nazleen; Choi, Sarah; Araiza, Daniel; Moore, Mignon R; Trejo, Laura; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    To inform the development of a tailored behavioral stroke risk reduction intervention for ethnic minority seniors, we sought to explore gender differences in perceptions of stroke prevention and physical activity (walking). In collaboration with community-based organizations, we conducted 12 mixed-gender focus groups of African American, Latino, Chinese, and Korean seniors aged 60 years and older with a history of hypertension (89 women and 42 men). Transcripts were coded and recurring topics compared by gender. Women expressed beliefs that differed from men in 4 topic areas: 1) stroke-related interest, 2) barriers to walking, 3) facilitators to walking, and 4) health behavior change attitudes. Compared with men, women were more interested in their role in response to a stroke and post-stroke care. Women described walking as an acceptable form of exercise, but cited neighborhood safety and pain as walking barriers. Fear of nursing home placement and weight loss were identified as walking facilitators. Women were more prone than men to express active/control attitudes toward health behavior change. Older ethnic minority women, a high-risk population for stroke, may be more receptive to behavioral interventions that address the gender-specific themes identified by this study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  18. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. de Koning (Johan); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Prins (Ad); G.J.J.M. Borsboom (Gerard); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. DESIGN: This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the

  19. Quality of stroke prevention in general practice: relationship with practice organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Johan S.; Klazinga, Niek; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Prins, A. D.; Borsboom, Gerard J. J. M.; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between elements of practice organization related to stroke prevention in general practice, and suboptimal preventive care preceding the occurrence of stroke. Design. This study was conducted among 69 Dutch general practitioners in the Rotterdam region.

  20. Antiplatelet therapy for recurrent stroke prevention: newer perspectives based on (MATCH), (CHARISMA), and (ESPRIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B

    2008-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is an important component of our armamentarium for recurrent stroke prevention. Aspirin is a safe and effective antiplatelet drug for recurrent stroke prevention, however, it has been challenged recently by the thienopyridine derivative, clopidogrel, and the combination agent, aspirin plus extended release dipyridamole. In this review, we discuss recent studies of thienopyridine derivatives and aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole in stroke prevention and evidence-based guidelines for the administration of these agents in practice for recurrent stroke prevention.

  1. Stroke Outreach in an Inner City Market: A Platform for Identifying African American Males for Stroke Prevention Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrief, Anjail Zarinah; Johnson, Brenda; Urrutia, Victor Cruz

    2015-01-01

    There are significant racial disparities in stroke incidence and mortality. Health fairs and outreach programs can be used to increase stroke literacy, but they often fail to reach those at highest risk, including African American males. We conducted a stroke outreach and screening program at an inner city market in order to attract a high-risk group for a stroke education intervention. A modified Framingham risk tool was used to estimate stroke risk and a 10-item quiz was developed to assess stroke literacy among 80 participants. We report results of the demographic and stroke risk analyses and stroke knowledge assessment. The program attracted a majority male (70%) and African American (95%) group of participants. Self-reported hypertension (57.5%), tobacco use (40%), and diabetes (23.8%) were prevalent. Knowledge of stroke warning signs, risk factors, and appropriate action to take for stroke symptoms was not poor when compared to the literature. Stroke outreach and screening in an inner city public market may be an effective way to target a high-risk population for stroke prevention interventions. Stroke risk among participants was high despite adequate stroke knowledge.

  2. B vitamins in stroke prevention: time to reconsider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J David; Yi, Qilong; Hankey, Graeme J

    2017-09-01

    B vitamin therapy lowers plasma total homocysteine concentrations, and might be a beneficial intervention for stroke prevention; however, cyanocobalamin (a form of vitamin B12) can accelerate decline in renal function and increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with impaired renal function. Although early trials did not show benefit in reduction of stroke, these results might have been due to harm in participants with impaired renal function. In patients with diabetic nephropathy, cyanocobalamin is harmful, whereas B vitamins appear to reduce cardiovascular events in study participants with normal renal function. Our meta-analysis of individual patient data from two large trials of B vitamin therapy (VISP and VITATOPS) indicates that patients with impaired renal function who are exposed to high-dose cyanocobalamin do not benefit from therapy with B vitamins for the prevention of stroke (risk ratio 1·04, 95% CI 0·84-1·27), however, patients with normal renal function who are not exposed to high-dose cyanocobalamin benefit significantly from this treatment (0.78, 0·67-0·90; interaction p=0·03). The potential benefits of B vitamin therapy with folic acid and methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin, instead of cyanocobalamin, to lower homocysteine concentrations in people at high risk of stroke warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Community-based prevention of stroke: nutritional improvement in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Y; Horie, R

    1994-01-01

    (1) To demonstrate the importance of nutrition, especially sodium restriction and increased potassium and protein intakes, in the prevention of hypertension and stroke in a pilot study involving senior citizens. (2) To design a population-based intervention in the Shimane Prefecture of Japan concerning dietary factors such as low sodium and high potassium, protein, magnesium, calcium and dietary fibre in the prevention of stroke. The intervention study was carried out at a senior citizens' residence and included general health education along with a reduction of dietary salt intake and increases in vegetable and protein, especially from seafood. Sixty-three healthy senior citizens (average age: 74.8 +/- 7.7 years) had their daily meals modified to a low sodium/potassium ratio for four weeks without their knowledge by the use of a potassium chloride substitute for salt, soy sauce and bean paste, which contains much less sodium and more potassium. Monosodium L-glutamate monohydrate used for cooking was changed to monopotassium L-glutamate monohydrate. Blood pressure was measured with the patient in the sitting position. Daily dietary sodium and potassium intakes were assessed by flame photometry from 24-hour urine specimens. Extensive intervention programs were introduced into the Shimane Prefecture, which has a population of 750,000, through health education classes for housewives, home visits by health nurses and an educational TV program for dietary improvement. The mortality from stroke was monitored for 10 years and compared with the average in Japan. The blood pressure lowering effect of reducing the dietary sodium/potassium ratio was confirmed through a pilot intervention study at the senior citizens' residence. The mortality rates for stroke in the middle-aged population from the Shimane Prefecture during the 10 years after the introduction of dietary improvement had a steeper decline in hemorrhagic, ischemic and all strokes than the average for Japan.

  4. Blood pressure control to prevent decline in cognition after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihle-Hansen H

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hege Ihle-Hansen,1 Bente Thommessen,2 Morten W Fagerland,3 Anne R Øksengård,4 Torgeir B Wyller,5 Knut Engedal,6 Brynjar Fure7 1Department of Internal Medicine, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Bærum Hospital, Bærum, Norway; 2Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway; 3Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Research Support Services, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; 4Department of Internal medicine, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Bærum Hospital, Bærum, Norway; 5Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 6Norwegian Centre for Dementia Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 7Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway Background: Treatment of hypertension post-stroke preserves cognition through prevention of recurrent stroke, but it is not clear whether it prevents cognitive decline through other mechanisms. We aimed to describe changes in blood pressure from baseline to 1 year post-stroke and to evaluate the association between achieved blood pressure targets and cognitive function, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia.Methods: We included patients with first-ever stroke, and defined achieved blood pressure goals as systolic blood pressure (SBP in the categories ≤125 mmHg, ≤140 mmHg, and ≤160 mmHg, SBP reduction of ≥10 mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP reduction of ≥5 mmHg. The main outcome variables were cognitive assessments 1 year post stroke. Secondary outcomes were diagnoses of MCI or dementia.Results: Forty-one of 166 patients (25% reached SBP ≤125 mmHg after 1 year, 92/166 (55% reached SBP ≤140 mmHg, and 150/166 (90% reached SBP ≤160 mmHg. SBP was reduced by ≥10 mmHg in 44/150 (29% and DBP by ≥5 mmHg in 57/150 (38%. We did not find any statistically significant associations between cognitive test performances and different blood pressure goals (P=0.070–1.0. Nor was there any significant association

  5. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease through population-wide motivational strategies: insights from using smartphones in stroke prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; Mensah, George A

    2017-01-01

    The fast increasing stroke burden across all countries of the world suggests that currently used primary stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention strategies are not sufficiently effective. In this article, we overview the gaps in, and pros and cons of, population-wide and high-risk prevention strategies. We suggest that motivating and empowering people to reduce their risk of having a stroke/CVD by using increasingly used smartphone technologies would bridge the gap in the population-wide and high-risk prevention strategies and reduce stroke/CVD burden worldwide. We emphasise that for primary stroke prevention to be effective, the focus should be shifted from high-risk prevention to prevention at any level of CVD risk, with the focus on behavioural risk factors. Such a motivational population-wide strategy could open a new page in primary prevention of not only stroke/CVD but also other non-communicable disorders worldwide. PMID:28589034

  6. Update of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): Statistical analysis plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.F. Westendorp (Willeke); J.-D. Vermeij (Jan-Dirk); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); T. van der Poll (Tom); J.M. Prins (Jan); F.H. Vermeij (Frederique); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Yvo); M.C. Brouwer (Matthijs C.); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko); D. van de Beek (Diederik); P.J. Nederkoorn (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Infections occur in 30% of stroke patients and are associated with unfavorable outcomes. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers the infection rate after stroke, but the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on functional outcome in patients with stroke is unknown. The PASS

  7. Update of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): statistical analysis plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; van der Poll, Tom; Prins, Jan M.; Vermeij, Frederique H.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Infections occur in 30% of stroke patients and are associated with unfavorable outcomes. Preventive antibiotic therapy lowers the infection rate after stroke, but the effect of preventive antibiotic treatment on functional outcome in patients with stroke is unknown. The PASS is a multicenter,

  8. Statin treatment and stroke outcome in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Zivin, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Laboratory experiments suggest statins reduce stroke severity and improve outcomes. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial was a placebo-controlled, randomized trial designed to determine whether treatment with atorvastatin reduces...... or 4), moderate (modified Rankin Scale score 3 or 2), and mild (modified Rankin Scale score 1 or 0) outcome ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks and an increase in the proportion of event-free subjects randomized to atorvastatin (P

  9. Stroke prevention-surgical and interventional approaches to carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra cranial carotid artery stenosis is an important cause of stroke, which often needs treatment with carotid revascularization. To prevent stroke recurrence, carotid endarterectomy (CEA has been well-established for several decades for symptomatic high and moderate grade stenosis. Carotid stenting is a less invasive alternative to CEA and several recent trials have compared the efficacy of the 2 procedures in patients with carotid stenosis. Carotid artery stenting has emerged as a potential mode of therapy for high surgical risk patients with symptomatic high-grade stenosis. This review focuses on the current data available that will enable the clinician to decide optimal treatment strategies for patients with carotid stenosis.

  10. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F; Dippel, Diederik Wj; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J

    2018-01-22

    Stroke is the main cause of disability in high-income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce the incidence of infections and improve outcome. In the previous version of this Cochrane Review, published in 2012, we found that antibiotics did reduce the risk of infection but did not reduce the number of dependent or deceased patients. However, included studies were small and heterogeneous. In 2015, two large clinical trials were published, warranting an update of this Review. To assess the effectiveness and safety of preventive antibiotic therapy in people with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. We wished to determine whether preventive antibiotic therapy in people with acute stroke:• reduces the risk of a poor functional outcome (dependency and/or death) at follow-up;• reduces the occurrence of infections in the acute phase of stroke;• reduces the occurrence of elevated body temperature (temperature ≥ 38° C) in the acute phase of stroke;• reduces length of hospital stay; or• leads to an increased rate of serious adverse events, such as anaphylactic shock, skin rash, or colonisation with antibiotic-resistant micro-organisms. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (25 June 2017); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 5; 25 June 2017) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE Ovid (1950 to 11 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 11 May 2017). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing trials, we searched trials and research registers, scanned reference lists, and contacted trial authors, colleagues, and researchers in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of preventive antibiotic therapy versus control (placebo or open control) in people with acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Two review authors independently selected

  11. Assessing Cardiovascular Health Using Life′s Simple 7 in a Chinese Population Undergoing Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Few Chinese patients undergoing stroke prevention had optimal CVH (determined using LS7. Additionally, fewer patients undergoing secondary prevention had optimal CVH than those undergoing primary prevention. In particular, physical activity and diet status in this population require improvement.

  12. Prevention and management of stroke in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kilinç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sickle Cell Disease(SCD is one of the most common hemoglobinopathies in the world which causes stroke. The management of stroke depends on the manifestations and the age of the patient. Especially in childhood, anatomic and physiological abnormalities of CNS may be a predisposing factors. Stroke mostly affects the distal segments of the Internal Carotid Artery, but also middle and anterior segments of the cerebral arteries are involved. The most important predisposing factors are the arterial malformations, stenosis and obstructions in cranial arteries, generally involving Internal Carotid Artery, frequently Proximal Middle Cerebral or Anterior Cerebral Arteries. After infarcts at brain vessels, most frequent clinical findings are hemiparesis or hemiplegia, impaired speech, focal seizures, gait disturbances. Risk factors for predisposing stroke are prior transient ischemia, baseline Hb decrease, acute chest sydrome within previous two weeks, systolic blood pressure rises, leucocyte increases. The patient with silent stroke or transient ischemic attacks may be asymptomatic or without neurological symptoms. Neuroimaging abnormalities may be seen without significant clinical findings in children with SCD. We talk about silent stroke if there are neuroradiological abnormalities without clinical findings. Children with silent strokes are more prone to new strokes. If there is a significant stroke a ischemic stroke often present with focal neurological signs and symptoms. If patient is asymptomatic or have suspected stroke, first step may be performance of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD. Children with time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV, measured in Middle Carotid Artery or in distal internal carotid Artery abnormally elevated, defined as TAMV≥200cm/sec, have sixfold increase for stroke than those with normal TAMV≤170cm/sec. For these patients under the risk of stroke, chronic blood transfusion is recommended for prevention of primary

  13. Stroke epidemiology, prevention, and management strategies at a regional level: Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavados, Pablo M; Hennis, Anselm J M; Fernandes, Jefferson G; Medina, Marco T; Legetic, Branca; Hoppe, Arnold; Sacks, Claudio; Jadue, Liliana; Salinas, Rodrigo

    2007-04-01

    Stroke is a major health problem in Latin American and Caribbean countries. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, aetiology, and management of stroke in the region based on a systematic search of articles published in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Stroke mortality is higher than in developed countries but rates are declining. Population-based studies show variations in incidence of strokes: lower rates of ischaemic stroke and similar rates of intracranial haemorrhages, compared with other regions. A significant proportion of strokes in these populations can be attributed to a few preventable risk factors. Some countries have published national clinical guidelines, although much needs to be done in the organisation of care and rehabilitation. Even though the burden of stroke is high, there is a paucity of information for implementing evidence-based management. The Global Stroke Initiative, the WHO STEPS Stroke surveillance, and WHO-PREMISE projects provide opportunities for surveillance at institutional and community levels.

  14. Interventions for preventing falls in people after stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheyden, G.S.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Pickering, R.M.; Kunkel, D.; Lennon, S.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Ashburn, A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Falls are one of the most common medical complications after stroke with a reported incidence of 7% in the first week after stroke onset. Studies investigating falls in the later phase after stroke report an incidence of up to 73% in the first year post-stroke. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate

  15. Frequent inaccuracies in ABCD(2) scoring in non-stroke specialists' referrals to a daily Rapid Access Stroke Prevention service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bradley, David

    2013-09-15

    The \\'accuracy\\' of age, blood pressure, clinical features, duration and diabetes (ABCD(2)) scoring by non-stroke specialists referring patients to a daily Rapid Access Stroke Prevention (RASP) service is unclear, as is the accuracy of ABCD(2) scoring by trainee residents. In this prospective study, referrals were classified as \\'confirmed TIAs\\' if the stroke specialist confirmed a clinical diagnosis of possible, probable or definite TIA, and \\'non-TIAs\\' if patients had a TIA mimic or completed stroke. ABCD(2) scores from referring physicians were compared with scores by experienced stroke specialists and neurology\\/geriatric medicine residents at a daily RASP clinic; inter-observer agreement was examined. Data from 101 referrals were analysed (mean age=60.0years, 58% male). The median interval between referral and clinic assessment was 1day. Of 101 referrals, 52 (52%) were \\'non-TIAs\\': 45 (86%) of 52 were \\'TIA mimics\\' and 7 (14%) of 52 were completed strokes. There was only \\'fair\\' agreement in total ABCD(2) scoring between referring physicians and stroke specialists (κ=0.37). Agreement was \\'excellent\\' between residents and stroke specialists (κ=0.91). Twenty of 29 patients scored as \\'moderate to high risk\\' (score 4-6) by stroke specialists were scored \\'low risk\\' (score 0-3) by referring physicians. ABCD(2) scoring by referring doctors is frequently inaccurate, with a tendency to underestimate stroke risk. These findings emphasise the importance of urgent specialist assessment of suspected TIA patients, and that ABCD(2) scores by non-stroke specialists cannot be relied upon in isolation to risk-stratify patients. Inter-observer agreement in ABCD(2) scoring was \\'excellent\\' between residents and stroke specialists, indicating short-term training may improve accuracy.

  16. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 Hours after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Anne Murtha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental Middle Cerebral Artery occlusion (MCAo - 3 hour occlusion was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19-20 months. At one hour after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 hours hypothermia-treatment (32.5 °C or normothermia (37 °C. ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 hours post-occlusion, and at 24 hours post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03. Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 hours post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients.

  17. Is blood pressure control for stroke prevention the correct goal? The lost opportunity of preventing hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; Banach, Maciej; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C; Howard, Virginia J; Lackland, Daniel T; McVay, Jim; Meschia, James F; Muntner, Paul; Oparil, Suzanne; Rightmyer, Melanie; Taylor, Herman A

    2015-06-01

    Although pharmacological treatment of hypertension has important health benefits, it does not capture the benefit of maintenance of ideal health through the prevention or delay of hypertension. A total of 26 875 black and white participants aged 45+ years were assessed and followed for incident stroke events. The association was assessed between incident stroke and: (1) systolic blood pressure (SBP)categorized as normal (pressure strata, the risk of stroke increased with each additional class of required antihypertensive medication, with hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 1.52 for normotensive, HR, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.05 to 1.26 for prehypertension, and HR, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.39 for stage 1 hypertension. A successfully treated (SBP<120 mm Hg) hypertensive person on 3+ antihypertensive medication classes was at marginally higher stroke risk than a person with untreated stage 1 hypertension (HR, 2.48 versus HR=2.19; relative to those with SBP <120 on no antihypertensive medications). Maintaining the normotensive status solely through pharmacological treatment has a profound impact, as nearly half of this general population cohort were treated to guideline (SBP<140 mm Hg) but failed to return to risk levels similar to normotensive individuals. Even with successful treatment, there is a substantial potential gain by prevention or delay of hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Stroke Care 1 Medical treatment in acute and long-term secondary prevention after transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, Peter M.; Algra, Ale; Amarenco, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Without improvements in prevention, the burden will increase during the next 20 years because of the ageing population, especially in developing countries. Major advances have occurred in secondary prevention during the past three decades,

  19. Prevention of ischemic stroke in clinical practice: a role of internists and general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewada, Maciej; Członkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Stroke constitutes a substantial clinical and socio-economic burden. It is currently the third cause of death worldwide and results in mortality or disability in every third patient at the end of the first year following an acute cerebrovascular event. Although in-hospital mortality rates in stroke patients have decreased, prevention and cardiovascular risk control remain critical for improving the prognosis and reducing stroke burden worldwide. The definitions of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) have been recently modified following the findings from neuroimaging and thrombolysis research. Both stroke and TIA are recurrent and preventable disorders. Both patients with stroke and those with TIA require prompt clinical workup, risk assessment, and appropriate management because the risk of recurrence, stroke, and coronary events is significant. The 5 most common cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, smoking, abdominal obesity, diet, and lack of physical activity) are responsible for 80% of the cases. Stroke prevention involves lifestyle modification and specific treatment. Secondary prevention of ischemic stroke involves early treatment (antiplatelets and carotid interventions) and long-term management including lifestyle changes, antihypertensive therapy, antiplatelets, antithrombotic drugs in patients with atrial fibrillation, and the use of statins and other lipid-lowering drugs. Stroke patients are at risk of depression, dementia, epilepsy, and other complications that also require targeted treatment.

  20. Fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deren; Liu, Bian; Tao, Wendan; Hao, Zilong; Liu, Ming

    2015-10-25

    Fibrates are a class of drugs characterised by mainly lowering high triglyceride, raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and lowering the small dense fraction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Their efficacy for secondary prevention of serious vascular events is unclear, and to date no systematic review focusing on secondary prevention has been undertaken. To assess the efficacy and safety of fibrates for the prevention of serious vascular events in people with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease and stroke. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 9, 2014) on the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to October week 1 2014), EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to 2014 week 41), the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM) (1978 to 2014), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 2014), Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (VIP) (1989 to 2014). We also searched other resources, such as ongoing trials registers and databases of conference abstracts, to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which a fibrate (for example gemfibrozil, fenofibrate) was compared with placebo or no treatment. We excluded RCTs with only laboratory outcomes. We also excluded trials comparing two different fibrates without a placebo or no-treatment control. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias, and extracted the data. We contacted authors of trials for missing data. We included 13 trials involving a total of 16,112 participants. Eleven trials recruited participants with history of coronary heart disease, two trials recruited participants with history of stroke, and one trial recruited participants with a mix of people with CVD. We judged overall risk of bias to be moderate. The meta-analysis (including all fibrate trials) showed evidence for a protective

  1. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Keitaro; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-09-01

    The availability of 4 non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, has changed the landscape of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review article provides an overview of the 4 phase III studies that have compared these NOACs, examining major outcomes of efficacy and safety. A range of practical questions relating to the NOACs have emerged, including topics such as patient selection, treating patients with renal impairment, treating elderly patients, and combining anticoagulant therapy with antiplatelet drugs. We also address the interaction of various patient characteristics with the treatments and suggest the features can assist the physician in the choice of a particular NOAC for a particular patient(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stroke care challenges in rural India: Awareness of causes, preventive measures and treatment options of stroke among the rural communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaga Lakshmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of stroke in the remote rural areas in India faces major challenges because of lack of awareness. Stroke care services can be optimally implemented only if the communities have an understanding of the disease. Method: A population based, cross sectional survey of an adult general population sample between the ages of 31-60 years in a rural block in Tamil Nadu, India was carried out to study their knowledge, attitude, beliefs about cause, signs and symptoms, preventive measures and treatment options of stroke. Results: Of the 174 subjects studied only 69% were aware of the term stroke and 63% were able to list the symptoms. Only a little more than half the participants (58% were aware that diabetes, smoking and hypertension are risk factors for stroke. None of the participants were aware of the endovascular thrombolysis injection for better recovery from stroke. About quarter (23% of the participants did not think that the stroke is an emergency condition and they need to take the patient urgently to the hospital. Only 56% of the participants had checked their blood pressure and 49% for diabetes. A history of having either hypertension or diabetes and stroke in the family was the only factor that was significantly associated with better awareness (p=<0.001 independent of other potential facilitating factors including age, occupation, education and gender. Conclusion: There is a need to educate the rural communities about the risk factors, how to recognize the onset, the preventive measures and optimum care of stroke to reduce the burden.

  3. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Renee H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P. L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlof, Bjorn; de Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood

  4. Could Stroke Trigger Be Prevented by Healthy Family Relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Annie; Gaulin, Philippe; Tellier, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Although major stroke risk factors are well documented, little is known about which life circumstances are perceived to be related to the actual triggering of a first stroke. The purpose was to explore self-perceived spontaneously related life circumstances surrounding the trigger of a first stroke. A qualitative design with a phenomenological…

  5. Preventing Strokes (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Strokes are the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., and they don’t just occur in older adults. Anyone can have a stroke at any age. In this podcast, Dr. Mary George discusses ways to decrease your chances of having a stroke.

  6. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pres...

  7. A quasi-experimental study on a community-based stroke prevention programme for clients with minor stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Janet W H; Yip, Vera Y B; Ko, Stanley K K; Gun, Amy P C; Lee, Judy S H

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a community-based stroke prevention programme in (1) improving knowledge about stroke; (2) improving self-health-monitoring practice; (3) maintaining behavioural changes when adopting a healthy lifestyle for stroke prevention. People with minor stroke (or transient ischaemic attack) tend to under-estimate the long-term impact of this on their health. The challenge for nurses is to prevent subsequent strokes by finding ways to promote and sustain appropriate behaviours. Educational intervention is of paramount importance in equipping those at risk with relevant knowledge and self-care strategies for secondary stroke prevention. This study adopted a quasi-experimental design. One hundred and ninety subjects were recruited, of whom 147 (77 in the intervention group and 70 in the control group) completed the study. Data were obtained at three time points: baseline (T0); one week after (T1) and three months after (T2) the intervention. The intervention programme consisted of eight weekly two-hour sessions, with the aims of improving the participants' awareness of their own health signals and of actively involving them in self-care management of their own health for secondary stroke prevention. Significant positive changes were found among participants of the intervention group in the knowledge on stroke warning signs (P lifestyle modification of dietary habits (reduction in salted food intake, P = 0.004). No significant improvement was found in walking exercise participation in the intervention group, yet a significant decrease was detected among the control group. This study found a three-month-sustained effect of positive changes in knowledge and skill from participants who undertook a nurse-led community-based stroke prevention programme. Effective educational intervention by professional nurses helped clients integrate their learned knowledge into their real-life practice. This empowering, that is, the

  8. The Neuropsychology of Acute Stroke : Characterisation and Prognostic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, G.M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a longitudinal study was performed in a large cohort of patients with a first symptomatic stroke who had no neurological, psychiatric, and/or cognitive history prior to the stroke. The patient cohort was examined in a very early phase (mean interval eight days post-stroke) with a

  9. Diagnosis, management and prevention of ischemic stroke for non-neurologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is the third common cause of disability and death. Diagnosis of stroke is based on its clinical manifestations and/or observation of infarct in the neuroimaging. Standard battery of diagnostic investigations and classification criteria is required for detection of stroke etiology. Materials and Method: This review article deals with the diagnosis and management of brain infarction particularly in our country and is provided for non-neurologists. Using online scientific search engines and in some parts referring to laboratory archives constituted base of this review article.Results: Acute stroke management is almost similar in its various etiologies. Neuroprotective drugs have little value in acute stroke management. At present time, a few Iranian medical centers have infrastructure of thrombolysis therapy. Prevention of stroke is based on the detection and control of its risk factors. Aspirin, 80 mg per day is the most common drug for stroke prevention. Co-administration of aspirin 80 mg/d and Dipyridamole 200-400 mg/d increases the preventive effects of aspirin. Clopidogrel 75 mg/d is the stroke preventive drug of choice in patients with peptic ulcer and coronary artery disease. Co-administration of aspirin and clopidogrel is more effective in stroke prevention but has more hemorrhagic complications. Using warfarin for stroke prevention is suggested only in patients who have facilities for repetitive coagulation tests. Carotid endarterectomy is indicated in symptomatic patients with more than 70% stenosis of extracranial internal carotid artery, if performed only by vascular surgeons experienced in carotid surgery.Conclusion: Many stroke patients are managed by general practitioners and non-neurologists, e.g. internists, cardiologists and neurosurgeons. This review article provides continuous medical education according to Iranian medical curriculum

  10. Results of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial by stroke subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Benavente, Oscar; Goldstein, Larry B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The SPARCL trial showed that atorvastatin 80 mg/d reduces the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We tested the hypothesis that the benefit of treatment varies according to index event stroke...... subtype. METHODS: Subjects with stroke or TIA without known coronary heart disease were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/d or placebo. The SPARCL primary end point was fatal or nonfatal stroke. Secondary end points included major cardiovascular events (MCVE; stroke plus major coronary events). Cox...... regression models testing for an interaction with treatment assignment were used to explore potential differences in efficacy based on stroke subtype. RESULTS: For subjects randomized to atorvastatin versus placebo, a primary end point occurred in 13.1% versus 18.6% of those classified as having large vessel...

  11. SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE IN PATIENTS WITH NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: THE CLINICIANS’ VIEWPOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozdova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is one of the main risk factor of ischemic stroke. Current problems of the management of patients with stroke due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and secondary stroke prevention in these patients are considered. Data of own author’s observation for patients of this type during 6 months after discharge from the hospital are presented. The problems which patients faced with are analyzed. Comparative assessment of warfarin and dabigatran therapies is given.

  12. Preventing Strokes (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-05

    Strokes are the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., and they don’t just occur in older adults. Anyone can have a stroke at any age. In this podcast, Dr. Mary George discusses ways to decrease your chances of having a stroke.  Created: 6/5/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 6/5/2014.

  13. Microglial Cells Prevent Hemorrhage in Neonatal Focal Arterial Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Derugin, Nikita; Blanchard, Elodie; Simon, Franziska; Leib, Stephen L.; Vexler, Zinaida S.

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and long-term neurological and cognitive deficits. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain damage depend on brain maturation at the time of stroke. To understand whether microglial cells limit injury after neonatal stroke by preserving neurovascular integrity, we subjected postnatal day 7 (P7) rats depleted of microglial cells, rats with inhibited microglial TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling, and corresponding controls, to transient middle cerebral arter...

  14. New developments in secondary stroke prevention: impact of the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT) on clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsep, Helmi L

    2007-01-01

    Secondary stroke prevention is an important goal of poststroke patient treatment. Various pharmacologic approaches have been advocated, but the relative efficacy and safety of these regimens has remained the subject of much debate. Recently released data from the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT) indicated that combination therapy with aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin monotherapy, and probably more effective than anticoagulants, for the prevention of cerebrovascular events after a stroke or transient ischemic attack. When viewed in light of results of earlier trials, these findings confirmed that combination aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole therapy improved outcomes in these patients and is a recommended option for poststroke patient treatment.

  15. Preventing Strokes (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-06-05

    Strokes are the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., and they don’t just occur in older adults. This podcast discusses ways to lessen your chances of having a stroke.  Created: 6/5/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 6/5/2014.

  16. Impact of Secondary Prevention on Mortality after a First Ischemic Stroke in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Maria E; Marsh, Wallace; Felici-Giovanini, Marcos E; Rodríguez-Benitez, Rosa J; Zevallos, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the prescription of secondary prevention therapies on mortality in Puerto Rican patients hospitalized with a first ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective secondary data analysis of the 2007 and 2009 Puerto Rico Stroke Registry electronic database. Information was obtained from the medical charts of patients discharged with ICD-9 codes 434 and 436 from 20 hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Descriptive analyses were conducted for demographics and comorbidities. Chi2 statistics compared the proportion of patients prescribed secondary prevention therapy and the proportion of patients not prescribed secondary prevention therapy. Lastly, survival rates were calculated from 2007 up to and including December 2010. The mean age of the 3,965 patients was 70 (±14) years. Secondary prevention therapy was prescribed to only 1% of the patients. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (85%), diabetes (52%), and hyperlipidemia (25%). The case fatality rate for patients prescribed secondary prevention therapy was 16%, compared to 26% for patients not prescribed secondary prevention therapy (p<0.01). The mean survival for stroke patients prescribed secondary preventions was 450 days (95% CI;182−718), compared to 266 days (95% CI; 244−287) for those not prescribed secondary prevention therapy (p = 0.175). A low percentage of patients with a first ischemic stroke were prescribed secondary prevention therapy. While not statistically significant, survival analysis suggests that secondary prevention therapy decreased mortality in patients with a stroke.

  17. Help seeking behavior and onset-to-alarm time in patients with acute stroke: sub-study of the preventive antibiotics in stroke study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zock, E; Kerkhoff, H; Kleyweg, R P; van Bavel-Ta, T B V; Scott, S; Kruyt, N D; Nederkoorn, P J; van de Beek, D

    2016-11-25

    Patients with acute stroke often do not seek immediate medical help, which is assumed to be driven by lack of knowledge of stroke symptoms. We explored the process of help seeking behavior in patients with acute stroke, evaluating knowledge about stroke symptoms, socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and onset-to-alarm time (OAT). In a sub-study of the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), 161 acute stroke patients were prospectively included in 3 Dutch hospitals. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to assess knowledge, recognition and interpretation of stroke symptoms. With in-depth interviews, response actions and reasons were explored. OAT was recorded and associations with socio-demographic, clinical parameters were assessed. Knowledge about stroke symptoms does not always result in correct recognition of own stroke symptoms, neither into correct interpretation of the situation and subsequent action. In our study population of 161 patients with acute stroke, median OAT was 30 min (interquartile range [IQR] 10-150 min). Recognition of one-sided weakness and/or sensory loss (p = 0.046) and adequate interpretation of the stroke situation (p = 0.003), stroke at daytime (p = 0.002), severe stroke (p = 0.003), calling the emergency telephone number (p = 0.004), and transport by ambulance (p = 0.040) were associated with shorter OAT. Help seeking behavior after acute stroke is a complex process. A shorter OAT after stroke is associated with correct recognition of one-sided weakness and/or sensory loss, adequate interpretation of the stroke situation by the patient and stroke characteristics and logistics of stroke care, but not by knowledge of stroke symptoms.

  18. Old and new oral anticoagulants for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Sacquegna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, used in oral anticoagulation therapy currently represent the standard drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, with a relative risk reduction close to 70%. Newer oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (i.e., dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e., apixaban and rivaroxaban have been recently compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for stroke prevention in AF. The new oral anticoagulants showed, compared with warfarin, no statistically significant difference in the rate of stroke or systemic embolism in secondary prevention (patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke subgroups. With regard to safety, the risk of intracranial bleeding was reduced with new anticoagulants compared with warfarin. Indirect treatment comparisons of clinical trials on secondary prevention cohorts showed no significant difference in efficacy among apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran; but dabigatran 110 mg was associated with less intracranial bleedings than rivaroxaban.

  19. Neuroserpin polymorphisms and stroke risk in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Barney J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroserpin, primarily localized to CNS neurons, inhibits the adverse effects of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA on the neurovascular unit and has neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke. We sought to evaluate the association of neuroserpin polymorphisms with risk for ischemic stroke among young women. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-matched control subjects (43.1% African-American. Neuroserpin single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs chosen through HapMap were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke. Results Of the five SNPs analyzed, the A allele (frequency; Caucasian = 0.56, African-American = 0.42 of SNP rs6797312 located in intron 1 was associated with stroke in an age-adjusted dominant model (AA and AT vs. TT among Caucasians (OR = 2.05, p = 0.023 but not African-Americans (OR = 0.71, p = 0.387. Models adjusting for other risk factors strengthened the association. Race-specific haplotype analyses, inclusive of SNP rs6797312, again demonstrated significant associations with stroke among Caucasians only. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that neuroserpin is associated with early-onset ischemic stroke among Caucasian women.

  20. Outcome of Secondary Stroke Prevention in Patients Taking Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Taizen; Moroi, Junta; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2018-05-01

    Since non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were released for clinical use, many studies have investigated its effectiveness in stroke prevention. In this study, to determine whether or not there is a difference in outcome in secondary stroke prevention between warfarin and NOACs, patients with embolic stroke with newly prescribed anticoagulants were prospectively analyzed. Patients with acute ischemic stroke, who newly started anticoagulant therapy, were consecutively asked to participate in this study. Enrolled patients (76.3 ± 11.0 years old) were classified into warfarin (n = 48), dabigatran (n = 73), rivaroxaban (n = 49), and apixaban (n = 65). The outcome in 1 year was prospectively investigated at outpatient clinic or telephone interview. Recurrence of stroke and death was considered as the critical incidence. The prevalence of risk factors was not different among all medicines. Patients with dabigatran showed significantly younger onset age (P incident rates were 7.1%, 15.3%, 19.0%, and 29.7% for dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, and warfarin, respectively. Dabigatran showed relatively better outcome compared with warfarin (P = .069) and rivaroxaban (P = .055). All patients on NOACs presented lower cumulative stroke recurrence compared with warfarin. Even in the situation of secondary stroke prevention, noninferiority of NOACs to warfarin might be demonstrated. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antihypertensive treatment and stroke prevention: are angiotensin receptor blockers superior to other antihypertensive agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2009-06-01

    Stroke remains a common vascular event with high mortality and morbidity. After heart disease, stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide in adult persons. Silent or subclinical stroke is likely to occur with even greater frequency than clinical stroke and increases the risk of subsequent cerebrovascular events. Hypertension is by far the single most important controllable risk factor for stroke. The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and stroke mortality is strong, linear, and continuous in subjects with levels of BP higher than 115/75 mm Hg. Blood pressure reduction by antihypertensive treatment is clearly efficacious in the prevention of stroke (both primary and secondary). Although meta-analyses suggest that BP reduction, per se, is the most important determinant for stroke risk reduction, the question is if specific classes of antihypertensive drugs offer special protection against stroke is still controversial. Some studies have suggested that angiotensin receptors blockers (ARBs) appear to offer additional protection against stroke. This has been hypothesized in studies in hypertensives, such as LIFE and SCOPE, and especially in the only comparative trial focused on secondary stroke prevention. In the MOSES trial, the comparison of eprosartan versus nitrendipine in patients with a previous stroke resulted, despite a similar BP reduction, in a significant reduction in the primary composite endpoint of total mortality plus cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, including recurrent events. These results may suggest a blood pressure-independent effect of ARBs, which can be mediated through several mechanisms, including their ability to counteract other markers of target organ damage, but also through a direct neuroprotective effect.

  2. Regulation of Hypertension for Secondary Prevention of Stroke: The Possible 'Bridging Function' of Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haizhen; Han, Yuhui; Du, Yuzheng; Shi, Xuemin; Huang, Huiyuan; Yu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Xiaochan; Hu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Shiyuan

    2018-01-01

    Worldwide, stroke is the leading cause of mortality and disability, with hypertension being an independent risk factor for a secondary stroke. Acupuncture for the treatment of hypertension gains more attention in alternative and complementary medicine, but the results are inconsistent. Few studies regarding the secondary prevention of stroke by managing hypertension with acupuncture have been carried out as there are some problems regarding the antihypertensive drug status in the secondary prevention of stroke. Still, the potential of acupuncture in regulating the blood pressure for secondary stroke prevention deserves our focus. This review is based on papers recorded in the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases, from their inception until March 28, 2017, and retrieved with the following search terms: hypertension and acupuncture, limited in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), stress-induced (or cold-induced) hypertensive or pre-hypertensive models. We find that, in these hypertensive animals, acupuncture could mainly influence factors related to the nervous system, oxidative stress, the endocrine system, cardiovascular function, and hemorheology, which are closely associated with the stroke outcome. This trend may give us a hint that acupuncture might well participate in the secondary prevention of stroke through these pathways when used in the management of hypertension. © 2018 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  3. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.

  4. High dietary fiber intake prevents stroke at a population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Caffi, Sandro; Boschetti, Giovanni; Grasselli, Carla; Saugo, Mario; Giordano, Nunzia; Rapisarda, Valentina; Spinella, Paolo; Palatini, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    This research was aimed at clarifying whether high dietary fiber intake has an impact on incidence and risk of stroke at a population level. In 1647 unselected subjects, dietary fiber intake (DFI) was detected in a 12-year population-based study, using other dietary variables, anagraphics, biometrics, blood pressure, heart rate, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, uricaemia, fibrinogenaemia, erytrosedimentation rate, diabetes, insulin resistance, smoking, pulmonary disease and left ventricular hypertrophy as covariables. In adjusted Cox models, high DFI reduced the risk of stroke. In analysis based on quintiles of fiber intake adjusted for confounders, HR for incidence of stroke was lower when the daily intake of soluble fiber was >25 g or that of insoluble fiber was >47 g. In multivariate analyses, using these values as cut-off of DFI, the risk of stroke was lower in those intaking more that the cut-off of soluble (HR 0.31, 0.17-0.55) or insoluble (HR 0.35, 0.19-0.63) fiber. Incidence of stroke was also lower (-50%, p < 0.003 and -46%, p < 0.01, respectively). Higher dietary DFI is inversely and independently associated to incidence and risk of stroke in general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Carotenoids as potential antioxidant agents in stroke prevention: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Bahonar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases are among the most common causes of death worldwide. Prevention of modifiable risk factors is a cost-effective approach to decrease the risk of stroke. Oxidative stress is regarded as the major flexible operative agent in ischemic brain damage. This review presents recent scientific advances in understanding the role of carotenoids as antioxidants in lowering stroke risk based on observational studies. We searched Medline using the following terms: (Carotenoids [MeSH] OR Carotenes [tiab] OR Carotene [tiab] OR “lycopene [Supplementary Concept]” [MeSH] OR lycopene [tiab] OR beta-Carotene [tiab] AND (stroke [MeSH] OR stroke [tiab] OR “Cerebrovascular Accident” [tiab] OR “Cerebrovascular Apoplexy” [tiab] OR “Brain Vascular Accident” [tiab] OR “Cerebrovascular Stroke” [tiab] AND (“oxidative stress” [MeSH] OR “oxidative stress”[tiab]. This search considered papers that had been published between 2000 and 2017. Recent studies indicated that high dietary intake of six main carotenoids (i.e., lycopene, <- and ®-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and astaxanthin was associated with reduced risk of stroke and other cardiovascular outcomes. However, the main mechanism of the action of these nutrients was not identified, and multiple mechanisms except antioxidant activity were suggested to be involved in the observed beneficial effects. The dietary intake of six major carotenoids should be promoted as this may have a substantial positive effect on stroke prevention and stroke mortality reduction.

  6. Risk of stroke and cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in patients with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Alfred; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    To perform a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial, which tested the effect of treatment with atorvastatin in reducing stroke in subjects with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, to explore the effects of treatment...

  7. Status and costs of primary prevention for ischemic stroke in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J J; He, G Q; Gong, S Y; He, L

    2013-10-01

    Despite the benefits in reducing the risk of stroke, primary prevention is not well translated into practice. We sought to evaluate patient compliance with guidelines and the cost of primary stroke prevention in southwest China. We consecutively enrolled 305 patients with headaches and/or dizziness who were at high risk of stroke from our hospital. We retrospectively obtained their information, including the extent of their knowledge of stroke risk factors, adherence to guidelines, medications taken, and costs of primary prevention for stroke within the past year. Only 45.9% of patients had any knowledge of primary prevention, and only 17.0% had completely followed guidelines. Moreover, 79.0% of the patients were using medications, but only 39.3% took their medication as recommended. In patients who took medication, 89.6% were prescribed by physicians. The annual costs of primary prevention were estimated to be US$517.8 per capita, which included direct medical costs (US$435.4), direct non-medical costs (US$18.1), and indirect costs (US$64.3). Costs in the hypertension group were less than those reported by a similar international study. Although our population sample may not be representative of the population at high risk of stroke in China, it is appropriate for the evaluation of our primary prevention system. Primary prevention for stroke in southwest China is very challenging, with few medical resource investments. There is a current urgency to improve patient knowledge of primary prevention, which would bridge the gaps between guidelines and practice and increase medical resource investments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Why invest in a national public health program for stroke? An example using Australian data to estimate the potential benefits and cost implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Carter, Robert C; Thrift, Amanda G; Dewey, Helen M

    2007-10-01

    Stroke is the world's second leading cause of death in people aged over 60 years. Approximately 50,000 strokes occur annually in Australia with numbers predicted to increase by about one third over 10-years. Our objectives were to assess the economic implications of a public health program for stroke by: (1) predicting what potential health-gains and cost-offsets could be achieved; and (2) determining the net level of annual investment that would offer value-for-money. Lifetime costs and outcomes were calculated for additional cases that would benefit if 'current practice' was feasibly improved, estimated for one indicative year using: (i) local epidemiological data, coverage rates and costs; and (ii) pooled effect sizes from systematic reviews. blood pressure lowering; warfarin for atrial fibrillation; increased access to stroke units; intravenous thrombolysis and aspirin for ischemic events; and carotid endarterectomy. Value-for-money threshold: AUD$30,000/DALY recovered. Improved, prevention and management could prevent about 27,000 (38%) strokes in 2015. In present terms (2004), about 85,000 DALYs and AUD$1.06 billion in lifetime cost-offsets could be recovered. The net level of annual warranted investment was AUD$3.63 billion. Primary prevention, in particular blood pressure lowering, was most effective. A public health program for stroke is warranted.

  9. A combined role of calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers in stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Guang Wang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ji-Guang WangCentre for Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The importance of lowering blood pressure for reducing the risk of stroke is well established. However, not all the benefits of antihypertensive treatments in stroke can be accounted for by reductions in BP and there may be differences between antihypertensive classes as to which provides optimal protection. Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, such as amlodipine, and angiotensin receptor blockers, such as valsartan, represent the two antihypertensive drug classes with the strongest supportive data for the prevention of stroke. Therefore, when combination therapy is required, a combination of these two antihypertensive classes represents a logical approach.Keywords: stroke, angiotensin, calcium channel, cerebrovascular, hypertension, blood pressure

  10. Cost-benefit analysis of the polypill in the primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Nicholas J; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Morris, Joan K; Taylor, David; Oppenheimer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is a public health priority. To assess the costs and benefits of a Polypill Prevention Programme using a daily 4-component polypill from age 50 in the UK, we determined the life years gained without a first myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke, together with the total service cost (or saving) and the net cost (or saving) per year of life gained without a first MI or stroke. This was estimated on the basis of a 50 % uptake and a previously published 83 % treatment adherence. The total years of life gained without a first MI or stroke in a mature programme is 990,000 each year in the UK. If the cost of the Polypill Prevention Programme were £1 per person per day, the total cost would be £4.76 bn and, given the savings (at 2014 prices) of £2.65 bn arising from the disease prevented, there would be a net cost of £2.11 bn representing a net cost per year of life gained without a first MI or stroke of £2120. The results are robust to sensitivity analyses. A national Polypill Prevention Programme would have a substantial effect in preventing MIs and strokes and be cost-effective.

  11. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    contains patient level-data from randomized trials of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We used Cox regression models with age as a continuous variable that controlled for sex, year of randomization, and history of cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and congestive heart failure......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke risk increases with age in patients who have nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. It is uncertain whether the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies in atrial fibrillation changes as patients age. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age...... on the relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...

  12. Carotid Artery Stenting Successfully Prevents Progressive Stroke Due to Mobile Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Oomura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of progressive ischemic stroke due to a mobile plaque, in which carotid artery stenting successfully prevented further infarctions. A 78-year-old man developed acute multiple infarcts in the right hemisphere, and a duplex ultrasound showed a mobile plaque involving the bifurcation of the left common carotid artery. Maximal medical therapy failed to prevent further infarcts, and the number of infarcts increased with his neurological deterioration. Our present case suggests that the deployment of a closed-cell stent is effective to prevent the progression of the ischemic stroke due to the mobile plaque.

  13. Utility of electronic patient records in primary care for stroke secondary prevention trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashworth Mark

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to inform the design of a pragmatic trial of stroke prevention in primary care by evaluating data recorded in electronic patient records (EPRs as potential outcome measures. The study also evaluated achievement of recommended standards of care; variation between family practices; and changes in risk factor values from before to after stroke. Methods Data from the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD were analysed for 22,730 participants with an index first stroke between 2003 and 2006 from 414 family practices. For each subject, the EPR was evaluated for the 12 months before and after stroke. Measures relevant to stroke secondary prevention were analysed including blood pressure (BP, cholesterol, smoking, alcohol use, body mass index (BMI, atrial fibrillation, utilisation of antihypertensive, antiplatelet and cholesterol lowering drugs. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were estimated by family practice. Random effects models were fitted to evaluate changes in risk factor values over time. Results In the 12 months following stroke, BP was recorded for 90%, cholesterol for 70% and body mass index (BMI for 47%. ICCs by family practice ranged from 0.02 for BP and BMI to 0.05 for LDL and HDL cholesterol. For subjects with records available both before and after stroke, the mean reductions from before to after stroke were: mean systolic BP, 6.02 mm Hg; diastolic BP, 2.78 mm Hg; total cholesterol, 0.60 mmol/l; BMI, 0.34 Kg/m2. There was an absolute reduction in smokers of 5% and heavy drinkers of 4%. The proportion of stroke patients within the recommended guidelines varied from less than a third (29% for systolic BP, just over half for BMI (54%, and over 90% (92% on alcohol consumption. Conclusions Electronic patient records have potential for evaluation of outcomes in pragmatic trials of stroke secondary prevention. Stroke prevention interventions in primary care remain suboptimal but important

  14. 2017 consensus of the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society on stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern-En Chiang, MD, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia, causing a 2-fold increase in mortality and a 5-fold increase in stroke. The Asian population is rapidly aging, and in 2050, the estimated population with AF will reach 72 million, of whom 2.9 million may suffer from AF-associated stroke. Therefore, stroke prevention in AF is an urgent issue in Asia. Many innovative advances in the management of AF-associated stroke have emerged recently, including new scoring systems for predicting stroke and bleeding risks, the development of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs, knowledge of their special benefits in Asians, and new techniques. The Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS aimed to update the available information, and appointed the Practice Guideline sub-committee to write a consensus statement regarding stroke prevention in AF. The Practice Guidelines sub-committee members comprehensively reviewed updated information on stroke prevention in AF, emphasizing data on NOACs from the Asia Pacific region, and summarized them in this 2017 Consensus of the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society on Stroke Prevention in AF. This consensus includes details of the updated recommendations, along with their background and rationale, focusing on data from the Asia Pacific region. We hope this consensus can be a practical tool for cardiologists, neurologists, geriatricians, and general practitioners in this region. We fully realize that there are gaps, unaddressed questions, and many areas of uncertainty and debate in the current knowledge of AF, and the physician׳s decision remains the most important factor in the management of AF.

  15. Evidence-based evaluation of the primary prevention of stroke in migraineurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the evidence of migraine increasing the risk of stroke, so as to provide evidence-based foundation for primary prevention of stroke in patients with migraine.  Methods Taking migraine or migraine with aura, prevention and control, ischemia, hemorrhagic stroke, treatment or therapy as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed and ScienceDirect, assisted by manual searching, in order to collect relevant literatures including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, Meta-analysis, randomized controlled trials, clinical controlled trials, retrospective case analysis, case-observation studies and reviews. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-four related articles were finally selected, including 5 clinical guidelines, 2 systematic reviews, 4 Meta-analyses, 2 randomized controlled trials, 10 case-observation studies and 1 review. Among them 20 were of high quality, while 4 were of low quality. The results were as follows: 1 migraine, particularly migraine with aura, significantly increased the risk of ischemic stroke, and the risk of women was higher than men. Smoking and oral contraceptives further increased the risk of stroke. 2 The risk of hemorrhagic stroke in migraine with aura patients was higher than that in general population. Migraine without aura did not appear to increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke, and migraine was an independent risk factor for aneurysm rupture. 3 Frequency of migraine attacks, especially migraine with aura, and risk of ischemic stroke was positively correlated. 4 Patent foramen ovale (PFO was more common in young patients with cryptogenic stroke and migraineurs. However, closure of PFO was not indicated for preventing stroke in migraineurs. 5 Triptans, which was used to treat acute migraine, with a vasoconstrictor effect, may increase the risk of stroke, therefore prophylactic treatment of migraine was very important.  Conclusions Smoking

  16. Weight reduction for primary prevention of stroke in adults with overweight or obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curioni, C; André, C; Veras, R

    2006-10-18

    Obesity is seen as a worldwide chronic disease with high prevalence that has been associated with increased morbidity from many conditions including stroke, which is the third leading cause of death in developed countries and a leading cause of severe long-term disability. The causal association between overweight or obesity and stroke is unclear and there is no definite study clarifying the role of obesity treatment in the prevention of a first stroke (primary prevention). Given the prevalence of stroke and the enormous health and economic cost of the disease, it is important to establish the possible impact of weight reduction per se on stroke incidence. To assess the effects of weight reduction in people with overweight or obesity on stroke incidence. MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, LILACS, databases of ongoing trials and reference lists were used to identify relevant trials. The last search was conducted in April 2006. Randomised controlled trials comparing any intervention for weight reduction (single or combined) with placebo or no intervention in overweight or obese people. No trials were found in the literature for inclusion in this review. There are currently no results to be reported. Obesity seems to be associated with an increased risk of stroke and it has been suggested that weight loss may lead to a reduction of stroke occurrence. However, this hypothesis is not based on strong scientific evidence resulting from randomised controlled clinical trials. This systematic review identified the urgent need for well-designed, adequately-powered, multi centre randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of weight reduction in persons with overweight or obesity on stroke occurrence.

  17. Cervical artery dissection: early recognition and stroke prevention [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Rhonda; Kim, Jeremy

    2016-07-22

    Cervical artery dissections involve the carotid or vertebral arteries. Although the overall incidence is low, they remain a common cause of stroke in children, young adults, and trauma patients. Symptoms such as headache, neck pain, and dizziness are commonly seen in the emergency department, but may not be apparent in the obtunded trauma patient. A missed diagnosis of cervical artery dissection can result in devastating neurological sequelae, so emergency clinicians must act quickly to recognize this event and begin treatment as soon as possible while neurological consultation is obtained. This issue reviews the evidence in applying advanced screening criteria and choosing imaging and antithrombotic treatment strategies for patients with cervical artery dissections to reduce the occurrence of ischemic stroke. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  18. The Changing Landscape for Stroke Prevention in AF

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, Menno V.; Rothman, Kenneth J.; Paquette, Miney; Teutsch, Christine; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dubner, Sergio J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Ma, Chang Sheng; Zint, Kristina; Elsaesser, Amelie; Bartels, Dorothee B.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Abban, Dzifa; Abdul, Nasser; Abelson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GLORIA-AF (Global Registry on Long-Term Oral Antithrombotic Treatment in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation) is a prospective, global registry program describing antithrombotic treatment patterns in patients with newly diagnosed nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke. Phase 2 began when dabigatran, the first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC), became available. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to describe phase 2 baseline data and compare these with the p...

  19. Microglial Cells Prevent Hemorrhage in Neonatal Focal Arterial Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, David; Faustino, Joel; Klibanov, Alexander L; Derugin, Nikita; Blanchard, Elodie; Simon, Franziska; Leib, Stephen L; Vexler, Zinaida S

    2016-03-09

    Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and long-term neurological and cognitive deficits. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain damage depend on brain maturation at the time of stroke. To understand whether microglial cells limit injury after neonatal stroke by preserving neurovascular integrity, we subjected postnatal day 7 (P7) rats depleted of microglial cells, rats with inhibited microglial TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling, and corresponding controls, to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Microglial depletion by intracerebral injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate at P5 significantly reduced vessel coverage and triggered hemorrhages in injured regions 24 h after tMCAO. Lack of microglia did not alter expression or intracellular redistribution of several tight junction proteins, did not affect degradation of collagen IV induced by the tMCAO, but altered cell types producing TGFβ1 and the phosphorylation and intracellular distribution of SMAD2/3. Selective inhibition of TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling in microglia via intracerebral liposome-encapsulated SB-431542 delivery triggered hemorrhages after tMCAO, demonstrating that TGFβ1/TGFbr2/ALK5 signaling in microglia protects from hemorrhages. Consistent with observations in neonatal rats, depletion of microglia before tMCAO in P9 Cx3cr1(GFP/+)/Ccr2(RFP/+) mice exacerbated injury and induced hemorrhages at 24 h. The effects were independent of infiltration of Ccr2(RFP/+) monocytes into injured regions. Cumulatively, in two species, we show that microglial cells protect neonatal brain from hemorrhage after acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362881-13$15.00/0.

  20. Beyond Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Exploring Further Unmet Needs with Rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C M; Hankey, G J; Nafee, T; Welsh, R C

    2018-03-22

    With improved life expectancy and the aging population, the global burden of atrial fibrillation (AF) continues to increase, and with AF comes an estimated fivefold increased risk of ischaemic stroke. Prophylactic anticoagulant therapy is more effective in reducing the risk of ischaemic stroke in AF patients than acetylsalicylic acid or dual-antiplatelet therapy combining ASA with clopidogrel. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants are the standard of care for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular AF. The optimal anticoagulant strategy to prevent thromboembolism in AF patients who are undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention and stenting, those who have undergone successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement and those with embolic stroke of undetermined source are areas of ongoing research. This article provides an update on three randomized controlled trials of rivaroxaban, a direct, oral factor Xa inhibitor, that are complete or are ongoing, in these unmet areas of stroke prevention: oPen-label, randomized, controlled, multicentre study explorIng twO treatmeNt stratEgiEs of Rivaroxaban and a dose-adjusted oral vitamin K antagonist treatment strategy in patients with Atrial Fibrillation who undergo Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PIONEER AF-PCI) trial; the New Approach riVaroxaban Inhibition of factor Xa in a Global trial vs Aspirin to prevenT Embolism in Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source (NAVIGATE ESUS) trial and the Global study comparing a rivAroxaban-based antithrombotic strategy to an antipLatelet-based strategy after transcatheter aortIc vaLve rEplacement to Optimize clinical outcomes (GALILEO) trial. The data from these studies are anticipated to help address continuing challenges for a range of patients at risk of stroke. Schattauer.

  1. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary stroke prevention and hypertension treatment: which is the first-line strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenni, Roberta; Jabre, Joe F; Casiglia, Edoardo; Mazza, Alberto

    2011-07-05

    Hypertension (HT) is considered the main classic vascular risk factor for stroke and the importance of lowering blood pressure (BP) is well established. However, not all the benefit of antihypertensive treatment is due to BP reduction per se, as the effect of reducing the risk of stroke differs among classes of antihypertensive agents. Extensive evidences support that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB), dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCB) and thiazide diuretics each reduced risk of stroke compared with placebo or no treatment. Therefore, when combination therapy is required, a combination of these antihypertensive classes represents a logical approach. Despite the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy a large proportion of the population, still has undiagnosed or inadequately treated HT, and remain at high risk of stroke. In primary stroke prevention current guidelines recommend a systolic/diastolic BP goal of market of the fixed-dose combination (FDC) of ACEI or ARB and CCB should provide a better control of BP. However to confirm the efficacy of the FDC in primary stroke prevention, clinical intervention trials are needed.

  3. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amy Tawfik,1,2 Joanna M Bielecki,2 Murray Krahn,1,2 Paul Dorian,3,4 Jeffrey S Hoch,1,3,5 Heather Boon,1 Don Husereau,6 Petros Pechlivanoglou2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA Collaborative, University of Toronto, 3Centre for Excellence in Economic Analysis Research (CLEAR, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael’s Hospital, 4Department of Medicine and Cardiology, University of Toronto, 5Pharmacoeconomics Research Unit, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, 6Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients.Materials and methods: Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015, Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (­CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015. Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage.Results: Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82 and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97 reduced the risk of

  4. Use of escitalopram to prevent depression and cognitive impairments in the acute phase of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Rustemovna Khasanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to comparatively analyze the rate of post-stroke depression and cognitive impairments in escitalopram (cipralex-treated and untreated (control patients. Emotional and affective cognitive symptoms, neurological deficit, and day-to-day activity were evaluated over time 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The results of the study indicated that escitalopram used to prevent depression in the acute phase of stroke provided a good effect. This drug caused a prompter recovery of cognitive impairments and reduced the pace of development of neurodegenerative disorders underlying the post-stroke 2D (depression and dementia syndrome. The study group was recorded to have more favorable functional outcomes of stroke and patient mobility indicators associated with lower disability rates.

  5. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied.

  6. The Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS): a pragmatic randomised open-label masked endpoint clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, W.F.; Vermeij, J.D.; Zock, E.; Hooijenga, I.J.; Kruyt, N.D.; Bosboom, H.J.; Kwa, V.I.H.; Weisfelt, M.; Remmers, M.J.; Houten, R. ten; Schreuder, A.H.; Vermeer, S.E.; Dijk, E.J. van; Dippel, D.W.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Spanjaard, L.; Vermeulen, M; Poll, T. van der; Prins, J.M.; Vermeij, F.H.; Roos, Y.B.; Kleyweg, R.P.; Kerkhoff, H.; Brouwer, M.C.T.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Beek, D. van de; Nederkoorn, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In adults with acute stroke, infections occur commonly and are associated with an unfavourable functional outcome. In the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS) we aimed to establish whether or not preventive antimicrobial therapy with a third-generation cephalosporin,

  7. Economic evaluation of apixaban for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanovic, J.; Pompen, M.; Le, H.H.; Rozenbaum, M.H.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Stroke prevention is the main goal in treating patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Treatment with anticoagulants, such as vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs; e.g. warfarin and cumarines), was demonstrated to be an effective strategy. However, even though VKAs are the current standard

  8. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  9. Recent advances in preventing stroke recurrence [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J David Spence

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in secondary stroke prevention include new evidence in hypertension, nutrition, anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, intracranial stenosis, percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale, and lipid-lowering therapy. Individualized therapy for hypertension based on phenotyping with plasma renin and aldosterone markedly improves blood pressure control in patients with resistant hypertension. A Mediterranean diet can reduce the risk of stroke by nearly half. The diagnosis and treatment of metabolic vitamin B12 deficiency, and B vitamins to lower homocysteine, can reduce the risk of stroke by approximately 30%. There are problems with clopidogrel that can be overcome by using ticagrelor, and new anticoagulant drugs markedly improve anticoagulation for stroke prevention, particularly in atrial fibrillation. There are pharmacokinetic problems with dabigatran that deserve attention. Intensive medical therapy is better than stenting for intracranial stenosis, and new therapies directed at proprotein convertase subtilisin–kexin type 9 (PCSK9 will revolutionize lipid-lowering therapy. In the past, it was estimated that rational therapy could reduce recurrent stroke by about 80%. With recent advances, we should be able to do even better.

  10. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease.

  11. The impact of stroke-related dysarthria on social participation and implications for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Marian C; Clark, Alexander M; Dickson, Sylvia; Paton, Gillian; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2011-01-01

    Each year an estimated 30,000-45,000 UK individuals experience stroke-related dysarthria (impairment of movements required to produce speech). Many will experience persistent dysarthria long after discharge from stroke services. Although we have some insight into the impact of other communication impairments, we have very limited information on the impact of dysarthria on social participation. To explore the impact of dysarthria on social participation following stroke. We report data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with 24 individuals with stroke-related dysarthria. Our findings suggest a complex association between the severity of an individual's dysarthria and the impact on their social participation. Participants' descriptions highlighted their experiences of social participation and isolation. We further suggest that, in some cases, the coping strategies adopted by the participants could be seen to further exacerbate this isolation. These results have important implications for the prioritisation, planning and delivery of therapeutic interventions for people with dysarthria. The impact of stroke-related dysarthria transcends the physiological impairment to impact upon individuals' social participation, which is key to the process of rehabilitation. The development and evaluation of the effectiveness of an intervention that addresses these impacts is the next challenge for therapists and researchers working in this area.

  12. Barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation in stroke: consumer participation in secondary prevention design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Olive C; Doody, Catherine; Ni Choisdealbh, Cliodhna; Blake, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore community-dwelling stroke patients' perceived barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation for secondary disease prevention, as well as their preferred means for risk-reduction information dissemination and motivators to participation in healthy-lifestyle interventions. Four focus groups (5-6 stroke survivors per group) were defined from community support groups. Key questions addressed barriers to healthy-lifestyle adoption, preferred methods for receiving information and factors that would engage participants in a risk-reduction programme. Groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic content using a framework approach. Twenty-two participants, 12 men, 10 women, mean age 71.4 (53-87) years, were included in the study. Three overarching themes emerged as barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation: physical, mental and environmental. Exercise participation difficulties spread across all three themes; healthy eating and smoking cessation concentrated in environmental and mental dimensions. Talks (discussions) were noted as participants' preferred method of information provision. Risk-reduction programmes considered attractive were stroke specific, convenient and delivered by healthcare professionals and involved both social and exercise components. Many stroke patients appear unable to adopt healthy-lifestyle changes through advice alone because of physical, mental and environmental barriers. Risk-reduction programmes including interactive education should be specifically tailored to address barriers currently experienced and extend beyond the stroke survivor to others in their environment who influence lifestyle choices.

  13. Interventions for improving modifiable risk factor control in the secondary prevention of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Kate E; Mistri, Amit K; Khunti, Kamlesh; Haunton, Victoria J; Sett, Aung K; Wilson, Andrew D

    2014-05-02

    People with stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk of future stroke and other cardiovascular events. Evidence-based strategies for secondary stroke prevention have been established. However, the implementation of prevention strategies could be improved. To assess the effects of stroke service interventions for implementing secondary stroke prevention strategies on modifiable risk factor control, including patient adherence to prescribed medications, and the occurrence of secondary cardiovascular events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (April 2013), the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Trials Register (April 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to April 2013), EMBASE (1981 to April 2013) and 10 additional databases. We located further studies by searching reference lists of articles and contacting authors of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of organisational or educational and behavioural interventions (compared with usual care) on modifiable risk factor control for secondary stroke prevention. Two review authors selected studies for inclusion and independently extracted data. One review author assessed the risk of bias for the included studies. We sought missing data from trialists. This review included 26 studies involving 8021 participants. Overall the studies were of reasonable quality, but one study was considered at high risk of bias. Fifteen studies evaluated predominantly organisational interventions and 11 studies evaluated educational and behavioural interventions for patients. Results were pooled where appropriate, although some clinical and methodological heterogeneity was present. The estimated effects of organisational interventions were compatible with improvements and no differences in the modifiable risk factors mean systolic blood pressure (mean difference (MD) -2.57 mmHg; 95% confidence

  14. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: Past, present and future. Comparing the guidelines and practical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory; Freedman, Ben; De Caterina, Raffaele; Potpara, Tatjana S

    2017-06-28

    Concepts and our approaches to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) have changed markedly over the last decade. There has been an evolution over the approach to stroke and bleeding risk assessment, as well as new treatment options. An increasing awareness of AF has led to calls to improve the detection of and population screening for AF. Stroke and bleeding risk assessment continues to evolve, and the ongoing debate on balance between simplicity and practicality, against precision medicine will continue. In this review article, we provide an overview of past, present and the (likely) future concepts and approaches to stroke prevention in AF. We propose three simple steps (the Birmingham '3-step') that offers a practical management pathway to help streamline and simplify decision-making for stroke prevention in patients with AF.

  15. Atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention practices in patients with candidacy for anticoagulation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, I.; Ahmad, S.; Hayat, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke secondary to Atrial Fibrillation is usually due to thrombi formed in the left atrium and left atrial appendage embolizing to cause ischemic stroke. Therefore, in patients with Atrial Fibrillation, antithrombotic therapy is recommended to prevent stroke. Vitamin K antagonist therapy is most widely used antithrombotic therapy for patients with valvular and non valvular AF. Aspirin is recommended only in low risk patients. This study was conducted to determine the stroke prevention practices in local patients with atrial fibrillation who were candidates for anticoagulation therapy. Method: This was descriptive cross sectional study conducted at Cardiovascular Department Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar and Cardiology Department Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar. Sampling technique was non probability consecutive. Patients visiting OPD of respective hospitals with EKG evidence of AF and having CHADES VASC score 2 or more or having mitral stenosis and AF were included in the study. Patients with additional indications for anticoagulation were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 205 patients with atrial fibrillation were studied. Mean age was 60.7±14.7 years. Male were 55.6 percentage (n=114) while 44.4 percentage (n=91) were female. Of these 149 (72.7 percentage) were candidates for anticoagulation based on CHA2DS2 VASc score of 2 and more or mitral stenosis with AF. Only 27.5 percentage (n=41) patients were adequately treated with anticoagulant therapy using VKA or novel oral anticoagulant drugs. Majority of them were getting dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Conclusion: Most patients with AF and high risk characteristics for thromboembolism are not receiving proper stroke prevention therapies. (author)

  16. Ipsilateral motor pathways after stroke: implications for noninvasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynley V Bradnam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In humans the two cerebral hemispheres have essential roles in controlling the upper limb. The purpose of this article is to draw attention to the potential importance of ipsilateral descending pathways for functional recovery after stroke, and the use of noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS protocols of the contralesional primary motor cortex (M1. Conventionally NBS is used to suppress contralesional M1, and to attenuate transcallosal inhibition onto the ipsilesional M1. There has been little consideration of the fact that contralesional M1 suppression may also reduce excitability of ipsilateral descending pathways that may be important for paretic upper limb control for some patients. One such ipsilateral pathway is the cortico-reticulo-propriospinal pathway (CRPP. In this review we outline a neurophysiological model to explain how contralesional M1 may gain control of the paretic arm via the CRPP. We conclude that the relative importance of the CRPP for motor control in individual patients must be considered before using NBS to suppress contralesional M1. Neurophysiological, neuroimaging and clinical assessments can assist this decision making and facilitate the translation of NBS into the clinical setting.

  17. Oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention amongst atrial fibrillation patients with valvular heart disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Andrew C T; Verma, Atul; Verma, Subodh

    2017-03-01

    The majority of evidence on the safety and efficacy of oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention amongst patients with atrial fibrillation is derived from those without significant valvular heart disease. This article will review current knowledge, areas of uncertainty and controversy, and ongoing research on oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention amongst patients with valvular heart disease. The rates of stroke, systemic embolism, and major bleeding were similar for patients with and without significant native valvular disease when treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) or vitamin K antagonists. There are very limited prospective data on the safety and efficacy of DOAC use for patients with bioprosthetic valves or rheumatic mitral stenosis. Atrial fibrillation patients with concomitant valvulopathies constitute a group with high thromboembolic risk and should be treated with oral anticoagulation. There is good supportive evidence that DOAC is well tolerated and effective in preventing thromboembolism amongst patients with native valvular disease. Further research is underway to better define the risks and benefits of DOAC use among patients with bioprosthetic valves or rheumatic mitral stenosis in preventing thromboembolic events. Until then, vitamin K antagonists remain the oral anticoagulant of choice for these patient subsets.

  18. European Primary Care Cardiovascular Society (EPCCS) consensus guidance on stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (SPAF) in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, Fd Richard; Taylor, Clare J; Jan Geersing, Geert; Rutten, FH; Brouwer, Judith R

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation affects 1-2% of the general population and 10% of those over 75, and is responsible for around a quarter of all strokes. These strokes are largely preventable by the use of anticoagulation therapy, although many eligible patients are not treated. Recent large clinical

  19. Left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Dagres, Nikolaos; Proclemer, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this EP wire survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the use of left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) devices for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) among members of the European Heart Rhythm Association research network. The average number of performed LA...... are most often performed by interventional cardiologists. Experience varied widely, and this was reflected in the wide range of thromboembolic and procedural (tamponade, bleeding) complications reported by the respondents to this EP wire survey....

  20. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Dong

    Full Text Available Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke.A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions.B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12.B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied.

  1. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  2. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  3. Prevention and intervention studies with telmisartan, ramipril and their combination in different rat stroke models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Thoene-Reineke

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The effects of AT1 receptor blocker, telmisartan, and the ACE inhibitor, ramipril, were tested head-to head and in combination on stroke prevention in hypertensive rats and on potential neuroprotection in acute cerebral ischemia in normotensive rats. METHODS: Prevention study: Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP were subjected to high salt and randomly assigned to 4 groups: (1 untreated (NaCl, n = 24, (2 telmisartan (T; n = 27, (3 ramipril (R; n = 27 and (4 telmisartan + ramipril (T+R; n = 26. Drug doses were selected to keep blood pressure (BP at 150 mmHg in all groups. Neurological signs and stroke incidence at 50% mortality of untreated SHR-SP were investigated. Intervention study: Normotensive Wistar rats were treated s.c. 5 days prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO for 90 min with reperfusion. Groups (n = 10 each: (1 sham, (2 vehicle (V; 0.9% NaCl, (3 T (0.5 mg/kg once daily, (4 R (0.01 mg/kg twice daily, (5 R (0.1 mg/kg twice daily or (6 T (0.5 mg/kg once daily plus R (0.01 mg/kg twice daily. Twenty-four and 48 h after MCAO, neurological outcome (NO was determined. Forty-eight h after MCAO, infarct volume by MRI, neuronal survival, inflammation factors and neurotrophin receptor (TrkB were analysed. RESULTS: Stroke incidence was reduced, survival was prolonged and neurological outcome was improved in all treated SHR-SP with no differences between treated groups. In the acute intervention study, T and T+R, but not R alone, improved NO, reduced infarct volume, inflammation (TNFα, and induced TrkB receptor and neuronal survival in comparison to V. CONCLUSIONS: T, R or T+R had similar beneficial effects on stroke incidence and NO in hypertensive rats, confirming BP reduction as determinant factor in stroke prevention. In contrast, T and T+R provided superior neuroprotection in comparison to R alone in normotensive rats with induced cerebral ischemia.

  4. Platelet aggregation inhibitors in primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ischaemic stroke (IS is one of the most frequent cause of death in Germany. Besides of non-drug many drug-based interventions are used in primary or secondary prevention of IS, among them the thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors (TAI. Objectives: The evaluation addresses the questions on medical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the TAI administration in the prevention of IS as compared to the management of risk factors alone as well as to the use of anticoagulant drugs. Methods: The literature search for articles published after 1997 was conducted in December 2003 in the most important medical and economic databases. The medical analysis was performed on the basis of the most up-to date meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials (RCT as well as of new published RCT. The data from the studies for stroke, bleeding complications as well as for the combined endpoint "severe vascular events" (SVE: death or stroke or myocardial infarction were summarised in meta-analyses.In order to include grey literature contact has been taken up with the pharmaceutical manufacturers of TAI. Results are presented in a descriptive way. Results: The medical analysis included data from 184 RCT (vs. placebo and from 22 RCT (vs. anticoagulant drugs. The absolute reduction of IS (4.8% vs. 6.6%; p<0,00001 and SVE (10.0% vs. 12.4%; p<0,00001 were definitely higher than the absolute increase of bleeding complications (1.6% vs. 0.9%; p<0,00001, but relatively similar to this absolute increase in a subpopulation with a low risk for SVE. With regard to the stroke prevention, evidence of efficacy could be yielded for acetylsalicil acid (ASA, dipyridamole, cilostazol, ridogrel and the combination ASA with dipyridamole. ASA is less effective than anticoagulants in the prevention of ischaemic stroke in atrial fibrillation, however, it causes fewer bleeding complications.Low dosed ASA can be considered cost-effective in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

  5. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Organization definition of stroke is 'a clinical syndrome of rapidly developing focal or global ..... In the case of sickle cell disease primary and secondary prevention is by ... stroke and must involve caregivers. Prognosis7,10,17.

  6. Comparison of Efficacy Compressive Stockings with Heparin in Prevention of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Majdi-Nasab

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study is carried out to make a comparison between two pharmacological (heparin and physical (compression stockings in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in lower limb of the patients suffered from acute stroke. Materials and Methods: In this investigation as a clinical trial, the effectiveness of the above methods on 100 patients with the stroke was compared in two groups of 50 persons. Results: Three patients in physical group and two patients in pharmacological group got deep vein thrombosis that showed no significant difference between two groups.Conclusion: In spite of no significant relationship and due to less incurrence of thrombosis in heparin group, it is more reasonable to use pharmacological methods.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of apixaban compared with warfarin for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyon Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apixaban was shown to be superior to adjusted-dose warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and at least one additional risk factor for stroke, and associated with reduced rates of hemorrhage. We sought to determine the cost-effectiveness of using apixaban for stroke prevention. METHODS: Based on the results from the Apixaban Versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE trial and other published studies, we constructed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of apixaban versus warfarin from the Medicare perspective. The base-case analysis assumed a cohort of 65-year-old patients with a CHADS(2 score of 2.1 and no contraindication to oral anticoagulation. We utilized a 2-week cycle length and a lifetime time horizon. Outcome measures included costs in 2012 US$, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs, life years saved and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. RESULTS: Under base case conditions, quality adjusted life expectancy was 10.69 and 11.16 years for warfarin and apixaban, respectively. Total costs were $94,941 for warfarin and $86,007 for apixaban, demonstrating apixaban to be a dominant economic strategy. Upon one-way sensitivity analysis, these results were sensitive to variability in the drug cost of apixaban and various intracranial hemorrhage related variables. In Monte Carlo simulation, apixaban was a dominant strategy in 57% of 10,000 simulations and cost-effective in 98% at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with AF and at least one additional risk factor for stroke and a baseline risk of ICH risk of about 0.8%, treatment with apixaban may be a cost-effective alternative to warfarin.

  8. Does Perturbation Training Prevent Falls after Discharge from Stroke Rehabilitation? A Prospective Cohort Study with Historical Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Danells, Cynthia J; Aqui, Anthony; Aryan, Raabeae; Biasin, Louis; DePaul, Vincent G; Inness, Elizabeth L

    2017-10-01

    Individuals with stroke fall frequently, and no exercise intervention has been shown to prevent falls post stroke. Perturbation-based balance training (PBT), which involves practicing reactions to instability, shows promise for preventing falls in older adults and individuals with Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to determine if PBT during inpatient stroke rehabilitation can prevent falls after discharge into the community. Individuals with subacute stroke completed PBT as part of routine inpatient rehabilitation (n = 31). Participants reported falls experienced in daily life for up to 6 months post discharge. Fall rates were compared to a matched historical control group (HIS) who did not complete PBT during inpatient rehabilitation. Five of 31 PBT participants, compared to 15 of 31 HIS participants, reported at least 1 fall. PBT participants reported 10 falls (.84 falls per person per year) whereas HIS participants reported 31 falls (2.0 falls per person per year). When controlled for follow-up duration and motor impairment, fall rates were lower in the PBT group than the HIS group (rate ratio: .36 [.15, .79]; P = .016). These findings suggest that PBT is promising for reducing falls post stroke. While this was not a randomized controlled trial, this study may provide sufficient evidence for implementing PBT in stroke rehabilitation practice. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Stroke affects around 10% of children with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS). Chronic blood transfusions may reduce the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke by diluting the proportion of sickled cells in the circulation. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and last updated in 2013. Objectives To assess risks and benefits of chronic blood transfusion regimens in people with sickle cell disease for primary and secondary stroke prevention (excluding silent cerebral infarcts). Search methods We searched for relevant trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 04 April 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 25 April 2016. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusions as prophylaxis for stroke in people with sickle cell disease to alternative or standard treatment. There were no restrictions by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results We included five trials (660 participants) published between 1998 and 2016. Four of these trials were terminated early. The vast majority of participants had the haemoglobin (Hb)SS form of sickle cell disease. Three trials compared regular red cell transfusions to standard care in primary prevention of stroke: two in children with no previous long-term transfusions; and one in children and adolescents on long-term transfusion. Two trials compared the drug

  10. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-17

    Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Stroke affects around 10% of children with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS). Chronic blood transfusions may reduce the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke by diluting the proportion of sickled cells in the circulation.This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and last updated in 2013. To assess risks and benefits of chronic blood transfusion regimens in people with sickle cell disease for primary and secondary stroke prevention (excluding silent cerebral infarcts). We searched for relevant trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 04 April 2016.We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 25 April 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusions as prophylaxis for stroke in people with sickle cell disease to alternative or standard treatment. There were no restrictions by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. We included five trials (660 participants) published between 1998 and 2016. Four of these trials were terminated early. The vast majority of participants had the haemoglobin (Hb)SS form of sickle cell disease.Three trials compared regular red cell transfusions to standard care in primary prevention of stroke: two in children with no previous long-term transfusions; and one in children and adolescents on long-term transfusion.Two trials compared the drug hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) and phlebotomy to long-term transfusions and iron chelation therapy: one in

  11. Telemedicine-guided education on secondary stroke and fall prevention following inpatient rehabilitation for Texas patients with stroke and their caregivers: a feasibility pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Mansi M; Benjamin-Garner, Ruby; Rianon, Nahid; Sherer, Mark; Francisco, Gerard; Vahidy, Farhaan; Kobayashi, Kayta; Gaber, Mary; Shoemake, Paige; Vu, Kim; Trevino, Alyssa; Grotta, James; Savitz, Sean

    2017-09-03

    The aftermath of stroke leaves many consequences including cognitive deficits and falls due to imbalance. Stroke survivors and families struggle to navigate the complex healthcare system with little assistance posthospital discharge, often leading to early hospital readmission and worse stroke outcomes. Telemedicine Guided Education on Secondary Stroke and Fall Prevention Following Inpatient Rehabilitation feasibility study examines whether stroke survivors and their caregivers find value in telerehabilitation (TR) home visits that provide individualised care and education by a multidisciplinary team after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. A prospective, single arm, pilot study is designed to evaluate the feasibility of weekly TR home visits initiated postdischarge from inpatient rehabilitation. Newly diagnosed patients with stroke are recruited from a Houston-based comprehensive stroke centre inpatient rehabilitation unit, loaned an iPad with data plan and trained to use information technology security-approved videoconferencing application. After hospital discharge, six weekly TR home visits are led by rotating specialists (pharmacist, physical/occupational therapist, speech therapist, rehabilitation physician, social worker, geriatrician specialised in fracture prevention) followed by satisfaction survey on week 7. Specialists visually assess patients in real time, educate them on secondary stroke and fall prevention and suggest ways to improve function including direct medical interventions when indicated. Primary outcomes are proportion of eligible patients consenting to the study, participation rate in all six TR home visits and satisfaction score. The study started 31 December 2015 with plan to enrol up to 50 patients over 24 months. Feasibility study results will inform us as to whether a randomised controlled trial is warranted to determine efficacy of TR home visit intervention in improving stroke outcomes. Ethics approval obtained by the

  12. Design and rationale of dabigatran's stroke prevention in real life in Turkey (D-SPIRIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Uğur Önsel; Alioğlu, Emin; Tunçer, Eşref; Özpelit, Mehmet Emre; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, İstemihan; Çetin, Nurullah; Dalgıç, Onur; Topaloğlu, Caner; Bilgin, Nazile; Altın, Cihan; Özdemirkıran, Tolga; Tülüce, Kamil; Türkoğlu, Ebru İpek; Özpelit, Ebru

    2016-04-01

    The D-SPIRIT registry is designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of dabigatran etexilate in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and to collect data on outcomes in clinical practice. The D-SPIRIT is a national, prospective, observational, post-marketing registry involving patients with NVAF who have been taking dabigatran etexilate therapy for stroke prevention for a minimum of 6 months prior to enrollment. The registry will collect and analyze data from routine care, enrolling up to 600 patients in 9 centers. Patients will be followed up for 2 years to evaluate effectiveness and safety. A sample size of 600 subjects is proposed based on the following assumptions; Two-sided significance level of 0.05 (1-sided significance level of 0.025), ischemic stroke incidence rate of 0.768%-1.111%, hemorrhagic stroke incidence rate of 0.109%-0.130%, transient ischemic attack incidence rate of 0.722%-0.623%, therapy discontinuation incidence rate of 40% at day 730, and duration of enrollment period of 12 months with non-uniformed enrollment rate. Ethics approval was given by Dokuz Eylül University Ethics Committee of Clinical Research (2014/54) and approved by the Turkish Ministry of Health. Potential results of D-SPIRIT registry will add data from clinical practice to those from the RE-LY trial to expand knowledge of dabigatran etexilate treatment in patients with NVAF.

  13. [Economic evaluation of dabigatran for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Miguel, Luís; Rocha, Evangelista; Ferreira, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of dabigatran in the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in Portugal. A Markov model was used to simulate patients' clinical course, estimating the occurrence of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, transient ischemic attack, systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, and intra- and extracranial hemorrhage. The clinical parameters are based on the results of the RE-LY trial, which compared dabigatran with warfarin, and on a meta-analysis that estimated the risk of each event in patients treated with aspirin or with no antithrombotic therapy. Dabigatran provides an increase of 0.331 life years and 0.354 quality-adjusted life years for each patient. From a societal perspective, these clinical gains entail an additional expenditure of 2978 euros. Thus, the incremental cost is 9006 euros per life year gained and 8409 euros per quality-adjusted life year. The results show that dabigatran reduces the number of events, especially the most severe such as ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as their long-term sequelae. The expense of dabigatran is partially offset by lower event-related costs and by the fact that INR monitoring is unnecessary. It can thus be concluded that the use of dabigatran in clinical practice in Portugal is cost-effective. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Preliminary Reliability and Validity of an Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention Scale in an African American Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Dawn M; Clark, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    African Americans are at heightened risk of first stroke, and regular exercise can reduce stroke risk. Benefits and barriers to exercise subscales from 2 instruments were combined to create the Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention (EBBSP) scale. Reliability and validity of the EBBSP scale were examined in a nonrandom sample of 66 African Americans who were primarily female, average age 43.3 ± 9.4 years, and high school graduates. Both subscales had adequate internal consistency reliability. Factor analysis revealed two factors for each subscale. More benefits and fewer perceived barriers were significantly related to current exercise and future intentions to exercise. The EBBSP scale may be useful in research focused on understanding, predicting, and promoting exercise for stroke prevention in adults.

  15. Guidelines for the preventive treatment of ischaemic stroke and TIA (I). Update on risk factors and life style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B; Gállego, J; Gil-Nuñez, A; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Roquer, J; Segura, T; Tejada, J; Lago, A; Díez-Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; García Pastor, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Nombela, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Rubio, F; Serena, J; Simal, P; Vivancos, J

    2012-01-01

    To update the ad hoc Committee of the Cerebrovascular Diseases Study Group of The Spanish Neurological Society guidelines on prevention of ischaemic stroke (IS) and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We reviewed available evidence on risk factors and means of modifying them to prevent ischaemic stroke and TIA. Levels of evidence and recommendation grades are based on the classification of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. This first section summarises the recommendations for action on the following factors: blood pressure, diabetes, lipids, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity, cardio-embolic diseases, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives, hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombotic states and sleep apnea syndrome. Changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia, according to criteria of primary and secondary prevention, are recommended for preventing ischemic stroke. © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. [Rehabilitation evaluation on post-stroke abnormal movement pattern prevented and treated with acupuncture and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-min; Tang, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    To explore the impacts of acupuncture and rehabilitation on post-stroke abnormal patterns of limb movement and evaluate them via rehabilitation method. Ninety cases of post-stroke movement disorder were randomly divided into an acupuncture-rehabilitation group, a body acupuncture group and a medication group, 30 cases in each group. In medication group, the conventional medication in neurological department was administered. In acupuncture-rehabilitation group and body acupuncture group, on the basis of the therapy as medication group, scalp acupuncture (such as parietal area and anterior parietal area, etc.), rehabilitation training and traditional body acupuncture [such as Jianyu (LI 15) and Fengshi (GB 31),etc.] were supplemented. The continuous electric stimulation was applied in body acupuncture group. The treatment lasted for 8 weeks. The assessment of clinical efficacy, Fugl-Meyer score, Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), range of motion (ROM) and shoulder pain score were taken as observation indices for rehabilitation evaluation before and after treatment in each group. The effective rate was 93.1% (27/29) in acupuncture-rehabilitation group, which was superior to 66.7% (20/30) in body acupuncture group and 57.1% (16/28) in control group (both Prehabilitation group were significantly superior to those in body acupuncture group and medication group (Prehabilitation therapy and traditional body acupuncture remarkably improve in post-stroke movement disorder. But acupuncture and rehabilitation therapy is apparently superior to traditional body acupuncture. This therapy can effectively prevent and treat post-stroke abnormal patterns and it is greatly significant in the improvement of survival quality for the patients.

  17. Achieved Blood Pressure and Outcomes in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Michelle C; McClure, Leslie A; Sawaya, B Peter; White, Carole L; Peralta, Carmen A; Field, Thalia S; Hart, Robert G; Benavente, Oscar R; Pergola, Pablo E

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest a J-shaped association between blood pressure and cardiovascular events in the setting of intensive systolic blood pressure control; whether there is a similar association with stroke remains less well established. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes was a randomized trial to evaluate higher (130-149 mm Hg) versus lower (blood pressure targets in participants with recent lacunar infarcts. We evaluated the association of mean achieved blood pressure, 6 months after randomization, and recurrent stroke, major vascular events, and all-cause mortality. After a mean follow up of 3.7 years, there was a J-shaped association between achieved blood pressure and outcomes; the lowest risk was at ≈124 and 67 mm Hg systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. For example, above a systolic blood pressure of 124 mm Hg, 1 standard deviation higher (11.1 mm Hg) was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 2.7), whereas below this level, this relationship was inverted (0.29; 0.10, 0.79), Pblood pressure of 67 mm Hg, a 1 standard deviation higher (8.2 mm Hg) was associated with an increased risk of stroke (2.2; 1.4, 3.6), whereas below this level, the association was in the opposite direction (0.34; 0.13, 0.89), P=0.02 for interaction. The lowest risk of all events occurred at a nadir of ≈120 to 128 mm Hg systolic blood pressure and 65 to 70 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure. Future studies should evaluate the impact of excessive blood pressure reduction, especially in older populations with preexisting vascular disease. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00059306. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Point-of-care cluster randomized trial in stroke secondary prevention using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; van Staa, Tjeerd P; McDermott, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Ashworth, Mark; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony; Yardley, Lucy; Gulliford, Martin C; Trial Steering Committee

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the remote introduction of electronic decision support tools into family practices improves risk factor control after first stroke. This study also aimed to develop methods to implement cluster randomized trials in stroke using electronic health records. Family practices were recruited from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and allocated to intervention and control trial arms by minimization. Remotely installed, electronic decision support tools promoted intensified secondary prevention for 12 months with last measure of systolic blood pressure as the primary outcome. Outcome data from electronic health records were analyzed using marginal models. There were 106 Clinical Practice Research Datalink family practices allocated (intervention, 53; control, 53), with 11 391 (control, 5516; intervention, 5875) participants with acute stroke ever diagnosed. Participants at trial practices had similar characteristics as 47,887 patients with stroke at nontrial practices. During the intervention period, blood pressure values were recorded in the electronic health records for 90% and cholesterol values for 84% of participants. After intervention, the latest mean systolic blood pressure was 131.7 (SD, 16.8) mm Hg in the control trial arm and 131.4 (16.7) mm Hg in the intervention trial arm, and adjusted mean difference was -0.56 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -1.38 to 0.26; P=0.183). The financial cost of the trial was approximately US $22 per participant, or US $2400 per family practice allocated. Large pragmatic intervention studies may be implemented at low cost by using electronic health records. The intervention used in this trial was not found to be effective, and further research is needed to develop more effective intervention strategies. http://www.controlled-trials.com. Current Controlled Trials identifier: ISRCTN35701810. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Exploratory Network Meta Regression Analysis of Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Fails to Identify Any Interactions with Treatment Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Sarah; Sutton, Alex; Abrams, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation are at a greater risk of stroke and therefore the main goal for treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation is to prevent stroke from occurring. There are a number of different stroke prevention treatments available to include warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants. Previous network meta-analyses of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation acknowledge the limitation of heterogeneity across the included trials but have not explored the impact of potentially important treatment modifying covariates. To explore potentially important treatment modifying covariates using network meta-regression analyses for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We performed a network meta-analysis for the outcome of ischaemic stroke and conducted an exploratory regression analysis considering potentially important treatment modifying covariates. These covariates included the proportion of patients with a previous stroke, proportion of males, mean age, the duration of study follow-up and the patients underlying risk of ischaemic stroke. None of the covariates explored impacted relative treatment effects relative to placebo. Notably, the exploration of 'study follow-up' as a covariate supported the assumption that difference in trial durations is unimportant in this indication despite the variation across trials in the network. This study is limited by the quantity of data available. Further investigation is warranted, and, as justifying further trials may be difficult, it would be desirable to obtain individual patient level data (IPD) to facilitate an effort to relate treatment effects to IPD covariates in order to investigate heterogeneity. Observational data could also be examined to establish if there are potential trends elsewhere. The approach and methods presented have potentially wide applications within any indication as to highlight the potential benefit of extending decision problems to include additional

  20. Exploratory Network Meta Regression Analysis of Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Fails to Identify Any Interactions with Treatment Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Batson

    Full Text Available Patients with atrial fibrillation are at a greater risk of stroke and therefore the main goal for treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation is to prevent stroke from occurring. There are a number of different stroke prevention treatments available to include warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants. Previous network meta-analyses of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation acknowledge the limitation of heterogeneity across the included trials but have not explored the impact of potentially important treatment modifying covariates.To explore potentially important treatment modifying covariates using network meta-regression analyses for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.We performed a network meta-analysis for the outcome of ischaemic stroke and conducted an exploratory regression analysis considering potentially important treatment modifying covariates. These covariates included the proportion of patients with a previous stroke, proportion of males, mean age, the duration of study follow-up and the patients underlying risk of ischaemic stroke.None of the covariates explored impacted relative treatment effects relative to placebo. Notably, the exploration of 'study follow-up' as a covariate supported the assumption that difference in trial durations is unimportant in this indication despite the variation across trials in the network.This study is limited by the quantity of data available. Further investigation is warranted, and, as justifying further trials may be difficult, it would be desirable to obtain individual patient level data (IPD to facilitate an effort to relate treatment effects to IPD covariates in order to investigate heterogeneity. Observational data could also be examined to establish if there are potential trends elsewhere. The approach and methods presented have potentially wide applications within any indication as to highlight the potential benefit of extending decision problems to

  1. Secondary prevention after minor stroke and TIA - usual care and development of a support program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Leistner

    Full Text Available Effective methods of secondary prevention after stroke or TIA are available but adherence to recommended evidence-based treatments is often poor. The study aimed to determine the quality of secondary prevention in usual care and to develop a stepwise modeled support program.Two consecutive cohorts of patients with acute minor stroke or TIA undergoing usual outpatient care versus a secondary prevention program were compared. Risk factor control and medication adherence were assessed in 6-month follow-ups (6M-FU. Usual care consisted of detailed information concerning vascular risk factor targets given at discharge and regular outpatient care by primary care physicians. The stepwise modeled support program additionally employed up to four outpatient appointments. A combination of educational and behavioral strategies was employed.168 patients in the observational cohort who stated their openness to participate in a prevention program (mean age 64.7 y, admission blood pressure (BP: 155/84 mmHg and 173 patients participating in the support program (mean age 67.6 y, BP: 161/84 mmHg were assessed at 6 months. Proportions of patients with BP according to guidelines were 50% in usual-care and 77% in the support program (p<0.01. LDL<100 mg/dl was measured in 62 versus 71% (p = 0.12. Proportions of patients who stopped smoking were 50 versus 79% (p<0.01. 72 versus 89% of patients with atrial fibrillation were on oral anticoagulation (p = 0.09.Risk factor control remains unsatisfactory in usual care. Targets of secondary prevention were met more often within the supported cohort. Effects on (cerebro-vascular recurrence rates are going to be assessed in a multicenter randomized trial.

  2. Effect of Smoking and Folate Levels on the Efficacy of Folic Acid Therapy in Prevention of Stroke in Hypertensive Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziyi; Li, Jianping; Yu, Yaren; Li, Youbao; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Lishun; Song, Yun; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yu; Tang, Genfu; He, Mingli; Xu, Xiping; Cai, Yefeng; Dong, Qiang; Yin, Delu; Huang, Xiao; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Wang, Binyan; Hou, Fan Fan; Wang, Xiaobin; Qin, Xianhui; Huo, Yong

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether the efficacy of folic acid therapy in the primary prevention of stroke is jointly affected by smoking status and baseline folate levels in a male population in a post hoc analysis of the CSPPT (China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial). Eligible participants of the CSPPT were randomly assigned to a double-blind daily treatment of a combined enalapril 10-mg and folic acid 0.8-mg tablet or an enalapril 10-mg tablet alone. In total, 8384 male participants of the CSPPT were included in the current analyses. The primary outcome was first stroke. The median treatment duration was 4.5 years. In the enalapril-alone group, the first stroke risk varied by baseline folate levels and smoking status (never versus ever). Specifically, there was an inverse association between folate levels and first stroke in never smokers ( P for linear trend=0.043). However, no such association was found in ever smokers. A test for interaction between baseline folate levels and smoking status on first stroke was significant ( P =0.045). In the total sample, folic acid therapy significantly reduced the risk of first stroke in never smokers with folate deficiency (hazard risk, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.83) and in ever smokers with normal folate levels (hazard risk, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.99). Baseline folate levels and smoking status can interactively affect the risk of first stroke. Our data suggest that compared with never smokers, ever smokers may require a higher dosage of folic acid to achieve a greater beneficial effect on stroke. Our findings need to be confirmed by future randomized trials. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00794885. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. The FLASSH study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating falls prevention after stroke and two sub-studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackintosh Shylie F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common in stroke survivors returning home after rehabilitation, however there is currently a lack of evidence about preventing falls in this population. This paper describes the study protocol for the FLASSH (FaLls prevention After Stroke Survivors return Home project. Methods and design This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial falls prevention program for stroke survivors who are at high risk of falling when they return home after rehabilitation. Intervention will consist of a home exercise program as well as individualised falls prevention and injury minimisation strategies based on identified risk factors for falls. Additionally, two sub-studies will be implemented in order to explore other key areas related to falls in this population. The first of these is a longitudinal study evaluating the relationship between fear of falling, falls and function over twelve months, and the second evaluates residual impairment in gait stability and obstacle crossing twelve months after discharge from rehabilitation. Discussion The results of the FLASSH project will inform falls prevention practice for stroke survivors. If the falls prevention program is shown to be effective, low cost strategies to prevent falls can be implemented for those at risk around the time of discharge from rehabilitation, thus improving safety and quality of life for stroke survivors. The two sub-studies will contribute to the overall understanding and management of falls risk in stroke survivors. Trial registration This trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN012607000398404.

  4. Hypertension criterion for stroke prevention--to strengthen the principle of individualization in guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yicong; Chen, Xinran; Dang, Ge; Zhao, Yuhui; Ouyang, Fubing; Su, Zhenpei; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of hypertension, as recommended by most guidelines, is determined by systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg. A threshold-based definition of hypertension, however, ignores sex and age, pathophysiology, and disparities in patient-specific conditions. Moreover, the harmful effects of hypertension-induced target organ damage cannot be ignored. Although the principle of individualization for hypertension management is recommended, especially for stroke prevention, how to practice it in a clinical setting has not been clearly elaborated. Therefore, we put forward a proposal for individualized hypertension management incorporating target organ damage, the main harmful effect of hypertension. We propose that hypertension should be diagnosed when an individual's blood pressure exceeds some difference from their own baseline in young adulthood, accompanied by any hypertension-induced target organ damage, confirmed by various detection methods. Application of this proposal to stroke prevention will hopefully strengthen the principle of individualized hypertension management. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ischemic stroke risk, smoking, and the genetics of inflammation in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, John W; Brown, David W; Giles, Wayne H; Stine, Oscar C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Sorkin, John D; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Sparks, Mary J; Dobbins, Mark T; Shoffner, Latasha T; Zappala, Nancy K; Reinhart, Laurie J; Kittner, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Although cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for vascular disease, the genetic mechanisms that link cigarette smoking to an increased incidence of stroke are not well understood. Genetic variations within the genes of the inflammatory pathways are thought to partially mediate this risk. Here we evaluate the association of several inflammatory gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with ischemic stroke risk among young women, further stratified by curre...

  6. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke--A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study.

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    Birgitta Söder

    Full Text Available Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis-atherosclerosis paradigm.In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used.Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3% had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01, prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI (p = 0.03, and dental calculus (p = 0.017. In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02-4.74 for stroke.Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention.

  7. Tai Chi Chuan for the Primary Prevention of Stroke in Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke is a major healthcare problem with serious long-term disability and is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Prevention of stroke is considered an important strategy. Methods. Seven electronic databases were searched. Results. 36 eligible studies with a total of 2393 participants were identified. Primary outcome measures, TCC exercise combined with other intervention had a significant effect on decreasing the incidence of nonfatal stroke (n=185, RR = 0.11, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.85, P=0.03 and CCD (n=125, RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.96, P=0.04. For the risk factors of stroke, pooled analysis demonstrated that TCC exercise was associated with lower body weight, BMI, FBG level, and decreasing SBP, DBP, plasma TC, and LDL-C level regardless of the intervention period less than half a year or more than one year and significantly raised HDL-C level in comparison to nonintervention. Compared with other treatments, TCC intervention on the basis of the same other treatments in patients with chronic disease also showed the beneficial effect on lowering blood pressure. Conclusion. The present systematic review indicates that TCC exercise is beneficially associated with the primary prevention of stroke in middle-aged and elderly adults by inversing the high risk factors of stroke.

  8. Review of economics and cost-effectiveness analyses of anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schéele, Birgitta; Fernandez, Maria; Hogue, Susan Lynn; Kwong, Winghan Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    To summarize the available evidence on the issues in health economics related to oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) in the US. A literature review was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, as well as the websites of professional organizations. The search was conducted according to a prespecified protocol, limiting articles to those published in English from 2001 to October 2012 and focused on the economics associated with AF and AF-related stroke in the US. Data from 27 studies were extracted and included in the review. Strokes in patients with AF are more debilitating and have higher recurrence rates and mortality compared with strokes unrelated to AF. However, data describing the long-term cost of AF-related stroke and stroke subtypes remain limited. The costs of major gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and intracranial bleeding related to warfarin are significant, whereas the costs of the more frequent minor GI bleeding are relatively low. Overall, the cost-effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin or no treatment in patients with at least 1 risk factor for stroke is well established. Economic evaluations based on results from randomized controlled clinical trials generally found that new anticoagulants were a cost-effective alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in AF. However, these cost-effectiveness results are highly sensitive to how well optimal international normalized ratio control is maintained (within target of 2.0-3.0) for warfarin and the time horizon used for analysis. Time in therapeutic range for warfarin in routine clinical practice was lower than in clinical trials, as shown by previous studies. This review identified several areas of uncertainty regarding the economic benefit of anticoagulants. The generalizability of cost-effectiveness results of anticoagulant therapy in AF based on clinical trial data must be confirmed by comparative effectiveness

  9. Acupuncture lowering blood pressure for secondary prevention of stroke: a study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu-Zheng; Gao, Xin-Xin; Wang, Cheng-Ting; Zheng, Hai-Zhen; Lei, Yun; Wu, Meng-Han; Shi, Xue-Min; Ban, Hai-Peng; Gu, Wen-Long; Meng, Xiang-Gang; Wei, Mao-Ti; Hu, Chun-Xiao

    2017-09-15

    Stroke is the prime cause of morbidity and mortality in the general population, and hypertension will increase the recurrence and mortality of stroke. We report a protocol of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) using blood pressure (BP)-lowering acupuncture add-on treatment to treat patients with hypertension and stroke. This is a large-scale, multicenter, subject-, assessor- and analyst-blinded, pragmatic RCT. A total of 480 patients with hypertension and ischemic stroke will be randomly assigned to two groups: an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group will receive "HuoXueSanFeng" acupuncture combined with one antihypertensive medication in addition to routine ischemic stroke treatment. The control group will only receive one antihypertensive medication and basic treatments for ischemic stroke. HuoXueSanFeng acupuncture will be given for six sessions weekly for the first 6 weeks and three times weekly for the next 6 weeks. A 9-month follow-up will, thereafter, be conducted. Antihypertensive medication will be adjusted based on BP levels. The primary outcome will be the recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcomes including 24-h ambulatory BP, the TCM syndrome score, the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), as well as the Barthel Index (BI) scale will be assessed at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks post initiating treatments; cardiac ultrasound, carotid artery ultrasound, transcranial Doppler, and lower extremity ultrasound will be evaluated at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment. The safety of acupuncture will also be assessed. We aim to determine the clinical effects of controlling BP for secondary prevention of stroke with acupuncture add-on treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02967484 . Registered on 13 February 2017; last updated on 27 June 2017.

  10. Exercise intervention to prevent falls and enhance mobility in community dwellers after stroke: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Ruth N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the most common disabling neurological condition in adults. Falls and poor mobility are major contributors to stroke-related disability. Falls are more frequent and more likely to result in injury among stroke survivors than among the general older population. Currently there is good evidence that exercise can enhance mobility after stroke, yet ongoing exercise programs for general community-based stroke survivors are not routinely available. This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether exercise can reduce fall rates and increase mobility and physical activity levels in stroke survivors. Methods and design Three hundred and fifty community dwelling stroke survivors will be recruited. Participants will have no medical contradictions to exercise and be cognitively and physically able to complete the assessments and exercise program. After the completion of the pre-test assessment, participants will be randomly allocated to one of two intervention groups. Both intervention groups will participate in weekly group-based exercises and a home program for twelve months. In the lower limb intervention group, individualised programs of weight-bearing balance and strengthening exercises will be prescribed. The upper limb/cognition group will receive exercises aimed at management and improvement of function of the affected upper limb and cognition carried out in the seated position. The primary outcome measures will be falls (measured with 12 month calendars and mobility. Secondary outcome measures will be risk of falling, physical activity levels, community participation, quality of life, health service utilisation, upper limb function and cognition. Discussion This study aims to establish and evaluate community-based sustainable exercise programs for stroke survivors. We will determine the effects of the exercise programs in preventing falls and enhancing mobility among people following stroke. This program, if

  11. Blood Pressure Reduction and Secondary Stroke Prevention: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Filippatou, Angeliki; Manios, Efstathios; Deftereos, Spyridon; Parissis, John; Frogoudaki, Alexandra; Vrettou, Agathi-Rosa; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Pikilidou, Maria; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Alexandrov, Anne W; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Current recommendations do not specifically address the optimal blood pressure (BP) reduction for secondary stroke prevention in patients with previous cerebrovascular events. We conducted a systematic review and metaregression analysis on the association of BP reduction with recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events using data from randomized controlled clinical trials of secondary stroke prevention. For all reported events during each eligible study period, we calculated the corresponding risk ratios to express the comparison of event occurrence risk between patients randomized to antihypertensive treatment and those randomized to placebo. On the basis of the reported BP values, we performed univariate metaregression analyses according to the achieved BP values under the random-effects model (Method of Moments) for those adverse events reported in ≥10 total subgroups of included randomized controlled clinical trials. In pairwise meta-analyses, antihypertensive treatment lowered the risk for recurrent stroke (risk ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.87; Psecondary stroke prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Primary prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease in the community (PREVENTS): Methodology of a health wellness coaching intervention to reduce stroke and cardiovascular disease risk, a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Susan; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Vandal, Alain; Witt, Emma; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Parmar, Priya; Theadom, Alice; Barber, Alan; Arroll, Bruce; Rush, Elaine; Elder, Hinemoa; Dyer, Jesse; Feigin, Valery

    2018-02-01

    Rationale Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, yet 80% of strokes can be prevented through modifications of risk factors and lifestyle and by medication. While management strategies for primary stroke prevention in high cardiovascular disease risk individuals are well established, they are underutilized and existing practice of primary stroke prevention are inadequate. Behavioral interventions are emerging as highly promising strategies to improve cardiovascular disease risk factor management. Health Wellness Coaching is an innovative, patient-focused and cost-effective, multidimensional psychological intervention designed to motivate participants to adhere to recommended medication and lifestyle changes and has been shown to improve health and enhance well-being. Aims and/or hypothesis To determine the effectiveness of Health Wellness Coaching for primary stroke prevention in an ethnically diverse sample including Māori, Pacific Island, New Zealand European and Asian participants. Design A parallel, prospective, randomized, open-treatment, single-blinded end-point trial. Participants include 320 adults with absolute five-year cardiovascular disease risk ≥ 10%, calculated using the PREDICT web-based clinical tool. Randomization will be to Health Wellness Coaching or usual care groups. Participants randomized to Health Wellness Coaching will receive 15 coaching sessions over nine months. Study outcomes A substantial relative risk reduction of five-year cardiovascular disease risk at nine months post-randomization, which is defined as 10% relative risk reduction among those at moderate five-year cardiovascular disease risk (10-15%) and 25% among those at high risk (>15%). Discussion This clinical trial will determine whether Health Wellness Coaching is an effective intervention for reducing modifiable risk factors, and hence decrease the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease.

  13. [Compliance with recommendations in secondary prevention of stroke in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Ojeda, Carmen; Parellada-Esquius, Neus; Salvador-González, Betlem; Oriol-Torón, Pilar Ángeles; Rodríguez-Garrido, M Dolores; Muñoz-Segura, Dolores

    Knowing compliance with secondary prevention recommendations of stroke in primary care and to identify factors associated with compliance. Multi-centre cross-sectional. Health primary care centres in a metropolitan area (944,280 inhabitants). Patients aged 18years and over with ischemic brain disease diagnosis prior to 6months before the study. Clinical history records of demographic variables, risk factors and cardiovascular comorbidity, drugs, blood pressure values (BP), LDL-cholesterol and medical visits by doctor and nurses after the event. Good adherence was considered when BP <140/90 mmHg, LDL-cholesterol <100 mg/dL, smoking abstention and preventive drugs prescription (anti-platelet/anticoagulants, statins and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor-antagonists or diuretics) during the last 18months. A total of 21,976 patients, mean age 73.12 years (SD: 12.13), 48% women, 72.7% with stroke. Co-morbidity: hypertension 70.8%, dyslipidemia 55.1%, DM 30.9%, atrial fibrillation 14.1%, ischemic heart disease 13.5%, chronic renal failure 12.5%, heart failure 8.8%, peripheral arterial disease 6.2%, dementia 7.8%. No record was found for smoking in 3.7%, for BP in 3.5% and for LDL in 6.5%. Optimal control: abstention smoking in 3.7%, BP <140/90 in 65.7% and LDL <100 mg/dL in 41.0%. 86.2% anti-platelet/anticoagulants, 61.3% statins and 61.8% angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor-antagonists or diuretic. Registration and risk factors control was higher in 66-79years aged and lower in 18-40years aged. The implementation of clinical guidelines recommendations for stroke prevention in primary care must be improved, especially among younger population. Organizational changes and more active involvement by professionals and strategies against therapeutic inertia must be taken. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Ischemic stroke risk, smoking, and the genetics of inflammation in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorkin John D

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for vascular disease, the genetic mechanisms that link cigarette smoking to an increased incidence of stroke are not well understood. Genetic variations within the genes of the inflammatory pathways are thought to partially mediate this risk. Here we evaluate the association of several inflammatory gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with ischemic stroke risk among young women, further stratified by current cigarette smoking status. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-comparable control subjects (43.1% African-American. Several inflammatory candidate gene SNPs chosen through literature review were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke and interaction with smoking status. Results Of the 8 SNPs (across 6 genes analyzed, only IL6 SNP rs2069832 (allele C, African-American frequency = 92%, Caucasian frequency = 55% was found to be significantly associated with stroke using an additive model, and this was only among African-Americans (age-adjusted: OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–5.0, p = 0.049; risk factor adjusted: OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.0–6.5, p = 0.05. When stratified by smoking status, two SNPs demonstrated statistically significant gene-environment interactions. First, the T allele (frequency = 5% of IL6 SNP rs2069830 was found to be protective among non-smokers (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.11–.082, p = 0.02, but not among smokers (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 0.48–5.58, p = 0.43; genotype by smoking interaction (p = 0.036. Second, the C allele (frequency = 39% of CD14 SNP rs2569190 was found to increase risk among smokers (OR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.09–3.86, p = 0.03, but not among non-smokers (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.62–1.39, p = 0.72; genotype by smoking interaction (p = 0.039. Conclusion This study demonstrates

  15. Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires da Rosa, Gilberto; Libânio, Diogo; Filipe Azevedo, Luís

    2017-01-01

    The influence of fibrates on cardiovascular risk has been the focus of several clinical trials. This Cochrane Collaboration Systematic Review evaluated the efficacy of fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and stroke, analyzing 13 randomized controlled trials, in a total of 16 112 participants with a history of cardiovascular disease. Fibrates showed a protective effect for the composite outcome of non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and vascular death, mainly due to reduction in the risk of non-fatal or fatal MI. Nonetheless, these results largely relied on studies including clofibrate, a drug withdrawn from the market in 2002. No statistically significant differences regarding adverse events were found between fibrates and placebo. Although insufficient to support the routine prescription of fibrates in this setting, this evidence should be taken into account when deciding on lipid-modifying therapy in dyslipidemic patients with a history of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke receiving enoxaparin or heparin for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: subanalysis of the Prevention of VTE after Acute Ischemic Stroke with LMWH (PREVAIL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Carlos S; Albers, Gregory W; Bladin, Christopher; Fieschi, Cesare; Gabbai, Alberto A; O'Riordan, William; Pineo, Graham F

    2009-11-01

    The Prevention of VTE after Acute Ischemic Stroke with LMWH (PREVAIL) study demonstrated that enoxaparin was superior to unfractionated heparin (UFH) in preventing venous thromboembolism in patients with ischemic stroke and was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in extracranial hemorrhage rates. In this PREVAIL subanalysis, we evaluate the long-term neurological outcomes associated with the use of enoxaparin compared with UFH. We also determine predictors of stroke progression. Acute ischemic stroke patients aged >or=18 years, who could not walk unassisted, were randomized to receive enoxaparin (40 mg once daily) or UFH (5000 U every 12 hours) for 10 days. Patients were stratified according to baseline stroke severity using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. End points for this analysis included stroke progression (>or=4-point increase in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score), neurological outcomes up to 3 months postrandomization (assessed using National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score and modified Rankin Scale score), and incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke progression occurred in 45 of 877 (5.1%) patients in the enoxaparin group and 42 of 872 (4.8%) of those receiving UFH. Similar improvements in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin Scale scores were observed in both groups over the 90-day follow-up period. Incidence of intracranial hemorrhage was comparable between groups (20 of 877 [2.3%] and 22 of 872 [2.5%] in enoxaparin and UFH groups, respectively). Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, hyperlipidemia, and Hispanic ethnicity were independent predictors of stroke progression. The clinical benefits associated with use of enoxaparin for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with acute ischemic stroke are not associated with poorer long-term neurological outcomes or increased rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage compared

  17. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke: A Ghost from the Past or a New Frontier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Balucani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With majority of ischemic strokes attributable to atherothrombosis and many being predictable after transient ischemic attacks (TIA, the role of early secondary prevention with antiplatelet agents is under renewed investigation. Prior major clinical trials of various secondary stroke prevention regimens pointed to a greater efficacy of dual antiplatelet agents if initiated early from symptom onset. This paper examines data and rationale behind dual antiplatelet regimens across the completed clinical trials. The safety of dual antiplatelets approach is of concern, but it could be outweighed, at least in early management, by a greater reduction in recurrence of ischemic events since this risk is “front loaded” after minor stroke or TIA. Aspirin monotherapy, though considered standard of care, is compared to aspirin-extended release dipiridamole and its combination with clopidogrel in early-phase completed and efficacy-phase ongoing clinical trials.

  18. Spotlight on unmet needs in stroke prevention: The PIONEER AF-PCI, NAVIGATE ESUS and GALILEO trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmrich, Melanie; Peterson, Eric D; Thomitzek, Karen; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-09-28

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major healthcare concern, being associated with an estimated five-fold risk of ischaemic stroke. In patients with AF, anticoagulants reduce stroke risk to a greater extent than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with ASA plus clopidogrel. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are now a widely-accepted therapeutic option for stroke prevention in non-valvular AF (NVAF). There are particular patient types with NVAF for whom treatment challenges remain, owing to sparse clinical data, their high-risk nature or a need to harmonise anticoagulant and antiplatelet regimens if co-administered. This article focuses on three randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that are investigating the utility of rivaroxaban, a direct, oral, factor Xa inhibitor, in additional areas of stroke prevention where data for anticoagulants are lacking: oPen-label, randomized, controlled, multicentre study explorIng twO treatmeNt stratEgiEs of Rivaroxaban and a dose-adjusted oral vitamin K antagonist treatment (PIONEER AF-PCI); New Approach riVaroxoban Inhibition of factor Xa in a Global trial vs Aspirin to prevenT Embolism in Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source (NAVIGATE ESUS); and Global study comparing a rivAroxaban-based antithrombotic strategy to an antipLatelet-based strategy after transcatheter aortIc vaLve rEplacement to Optimize clinical outcomes (GALILEO). Data from these studies present collaborative efforts to build upon existing registrational Phase III data for rivaroxaban, driving the need for effective and safe treatment of a wider range of patients for stroke prevention.

  19. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of intensive-dose and standard-dose statin treatment for stroke prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Chen, Dan; Li, Da-Bing; Yu, Xin; Shi, Guo-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous study indicated that high-dose statin treatment might increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke and adverse reactions. We aim to compare the efficacy and safety of intensive-dose and standard-dose statin treatment for preventing stroke in high-risk patients. Methods: A thorough search was performed of multiple databases for publications from 1990 to June 2015. We selected the randomized clinical trials comparing standard-dose statin with placebo and intensive-dose statin with standard-dose statin or placebo for the prevention of stroke events in patients. Duplicate independent data extraction and bias assessments were performed. Data were pooled using a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model if significant heterogeneity was present. Results: For the all stroke incidences, intensive-dose statin treatment compared with placebo treatment and standard-dose statin treatment compared with placebo treatment showed a significant 21% reduction in relative risk (RR) (RR 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.71, 0.87], P statin treatment compared with standard dose or placebo was effective reducing fatal stroke (RR 0.61, 95% CI [0.39, 0.96], P = 0.03) and the RR was 1.01 (95% CI [0.85, 1.20], P = 0.90) in standard-dose statin treatment compared with placebo. Conclusion: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that intensive-dose statin treatment might be more favorable for reducing the incidences of all strokes than standard-dose statin treatment, especially for patients older than 65 years in reducing the incidences of all stroke incidences. PMID:27684837

  20. Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in the secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk

    OpenAIRE

    Halkes, P.H.A.; Gray, Laura J.; Bath, Philip M.W.; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Guiraud-Chaumeil, B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to study the effect of combination therapy with aspirin and dipyridamole (A+D) over aspirin alone (ASA) in secondary prevention after transient \\ud ischemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin and to perform subgroup analyses to identify patients that might benefit most from secondary prevention with A+D.\\ud Data sources: The previously published meta-analysis of individual patient data was updated with data from ESPRIT (N=2,739); trials without data on ...

  1. Primary prevention of stroke by a healthy lifestyle in a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Åkesson, Agneta; Wolk, Alicja

    2015-06-02

    To examine the impact of a healthy lifestyle on stroke risk in men at higher risk of stroke because of other cardiovascular diseases or conditions. Our study population comprised 11,450 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men who had a history of hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart failure, or atrial fibrillation. Participants had completed a questionnaire about diet and lifestyle and were free from stroke and ischemic heart disease at baseline (January 1, 1998). We defined a healthy lifestyle as a low-risk diet (≥5 servings/d of fruits and vegetables and 0 to ≤30 g/d). Ascertainment of stroke cases was accomplished through linkage with the National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, we ascertained 1,062 incident stroke cases. The risk of total stroke and stroke types decreased with increasing number of healthy lifestyle factors. The multivariable relative risk of total stroke for men who achieved all 5 healthy lifestyle factors compared with men who achieved 0 or 1 factor was 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.14-0.55). The corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.31 (0.15-0.66) for ischemic stroke and 0.32 (0.04-2.51) for hemorrhagic stroke. A healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially reduced risk of stroke in men at higher risk of stroke. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Assessment of Web-based education resources informing patients about stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, E; Bajorek, B V

    2016-12-01

    risk and/or bleeding risk within the decision-making. At the 'latent-level' analysis, three overarching themes emerged: (i) The practical ease of managing NOACs over warfarin; (ii) Unbalanced explanation about stroke risk versus bleeding risk; and (iii) Individualized antithrombotic therapy selection. In general, the benefit of stroke prevention with anticoagulant use was emphasized less compared to the risk of bleeding. Overall, one in four resources had an implied preference for either warfarin or the NOACs. The implied inclination of some resources towards particular anticoagulant therapies and imbalanced information about the importance of anticoagulation in AF might misinform and confuse patients. Patients' engagement in shared decision-making and adherence to medicines may be undermined by the suboptimal quality of information provided in the resources. Health professionals have an important role to play in referring patients to appropriate resources to enable patient engagement in shared decision-making when selecting treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Multimodal secondary prevention behavioral interventions for TIA and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Lawrence

    Full Text Available Guidelines recommend implementation of multimodal interventions to help prevent recurrent TIA/stroke. We undertook a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of behavioral secondary prevention interventions.Searches were conducted in 14 databases, including MEDLINE (1980-January 2014. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs testing multimodal interventions against usual care/modified usual care. All review processes were conducted in accordance with Cochrane guidelines.Twenty-three papers reporting 20 RCTs (6,373 participants of a range of multimodal behavioral interventions were included. Methodological quality was generally low. Meta-analyses were possible for physiological, lifestyle, psychosocial and mortality/recurrence outcomes. Note: all reported confidence intervals are 95%. Systolic blood pressure was reduced by 4.21 mmHg (mean (-6.24 to -2.18, P = 0.01 I2 = 58%, 1,407 participants; diastolic blood pressure by 2.03 mmHg (mean (-3.19 to -0.87, P = 0.004, I2 = 52%, 1,407 participants. No significant changes were found for HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, high sensitivity-CR, BMI, weight or waist:hip ratio, although there was a significant reduction in waist circumference (-6.69 cm, -11.44 to -1.93, P = 0.006, I2 = 0%, 96 participants. There was no significant difference in smoking continuance, or improved fruit and vegetable consumption. There was a significant difference in compliance with antithrombotic medication (OR 1.45, 1.21 to 1.75, P<0.0001, I2 = 0%, 2,792 participants and with statins (OR 2.53, 2.15 to 2.97, P< 0.00001, I2 = 0%, 2,636 participants; however, there was no significant difference in compliance with antihypertensives. There was a significant reduction in anxiety (-1.20, -1.77 to -0.63, P<0.0001, I2 = 85%, 143 participants. Although there was no significant difference in odds of death or recurrent TIA/stroke, there was a significant reduction in the odds of cardiac events (OR 0.38, 0

  4. Is bleeding a necessary evil? The inherent risk of antithrombotic pharmacotherapy used for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myat, Aung; Ahmad, Yousif; Haldar, Shouvik; Tantry, Udaya S; Redwood, Simon R; Gurbel, Paul A; Lip, Gregory Yh

    2013-08-01

    Current European atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines have assigned a strong recommendation for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy to prevent thromboembolism in all but those AF patients at low risk (or with contraindications). Furthermore, the selection of antithrombotic therapy is based on the absolute risks of thromboembolism and bleeding, and the relative risk and benefit for a given patient. By their very mechanism of action, antithrombotic agents used for stroke prevention in AF will potentially increase the risk of bleeding events. Moreover, the introduction of novel oral anticoagulation agents have introduced new, hitherto ill-defined, deficiencies in the authors' knowledge with respect to anticoagulation monitoring, availability of direct antidotes, drug-drug interactions and the ability to appropriately control and reverse their actions if bleeding events occur. The authors present a comprehensive review on all aspects of bleeding related to currently licensed antithrombotic agents used for stroke prevention in patients with AF.

  5. Impact of the New American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Definition of Stroke on the Results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kasab, Sami; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. We also compared the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in both treatment groups. By considering CITS as equivalent to stroke, the number of primary end points increased from 34 to 43 in the medical group and from 52 to 66 in the stenting group of SAMMPRIS. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary end points in the 2 groups were significantly different (P = .009). The percentage of patients with reported TIAs who underwent brain MRI was 69% in the medical group and 61% in the stenting group (P = .40). Using the AHA/ASA definition of stroke resulted in a substantially higher primary end point rate in both treatment groups and an even higher benefit from medical therapy over stenting than originally shown in SAMMPRIS. The higher rate of CITS in the stenting group was not due to ascertainment bias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Prevalence, risk factors and secondary prevention of stroke recurrence in eight countries from south, east and southeast asia: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Y Y; Sakinah, H; Aryati, A; Hassan, B M

    2018-04-01

    In most Asian countries, stroke is one of the major causes of mortality. A stroke event is life-changing for stroke survivors, which results in either mortality or disability. Therefore, this study comprehensively focuses on prevalence, risk factors, and secondary prevention for stroke recurrence identified in South, East, and Southeast Asian countries. This scoping review uses the methodological framework of Arksey and O'Malley. A comprehensive search of academic journals (English) on this topic published from 2007 to 2017 was conducted. A total of 22 studies were selected from 585 studies screened from the electronic databases. First-year stroke recurrence rates are in the range of 2.2% to 25.4%. Besides that, modifiable risk factors are significantly associated with pathophysiological factors (hypertension, ankle-brachial pressure index, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and atrial fibrillation) and lifestyle factors (obesity, smoking, physical inactivity, and high salt intake). Furthermore, age, previous history of cerebrovascular events, and stroke subtype are also significant influence risk factors for recurrence. A strategic secondary prevention method for recurrent stroke is health education along with managing risk factors through a combination of appropriate lifestyle intervention and pharmacological therapy. To prevent recurrent stroke, health intervention should be geared towards changing lifestyle to embody a healthier approach to life. This is of great importance to public health and stroke survivors' quality of life.

  7. Stroke prevention--a population screening day in district XII of Budapest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folyovich, András; Bakos, Mária; Kántor, Zita; Hertelendy, Anna; Horváth, Eszter; Zsiga, Katalin; Lakatos, Henriette; Vadasdi, Károly

    2012-03-30

    Along with advances in the treatment of acute stroke, new efforts have been made to enhance efficiency of the prevention of cerebrovascular diseases. Population screening is a way to contact high-risk patients, and there is an increasing international and national experience with the procedure. However, efforts are associated with high costs, so an efficient method, complying with local features, should be selected from the various methods. A stroke prevention day was organized in Szent János Hospital, localized in district XII, and data were analyzed. Taking advantage of the potentials of a large hospital, a comprehensive risk assessment - within the capacity of health care workers - was performed. Program and contact information of the screening day was published in the local newspaper of the district. Data of 48 residents of the district were analyzed. In addition to neurologists, a radiologist, a cardiologist and an ophtalmologist, as well as health care workers were involved in the project. A data sheet was filled in for all participants, including known risk factors, BMI, blood pressure and serum cholesterol levels. All participants had duplex sonography of the cervical vessels, cardiac evaluation and ophtalmic examination. Data were analyzed anonymously, and - if participants approved - postcode and educational level were also recorded. Among the 48 individuals screened, 35 were female and 13 were male. Average age was 62.86 (+/- 8.57) years, and participants were typically of higher educational level. 5 individuals had no known risk factors, most of them had 2-3 risk factors, and multiple risk factors were not uncommon. Individuals with six and seven risk factors were also found. 20 of 27 patients with known hypertension had target blood pressure levels. By duplex sonography, 36 individuals had mild, 4 had significant atherosclerosis. There was no significant carotid stenosis or occlusion. Based on ophtalmic evaluation, 26 patients had signs of vascular

  8. What is the evidence for using family based interventions to prevent stroke recurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maggie; McVey, Caroline; Kerr, Susan

    Stroke has a devastating impact on individuals and families. Risk factors for recurrence include lifestyle behaviours such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. This article describes a programme of research that aims to gather and synthesise the evidence required to inform the development and evaluation of a family centred, behavioural intervention designed to address lifestyle risk factors for recurrent stroke. We present an overview of the research undertaken to develop the evidence base. This included a survey of stroke nurse practice, a focus group study with people who had had a stroke as well as their family members, and a systematic review of the efficacy of lifestyle interventions.

  9. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. F. Yip

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries.

  10. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2012-01-01

    As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries. PMID:22690187

  11. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diener, H.C.; Aisenberg, J.; Ansell, J.; Atar, D.; Breithardt, G.; Eikelboom, J.; Ezekowitz, M.D.; Granger, C.B.; Halperin, J.L.; Hohnloser, S.H.; Hylek, E.M.; Kirchhof, P.; Lane, D.A.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Veltkamp, R.; Lip, G.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have a high risk of stroke and mortality, which can be considerably reduced by oral anticoagulants (OAC). Recently, four non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for the prevention of stroke and systemic

  12. FERMENTED SOYBEAN CAKE AND ALBUMIN FORMULA AS NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT PREVENTS PROTEIN ENERGY MALNUTRITION AND AKI IN STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanny Djaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of death in every hospital in Indonesia. The death rate of newly formed or recurrent stroke is estimated around 750.000 case every year nation wide, 200.000 of which are recurrent stroke. Stroke patients have higher risk to develop another stroke attack. In 5 years time, the recurrence of stroke attack is estimated around 30–43%. In many cases, elderly stroke patients who were admitted to the hospital with recurrent stroke attack also suffer from anorexia which leads to hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and impaired renal function marked by a rise in ureum level with or without elevation in blood creatinin levels. This study uses pre and post nutrition intervention method. Hospital’s fermented soybean cake and albumin blend formula was given through nasogastric tube. The amount of calorie was adjusted according to basal needs x 1,3 and consisted of carbohydrate, protein 1 gram/kg BB (albumin : fermented soybean cake=3:1 and 25% fat. This formula was given to 11 stroke patients who had been admitted to Atma Jaya Hospital for at least 10 days and met the inclusion & exclusion criteria, such as did not receive parenteral blood and albumin transfusion without history of renal failure. All the patients’ intake and fluid balance were monitored. The average albumin level of these patients was ±3,1 mg/dL(pre intervention. After receiving nutrition (NGT and fluid (parenteral nutrition intervention, the result is as follows: There was an average of±5 mg increase in Natrium level during day 3–5 of hospital stay. There was an average of±0,3 mg increase in Kalium level during day 2–3 of hospital stay. There was an average of ±15 mg reduction of Ureum level during day 5–7 of hospital stay When there was inadequate calorie intake, protein from muscle might be broken down marked by a rise in blood ureum level with or without an increase in creatinin level. In this condition, electrolyte level, such as

  13. Management of Stroke Prevention in Canadian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation at Moderate to High Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchuk, William M; Levac, Brandon; Lara, Muria; Shakespeare, Annabelle; Evers, Thomas; Bolt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with atrial fibrillation who are at moderate to high risk of stroke do not receive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in accordance with recommendations. Objective: To determine (1) why Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation who are potentially eligible for VKA do not receive this therapy, (2) why Canadian primary care physicians discontinue VKA therapy, and (3) why VKA therapy is perceived as difficult to manage. Methods: The study involved a chart review of 3 cohorts of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at moderate to high risk of stroke: patients who had never received VKA treatment (VKA-naive), those whose treatment had been discontinued, and those whose VKA treatment was considered difficult to manage. Results: Charts for 187 patients (mean age 78.4 years, standard deviation 8.9 years) treated at 39 primary care sites were reviewed (62 treatment-naive, 42 with therapy discontinued, and 83 whose therapy was considered difficult to manage). Atrial fibrillation was paroxysmal in 82 (44%) of the patients, persistent in 47 patients (25%), and permanent in 58 (31%). One patient in each of the 3 cohorts had experienced a stroke during the 6 months before study participation. Bleeding events were more frequent among patients who had discontinued VKA therapy than in the other 2 groups. Among those whose therapy was discontinued and those whose therapy was difficult to manage, the mean time in the therapeutic range was 46.3% and 56.4%, respectively. The most common reason for not initiating VKA therapy in treatment-naive patients was the transient nature of atrial fibrillation (25/62 [40%]). The most common reason for discontinuation of VKA therapy was a bleeding event (10/42 [24%]). The presence of a concomitant chronic disease was the most common reason that a patient’s therapy was considered difficult to manage (46/83 [55%]). Conclusions: VKA therapy was not initiated or was discontinued for various reasons

  14. Management of stroke prevention in canadian patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate to high risk of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchuk, William M; Levac, Brandon; Lara, Muria; Shakespeare, Annabelle; Evers, Thomas; Bolt, Jennifer

    2013-09-01

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation who are at moderate to high risk of stroke do not receive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in accordance with recommendations. To determine (1) why Canadian patients with atrial fibrillation who are potentially eligible for VKA do not receive this therapy, (2) why Canadian primary care physicians discontinue VKA therapy, and (3) why VKA therapy is perceived as difficult to manage. The study involved a chart review of 3 cohorts of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at moderate to high risk of stroke: patients who had never received VKA treatment (VKA-naive), those whose treatment had been discontinued, and those whose VKA treatment was considered difficult to manage. Charts for 187 patients (mean age 78.4 years, standard deviation 8.9 years) treated at 39 primary care sites were reviewed (62 treatment-naive, 42 with therapy discontinued, and 83 whose therapy was considered difficult to manage). Atrial fibrillation was paroxysmal in 82 (44%) of the patients, persistent in 47 patients (25%), and permanent in 58 (31%). One patient in each of the 3 cohorts had experienced a stroke during the 6 months before study participation. Bleeding events were more frequent among patients who had discontinued VKA therapy than in the other 2 groups. Among those whose therapy was discontinued and those whose therapy was difficult to manage, the mean time in the therapeutic range was 46.3% and 56.4%, respectively. The most common reason for not initiating VKA therapy in treatment-naive patients was the transient nature of atrial fibrillation (25/62 [40%]). The most common reason for discontinuation of VKA therapy was a bleeding event (10/42 [24%]). The presence of a concomitant chronic disease was the most common reason that a patient's therapy was considered difficult to manage (46/83 [55%]). VKA therapy was not initiated or was discontinued for various reasons. Multiple comorbid conditions made management of VKA

  15. [Edoxaban for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism: an expert position paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Thomas W; Rohla, Miklos; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Domanovits, Hans; Fries, Dietmar; Vosko, Milan R; Gary, Thomas; Ay, Cihan

    2018-04-01

    Edoxaban is the most recent available representative of the Non-Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC). The approval was based on the largest phase III trials of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, ENGAGE-AF), and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE, HOKUSAI-VTE). In both trials, edoxaban was associated with similar efficacy and a significant reduction in bleeding events with respect to the pre-defined primary safety endpoints, as compared to warfarin.Additionally, the once daily dosing of edoxaban, the clinically investigated strategy for dose-reduction based on clearly defined criteria and the favorable pharmacokinetic profile might further support the clinical applicability of the substance.In the light of recent data, this expert consensus document aims to summarize the latest clinical trial results while providing a concise overview of current guideline recommendations on the management of patients with non-valvular AF and VTE.

  16. Mexican Americans are Less Likely to Return to Work Following Stroke: Clinical and Policy Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Wing, Jeffrey J; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Brown, Devin L; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2016-08-01

    Greater poststroke disability and U.S. employment policies may disadvantage minority stroke survivors from returning to work. We explored ethnic differences in return to work among Mexican Americans (MAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) working at the time of their stroke. Stroke patients were identified from the population-based BASIC (Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi) study from August 2011 to December 2013. Employment status was obtained at baseline and 90-day interviews. Sequential logistic regression models were built to assess ethnic differences in return to work after accounting for the following: (1) age (working at the time of their stroke, of which 125 (63%) completed the 90-day outcome interview. Forty-nine (40%) stroke survivors returned to work by 90 days. MAs were less likely to return to work (OR = .45, 95% CI .22-.94) than NHWs. The ethnic difference became nonsignificant after adjusting for NIHSS (OR = .59, 95% CI .24-1.44) and further attenuated after adjusting for education (OR = .85, 95% CI .32- 2.22). The majority of stroke survivors did not return to work within 90 days of their stroke. MA stroke survivors were less likely to return to work after stroke than NHW stroke survivors which was due to their greater neurological deficits and lower educational attainment compared with that of NHW stroke survivors. Future work should focus on clinical and policy efforts to reduce ethnic disparities in return to work. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic interventions and success in risk factor control for secondary prevention of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Sabin, Jose; Quintana, Manuel; Hernandez-Presa, Miguel Angel; Alvarez, Carlos; Chaves, Jose; Ribo, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the success rates in achieving preventive therapeutic goals in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke (IS) and compare them with those achieved in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This was an observational multicenter case-control study (3 patients with IS and one control subject with CAD) performed in 1444 primary health centers in Spain. Preventive therapeutic objectives according to American Heart Association guidelines were predefined. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, and success/failure in achievement of objectives were recorded and compared between patients with IS and CAD. A total of 5458 patients were included, 4098 (75.1%) had IS and 1360 (24.9%) had CAD. Although more than 90% of patients with hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia were under specific drug regimens, only about 25% achieved the recommended therapeutic objective for each risk factor. Success rate was especially low among patients with IS compared with CAD: hypertension (23.8% v 27.2%; P = .028); dyslipidemia (13.6% v 20.3%; P risk factors under control, compared with 5.6% of those with CAD (P = .006). For all patients, multivariate logistic regression model showed that independent predictors of full risk factor control were: presence of CAD as compared with IS (odds ratio [OR] 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-3.29; P = .001), older age (OR 1.02; 95% CI 1.00-1.04; P = .028), and having less than 3 risk factors (OR 16.98; 95% CI 9.02-31.97; P risk factor control.

  18. Point-of-care cluster randomized trial in stroke secondary prevention using electronic health records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dregan, Alex; van Staa, Tjeerd P; McDermott, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Ashworth, Mark; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony; Yardley, Lucy; Gulliford, Martin C

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the remote introduction of electronic decision support tools into family practices improves risk factor control after first stroke. This study also aimed to develop methods to implement cluster randomized trials in stroke using

  19. Safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients: The AMADEUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Minini, P.; Buller, H.R.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    ackground: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous ischemic stroke are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but are also perceived to be at increased bleeding risk while treated with anticoagulants. Methods: Post-hoc analyses examined the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation of 4576 AF

  20. Help seeking behavior and onset-to-alarm time in patients with acute stroke: sub-study of the preventive antibiotics in stroke study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, E.; Kerkhoff, H.; Kleyweg, R. P.; van Bavel-Ta, T. B. V.; Scott, S.; Kruyt, N. D.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute stroke often do not seek immediate medical help, which is assumed to be driven by lack of knowledge of stroke symptoms. We explored the process of help seeking behavior in patients with acute stroke, evaluating knowledge about stroke symptoms, socio-demographic and clinical

  1. Indications and applications of arterial stents for stroke prevention in atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Jeremy D; Liu, Kenneth C; Barnwell, Stanley L; Clark, Wayne M; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial stenosis accounts for 8-10% of all ischemic strokes in North America, a frequency slightly less than that of extracranial carotid stenosis. Among patients presenting with transient ischemic attack or stroke due to intracranial stenosis, the risk of recurrent stroke in the first year after initial symptoms is about 14%. Those with high-risk features (recent stroke and severe stenosis) have up to a 23% rate of recurrent stroke in the year after their initial event. Angioplasty with stenting has emerged as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in high-risk patients, although evidence is currently limited to uncontrolled prospective trials and retrospective case series. In this article, we critically review the clinical results supporting the use of stenting and highlight some key considerations in the application of this technology, including patient selection, procedural management, technical issues, and risk factors for complications and in-stent restenosis.

  2. Contemporary approach to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: Risks, benefits, and new options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Jonathan; Malm, Brian J

    2018-04-04

    Atrial fibrillation is a common diagnosis affecting nearly 3 million adults in the United States. Morbidity and mortality in these patients is driven largely by the associated increased risk of thromboembolic complications, especially stroke. Atrial fibrillation is a stronger risk factor than hypertension, coronary disease, or heart failure and is associated with an approximately five-fold increased risk. Mitigating stroke risk can be challenging and requires accurate assessment of stroke risk factors and careful selection of appropriate therapy. Anticoagulation, including the more recently introduced direct oral anticoagulants, is the standard of care for most patients. In addition, emerging non-pharmacologic mechanical interventions are playing an expanding role in reducing stroke risk in select patients. In this review we highlight the current approach to stroke risk stratification in atrial fibrillation and discuss in detail the mechanism, risks, and benefits of current and evolving therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure for Secondary Prevention of Cryptogenic Stroke: Updated Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Qamar, Arman; Gupta, Ankur; Bajaj, Navkaranbir; Golwala, Harsh B; Pandey, Ambarish; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-05-01

    Patent foramen ovale closure represents a potential secondary prevention strategy for cryptogenic stroke, but available trials have varied by size, device studied, and follow-up. We conducted a systematic search of published randomized clinical trials evaluating patent foramen ovale closure versus medical therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack using PubMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane through September 2017. Weighting was by random effects models. Of 480 studies screened, we included 5 randomized clinical trials in the meta-analysis in which 3440 patients were randomized to patent foramen ovale closure (n = 1829) or medical therapy (n = 1611) and followed for an average of 2.0 to 5.9 years. Index stroke/transient ischemic attack occurred within 6 to 9 months of randomization. The primary end point was composite stroke/transient ischemic attack and death (in 3 trials) or stroke alone (in 2 trials). Patent foramen ovale closure reduced the primary end point (0.70 vs 1.48 events per 100 patient-years; risk ratio [RR], 0.52 [0.29-0.91]; I 2  = 55.0%) and stroke/transient ischemic attack (1.04 vs 2.00 events per 100 patient-years; RR, 0.55 [0.37-0.82]; I 2  = 42.2%) with modest heterogeneity compared with medical therapy. Procedural bleeding was not different between study arms (1.8% vs 1.8%; RR, 0.94 [0.49-1.83]; I 2  = 29.2%), but new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter was increased with patent foramen ovale closure (6.6% vs 0.7%; RR, 4.69 [2.17-10.12]; I 2  = 29.3%). In patients with recent cryptogenic stroke, patent foramen ovale closure reduces recurrent stroke/transient ischemic attack compared with medical therapy, but is associated with a higher risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Large-Scale Linkage Data to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a National Educational Program on Antithrombotic Prescribing and Associated Stroke Prevention in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixin; Moorin, Rachael; Worthington, John; Tofler, Geoffrey; Bartlett, Mark; Khan, Rabia; Zuo, Yeqin

    2016-10-13

    The National Prescribing Service (NPS) MedicineWise Stroke Prevention Program, which was implemented nationally in 2009-2010 in Australia, sought to improve antithrombotic prescribing in stroke prevention using dedicated interventions that target general practitioners. This study evaluated the impact of the NPS MedicineWise Stroke Prevention Program on antithrombotic prescribing and primary stroke hospitalizations. This population-based time series study used administrative health data linked to 45 and Up Study participants with a high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to assess the possible impact of the NPS MedicineWise program on first-time aspirin prescriptions and primary stroke-related hospitalizations. Time series analysis showed that the NPS MedicineWise program was significantly associated with increased first-time prescribing of aspirin (P=0.03) and decreased hospitalizations for primary ischemic stroke (P=0.03) in the at-risk study population (n=90 023). First-time aspirin prescription was correlated with a reduction in the rate of hospitalization for primary stroke (P=0.02). Following intervention, the number of first-time aspirin prescriptions increased by 19.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-38.0), while the number of first-time stroke hospitalizations decreased by 17.3% (95% confidence interval, 1.8-30.0). Consistent with NPS MedicineWise program messages for the high-risk CVD population, the NPS MedicineWise Stroke Prevention Program (2009) was associated with increased initiation of aspirin and a reduced rate of hospitalization for primary stroke. The findings suggest that the provision of evidence-based multifaceted large-scale educational programs in primary care can be effective in changing prescriber behavior and positively impacting patient health outcomes. © 2016 The Authors and NPS MedicineWise. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Effects of a multifactorial falls prevention program for people with stroke returning home after rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Frances A; Hill, Keith D; Mackintosh, Shylie F; Said, Catherine M; Whitehead, Craig H

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether a multifactorial falls prevention program reduces falls in people with stroke at risk of recurrent falls and whether this program leads to improvements in gait, balance, strength, and fall-related efficacy. A single blind, multicenter, randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Participants were recruited after discharge from rehabilitation and followed up in the community. Participants (N=156) were people with stroke at risk of recurrent falls being discharged home from rehabilitation. Tailored multifactorial falls prevention program and usual care (n=71) or control (usual care, n=85). Primary outcomes were rate of falls and proportion of fallers. Secondary outcomes included injurious falls, falls risk, participation, activity, leg strength, gait speed, balance, and falls efficacy. There was no significant difference in fall rate (intervention: 1.89 falls/person-year, control: 1.76 falls/person-year, incidence rate ratio=1.10, P=.74) or the proportion of fallers between the groups (risk ratio=.83, 95% confidence interval=.60-1.14). There was no significant difference in injurious fall rate (intervention: .74 injurious falls/person-year, control: .49 injurious falls/person-year, incidence rate ratio=1.57, P=.25), and there were no significant differences between groups on any other secondary outcome. This multifactorial falls prevention program was not effective in reducing falls in people with stroke who are at risk of falls nor was it more effective than usual care in improving gait, balance, and strength in people with stroke. Further research is required to identify effective interventions for this high-risk group. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke: Quantitative synthesis of pooled randomized trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Abdul; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Katramados, Angelos; Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Iliescu, Cezar; Gundogdu, Betul; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos

    2018-01-14

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous device closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke BACKGROUND: Stroke remains the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States. The effectiveness of a percutaneous PFO closure in the prevention of recurrent cryptogenic strokes has not been established. We performed a literature search using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, and Internet-based sources from January 2003 to September 2017. Randomized controlled trails (RCTs) comparing percutaneous PFO closure to medical therapy alone. Five RCTs (CLOSURE I, PC Trial, REDUCE, RESPECT, and CLOSE) with 1,829 patients in the device group and 1,611 patients in the medical group met inclusion criteria. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 2.02% in the PFO closure arm and 4.4% in the medical therapy group (RR 0.42, 95%CI 0.20, 0.91; P = 0.03). There was no difference in the incidence of death [0.7% vs. 0.9%; RR 0.76 (95% CI 0.35, 1.64), P = 0.49] or adverse events during the follow-up period [24.6% vs. 23.7% (RR 1.03; 95% CI 0.91, 1.16), P = 0.65] between the closure and medical therapy groups. Incidence of atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in closure group compared to medical therapy [4% vs. 0.6% (RR 4.73; 95% CI 2.09, 10.70), P = 0.0002]. The comparative effectiveness of PFO closure (compared to medical therapy) was significantly more pronounced in those younger than 45 years, males, larger shunts and disc design platforms (P < 0.05). Based on the results of this analysis of randomized trial data, percutaneous PFO closure appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with PFO and cryptogenic stroke. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid...... management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients....

  8. In vivo bioimpedance measurement of healthy and ischaemic rat brain: implications for stroke imaging using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowrick, T; Blochet, C; Holder, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to facilitate the imaging of haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke using frequency difference electrical impedance tomography (EIT), impedance measurements of normal and ischaemic brain, and clotted blood during haemorrhage, were gathered using a four-terminal technique in an in vivo animal model, a first for ischaemic measurements. Differences of 5–10% in impedance were seen between the frequency spectrums of healthy and ischaemic brain, over the frequency range 0–3 kHz, while the spectrum of blood was predominately uniform. The implications of imaging blood/ischaemia in the brain using electrical impedance tomography are discussed, supporting the notion that it will be possible to differentiate stroke from haemorrhage. (paper)

  9. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness of the Adverse Cardiovascular Health Impacts of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities i...

  10. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild stroke: I: feasibility and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Peter L; Hachinski, Vladimir; Unsworth, Karen; Chan, Richard; Mytka, Sharon; O'Callaghan, Christina; Suskin, Neville

    2011-11-01

    Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), which integrates structured lifestyle interventions and medications, reduces morbidity and mortality among cardiac patients. CCR has not typically been used with cerebrovascular populations, despite important commonalities with heart patients. We tested feasibility and effectiveness of 6-month outpatient CCR for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke. This article presents risk factors. A future article will discuss psychological outcomes. Consecutive consenting subjects having sustained a transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke within the previous 12 months (mean, 11.5 weeks; event-to-CCR entry) with ≥1 vascular risk factor, were recruited from a stroke prevention clinic providing usual care. We measured 6-month CCR outcomes following a prospective cohort design. Of 110 subjects recruited from January 2005 to April 2006, 100 subjects (mean age, 64.9 years; 46 women) entered and 80 subjects completed CCR. We obtained favorable, significant intake-to-exit changes in: aerobic capacity (+31.4%; Pstroke, offering a promising model for vascular protection across chronic disease entities. We know of no similar previous investigation, and are now conducting a randomized trial.

  11. Implication of Mauk Nursing Rehabilitation Model on Adjustment of Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Ebrahimpour mouziraji

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stroke is a neurological syndrome with sudden onset or gradual destruction of brain vessels, which may take 24 hours or more. Complications of stroke effect in the variation aspects of the individual. According to De Spulveda and Chang’s Studies, disability reduced the effective adjustment. This study aimed to overview the adjustment of stroke patients based on the main concepts of rehabilitation nursing Mauk model. Methods: In a quasi-experimental one group pre-posttest design study, data was collected in the neurology clinic of Imam Khomeini hospital and stroke patient rehabilitation centers in Tehran (Tabassom. Data collection included demographic and adjustment questionnaires of stroke patients. The intervention included seven sessions as Mauk model, each session with one hour training, for seven patients. Data analysis performed with SPSS software with paired t-test and was compared with previous results. Results: There were significant differences between the mean scores of patients with stroke adjustment questionnaire in the pre-test-post-test. But in the adjustment sub-scales, except for relationship with wife and Personal adjustment, in other areas, there is no statistically significant difference between the pre and posttest. Discussion: The results indicated that training has been affected on some aspects of adjustment of stroke patients in order to, as improving functions, complications and its limitations. Nurses can help then with implementing of plans such as patients education in this regard.

  12. A qualitative study on discrimination and ethical implications in stroke care in contemporary Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofanidis, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    Contemporary stroke care is diverse, contributing to complex ethical dilemmas and controversies. In Greece, continuing austerity measures and an ageing population are expected to increase the burden of stroke on health care delivery. We sought to explore ethical views and stances of health care professionals caring for stroke patients in Greece. Forms of discrimination against elderly hospitalized patients were also addressed. A qualitative design was adopted whereby an informal focus group interview and follow-up, face-to-face individual interviews were undertaken. The sample consisted of 12 nurses working in clinical areas with stroke patients. Their mean age was 31 years with a mean work experience of 10 years. Individual discussions were audio taped after subject consent and were transcribed verbatim subsequently for keywords-in-context analysis. Analysis of the focus interview revealed several recurring themes, namely, ward destination, admission policies, the concepts of age as related to stroke. Individual interviews highlighted several other topics, such as preferences for specific types of patients, communication capacity of the patient's condition, and his or her individual characteristics as a favoring or limiting factors, and challenges to age-related criteria for treatment. There is an age-related criteria of 65 years for ward destination after stroke as set by a ministerial decree, which is still practiced. Moreover, younger stroke patients may be offered more thorough assessments and clinical tests and therapies. Discrepancies in the level of care pose an ethical concern regarding levels of care for older stroke patients in Greece. A longstanding, age-related national policy in Greece regarding hospital admission criteria is shown to be a detrimental influence on ward admission for stroke patients. This policy, coupled with prehospital care protocols, was shown to promote ageism against this patient group. The age-related agenda in the Greek health

  13. Anticoagulant use for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: findings from a multi-payer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kathleen; Bozkaya, Duygu; Patel, Aarti A; Macomson, Brian; Nelson, Winnie; Owens, Gary; Mody, Samir; Schein, Jeff; Menzin, Joseph

    2014-07-28

    Oral anticoagulation is recommended for stroke prevention in intermediate/high stroke risk atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of analytic software tools for descriptive analyses of disease management in atrial AF; a secondary objective is to demonstrate patterns of potential anticoagulant undertreatment in AF. Retrospective data analyses were performed using the Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer (AQuIA), a software tool designed to analyze health plan data. Two-year data from five databases were analyzed: IMS LifeLink (IMS), MarketScan Commercial (MarketScanCommercial), MarketScan Medicare Supplemental (MarketScanMedicare), Clinformatics™ DataMart, a product of OptumInsight Life Sciences (Optum), and a Medicaid Database (Medicaid). Included patients were ≥ 18 years old with a new or existing diagnosis of AF. The first observed AF diagnosis constituted the index date, with patient outcomes assessed over a one year period. Key study measures included stroke risk level, anticoagulant use, and frequency of International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring. High stroke risk (CHADS2 ≥ 2 points) was estimated in 54% (IMS), 22% (MarketScanCommercial), 64% (MarketscanMedicare), 42% (Optum) and 62% (Medicaid) of the total eligible population. Overall, 35%, 29%, 38%, 39% and 16% of all AF patients received an anticoagulant medication in IMS, MarketScanCommercial, MarketScanMedicare, Optum and Medicaid, respectively. Among patients at high risk for stroke, 19% to 51% received any anticoagulant. The AQuIA provided a consistent platform for analysis across multiple AF populations with varying baseline characteristics. Analyzer results show that many high-risk AF patients in selected commercial, Medicare-eligible, and Medicaid populations do not receive appropriate thromboprophylaxis, as recommended by treatment guidelines.

  14. Design and Rationale of the Intima-Medial Thickness Sub-Study of the PreventIon of CArdiovascular Events in iSchemic Stroke Patients with High Risk of Cerebral hemOrrhage (PICASSO-IMT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Woo-Keun; Kim, Yong Jae; Lee, Juneyoung; Kwon, Sun U

    2017-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the main mechanisms of stroke and cardiovascular diseases and is associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events. Intima-medial thickness (IMT) is a well-known surrogate marker of atherosclerosis and has been used to predict stroke and cardiovascular events. However, the clinical significance of IMT and IMT change in stroke has not been investigated in well-designed studies. The PreventIon of CArdiovascular events in iSchemic Stroke patients with high risk of cerebral hemOrrhage-Intima-Media Thickness (PICASSO-IMT) sub-study is designed to investigate the effects of cilostazol, probucol, or both on IMT in patients with stroke. PICASSO-IMT is a prospective sub-study of the PICASSO study designed to measure IMT and plaque score at 1, 13, 25, 37, and 49 months after randomization. The primary outcome is the change in mean carotid IMT, which is defined as the mean of the far-wall IMTs of the right and left common carotid arteries, between baseline and 13 months after randomization. PICASSO-IMT will provide the largest IMT data set in a stroke population and will provide valuable information about the clinical significance of IMT in patients with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depending on the quality of warfarin anticoagulation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, are standard treatments for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Patient outcomes depend on quality of warfarin management, which includes regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that do not require regular monitoring offer an alternative to warfarin. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depends on the quality of warfarin control. We developed a Markov decision model to simulate warfarin treatment outcomes in relation to the quality of anticoagulation control, expressed as percentage of time in the therapeutic range (TTR). Standard treatment with adjusted-dose warfarin and improved anticoagulation control by genotype-guided dosing were compared with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. The analysis was performed from the Slovenian healthcare payer perspective using 2014 costs. In the base case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for apixaban, dabigatran and edoxaban was below the threshold of €25,000 per quality-adjusted life-years compared with adjusted-dose warfarin with a TTR of 60%. The probability that warfarin was a cost-effective option was around 1%. This percentage rises as the quality of anticoagulation control improves. At a TTR of 70%, warfarin was the preferred treatment in half the iterations. The cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who are at increased risk for stroke is highly sensitive to warfarin anticoagulation control. NOACs are more likely to be cost-effective options in settings with poor warfarin management than in settings with better anticoagulation control, where they may not represent good value for money.

  16. Intensified secondary prevention intending a reduction of recurrent events in TIA and minor stroke patients (INSPiRE-TMS: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leistner Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with recent stroke or TIA are at high risk for new vascular events. Several evidence based strategies in secondary prevention of stroke are available but frequently underused. Support programs with multifactorial risk factor modifications after stroke or TIA have not been investigated in large-scale prospective controlled trials so far. INSPiRE-TMS is a prospective, multi-center, randomized open intervention trial for intensified secondary prevention after minor stroke and TIA. Methods/design Patients with acute TIA or minor stroke admitted to the participating stroke centers are screened and recruited during in-hospital stay. Patients are randomised in a 1:1 ratio to intervention (support program and control (usual care arms. Inclusion of 2.082 patients is planned. The support program includes cardiovascular risk factor measurement and feedback, monitoring of medication adherence, coaching in lifestyle modifications, and active involvement of relatives. Standardized motivational interviewing is used to assess and enhance patients’ motivation. Primary objective is a reduction of new major vascular events defined as nonfatal stroke and myocardial infarction or vascular death. Recruitment time is planned for 3.5 years, follow up time is at least 2 years for every patient resulting in a total study time of 5 years (first patient in to last patient out. Discussion Given the high risk for vascular re-events in acute stroke and the available effective strategies in secondary prevention, the INSPIRE-TMS support program has the potential to lead to a relevant reduction of recurrent events and a prolongation of the event-free survival time. The trial will provide the basis for the decision whether an intensified secondary prevention program after stroke should be implemented into regular care. A cost-effectiveness evaluation will be performed. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov: 01586702

  17. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevent Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and ... can’t change some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of ...

  18. Anticoagulant use for prevention of stroke in a commercial population with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti A; Lennert, Barb; Macomson, Brian; Nelson, Winnie W; Owens, Gary M; Mody, Samir H; Schein, Jeff

    2012-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, and patients with AF are at an increased risk for stroke. Thromboprophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists reduces the annual incidence of stroke by approximately 60%, but appropriate thromboprophylaxis is prescribed for only approximately 50% of eligible patients. Health plans may help to improve quality of care for patients with AF by analyzing claims data for care improvement opportunities. To analyze pharmacy and medical claims data from a large integrated commercial database to determine the risk for stroke and the appropriateness of anticoagulant use based on guideline recommendations for patients with AF. This descriptive, retrospective claims data analysis used the Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer software, which was designed to analyze health plan data. The data for this study were obtained from a 10% randomly selected sample from the PharMetrics Integrated Database. This 10% sample resulted in almost 26,000 patients with AF who met the inclusion criteria for this study. Patients with a new or existing diagnosis of AF between July 2008 and June 2010 who were aged ≥18 years were included in this analysis. The follow-up period was 1 year. Demographics, stroke risk level (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores), anticoagulant use, and inpatient stroke hospitalizations were analyzed through the analyzer software. Of the 25,710 patients with AF (CHADS2 score 0-6) who were eligible to be included in this study, 9093 (35%) received vitamin K antagonists and 16,617 (65%) did not receive any anticoagulant. Of the patients at high risk for stroke, as predicted by CHADS2, 39% received an anticoagulant medication. The rates of patients receiving anticoagulant medication varied by age-group-16% of patients aged <65 years, 22% of those aged 65 to 74 years, and 61% of elderly ≥75 years. Among patients hospitalized for stroke, only 28% were treated with an anticoagulant agent in the outpatient

  19. Piloting a Sex-Specific, Technology-Enhanced, Active Learning Intervention for Stroke Prevention in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirickson, Amanda; Stutzman, Sonja E; Alberts, Mark J; Novakovic, Roberta L; Stowe, Ann M; Beal, Claudia C; Goldberg, Mark P; Olson, DaiWai M

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies reveal deficiencies in stroke awareness and knowledge of risk factors among women. Existing stroke education interventions may not address common and sex-specific risk factors in the population with the highest stroke-related rate of mortality. This pilot study assessed the efficacy of a technology-enhanced, sex-specific educational program ("SISTERS") for women's knowledge of stroke. This was an experimental pretest-posttest design. The sample consisted of 150 women (mean age, 55 years) with at least 1 stroke risk factor. Participants were randomized to either the intervention (n = 75) or control (n = 75) group. Data were collected at baseline and at a 2-week posttest. There was no statistically significant difference in mean knowledge score (P = .67), mean confidence score (P = .77), or mean accuracy score (P = .75) between the intervention and control groups at posttest. Regression analysis revealed that older age was associated with lower knowledge scores (P < .001) and lower confidence scores (P < .001). After controlling for age, the SISTERS program was associated with a statistically significant difference in knowledge (P < .001) and confidence (P < .001). Although no change occurred overall, after controlling for age, there was a statistically significant benefit. Older women may have less comfort with technology and require consideration for cognitive differences.

  20. An examination of current stroke rehabilitation practice in Peru: Implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Cody L; Fuhs, Amy K; Kartin, Deborah

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to better understand current clinical practice of rehabilitation professionals in Lima, Peru, and to explore the existence of and potential for interprofessional collaboration. A secondary purpose was to assess rehabilitation professionals' agreement with evidence-based stroke rehabilitation statements and confidence performing stroke rehabilitation tasks prior to and following an interprofessional stroke rehabilitation training. Current clinical practice for rehabilitation professionals in Peru differs from high-income counties like the United States, as physical therapists work with dysphagia and feeding, prosthetist orthotists serve a strictly technical role, and nurses have a limited role in rehabilitation. Additionally, while opportunity for future interprofessional collaboration within stroke rehabilitation exists, it appears to be discouraged by current health system policies. Pre- and post-training surveys were conducted with a convenience sample of 107 rehabilitation professionals in Peru. Survey response options included endorsement of professionals for rehabilitation tasks and a Likert scale of agreement and confidence. Training participants largely agreed with evidence-based stroke rehabilitation statements. Differences in opinion remained regarding the prevalence of dysphagia and optimal frequency of therapy post-stroke. Substantially increased agreement post-training was seen in favour of early initiation of stroke rehabilitation and ankle foot orthosis use. Participants were generally confident performing traditional profession-specific interventions and educating patients and families. Substantial increases were seen in respondents' confidence to safely and independently conduct bed to chair transfers and determine physiological stability. Identification of key differences in rehabilitation professionals' clinical practice in Peru is a first step toward strengthening the development of sustainable rehabilitation systems and

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Apixaban, Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Warfarin for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Hui-Chun

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients by incorporating Taiwanese demographic information derived from a population-based database, the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), into cost-effectiveness analysis. From 1 January to 31 December 2012, 98,213 AF patients were selected from the NHIRD database. A Markov model was constructed that combined published secondary data with the Taiwan NHIRD to compare the cost and incremental cost effectiveness of apixaban 5 mg twice daily, dabigatran 110 or 150 mg twice daily, rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily, and warfarin. The lifetime costs of warfarin, dabigatran 110 mg, dabigatran 150 mg, rivaroxaban 20 mg, and apixaban 5 mg were US$10,660, US$13,693, US$13,426, US$13,455, US$15,965, respectively. Apixaban resulted in an incremental cost effectiveness of US$39,351, US$27,039, US$41,298, and US$48,896 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) compared with warfarin, dabigatran 110 mg, dabigatran 150 mg, and rivaroxaban 20 mg, respectively. In Monte-Carlo analyses, apixaban 5 mg, rivaroxaban 20 mg, warfarin, and dabigatran 110 mg were cost effective in 83, 10.4, 7, and 0.8%, respectively, of the simulations using a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of US$50,000 per QALY. Apixaban was more cost effective than warfarin, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Among the anticoagulant therapies, the WTP threshold of apixaban was about US$50,000 per QALY gained. These cost-effectiveness estimations provide useful information to aid clinical decision making in stroke prevention for AF patients.

  2. Percutaneous atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm-Larsen, Stine; Cao, Christopher; Yan, Tristan D

    2012-01-01

    databases. Fourteen studies were identified for evaluation. Overall, implantation was successful in 93% of all cases. Periprocedural mortality and stroke rates were 1.1% and 0.6%, respectively. The incidences of pericardial effusion/cardiac tamponade and device embolisation were 4% and 0.7%, respectively....... At the time of the latest follow-up (up to 40 months), the overall incidence of stroke among all studies was 1.4% per annum. Existing evidence suggests that PLAAO is a relatively safe treatment for patients with AF. However, there is a need for further evaluation of its efficacy in the form of large and well...

  3. Time since injury limits but does not prevent improvement and maintenance of gains in balance in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Roberto; Noé, Enrique; Alcañiz, Mariano; Deutsch, Judith E

    2018-01-01

    To determine the influence of time since injury on the efficacy and maintenance of gains of rehabilitation of balance after stroke. Forty-seven participants were assigned to a least (6-12 months), a moderate (12-24 months), or a most chronic (>24 months) group. Participants trained for 20 one-hour sessions, administered three to five times a week, combining conventional physical therapy and visual feedback-based exercises that trained the ankle and hip strategies. Participants were assessed before, after the intervention, and one month later with a posturography test (Sway Speed and Limits of Stability) and clinical scales. In contrast to other subjects, the most chronic participants failed to improve their sway and to maintain the benefits detected in the Limits of Stability after the intervention. Although all the participants improved in those clinical tests that better matched the trained skills, time since injury limited the improvement, and over all, the maintenance of gains. Time since injury limits but does not prevent improvement in chronic stages post-stroke, and this effect appears to be more pronounced with maintaining gains. These findings support that training duration and intensity as well as type of therapy may need to be adjusted based on time post-stroke.

  4. Atrial fibrillation detected by continuous electrocardiographic monitoring using implantable loop recorder to prevent stroke in individuals at risk (The LOOP study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Zöga; Haugan, Ketil Jørgen; Køber, Lars

    2017-01-01

    years or older and previously diagnosed as having at least one of the following conditions: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, or previous stroke. Exclusion criteria include history of AF and current oral anticoagulation treatment. When an AF episode lasting ≥6minutes is detected, oral...... anticoagulation will be initiated according to guidelines. Expected follow-up is 4years. The primary end point is time to stroke or systemic embolism, whereas secondary end points include time to AF diagnosis and death. CONCLUSION: The LOOP study will evaluate health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ILR...... as a screening tool for AF to prevent stroke in patients at risk. Secondary objectives include identification of risk factors for the development of AF and characterization of arrhythmias in the population. The trial holds the potential to influence the future of stroke prevention....

  5. Totarol prevents neuronal injury in vitro and ameliorates brain ischemic stroke: Potential roles of Akt activation and HO-1 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuanxue; Xu, Xiaojun; Chang, Sai; Wang, Yunjie; Xu, Yazhou; Ran, Siqi [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Huang, Zhangjian [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Discovery for Metabolic Diseases, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Ping [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Jia [National Center for Drug Screening, State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Guo Shoujing Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Zhang, Luyong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Saavedra, Juan M. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Liao, Hong, E-mail: liaohong56@hotmail.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Pang, Tao, E-mail: tpang@cpu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The natural product totarol, a phenolic diterpenoid and a major constituent isolated from the sap of Podocarpus totara, has been reported to have a potent antimicrobial activity. In this study, we determined whether totarol possessed an additional neuroprotective activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that totarol prevented glutamate- and oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death in primary rat cerebellar granule neuronal cells and cerebral cortical neurons. Totarol increased Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylation, Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expressions and suppressed oxidative stress by increasing GSH and SOD activities. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 prevented totarol neuroprotective effect by suppressing the totarol-induced changes in HO-1 expression and the activities of GSH and SOD. The HO-1 inhibitor ZnPPIX also prevented totarol-increased GSH and SOD activities. In a model of acute cerebral ischemic injury in Sprague–Dawley rats, produced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 2 h followed by 22 h or 46 h of reperfusion, totarol significantly reduced infarct volume and improved the neurological deficit. In this model, totarol increased HO-1 expression and the activities of GSH and SOD. These observations suggest that totarol may be a novel activator of the Akt/HO-1 pathway protecting against ischemic stroke through reduction of oxidative stress. - Graphical abstract: It is unknown whether the natural product totarol has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. This study underscores that totarol prevents neuronal injury in vitro, not only by activating PI3K/Akt pathway, but also via induction of Nrf2, HO-1, GSH and SOD expressions. Totarol also ameliorated acute cerebral ischemic injury in a rat ischemic stroke model. The findings highlight that totarol may be exploited for protecting against ischemic stroke through Akt/HO-1 pathway. - Highlights: • Totarol protects glutamate- and OGD-induced neuronal injury in vitro.

  6. Totarol prevents neuronal injury in vitro and ameliorates brain ischemic stroke: Potential roles of Akt activation and HO-1 induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yuanxue; Xu, Xiaojun; Chang, Sai; Wang, Yunjie; Xu, Yazhou; Ran, Siqi; Huang, Zhangjian; Li, Ping; Li, Jia; Zhang, Luyong; Saavedra, Juan M.; Liao, Hong; Pang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The natural product totarol, a phenolic diterpenoid and a major constituent isolated from the sap of Podocarpus totara, has been reported to have a potent antimicrobial activity. In this study, we determined whether totarol possessed an additional neuroprotective activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that totarol prevented glutamate- and oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death in primary rat cerebellar granule neuronal cells and cerebral cortical neurons. Totarol increased Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylation, Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expressions and suppressed oxidative stress by increasing GSH and SOD activities. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 prevented totarol neuroprotective effect by suppressing the totarol-induced changes in HO-1 expression and the activities of GSH and SOD. The HO-1 inhibitor ZnPPIX also prevented totarol-increased GSH and SOD activities. In a model of acute cerebral ischemic injury in Sprague–Dawley rats, produced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 2 h followed by 22 h or 46 h of reperfusion, totarol significantly reduced infarct volume and improved the neurological deficit. In this model, totarol increased HO-1 expression and the activities of GSH and SOD. These observations suggest that totarol may be a novel activator of the Akt/HO-1 pathway protecting against ischemic stroke through reduction of oxidative stress. - Graphical abstract: It is unknown whether the natural product totarol has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. This study underscores that totarol prevents neuronal injury in vitro, not only by activating PI3K/Akt pathway, but also via induction of Nrf2, HO-1, GSH and SOD expressions. Totarol also ameliorated acute cerebral ischemic injury in a rat ischemic stroke model. The findings highlight that totarol may be exploited for protecting against ischemic stroke through Akt/HO-1 pathway. - Highlights: • Totarol protects glutamate- and OGD-induced neuronal injury in vitro.

  7. Implications of Helicobacter pylori infection for stomach cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Karen J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has implicated Helicobacter pylori, an established cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, in the etiology of gastric cancer. Control of this infection would reduce the occurrence of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and might substantially lower the risk of stomach cancer as well. The public health impact of this infectious agent warrants efforts to identify preventive measures. This paper reviews the evidence linking H. pylori infection to gastric cancer and evaluates the potential for control in high-risk populations. Current obstacles to H. pylori control are discussed, including the link to poor socioeconomic conditions, difficulty in identifying incident cases, lack of natural immunity to reinfection, limited effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in high-prevalence populations, and incomplete knowledge regarding the reservoir of infection, mode of transmission, host susceptibility factors, and the potential for developing an effective vaccine. Worthwhile avenues of research include studies designed to identify modifiable risk factors for acquisition of the infection, modifiable host factors that may increase resistance to chronic infection, more effective antibiotic therapies, and effective vaccines.

  8. Million Hearts 2022: Understanding the Links between Environmental Pollutant Exposure and Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Events - Justus-Warren Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    The webinar was requested by the Justus-Warren Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Task Force. From their website, “The task force was established in 1995 in North Carolina to provide statewide leadership for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. Meetings are...

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of left atrial appendage occlusion compared with pharmacological strategies for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian Wing-Yan; Tsai, Ronald Bing-Ching; Chow, Ines Hang-Iao; Yan, Bryan Ping-Yen; Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Park, Jai-Wun; Lam, Yat-Yin

    2016-08-31

    Transcatheter left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) is a promising therapy for stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) but its cost-effectiveness remains understudied. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of LAAO for stroke prophylaxis in NVAF. A Markov decision analytic model was used to compare the cost-effectiveness of LAAO with 7 pharmacological strategies: aspirin alone, clopidogrel plus aspirin, warfarin, dabigatran 110 mg, dabigatran 150 mg, apixaban, and rivaroxaban. Outcome measures included quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), lifetime costs and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Base-case data were derived from ACTIVE, RE-LY, ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, PROTECT-AF and PREVAIL trials. One-way sensitivity analysis varied by CHADS2 score, HAS-BLED score, time horizons, and LAAO costs; and probabilistic sensitivity analysis using 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations was conducted to assess parameter uncertainty. LAAO was considered cost-effective compared with aspirin, clopidogrel plus aspirin, and warfarin, with ICER of US$5,115, $2,447, and $6,298 per QALY gained, respectively. LAAO was dominant (i.e. less costly but more effective) compared to other strategies. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated favorable ICERs of LAAO against other strategies in varied CHADS2 score, HAS-BLED score, time horizons (5 to 15 years) and LAAO costs. LAAO was cost-effective in 86.24 % of 10,000 simulations using a threshold of US$50,000/QALY. Transcatheter LAAO is cost-effective for prevention of stroke in NVAF compared with 7 pharmacological strategies. The transcatheter left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) is considered cost-effective against the standard 7 oral pharmacological strategies including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) alone, clopidogrel plus ASA, warfarin, dabigatran 110 mg, dabigatran 150 mg, apixaban, and rivaroxaban for stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation management.

  10. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, O; Arnous, S; Ihlemann, N

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. One of its most devastating complications is the development of thromboembolism leading to fatal or disabling stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC, warfarin) is the standard treatment for strok...

  11. Lifestyle interventions to prevent cardiovascular events after stroke and transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijle, Inger A.; Van Schaik, Sander M.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Kwakkel, Gert; Van Den Berg-Vos, Renske M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Patients with a transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke have an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine whether lifestyle interventions focusing on behaviorally modifiable risk factors

  12. ESPRIT (European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial) and related studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, P.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    1. We compared 120 patients who had had a large subcortical infarct with 324 who had had a small deep infarct and with 211 who had had a cortical infarct from the same cohort. We found no differences in risk factor profiles between the three groups, nor a difference in stroke recurrence rate. 2. We

  13. Can we prevent OA? Epidemiology and public health insights and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runhaar, Jos; Zhang, Yuqing

    2018-05-01

    This narrative review discusses the potential of prevention of OA in different stages of the disease. The theoretical background for primary prevention (i.e. prevention of occurrence of definite structural or clinical OA in subjects free of the disease) and secondary prevention (i.e. prevention of progression of the disease in subjects with pre-clinical pathological changes to the joint) is provided and evidence for effective strategies is discussed. Since direct evidence for the prevention of OA development and progression is scarce, indirect evidence enhancing our current knowledge on the potential of OA prevention is additionally discussed. Also, implications of preventive strategies for study design and public health are considered. Prevention of OA has great potential, but as deliberated in the current review, there are still large gaps in our current knowledge and the implications of preventive strategies for the development and progression of OA require consideration.

  14. Shared decision making for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Branda, Megan E; Noseworthy, Peter A; Linzer, Mark; Burnett, Bruce; Dick, Sara; Spencer-Bonilla, Gabriela; Fernandez, Cara A; Gorr, Haeshik; Wambua, Mike; Keune, Shelly; Zeballos-Palacios, Claudia; Hargraves, Ian; Shah, Nilay D; Montori, Victor M

    2017-09-29

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common ongoing health problem that places patients at risk of stroke. Whether and how a patient addresses this risk depends on each patient's goals, context, and values. Consequently, leading cardiovascular societies recommend using shared decision making (SDM) to individualize antithrombotic treatment in patients with AF. The aim of this study is to assess the extent to which the ANTICOAGULATION CHOICE conversation tool promotes high-quality SDM and influences anticoagulation uptake and adherence in patients with AF at risk of strokes. This study protocol describes a multicenter, encounter-level, randomized trial to assess the effect of using the ANTICOAGULATION CHOICE conversation tool in the clinical encounter, compared to usual care. The participating centers include an academic hospital system, a suburban community group practice, and an urban safety net hospital, all in Minnesota, USA. Patients with ongoing nonvalvular AF at risk of strokes (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score ≥ 1 in men, or ≥ 2 in women) will be eligible for participation. We aim to include 999 patients and their clinicians. The primary outcome is the quality of SDM as perceived by participants, and as assessed by a post-encounter survey that ascertains (a) knowledge transfer, (b) concordance of the decision made, (c) quality of communication, and (d) satisfaction with the decision-making process. Recordings of encounters will be reviewed to assess the extent of patient involvement and how participants use the tool (fidelity). Anticoagulant use, choice of agent, and adherence will be drawn from patients' medical and pharmacy records. Strokes and bleeding events will be drawn from patient records. This study will provide a valid and precise measure of the effect of the ANTICOAGULATION CHOICE conversation tool on SDM quality and processes, and on the treatment choices and adherence to therapy among AF patients at risk of stroke. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT

  15. Reaction of Sulfuric Acid in Lube Oil: Implications for Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejre, Kasper Hartvig; Kiil, Søren; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Slow-steaming operation and an increased pressure in the combustion chamber have contributed to increased sulfuric acid (H2SO4) condensation on the cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines, thus causing increased corrosion wear. To cope with this, lube oils are formulated...... of CaCO3 compared to the condensed H2SO4. The observed corrosion wear in large two-stroke marine diesel engines could consequently be attributed to local molar excess of H2SO4 compared to CaCO3 reverse micelles on the cylinder liners....

  16. The Gut Microbiome as Therapeutic Target in Central Nervous System Diseases: Implications for Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winek, Katarzyna; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Research on commensal microbiota and its contribution to health and disease is a new and very dynamically developing field of biology and medicine. Recent experimental and clinical investigations underscore the importance of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis and course of stroke. Importantly, microbiota may influence the outcome of cerebral ischemia by modulating central nervous system antigen-specific immune responses. In this review we summarize studies linking gut microbiota with physiological function and disorders of the central nervous system. Based on these insights we speculate about targeting the gut microbiome in order to treat stroke.

  17. The effect of electrical stimulation in combination with Bobath techniques in the prevention of shoulder subluxation in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fil, Ayla; Armutlu, Kadriye; Atay, Ahmet Ozgur; Kerimoglu, Ulku; Elibol, Bulent

    2011-01-01

    To examine the efficiency of electrical stimulation in combination with Bobath techniques in the prevention of inferior and anterior shoulder subluxation in acute stroke patients. A prospective randomized controlled trial. Intensive care unit and inpatient clinics of neurology in a university hospital. Forty-eight patients with acute stroke, divided equally into control and study groups. Subjects in both groups were treated in accordance with the Bobath concept during the early hospitalization period. In addition to Bobath techniques, electrical stimulation was also applied to the supraspinatus muscle, mid and posterior portions of the deltoid muscle of patients in the study group. Two radiological methods were used to measure the horizontal, vertical and total asymmetry and vertical distance values of the shoulder joint. Motor functions of the arm were evaluated with the Motor Assessment Scale. The hospitalization period was 12.62 ± 2.24 days for the control group and 11.66 ± 1.88 days for the study group. Shoulder subluxation occurred in 9 (37.5%) subjects in the control group, whereas it was not observed in the study group. All shoulder joint displacement values were higher in the control group than in the study group (horizontal asymmetry P = 0.0001, vertical asymmetry P = 0.0001, total asymmetry P = 0.0001, vertical range P = 0.002). Application of electrical stimulation combined with the Bobath approach proved to be efficient in preventing inferior and anterior shoulder subluxation in the acute stages of stroke.

  18. Lesion mapping in acute stroke aphasia and its implications for recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Stephanie J; Catani, Marco

    2018-03-29

    Patients with stroke lesions offer a unique window into understanding human brain function. Studying stroke lesions poses several challenges due to the complexity of the lesion anatomy and the mechanisms causing local and remote disruptions on brain networks. In this prospective longitudinal study, we compare standard and advanced approaches to white matter lesion mapping applied to acute stroke patients with aphasia. Eighteen patients with acute left hemisphere stroke were recruited and scanned within two weeks from symptom onset. Aphasia assessment was performed at baseline and six-month follow-up. Structural and diffusion MRI contrasts indicated an area of maximum overlap in the anterior external/extreme capsule with diffusion images showing a larger overlap extending into posterior perisylvian regions. Predictors of recovery included damage to ipsilesional tracts (as shown by both structural and diffusion images) and contralesional tracts (as shown by diffusion images only). These findings indicate converging results from structural and diffusion lesions mapping analysis but clear differences between the two approaches in their ability to identify predictors of recovery. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Relative effects of statin therapy on stroke and cardiovascular events in men and women: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Lamonte, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In SPARCL, treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily reduced stroke risk in patients with recent stroke or TIA and no known coronary heart disease by 16% versus placebo over 4.9 years of follow-up. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine whether men and women.......98 in women; P=0.40). CONCLUSIONS: Stroke and other cardiovascular events are similarly reduced with atorvastatin 80 mg/d in men and women with recent stroke or TIA Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9...

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events among atrial fibrillation patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimachi, Miho; Furukawa, Toshi A; Kimachi, Kimihiko; Goto, Yoshihito; Fukuma, Shingo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-11-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF), which is more prevalent among CKD patients than the general population. AF causes stroke or systemic embolism, leading to increased mortality. The conventional antithrombotic prophylaxis agent warfarin is often prescribed for the prevention of stroke, but risk of bleeding necessitates regular therapeutic monitoring. Recently developed direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are expected to be useful as alternatives to warfarin. To assess the efficacy and safety of DOAC including apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban versus warfarin among AF patients with CKD. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register (up to 1 August 2017) through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Specialised Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which directly compared the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors or factor Xa inhibitors) with dose-adjusted warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events in non-valvular AF patients with CKD, defined as creatinine clearance (CrCl) or eGFR between 15 and 60 mL/min (CKD stage G3 and G4). Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed quality, and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the association between anticoagulant therapy and all strokes and systemic embolic events as the primary efficacy outcome and major bleeding events as the primary safety outcome. Confidence in the evidence was assessing using GRADE. Our review included 12,545 AF participants with CKD from five studies. All participants were randomised to either DOAC (apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban

  1. Virtual reality in stroke rehabilitation: a meta-analysis and implications for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Levin, Mindy

    2011-05-01

    Approximately two thirds of stroke survivors continue to experience motor deficits of the arm resulting in diminished quality of life. Conventional rehabilitation provides modest and sometimes delayed effects. Virtual reality (VR) technology is a novel adjunctive therapy that could be applied in neurorehabilitation. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the added benefit of VR technology on arm motor recovery after stroke. We searched Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane literature from 1966 to July 2010 with the terms "stroke," "virtual reality," and "upper arm/extremity." We evaluated the effect of VR on motor function improvement after stroke. From the 35 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria totaling 195 participants. Among them, there were 5 randomized clinical trials and 7 observational studies with a pre-/postintervention design. Interventions were delivered within 4 to 6 weeks in 9 of the studies and within 2 to 3 weeks in the remaining 3. Eleven of 12 studies showed a significant benefit toward VR for the selected outcomes. In the pooled analysis of all 5 randomized controlled trials, the effect of VR on motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer) was OR=4.89 (95% CI, 1.31 to 18.3). No significant difference was observed for Box and Block Test or motor function. Among observational studies, there was a 14.7% (95% CI, 8.7%-23.6%) improvement in motor impairment and a 20.1% (95% CI, 11.0%-33.8%) improvement in motor function after VR. VR and video game applications are novel and potentially useful technologies that can be combined with conventional rehabilitation for upper arm improvement after stroke.

  2. The "DOC" screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H; Cayley, Megan L; Lanctôt, Krista L; Murray, Brian J; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E; Sicard, Michelle N; Lien, Karen; Sahlas, Demetrios J; Herrmann, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Cognitive impairment ("DOC") are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool ("DOC" screen) to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment. All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines. 1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes), less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index), had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens. Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may facilitate improved identification and treatment

  3. POST-STROKE COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT – PHENOMENOLOGY AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Danovska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke patients are at higher risk of developing cognitive impairment. Cognitive dysfunctions, especially progressive ones, worsen stroke prognosis and outcome. A longitudinal follow-up of cognitive disorders, however, is rendered difficult by their heterogeneity and the lack of definitions generally agreed upon. Stroke is a major cause of cognitive deficit. The identification of risk factors, clinical determinants and laboratory markers of post-stroke cognitive deficit may help detect patients at increased risk of cognitive deterioration, and prevent or delay the occurrence of post-stroke cognitive impairments. Though inflammatory processes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke, their role in the complex pathophysiological mechanisms of post-stroke cognitive impairment is not completely understood. Evidence suggests that elevated serum C-reactive protein is associated with both the increased risk of stroke and post-stroke cognitive deficit. The hypothesis of a possible relationship between markers of systemic inflammation and cognitive dysfunctions raises the question of how rational the option of applying non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a proper therapeutic window will be, especially during the acute phase of stroke, to prevent cognitive decline and dementia.

  4. Cognitive Impairment, Vulnerability, and Mortality Post Ischemic Stroke: A Five-Year Follow-Up of the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Eva; Rohde, Daniela; Large, Margaret; Mellon, Lisa; Hall, Patricia; Brewer, Linda; Conway, Orla; Hickey, Anne; Bennett, Kathleen; Dolan, Eamon; Callaly, Elizabeth; Williams, David

    2018-05-23

    The aim of this study was to examine predictors of mortality in patients 5 years after ischemic stroke, focusing on cognitive impairment, vulnerability, and vascular risk factors assessed at 6 months post stroke. Patients from the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) cohort were followed up 5 years post ischemic stroke. Vascular risk factors, cognitive impairment, and vulnerability were assessed at 6 months post stroke. Cognitive impairment was assessed using a cutoff score lower than 26 on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Vulnerability was defined as a score of 3 or higher on the Vulnerable Elders Scale (VES). Mortality and date of death were ascertained using hospital records, death notifications, and contact with general practitioners. Predictors of mortality were explored using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are presented. Sixty-three of 256 patients (24.6%) assessed at 6 months post stroke had died within 5 years. Cognitive impairment (HR [95% CI]: 2.19 [1.42-3.39]), vulnerability (HR [95% CI]: 5.23 [2.92-9.36]), atrial fibrillation (AF) (HR [95% CI]: 2.31 [1.80-2.96]), and dyslipidemia (HR [95% CI]: 1.90 [1.10-3.27]) were associated with increased risk of 5-year mortality. Vulnerability, cognitive impairment, AF, and dyslipidemia at 6 months were associated with increased risks of mortality 5 years post ischemic stroke. Identification and management of these risk factors should be emphasized in poststroke care. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood pressure 1 year after stroke: the need to optimize secondary prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Lowering blood pressure (BP) in stroke survivors reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. We tested the hypothesis that a nurse-led nonpharmacologic intervention would lower the BP of participants in an intervention group compared with a control group. A total of 349 patients who had sustained acute...... with antihypertensive therapy, and 92% of the hypertensive patients in the intervention group followed the advice to see a general practitioner (GP) for BP checkups. At follow-up, 187 patients (62%) were hypertensive, with no difference in the rate of hypertension seen between the groups. Our data indicate that home...... visits by nurses did not result in a lowering of BP. Patients complied with antihypertensive therapy and GP visits in the case of hypertension. Nonetheless, the majority of patients were hypertensive at the 1-year follow up....

  6. Generalization of the Right Acute Stroke Prevention Strategies in Reducing in-Hospital Delays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Huang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the door-to-needle (DTN time of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT in acute ischemic stroke (AIS through a comprehensive, hospital-based implementation strategy. The intervention involved a systemic literature review, identifying barriers to rapid IVT treatment at our hospital, setting target DTN time intervals, and building an evolving model for IVT candidate selection. The rate of non-in-hospital delay (DTN time ≤ 60 min was set as the primary endpoint. A total of 348 IVT cases were enrolled in the study (202 and 146 in the pre- and post-intervention group, respectively. The median age was 61 years in both groups; 25.2% and 26.7% of patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups, respectively, were female. The post-intervention group had higher rates of dyslipidemia and minor stroke [defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS ≤ 3]; less frequent atrial fibrillation; higher numbers of current smokers, heavy drinkers, referrals, and multi-model head imaging cases; and lower NIHSS scores and blood sugar level (all P 0.05. These findings indicate that it is possible to achieve a DTN time ≤ 60 min for up to 60% of hospitals in the current Chinese system, and that this logistical change can yield a notable improvement in the outcome of IVT patients.

  7. Rationale for ischemic conditioning to prevent stroke in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Al Kasab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic arterial stenosis (ICAS is one of the most common causes of stroke worldwide and is associated with particularly a high risk of recurrent stroke. Although aggressive medical management, consisting of dual antiplatelet therapy and intensive control of vascular risk factors, has improved the prognosis of patients with ICAS, subgroups of patients remain at very high risk of stroke. More effective therapies for these high-risk patients are urgently needed. One promising treatment is remote limb ischemic conditioning, which involves producing repetitive, transient ischemia of a limb by inflating a blood pressure cuff with the intention of protecting the brain from subsequent ischemia. In this study, we review the limitations of currently available treatments, discuss the potential mechanisms of action of ischemic conditioning, describe the preclinical and clinical data suggesting a possible role of ischemic conditioning in treating patients with ICAS, and outline the questions that still need to be answered in future studies of ischemic conditioning in subjects with ICAS.

  8. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist...

  9. The Implications of Preemptive and Preventive War Doctrines: A Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    geopolitics, ideology , and personality as combining to produce the fatal brew which resulted in 42 years of nuclear shadowed global menace.26 But...preventive war. 49 1. Preventive war is war, and preventive warfare is warfare. It is not a distinctive genus of war and warfare. The distinguishing

  10. Secondary prevention lifestyle interventions initiated within 90 days after TIA or 'minor' stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of rehabilitation programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Donnelly, Michael; Cupples, Margaret E

    2017-01-01

    Strokes are often preceded by a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or 'minor' stroke. The immediate period after a TIA/minor stroke is a crucial time to initiate secondary prevention. However, the optimal approach to prevention, including non-pharmacological measures, after TIA is not clear. To systematically review evidence about the effectiveness of delivering secondary prevention, with lifestyle interventions, in comprehensive rehabilitation programmes, initiated within 90 days of a TIA/minor stroke. Also, to categorise the specific behaviour change techniques used. The review identified randomised controlled trials by searching the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Web of Science, EBSCO CINAHL and Ovid PsycINFO. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility (programmes initiated within 90 days of event; outcomes reported for TIA/minor stroke) and extracted relevant data from appraised studies; a meta-analysis was used to synthesise the results. A total of 31 potentially eligible papers were identified and four studies, comprising 774 patients post-TIA or minor stroke, met the inclusion criteria; two had poor methodological quality. Individual studies reported increased aerobic capacity but meta-analysis found no significant change in resting and peak systolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, aerobic capacity, falls, or mortality. The main behaviour change techniques were goal setting and instructions about how to perform given behaviours. There is limited evidence of the effectiveness of early post-TIA rehabilitation programmes with preventive lifestyle interventions. Further robust randomised controlled trials of comprehensive rehabilitation programmes that promote secondary prevention and lifestyle modification immediately after a TIA are needed. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  11. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Patient Resources Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Pediatric Stroke » Introduction Introduction What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Introduction Types of Stroke Diagnosis and Treatment ...

  12. Implications of the 2015 World Health Organization isoniazid preventive therapy recommendations on tuberculosis prevention efforts in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloo, Stella Anne

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization recently released guidelines recommending 36-month use of isoniazid preventive therapy in adults and adolescents living with HIV in resource-limited settings. Namibia continues to grapple with one of the highest incidences of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide. Implementation of these guidelines requires considerations of TB epidemiology, health infrastructure, programmatic priorities and patient adherence. This article explores the challenges Namibia currently faces in its fight against TB and the implications of the new guidelines on Namibian TB prevention efforts.

  13. Therapeutic Decisions in Atrial Fibrillation for Stroke Prevention: The Role of Aversion to Ambiguity and Physicians' Risk Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, Luciano A; Stirling, Devin; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2018-04-09

    Knowledge-to-action gaps influence therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF). Physician-related factors are common, but the least studied. We evaluated the prevalence and determinants of physician-related factors and knowledge-to-action gaps among physicians involved in the management of AF patients. In this cross-sectional study, participants from 6 South American countries recruited during an educational program answered questions regarding 16 case scenarios of patients with AF and completed experiments assessing 3 outcome measures: therapeutic inertia, herding, and errors in risk stratification knowledge translated into action (ERSKTA) based on commonly used stratification tools (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years (double), Diabetes mellitus, previous Stroke/transient ischemic attack/thromboembolism (double), Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, and female gender (score of 0 for males and 1 for female) (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc) and Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years, Diabetes mellitus, and previous Stroke/transient ischemic attack (double) (CHADS 2 )). Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with the outcomes. Overall, 149 physicians were invited to participate, of which 88 (59.1%) completed the online assessment tool. Cardiology was the most frequent specialty (69.3%). Therapeutic inertia was present in 53 participants (60.2%), herding in 66 (75.0%), and ERSKTA in 46 (52.3%). Therapeutic inertia was inversely associated with willingness to take financial risks (odds ratio [OR] .72, 95% confidence interval [CI] .59-.89 per point in the financial risk propensity score), herding was associated with aversion to ambiguity in the medical domain (OR 5.35, 95% CI 1.40-20.46), and ERSKTA was associated with the willingness to take risks (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.15-2.50, per point in score). Among physicians involved in stroke prevention in AF, individual risk preferences and aversion to ambiguity lead

  14. Stroke prevention in hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Seema; Anderson, David; Putnam, Wayne; Flowerdew, Gordon; Gardner, Martin; Cox, Jafna

    2003-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants reduce the incidence of stroke by 68%, yet suboptimal use has been documented in surveys of patients with atrial fibrillation. The present study examined current patterns of anticoagulant use for patients hospitalized with atrial fibrillation across an entire health care system. Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes in Nova Scotia (ICONS) is a prospective cohort study involving all patients hospitalized in Nova Scotia with atrial fibrillation, among other conditions. Consecutive inpatients with atrial fibrillation from October 15, 1997 to October 14, 1998 were studied. Detailed demographic and clinical data were collected and the proportion of patients using antithrombotic therapy was tabulated by risk category. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship of various demographic and clinical factors with the use of antithrombotic agents. There were 2202 patients hospitalized with atrial fibrillation; 644 admitted specifically for this condition. Only 21% of patients admitted with atrial fibrillation were on warfarin sodium at admission and this increased by time of discharge. Diabetes was negatively correlated with warfarin sodium use. Histories of prosthetic valve replacement, stroke/transient ischemic attack, and heart failure were positively associated with anticoagulant use on admission. Patients with prosthetic valve replacement, heart failure, or hyperlipidemia were most likely to receive anticoagulants at discharge. Antithrombotic agents remain underused by patients with atrial fibrillation. While higher risk patients are generally targeted, this is not invariably the case; thus, diabetics remain under treated. Further work is needed to explain such anomalous practice and promote optimal antithrombotic therapy use.

  15. Dabigatran for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in atrial fibrillation: A NICE single technology appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rita; Spackman, Eldon; Burch, Jane; Corbacho, Belen; Todd, Derick; Pepper, Chris; Woolacott, Nerys; Palmer, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of dabigatran etexilate (Boehringer Ingelheim Ltd, UK) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost-effectiveness of this drug for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) as part of the NICE single technology appraisal process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York were commissioned to act as the evidence review group (ERG). This article presents a summary of the manufacturer's submission, the ERG report and the subsequent development of NICE guidance for the use of dabigatran within the UK National Health Service. Dabigatran was granted marketing authorisation by the European Medicines Agency for a sequential dosing regimen (DBG sequential), in which patients under 80 years are treated with dabigatran 150 mg twice daily (DBG150) and patients 80 years and over are given dabigatran 110 mg twice daily (DBG110). NICE decisions are bound by the marketing authorisation; therefore, the decision problem faced by the committee was whether the DBG sequential regimen was effective and cost-effective compared with warfarin or aspirin for patients with non-valvular AF and one or more risk factors. The RE-LY trial, a large multi-centre non-inferiority randomised clinical trial, was the primary source of clinical evidence. DBG150 was shown to be non-inferior, and subsequently superior to warfarin, for the primary outcome of all stroke/systemic embolism. DBG110 was found to be non-inferior to warfarin. Results were presented for a post hoc subgroup analysis for patients under and over 80 years of age, where DBG110 showed a statistically significant reduction of haemorrhagic stroke and intracranial haemorrhage in comparison to warfarin in patients over 80 years of age. This post hoc subgroup analysis by age was the basis for the licensed DBG sequential regimen

  16. LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE CLOSURE AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO WARFARIN FOR STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: A PATIENT¬LEVEL META¬ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmes D.R. Jr, Doshi S.K., Kar S., et al. Left Atrial Appendage Closure as an Alternative to Warfarin for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: A Patient­Level Meta­Analysis // J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. – 2015. – Vol. 65. – P. 2614–2623.

  17. Patent foramen ovale closure vs medical therapy for stroke prevention: meta-analysis of randomized trials and review of heterogeneity in meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udell, Jacob A; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Khairy, Paul; Silversides, Candice K; Gladstone, David J; O'Gara, Patrick T; Landzberg, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) might be a risk factor for unexplained ("cryptogenic") stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We sought to determine the efficacy and safety of transcatheter PFO closure compared with antithrombotic therapy for secondary prevention of cerebrovascular events among patients with cryptogenic stroke. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of MedLine and Embase (from inception to March 2013) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared transcatheter PFO closure with medical therapy in subjects with cryptogenic stroke. Data were independently extracted on trial conduct quality, baseline characteristics, efficacy, and safety events from published articles and appendices. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the composite of stroke or TIA, and adverse cardiovascular events including atrial fibrillation/flutter were constructed. Three RCTs of 2303 subjects with previous stroke, TIA, or systemic arterial embolism (mean age, 45.7 years; 47.3% women; mean follow-up, 2.6 years) were included. PFO closure did not significantly reduce the risk of recurrent stroke/TIA (3.7% vs 5.2%; RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.50-1.07; P = 0.10); however, an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation/flutter was detected (3.8% vs 1.0%; RR, 3.67; 95% CI, 1.95-6.89; P < 0.0001). No significant heterogeneity was detected for any end point among subgroups of patients stratified according to age, sex, index cardiovascular event, device type, interatrial shunt size, and presence of an atrial septal aneurysm (all P interactions ≥ 0.09). Meta-analysis of RCTs that assessed transcatheter PFO closure for secondary prevention of cerebrovascular events in subjects with cryptogenic stroke does not demonstrate benefit compared with antithrombotic therapy, and suggests potential risks. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. How do stroke survivors and their carers use practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medications? Qualitative study of an online forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuka, Nkeonye J; Alexander, Matthew A W; Balasooriya-Smeekens, Chantal; Mant, Jonathan; De Simoni, Anna

    2017-09-01

    Secondary prevention medications reduce risk of stroke recurrence, yet many people do not receive recommended treatment, nor take medications optimally. Exploring how patients report making use of practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medicines on an online forum and what feedback was received from other participants. Thematic analysis of the archive of Talkstroke (2004-2011), UK. Posts including any secondary prevention medication terms, General Practitioner (GP) and their replies were identified. Fifity participants talked about practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medications in 43 discussion threads. Patients consulted practitioners for reassurance and dealing with side effects. Practitioners' advice varied from altering to maintaining current treatment. Three main themes emerged from the use of practitioners' advice: patients following advice (reassured, happy when side effects made tolerable, or still retaining anxiety about treatment); patients not following advice (admitting adherence on-off or stopping medications as side effects still not tolerable); asking other participants for feedback on advice received. Practitioners' advice was disregarded mainly when related to dealing with statin side effects, after one or two consultations. Themes for feedback involved sharing experience, directing back to practitioners, or to external evidence. Side effects of secondary prevention medications and statins in particular, cause anxiety and resentment in some patients, and their concerns are not always addressed by practitioners. Practitioners could consider more proactive strategies to manage such side effects. Forum feedback was appropriate and supportive of the practitioners' advice received. Our findings from peer-to-peer online conversations confirm and widen previous research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Suboptimal Anticoagulant Management in Japanese Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Warfarin for Stroke Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Kaneko, Hirokazu; Mishina, Sari; Wang, Feng; Morita, Satoshi

    2017-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with increasing prevalence in Japan. Although prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (PT-INR) targets for monitoring warfarin therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF (NVAF) are well defined, real-world patient characteristics and PT-INR levels remain unknown among Japanese patients with NVAF who initiate and continue warfarin (warfarin maintainers) versus those who switch from warfarin to direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs; warfarin switchers). Patients with NVAF receiving oral anticoagulants between February 2013 and June 2015 were identified using a nationwide electronic medical record (EMR) database from 69 hospitals in Japan. Demographics and characteristics of patients, PT-INR, time in therapeutic range (TTR), and frequency in range (FIR) of PT-INR between warfarin maintainers and warfarin switchers were assessed. A total of 1705 patients met inclusion criteria and were examined (1501 warfarin maintainers versus 204 warfarin switchers). CHADS 2 , CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc, and HAS-BLED scores were comparable between groups. However, these scores were significantly higher among warfarin switchers at the time of switching than at the time of warfarin initiation. Furthermore, TTR and FIR of PT-INR were lower in warfarin switchers than in maintainers. Nevertheless, TTR and FIR were below 50% (PT-INR, 1.6-2.6) in both patient groups. In this EMR-based clinical study, patients who switched to DOACs had both poor or inadequate PT-INR control and higher risk factors of stroke. Many patients receiving warfarin did not achieve sufficient PT-INR therapeutic range. DOACs could be recommended in Japanese patients with NVAF with inadequate PT-INR control and increased risk of stroke. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prophylactic Edaravone Prevents Transient Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: Implications for Perioperative Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Yo; Li, Yikun; Wali, Bushra; Li, Yuancheng; Lee, Jolly; Heinmiller, Andrew; Abe, Koji; Stein, Donald G; Mao, Hui; Sayeed, Iqbal; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2015-07-01

    Hypoperfusion-induced thrombosis is an important mechanism for postsurgery stroke and cognitive decline, but there are no perioperative neuroprotectants to date. This study investigated whether prophylactic application of Edaravone, a free radical scavenger already used in treating ischemic stroke in Japan, can prevent infarct and cognitive deficits in a murine model of transient cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to transient hypoxic-ischemic (tHI) insult that consists of 30-minute occlusion of the unilateral common carotid artery and exposure to 7.5% oxygen. Edaravone or saline was prophylactically applied to compare their effects on cortical oxygen saturation, blood flow, coagulation, oxidative stress, metabolites, and learning-memory using methods that include photoacoustic imaging, laser speckle contrast imaging, solid-state NMR, and Morris water maze. The effects on infarct size by Edaravone application at different time points after tHI were also compared. Prophylactic administration of Edaravone (4.5 mg/kg×2, IP, 1 hour before and 1 hour after tHI) improved vascular reperfusion, oxygen saturation, and the maintenance of brain metabolites, reducing oxidative stress, thrombosis, white-matter injury, and learning impairment after tHI insult. Delayed Edaravone treatment after 3 h post-tHI became unable to reduce infarct size. Acute application of Edaravone may be a useful strategy to prevent postsurgery stroke and cognitive impairment, especially in patients with severe carotid stenosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Securitisation, Counterterrorism and the Silencing of Dissent: The Educational Implications of "Prevent"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the implications of counterterrorist legislation, including Prevent, for the pedagogical relationship and for educational institutions. The concept of "radicalisation", central to the Prevent Strategy, is one that is contested in the field of counterterrorism, yet educators are now expected to identify and…

  2. Aversion to ambiguity and willingness to take risks affect therapeutic decisions in managing atrial fibrillation for stroke prevention: results of a pilot study in family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Stavroula; Chen, Jia Ning; Saposnik, Florencia; Pelyavskyy, Roman; Liuni, Andrew; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation is the therapeutic paradigm for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). It is unknown how physicians make treatment decisions in primary stroke prevention for patients with AF. To evaluate the association between family physicians' risk preferences (aversion risk and ambiguity) and therapeutic recommendations (anticoagulation) in the management of AF for primary stroke prevention by applying concepts from behavioral economics. Overall, 73 family physicians participated and completed the study. Our study comprised seven simulated case vignettes, three behavioral experiments, and two validated surveys. Behavioral experiments and surveys incorporated an economic framework to determine risk preferences and biases (e.g., ambiguity aversion, willingness to take risks). The primary outcome was making the correct decision of anticoagulation therapy. Secondary outcomes included medical errors in the management of AF for stroke prevention. Overall, 23.3% (17/73) of the family physicians elected not to escalate the therapy from antiplatelets to anticoagulation when recommended by best practice guidelines. A total of 67.1% of physicians selected the correct therapeutic options in two or more of the three simulated case vignettes. Multivariate analysis showed that aversion to ambiguity was associated with appropriate change to anticoagulation therapy in the management of AF (OR 5.48, 95% CI 1.08-27.85). Physicians' willingness to take individual risk in multiple domains was associated with lower errors (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.03-0.86). Physicians' aversion to ambiguity and willingness to take risks are associated with appropriate therapeutic decisions in the management of AF for primary stroke prevention. Further large scale studies are needed.

  3. Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... » [ pdf, 433 kb ] Order Materials » Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms Risk Factors for a Stroke Stroke prevention is still ... it. Treatment can delay complications that increase the risk of stroke. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Seek help. ...

  4. Cluster randomized trial in the general practice research database: 2. Secondary prevention after first stroke (eCRT study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dregan Alex

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this research is to develop and evaluate methods for conducting pragmatic cluster randomized trials in a primary care electronic database. The proposal describes one application, in a less frequent chronic condition of public health importance, secondary prevention of stroke. A related protocol in antibiotic prescribing was reported previously. Methods/Design The study aims to implement a cluster randomized trial (CRT using the electronic patient records of the General Practice Research Database (GPRD as a sampling frame and data source. The specific objective of the trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention at enhancing the delivery of stroke secondary prevention in primary care. GPRD family practices will be allocated to the intervention or usual care. The intervention promotes the use of electronic prompts to support adherence with the recommendations of the UK Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party and NICE guidelines for the secondary prevention of stroke in primary care. Primary outcome measure will be the difference in systolic blood pressure between intervention and control trial arms at 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be differences in serum cholesterol, prescribing of antihypertensive drugs, statins, and antiplatelet therapy. The intervention will continue for 12 months. Information on the utilization of the decision-support tools will also be analyzed. Discussion The CRT will investigate the effectiveness of using a computer-delivered intervention to reduce the risk of stroke recurrence following a first stroke event. The study will provide methodological guidance on the implementation of CRTs in electronic databases in primary care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN35701810

  5. Clinical implications of using the arm motor ability test in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Michael W; Kim, Grace; Finnen, Lisa Rivera; Polistena, Caitlin

    2011-05-01

    To identify all published studies using the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT), a standardized, laboratory-based measure for selected upper extremity activities of daily living (ADLs); and to summarize its current uses and provide recommendations for its future use. An Ovid online search was performed using the terms "Arm Motor Ability Test" and "AMAT." The reference lists of all articles obtained were reviewed for additional studies not appearing in the literature search. In addition, the original manual for the use and administration of the AMAT was reviewed. All studies examining the psychometric properties of the AMAT or using the AMAT as an outcome measure were identified. Articles simply mentioning the AMAT without providing data and case reports or abstracts (other than those addressing a specific aspect of the scale of interest) were excluded. Studies were reviewed by the primary author. No formal system of quality review was used. The AMAT has been used as an outcome measure in stroke rehabilitation research examining upper extremity robotics, functional electrical stimulation, and cortical stimulation. The most recent version contains 10 ADL tasks, each of which is composed of 1 to 3 subtasks. Of the 3 domains originally proposed, only the "functional ability" domain is routinely assessed. Psychometric studies have demonstrated good reliability and at least reasonable construct validity. The instrument's sensitivity to change over time is less well established, and no recommendation can be made regarding a minimal clinically important difference. We recommend that the 10-item version of the AMAT and assessment of only the functional ability domain be adopted as standard going forward. Further research should include examination of sensitivity over time, minimal clinically important change, reliability and validity in the mid and lower range of scores, and in neurologic diagnoses other than stroke. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  6. Adolescent suicide prevention. Current research and social policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, A F; Zigler, E

    1993-02-01

    The rate of adolescent suicide has increased dramatically in the past few decades, prompting several interventions to curb the increase. Unfortunately, many of the intervention efforts have not benefited from current research findings because the communication between researchers and those who develop the interventions is inadequate. Of specific concern are the increasingly popular curriculum-based suicide prevention programs, which have not demonstrated effectiveness and may contain potentially deleterious components. This article reviews the current epidemiological research in adolescent suicide and suggests how this knowledge could be used more effectively to reduce the rate of adolescent suicide. Recommendations include support for integrated primary prevention efforts; suicide prevention education for professionals; education and policies on firearm management; education for the media about adolescent suicide; more efficient identification and treatment of at-risk youth, including those exposed to suicidal behavior; crisis intervention; and treatment for suicide attempters.

  7. Organizational culture and its implications on infection prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hospital acquired infections are becoming common in our hospitals lately. These infections are difficult to treat and maybe life threatening. Hospital acquired infection  can be minimized or eradicated by good Infection Prevention and Control guidelines and good hand hygiene practices. The success of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program in any hospital is largely impacted by the organizational culture.  In any health care setting the management is challenged by the organizational culture to change of any kind. Where implementation of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program is easily implemented in some hospitals it is very difficult in others. Moreover, hand hygiene is not only biomedical practice but also has more behavioral factors. 

  8. Stroke prevention by endovascular treatment of carotid and vertebral artery dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Karam; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Cole, Tyler; Gross, Bradley A; McDougall, Cameron G

    2017-10-01

    Endovascular intervention for cervical carotid artery dissection (CAD) and vertebral artery dissection (VAD) may be indicated in specific circumstances. To review our institutional experience with endovascular treatment of cervical dissections over the past 20 years to examine indications for treatment, interventional methods, and outcomes. Retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database to identify patients with extracranial dissection who underwent endovascular intervention between January 1996 and January 2016. Demographic data and details of procedures, outcomes, and complications were extracted. Of 116 patients [93 CAD, 23 VAD; mean age 44.9 years (range 5-76 years)], 104 underwent stent placement; 11, coil occlusion of the parent artery; and 1, stenting with contralateral vessel occlusion. The cohorts were well matched for age, sex, dissection etiology, and admission and follow-up modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores. Patients with CAD had significantly more stent placements (p<0.001), failure of medical therapy (p=0.004), and interventions for enlarging pseudoaneurysms (p=0.01) or thromboembolic events (p=0.004). Patients with VAD had significantly more interventions for traumatic occlusion with recanalization (p<0.001). Dissections were spontaneous (n=67), traumatic (n=36), or iatrogenic (n=13). Traumatic dissections in patients with CAD were associated with poor admission mRS scores (p=0.01). Six of 67 (9.0%) patients with spontaneous dissection reported recent chiropractic manipulation. Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (range 1-146 months). Permanent morbidity/mortality was 3.4%, including two deaths. Over a follow-up period of 364 patient-years, 1 stroke occurred (0.27% per year). At last follow-up, 41 previously disabled patients [CAD, 31/93 (33.3%); VAD, 10/23 (43.5%)] were no longer disabled; no patient reported worsened disability. Patients with CAD and VAD differ significantly in presentation, indications for treatment, and treatment

  9. Preventing skin cancer through behavior change. Implications for interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, J S; Blais, L M; Redding, C A; Weinstock, M A

    1995-07-01

    Sun exposure is the only major causative factor for skin cancer for which prevention is feasible. Both individual and community-based interventions have been effective in changing sun exposure knowledge and attitudes but generally have not been effective in changing behaviors. An integrative model of behavior change is described that has been successful in changing behavior across a wide range of health conditions. This model holds promise for developing a rational public health approach to skin cancer prevention based on sound behavioral science.

  10. Aversion to ambiguity and willingness to take risks affect therapeutic decisions in managing atrial fibrillation for stroke prevention: results of a pilot study in family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raptis S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stavroula Raptis,1,* Jia Ning Chen,2,* Florencia Saposnik,2 Roman Pelyavskyy,2 Andrew Liuni,3 Gustavo Saposnik2,4 On behalf of the Stroke Outcomes Research Canada Working Group (SORCan- www.sorcan.ca 1Applied Health Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, 2Stroke Outcomes and Decision Neuroscience Research Unit, Department of Medicine, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, 3Medical Department, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada Ltd., Burlington, ON, Canada; 4Neuroeconomics and Decision Neuroscience, Department of Economics, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Anticoagulation is the therapeutic paradigm for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. It is unknown how physicians make treatment decisions in primary stroke prevention for patients with AF. Objectives: To evaluate the association between family physicians’ risk preferences (aversion risk and ambiguity and therapeutic recommendations (anticoagulation in the management of AF for primary stroke prevention by applying concepts from behavioral economics. Methods: Overall, 73 family physicians participated and completed the study. Our study comprised seven simulated case vignettes, three behavioral experiments, and two validated surveys. Behavioral experiments and surveys incorporated an economic framework to determine risk preferences and biases (e.g., ambiguity aversion, willingness to take risks. The primary outcome was making the correct decision of anticoagulation therapy. Secondary outcomes included medical errors in the management of AF for stroke prevention. Results: Overall, 23.3% (17/73 of the family physicians elected not to escalate the therapy from antiplatelets to anticoagulation when recommended by best practice guidelines. A total of 67.1% of physicians selected the correct therapeutic options in two or more of the three simulated case vignettes. Multivariate

  11. social desirability bias and possible implications for HIV-prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluations of the safety, effectiveness, and feasibility of HIV prevention interventions rely on self-reported sexual behaviour data. The accuracy of such data has sometimes been questioned. The absence of a so-called objective measure of sexual behaviour complicates this. Social desirability bias (SDB) is a key factor ...

  12. Randomized controlled trial of a coordinated care intervention to improve risk factor control after stroke or transient ischemic attack in the safety net: Secondary stroke prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic care model teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Cheng, Eric M; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; McCreath, Heather; Sanossian, Nerses; Dutta, Tara; Mehta, Bijal; Bryg, Robert; Rao, Neal; Song, Shlee; Razmara, Ali; Ramirez, Magaly; Sivers-Teixeira, Theresa; Tran, Jamie; Mojarro-Huang, Elizabeth; Montoya, Ana; Corrales, Marilyn; Martinez, Beatrice; Willis, Phyllis; Macias, Mireya; Ibrahim, Nancy; Wu, Shinyi; Wacksman, Jeremy; Haber, Hilary; Richards, Adam; Barry, Frances; Hill, Valerie; Mittman, Brian; Cunningham, William; Liu, Honghu; Ganz, David A; Factor, Diane; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-02-06

    Recurrent strokes are preventable through awareness and control of risk factors such as hypertension, and through lifestyle changes such as healthier diets, greater physical activity, and smoking cessation. However, vascular risk factor control is frequently poor among stroke survivors, particularly among socio-economically disadvantaged blacks, Latinos and other people of color. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an effective framework for multi-component interventions aimed at improving care processes and outcomes for individuals with chronic disease. In addition, community health workers (CHWs) have played an integral role in reducing health disparities; however, their effectiveness in reducing vascular risk among stroke survivors remains unknown. Our objectives are to develop, test, and assess the economic value of a CCM-based intervention using an Advanced Practice Clinician (APC)-CHW team to improve risk factor control after stroke in an under-resourced, racially/ethnically diverse population. In this single-blind randomized controlled trial, 516 adults (≥40 years) with an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or intracerebral hemorrhage within the prior 90 days are being enrolled at five sites within the Los Angeles County safety-net setting and randomized 1:1 to intervention vs usual care. Participants are excluded if they do not speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean or if they are unable to consent. The intervention includes a minimum of three clinic visits in the healthcare setting, three home visits, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Program group workshops in community venues. The primary outcome is blood pressure (BP) control (systolic BP risk factors including lipids and hemoglobin A1c, (3) inflammation (C reactive protein [CRP]), (4) medication adherence, (5) lifestyle factors (smoking, diet, and physical activity), (6) estimated relative reduction in risk for recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI), and (7) cost

  13. Left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Hasib; Belley-Cote, Emilie P; Alotaibi, Abdullah; Dvirnik, Nazari; Neupane, Binod; Beyene, Joseph; Eikelboom, John W; Holmes, David; Whitlock, Richard P

    2018-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the leading causes of stroke. Risks associated with oral anticoagulation (OAC) limit adherence to recommended therapy. Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion is a treatment alternative in patients with AF. We performed a network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of LAA occlusion compared with oral anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and placebo for stroke prevention. We also assessed the impact of LAA occlusion on mortality, major bleeding, and operative time. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library for randomized trials comparing percutaneous or surgical LAA occlusion with standard of care in AF patients. Conventional meta-analysis found no difference between groups for stroke (5 trials, 1285 patients;RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.47-1.29), and a significant reduction in mortality (5 trials, 1285 patients; RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-0.99) favouring LAA occlusion. NMA demonstrated a trend towards reduction in stroke (OR 0.84, 95% CrI 0.47-1.55) and mortality (OR 0.69, 95% CrI 0.44-1.10) for LAA occlusion versus warfarin, but no statistically significant effect. Statistical ranking curves placed LAA occlusion as the most efficacious treatment on the outcomes of stroke and mortality when compared to warfarin, aspirin, or placebo. No significant differences between groups were seen in major bleeding or operative time for surgical trials. The overall quality of the evidence was low as assessed by GRADE. LAA occlusion appears to preserve the benefits of OAC therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF, but the current evidence is of low quality.

  14. Atorvastatin reduces the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with carotid atherosclerosis: a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H.; Amarenco, P.; Hennerici, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial found that treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg per day reduced the risk of stroke and cardiovascular events in patients with a recent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke. We hypothesized...... this benefit would be greatest in the subgroup of patients with carotid stenosis. METHODS: The SPARCL trial randomized patients with TIA or stroke within 1 to 6 months without known coronary heart disease (CHD) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 100 to 190 mg/dL to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg per...... artery stenosis, treatment with atorvastatin was associated with a 33% reduction in the risk of any stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47, 0.94; P=0.02), and a 43% reduction in risk of major coronary events (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.32, 1.00; P=0.05). Later carotid revascularization...

  15. [Good practice in occupational health services--Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances). During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer's post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  16. Good practice in occupational health services – Certification of stroke as an accident at work. Need for secondary prevention in people returning to work after acute cerebrovascular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marcinkiewicz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The classification of an acute vascular episode, both heart infarct and stroke, as an accident at work poses difficulties not only for post accidental teams, but also to occupational health professionals, experts and judges at labor and social insurance courts. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old office worker, whose job involved client services. While attending a very aggressive customer she developed solid stress that resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system (headache, speech disturbances. During her hospitalisation at the neurological unit ischemic stroke with transient mixed type aphasia was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan of the head revealed subacute ischemia. After an analysis of the accident circumstances, the employer’s post accidental team decided that ischemic stroke had been an accident at work, because it was a sudden incident due to an external cause inducing work-related traumatic stroke. As a primary cause tough stress and emotional strain due to the situation developed while attending the customer were acknowledged. During control medical check up after 5 months the patient was found to be fit for work, so she could return to work. However, it should be noted that such a check up examination of subjects returning to work after stroke must be holistic, including the evaluation of job predispositions and health education aimed at secondary prevention of heart and vascular diseases with special reference to their risk factors. Med Pr 2015;66(4:595–599

  17. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine from their body. To prevent skin or pressure sores: Clean up after incontinence Change position often and ... artery surgery - discharge Daily bowel care program Preventing pressure ulcers Stroke - discharge References Dobkin BH. Neurological rehabilitation In: ...

  18. Transition of care for acute stroke and myocardial infarction patients: from hospitalization to rehabilitation, recovery, and secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Alexander, Karen P; Kendrick, Amy S; Irvine, Julian R; Wing, Liz; Coeytaux, Remy R; Dolor, Rowena J; Duncan, Pamela W; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review the available published literature to assess whether evidence supports a beneficial role for coordinated transition of care services for the postacute care of patients hospitalized with first or recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI). This review was framed around five areas of investigation: (1) key components of transition of care services, (2) evidence for improvement in functional outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, (3) associated risks or potential harms, (4) evidence for improvement in systems of care, and (5) evidence that benefits and harms vary by patient-based or system-based characteristics. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Embase(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from 2000 to 2011 that specified postacute hospitalization transition of care services as well as prevention of recurrent stroke or MI. RESULTS A total of 62 articles representing 44 studies were included for data abstraction. Transition of care interventions were grouped into four categories: (1) hospital -initiated support for discharge was the initial stage in the transition of care process, (2) patient and family education interventions were started during hospitalization but were continued at the community level, (3) community-based models of support followed hospital discharge, and (4) chronic disease management models of care assumed the responsibility for long-term care. Early supported discharge after stroke was associated with reduced total hospital length of stay without adverse effects on functional recovery, and specialty care after MI was associated with reduced mortality. Because of several methodological shortcomings, most studies did not consistently demonstrate that any specific intervention resulted in improved patient-or system -based outcomes. Some studies included more than one intervention, which made it difficult to determine the effect of individual

  19. Transition of care for acute stroke and myocardial infarction patients: from hospitalization to rehabilitation, recovery, and secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Alexander, Karen P; Kendrick, Amy S; Irvine, Julian R; Wing, Liz; Coeytaux, Remy R; Dolor, Rowena J; Duncan, Pamela W; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2011-10-01

    To review the available published literature to assess whether evidence supports a beneficial role for coordinated transition of care services for the postacute care of patients hospitalized with first or recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI). This review was framed around five areas of investigation: (1) key components of transition of care services, (2) evidence for improvement in functional outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, (3) associated risks or potential harms, (4) evidence for improvement in systems of care, and (5) evidence that benefits and harms vary by patient-based or system-based characteristics. MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Embase(®). We included studies published in English from 2000 to 2011 that specified postacute hospitalization transition of care services as well as prevention of recurrent stroke or MI. A total of 62 articles representing 44 studies were included for data abstraction. Transition of care interventions were grouped into four categories: (1) hospital -initiated support for discharge was the initial stage in the transition of care process, (2) patient and family education interventions were started during hospitalization but were continued at the community level, (3) community-based models of support followed hospital discharge, and (4) chronic disease management models of care assumed the responsibility for long-term care. Early supported discharge after stroke was associated with reduced total hospital length of stay without adverse effects on functional recovery, and specialty care after MI was associated with reduced mortality. Because of several methodological shortcomings, most studies did not consistently demonstrate that any specific intervention resulted in improved patient-or system -based outcomes. Some studies included more than one intervention, which made it difficult to determine the effect of individual components on clinical outcomes. There was

  20. Burden of stroke in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Basri, Rehana; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-04-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in Bangladesh. The World Health Organization ranks Bangladesh's mortality rate due to stroke as number 84 in the world. The reported prevalence of stroke in Bangladesh is 0.3%, although no data on stroke incidence have been recorded. Hospital-based studies conducted in past decades have indicated that hypertension is the main cause of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in Bangladesh. The high number of disability-adjusted life-years lost due to stroke (485 per 10,000 people) show that stroke severely impacts Bangladesh's economy. Although two non-governmental organizations, BRAC and the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed, are actively involved in primary stroke prevention strategies, the Bangladeshi government needs to emphasize healthcare development to cope with the increasing population density and to reduce stroke occurrence. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  1. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Aisenberg, James; Ansell, Jack; Atar, Dan; Breithardt, Günter; Eikelboom, John; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Granger, Christopher B; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Hylek, Elaine M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Lane, Deirdre A; Verheugt, Freek W A; Veltkamp, Roland; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-03-21

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have a high risk of stroke and mortality, which can be considerably reduced by oral anticoagulants (OAC). Recently, four non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism. Today's clinician is faced with the difficult task of selecting a suitable OAC for a patient with a particular clinical profile or a particular pattern of risk factors and concomitant diseases. We reviewed analyses of subgroups of patients from trials of vitamin K antagonists vs. NOACs for stroke prevention in AF with the aim to identify patient groups who might benefit from a particular OAC more than from another. In the first of a two-part review, we discuss the choice of NOAC for stroke prevention in the following subgroups of patients with AF: (i) stable coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease, including percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting and triple therapy; (ii) cardioversion, ablation and anti-arrhythmic drug therapy; (iii) mechanical valves and rheumatic valve disease, (iv) patients with time in therapeutic range of >70% on warfarin; (v) patients with a single stroke risk factor (CHA2DS2VASc score of 1 in males, 2 in females); and (vi) patients with a single first episode of paroxysmal AF. Although there are no major differences in terms of efficacy and safety between the NOACs for some clinical scenarios, in others we are able to suggest that particular drugs and/or doses be prioritized for anticoagulation. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effectiveness differences of ranitidine and omeprazole in prevention of stress ulcer and its effect on pneumonia occurrence and outcome of acute stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batubara, C. A.; Ritarwan, K.; Rambe, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    Stress ulcer is one ofacute stroke complications. Giving ranitidine or omeprazole may prevent stress ulcer, but may increase the occurrence of pneumonia. Thus, it will affect the outcome of acute stroke. The method was experimental with a randomized control-group pretest - posttest design. This study divided the subjects into two groups, ranitidine 300mg and omeprazole 20mg group.We observed the patients whether stress ulcer or pneumonia occurred during hospitalization. Then, we measured the outcome by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scaleand modified Rankin Scale. There were 32 subjects in this study. Only 1 (3.1%) subject suffered stress ulcer, and 3 (3.1%) suffered pneumonia in ranitidine group. Moreover, 2 (6.2%) subjects suffered pneumonia in omeprazole group. The differences were not significant between the two groups (p = 0.31 and p = 0.54). There was no significant effect and difference effect on the administration of both medications to the outcome at day 14. These results indicate that ranitidine and omeprazole have anequal effectiveness in the prevention of stress ulcer and also have equal effect on the occurrence of pneumonia, and both have no effect on the outcome of acute stroke patients.

  3. Monotherapy of aspirin or warfarin for prevention of ischemic stroke in low-risk atrial fibrillation: A Easter Asian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Hui-Chun

    2018-05-02

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of monotherapy aspirin and warfarin for stroke prevention in low-risk atrial fibrillation (AF) by using a population-based cohort study in Taiwan. A newly diagnosed low-risk AF patient cohort were identified by using National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan in 2008. The study cohort was observed with a follow-up of 2 years to examine the onset of ischemic stroke (IS) (to 2010). The longitudinal data were analyzed by using generalized estimation equations (GEE). A total of 8,065 newly-diagnosed low-risk AF patients were identified in 2008. 7.4% were prescribed with aspirin and 4.6% were prescribed with warfarin. The GEE results showed that low-risk AF patients with hypertension who received warfarin were associated with a statistically significant 58.4% reduction of IS risk (OR = 0.416, p = 0.024, 95% CI 0.194-0.891). Additionally, low-risk AF patients with hyperlipidemia who received warfarin were associated with a 69.3% reduction of IS risk (OR = 0.307, p = 0.044, 95% CI 0.097-0.969). Warfarin is suggested to be prescribed in preventing ischemic stroke for low-stroke-risk atrial fibrillation patients with hypertension and hyperlipidemia.

  4. Neurocriminology: implications for the punishment, prediction and prevention of criminal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Andrea L; Raine, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Criminal behaviour and violence are increasingly viewed as worldwide public health problems. A growing body of knowledge shows that criminal behaviour has a neurobiological basis, and this has intensified judicial interest in the potential application of neuroscience to criminal law. It also gives rise to important questions. What are the implications of such application for predicting future criminal behaviour and protecting society? Can it be used to prevent violence? And what are the implications for the way offenders are punished?

  5. Hypertension and experimental stroke therapies

    OpenAIRE

    O'Collins, Victoria E; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an established target for long-term stroke prevention but procedures for management of hypertension in acute stroke are less certain. Here, we analyze basic science data to examine the impact of hypertension on candidate stroke therapies and of anti-hypertensive treatments on stroke outcome. Methods: Data were pooled from 3,288 acute ischemic stroke experiments (47,899 animals) testing the effect of therapies on infarct size (published 1978–2010). Data were combined using meta...

  6. Implementation of Telephone-Based Secondary Preventive Intervention after Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack - Participation Rate, Reasons for Nonparticipation and One-Year Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lotta Irewall

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Patients who experience a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA are known to be at high risk of subsequent vascular events, underscoring the need for secondary preventive intervention. However, previous studies have indicated insufficiency in the implementation of secondary prevention, emphasizing the need to develop effective methods of follow-up. In the present study, we examined the potential of implementing a telephone-based, nurse-led, secondary preventive follow-up in stroke and TIA patients on a population level by analyzing the participation rate, reasons for nonparticipation, and one-year mortality. Methods: Between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011, all patients admitted to Östersund hospital, Sweden, and diagnosed with either stroke or TIA were considered for inclusion into the secondary preventive follow-up. Baseline data were collected at the hospital, and reasons for nonparticipation were documented. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of the patient decision not to participate and to explore independent associations between baseline characteristics and exclusion. A one-year follow-up of mortality was also performed; the survival functions of the three groups (included, excluded, declining participation was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Results: From a total of 810 identified patients, 430 (53.1% were included in the secondary preventive follow-up, 289 (35.7% were excluded mainly due to physical or cognitive disability, and 91 (11.2% declined participation. Age ≥85 years, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, modified Rankin scale score >3, body mass index ≥25, congestive heart failure, and lower education level were independently associated with exclusion, whereas lower education level was the only factor independently associated with the patient decision not to participate. Exclusion was associated with a more than 12 times higher risk of mortality

  7. Analysis of preventability of stroke-related maternal death from the nationwide registration system of maternal deaths in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Junichi; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Kanayama, Naohiro; Nakata, Masahiko; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Osato, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kayo; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2018-08-01

    The number of stroke-related maternal deaths is increasing in Japan. We investigated methods to reduce maternal death from stroke. We analyzed stroke-related maternal deaths in Japan reported to the Committee of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare from 2010 to 2014 inclusive. A total of 35 cases were identified. The median maternal age was 35 years (range 22-45) and the incidence of stoke in women ≥40 was seven-fold higher than in death from stroke.

  8. Contaminants in blood cultures: importance, implications, interpretation and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargère, S; Cormier, H; Verdon, R

    2018-04-03

    Despite the development of new microbiologic technologies, blood cultures (BCs) remain the first-line tool for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections. Their diagnostic value may be affected when a microorganism of questionable evidence is isolated-for example, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Bacillus spp., viridans group streptococci, Corynebacterium spp., Propionibacterium spp. and Micrococcus spp. Finally, making a correct diagnosis of pathogenicity (vs. contamination) is challenging. To review the current ways of dealing with the problem of BC contaminants (BCCs) and to provide practical suggestions to decrease BCC rates. PubMed electronic databases and existing reviews were searched up to December 2017 to retrieve relevant publications related to the topic. This review describes the burden of BCC and analyses the main current issues and controversies in interpreting the occurrence of potential BC contaminants. It focuses on the best-described approaches to decide whether BCC is present and discusses the different strategies of prevention in adults. Each institution should have an efficient policy to prevent BCC, emphasizing the importance of following guidelines for prescribing and collecting BCs. Training healthcare workers should focus on detrimental influence on patient care and highlight the work and costs due to contaminants. The accurate differentiation of a contaminant from a true pathogen relies on a multidisciplinary approach and the clinical judgement of experienced practitioners. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric unintentional injury: behavioral risk factors and implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Gaines, Joanna

    2007-06-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death for children and adolescents between the ages of 1 and 18 in the United States, accounting for more deaths than the next 20 causes of mortality combined. It is estimated that pediatric injury accounts for more than $50 billion in annual losses from medical care costs, future wages, and quality of life. Despite these numbers, much remains to be learned about the behavioral risks for pediatric unintentional injury. This article reviews behavioral risk factors for pediatric unintentional injury risk, with a particular focus on four broad areas. First, we discuss the effects of demographic risk factors, including gender, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. Second, we present information about child-specific risk factors, including temperament, personality, psychopathology, and cognitive development. Third, we discuss the influence of parents and other primary caregivers on childhood injury risk, with a particular focus on the effects of supervision and parenting quality and style. Finally, we discuss the role of peers on child injury risk. We conclude with a discussion of the ways in which the material reviewed has been translated into injury prevention techniques, with a focus on how pediatricians might use knowledge about etiological risk to prioritize safety counseling topics. We also present thoughts on four priorities for future research: injury risk in diverse nations and cultures; developmental effects of injury; the influence of multiple risk factors together on injury risk; and translation of knowledge about risk for injury into intervention and prevention techniques.

  10. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  11. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Abigail Andrews

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in designing therapeutic studies of individuals at risk of Alzheimer disease (AD to prevent the onset of symptoms. Cortical β-amyloid plaques, the first stage of AD pathology, can be detected in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET, and several studies have shown that ~1/3 of healthy elderly have significant β-amyloid deposition. Here we assessed whether asymptomatic amyloid-PET-positive controls have increased rates of brain atrophy, which could be harnessed as an outcome measure for AD prevention trials. We assessed 66 control subjects (age = 73.5±7.3 yrs; MMSE = 29±1.3 from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers & Lifestyle study who had a baseline Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET scan and two 3T MRI scans ~18-months apart. We calculated PET standard uptake value ratios (SUVR, and classified individuals as amyloid-positive/negative. Baseline and 18-month MRI scans were registered, and brain, hippocampal, and ventricular volumes and annualized volume changes calculated. Increasing baseline PiB-PET measures of β-amyloid load correlated with hippocampal atrophy rate independent of age (p = 0.014. Twenty-two (1/3 were PiB-positive (SUVR>1.40, the remaining 44 PiB-negative (SUVR≤1.31. Compared to PiB-negatives, PiB-positive individuals were older (76.8±7.5 vs. 71.7±7.5, p<0.05 and more were APOE4 positive (63.6% vs. 19.2%, p<0.01 but there were no differences in baseline brain, ventricle or hippocampal volumes, either with or without correction for total intracranial volume, once age and gender were accounted for. The PiB-positive group had greater total hippocampal loss (0.06±0.08 vs. 0.02±0.05 ml/yr, p = 0.02, independent of age and gender, with non-significantly higher rates of whole brain (7.1±9.4 vs. 4.7±5.5 ml/yr and ventricular (2.0±3.0 vs. 1.1±1.0 ml/yr change. Based on the observed effect size, recruiting 384 (95%CI 195-1080 amyloid-positive subjects/arm will provide 80% power to detect 25

  12. Muertes por enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares prevenibles - (Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de septiembre del 2013 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Más de 800,000 personas en los Estados Unidos mueren cada año a causa de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares. Aprenda cómo controlar todos los principales factores de riesgo.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  13. Nutrigenomics: implications for breast and colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riscuta, Gabriela; Dumitrescu, Ramona G

    2012-01-01

    Nutrigenomics refers to the interaction between one's diet and his/her genes. These interactions can markedly influence digestion, absorption, and the elimination of bioactive food components, as well as influence their site of actions/molecular targets. Nutrigenomics comprises nutrigenetics, epigenetics, and transcriptomics, coupled with other "omic," such as proteomics and metabolomics, that apparently account for the wide variability in cancer risk among individuals with similar dietary habits. Multiple food components including essential nutrients, phytochemical, zoochemicals, fungochemical, and bacterochemicals have been implicated in cancer risk and tumor behavior, admittedly with mixed results. Such findings suggest that not all individuals respond identically to a diet. This chapter highlights the influence of single-nucleotide polymorphism, copy number, epigenetic events, and transcriptomic homeostasis as factors influencing the response to food components and ultimately health, including cancer risk. Both breast and colorectal cancers are reviewed as examples about how nutrigenomics may influence the response to dietary intakes. As the concept that "one size fits all" comes to an end and personalized approaches surface, additional research data will be required to identify those who will benefit most from dietary change and any who might be placed at risk because of an adjustment.

  14. Apixaban 5 and 2.5 mg twice-daily versus warfarin for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Keshishian, Allison; Hamilton, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Prior real-world studies have shown that apixaban is associated with a reduced risk of stroke/systemic embolism (stroke/SE) and major bleeding versus warfarin. However, few studies evaluated the effectiveness and safety of apixaban according to its dosage, and most studies contained limited numbe...

  15. Understanding Gay Community Subcultures: Implications for HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, Garrett; Brown, Graham; De Wit, John; Bavinton, Benjamin; Fairley, Christopher; Maycock, Bruce; Batrouney, Colin; Keen, Phillip; Down, Ian; Hammoud, Mohamed; Zablotska, Iryna

    2015-12-01

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) who participate in gay community subcultures have different profiles, including differing risk behaviors. We examined men's participation in gay community subcultures, and its association with risk behavior. In a cross-sectional survey, 849 GBM provided information about men in their personal networks. We devised measures of their participation in five subcultural groupings and explored their associations with sexual behavior. We identified five subcultural groupings: sexually adventurous; bear tribes; alternative queer; party scene; and sexually conservative. Higher scores on the sexually adventurous measure was associated with being older, having more gay friends, being HIV-positive, and being more sexually active. It was also independently associated with unprotected anal intercourse with casual partners (AOR 1.82; 95 % CI 1.20-2.76; p = 0.005). HIV prevention strategies need to account for the different subcultural groupings in which GBM participate. Measures of engagement with gay subcultures are useful indicators of differential rates of risk behavior and modes of participation in gay community life. Men in more sexually adventurous subcultures are more likely to engage in sexual risk behavior.

  16. The science of softball: implications for performance and injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyger, Nicholas; Button, Chris; Rishiraj, Neetu

    2006-01-01

    Whilst the sport of softball has achieved worldwide popularity over the last 100 years, a consideration of the scientific principles underpinning softball is in its infancy. It is clear that the various motor skills associated with softball, such as pitching, batting and fielding, place considerable perceptual and physical demands upon players. Each of these skill categories are examined in more detail by reviewing the biomechanical principles associated with skilled performance. For pitching, a certain amount of information can be gleaned from baseball research; however, the underarm technique required by softball places the highest loads on the arm and shoulder during the accelerative, downward phase of the swing. Kinematic analyses of the bat swing suggest that elite batters have approximately 200 ms to decide whether to swing, and approximately the same duration to complete the swing (resulting in reported bat speeds of up to 40 m/sec). The research conducted on fielding has been limited to a consideration of throwing styles adopted in games. A variety of throwing techniques are adopted in the course of a typical game but elite players commonly adopt a sidearm technique when returning to base as quickly as possible. Data obtained from the National Athletic Training Association indicate a similar level of injury incidence in softball as in baseball. Approximately 17% of injuries are experienced by the pitcher and approximately 25% of all injuries are located in the forearm/wrist/hand joint segments. Sports science and sports medicine research have the potential to contribute significantly to performance enhancement and injury prevention in the future.

  17. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  18. Baseline Quality of Life and Risk of Stroke in the ALLHAT Study (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tanzila; Auchus, Alexander P; Oparil, Suzanne; Wright, Clinton B; Wright, Jackson; Furlan, Anthony J; Sila, Cathy A; Davis, Barry R; Pressel, Sara; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Einhorn, Paula T; Lerner, Alan J

    2017-11-01

    The visual analogue scale is a self-reported, validated tool to measure quality of life (QoL). Our purpose was to determine whether baseline QoL predicted strokes in the ALLHAT study (Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) and evaluate determinants of poststroke change in QoL. In the ALLHAT study, among the 33 357 patients randomized to treatment arms, 1525 experienced strokes; 1202 (79%) strokes were nonfatal. This study cohort includes 32 318 (97%) subjects who completed the baseline visual analogue scale QoL estimate. QoL was measured on a visual analogue scale and adjusted using a Torrance transformation (transformed QoL [TQoL]). Kaplan-Meier curves and adjusted proportional hazards analyses were used to estimate the effect of TQoL on the risk of stroke, on a continuous scale (0-1) and by quartiles (≤0.81, >0.81≤0.89, >0.89≤0.95, >0.95). We analyzed the change from baseline to first poststroke TQoL using adjusted linear regression. After adjusting for multiple stroke risk factors, the hazard ratio for stroke events for baseline TQoL was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) per 0.1 U increase. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% increased stroke risk (hazard ratio=1.20 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.44]) compared with the reference highest quartile TQoL. Poststroke TQoL change was significant within all treatment groups ( P ≤0.001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that baseline TQoL was the strongest predictor of poststroke TQoL with similar results for the untransformed QoL. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% higher stroke risk than the highest quartile. Baseline TQoL was the only factor that predicted poststroke change in TQoL. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000542. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... works by dissolving the clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived ...

  20. Primary stroke prevention for sickle cell disease in north-east Italy: the role of ethnic issues in establishing a Transcranial Doppler screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierobon Marta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a serious complication of sickle cell disease (SCD in children. Transcranic Doppler (TCD is a well-established predictor of future cerebrovascular symptoms: a blood flow velocity >200 cm/sec in the Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA correlates with a high risk of stroke in cohorts of African-american HbS/HbS patients. In North-East Italy the recent increase in SCD patients is mainly due to immigration from Africa. A comprehensive care program for children with SCD was established in our Center since 2004, but a wide and routine screening for Primary stroke prevention needs to be developed. Methods In order to verify the feasibility of TCD and Transcranial color coded Sonography (TCCS screening in our setting and the applicability of international reference values of blood velocities to our population of African immigrants with HbS/HbS SCD, we performed TCD and TCCD in 12 HbS/HbS African children and two groups of age-matched controls of Caucasian and African origin respectively. TCD and TCCS were performed on the same day of the scheduled routine hematologic visit after parental education. Results All parents accepted to perform the sonography to their children. TCD and TCCD were performed in all patients and an adequate temporal window could be obtained in all of them. Pulsatility index and depth values in both the MCA and the Basilar Artery (BA were similar at TCD and TCCS evaluation in the three groups while time-average maximum velocities (TAMM, peak systolic velocity and diastolic velocity in the MCA and BA were higher in the patients' group on both TCD and TCCS evaluation. African and Caucasian healthy controls had similar lower values. Conclusion Our preliminary data set the base to further evaluate the implementation of a primary stroke prevention program in our setting of HbS/HbS African immigrants and HbS/beta thalassemia Italians. Parental education-preferably in the native language- on stroke risk and

  1. B vitamins and magnetic resonance imaging-detected ischemic brain lesions in patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke: the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) MRI-substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, Margherita; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chen, Christopher; Mok, Vincent; de Freitas, Gabriel R; Song, Swithin; Yi, Qilong; Ropele, Stefan; Grazer, Anja; Homayoon, Nina; Enzinger, Christian; Loh, Katherine; Wong, Ka Sing Lawrence; Wong, Adrian; Xiong, Yunyun; Chang, Hui Meng; Wong, Meng Cheong; Fazekas, Franz; Eikelboom, John W; Hankey, Graeme J

    2012-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of homocysteine are associated with cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD). B-vitamin supplementation with folate and vitamins B12 and B6 reduces homocysteine concentrations. In a substudy of the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) trial, we assessed the hypothesis that the addition of once-daily supplements of B vitamins would reduce the progression of CSVD-related brain lesions. A total of 359 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, who were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with placebo or b vitamins, underwent brain MRI at randomization and after 2 years of B-vitamin supplementation. MR images were analyzed blinded to treatment allocation. Outcomes related to the prespecified hypothesis were progression of white matter hyperintensities and incident lacunes. We also explored the effect of B-vitamin supplementation on the incidence of other ischemic abnormalities. After 2 years of treatment with b vitamins or placebo, there was no significant difference in white matter hyperintensities volume change (0.08 vs 0.13 cm3; P=0.419) and incidence of lacunes (8.0% vs 5.9%, P=0.434; odds ratio=1.38). In a subanalysis of patients with MRI evidence of severe CSVD at baseline, b-vitamin supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in white matter hyperintensities volume change (0.3 vs 1.7 cm3; P=0.039). Daily B-vitamin supplementation for 2 years did not significantly reduce the progression of brain lesions resulting from presumed CSVD in all patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack but may do so in the subgroup of patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and severe CSVD. http://vitatops.highway1.com.au/. Unique identifier: NCT00097669 and ISRCTN74743444.

  2. A Surgeon’s View on Endarterectomy and Stenting in 2011: Lest We Forget, It’s All About Preventing Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naylor, A. Ross

    2012-01-01

    It has been nearly 60 years since Felix Eastcott published his seminal paper on carotid reconstruction, which paved the way for carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and then carotid artery stenting (CAS) to assume prominent roles in the prevention of stroke. Yet the ensuing 60 years has witnessed repeated cycles of challenges to practice, professional mistrust, conflicts of interest, dogmatic retention of traditional management strategies, inappropriate corporate interventions, and a general failure to adapt to new evidence. Even the performance of large-scale randomised trials has been associated with rancour and a lack of consensus. This article reviews the history of invasive interventions in the treatment of carotid disease and makes a plea to both the surgical and interventional communities that the fundamental priority must always be the prevention of stroke. It concludes with an appeal for colleagues to collaborate to determine how best to treat patients during the hyperacute period after the onset of symptoms and to identify a smaller cohort of asymptomatic patients who are truly at high risk for stroke in whom to target CAS or CEA.

  3. Principal Results of a Prospective Randomised Controlled Study: Morbidity and Mortality after Stroke — Eprosartan Compared with Nitrendipine for Secondary Prevention (MOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Lüders

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity and mortality after stroke — eprosartan compared with nitrendipine for secondary prevention (MOSES trial compared the effects of two antihypertensive agents in secondary prevention of stroke. The hypothesis of the trial was that in hypertensive stroke patients, for the same level of blood pressure (BP control, eprosartan would be more effective than nitrendipine in reducing cerebrovascular and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.A total of 710 patients were assigned to an eprosartan-based regimen and 695 to a nitrendipine-based regimen.These patients had hypertension requiring treatment and documented cerebral ischaemia or haemorrhage. They were well matched at baseline in general characteristics, BP and concomitant disease. BP was lowered to the same extent in both treatment arms, with a very similar timeframe. A high proportion of patients in both treatment arms achieved target BP.The combined primary endpoint was a composite of total mortality and total number of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, including recurrent events.There were 206 endpoints in the eprosartan group and 255 endpoints in the nitrendipine group.This represents a statistically significant 21% risk reduction in favour of eprosartan. Eprosartan also had advantages over nitrendipine in respect of all cerebrovascular events and first cardiovascular events.

  4. Sony PlayStation EyeToy elicits higher levels of movement than the Nintendo Wii: implications for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, A; Ens, S; Pelletier, R; Jarus, T; Rand, D

    2013-02-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging trend in stroke rehabilitation. VR gaming consoles in stroke intervention have been shown to increase motivation and enjoyment during exercise. The amount and intensity of movements elicited using these consoles are unknown. The aims of this study were: (1) to quantify the amount and intensity of movement elicited from both hands of two groups of individuals ([chronic stroke and without a disability [healthy]); (2) to determine the effect of console (Wii/EyeToy) and group (stroke/healthy) on the amount and intensity of upper extremity movement; (3) to determine the effect of console (Wii/EyeToy) and group (stroke/healthy) on the usability and VR experience. A cross-sectional design was taken. Outpatient rehabilitation setting and healthy participant's homes. Participants included ten adults with stroke and ten adults without a disability. Participants experienced two games from each console. Amount and intensity of movement was measured using accelerometers on both wrists, while the virtual experience and usability was determined with questionnaires. No significant differences were found between the consoles usability and experience. EyeToy elicited significantly greater activity count than Wii among the healthy participants (P=0.028) and significantly greater movement intensity in both the stroke (P=0.005) and healthy (P=0.005) groups. Both consoles rated high for usability, enjoyment and satisfaction highlighting their suitability for a range of individuals in stroke rehabilitation. EyeToy provides increased movement and movement intensity. Both consoles are suitable for use in stroke rehabilitation however this information can be helpful to clinicians while selecting a gaming console according to the type and intensity of movements that he/she aims to encourage during therapy.

  5. Conceptualizing community mobilization for HIV prevention: implications for HIV prevention programming in the African context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri A Lippman

    Full Text Available Community mobilizing strategies are essential to health promotion and uptake of HIV prevention. However, there has been little conceptual work conducted to establish the core components of community mobilization, which are needed to guide HIV prevention programming and evaluation.We aimed to identify the key domains of community mobilization (CM essential to change health outcomes or behaviors, and to determine whether these hypothesized CM domains were relevant to a rural South African setting.We studied social movements and community capacity, empowerment and development literatures, assessing common elements needed to operationalize HIV programs at a community level. After synthesizing these elements into six essential CM domains, we explored the salience of these CM domains qualitatively, through analysis of 10 key informant in-depth-interviews and seven focus groups in three villages in Bushbuckridge.CM DOMAINS INCLUDE: 1 shared concerns, 2 critical consciousness, 3 organizational structures/networks, 4 leadership (individual and/or institutional, 5 collective activities/actions, and 6 social cohesion. Qualitative data indicated that the proposed domains tapped into theoretically consistent constructs comprising aspects of CM processes. Some domains, extracted from largely Western theory, required little adaptation for the South African context; others translated less effortlessly. For example, critical consciousness to collectively question and resolve community challenges functioned as expected. However, organizations/networks, while essential, operated differently than originally hypothesized - not through formal organizations, but through diffuse family networks.To date, few community mobilizing efforts in HIV prevention have clearly defined the meaning and domains of CM prior to intervention design. We distilled six CM domains from the literature; all were pertinent to mobilization in rural South Africa. While some adaptation of

  6. Peer outreach work as economic activity: implications for HIV prevention interventions among female sex workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie George

    Full Text Available Female sex workers (FSWs who work as peer outreach workers in HIV prevention programs are drawn from poor socio-economic groups and consider outreach work, among other things, as an economic activity. Yet, while successful HIV prevention outcomes by such programs are attributed in part to the work of peers who have dense relations with FSW communities, there is scant discussion of the economic implications for FSWs of their work as peers. Using observational data obtained from an HIV prevention intervention for FSWs in south India, we examined the economic benefits and costs to peers of doing outreach work and their implications for sex workers' economic security. We found that peers considered their payment incommensurate with their workload, experienced long delays receiving compensation, and at times had to advance money from their pockets to do their assigned peer outreach work. For the intervention these conditions resulted in peer attrition and difficulties in recruitment of new peer workers. We discuss the implications of these findings for uptake of services, and the possibility of reaching desired HIV outcomes. Inadequate and irregular compensation to peers and inadequate budgetary outlays to perform their community-based outreach work could weaken peers' relationships with FSW community members, undermine the effectiveness of peer-mediated HIV prevention programs and invalidate arguments for the use of peers.

  7. Homocyst(e)ine and risk of cerebral infarction in a biracial population : the stroke prevention in young women study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittner, S J; Giles, W H; Macko, R F; Hebel, J R; Wozniak, M A; Wityk, R J; Stolley, P D; Stern, B J; Sloan, M A; Sherwin, R; Price, T R; McCarter, R J; Johnson, C J; Earley, C J; Buchholz, D W; Malinow, M R

    1999-08-01

    Genetic enzyme variation and vitamin intake are important determinants of blood homocyst(e)ine levels. The prevalence of common genetic polymorphisms influencing homocyst(e)ine levels varies by race, and vitamin intake varies by socioeconomic status. Therefore, we examined the effect of vitamin intake, race, and socioeconomic status on the association of homocyst(e)ine with stroke risk. All 59 hospitals in the greater Baltimore-Washington area participated in a population-based case-control study of stroke in young women. One hundred sixty-seven cases of first ischemic stroke among women aged 15 to 44 years were compared with 328 controls identified by random-digit dialing from the same region. Risk factor data were collected by standardized interview and nonfasting phlebotomy. Plasma homocyst(e)ine was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. Blacks and whites did not differ in median homocyst(e)ine levels, nor did race modify the association between homocyst(e)ine and stroke. After adjustment for cigarettes per day, poverty status, and regular vitamin use, a plasma homocyst(e)ine level of >/=7.3 micromol/L was associated with an odds ratio for stroke of 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5). The association between elevated homocyst(e)ine and stroke was independent not only of traditional vascular risk factors but also of vitamin use and poverty status. The degree of homocyst(e)ine elevation associated with an increased stroke risk in young women is lower than that previously reported for middle-aged men and the elderly and was highly prevalent, being present in one third of the control group.

  8. Can readmission after stroke be prevented? Results of a randomized clinical study: a postdischarge follow-up service for stroke survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H E; Schultz-Larsen, K; Kreiner, S

    2000-01-01

    the completion of inpatient rehabilitation, were discharged to their homes. The patients were randomized to 1 of 2 follow-up interventions provided in addition to standard care or to standard aftercare. Fifty-four received follow-up home visits by a physician (INT1-HVP), 53 were provided instructions......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: About 50% of stroke survivors are discharged to their homes with lasting disability. Knowledge, however, of the importance of follow-up services that targets these patients is sparse. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate 2 models of follow-up intervention after...... by a physiotherapist in their home (INT2-PI), and 48 received standard aftercare only (controls). Baseline characteristics for the 3 groups were comparable. Six months after discharge, data were obtained on readmission and institutionalization. RESULTS: The readmission rates within 6 months after discharge were...

  9. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov . Vital Signs Topics Covered Alcohol Antibiotic Resistance Cancer Cardiovascular Diseases Diseases & Conditions Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections Healthy Living HIV / AIDS Injury, Violence & Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity ...

  10. A fraud prevention policy: Its relevance and implication at a university of technology in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Rorwana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using research grants administrators and their clients (academic researchers as the lens, this paper investigated the relevance and implication of a fraud prevention policy at a University of Technology (UoT in South Africa. The paper adopted a quantitative approach in which closed-ended questions were complemented by open-ended questions in the survey questionnaire in the attempt to capture the perceptions of both research grants administrators and their clients on the relevance and implications of a fraud and irregularity prevention policy. The results indicate that both research grants administrators (71.4 %, and their clients (73% do not know if UoTx has a fraud and irregularity policy. While only 36% of research grants administrators indicated that they would feel safe reporting deceitful activities, a slight majority (59% of the clients reported same. With regards to the steps to follow to report fraudulent activity, it was noted that while all (100% the research grants administrators noted that they were clueless, ironically an overwhelming majority of their clients indicated otherwise. Notwithstanding, both research grants administrators and their clients (93% and 95% respectively concurred that a fraud prevention policy was necessary for UoTx. The implication is that having phenomenal controls that are not effectively publicized, monitored or worse still overridden by someone are useless.

  11. Budget impact analysis of apixaban versus other NOACs for the prevention of stroke in Italian atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pradelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to perform a budget impact analysis of the use of three available novel oral anticoagulant agents (NOACs for preventing thromboembolic events in Italian patients with non‑valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF.METHODS: Estimated Italian population of patients was run through a previously published lifetime decision tree/Markov model simulating their treatment with the available therapeutic options: dabigatran at two dose levels (110 mg/bid for the over 80 years old, 150 mg/bid for younger NVAF patients, rivaroxaban (20 mg/uid, and apixaban (5 mg/bid. Effectiveness and safety estimates derive from an adjusted indirect treatment comparison using warfarin as link. The main clinical events considered in the model are ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, systemic thromboembolism, bleeds (both major and clinically relevant minor and cardiovascular hospitalizations, besides treatment discontinuations. Epidemiological data and unit costs, actualized to 2013, are collected from Italian published sources. The budget impact analysis evaluates the financial impact of apixaban introduction by comparing expected 1,2, and 3 years costs in hypothetical scenarios: with and without apixaban. Italian NVAF patient population estimation is based on official apixaban reimbursement criteria, applying the characteristics of the trial population to national epidemiologic data. Numbers of patients for each regimen are estimated by projecting share evolution. Sensitivity analysis is performed on an alternative non‑experimental population of NVAF patients.RESULTS: Among available NOACs, apixaban was expected to be the least expensive in an estimated patient population of 364,000 Italian patients, allowing for savings of € 1,180,549, € 3,841,429 and € 5,368,918 at 1,2, and 3 years, respectively. Results of the simulation run on an alternative non‑experimental population of NVAF patients yields comparable estimates.CONCLUSIONS: The different

  12. Comparative pharmacoeconomic assessment of apixaban vs. standard of care for the prevention of stroke in Italian atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pradelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost‑effectiveness of apixaban in the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with non‑valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF relatively to standard of care (warfarin or aspirin from the Italian National Health System (SSN perspective.METHODS: A previously published lifetime Markov model was adapted for Italian context. Clinical effectiveness data were acquired from head‑to‑head randomized trials (ARISTOTLE and AVERROES; main events considered in the model were ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, systemic thromboembolism, bleeds (both major and clinically relevant minor and cardiovascular hospitalizations, besides treatment discontinuations. Expected survival was projected beyond trial duration using national mortality data adjusted for individual clinical risks and adjusted by utility weights for health states acquired from literature. Unit costs were collected from published Italian sources and actualized to 2013. Costs and health gains accruing after the first year were discounted at an annual 3.5% rate. The primary outcome measure of the economic evaluation was the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER, where effectiveness is measured in terms of life‑years and quality adjusted life‑years gained. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA were carried out to assess the effect of input uncertainty.RESULTS: Apixaban is expected to reduce the incidence of ischemic events relative to aspirin and to improve bleeding safety profile when compared to warfarin. Incremental LYs (0.31/0.19, QALYs (0.28/0.20, and costs (1,932/1,104 are predicted with the use of apixaban relative to aspirin and warfarin, respectively. The ICERs of apixaban were € 6,794 and € 5,607 per QALY gained, respectively. In PSA, the probability of apixaban being cost effective relative to aspirin and warfarin was 95% and 93%, respectively, for a WTP threshold of € 20,000 per QALY gained

  13. Fogging on T2-weighted MR after acute ischaemic stroke: how often might this occur and what are the implications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, P.; Sellar, R.J.; Wardlaw, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    ''Fogging'' is the temporary loss of visibility of an infarct on CT which occurs in the subacute phase at about 2 weeks after stroke. It occurs in up to 40% of medium to large infarcts on CT. It is unclear whether or how often fogging occurs on T2-weighted MR, but if it does occur, it can cause underestimation of true infarct size. This study examined the possible frequency and time scale of ''fogging'' on T2-weighted MR. We conducted a blinded, independent review of prospectively collected MR scans from patients with symptoms of cortical ischaemic stroke, scanned sequentially up to 7 weeks after stroke. On each scan maximum infarct area was measured, and the infarct extent and swelling were coded on a validated scale. ''Fogging'' was suggested by reduced infarct extent between initial and subsequent scans. In 30 patients (with 74 scans) there was some apparent ''fogging'' in 50% of patients between 6 and 36 days (median 10 days) after stroke. Reduction in infarct extent on T2-weighted MR which may be attributed to ''fogging'' occurs in a significant proportion of patients with cortical infarcts. This may lead to an underestimation of true final infarct extent. This suggests that true infarct extent on T2-weighted MR can probably only be assessed on scans obtained beyond 7 weeks after stroke. (orig.)

  14. Electron Microscopic Recording of the Power and Recovery Strokes of Individual Myosin Heads Coupled with ATP Hydrolysis: Facts and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Sugi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The most straightforward way to get information on the performance of individual myosin heads producing muscle contraction may be to record their movement, coupled with ATP hydrolysis, electron-microscopically using the gas environmental chamber (EC. The EC enables us to visualize and record ATP-induced myosin head movement in hydrated skeletal muscle myosin filaments. When actin filaments are absent, myosin heads fluctuate around a definite neutral position, so that their time-averaged mean position remains unchanged. On application of ATP, myosin heads are found to move away from, but not towards, the bare region, indicating that myosin heads perform a recovery stroke (average amplitude, 6 nm. After exhaustion of ATP, myosin heads return to their neutral position. In the actin–myosin filament mixture, myosin heads form rigor actin myosin linkages, and on application of ATP, they perform a power stroke by stretching adjacent elastic structures because of a limited amount of applied ATP ≤ 10 µM. The average amplitude of the power stroke is 3.3 nm and 2.5 nm at the distal and the proximal regions of the myosin head catalytic domain (CAD, respectively. The power stroke amplitude increases appreciably at low ionic strength, which is known to enhance Ca2+-activated force in muscle. In both the power and recovery strokes, myosin heads return to their neutral position after exhaustion of ATP.

  15. Effects of a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Treadmill Training on Corticomotor Excitability following Stroke: Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. High intensity interval treadmill training (HIITT has been gaining popularity for gait rehabilitation after stroke. In this study, we examined the changes in excitability of the lower limb motor cortical representation (M1 in chronic stroke survivors following a single session of HIITT. We also determined whether exercise-induced changes in excitability could be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS enhanced with a paretic ankle skill acquisition task. Methods. Eleven individuals with chronic stroke participated in two 40-minute treadmill-training sessions: HIITT alone and HITT preceded by anodal tDCS enhanced with a skill acquisition task (e-tDCS+HIITT. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was used to assess corticomotor excitability of paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior (TA muscles. Results. HIIT alone reduced paretic TA M1 excitability in 7 of 11 participants by ≥ 10%. e-tDCS+HIITT increased paretic TA M1 excitability and decreased nonparetic TA M1 excitability. Conclusions. HIITT suppresses corticomotor excitability in some people with chronic stroke. When HIITT is preceded by tDCS in combination with a skill acquisition task, the asymmetry of between-hemisphere corticomotor excitability is reduced. Significance. This study provides preliminary data indicating that the cardiovascular benefits of HIITT may be achieved without suppressing motor excitability in some stroke survivors.

  16. Characteristics of Incarcerated Fathers and Mothers: Implications for Preventive Interventions Targeting Children and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellstrand, Jean; Cearley, Jennifer; Eddy, J Mark; Foney, Dana; Martinez, Charles R

    2012-12-01

    The number of children of incarcerated parents in the U.S. has grown dramatically in recent years. These children appear to be at risk for various problems, and a number of family-focused preventive efforts have been attempted. The current study examines differences between incarcerated mothers, incarcerated fathers, and their families on factors that might be important to consider when creating the content and process of preventive intervention programs. Participants were 359 inmates (54% women; 41% minority) who were parents of children between the ages of 3 and 11 years and who parented their children prior to imprisonment. Mothers and fathers were similar on a number of dimensions including age, education-level, number and age of children, and family criminal history, but differences were observed on key variables relevant to outcomes for children and families, including employment history and income, substance use, mental health, trauma experiences and criminal history. Implications for prevention programs are discussed.

  17. Recommendations of the IOM clinical preventive services for women committee: implications for obstetricians and gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Rebekah E; Brindis, Claire D; Diaz, Angela; Garcia, Francisco; Gregory, Kimberly; Peck, Magda G; Reece, E Albert

    2011-12-01

    In July 2011, in response to language in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) tasked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to develop a report on the clinical preventive services necessary for women. The committee proposed eight new clinical preventive service recommendations aimed at closing significant gaps in preventive healthcare. This article reviews the process, findings, and the implications for obstetrician gynecologists and other primary care clinicians. Obstetricians and gynecologists play a major role in delivering primary care to women and many of the services recommended by the Committee are part of the core set of obstetrics and gynecology services. The women's health amendment to the ACA (Federal Register, 2010) requires that new private health plans cover - with no cost-sharing requirements - preventive healthcare services for women. Congress requested that a review be conducted to ascertain whether there were any additional needed preventive services specific to women's health that should be included. The IOM Committee on Preventive Services for Women recommended eight clinical measures specific to women's health that should be considered for coverage without co-payment. The US Department of HHS reviewed and adopted these recommendations, and, as a result, new health plans will need to include these services as part of insurance policies with plan years beginning on or after 1 August 2012. The authors discuss the implications of the IOM recommendations on practicing clinicians and on their potential impact on women's health and well being.

  18. Cost-effectiveness and budget impact analyses of a long-term hypertension detection and control program for stroke prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sato, Shinichi; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kondo, Masahide; Okubo, Ichiro; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Shimamoto, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2012-09-01

    The nation-wide, community-based intensive hypertension detection and control program, as well as universal health insurance coverage, may well be contributing factors for helping Japan rank near the top among countries with the longest life expectancy. We sought to examine the cost-effectiveness of such a community-based intervention program, as no evidence has been available for this issue. The hypertension detection and control program was initiated in 1963 in full intervention and minimal intervention communities in Akita, Japan. We performed comparative cost-effectiveness and budget-impact analyses for the period 1964-1987 of the costs of public health services and treatment of patients with hypertension and stroke on the one hand, and incidence of stroke on the other in the full intervention and minimal intervention communities. The program provided in the full intervention community was found to be cost saving 13 years after the beginning of program in addition to the fact of effectiveness that; the prevalence and incidence of stroke were consistently lower in the full intervention community than in the minimal intervention community throughout the same period. The incremental cost was minus 28,358 yen per capita over 24 years. The community-based intensive hypertension detection and control program was found to be both effective and cost saving. The national government's policy to support this program may have contributed in part to the substantial decline in stroke incidence and mortality, which was largely responsible for the increase in Japanese life expectancy.

  19. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  20. The Changing Landscape for Stroke Prevention in AF: Findings From the GLORIA-AF Registry Phase 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.V.; Rothman, K.J.; Paquette, M.; Teutsch, C.; Diener, H.C.; Dubner, S.J.; Halperin, J.L.; Ma, C.S.; Zint, K.; Elsaesser, A.; Bartels, D.B.; Lip, G.Y.; Hemels, M.E.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GLORIA-AF (Global Registry on Long-Term Oral Antithrombotic Treatment in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation) is a prospective, global registry program describing antithrombotic treatment patterns in patients with newly diagnosed nonvalvular atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke. Phase 2

  1. Echocardiography underestimates stroke volume and aortic valve area: implications for patients with small-area low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Calvin W L; Khaw, Hwan J; Luo, Elton; Tan, Shuwei; White, Audrey C; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2014-09-01

    Discordance between small aortic valve area (AVA; area (LVOTarea) and stroke volume alongside inconsistencies in recommended thresholds. One hundred thirty-three patients with mild to severe AS and 33 control individuals underwent comprehensive echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Stroke volume and LVOTarea were calculated using echocardiography and MRI, and the effects on AVA estimation were assessed. The relationship between AVA and MPG measurements was then modelled with nonlinear regression and consistent thresholds for these parameters calculated. Finally the effect of these modified AVA measurements and novel thresholds on the number of patients with small-area low-gradient AS was investigated. Compared with MRI, echocardiography underestimated LVOTarea (n = 40; -0.7 cm(2); 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.6 to 1.3), stroke volumes (-6.5 mL/m(2); 95% CI, -28.9 to 16.0) and consequently, AVA (-0.23 cm(2); 95% CI, -1.01 to 0.59). Moreover, an AVA of 1.0 cm(2) corresponded to MPG of 24 mm Hg based on echocardiographic measurements and 37 mm Hg after correction with MRI-derived stroke volumes. Based on conventional measures, 56 patients had discordant small-area low-gradient AS. Using MRI-derived stroke volumes and the revised thresholds, a 48% reduction in discordance was observed (n = 29). Echocardiography underestimated LVOTarea, stroke volume, and therefore AVA, compared with MRI. The thresholds based on current guidelines were also inconsistent. In combination, these factors explain > 40% of patients with discordant small-area low-gradient AS. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants are non-inferior for stroke prevention but cause fewer major bleedings than well-managed warfarin: A retrospective register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelm Sjögren

    Full Text Available For patients with atrial fibrillation, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants, or NOACs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, and apixaban have been proven non-inferior or superior to warfarin in preventing stroke and systemic embolism, and in risk of haemorrhage. In the pivotal NOAC studies, quality of warfarin treatment was poor with mean time in therapeutic range (TTR 55-65%, compared with ≥70% in Swedish clinical practice.We compared NOACs (as a group to warfarin in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, studying all 12,694 patients starting NOAC treatment within the Swedish clinical register and dosing system Auricula, from July 1, 2011 to December 31, 2014, and matching them to 36,317 patients starting warfarin using propensity scoring. Endpoints were thromboembolic events and major bleedings that were fatal or required hospital care. Outcome data were collected from validated Swedish hospital administrative and clinical registers.Mean age was 72.2 vs 72.3 years, proportion of males 58.2% vs 57.0%, and mean follow-up time 299 vs 283 days for NOACs and warfarin. Distribution of NOACs was: dabigatran 40.3%, rivaroxaban 31.2%, and apixaban 28.5%. Mean TTR was 70%. There were no significant differences in rates of thromboembolic/thrombotic events or gastrointestinal bleeding. NOAC treated patients had lower rates of major bleeding overall, hazard ratio 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.67-0.92, intracranial bleeding 0.59 (0.40-0.87, haemorrhagic stroke 0.49 (0.28-0.86, and other major bleeding 0.71 (0.57-0.89.For patients with atrial fibrillation, NOACs are as effective for stroke prevention as well-managed warfarin but cause fewer major bleedings.

  3. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... history of stroke. Dr. Galen Henderson, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Strokes are preventable, they ... University of Maryland Medical Center University of Maryland School of Medicine Know Stroke: Know the Signs. Act ...

  4. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professional Resources Campaign Partners Research Programs Español Research Spotlight The NINDS conducts stroke research and clinical ... history of stroke. Dr. Galen Henderson, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Strokes are preventable, they ...

  5. The “DOC” screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H.; Cayley, Megan L.; Lanctôt, Krista L.; Murray, Brian J.; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Sicard, Michelle N.; Lien, Karen; Sahlas, Demetrios J.; Herrmann, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Cognitive impairment (“DOC”) are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool (“DOC” screen) to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment. Methods All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines. Findings 1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes), less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index), had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens. Conclusions Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may

  6. Sunlight exposure is important for preventing hip fractures in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, J; Takeda, T; Matsumoto, H

    2012-04-01

    Hypovitaminosis D as a result of malnutrition or sunlight deprivation, increased bone resorption, low bone mineral density (BMD), or an increased risk of falls may contribute to an increased risk of hip fractures in patients with neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of sunlight exposure for reducing the risk of hip fractures in patients with such neurological diseases. The English literature was searched using PubMed, and randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of sunlight exposure for reducing the risk of hip fractures in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke were identified. The relative risk and the 95% confidence interval were calculated for individual randomized controlled trials, and a pooled data analysis (meta-analysis) was performed. Three randomized controlled trials were identified. Sunlight exposure improved hypovitaminosis D and increased the BMD. The relative risk (95% confidence interval) of hip fractures was 0.22 (0.05, 1.01) for Alzheimer's disease, 0.27 (0.08, 0.96) for Parkinson's disease, and 0.17 (0.02, 1.36) for stroke. The relative risk (95% confidence interval) calculated for the pooled data analysis was 0.23 (0.10, 0.56) (P = 0.0012), suggesting a significant risk reduction rate of 77%. The present meta-analysis added additional evidence indicating the efficacy of sunlight exposure for reducing the risk of hip fractures in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Evaluation of self-reported ethnicity in a case-control population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wozniak Marcella A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based association studies are used to identify common susceptibility variants for complex genetic traits. These studies are susceptible to confounding from unknown population substructure. Here we apply a model-based clustering approach to our case-control study of stroke among young women to examine if self-reported ethnicity can serve as a proxy for genetic ancestry. Findings A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15-49 identified 361 cases of first ischemic stroke and 401 age-comparable control subjects. Thirty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs throughout the genome unrelated to stroke risk and with established ancestry-based allele frequency differences were genotyped in all participants. The Structure program was used to iteratively evaluate for K = 1 to 5 potential genetic-based subpopulations. Evaluating the population as a whole, the Structure output plateaued at K = 2 clusters. 98% of self-reported Caucasians had an estimated probability ≥50% of belonging to Cluster 1, while 94% of self-reported African-Americans had an estimated probability ≥50% of belonging to Cluster 2. Stratifying the participants by self-reported ethnicity and repeating the analyses revealed the presence of two clusters among Caucasians, suggesting that potential substructure may exist. Conclusions Among our combined sample of African-American and Caucasian participants there is no large unknown subpopulation and self-reported ethnicity can serve as a proxy for genetic ancestry. Ethnicity-specific analyses indicate that population substructure may exist among the Caucasian participants indicating that further studies are warranted.

  8. Program of rehabilitative exercise and education to avert vascular events after non-disabling stroke or transient ischemic attack (PREVENT Trial: a multi-centred, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite lack of outward signs, most individuals after non-disabling stroke (NDS and transient ischemic attack (TIA have significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and are at high risk of a major stroke, hospitalization for other vascular events, or death. Most have multiple modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, physical inactivity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, tobacco consumption, psychological stress. In addition, accelerated rates of depression, cognitive decline, and poor quality of sleep have been reported following TIA, which correlate with poor functional outcomes and reduced quality of life. Thus, NSD and TIA are important warning signs that should not be overlooked. The challenge is not unlike that facing other 'silent' conditions - to identify a model of care that is effective in changing people's current behaviors in order to avert further morbidity. Methods/Design A single blind, randomized controlled trial will be conducted at two sites to compare the effectiveness of a program of rehabilitative exercise and education versus usual care in modifying vascular risk factors in adults after NDS/TIA. 250 adults within 90 days of being diagnosed with NDS/TIA will be randomly allocated to a 12-week program of exercise and education (PREVENT or to an outpatient clinic assessment and discussion of secondary prevention recommendations with return clinic visits as indicated (USUAL CARE. Primary outcome measures will include blood pressure, waist circumference, 12-hour fasting lipid profile, and 12-hour fasting glucose/hemoglobin A1c. Secondary measures will include exercise capacity, walking endurance, physical activity, cognitive function, depression, goal attainment and health-related quality of life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Direct health care costs incurred over one year by PREVENT versus USUAL CARE participants will also be

  9. Outcomes validity and reliability of the modified Rankin scale: implications for stroke clinical trials: a literature review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jamie L; Marotta, Charles A

    2007-03-01

    The modified Rankin scale (mRS), a clinician-reported measure of global disability, is widely applied for evaluating stroke patient outcomes and as an end point in randomized clinical trials. Extensive evidence on the validity of the mRS exists across a large but fragmented literature. As new treatments for acute ischemic stroke are submitted for agency approval, an appreciation of the mRS's attributes, specifically its relationship to other stroke evaluation scales, would be valuable for decision-makers to properly assess the impact of a new drug on treatment paradigms. The purpose of this report is to assemble and systematically assess the properties of the mRS to provide decision-makers with pertinent evaluative information. A Medline search was conducted to identify reports in the peer-reviewed medical literature (1957-2006) that provide information on the structure, validation, scoring, and psychometric properties of the mRS and its use in clinical trials. The selection of articles was based on defined criteria that included relevance, study design and use of appropriate statistical methods. Of 224 articles identified by the literature search, 50 were selected for detailed assessment. Inter-rater reliability with the mRS is moderate and improves with structured interviews (kappa 0.56 versus 0.78); strong test-re-test reliability (kappa=0.81 to 0.95) has been reported. Numerous studies demonstrate the construct validity of the mRS by its relationships to physiological indicators such as stroke type, lesion size, perfusion and neurological impairment. Convergent validity between the mRS and other disability scales is well documented. Patient comorbidities and socioeconomic factors should be considered in properly applying and interpreting the mRS. Recent analyses suggest that randomized clinical trials of acute stroke treatments may require a smaller sample size if the mRS is used as a primary end point rather than the Barthel Index. Multiple types of evidence

  10. Psychiatric Medication Intake in Suicide Victims: Gender Disparities and Implications for Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschakis, Antonios; Michopoulos, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Christos; Koutsaftis, Filippos; Douzenis, Athanassios

    2016-11-01

    Frequency and gender differences of psychiatric medication intake in a sample of suicide victims from the Athens Greater Area were investigated with a particular focus on the implications for suicide prevention. Data were collected from the toxicological analyses of the suicide cases of the period November 2007-October 2009. Information was available for 262 individuals, 196 men (74.8%) and 66 women (25.2%); 109 of these (41.6%) were receiving psychiatric medication(s). Women were statistically more frequently under treatment: antidepressants (32.8% vs. 11.3%, p suicides. More thoughtful choice of psychiatric medication could possibly already prevent a number of female suicides. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Predictive factors of subjective sleep quality and insomnia complaint in patients with stroke: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA C. DA ROCHA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The complaints regarding sleep problems have not been well identified after a stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive factors of sleep quality and insomnia complaints in patients with stroke. A total of 70 subjects, 40 patients (57 ± 7 years and 30 healthy controls (52 ± 6 years assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and the Sleep Habits Questionnaire took part in the study. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test, the Student's t-test and logistic regression analysis. On average, the patients showed poor sleep quality (patients: 6.3 ± 3.5; controls: 3.9 ± 2.2; p= 0.002 and insomnia complaint was the most prevalent (patients: 37.5%; controls: 6.7%; p= 0.007. The absence of insomnia complaint (OR= 0.120; 95%CI= 0.017-0.873; p= 0.036 and the decreased latency of sleep (OR= 0.120; 95%CI= 0.017-0.873; p= 0.036 were the protective factors of sleep quality. Female sex (OR= 11.098; 95%CI= 1.167-105.559; p= 0.036 and fragmented sleep (OR= 32.040; 95%CI= 3.236-317.261; p= 0.003 were the risk factors for insomnia complaint. We suggest that complaints of poor sleep quality and insomnia should be given priority assessment during clinical diagnosis of sleep disorders in stroke.

  12. tPA variant tPA-A296-299 Prevents impairment of cerebral autoregulation and necrosis of hippocampal neurons after stroke by inhibiting upregulation of ET-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, William M; Hekierski, Hugh; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof; Cines, Douglas B

    2018-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is neurotoxic and exacerbates uncoupling of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism after stroke, yet it remains the sole FDA-approved drug for treatment of ischemic stroke. Upregulation of c-Jun-terminal kinase (JNK) after stroke contributes to tPA-mediated impairment of autoregulation, but the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is unknown. Based on the Glasgow Coma Scale, impaired autoregulation is linked to adverse outcomes after TBI, but correlation with hippocampal histopathology after stroke has not been established. We propose that given after stroke, tPA activates N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) and upregulates ET-1 in a JNK dependent manner, imparing autoregulation and leading to histopathology. After stroke, CBF was reduced in the hippocampus and reduced further during hypotension, which did not occur in hypotensive sham pigs, indicating impairment of autoregulation. Autoregulation and necrosis of hippocampal CA1 and CA3 neurons were further impaired by tPA, but were preserved by the ET-1 antagonist BQ 123 and tPA-A, 296-299 a variant that is fibrinolytic but does not bind to NMDA-Rs. Expression of ET-1 was increased by stroke and potentiated by tPA but returned to sham levels by tPA-A 296-299 and the JNK antagonist SP600125. Results show that JNK releases ET-1 after stroke. Tissue-type plasminogen activator -A 296-299 prevents impairment of cerebral autoregulation and histopathology after stroke by inhibiting upregulation of ET-1. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gradual extinction prevents the return of fear: Implications for the discovery of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Joseph Gershman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fear memories are notoriously difficult to erase, often recovering over time. The longstanding explanation for this finding is that, in extinction training, a new memory is formed that competes with the old one for expression but does not otherwise modify it. This explanation is at odds with traditional models of learning such as Rescorla-Wagner and reinforcement learning. A possible reconciliation that was recently suggested is that extinction training leads to the inference of a new state that is different from the state that was in effect in the original training. This solution, however, raises a new question: under what conditions are new states, or new memories formed? Theoretical accounts implicate persistent large prediction errors in this process. As a test of this idea, we reasoned that careful design of the reinforcement schedule during extinction training could reduce these prediction errors enough to prevent the formation of a new memory, while still decreasing reinforcement sufficiently to drive modification of the old fear memory. In two Pavlovian fear-conditioning experiments, we show that gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli, rather than eliminating them abruptly, prevents the recovery of fear. This finding has important implications for theories of state discovery in reinforcement learning.

  14. Trends and disparities in coronary heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases in the United States: findings of the national conference on cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Cutler, J; Desvigne-Nickens, P; Fortmann, S P; Friedman, L; Havlik, R; Hogelin, G; Marler, J; McGovern, P; Morosco, G; Mosca, L; Pearson, T; Stamler, J; Stryer, D; Thom, T

    2000-12-19

    A workshop was held September 27 through 29, 1999, to address issues relating to national trends in mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular diseases; the apparent slowing of declines in mortality from cardiovascular diseases; levels and trends in risk factors for cardiovascular diseases; disparities in cardiovascular diseases by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography; trends in cardiovascular disease preventive and treatment services; and strategies for efforts to reduce cardiovascular diseases overall and to reduce disparities among subpopulations. The conference concluded that coronary heart disease mortality is still declining in the United States as a whole, although perhaps at a slower rate than in the 1980s; that stroke mortality rates have declined little, if at all, since 1990; and that there are striking differences in cardiovascular death rates by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography. Trends in risk factors are consistent with a slowing of the decline in mortality; there has been little recent progress in risk factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and hypertension control. There are increasing levels of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with major differences among subpopulations. There is considerable activity in population-wide prevention, primary prevention for higher risk people, and secondary prevention, but wide disparities exist among groups on the basis of socioeconomic status and geography, pointing to major gaps in efforts to use available, proven approaches to control cardiovascular diseases. Recommendations for strategies to attain the year 2010 health objectives were made.

  15. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is blood pressure reduction a valid surrogate endpoint for stroke prevention? an analysis incorporating a systematic review of randomised controlled trials, a by-trial weighted errors-in-variables regression, the surrogate threshold effect (STE and the biomarker-surrogacy (BioSurrogate evaluation schema (BSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassere Marissa N

    2012-03-01

    diastolic blood pressure was an A grade surrogate endpoint for stroke prevention. In comparison, using the same stroke data sets, no STEs could be estimated for cardiovascular (CV mortality or all-cause mortality reduction, although the STE for CV mortality approached 25 mmHg for systolic blood pressure. Conclusions In this report we provide the first surrogate threshold effect (STE values for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We suggest the STEs have face and content validity, evidenced by the inclusivity of trial populations, subject populations and pharmacologic intervention populations in their calculation. We propose that the STE and STEP metrics offer another method of evaluating the evidence supporting surrogate endpoints. We demonstrate how surrogacy evaluations are strengthened if formally evaluated within specific-context evaluation frameworks using the Biomarker- Surrogate Evaluation Schema (BSES3, and we discuss the implications of our evaluation of blood pressure on other biomarkers and patient-reported instruments in relation to surrogacy metrics and trial design.

  17. Is blood pressure reduction a valid surrogate endpoint for stroke prevention? an analysis incorporating a systematic review of randomised controlled trials, a by-trial weighted errors-in-variables regression, the surrogate threshold effect (STE) and the biomarker-surrogacy (BioSurrogate) evaluation schema (BSES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    was an A grade surrogate endpoint for stroke prevention. In comparison, using the same stroke data sets, no STEs could be estimated for cardiovascular (CV) mortality or all-cause mortality reduction, although the STE for CV mortality approached 25 mmHg for systolic blood pressure. Conclusions In this report we provide the first surrogate threshold effect (STE) values for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We suggest the STEs have face and content validity, evidenced by the inclusivity of trial populations, subject populations and pharmacologic intervention populations in their calculation. We propose that the STE and STEP metrics offer another method of evaluating the evidence supporting surrogate endpoints. We demonstrate how surrogacy evaluations are strengthened if formally evaluated within specific-context evaluation frameworks using the Biomarker- Surrogate Evaluation Schema (BSES3), and we discuss the implications of our evaluation of blood pressure on other biomarkers and patient-reported instruments in relation to surrogacy metrics and trial design. PMID:22409774

  18. Burden of Stroke in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Faisal; Deleu, Dirk; Akhtar, Naveed; Al-Yazeedi, Wafa; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Kamran, Sadaat; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2015-12-01

    Qatar is located on the northeastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. The total population is over 2.1 million with around 15% being Qatari citizens. Hamad General Hospital (HGH) is the only tertiary referral governmental hospital in Qatar which admits acute (thrombolysis-eligible) stroke patients. To provide an overview of the burden of stroke in Qatar. Data from literature databases, online sources and our stroke registry were collated to identify information on the burden of stroke in Qatar. Overall, over 80% of all stroke patients in Qatar are admitted in HGH. In 2010, the age-standardized incidence for first-ever ischemic stroke was 51.88/100,000 person-years. To date our stroke registry reveals that 79% of all stroke patients are male and almost 50% of stroke patients are 50 years or less. Hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the main predisposing factors for stroke, with ischemic stroke being more common (87%) than hemorrhagic stroke (13%). Despite the lack of a stroke unit, 9% of ischemic stroke patients are being thrombolyzed. However the presence of a stroke ward allows swift turnover of patients with a length of stay of less than 5 days before discharge or, if required, transfer to the fully-equipped hospital-based rehabilitation service. Several community awareness programs are ongoing, in addition to several research programs funded by the Qatar National Research Fund and Hamad Medical Corporation. In a country where over 15% of the population suffers from diabetes there is continuous need for national community-based awareness campaigns, prevention and educational programs particularly targeting patients and health care workers. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention of cardiovascular events in Asian patients with ischaemic stroke at high risk of cerebral haemorrhage (PICASSO): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Eun-Jae; Kwon, Sun U; Park, Jong-Ho; Kim, Yong-Jae; Hong, Keun-Sik; Wong, Lawrence K S; Yu, Sungwook; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Rha, Joung-Ho; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Seo, Woo-Keun; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Ju-Hun; Kwon, Jee-Hyun; Sohn, Sung-Il; Jung, Jin-Man; Navarro, Jose C; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2018-06-01

    p=0·18). The incidence of vascular events was 3·91 per 100 person-years in the probucol group compared with 5·75 per 100 person-years in the non-probucol group (HR 0·69, 95% CI 0·50-0·97; superiority p=0·0316). The incidence of cerebral haemorrhage was 0·72 per 100 person-years in the probucol group and 1·11 per 100 person-years in the non-probucol group (HR 0·65, 97·5% CI 0·27-1·57; p=0·55). Adverse events were similar across the four study groups; the most common events were dizziness, headache, diarrhoea, and constipation. In patients with ischaemic stroke at high risk of cerebral haemorrhage, cilostazol was non-inferior to aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular events, but did not reduce the risk of haemorrhagic stroke. Addition of probucol to aspirin or cilostazol could be beneficial for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events. Korea Otsuka Pharmaceutical. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular basis of young ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Borellini, Linda; Motto, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Pezzini, Alessandro; Basilico, Paola; Micieli, Giuseppe; Padovani, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio; Candelise, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and family studies have provided evidence on the role of genetic factors in stroke, particularly in stroke occurring at young age. However, despite its impact, young stroke continues to be understudied. This article reviews the existing literature on the most investigated monogenic disorders (CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, RVCL, COL4A1, Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes) causing stroke in young and a number of candidate genes associated with stroke occurring in patients younger than 50 years. Although our study failed in identifying strong and reliable associations between specific genes and young stroke, our detailed literature revision on the field allowed us to compile a panel of genes possibly generating a susceptibility to stroke, which could be a starting point for future research. Since stroke is a potentially preventable disease, the identification of genes associated with young stroke may promote novel prevention strategies and allow the identification of therapeutic disease targets.

  1. Right-hemispheric processing of non-linguistic word features: implications for mapping language recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertner, Annette; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Roman Siebner, Hartwig

    2013-06-01

    Verbal stimuli often induce right-hemispheric activation in patients with aphasia after left-hemispheric stroke. This right-hemispheric activation is commonly attributed to functional reorganization within the language system. Yet previous evidence suggests that functional activation in right-hemispheric homologues of classic left-hemispheric language areas may partly be due to processing nonlinguistic perceptual features of verbal stimuli. We used functional MRI (fMRI) to clarify the role of the right hemisphere in the perception of nonlinguistic word features in healthy individuals. Participants made perceptual, semantic, or phonological decisions on the same set of auditorily and visually presented word stimuli. Perceptual decisions required judgements about stimulus-inherent changes in font size (visual modality) or fundamental frequency contour (auditory modality). The semantic judgement required subjects to decide whether a stimulus is natural or man-made; the phonologic decision required a decision on whether a stimulus contains two or three syllables. Compared to phonologic or semantic decision, nonlinguistic perceptual decisions resulted in a stronger right-hemispheric activation. Specifically, the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), an area previously suggested to support language recovery after left-hemispheric stroke, displayed modality-independent activation during perceptual processing of word stimuli. Our findings indicate that activation of the right hemisphere during language tasks may, in some instances, be driven by a "nonlinguistic perceptual processing" mode that focuses on nonlinguistic word features. This raises the possibility that stronger activation of right inferior frontal areas during language tasks in aphasic patients with left-hemispheric stroke may at least partially reflect increased attentional focus on nonlinguistic perceptual aspects of language. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Relationship between Risk Factor Control and Compliance with a Lifestyle Modification Program in the Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Tanya N; Al Kasab, Sami; Nizam, Azhar; Lynn, Michael J; Harrell, Jamie; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Janis, L Scott; Lane, Bethany F; Montgomery, Jean; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2018-03-01

    Lifestyle modification programs have improved the achievement of risk factor targets in a variety of clinical settings, including patients who have previously suffered a stroke or transient ischemic attack and those with multiple risk factors. Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) was the first vascular disease prevention trial to provide a commercially available lifestyle modification program to enhance risk factor control. We sought to determine the relationship between compliance with this program and risk factor control in SAMMPRIS. SAMMPRIS aggressive medical management included a telephonic lifestyle modification program provided free of charge to all subjects (n = 451) during their participation in the study. Subjects with fewer than 3 expected lifestyle-coaching calls were excluded from these analyses. Compliant subjects (n = 201) had  greater than or equal to 78.5% of calls (median % of completed/expected calls). Noncompliant subjects (n = 200) had less than 78.5% of calls or refused to participate. Mean risk factor values or % in-target for each risk factor was compared between compliant versus noncompliant subjects, using t tests and chi-square tests. Risk factor changes from baseline to follow-up were compared between the groups to account for baseline differences. Compliant subjects had better risk factor control throughout follow-up for low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure (SBP), hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c), non-high-density lipoprotein, nonsmoking, and exercise than noncompliant subjects, but there was no difference for body mass index. After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups, compliant subjects had a greater change from baseline than noncompliant subjects for SBP did at 24 months and HgA1c at 6 months. SAMMPRIS subjects who were compliant with the lifestyle modification program had better risk factor control during the study for almost

  3. The Stroke RiskometerTM App: Validation of a data collection tool and stroke risk predictor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Parmar (Priya); R. Krishnamurthi (Rita); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); A. Hofman (Albert); S.S. Mirza (Saira); Y. Varakin (Yury); M. Kravchenko (Michael); M. Piradov (Michael); A.G. Thrift (Amanda G.); B. Norrving (Bo); W. Wang (Wenzhi); D.K. Mandal (Dipes Kumar); S. Barker-Collo (Suzanne); R. Sahathevan (Ramesh); S.M. Davis (Stephen); G. Saposnik (Gustavo); M. Kivipelto (Miia); S. Sindi (Shireen); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); M. Giroud (Maurice); Y. Béjot (Yannick); M. Brainin (Michael); R. Poulton (Richie); K.M.V. Narayan (K. M. Venkat); M. Correia (Manuel); A. Freire (António); Y. Kokubo (Yoshihiro); D. Wiebers (David); F.K.F. Mensah (Fane ); N.F. Bindhim (Nasser); P.A. Barber (P. Alan); N.G. Pandian (Natesa); G.J. Hankey (Graeme); M.M. Mehndiratta (Man Mohan); S. Azhagammal (Shobhana); N.M. Ibrahim (Norlinah Mohd); M. Abbott (Max); E. Rush (Elaine); P. Hume (Patria); T. Hussein (Tasleem); R. Bhattacharjee (Rohit); M. Purohit (Mitali); V.L. Feigin (V.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The greatest potential to reduce the burden of stroke is by primary prevention of first-ever stroke, which constitutes three quarters of all stroke. In addition to population-wide prevention strategies (the 'mass' approach), the 'high risk' approach aims to identify

  4. Cerebrogenic tachyarrhythmia in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiac abnormalities following acute stroke are frequent and seen in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The changes seen in electrocardiogram (ECG consist of repolarization abnormalities such as ST elevation, ST depression, negative T waves, and QT prolongation. Among tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation is the most common and occurrence of focal atrial tachycardia is very rare though any cardiac arrhythmias can follow acute stroke. We report a case of focal atrial tachycardia following acute ischemic stroke in 50-year-old female without structural heart disease, and their mechanisms and clinical implications.

  5. Post-stroke cognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Anatolyevna Katunina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke cognitive impairments are common effects of stroke. Vascular cognitive impairments are characterized by the heterogeneity of the neuropsychological profile in relation to the site and pattern of stroke. Their common trait is the presence of dysregulation secondary to frontal dysfunction. The treatment of vascular cognitive impairments should be multimodality and aimed at stimulating neuroplasticity processes, restoring neurotransmitter imbalance, and preventing recurrent vascular episodes.

  6. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Perna, Robert; Temple, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n = 172) or hemorrhagic stroke (n = 112) within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program....

  7. Rumor, gossip and blame: implications for HIV/AIDS prevention in the South African lowveld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Jonathan

    2003-08-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic provides fertile breeding ground for theories of the origin of HIV/AIDS, its mode of transmission, and the allocation of blame. Drawing on ethnographic research in the Bushbuckridge region of the South African lowveld, this article examines the articulation of AIDS through gossip and rumor. These oral forms create moral readings of behavior and shape folk discourses of AIDS that resist dominant epidemiological explanations. Significantly, constructions of AIDS are not uniform. Although elders claim AIDS as traditional and curable, younger men and women support theories of AIDS as a modern, foreign disease. Witchcraft beliefs are popular in explaining why certain people die and not others. At times, rumor may escalate into a moral panic. The implications of these findings for social responses to the AIDS epidemic and HIV/AIDS prevention are explored.

  8. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sickle cell disease, high cholesterol, or a family history of stroke. Dr. Galen Henderson, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Strokes are preventable, they can be prevented, ...

  9. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dr. Galen Henderson, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Strokes are preventable, they can be prevented, ... down, it's just so important to try to stay healthy so you won't have another stroke." ...

  10. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  11. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  12. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  13. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    . Data analysis was performed by multiple logistic regression test. This study revealed that stroke disease was found in 49 people (2.6%. The main determinant of stroke included hypertension (OR = 4.20; 95% CI = 2.20 – 8.03, coronary heart disease (OR = 2.74; 95% CI = 1.51 – 4.99, diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.89; 95% CI = 1.47 – 5.64, and low economic status (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.03 – 3.33. Prevention of stroke should be done by increasing education (campaign through the control of major risk factors of hypertension and prevention of other degenerative diseases are coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus.

  14. Stroke and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Ozkan Kuscu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is significant cause of morbidity and mortality caused by disruption of blood flow. Neural injury occurs with two stage; while primary neural injury occurs with disruption of blood flow, after days and hours with metabolic processes secondary injury develops in tissues which is non injured in the first stage. Therefore it is important to prevent and treat the secondary injury as much as preventing and treating the primary neural injury. In this article developing pathophysiological changes after stroke, mechanisms of therapeutic hypothermia, application methods, the factors that determine the effectiveness, side effects and complications were reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 351-368

  15. Prevention of Congenital Transmission of Malaria in Sub-Saharan African Countries: Challenges and Implications for Health System Strengthening

    OpenAIRE

    Osungbade, Kayode O.; Oladunjoye, Olubunmi O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Review of burden of congenital transmission of malaria, challenges of preventive measures, and implications for health system strengthening in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. Literature from Pubmed (MEDLINE), Biomed central, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Database were reviewed. Results. The prevalence of congenital malaria in sub-Saharan Africa ranges from 0 to 23%. Diagnosis and existing preventive measures are constantly hindered by weak health systems and sociocultural issues. WHO ...

  16. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog ...

  17. Contemporary utilization of antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: an audit in an Australian hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Ekta Yogeshkumar; Anderson, Elizabeth; Chow, Clara; Wang, Yishen; Bajorek, Beata

    2018-02-01

    To document antithrombotic utilization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), particularly, recently approved NOACs (nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants) and warfarin; and identify factors predicting the use of NOACs versus warfarin. A retrospective audit was conducted in an Australian hospital. Data pertaining to inpatients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AF) admitted between January and December 2014 were extracted. This included patient demographics, risk factors (stroke, bleeding), social history, medical conditions, medication history, medication safety issues, medication adherence, and antithrombotic prescribed at admission and discharge. Among 199 patients reviewed, 84.0% were discharged on antithrombotics. Anticoagulants (± antiplatelets) were most frequently (52.0%) prescribed (two-thirds were prescribed warfarin, the remainder NOACs), followed by antiplatelets (33.0%). Among 41 patients receiving NOACs, 59.0% were prescribed rivaroxaban, 24.0% dabigatran, and 17.0% apixaban. Among patients aged 75 years and over, antiplatelets were most frequently used (37.0%), followed by warfarin (33.0%), then NOACs (14.0%). Compared with their younger counterparts, patients aged 75 years and over were significantly less likely to receive NOACs (14.0% versus 28.0%, p = 0.01). Among the 'most eligible' patients (Congestive Cardiac Failure, Hypertension (, Age ⩾ 75 years, Age= 65-74 years, Diabetes Mellitus, Stroke/ Transient Ischaemic Attack/ Thromboembolism, Vascular disease, Sex female[CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc] score ⩾2 and no bleeding risk factors), 46.0% were not anticoagulated on discharge. Patients with anaemia (68.0% versus 86.0%, p = 0.04) or a history of bleeding (65.0% versus 87.0%, p = 0.01) were less likely to receive antithrombotics compared with those without these risk factors. Warfarin therapy was less frequently prescribed among patients with cognitive impairment compared with patients with no cognitive issues (12.0% versus 23

  18. Urinary Retention Associated with Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Takeru; Ohta, Hirotsugu; Yokota, Akira; Yarimizu, Shiroh; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    Patients often exhibit urinary retention following a stroke. Various neuropathological and animal studies have implicated the medulla oblongata, pons, limbic system, frontal lobe as areas responsible for micturition control, although the exact area responsible for urinary retention after stroke is not clear. The purpose of this study was to identify the stroke area responsible for urinary retention by localizing the areas where strokes occur. We assessed 110 patients with cerebral infarction and 27 patients with cerebral hemorrhage (78 men, 59 women; mean age, 73.0 years) who had been admitted to our hospital between October, 2012 and September, 2013. We used computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the stroke location, and evaluated whether post-stroke urinary retention occurred. Twelve (8.8%) of the 137 patients (7 men, 5 women; mean age, 78.8 years) exhibited urinary retention after a stroke. Stroke occurred in the right/left dominant hemisphere in 7 patients; nondominant hemisphere in 1; cerebellum in 3; and brainstem in 1. Strokes in the dominant hemisphere were associated with urinary retention (P = 0.0314), particularly in the area of the insula (P < 0.01). We concluded that stroke affecting the insula of the dominant hemisphere tends to cause urinary retention.

  19. Potentially preventable infant and child deaths identified at autopsy; findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Andrew R; Mifsud, William; Wolfe, Ingrid; Cass, Hilary; Pryce, Jeremy; Malone, Marian; Sebire, Neil J

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the proportion of pediatric deaths investigated by HM Coronial autopsy which were potentially preventable deaths due to treatable natural disease, and what implications such findings may have for health policies to reduce their occurrence. A retrospective study of 1779 autopsies of individuals between 7 days and 14 years of age requested by HM Coroner, taking place in one specialist pediatric autopsy center, was undertaken. Cases were included if they involved a definite natural disease process in which appropriate recognition and treatment was likely to have affected their outcome. Strict criteria were used and cases were excluded where the individual had any longstanding condition which might have predisposed them to, or altered the recognition of, acute illness, or its response to therapy. Almost 8% (134/1779) of the study group were potentially preventable deaths as a result of natural disease, the majority occurring in children younger than 2 years of age. Most individuals reported between 1 and 7 days of symptoms before their death, and the majority had sought medical advice during this period, including from general practitioners within working hours, and hospital emergency departments. Of those who had sought medical attention, around one-third had done so more than once (28%, 15/53). Sepsis and pneumonia accounted for the majority of deaths (46 and 34% respectively), with all infections (sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis) accounting for 110/134 (82%). Around 10% of pediatric deaths referred to HM Coroner are potentially preventable, being the result of treatable natural acute illnesses. In many cases medical advice had been sought during the final illness. The results highlight how a review of autopsy data can identify significant findings with the potential to reduce mortality, and the importance of centralized investigation and reporting of pediatric deaths.

  20. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  2. Improving Stroke Management through Specialized Stroke Units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    seeking help early enough are also highlighted. Conclusion: The evidence ... Stroke as defined by the World Health Organization. (WHO) is a syndrome of ... parenteral nutrition and prevention of constipation by using stool softeners. The case ...

  3. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  4. New oral anticoagulants are not superior to warfarin in secondary prevention of stroke or transient ischemic attacks, but lower the risk of intracranial bleeding: insights from a meta-analysis and indirect treatment comparisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sardar

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (AF and prior stroke are classified as high risk in all risk stratification schemes. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of New Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs to warfarin in patients with AF and previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA. METHODS: Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs, including total 14527 patients, comparing NOACs (apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban with warfarin were included in the analysis. Primary efficacy endpoint was ischemic stroke, and primary safety endpoint was intracranial bleeding. Random-effects models were used to pool efficacy and safety data across RCTs. RevMan and Stata software were used for direct and indirect comparisons, respectively. RESULTS: In patients with AF and previous stroke or TIA, effects of NOACs were not statistically different from that of warfarin, in reduction of stroke (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73- 1.01, disabling and fatal stroke (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.71-1.04, and all-cause mortality (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.79 -1.02. Randomization to NOACs was associated with a significantly lower risk of intracranial bleeding (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.25-0.70. There were no major differences in efficacy between apixaban, dabigatran (110 mg BID and 150 mg BID and rivaroxaban. Major bleeding was significantly lower with apixaban and dabigatran (110 mg BID compared with dabigatran (150 mg BID and rivaroxaban. CONCLUSION: NOACs may not be more effective than warfarin in the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with a prior history of cerebrovascular ischemia, but have a lower risk of intracranial bleeding.

  5. The Effects of Poverty on the Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Health of Children and Youth: Implications for Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Aber, J. Lawrence; Beardslee, William R.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the implications for prevention science of recent advances in research on family poverty and children's mental, emotional, and behavioral health. First, we describe definitions of poverty and the conceptual and empirical challenges to estimating the causal effects of poverty on children's mental, emotional, and behavioral…

  6. An outline of the need for psychology knowledge in health professionals: implications for community development and breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Maryam; Samah, Asnarulkhadi Abu; Saidu, Mohammed Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of health and community psychology in health professionals influences psychosocial and community determinants of health and promoting participation in disease prevention at the community level. This paper appraises the potential of knowledge on psychology in health care professionals and its contribution to community empowerment through individual behavior change and health practice. The authors proposed a schematic model for the use of psychological knowledge in health professionals to promote participation in health interventions/disease prevention programs in developing countries. By implication, the paper provides a vision on policies towards supporting breast cancer secondary prevention efforts for community health development in Asian countries.

  7. Current approaches to antithrombotic therapy in patients with cardioembolic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Ivanovich Vinogradov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of cardiogenic embolism among all ischemic strokes is as high as 38%. Cardioembolic strokes are characterized by the higher magnitude of neurological deficit, the high risk of recurrent acute stroke, and a lethal outcome. This review deals with the etiopathogenesis of thrombus formation in the heart chambers, with current criteria for the verification of cardioembolic strokes, with the results of trials of new oral anticoagulants, and latest guidelines for antithrombotic therapy to prevent stroke. Special focus is given to secondary stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation since it is atrial fibrillation that is the most common cause of cardioembolic stroke.

  8. Epigenetic basis of sensitization to stress, affective episodes, and stimulants: implications for illness progression and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    The process of sensitization (increased responsivity) to the recurrence of stressors, affective episodes, and bouts of substance abuse that can drive illness progression in the recurrent affective disorders requires a memory of and increased reactivity to the prior exposures. A wealth of studies now supports the postulate that epigenetic mechanisms underlie both normal and pathological memory processes. We selectively reviewed the literature pertinent to the role of epigenetics in behavioral sensitization phenomena and discuss its clinical implications. Epigenetics means above genetics and refers to environmental effects on the chemistry of DNA, histones (around which DNA is wound), and microRNA that change how easily genes are turned on and off. The evidence supports that sensitization to repeated stressor, affective episodes, and substance is likely based on epigenetic mechanisms and that these environmentally based processes can then become targets for prevention, early intervention, and ongoing treatment. Sensitization processes are remediable or preventable risk factors for a poor illness outcome and deserve increased clinical, public health, and research attention in the hopes of making the recurrent unipolar and bipolar affective disorders less impairing, disabling, and lethal by suicide and increased medical mortality. The findings that epigenetic chemical marks, which change in the most fundamental way how genes are regulated, mediate the long-term increased responsivity to recurrent stressors, mood episodes, and bouts of substance abuse should help change how the affective disorders are conceptualized and move treatment toward earlier, more comprehensive, and sustained pharmacoprophylaxis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Human papillomavirus vaccine and cervical cancer prevention: practice and policy implications for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Jennifer; Sturpe, Deborah A; Khanna, Niharika

    2008-01-01

    To review the epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV), summarize relevant clinical trials of the prophylactic HPV vaccines, and describe the practice and policy implications that HPV vaccine represents for pharmacists. Search of Medline through June 2007 using keywords human papillomavirus vaccine, Gardasil, and Cervarix; meeting abstracts; bibliographies from selected articles; and National Institutes of Health clinical trials registry. English language review articles, clinical trials, and published abstracts were considered for inclusion. HPV is a sexually transmitted infection that is necessary for the development of cervical cancer, and types 16 and 18 are associated with 70% of cases of invasive cervical cancer worldwide. A quadrivalent prophylactic vaccine against HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 is currently available, and a bivalent vaccine targeting HPV-16 and -18 is under review by the Food and Drug Administration. Both are highly effective at preventing persistent HPV infection and precancerous lesions caused by vaccine-specific HPV. HPV vaccine is currently indicated for girls aged 9 to 26 years, but ongoing trials are evaluating the efficacy in other populations. Implementation of a vaccine administration program is an area of opportunity for new policies to include pharmacists in the administration of prophylactic HPV vaccines. Pharmacists are allowed to administer vaccinations in 46 states and can potentially play a role in HPV vaccine administration. For this to happen, however, multiple legal and regulatory changes must occur. Prophylactic HPV vaccines safely and effectively prevent HPV infection and precancerous lesions in the cervix. The availability of these vaccines also create new clinical opportunities for community pharmacists, provided needed legal, regulatory, and policy changes are made.

  10. Dabigatran etexilate for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in real practice and promises for its use to prevent stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Fonyakin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of antithrombotic therapy to prevent thromboembolic events in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF are substantially extended after designing and clinically introducing new oral anticoagulants, one of which is dabigatran. A wealth of world clinical experience with dabigatran has confirmed its efficacy and safety provided that all recommendations for dosage regimens are followed. The universal properties of the drug can hope that the indications for its use will be extended and will not be confined to the prevention and treatment of venous and atrial thromboses and thromboembolisms. Whether dabigatran may be used in acute myocardial infarction and coronary stenting in the presence of nonvalvular AF, left ventricular thrombosis, and cardiomyopathies is being considered today.

  11. Implications of Postharvest Food Loss/Waste Prevention to Energy and Resources Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Shafiee-Jood, M.

    2015-12-01

    World's growing demand for food is driven by population and income growth, dietary changes, and the ever-increasing competition between food, feed and bioenergy challenges food security; meanwhile agricultural expansion and intensification threats the environment by the various detrimental impacts. Researchers have attempted to explore strategies to overcome this grand challenge. One of the promising solutions that have attracted considerable attention recently is to increase the efficiency of food supply chain by reducing food loss and waste (FLW). According to recent studies conducted by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), United Nation, almost one third of the food produced for human consumption globally is lost or wasted along the food supply chain. This amount of food discarded manifests a missing, yet potential, opportunity to sustainably enhance both food security and environmental sustainability. However, implementing the strategies and technologies for tackling FLW does not come up as an easy solution since it requires economic incentives, benefit and cost analysis, infrastructure development, and appropriate market mechanism. In this presentation I will provide a synthesis of knowledge on the implications of postharvest food loss/waste prevention to energy and resource conservation, environmental protection, as well as food security. I will also discuss how traditional civil and environmental engineering can contribute to the reduction of postharvest food loss, an important issue of sustainable agriculture.

  12. Experiences of vision impairment in Papua New Guinea: implications for blindness prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Anthea; Yashadhana, Aryati; Cabrera Aguas, Maria; Hanni, Yvonne; Yu, Mitasha

    2016-01-01

    A person's capability to access services and achieve good eye health is influenced by their behaviours, perceptions, beliefs and experiences. As evidence from Papua New Guinea (PNG) about people's lived experience with vision impairment is limited, the purpose of the present study was to better understand the beliefs, perceptions and emotional responses to vision impairment in PNG. A qualitative study, using both purposive and convenience sampling, was undertaken to explore common beliefs and perceptions about vision impairment, as well as the emotional responses to vision impairment. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 51 adults from five provinces representing culturally and geographically diverse regions of PNG. Grounded theory was used to elicit key themes from interview data. Participants described activities of everyday life impacted by vision impairment and the related worry, sadness and social exclusion. Common beliefs about the causes of vision impairment were environmental stressors (sun, dust, dirt and smoke), ageing and sorcery. Findings provide insight into the unique social context in PNG and identify a number of programmatic and policy implications, such as the need for preventative eye health information and services, addressing persisting beliefs in sorcery when developing health information packages, and the importance of coordinating with counselling and well-being services for people experiencing vision impairment.

  13. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial : a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dienert, Hans-Christoph; Saccot, Ralph L.; Yusuft, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Renee H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P. L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlof, Bjorn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Background The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist

  14. Association of Osteopontin, Neopterin, and Myeloperoxidase With Stroke Risk in Patients With Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Peter; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Established risk factors do not fully identify patients at risk for recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels) evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on stroke risk in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic...

  15. Signos Vitales de los CDC–Prevención de muertes por accidentes cerebrovasculares (Preventing Stroke Deaths)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de septiembre del 2017 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Cada año, más de 140 000 personas mueren y muchos sobrevivientes quedan con discapacidades. El ochenta por ciento de los accidentes cerebrovasculares son prevenibles. Conozca los signos de un accidente cerebrovascular y sepa cómo prevenirlo.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  16. Association of peripheral differential leukocyte counts with dyslipidemia risk in Chinese patients with hypertension: insight from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhong; Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Wen; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yupeng; Wang, Yu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Hou, Fan Fan; Gao, Wei; Sun, Ningling; Li, Jianping; Venners, Scott A; Jiang, Shanqun; Huo, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between peripheral differential leukocyte counts and dyslipidemia in a Chinese hypertensive population. A total of 10,866 patients with hypertension were enrolled for a comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular risk factors using data from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. Plasma lipid levels and total leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were determined according to standard methods. Peripheral differential leukocyte counts were consistently and positively associated with serum total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and TG levels (all P dyslipidemia/normolipidemia), we found that patients in the highest quartile of total leukocyte count (≥7.6 × 10 9 cells/l) had 1.64 times the risk of high TG [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.46, 1.85], 1.34 times the risk of high TC (95% CI: 1.20, 1.50), and 1.24 times the risk of high LDL-C (95% CI: 1.12, 1.39) compared with their counterparts in the lowest quartile of total leukocyte count. Similar patterns were also observed with neutrophils and lymphocytes. In summary, these findings indicate that elevated differential leukocyte counts are directly associated with serum lipid levels and increased odds of dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  18. Evaluating the Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Statin Use Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David J; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Pletcher, Mark J; Goldman, Lee; Odden, Michelle C; Kazi, Dhruv S; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2017-09-19

    Statins are effective in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline expands recommended statin use, but its cost-effectiveness has not been compared with other guidelines. We used the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the ACC/AHA guideline relative to current use, Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, and universal statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age over a 10-year horizon from 2016 to 2025. Sensitivity analyses varied costs, risks, and benefits. Main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and numbers needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Each approach produces substantial benefits and net cost savings relative to the status quo. Full adherence to the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline would result in 8.8 million more statin users than the status quo, at a number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 35. The ACC/AHA guideline would potentially result in up to 12.3 million more statin users than the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 68. Moderate-intensity statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age would result in 28.9 million more statin users than the ACC/AHA guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 108. In all cases, benefits would be greater in men than women. Results vary moderately with different risk thresholds for instituting statins and statin toxicity estimates but depend greatly on the disutility caused by daily medication use (pill burden). At a population level, the ACC/AHA guideline for expanded statin use for primary prevention is projected to treat more people, to save more lives, and to cost less

  19. Long-Term Effect of Participation in an Early Exercise and Education Program on Clinical Outcomes and Cost Implications, in Patients with TIA and Minor, Non-Disabling Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, James; Stoner, Lee; Lanford, Jeremy; Jolliffe, Evan; Mitchelmore, Andrew; Lambrick, Danielle

    2017-06-01

    Participation in exercise and education programs following transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke may decrease cardiovascular disease risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term effect (3.5 years) of an exercise and education program administered soon after TIA or minor stroke diagnosis on clinical outcome measures (stroke classification and number, patient deaths, hospital/emergency department admission) and cost implications obtained from standard hospital records. Hospital records were screened for 60 adults (male, n = 31; 71 ± 10 years), diagnosed with TIA or non-disabling stroke, who had previously been randomised and completed either an 8-week exercise and education program, or usual care control. Follow-up clinical outcomes and cost implications were obtained 3.5 ± 0.3 years post-exercise. Participants randomised to the exercise and education program had significantly fewer recurrent stroke/TIAs (n = 3 vs. n = 13, Cohen's d = 0.79) than the control group (P ≤ 0.003). Similar finding were reported for patient deaths (n = 0 vs. n = 4, d = 0.53), and hospital admissions (n = 48 vs. n = 102, d = 0.54), although these findings were only approaching statistical significance. The relative risk (mean; 95%CI) of death, stroke/TIAs and hospital admissions were 0.11 (0.01 to 1.98), 0.23 (0.07 to 0.72) and 0.79 (0.57 to 1.09), respectively. Hospital admission costs were significantly lower for the exercise group ($9041 ± 15,080 NZD [~$6000 ± 10,000 USD]) than the control group ($21,750 ± 22,973 NZD [~$14,000 ± 15,000 USD]) during the follow-up period (P TIA and minor stroke. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/ ; Trial Registration Number: ACTRN12611000630910.

  20. Using Beta-Version mHealth Technology for Team-Based Care Management to Support Stroke Prevention: An Assessment of Utility and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Magaly; Wu, Shinyi; Ryan, Gery; Towfighi, Amytis; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-05-23

    Beta versions of health information technology tools are needed in service delivery models with health care and community partnerships to confirm the key components and to assess the performance of the tools and their impact on users. We developed a care management technology (CMT) for use by community health workers (CHWs) and care managers (CMs) working collaboratively to improve risk factor control among recent stroke survivors. The CMT was expected to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the CHW-CM team. The primary objective was to describe the Secondary Stroke Prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic Care Model Teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED) CMT and investigate CM and CHW perceptions of the CMT's usefulness and challenges for team-based care management. We conducted qualitative interviews with all users of the beta-version SUCCEED CMT, namely two CMs and three CHWs. They were asked to demonstrate and describe their perceptions of the CMT's ease of use and usefulness for completing predefined key care management activities. They were also probed about their general perceptions of the CMT's information quality, ease of use, usefulness, and impact on CM and CHW roles. Interview transcripts were coded using a priori codes. Coded excerpts were grouped into broader themes and then related in a conceptual model of how the CMT facilitated care management. We also conducted a survey with 14 patients to obtain their perspective on CHW tablet use during CHW-patient interactions. Care managers and community health workers expressed that the CMT helped them keep track of patient interactions and plan their work. It guided CMs in developing and sharing care plans with CHWs. For CHWs, the CMT enabled electronic collection of clinical assessment data, provided decision support, and provided remote access to patients' risk factor values. Long loading times and downtimes due to outages were the most significant challenges encountered. Additional issues

  1. Effectiveness of a Stroke Risk Self-Management Intervention for Adults with Prehypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Young Song, RN, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that the stroke risk self-management intervention is feasible and associated with improvement in self-management of stroke risk factors for primary stroke prevention among a prehypertensive population.

  2. Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belagaje, Samir R

    2017-02-01

    Rehabilitation is an important aspect of the continuum of care in stroke. With advances in the acute treatment of stroke, more patients will survive stroke with varying degrees of disability. Research in the past decade has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stroke recovery and has led to the development of new treatment modalities. This article reviews and summarizes the key concepts related to poststroke recovery. Good data now exist by which one can predict recovery, especially motor recovery, very soon after stroke onset. Recent trials have not demonstrated a clear benefit associated with very early initiation of rehabilitative therapy after stroke in terms of improvement in poststroke outcomes. However, growing evidence suggests that shorter and more frequent sessions of therapy can be safely started in the first 24 to 48 hours after a stroke. The optimal amount or dose of therapy for stroke remains undetermined, as more intensive treatments have not been associated with better outcomes compared to standard intensities of therapy. Poststroke depression adversely affects recovery across a variety of measures and is an important target for therapy. Additionally, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to benefit motor recovery through pleiotropic mechanisms beyond their antidepressant effect. Other pharmacologic approaches also appear to have a benefit in stroke rehabilitation. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is essential to optimize poststroke outcomes. Rehabilitation is a process that uses three major principles of recovery: adaptation, restitution, and neuroplasticity. Based on these principles, multiple different approaches, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, exist to enhance rehabilitation. In addition to neurologists, a variety of health care professionals are involved in stroke rehabilitation. Successful rehabilitation involves understanding the natural history of stroke recovery and a

  3. Nonlinear association between betel quid chewing and oral cancer: Implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathil, Sreenath Arekunnath; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Wynant, Willy; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Franco, Eduardo L; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-09-01

    Betel quid chewing is a major oral cancer risk factor and the human papillomaviruses (HPV) may play an aetiological role in these cancers. However, little is known about the shape of the dose-response relationship between the betel quid chewing habit and oral cancer risk in populations without HPV. We estimate the shape of this dose-response relationship, and discuss implications for prevention. Cases with oral squamous cell carcinoma (350) and non-cancer controls (371) were recruited from two major teaching hospitals in South India. Information on socio-demographic and behavioral factors was collected using a questionnaire and the life grid technique. The effect of daily amount of use and duration of the habit were estimated jointly as risk associated with cumulative exposure (chew-years). The shape of the dose-response curve was estimated using restricted cubic spline transformation of chew-years in a conditional logistic regression model. Risk estimates for low dose combinations of daily amount and duration of the habit were computed from flexible regression. Most (72%) oral cancer cases were betel quid chewers in contrast to only 18% of controls. A nonlinear dose-response relationship was observed; the risk increased steeply at low doses and plateaued at high exposures to betel quid (>425 chew-years). A threefold increase in risk (OR=3.92, 95%CI: 1.87-8.21) was observed for the lowest dose; equivalent to the use of one quid per day for one year. Our findings may be used to counsel people to refrain from even low betel quid chewing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Riks-Stroke story: building a sustainable national register for quality assessment of stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Kjell; Hulter Åsberg, Kerstin; Appelros, Peter; Bjarne, Daniela; Eriksson, Marie; Johansson, Asa; Jonsson, Fredrik; Norrving, Bo; Stegmayr, Birgitta; Terént, Andreas; Wallin, Sari; Wester, Per-Olov

    2011-04-01

    Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register, is the world's longest-running national stroke quality register (established in 1994) and includes all 76 hospitals in Sweden admitting acute stroke patients. The development and maintenance of this sustainable national register is described. Riks-Stroke includes information on the quality of care during the acute phase, rehabilitation and secondary prevention of stroke, as well as data on community support. Riks-Stroke is unique among stroke quality registers in that patients are followed during the first year after stroke. The data collected describe processes, and medical and patient-reported outcome measurements. The register embraces most of the dimensions of health-care quality (evidence-based, safe, provided in time, distributed fairly and patient oriented). Annually, approximately 25,000 patients are included. In 2009, approximately 320,000 patients had been accumulated (mean age 76-years). The register is estimated to cover 82% of all stroke patients treated in Swedish hospitals. Among critical issues when building a national stroke quality register, the delicate balance between simplicity and comprehensiveness is emphasised. Future developments include direct transfer of data from digital medical records to Riks-Stroke and comprehensive strategies to use the information collected to rapidly implement new evidence-based techniques and to eliminate outdated methods in stroke care. It is possible to establish a sustainable quality register for stroke at the national level covering all hospitals admitting acute stroke patients. Riks-Stroke is fulfilling its main goals to support continuous quality improvement of Swedish stroke services and serve as an instrument for following up national stroke guidelines. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2010 World Stroke Organization.

  5. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of 'Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-04

    Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. ISRCTN1648908; Pre-results. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02324634. Published by the BMJ

  6. Risk stratification and stroke prevention therapy care gaps in Canadian atrial fibrillation patients (from the Co-ordinated National Network to Engage Physicians in the Care and Treatment of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation chart audit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashish D; Tan, Mary K; Angaran, Paul; Bell, Alan D; Berall, Murray; Bucci, Claudia; Demchuk, Andrew M; Essebag, Vidal; Goldin, Lianne; Green, Martin S; Gregoire, Jean C; Gross, Peter L; Heilbron, Brett; Lin, Peter J; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Skanes, Allan; Wheeler, Bruce H; Goodman, Shaun G

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this national chart audit (January to June 2013) of 6,346 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF; ≥18 years without a significant heart valve disorder) from 647 primary care physicians were to (1) describe the frequency of stroke and bleed risk assessments in patients with nonvalvular AF by primary care physicians, including the accuracy of these assessments relative to established predictive indexes; (2) outline contemporary methods of anticoagulation used; and (3) report the time in the therapeutic range among patients prescribed warfarin. An annual stroke risk assessment was not undertaken in 15% and estimated without a formal risk tool in 33%; agreement with CHADS2 score estimation was seen in 87% of patients. Major bleeding risk assessment was not undertaken in 25% and estimated without a formal risk tool in 47%; agreement with HAS-BLED score estimation was observed in 64% with physician overestimation in 26% of patients. Antithrombotic therapy included warfarin (58%), dabigatran (22%), rivaroxaban (14%), and apixaban (risk for stroke. There is apparent overestimation of bleeding risk in many patients. Warfarin was the dominant stroke prevention treatment; however, the suggested TTR target was achieved in only 55% of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: re-defining 'real-world data' within the broader data universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaroff, Alexander C; Steffel, Jan; Alexander, John H; Lip, Gregory Y H; Califf, Robert M; Lopes, Renato D

    2018-04-23

    Real-world data (RWD) has been defined as data generated outside of traditional randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Though RWD has received increasing attention from regulatory authorities and professional societies, dividing evidence into that derived from 'real-world' vs. 'non-real-world' sources provides only one element of a much larger framework for evidence evaluation. Evidence should be evaluated on the source of the data, the method of treatment allocation (whether any intervention being evaluated was assigned or simply observed as used in practice) and the context in which the evidence was generated (overall study design). Under this framework, RWD refers only to data source, and a study incorporates RWD when it primarily uses data collected for non-research purposes, such as insurance claims data or the electronic health record, regardless of study design. Separation of study design, data source, and context enables parallel evaluation of two critical elements: (i) whether a study can support claims of causal inference, which can be assured with a high degree of confidence only in studies where patients are assigned treatments by protocol; and (ii) whether the study population and clinical context mirror clinical practice, a strength of observational studies using data from clinical practice or administrative claims. In this review, we describe the strengths and weaknesses of observational and non-observational studies, and studies involving RWD and non-RWD, through the lens of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Observational studies employing RWD are useful for describing how oral anticoagulants are used in clinical practice, but generally cannot be used to make claims regarding comparative treatment effects. Questions regarding treatment effect generally are best answered through an RCT, and additional pragmatic RCTs are needed to compare different antithrombotic agents for the prevention of thrombotic events in AF.

  8. Serum Potassium Is Positively Associated With Stroke and Mortality in the Large, Population-Based Malmö Preventive Project Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Linda S; Mattsson, Nick; Sajadieh, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    analyses. There were 2061 incident stroke events and 8709 deaths. Cox regression analyses adjusted for multiple stroke risk factors (age, sex, height, weight, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, serum sodium, current smoking, prevalent diabetes mellitus, prevalent coronary artery disease.......0001). This was significant in subjects both older and younger than the median age (46.5 years), and there was evidence of an interaction with serum sodium. The association was positive and significant for both ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage and in both hypertensive and normotensive subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Serum...

  9. Cuidador familiar de seqüelados de acidente vascular cerebral: significado e implicações Family caregiver of stroke sequel patients: meanings and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Freitas Mendonça

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O acidente vascular cerebral (AVC está entre as principais causas de morte no mundo. Diante das incapacidades impostas pelo AVC, surge o cuidador familiar. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi analisar o significado e as implicações de se tornar cuidador de um indivíduo seqüelado de AVC. Trata-se de um estudo qualitativo, realizado com cinco cuidadores, em Londrina-PR, no período de agosto a dezembro de 2005. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas semi-estruturadas e submetidos à análise de discurso proposta por Martins e Bicudo. Da análise das entrevistas emergiram sete categorias: voltando-se para o Ser cuidado, descrevendo os cuidados, apresentando as mudanças, o apoio da espiritualidade, compreendendo o significado do cuidado, expressando as necessidades para cuidar e perspectivas para o futuro. Os resultados revelaram que ser cuidador familiar é um fenômeno complexo, que gera nos sujeitos sentimentos de alegria e felicidade concomitantes aos sentimentos de medo, ansiedade e revolta.The brain vascular accident (BVA is one of the main death causes worldwide. Due to the impairments imposed by the BVA, there is the family caregiver. This work aims to analyze the meaning and implications of being a caregiver of a stroke sequel person. It is a qualitative research, carried out with five caregivers in Londrina-PR, from August to December 2005. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews and were subjected to discourse analysis proposed by Martins and Bicudo. From the analysis of interviews seven categories arouse: turning to the being cared, describing care, presenting changes, spirituality support, understanding the meaning of care, expressing the needs to take care and future perspectives. Results revealed that being a family caregiver is a complex phenomenon, that creates in the subjects feelings of happiness and along with feelings of fear, anxiety and revolt.

  10. Diagnostics and training of affordance perception in healthy young adults – implications for post-stroke neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eRanderath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affordance perception is critical to adaptive behavior. It comprises the ability to evaluate whether the environment and the actor’s capabilities enable particular actions. It remains unclear how brain damage and its behavioral sequela impact this ability. Two affordance based judgment tasks were applied in healthy young adults that were adapted for prospective diagnostic purposes in patients. In addition to the commonly analyzed error-rate we included response times and accuracy measures based on a detection theory approach. Moreover, a manipulation was added intended to determine the effectiveness of feedback-based learning. We further applied control tasks that consider whether errors in affordance perception can be explained by errors in perception. Participants responded yes or no to decide prospectively if a given setting would afford a particular action. In study1, 27 participants judged whether their hand would fit through a given aperture [adapted from Ishak, Adolph, & Lin (2008]. In study2, 19 participants judged whether objects are reachable [adapted from Gabbard, Ammar, & Rodrigues (2005]. For both studies two sessions were administered. In the first session all participants solved the judgment-task without executing the action. In the second session (feedback manipulation, half of the participants were allowed to first judge and then perform the task for each trial (reach forward and touch the object, or fitting the hand into the aperture.Judgments were slowest and errors most frequent for openings or distances close to the individual’s actual physical limits. With more extreme settings accuracy increased and responses became faster. Importantly, we found an advantageous effect of feedback on performance in both tasks suggesting that affordance perception is rapidly trainable. Further, the aperture task demonstrated that feedback experienced with one hand can transfer to the other. This may have important implications for

  11. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  12. Cardiovascular Disease Burden: Evolving Knowledge of Risk Factors in Myocardial Infarction and Stroke through Population-Based Research and Perspectives in Global Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUSTAVO B.F. OLIVEIRA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge and research perspectives on the top ranking causes of mortality worldwide, i.e., ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases have developed rapidly. In fact, until recently, it was considered that only half of the myocardial infarctions were due to traditional risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking and diabetes. In addition, most of the available evidence of incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes, if not all of it, was derived from studies conducted in developed countries, which included lower proportion of female individuals and with low ethnic diversity. Recent reports by the WHO have provided striking public health information, i.e., the global burden of cardiovascular mortality for the next decades is expected to predominantly occur among developing countries. Therefore, multi-ethnic population-based research including prospective cohorts and, when appropriate, case-control studies, is warranted. These studies should be specifically designed to ascertain key public health measures such as geographic variations in noncommunicable diseases, diagnosis of traditional and potential newly discovered risk factors, causes of death and disability, and gaps for improvement in healthcare prevention (both primary and secondary and specific treatments. As an example, a multinational, multiethnic population-based cohort study is the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology (PURE study, which is the largest global initiative of 150,000 adults aged 35-70 yrs, looking at environmental, societal and biological influences on obesity and chronic health conditions such as ischemic heart disease, stroke and cancer among urban and rural communities in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, with national, community, household and individual-level data. Implementation of population-based strategies is crucial to optimizing limited health system resources while improving care and cardiovascular morbidity

  13. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the National Institutes of Health For more information about stroke, please call 1-800-352-9424 ... Merino. This 13 minute Spanish video provides critical information about stroke prevention and treatment through the compelling, ...

  14. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  15. Intensive versus Guideline Blood Pressure and Lipid Lowering in Patients with Previous Stroke: Main Results from the Pilot ‘Prevention of Decline in Cognition after Stroke Trial’ (PODCAST) Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Polly; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Ankolekar, Sandeep; Krishnan, Kailash; Ballard, Clive; Burns, Alistair; Mant, Jonathan; Passmore, Peter; Pocock, Stuart; Reckless, John; Sprigg, Nikola; Stewart, Rob; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Ford, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Stroke is associated with the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. We assessed the effect of intensive blood pressure (BP) and/or lipid lowering on cognitive outcomes in patients with recent stroke in a pilot trial. Methods In a multicentre, partial-factorial trial, patients with recent stroke, absence of dementia, and systolic BP (SBP) 125–170 mmHg were assigned randomly to at least 6 months of intensive (target SBP Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R). Results We enrolled 83 patients, mean age 74.0 (6.8) years, and median 4.5 months after stroke. The median follow-up was 24 months (range 1–48). Mean BP was significantly reduced with intensive compared to guideline treatment (difference –10·6/–5·5 mmHg; pcognition, intensive BP and lipid lowering were feasible and safe, but did not alter cognition over two years. The association between intensive lipid lowering and improved scores for some secondary outcomes suggests further trials are warranted. Trial Registration ISRCTN ISRCTN85562386 PMID:28095412

  16. Strokes attributable to underuse of warfarin and antiplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Rasmussen, Berit Hammershaimb; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2007-01-01

    atrial fibrillation, prior myocardial infarction, angina, or prior stroke transient ischemic attack (TIA). Sufficient information on cardiovascular risk factors before stroke was available in 404 patients. A total of 54 patients had atrial fibrillation known before the stroke. Of these, 16 had...... fibrillation could have been prevented if warfarin or antiplatelets had been given before stroke. A total of 147 patients had known stroke/TIA and/or myocardial infarction/angina before stroke (41 patients had not received antiplatelets on admission). If antiplatelet therapy had been given before stroke, 10...

  17. Gender differences in suicide prevention responses: implications for adolescents based on an illustrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Emma; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2015-02-23

    There are well-documented gender differences in adolescent suicidal behavior; death by suicide is more common in males, while nonfatal suicide attempts are more common among females. Over the past three decades, researchers have documented the effectiveness of a myriad of suicide prevention initiatives. However, there has been insufficient attention to which types of suicide prevention interventions are effective in changing attitudes and behaviors for young males and females. In this review of the literature, we consider common examples of primarily universal suicide prevention programs from three implementation settings: school-based, community-based, and healthcare-based. Our purpose is to delineate how the potential gender bias in such strategies may translate into youth suicide prevention efforts. Research in which gender was found to moderate program success was retrieved through online databases. The results that feature programming effects for both males and females are provocative, suggesting that when gender differences are evident, in almost all cases, females seem to be more likely than males to benefit from existing prevention programming. We conclude by considering recommendations that may benefit males more directly. Implications for adolescent suicide prevention in particular are discussed. Personalization of suicide intervention is presented as a promising solution to reduce suicide rates.

  18. Gender Differences in Suicide Prevention Responses: Implications for Adolescents Based on an Illustrative Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hamilton

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are well-documented gender differences in adolescent suicidal behavior; death by suicide is more common in males, while nonfatal suicide attempts are more common among females. Over the past three decades, researchers have documented the effectiveness of a myriad of suicide prevention initiatives. However, there has been insufficient attention to which types of suicide prevention interventions are effective in changing attitudes and behaviors for young males and females. In this review of the literature, we consider common examples of primarily universal suicide prevention programs from three implementation settings: school-based, community-based, and healthcare-based. Our purpose is to delineate how the potential gender bias in such strategies may translate into youth suicide prevention efforts. Methods: Research in which gender was found to moderate program success was retrieved through online databases. Results: The results that feature programming effects for both males and females are provocative, suggesting that when gender differences are evident, in almost all cases, females seem to be more likely than males to benefit from existing prevention programming. Conclusions: We conclude by considering recommendations that may benefit males more directly. Implications for adolescent suicide prevention in particular are discussed. Personalization of suicide intervention is presented as a promising solution to reduce suicide rates.

  19. Intensive versus Guideline Blood Pressure and Lipid Lowering in Patients with Previous Stroke: Main Results from the Pilot 'Prevention of Decline in Cognition after Stroke Trial' (PODCAST Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Bath

    Full Text Available Stroke is associated with the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. We assessed the effect of intensive blood pressure (BP and/or lipid lowering on cognitive outcomes in patients with recent stroke in a pilot trial.In a multicentre, partial-factorial trial, patients with recent stroke, absence of dementia, and systolic BP (SBP 125-170 mmHg were assigned randomly to at least 6 months of intensive (target SBP <125 mmHg or guideline (target SBP <140 mmHg BP lowering. The subset of patients with ischaemic stroke and total cholesterol 3.0-8.0 mmol/l were also assigned randomly to intensive (target LDL-cholesterol <1.3 mmol/l or guideline (target LDL-c <3.0 mmol/l lipid lowering. The primary outcome was the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R.We enrolled 83 patients, mean age 74.0 (6.8 years, and median 4.5 months after stroke. The median follow-up was 24 months (range 1-48. Mean BP was significantly reduced with intensive compared to guideline treatment (difference -10·6/-5·5 mmHg; p<0·01, as was total/LDL-cholesterol with intensive lipid lowering compared to guideline (difference -0·54/-0·44 mmol/l; p<0·01. The ACE-R score during treatment did not differ for either treatment comparison; mean difference for BP lowering -3.6 (95% CI -9.7 to 2.4, and lipid lowering 4.4 (95% CI -2.1 to 10.9. However, intensive lipid lowering therapy was significantly associated with improved scores for ACE-R at 6 months, trail making A, modified Rankin Scale and Euro-Qol Visual Analogue Scale. There was no difference in rates of dementia or serious adverse events for either comparison.In patients with recent stroke and normal cognition, intensive BP and lipid lowering were feasible and safe, but did not alter cognition over two years. The association between intensive lipid lowering and improved scores for some secondary outcomes suggests further trials are warranted.ISRCTN ISRCTN85562386.

  20. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the effects of a stroke Trouble swallowing (dysphagia) Problems with bowel or bladder control Fatigue Difficulty ... NINDS Focus on Disorders Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Epilepsy Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Traumatic Brain Injury Focus ...

  1. "Macho men" and preventive health care: implications for older men in different social classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kristen W; Mouzon, Dawne M

    2011-06-01

    The gender paradox in mortality--where men die earlier than women despite having more socioeconomic resources--may be partly explained by men's lower levels of preventive health care. Stereotypical notions of masculinity reduce preventive health care; however, the relationship between masculinity, socioeconomic status (SES), and preventive health care is unknown. Using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, the authors conduct a population-based assessment of masculinity beliefs and preventive health care, including whether these relationships vary by SES. The results show that men with strong masculinity beliefs are half as likely as men with more moderate masculinity beliefs to receive preventive care. Furthermore, in contrast to the well-established SES gradient in health, men with strong masculinity beliefs do not benefit from higher education and their probability of obtaining preventive health care decreases as their occupational status, wealth, and/or income increases. Masculinity may be a partial explanation for the paradox of men's lower life expectancy, despite their higher SES.

  2. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  3. Evidence to Maintain the Systolic Blood Pressure Treatment Threshold at 140 mm Hg for Stroke Prevention: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanhui; Della-Morte, David; Rundek, Tatjana; Wright, Clinton B; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, the Eighth Joint National Committee revised the target maximum systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 140 to 150 mm Hg in patients aged ≥60 years without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. The evidence from cohort studies supporting this change was sparse, particularly among US minority populations. In the Northern Manhattan Study, 1750 participants aged ≥60 years and free of stroke, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease had SBP measured at baseline and were annually followed up for incident stroke. Mean age at baseline was 72±8 years, 63% were women, 48% Hispanic, 25% non-Hispanic white, and 25% non-Hispanic black. Among all participants, 40% were on antihypertensive medications; 43% had SBP Hg, 20% had 140 to 149 mm Hg, and 37% had ≥150 mm Hg. Over a median follow-up of 13 years, 182 participants developed stroke. The crude stroke incidence was greater among individuals with SBP≥150 mm Hg (10.8 per 1000 person-years) and SBP 140 to 149 (12.3) than among those with SBPHg had an increased risk of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.6) compared with those with SBP Hg. The increased stroke risk was most notable among Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks. Raising the SBP threshold from 140 to 150 mm Hg as a new target for hypertension treatment in older individuals without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease could have a detrimental effect on stroke risk reduction, especially among minority US populations. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Community health workers for non-communicable diseases prevention and control in developing countries: Evidence and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeet, Gursimer; Thakur, J S; Prinja, Shankar; Singh, Meenu

    2017-01-01

    National programs for non-communicable diseases (NCD) prevention and control in different low middle income countries have a strong community component. A community health worker (CHW) delivers NCD preventive services using informational as well as behavioural approaches. Community education and interpersonal communication on lifestyle modifications is imparted with focus on primordial prevention of NCDs and screening is conducted as part of early diagnosis and management. However, the effectiveness of health promotion and screening interventions delivered through community health workers needs to be established. This review synthesised evidence on effectiveness of CHW delivered NCD primary prevention interventions in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). A systematic review of trials that utilised community health workers for primary prevention/ early detection strategy in the management of NCDs (Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), cancers, stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD)) in LMICs was conducted. Digital databases like PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, Cochrane library, dissertation abstracts, clinical trials registry web sites of different LMIC were searched for such publications between years 2000 and 2015. We focussed on community based randomised controlled trial and cluster randomised trials without any publication language limitation. The primary outcome of review was percentage change in population with different behavioural risk factors. Additionally, mean overall changes in levels of several physical or biochemical parameters were studied as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses was performed by the age and sex of participants, and sensitivity analyses was conducted to assess the robustness of the findings. Sixteen trials meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. Duration, study populations and content of interventions varied across trials. The duration of the studies ranged from mean follow up of 4 months for some risk

  5. Rehabilitation and education are underutilized for mild stroke and TIA sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faux, Steven G; Arora, Pooja; Shiner, Christine T; Thompson-Butel, Angelica G; Klein, Linda A

    2018-06-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and mild stroke represent a large proportion of cerebrovascular events, at high risk of being followed by recurrent, serious events. The importance of early education addressing risk management, secondary prevention and lifestyle modifications is the centerpiece of further stroke prevention. However, delivering education and rehabilitation to this population can be complex and challenging. Via synthesis of a narrative review and clinical experience, we explore the unique and inherent complexities of rehabilitation management and education provision for patients following mild stroke and TIA. A considerable proportion of TIA/mild stroke survivors have ongoing rehabilitation needs that are poorly addressed. The need for rehabilitation in these patients is often overlooked, and available assessment tools lack the sensitivity to identify common subtle impairments in cognition, mood, language and fatigue. Active and accessible education interventions need to be initiated early after the event, and integrated with ongoing rehabilitation management. Priority areas in need of future development in this field are highlighted and discussed. Implications for rehabilitation Survivors of mild stroke and TIA have ongoing unmet rehabilitation needs and require a unique approach to rehabilitation and education. Rehabilitation needs are difficult to assess and poorly addressed in this cohort, where available assessment tools lack the sensitivity required to identify subtle impairments. Education needs to be initiated early after the event and involve active engagement of the patient in order to improve stroke knowledge, mood and motivate adherence to lifestyle modifications and secondary prevention. Rehabilitation physicians are currently an underutilized resource, who should be more involved in the management of all patients following TIA or mild stroke.

  6. Etiologic stroke subtypes: updated definition and efficient workup strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehndiratta, Prachi; Chapman Smith, Sherita; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-01-01

    Stroke affects approximately 16.9 million individuals per year worldwide and is the second leading cause of death. Stroke represents a family of related, but distinct subtypes. Classifying stroke subtypes must take into account various aspects of a standardized stroke workup to allow optimization of treatment and prevention strategies. Secondary prevention and pharmacologic treatment is tailored based on stroke mechanism. Additionally prognostication and recurrent risk also depends on stroke etiology. Efficient workup of stroke relies on a thorough history, clinical examination, imaging studies, and putative mechanism of stroke that lead the treating physician to a particular etiological path. Here , we provide the reader with updated definitions of etiologic ischemic stroke types as well as efficient workup strategies.

  7. [No role for oral anticoagulants (target INR: 2.0-3.0) after transient ischaemic attack or cerebral infarction of arterial origin; the 'European/Australasian stroke prevention in reversible ischaemia trial' (ESPRIT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, E L L M; Halkes, P H A

    2008-02-23

    The 'European/Australasian stroke prevention in reversible ischaemia trial' (ESPRIT) aimed to determine whether oral anticoagulation of moderate intensity (target international normalised ratio (INR): 2.0-3.0) is more effective than acetylsalicylic acid in preventing future vascular events in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke of arterial origin. International, multicentre randomised clinical trial. Patients were randomised within 6 months of TIA or minor stroke of arterial origin to oral anticoagulants (target INR: 2.0-3.0; n = 536) or acetylsalicylic acid (30-325 mg daily; n = 532). The primary endpoint was a composite of vascular death, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction or major bleeding complications. In a post hoc analysis, the efficacy of anticoagulants was compared with that of the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily), a third arm of ESPRIT. Treatment was unblinded, but auditing of endpoints was blinded. Data were analysed on an intent-to-treat basis. The comparison of anticoagulants and acetylsalicylic acid was stopped prematurely because the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole was found to be more effective than acetylsalicylic acid alone. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.6 years (SD: 2.2). The mean INR was 2.57 (SD: 0.86; nearly 70% of the time within target range). The primary endpoint occurred in 99 patients (19%) in the anticoagulation group and 98 patients (18%) in the acetylsalicylic acid group (hazard ratio: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.77-1.35). The hazard ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.52-1.01) for ischaemic events and 2.56 (95% CI: 1.48-4.43) for major bleeding complications. The hazard ratio for the primary outcome event comparing anticoagulants with the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole was 1.31 (95% CI: 0.98-1.75). Oral anticoagulants (target INR: 2.0-3.0) were not more effective than acetylsalicylic acid in the secondary prevention of

  8. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Gong

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2 in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP.Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention.Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China.A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients.KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke.Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome, blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome, and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention.Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p < .05 and stroke (5.11% vs. 9.90%, p<0.05, and moderate reduction in blood pressure (-3.72 mmHg in DBP and -2.92 mmHg in DBP at 6-month post-intervention; and significant increases in physical activity at 3- (d = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.85 and 6-month (d = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85 post-intervention, respectively.The program KM2H2 is efficacious to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke among senior patients who are on anti

  9. Neurosteroids and Ischemic Stroke: Progesterone a Promising Agent in Reducing the Brain Injury in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2017-01-01

    Progesterone (P4), a well-known neurosteroid, is produced by ovaries and placenta in females and by adrenal glands in both sexes. Progesterone is also synthesized by central nervous system (CNS) tissues to perform various vital neurological functions in the brain. Apart from performing crucial reproductive functions, it also plays a pivotal role in neurogenesis, regeneration, cognition, mood, inflammation, and myelination in the CNS. A substantial body of experimental evidence from animal models documents the neuroprotective role of P4 in various CNS injury models, including ischemic stroke. Extensive data have revealed that P4 elicits neuroprotection through multiple mechanisms and systems in an integrated manner to prevent neuronal and glial damage, thus reducing mortality and morbidity. Progesterone has been described as safe for use at the clinical level through different routes in several studies. Data regarding the neuroprotective role of P4 in ischemic stroke are of great interest due to their potential clinical implications. In this review, we succinctly discuss the biosynthesis of P4 and distribution of P4 receptors (PRs) in the brain. We summarize our work on the general mechanisms of P4 mediated via the modulation of different PR and neurotransmitters. Finally, we describe the neuroprotective mechanisms of P4 in ischemic stroke models and related clinical prospects.

  10. Prevention of dopaminergic neurotoxicity by targeting nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: implications for the prevention of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, S Z; Islam, F; Itzhak, Y; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    2000-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic psychostimulant that produces catecholaminergic brain damage by producing oxidative stress and free radical generation. The role of oxygen and nitrogen radicals is well documented as a cause of METH-induced neurotoxic damage. In this study, we have obtained evidence that METH-induced neurotoxicity is the resultant of interaction between oxygen and nitrogen radicals, and it is mediated by the production of peroxynitrite. We have also assessed the effects of inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) as well as scavenger of nitric oxide and a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst. Significant protective effects were observed with the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), as well as by the selective peroxynitrite scavenger or decomposition catalyst, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato iron III (FeTPPS). However, the use of a nitric oxide scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), did not provide any significant protection against METH-induced hyperthermia or peroxynitrite generation and the resulting dopaminergic neurotoxicity. In particular, treatment with FeTPPS completely prevented METH-induced hyperthermia, peroxynitrite production, and METH-induced dopaminergic depletion. Together, these data demonstrate that METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is mediated by the generation of peroxynitrite, which can be selectively protected by nNOS inhibitors or peroxynitrite scavenger or decomposition catalysts.

  11. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanaroff, Alexander C; Steffel, Jan; Alexander, John H

    2018-01-01

    of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Observational studies employing RWD are useful for describing how oral anticoagulants are used in clinical practice, but generally cannot be used to make claims regarding comparative treatment effects. Questions regarding treatment effect generally are best answered...

  12. Preventing Stroke Deaths PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.

  13. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest, arms, and legs) that allow an electric tracing of the hearts activity to be recorded. On ... thought you would like to see the Circulation web site. Your Personal Message Send Message Share on ...

  14. Obstacles to preventive care for individuals with disability: Implications for nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Anna; Krouse, Helene J

    2017-05-01

    Individuals with disabilities have been identified as a population with a significantly lower usage of preventive services. Nurse practitioners (NPs) provide a key access point in the healthcare delivery system for preventive services for vulnerable populations such as those with disabilities. It is essential to understand existing barriers that prohibit access to effective preventive care for this vulnerable population. Systematic search and review of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline, PubMed, Google Scholar, and government reports and World Health Organizations reports. Twenty-six articles were included in the review. This literature review confirmed previous notions that people with disabilities are receiving much fewer preventive services than the general population. The studies reviewed identified four major barriers that contributed to the lack of preventive care. These barriers included physical environment and system, transportation, provider knowledge and attitude, and financial. Recognition of the obstacles that this subpopulation faces in accessing preventive care services is the first step to effectively remedying this problem. Preventive services have been identified as one of the cornerstones to improving health and quality of life. By understanding the circumstances that restrict those with disabilities from accessing preventive services, NPs can provide meaningful and effective solutions. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Heat and health in Antwerp under climate change: Projected impacts and implications for prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Martinez, Gerardo; Diaz, Julio; Hooyberghs, Hans

    2018-01-01

    Background Excessive summer heat is a serious environmental health problem in several European cities. Heat-related mortality and morbidity is likely to increase under climate change scenarios without adequate prevention based on locally relevant evidence. Methods We modelled the urban climate...... climate, and the calibration of existing prevention activities in light of locally relevant evidence....

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Unusual Cause of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nilesh H; O'Riordan, Jennifer A; Malik, Preeti; Vasanwala, Farhad F

    2017-09-27

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Hemorrhagic stroke comprises 10-20% of strokes. Here, we present a case report of hemorrhagic stroke that may have been secondary to untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) in a young man with no other cardiovascular risk factors or features of metabolic syndrome. A 32-year-old man was admitted for hemorrhagic stroke. An initial thorough workup for the etiology of stroke was inconclusive. Eventually, a polysomnography was done, which demonstrated OSA suggesting that untreated OSA may have contributed to his stroke. OSA may cause hemorrhagic stroke by nocturnal blood pressure surge. So, all physicians should consider doing polysomnography for unexplained hemorrhagic stroke or in patients at risk. Diagnosing and treating OSA would be critical in preventing hemorrhagic stroke and its recurrences.

  17. Strokes In Young Adults And Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Iranmanesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is in second place on a mortality list in the world. Also, stroke is a leading cause of disability. Approximately 20% of all strokes occur in Children and young adults. The etiology of stroke in Children and young adults is different from that in older patients, and has an influence on diagnostic evaluation and treatment, so knowledge about older patients cannot always be applied to these patients. The list of stroke etiologies among young adults and children is extensive. Ischemic stroke are more frequent than hemorrhagic strokes in both groups. Stroke in young adults had been thought to be associated with   risk factors, including arterial (such as dissection, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, inflammatory arteritis ,moyamoya ,migraine - induced stroke, genetic or inherted arteriopathy, premature atherosclerosis cardiac (such as patent foramen ovale, cardiomyopathy , congenital heart disease and   hematologic (such as  deficiencies of protein S,protein C,or antithrombin;factor V lieden mutation . Common risk factors for stroke in children include: Sickle-cell disease, diseases of the arteries, abnormal blood clotting, head or neck trauma. There are no specific recommendations or guidelines for primary or secondary stroke prevention in young adults. Primary prevention focused on identifying and managing known vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, disorders of lipid metabolism, and diabetes, and non-drug strategies and lifestyle changes, including smoking, reducing body weight, increasing regular aerobic physical activity, and adopting a healthy diet with more fruit and vegetables and less salt. For secondary stroke prevention, identification of the etiologic mechanism of the initial stroke and the presence of any additional risk factors is most important. It consists of optimal treatment of vascular risk factors administering antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, and if indicated, invasive surgical or

  18. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... endothelium significantly. The artery’s diameter shrinks and blood flow decreases, reducing oxygen supply. How atherosclerotic plaque causes ...

  19. Blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol targets for prevention of recurrent strokes and cognitive decline in the hypertensive patient: design of the European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetti, Alberto; Liu, Lisheng; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Grassi, Guido; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Silani, Vincenzo; Bilo, Grzegorz; Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Scotti, Lorenza; Zhang, Xinhua; Wang, HayYan; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhang, Xuezhong; Guan, Ting Rui; Berge, Eivind; Redon, Josep; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Dominiczak, Anna; Nilsson, Peter; Viigimaa, Margus; Laurent, Stéphane; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Wu, Zhaosu; Zhu, Dingliang; Rodicio, José Luis; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Pinto, Fernando; Schmieder, Roland E; Burnier, Michel; Banach, Maciej; Cifkova, Renata; Farsang, Csaba; Konradi, Alexandra; Lazareva, Irina; Sirenko, Yuriy; Dorobantu, Maria; Postadzhiyan, Arman; Accetto, Rok; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lovic, Dragan; Manolis, Athanasios J; Stylianou, Philippos; Erdine, Serap; Dicker, Dror; Wei, Gangzhi; Xu, Chengbin; Xie, Hengge; Coca, Antonio; O'Brien, John; Ford, Gary

    2014-09-01

    The SBP values to be achieved by antihypertensive therapy in order to maximize reduction of cardiovascular outcomes are unknown; neither is it clear whether in patients with a previous cardiovascular event, the optimal values are lower than in the low-to-moderate risk hypertensive patients, or a more cautious blood pressure (BP) reduction should be obtained. Because of the uncertainty whether 'the lower the better' or the 'J-curve' hypothesis is correct, the European Society of Hypertension and the Chinese Hypertension League have promoted a randomized trial comparing antihypertensive treatment strategies aiming at three different SBP targets in hypertensive patients with a recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack. As the optimal level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level is also unknown in these patients, LDL-C-lowering has been included in the design. The European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment trial is a prospective multinational, randomized trial with a 3 × 2 factorial design comparing: three different SBP targets (1, hypertension and a stroke or transient ischaemic attack 1-6 months before randomization. Antihypertensive and statin treatments will be initiated or modified using suitable registered agents chosen by the investigators, in order to maintain patients within the randomized SBP and LDL-C windows. All patients will be followed up every 3 months for BP and every 6 months for LDL-C. Ambulatory BP will be measured yearly. Primary outcome is time to stroke (fatal and non-fatal). Important secondary outcomes are: time to first major cardiovascular event; cognitive decline (Montreal Cognitive Assessment) and dementia. All major outcomes will be adjudicated by committees blind to randomized allocation. A Data and Safety Monitoring Board has open access to data and can recommend trial interruption for safety. It has been calculated that 925 patients would reach the primary

  20. Coronary heart disease in South Asian immigrants: synthesis of research and implications for health promotion and prevention in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Rahel; Zachariah, Rachel

    2008-07-01

    Although the literature reflects that Asian Indians in the United States and globally have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality because of coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes, few studies have described the clinical implications in the United States. Traditional risk factors dictate practice, yet these risk factors do not fully explain the rates. Central obesity, lipoprotein (a), and insulin resistance may have a strong role. The literature suggests that proactive nursing using culturally specific clinical measures are necessary to reduce risk factors for CHD and diabetes in South Asians. Additional research and prevention strategies focused on immigrant South Asians in the United States are recommended.

  1. Prevention of Decline in Cognition after Stroke Trial (PODCAST): a study protocol for a factorial randomised controlled trial of intensive versus guideline lowering of blood pressure and lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is a common cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. However, effective strategies for reducing the risk of post-stroke dementia remain undefined. Potential strategies include intensive lowering of blood pressure and/or lipids. Methods/Design Design: multi-centre prospective randomised open-label blinded-endpoint controlled partial-factorial phase IV trial in secondary and primary care. Participants: 100 participants from 30 UK Stroke Research Network sites who are post- ischemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage by three to seven months. Interventions - all patients (1:1): intensive versus guideline blood pressure lowering (target systolic cognitive decline and dementia in people with ischemic stroke; and does ‘intensive’ blood pressure lowering therapy reduce cognitive decline and dementia in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Primary outcome: Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised. Secondary outcomes: feasibility of recruitment and retention of participants, tolerability and safety of the interventions, achieving and maintaining the blood pressure and lipid targets, maintaining differences in systolic blood pressure (> 10 mmHg) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (> 1 mmol/l) between the treatment groups, and performing clinic and telephone follow-up of cognition measures. Randomisation: using stratification, minimization and simple randomization. Blinding: participants receive open-label management. Cognition is assessed both unblinded (in clinic) and blinded (by telephone) to treatment. Adjudication of events (dementia, vascular, serious adverse events) is blinded to management. Discussion The PODCAST trial is ongoing with 78 patients recruited to date from 22 sites. Outcomes of cognitive impairment and dementia are accruing. Trial registration ISRCTN85562386 PMID:24266960

  2. Association between ambient air pollution and hospitalization for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in China: A multicity case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Tian, Yaohua; Xu, Yan; Huang, Zhe; Huang, Chao; Hu, Yonghua; Zhang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    There is growing interest in the association between ambient air pollution and stroke, but few studies have investigated the association in developing countries. The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between levels of ambient air pollutants and hospital admission for stroke in China. A time-stratified case-crossover analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015 in 14 large Chinese cities among 200,958 ischemic stroke and 41,746 hemorrhagic stroke hospitalizations. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the percentage changes in stroke admissions in relation to interquartile range increases in air pollutants. Air pollution was positively associated with ischemic stroke. A difference of an interquartile range of the 6-day average for particulate matter less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone corresponded to 0.7% (95% CI: 0%, 1.4%), 1.6% (95% CI: 1.0%, 2.3%), 2.6% (95% CI: 1.8%, 3.5%), 0.5% (95% CI: -0.2%, 1.1%), and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.3%, 2.3%) increases in ischemic stroke admissions, respectively. For hemorrhagic stroke, we observed the only significant association in relation to nitrogen dioxide on the current day (percentage change: 1.6%; 95% CI: 0.3%, 2.9%). Our findings contribute to the limited scientific literature concerning the effect of ambient air pollution on stroke in developing countries. Our findings may have significant public health implications for primary prevention of stroke in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic modification of cerebral arterial wall: implications for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Anantha; Santhanam, R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-10-01

    Genetic modification of cerebral vessels represents a promising and novel approach for prevention and/or treatment of various cerebral vascular disorders, including cerebral vasospasm. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the use of gene transfer to the cerebral arteries for prevention and/or treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We also discuss the recent developments in vascular therapeutics, involving the autologous use of progenitor cells for repair of damaged vessels, as well as a cell-based gene delivery approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  4. "It's an Uphill Battle Everyday": Intersectionality, Low-Income Black Heterosexual Men, and Implications for HIV Prevention Research and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J; Tschann, Jeanne M

    2013-01-01

    This interview study, the initial qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods HIV prevention study focused on Black heterosexual men, used intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore: (1) How a sample of Black heterosexual men describe and experience the multiple intersections of race, gender, and SES; and (2) How these descriptions reflected interlocking systems of social inequality for Black men at the social-structural level. Participants were 30 predominantly low-income self-identified Black heterosexual men between the ages of 18 and 44. Analyses highlighted four themes that demonstrate how participants' individual-level experiences as Black men reflect macro social-structural inequality: (1) racial discrimination and microaggressions; (2) unemployment; (3) incarceration; and (4) police surveillance and harassment. We discuss the study's findings within the context of social-structural factors that disproportionately and adversely impact Black men. We also highlight the implications of the intersectionality perspective for HIV prevention research and interventions for Black heterosexual men.

  5. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog bite prevention working as well as it should? In this novel, small scale qualitative study, the perceptions of victims regarding their dog bite experience were explored in-depth. The study recruited 8 female participants who had been bitten by a dog in the past 5 years. In-depth, one-to-one interviews were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings indicate that dog bites may not be as easily preventable as previously presumed, and that education about dog body language may not prevent some types of dog bites. The reasons participants were bitten were multifaceted and complex. In some cases, there was no interaction with the dog before the bite so there was no opportunity to assess the situation and modify behavior around the dog accordingly. Identifying who was to blame, and had responsibility for preventing the bite, was straightforward for the participants in hindsight. Those bitten blamed themselves and/or the dog owner, but not the dog. Most participants already felt they had a theoretical knowledge that would allow them to recognize dog aggression before the dog bite, yet participants, especially those who worked regularly with dogs, routinely believed, "it would not happen to me." We also identified an attitude that bites were "just one of those things," which could also be a barrier prevention initiatives. Rather than being special to the human-canine relationship, the attitudes discovered mirror those found in other areas of injury

  6. Damage to Broca’s area OR the anterior temporal lobe is implicated in stroke-induced agrammatic comprehension: it depends on the task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corianne Rogalsky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurobiology of sentence comprehension remains unresolved. Previous large-scale studies of stroke patients have yielded conflicting results regarding sentence comprehension, implicating inferior frontal, anterior temporal and/or posterior temporal regions (Dronkers et al., 2004; Magnusdottir et al., 2013; Thothathiri et al. 2012. Furthermore, only one large-scale lesion study (Magnusdottir et al. 2013 has examined the neural underpinnings of agrammatic comprehension (i.e. substantially worse performance on sentences with noncanonical word orders compared to canonical word order sentences in English, a hallmark of Broca’s aphasia. This one previous study of noncanonical < canonical sentence performance on a sentence picture-matching task implicated damage to the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL and to a lesser degree Broca’s area damage (i.e. < 10% of significant voxels (Magnusdottir et al. 2013. The present study investigated the neurobiology of agrammatic comprehension with two sentence comprehension tasks in the MARC test battery: a sentence-picture matching task (the SOAP Test: a test of syntactic complexity; Love & Oster, 2002 and a sentence plausibility judgment task. Each task contained active, passive, subject-relative and object-relative sentences. Participants included 91 patients with chronic focal cerebral damage. First, we conducted voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM; Bates et al. 2003 for each sentence type in each task. Consistent with previous studies (Magnusdottir et al. 2013; Thothathiri et al. 2012, the VLSMs identified a significant association between sentence comprehension impairments and damage to a large left temporal-inferior parietal network for all sentences (peak t values were in posterior temporal and inferior parietal voxels; no areas of frontal lobe damage were significant for any sentence type/task. We then conducted VLSMs to identify areas of damage associated specifically with agrammatic

  7. Relationship jump-landing technique and neuropsychological characteristics, implications for ACL injury prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gokeler; Anne Benjaminse; N. Cortes; M. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Abstract from the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury & Illness in Sport, Monaco 2014 Background: Neuropsychological capabilities in athletes may be associated with a predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Objective: Assess differences between male and female athletes

  8. Prevention of mental and behavioral disorders : implications for policy and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saxena, S.; Llopis, E.J.; Hosman, C.M.H.

    2006-01-01

    There is sufficient evidence indicating the efficacy of interventions in reducing risk factors, increasing protective factors, preventing psychiatric symptoms and new cases of mental disorders. Macro-policy interventions to improve nutrition, housing and education or to reduce economic insecurity

  9. Risk factors for secondary transmission of Shigella infection within households: implications for current prevention policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boveé, Lian; Whelan, Jane; Sonder, Gerard J. B.; van Dam, Alje P.; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Internationally, guidelines to prevent secondary transmission of Shigella infection vary widely. Cases, their contacts with diarrhoea, and those in certain occupational groups are frequently excluded from work, school, or daycare. In the Netherlands, all contacts attending pre-school

  10. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  11. Hypercholesterolemia, Stroke And Statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between serum cholesterol levels and the incidence of stroke still remain to be established. There are conflicting reports from a series of observational cohort studies. However, clinical trials with HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins have shown that cholesterol lowering therapy used in the primary and secondary prevention of myocardial infarction significantly reduced cardiovascular events including strokes. Meta analysis of trials with statins have shown a relative risk reduction in stroke of 12 to 48% in patients with coronary heart disease after MI. It has been postulated that the clinical action of statins is the result of pleiotropic / antiatherogenic effects rather than simply a reduction in cholesterol. The putative beneficial effect of statins in stroke involve blocking of macrophage and platelet activation, improvement of endothelial cell vasomotor function, enhancement of endothelial fibrinolytic function, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory action, inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation and particularly enhancement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS.

  12. Hip Hop Stroke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Stroke Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; Leighton-Herrmann, Ellyn; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Hecht, Mindy; Hedmann, Monique; Huq, Saima; Gerin, William; Chinchilli, Vernon; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Noble, James

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious long-term adult disability in the US. Acute stroke treatments with intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy are proven to reduce disability, however a critical limitation on their effectiveness is the narrow time window for administration, which is 4.5 hours and 6 hours respectively from the onset of symptoms. Our overarching goal is to reduce pre-hospital delays to acute stroke treatments in economically disadvantaged minority communities where the greatest delays exist, using Hip Hop Stroke. Hip Hop Stroke (HHS) is a school-based, child-mediated, culturally-tailored stroke communication multimedia intervention developed using validated models of behavior change and designed to improve stroke literacy (knowledge of stroke symptoms, the urgent need to call 911, and prevention measures) of 4 th , 5 th and 6 th grade students and their parents residing in poor urban communities. Children in the intervention arm will receive the HHS intervention, while those in the attentional control arm will receive standardized nutrition education based on the USDA's MyPyramid program. Children will be trained and motivated to share stroke information with their parents or other adult caregiver. Both children and parents will complete a stroke knowledge assessment at baseline, immediately following the program, and at 3-months post-program. The primary outcome is the effect of the child mediation on parental stroke literacy. Stroke literate children, a captive audience in school systems, may represent a viable channel for spreading stroke information into households of poor urban communities where mass media stroke campaigns have shown the lowest penetration. These children may also call 911 when witnessing a stroke in their homes or communities. The HHS program may highlight the potential role of children in the chain of stroke recovery as a strategy for reducing prehospital delays to acute stroke

  13. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program ha...

  14. Blood markers of coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in lacunar stroke versus non-lacunar stroke and non-stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Stewart; Marlborough, Fergal; Doubal, Fergus; Webb, David J; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The cause of cerebral small vessel disease is not fully understood, yet it is important, accounting for about 25% of all strokes. It also increases the risk of having another stroke and contributes to about 40% of dementias. Various processes have been implicated, including microatheroma, endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. A previous review investigated endothelial dysfunction in lacunar stroke versus mostly non-stroke controls while another looked at markers of inflammation and endothelial damage in ischaemic stroke in general. We have focused on blood markers between clinically evident lacunar stroke and other subtypes of ischaemic stroke, thereby controlling for stroke in general. We systematically assessed the literature for studies comparing blood markers of coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in lacunar stroke versus non-stroke controls or other ischaemic stroke subtypes. We assessed the quality of included papers and meta-analysed results. We split the analysis on time of blood draw in relation to the stroke. We identified 1,468 full papers of which 42 were eligible for inclusion, including 4,816 ischaemic strokes, of which 2,196 were lacunar and 2,500 non-stroke controls. Most studies subtyped stroke using TOAST. The definition of lacunar stroke varied between studies. Markers of coagulation/fibrinolysis (tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), fibrinogen, D-dimer) were higher in lacunar stroke versus non-stroke although fibrinogen was no different to non-stroke in the acute phase. tPA and PAI were no different between lacunar and non-lacunar stroke. Fibrinogen and D-dimer were significantly lower in lacunar stroke compared to other ischaemic strokes, both acutely and chronically. Markers of endothelial dysfunction (homocysteine, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), E-selectin, P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM), vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM)) were higher or

  15. NADPH Oxidase Activity in Cerebral Arterioles Is a Key Mediator of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease—Implications for Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F. McCarty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD, a common feature of brain aging, is characterized by lacunar infarcts, microbleeds, leukoaraiosis, and a leaky blood-brain barrier. Functionally, it is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, depression, gait abnormalities, and increased risk for stroke. Cerebral arterioles in this syndrome tend to hypertrophy and lose their capacity for adaptive vasodilation. Rodent studies strongly suggest that activation of Nox2-dependent NADPH oxidase activity is a crucial driver of these structural and functional derangements of cerebral arterioles, in part owing to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity. This oxidative stress may also contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier seen in SVD. Hypertension, aging, metabolic syndrome, smoking, hyperglycemia, and elevated homocysteine may promote activation of NADPH oxidase in cerebral arterioles. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with phycocyanobilin from spirulina, as well as high-dose statin therapy, may have potential for prevention and control of SVD, and high-potassium diets merit study in this regard. Measures which support effective eNOS activity in other ways—exercise training, supplemental citrulline, certain dietary flavonoids (as in cocoa and green tea, and capsaicin, may also improve the function of cerebral arterioles. Asian epidemiology suggests that increased protein intakes may decrease risk for SVD; conceivably, arginine and/or cysteine—which boosts tissue glutathione synthesis, and can be administered as N-acetylcysteine—mediate this benefit. Ameliorating the risk factors for SVD—including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia, smoking, and elevated homocysteine—also may help to prevent and control this syndrome, although few clinical trials have addressed this issue to date.

  16. NADPH Oxidase Activity in Cerebral Arterioles Is a Key Mediator of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease-Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2015-04-15

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), a common feature of brain aging, is characterized by lacunar infarcts, microbleeds, leukoaraiosis, and a leaky blood-brain barrier. Functionally, it is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, depression, gait abnormalities, and increased risk for stroke. Cerebral arterioles in this syndrome tend to hypertrophy and lose their capacity for adaptive vasodilation. Rodent studies strongly suggest that activation of Nox2-dependent NADPH oxidase activity is a crucial driver of these structural and functional derangements of cerebral arterioles, in part owing to impairment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. This oxidative stress may also contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier seen in SVD. Hypertension, aging, metabolic syndrome, smoking, hyperglycemia, and elevated homocysteine may promote activation of NADPH oxidase in cerebral arterioles. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with phycocyanobilin from spirulina, as well as high-dose statin therapy, may have potential for prevention and control of SVD, and high-potassium diets merit study in this regard. Measures which support effective eNOS activity in other ways-exercise training, supplemental citrulline, certain dietary flavonoids (as in cocoa and green tea), and capsaicin, may also improve the function of cerebral arterioles. Asian epidemiology suggests that increased protein intakes may decrease risk for SVD; conceivably, arginine and/or cysteine-which boosts tissue glutathione synthesis, and can be administered as N-acetylcysteine-mediate this benefit. Ameliorating the risk factors for SVD-including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia, smoking, and elevated homocysteine-also may help to prevent and control this syndrome, although few clinical trials have addressed this issue to date.

  17. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijajlović, Milija D; Aleksić, Vuk M; Šternić, Nadežda M; Mirković, Mihailo M; Bornstein, Natan M

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. PMID:28203079

  18. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat......Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...

  19. Knowledge, behavioral practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: Implications for prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippendale, Tracy; Raveis, Victoria

    2017-09-01

    Although the epidemiology and prevention of falls has been well studied, the focus has been on indoor rather than outdoor falls. Older adults' knowledge of outdoor risk factors and their outdoor fall prevention practices have not been examined. To fill this gap, and to inform the development of a prevention program, we sought to explore the experiences and fall prevention knowledge and practices of older adults who had sustained an outdoor fall. A cross-sectional study using random digit telephone dialing was used to survey community dwelling seniors (N=120) across the five boroughs of New York City. We used the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire (OFQ), a valid and reliable tool as the survey instrument. Perceived outdoor fall risks, strategies used for prevention, and outdoor fall experiences were examined. SPSS version 21 was used for descriptive analysis of participant characteristics and to determine frequencies of perceived outdoor fall risks and strategies used for prevention. Phenomenological analysis was used with the qualitative data. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed separately and a mixed methods matrix was used to interpret and integrate the findings. Analysis revealed diverse unmet education and training needs including the importance of using single vision glasses, understanding the fall risks associated with recreational areas and parking lots, safe outdoor walking strategies, safe carrying of items on level and uneven surfaces, as well as when walking up and down stairs, and safety in opening/closing doors. Study findings are informative for outdoor fall prevention programs as well as practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relative and cumulative effects of lipid and blood pressure control in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Messig, Michael

    2009-01-01

    randomized 4731 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease to atorvastatin 80 mg per day or placebo. RESULTS: After 4.9 years, at each level of LDL-C reduction, subjects with HDL-C value above the median or systolic BP below the median had greater reductions...

  1. A Primer for Preventing Teen Dating Violence? The Representation of Teen Dating Violence in Young Adult Literature and Its Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Heather L; Strohl, Katyayani R

    2016-09-18

    Teen dating violence (TDV) is a significant public health issue. Preventing TDV requires attention to risk and protective factors across ecological system levels. The media is one of the primary cultural drivers of societal-level social scripts about the causes of TDV. Framing theory asserts that the media's portrayal of social issues, including what contextual information is included and/or excluded, affects individual-level attitudes about TDV and potential policy responses. This study investigates the representation of TDV in young adult (YA) literature, a media genre that is marketed to adolescent audiences. Data include all YA novels (N = 8) that have a primary focus on TDV. Texts were analyzed systematically using thematic content analysis methods. Results indicate that the antecedents of TDV were portrayed as being related to victim personal characteristics such as inexperience in relationships and low self-esteem. Rather than underscoring how societal-level factors contribute to TDV, perpetration was seen as stemming from family dysfunction and mental health issues. These results underscore how the structural determinants of TDV have been overshadowed in the media's portrayal of TDV, in favor of narrow portrayals of victimization and perpetration. Implications for TDV prevention programs including the importance of media literacy are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Endogenous information, adverse selection, and prevention: Implications for genetic testing policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Richard; Richter, Andreas; Thistle, Paul

    2017-09-01

    We examine public policy toward the use of genetic information by insurers. Individuals engage in unobservable primary prevention and have access to different prevention technologies. Thus, insurance markets are affected by moral hazard and adverse selection. Individuals can choose to take a genetic test to acquire information about their prevention technology. Information has positive decision-making value, that is, individuals may adjust their behavior based on the result of the test. However, testing also exposes individuals to uncertainty over the available insurance contract, so-called classification risk, which lowers the value of information. In our analysis we distinguish between four different policy regimes, determine the value of information under each regime and associated equilibrium outcomes on the insurance market. We show that the policy regimes can be Pareto ranked, with a duty to disclose being the preferred regime and an information ban the least preferred one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stopping Strokes (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Strokes are caused by either an obstruction of blood flow to the brain or bleeding in the brain. Nearly 800,000 strokes occur each year in the U.S. and are among the leading causes of disability. In this podcast, Dr. Amy Valderrama discusses ways to prevent strokes.

  4. Prevention and treatment practices and implications for malaria control in Mukono District Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, P

    2008-01-01

    and used insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) for malaria prevention. Similarly, only a few households (86, 1.5%) used indoor residual spraying. Self-treatment with home-stocked drugs was high, yet there was low awareness of the effectiveness of expired drugs on malaria treatment. Self-reported malaria...... was associated with socioeconomic, behavioural and environmental factors, but more especially with household ownership of ITNs. These results will contribute to the current debate on identifying new approaches for scaling-up prevention interventions and effective case management, as well as selection of priority...

  5. Effect of urgent treatment of transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke on early recurrent stroke (EXPRESS study): a prospective population-based sequential comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Peter M; Giles, Matthew F; Chandratheva, Arvind; Marquardt, Lars; Geraghty, Olivia; Redgrave, Jessica N E; Lovelock, Caroline E; Binney, Lucy E; Bull, Linda M; Cuthbertson, Fiona C; Welch, Sarah J V; Bosch, Shelley; Alexander, Faye C; Carasco-Alexander, Faye; Silver, Louise E; Gutnikov, Sergei A; Mehta, Ziyah

    2007-10-20

    The risk of recurrent stroke is up to 10% in the week after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke. Modelling studies suggest that urgent use of existing preventive treatments could reduce the risk by 80-90%, but in the absence of evidence many health-care systems make little provision. Our aim was to determine the effect of more rapid treatment after TIA and minor stroke in patients who are not admitted direct to hospital. We did a prospective before (phase 1: April 1, 2002, to Sept 30, 2004) versus after (phase 2: Oct 1, 2004, to March 31, 2007) study of the effect on process of care and outcome of more urgent assessment and immediate treatment in clinic, rather than subsequent initiation in primary care, in all patients with TIA or minor stroke not admitted direct to hospital. The study was nested within a rigorous population-based incidence study of all TIA and stroke (Oxford Vascular Study; OXVASC), such that case ascertainment, investigation, and follow-up were complete and identical in both periods. The primary outcome was the risk of stroke within 90 days of first seeking medical attention, with independent blinded (to study period) audit of all events. Of the 1278 patients in OXVASC who presented with TIA or stroke (634 in phase 1 and 644 in phase 2), 607 were referred or presented direct to hospital, 620 were referred for outpatient assessment, and 51 were not referred to secondary care. 95% (n=591) of all outpatient referrals were to the study clinic. Baseline characteristics and delays in seeking medical attention were similar in both periods, but median delay to assessment in the study clinic fell from 3 (IQR 2-5) days in phase 1 to less than 1 (0-3) day in phase 2 (prisk of recurrent stroke in the patients referred to the study clinic was 10.3% (32/310 patients) in phase 1 and 2.1% (6/281 patients) in phase 2 (adjusted hazard ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.08-0.49; p=0.0001); there was no significant change in risk in patients treated elsewhere. The

  6. 5-year survival and rehospitalization due to stroke recurrence among patients with hemorrhagic or ischemic strokes in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Lee, Sze Haur; Heng, Bee Hoon; Chin, Vivien S

    2013-10-03

    patients. Five year post-stroke survival and rehospitalization due to stroke recurrence as well as their associations with patient demographics were studied for different stroke types in Singapore. Specific preventive strategies are needed to target the high risk groups to improve their long-term outcomes after acute stroke.

  7. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  8. A cross-sectional observational study comparing foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Dorit; Potter, Julia; Mamode, Louis

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and compare foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls; and between stroke fallers and non-fallers. Participants were recruited from community groups and completed standardized tests assessing sensation, foot posture, foot function, ankle dorsiflexion and first metatarsal phalangeal joint range of motion (1st MPJ ROM), hallux valgus presence and severity. Twenty-three stroke participants (mean age 75.09 ± 7.57 years; 12 fallers) and 16 controls (mean age 73.44 ± 8.35 years) took part. Within the stroke group, reduced 1st MPJ sensation (p = 0.016) and 1st MPJ ROM (p = 0.025) were observed in the affected foot in comparison to the non-affected foot; no other differences were apparent. Pooled data (for both feet) was used to explore between stroke/control (n = 78 feet) and stroke faller/non-faller (n = 46 feet) group differences. In comparison to the control group, stroke participants exhibited reduced sensation of the 1st MPJ (p = 0.020), higher Foot Posture Index scores (indicating greater foot pronation, p = 0.008) and reduced foot function (p = 0.003). Stroke fallers exhibited significantly greater foot pronation in comparison to non-fallers (p = 0.027). Results indicated differences in foot and ankle characteristics post stroke in comparison to healthy controls. These changes may negatively impact functional ability and the ability to preserve balance. Further research is warranted to explore the influence of foot problems on balance ability and falls in people with stroke. Implications for Rehabilitation Foot problems are common post stroke. As foot problems have been linked to increased fall risk among the general population we recommend that it would be beneficial to include foot and ankle assessments or a referral to a podiatrist for people with stroke who report foot problems. Further research is needed to explore if we can improve functional

  9. Stroke: Working toward a Prioritized World Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Gorelick, Philip B.; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C.; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M.; Lo, Eng H.; Skolnick, Brett E.; Furie, Karen L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Smith, Jr., Sidney C.; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A.; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C.O.; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M.; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A.; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P.; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H.; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K.; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M.; Davis, Stephen M.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Methods Preliminary work was performed by 7 working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Results Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent ‘silo’ mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (e.g., social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build

  10. Stroke: working toward a prioritized world agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Gorelick, Philip B; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M; Lo, Eng H; Skolnick, Brett E; Furie, Karen L; Hankey, Graeme J; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C O; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M; Davis, Stephen M; Goldstein, Larry B; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Preliminary work was performed by 7 working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent 'silo' mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (e.g., social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build centralized electronic archives and

  11. Stroke: working toward a prioritized world agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Gorelick, Philip B; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M; Lo, Eng H; Skolnick, Brett E; Furie, Karen L; Hankey, Graeme J; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C O; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M; Davis, Stephen M; Goldstein, Larry B; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Preliminary work was performed by seven working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent 'silo' mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (eg, social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build centralized electronic archives and

  12. Stroke mortality and trends from 1990 to 2006 in 39 countries from Europe and Central Asia: implications for control of high blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redon, Josep; Olsen, Michael H; Cooper, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to extend our understanding of international trends in stroke and major sequelae in Europe and countries peripheral to Europe by assessing: (1) current mortality rates, (2) the most recent 15-year prevalence trends, and (3) the relationship between systolic b...

  13. Sexual Agreement Classifications for Gay and Bisexual Men and Implications for Harm Reduction HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J. Michael; Smolenski, Derek J.; Morgan, Richard; Rosser, B. R. Simon

    2012-01-01

    HIV prevention educators frequently encourage gay and bisexual men (GBM) to negotiate condom use prior to sexual engagement. Identifying groups of GBM based on their presexual agreements can aid efforts to tailor interventions. Using cross-sectional data from 1,188 GBM who reported having sex with a nonprimary sex partner in the 90 days prior to…

  14. Violent Extremism, National Security and Prevention. Institutional Discourses and Their Implications for Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Christer; Säljö, Roger

    2018-01-01

    Currently, threats to societal security from extremist groups are high on the political agenda in many countries. Politicians, policymakers at various levels and communities are searching for methods to counteract recruitment to violent organizations. These efforts are often referred to as Prevention of Violent Extremism (PVE-programmes). One of…

  15. Retention of movement technique : Implications for primary prevention of ACL injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, Wouter; Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Otten, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Retention of movement technique is crucial in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs. It is unknown if specific instructions or video instructions result in changes in kinematic and kinetic measures during a relatively short training session, and in a retention test

  16. Prodromal Symptoms and Atypical Affectivity as Predictors of Major Depression in Juveniles: Implications for Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Maria; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Background: Given the long-term morbidity of juvenile-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), it is timely to consider whether more effort should be dedicated to its primary and secondary prevention. Methods: We reviewed studies of prodromal symptoms that may herald a first episode pediatric MDD and considered whether that literature has made an…

  17. Intergenerational Continuity in Child Maltreatment: Mediating Mechanisms and Implications for Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa J.; Appleyard, Karen; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention, this prospective, longitudinal, community-based study of 499 mothers and their infants examined (a) direct associations between mothers' experiences of childhood maltreatment and their offspring's maltreatment, and (b) mothers' mental health problems, social isolation, and social…

  18. Factors influencing the provision of oral hygiene care following stroke: an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Malik, Normaliza; Mohamad Yatim, Saari; Lam, Otto L T; Jin, Lijian; McGrath, Colman

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to examine "intention to" and "performance of" oral hygiene care to stroke patients using the Theory of Planned Behavior. A large scale survey of 13 centers in Malaysia was conducted involving 806 nurses in relation to oral hygiene care intentions and practices. In addition, information on personal and environmental factors was collected. The response rate was 95.6% (778/806). The domains of the Theory of Planned Behavior were significantly associated with general intention to perform oral hygiene care: attitudes (β = 0.21, p behavior control (β = 0.04, p behavior was associated with general intention scores (OR =1.13, 95%CI =1.05-1.22, p Theory of Planned Behavior provides understanding of "intention to" and "performance of" oral hygiene care to stroke patients. Several provider and environmental factors were also associated with intentions and practices. This has implications for understanding and improving the implementation of oral hygiene care in stroke rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Oral hygiene care is crucial for stroke patients as it can prevent oral health problems and potentially life threatening events (such as aspiration pneumonia). Despite oral hygiene care being relative simple to perform, it is often neglected during stroke rehabilitation. A large-scale national survey was conducted to understand "intentions to" and "performance of" oral hygiene care to stroke patients using the Theory of Planned Behavior social cognition model. These study findings may have implications and use in promoting oral hygiene care to stroke patients:i) by understanding the pathways and influences to perform oral hygiene care.ii) to conduct health promotion and health education based on behavioral models such as Theory of Planned Behavior.

  19. Achieving population-level violence declines: implications of the international crime drop for prevention programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Manuel; Nivette, Amy; Murray, Aja Louise; Krisch, Maria

    2016-09-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations for the period 2016-2030 aim to achieve a substantial reduction of interpersonal violence. An increasing body of evidence of what works, emerging from randomized controlled trials, can inform public health policy decisions. However, there is very limited evidence on the kinds of mechanisms that lead to sustained declines in interpersonal violence at the population level. We discuss the implications of what is known about recent major declines in violence to guide violence-reduction policies.

  20. Community health workers for non-communicable diseases prevention and control in developing countries: Evidence and implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gursimer Jeet

    Full Text Available National programs for non-communicable diseases (NCD prevention and control in different low middle income countries have a strong community component. A community health worker (CHW delivers NCD preventive services using informational as well as behavioural approaches. Community education and interpersonal communication on lifestyle modifications is imparted with focus on primordial prevention of NCDs and screening is conducted as part of early diagnosis and management. However, the effectiveness of health promotion and screening interventions delivered through community health workers needs to be established.This review synthesised evidence on effectiveness of CHW delivered NCD primary prevention interventions in low and middle-income countries (LMICs.A systematic review of trials that utilised community health workers for primary prevention/ early detection strategy in the management of NCDs (Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, cancers, stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD in LMICs was conducted. Digital databases like PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, Cochrane library, dissertation abstracts, clinical trials registry web sites of different LMIC were searched for such publications between years 2000 and 2015. We focussed on community based randomised controlled trial and cluster randomised trials without any publication language limitation. The primary outcome of review was percentage change in population with different behavioural risk factors. Additionally, mean overall changes in levels of several physical or biochemical parameters were studied as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses was performed by the age and sex of participants, and sensitivity analyses was conducted to assess the robustness of the findings.Sixteen trials meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. Duration, study populations and content of interventions varied across trials. The duration of the studies ranged from mean follow up of 4 months

  1. Elicitation of cognitions related to HIV risk behaviors in persons with mental illnesses: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennille, Julie; Solomon, Phyllis; Fishbein, Martin; Blank, Michael

    2009-01-01

    An important step in research using the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior (TRA/TPB) is conducting an elicitation process to identify topic and population specific cognitions. This study explored HIV risk behaviors in persons with mental illnesses and introduces findings from focus groups conducted during the development phase of an HIV primary and secondary prevention intervention study. Researchers held four focus groups with persons with mental illnesses focused on HIV risks and condom use. Participants discussed sexual side effects of psychotropic medications as a potential cause of both medication non-adherence and HIV risk behaviors. The intersection of these two issues is specific to this population. We conclude with the recommendation that HIV primary and secondary prevention intervention for persons with mental illnesses must incorporate the promotion of healthy sexuality, including attention to sexual side effects of psychotropic medications.

  2. Oral preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection: clinical and public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jonathan; OʼHara, Kevin Michael

    2014-12-01

    This article reviews the use of combination emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-negative patients at high risk of acquiring HIV, including heterosexual men and women, men who have sex with men, and IV drug users. When used with classic prevention strategies such as condoms, PrEP has been found effective in reducing the risk of HIV transmission.

  3. Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission: Predictors of Utilization & Future Policy Implication

    OpenAIRE

    Martz, Tyler Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of highly efficacious antiretroviral drug regimens for the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT), transmission rates remain higher than those achieved in clinical trials. Access to these efficacious drug regimens continues to expand rapidly in countries most affected by HIV. Such expansion is an important first step in dramatically reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission rates. However, beyond access to drug regimens, programs must also identify and...

  4. Prevention of Drowning by Community-Based Intervention: Implications for Low- and Middle- Income Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Mohammadi, Reza; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh

    2012-01-01

    Background Drowning is a serious but neglected health problem in low-and middle-income countries. Objectives To describe the effectiveness of drowning prevention program on the reduction of drowning mortality rates in rural settings at the north of Iran, and guide its replication elsewhere. Patients and Methods This interventional design included pre- and post-intervention observations in the rural area of the Caspian Sea coastline without a comparison community. Cross-sectional data were col...

  5. The Implication of Coronary Artery Calcium Testing for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Blankstein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades coronary artery calcium (CAC scanning has emerged as a quick, safe, and inexpensive method to detect the presence of coronary atherosclerosis. Data from multiple studies has shown that compared to individuals who do not have any coronary calcifications, those with severe calcifications (i.e., CAC score >300 have a 10-fold increase in their risk of coronary heart disease events and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, those that have a CAC of 0 have a very low event rate (~0.1%/year, with data that now extends to 15 years in some studies. Thus, the most notable implication of identifying CAC in individuals who do not have known cardiovascular disease is that it allows targeting of more aggressive therapies to those who have the highest risk of having future events. Such identification of risk is especially important for individuals who are not on any therapies for coronary heart disease, or when intensification of treatment is being considered but has an uncertain role. This review will highlight some of the recent data on CAC testing, while focusing on the implications of those findings on patient management. The evolving role of CAC in patients with diabetes will also be highlighted.

  6. The US Air Force suicide prevention program: implications for public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kerry L; Pflanz, Steven; Talcott, Gerald W; Campise, Rick L; Lavigne, Jill E; Bajorska, Alina; Tu, Xin; Caine, Eric D

    2010-12-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of the US Air Force Suicide Prevention Program (AFSPP) in reducing suicide, and we measured the extent to which air force installations implemented the program. We determined the AFSPP's impact on suicide rates in the air force by applying an intervention regression model to data from 1981 through 2008, providing 16 years of data before the program's 1997 launch and 11 years of data after launch. Also, we measured implementation of program components at 2 points in time: during a 2004 increase in suicide rates, and 2 years afterward. Suicide rates in the air force were significantly lower after the AFSPP was launched than before, except during 2004. We also determined that the program was being implemented less rigorously in 2004. The AFSPP effectively prevented suicides in the US Air Force. The long-term effectiveness of this program depends upon extensive implementation and effective monitoring of implementation. Suicides can be reduced through a multilayered, overlapping approach that encompasses key prevention domains and tracks implementation of program activities.

  7. Sidestep cutting technique and knee abduction loading: implications for ACL prevention exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianslund, Eirik; Faul, Oliver; Bahr, Roald; Myklebust, Grethe; Krosshaug, Tron

    2014-05-01

    Sidestep cutting technique is essential in programmes to prevent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. A better understanding of how technique affects potentially harmful joint loading may improve prevention programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sidestep cutting technique on maximum knee abduction moments. Cross-sectional study. Whole-body kinematics and knee joint kinetics were calculated in 123 female handball players (mean±SD, 22.5±7.0 years, 171±7 cm, 67±7 kg) performing sidestep cutting. Three cuts from each side were analysed. Linear regression was applied between selected technique factors and maximum knee abduction moment during the first 100 ms of the contact phase. Furthermore, we investigated to what degree the abduction moment originated from the magnitude of the ground reaction force (GRF) or the knee abduction moment arm of the GRF. Technique factors explained 62% of the variance in knee abduction moments. Cut width, knee valgus, toe landing, approach speed and cutting angle were the most significant predictors. An increase in one of these factors of 1 SD increased the knee abduction moment from 12% to 19%. The effect of the moment arm of the GRF was more important than the force magnitude for maximum knee abduction moments. Lower knee abduction loads during sidestep cutting may be achieved if cuts are performed as narrow cuts with low knee valgus and toe landings. These factors may be targeted in ACL injury prevention programmes.

  8. Health of Older Adults in Assisted Living and Implications for Preventive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Christine E; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Ward, Kimberly T; Reed, David; Golin, Carol; Lewis, Carmen L

    2017-10-01

    Older adults in residential care and assisted living (RC/AL) are less healthy than the general elderly population, and some have needs similar to those in nursing homes, making this an important group in which to assess potential overuse or underuse of preventive services. We determined the health status of RC/AL residents and distinguished characteristics between those who may and may not benefit from preventive services requiring a life expectancy ≥5 years. Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of RC/AL residents using 2010 data from the National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The primary outcome was the weighted frequency distribution of health states using three predictive mortality indices: Charlson Comorbidity Index, 4-year mortality index, and 9-year mortality index. A total of 666,700 of 733,300 (weighted) residents met criteria for inclusion. Based on the three indices, 10%-15% were in good health, 11%-70% in intermediate health, and 20%-76% in poor health. Using triangulation between 3 well-validated mortality indices, 10%-15% of RC/AL residents are in good health and highly likely to benefit from preventive services that require ≥5 year life expectancy. In addition, many residents have uncertain benefit and would benefit from shared decision making. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Stigma - risk factor and consequence of suicidal behavior : Implications for suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, N; Rüsch, N

    2017-11-16

    Mental illness, previous suicidal behavior and loss of a relative by suicide are strong risk factors for suicidality. Both mental illness and suicide are stigmatized, which is a burden for those affected and potentially contributes to suicidality among stigmatized individuals. Many consequences of stigma, e. g. social isolation, low self-esteem and hopelessness, are well-known predictors of suicidality. Interventions to reduce stigmatization might therefore be an important component of successful suicide prevention. This paper discusses the currently available knowledge regarding this hypothesis. Many studies confirmed the association between the stigmatization of mental illness and suicidality and there is initial evidence for the influence of suicide stigma and suicidality. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of anti-stigma interventions to reduce suicidality and prevent suicide has not yet been tested. Reducing stigma among members of the general population and mental health care professionals as well as programs to support individuals in coping with stigmatization could be important components of successful suicide prevention.

  10. The increasing roles of epigenetics in breast cancer: Implications for pathogenicity, biomarkers, prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Clémence; Arock, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Nowadays, the mechanisms governing the occurrence of cancer are thought to be the consequence not only of genetic defects but also of epigenetic modifications. Therefore, epigenetic has become a very attractive and increasingly investigated field of research in order to find new ways of prevention and treatment of neoplasia, and this is particularly the case for breast cancer (BC). Thus, this review will first develop the main known epigenetic modifications that can occur in cancer and then expose the future role that control of epigenetic modifications might play in prevention, prognostication, follow-up and treatment of BC. Indeed, epigenetic biomarkers found in peripheral blood might become new tools to detect BC, to define its prognostic and to predict its outcome, whereas epi-drugs might have an increasing potential of development in the next future. However, if DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone desacetylase inhibitors have shown encouraging results in BC, their action remains nonspecific. Thus, additional clinical studies are needed to evaluate more precisely the effects of these molecules, even if they have provided encouraging results in cotreatment and combined therapies. This review will also deal with the potential of RNA interference (RNAi) as epi-drugs. Finally, we will focus on the potential prevention of BC through epigenetic based on diet and we will particularly develop the possible place of isothiocyanates from cruciferous vegetables or of Genistein from soybean in a dietary program that might potentially reduce the risk of BC in large populations. © 2014 UICC.

  11. Sources of HIV infection among men having sex with men and implications for prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratmann, O.; van Sighem, A.; Bezemer, D.; Gavryushkina, A.; Jurriaans, S.; Wensing, A.; de Wolf, F.; Reiss, P.; Fraser, C.

    2016-01-01

    New HIV diagnoses among men having sex with men (MSM) have not decreased appreciably in most countries, even though care and prevention services have been scaled up substantially in the past twenty years. To maximize the impact of prevention strategies, it is crucial to quantify the sources of transmission at the population level. We used viral sequence and clinical patient data from one of Europe’s nation-wide cohort studies to estimate probable sources of transmission for 617 recently infected MSM. 71% of transmissions were from undiagnosed men, 6% from men who had initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART), 1% from men with no contact to care for at least 18 months, and 43% from those in their first year of infection. The lack of substantial reductions in incidence amongst Dutch MSM is not a result of ineffective ART provision or inadequate retention in care. In counterfactual modeling scenarios, 19% of these past cases could have been averted with current annual testing coverage and immediate ART to those testing positive. 66% of these cases could have been averted with available antiretrovirals (immediate ART provided to all MSM testing positive, and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis taken by half of all who test negative for HIV), but only if half of all men at risk of transmission had tested annually. With increasing sequence coverage, molecular epidemiological analyses can be a key tool to direct HIV prevention strategies to the predominant sources of infection, and help send HIV epidemics amongst MSM into a decisive decline. PMID:26738795

  12. Efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin according to age for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: observations from the ARISTOTLE trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Sigrun; Atar, Dan; Yang, Hongqiu; De Caterina, Raffaele; Erol, Cetin; Garcia, David; Granger, Christopher B.; Hanna, Michael; Held, Claes; Husted, Steen; Hylek, Elaine M.; Jansky, Petr; Lopes, Renato D.; Ruzyllo, Witold; Thomas, Laine; Wallentin, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Aims The risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) increases with age. In the ARISTOTLE trial, apixaban when compared with warfarin reduced the rate of stroke, death, and bleeding. We evaluated these outcomes in relation to patient age. Methods and results A total of 18 201 patients with AF and a raised risk of stroke were randomized to warfarin or apixaban 5 mg b.d. with dose reduction to 2.5 mg b.d. or placebo in 831 patients with ≥2 of the following criteria: age ≥80 years, body weight ≤60 kg, or creatinine ≥133 μmol/L. We used Cox models to compare outcomes in relation to patient age during 1.8 years median follow-up. Of the trial population, 30% were 0.11 for all). Results were also consistent for the 13% of patients ≥80 years. No significant interaction with apixaban dose was found with respect to treatment effect on major outcomes. Conclusion The benefits of apixaban vs. warfarin were consistent in patients with AF regardless of age. Owing to the higher risk at older age, the absolute benefits of apixaban were greater in the elderly. PMID:24561548

  13. The complexity of atrial fibrillation newly diagnosed after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: advances and uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasuolo, Joshua O.; Cipriano, Lauren E.; Sposato, Luciano A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Atrial fibrillation is being increasingly diagnosed after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Patient characteristics, frequency and duration of paroxysms, and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke associated with atrial fibrillation detected after stroke and TIA (AFDAS) may differ from atrial fibrillation already known before stroke occurrence. We aim to summarize major recent advances in the field, in the context of prior evidence, and to identify areas of uncertainty to be addressed in future research. Recent findings Half of all atrial fibrillations in ischemic stroke and TIA patients are AFDAS, and most of them are asymptomatic. Over 50% of AFDAS paroxysms last less than 30 s. The rapid initiation of cardiac monitoring and its duration are crucial for its timely and effective detection. AFDAS comprises a heterogeneous mix of atrial fibrillation, possibly including cardiogenic and neurogenic types, and a mix of both. Over 25 single markers and at least 10 scores have been proposed as predictors of AFDAS. However, there are considerable inconsistencies across studies. The role of AFDAS burden and its associated risk of stroke recurrence have not yet been investigated. Summary AFDAS may differ from atrial fibrillation known before stroke in several clinical dimensions, which are important for optimal patient care strategies. Many questions remain unanswered. Neurogenic and cardiogenic AFDAS need to be characterized, as it may be possible to avoid some neurogenic cases by initiating timely preventive treatments. AFDAS burden may differ in ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with distinctive diagnostic and treatment implications. The prognosis of AFDAS and its risk of recurrent stroke are still unknown; therefore, it is uncertain whether AFDAS patients should be treated with oral anticoagulants. PMID:27984303

  14. Alcohol consumption and the risk of morbidity and mortality for different stroke types - a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roerecke Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have suggested a complex relationship between alcohol consumption and stroke, dependent on sex, type of stroke and outcome (morbidity vs. mortality. We undertook a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies assessing the association between levels of average alcohol consumption and relative risks of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes separately by sex and outcome. This meta-analysis is the first to explicitly separate morbidity and mortality of alcohol-attributable stroke and thus has implications for public health and prevention. Methods Using Medical Subject Headings (alcohol drinking, ethanol, cerebrovascular accident, cerebrovascular disorders, and intracranial embolism and thrombosis and the key word stroke, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CABS, WHOlist, SIGLE, ETOH, and Web of Science databases between 1980 to June 2009 was performed followed by manual searches of bibliographies of key retrieved articles. From twenty-six observational studies (cohort or case-control with ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes the relative risk or odds ratios or hazard ratios of stroke associated with alcohol consumption were reported; alcohol consumption was quantified; and life time abstention (manually estimated where data for current abstainers were given was used as the reference group. Two reviewers independently extracted the information on study design, participant characteristics, level of alcohol consumption, stroke outcome, control for potential confounding factors, risk estimates and key criteria of study quality using a standardized protocol. Results The dose-response relationship for hemorrhagic stroke had monotonically increasing risk for increasing consumption, whereas ischemic stroke showed a curvilinear relationship, with a protective effect of alcohol for low to moderate consumption, and increased risk for higher exposure. For more than 3 drinks on average/day, in general women had

  15. Stroke from systemic vascular disorders in Saudi children: The devastating role of hypernatremic dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    Systemic vascular disorders, leading to childhood stroke, include volume depletion or systemic hypotension and hypernatremic dehydration. We describe 3 cases of stroke following systemic vascular disorders. These were diagnosed during a prospective and retrospective study on childhood stroke, which included 104 patients. Post-gastroenteritis hypernatremic dehydration is an important, potentially preventable, cause of stroke in Saudi children. (author)

  16. The effect of gait velocity on calcaneal balance at heel strike; Implications for orthotic prescription in injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthikumar, Shivanthan; Low, Zi; Falvey, Eanna; McCrory, Paul; Franklyn-Miller, Andy

    2010-01-01

    Exercise related lower limb injuries (ERLLI), are common in the recreational and competitive sporting population. Although ERLLI are thought to be multi-factorial in aetiology, one of the critical predisposing factors is known to gait abnormality. There is little published evidence comparing walking and running gait in the same subjects, and no evidence on the effect of gait velocity on calcaneal pronation, even though this may have implications for orthotic prescription and injury prevention. In this study, the walking and running gait of 50 physically active subjects was assessed using pressure plate analysis. The results show that rearfoot pronation occurs on foot contact in both running and walking gait, and that there is significantly more rearfoot pronation in walking gait (prunning vs. walking gait. The findings of this study suggest that in the athletic population orthoses prescription should be based on dynamic assessment of running gait. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent sexually transmitted disease prevention efforts and their implications for AIDS health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, M Z; DeJong, W

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of a cure or vaccine for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) educational and social marketing efforts to reduce the transmission of Human T-lymphotropic type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) are currently our best hope for controlling the disease. Since 1983, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has funded a series of research studies to determine whether education efforts can successfully motivate the adoption of key behaviors relevant to the control of a variety of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Analysis of the first two studies which are now completed, and preliminary data from a third study, have documented dramatic changes in behavior, knowledge, and attitudes among clients in inner-city public health clinics. The authors describe the principles and underlying assumptions that have guided the design of their STD initiatives, drawing special attention to the implications for AIDS health education efforts.

  18. Protein consumptions in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Maghsoudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stroke is one of the most common causes of disabilities and death all over the world. The mortality rate of stroke