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Sample records for stroke power mobility

  1. mStroke: "Mobile Stroke"-Improving Acute Stroke Care with Smartphone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Benjamin Y; Stack, Colleen M; Yang, Julian P; Dodds, Jodi A

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of method and time of system activation on clinical metrics in cases utilizing the Stop Stroke (Pulsara, Inc.) mobile acute stroke care coordination application. A retrospective cohort analysis of stroke codes at 12 medical centers using Stop Stroke from March 2013 to May 2016 was performed. Comparison of metrics (door-to-needle time [DTN] and door-to-CT time [DTC], and rate of DTN ≤ 60 minutes [goal DTN]) was performed between subgroups based on method (emergency medical service [EMS] versus emergency department [ED]) and time of activation. Effects were adjusted for confounders (age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) using multiple linear and logistic regression. The final dataset included 2589 cases. Cases activated by EMS were more severe (median NIHSS score 8 versus 4, P smartphone technology provides unique insight into acute stroke codes. Activation of mobile electronic stroke coordination in the field appears to promote a more expedited and successful care process. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bidirectional Power Stroke by Ncd Kinesin

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, Anthony E.; Stewart, Russell J.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Skliar, Mikhail

    2010-01-01

    Optical trapping experiments reveal details of molecular motor dynamics. In noisy data, temporal structure within the power stroke of motors can be analyzed by ensemble averaging, but this obscures infrequent subcategories of events. We have here developed an analysis method that uses Kalman filtering of measurements, model-based estimation of the power strokes produced by the motor head, and automatic event classification to discriminate between different types of motor events. This method w...

  3. Monitoring mobility assistive device use in post-stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Hester, Todd; Sherrill, Delsey

    2007-01-01

    Mobility assistive devices (MAD) such as canes can improve mobility and allow independence in the performance of mobility-related tasks. The use of MAD is often prescribed for stroke survivors. Despite their acknowledged qualities, MAD in real life conditions are typically underutilized, misused ...

  4. Wireless Power for Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waffenschmidt, E.

    2011-01-01

    Wireless power transfer allows a convenient, easy to use battery charging of mobile phones and other mobile devices. No hassle with cables and plugs, just place the device on a pad and that’s it. Such asystem even has the potential to become a standard charging solution. Where are the limits for

  5. Validation of the mobility nursing outcome in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaella Pessoa; de Araujo, Thelma Leite; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; Costa, Alice Gabrielle de Sousa; Lopes, Marcos Venicios de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    To validate the indicators of the mobility nursing outcome. This is a methodological study carried out from February to April 2011. The instrument was assessed by 23 nurses, and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. The title "physical mobility" was the most suitable. There was a statistical proportion of less than 85% of experts who agreed that the indicators running, crawling, jumping, and moves with ease were relevant to mobility nursing outcome (p stroke patients. For stroke patients, some indicators are not adequate to their evaluation. This work supports the tools' development to assess accurate outcome measurements in specific populations. © 2013 NANDA International.

  6. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually ...

  7. Unsupervised Power Profiling for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    power savings while at the same time maintaining good quality of service. This paper proposes an unsupervised API-level method for power profiling mobile phones based on genetic algorithms. The method enables accurate profiling of the power consumption of devices and thereby provides the information......Today, power consumption is a main limitation for mobile phones. To minimize the power consumption of popular and traditionally power-hungry location-based services requires knowledge of how individual phone features consume power, so that those features can be utilized intelligently for optimal...... needed by methods that aim to minimize the power consumption of location-based and other services....

  8. Unsupervised Power Profiling for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik

    power savings while at the same time maintaining good quality of service. This paper proposes an unsupervised API-level method for power profiling mobile phones based on genetic algorithms. The method enables accurate profiling of the power consumption of devices and thereby provides the information......Today, power consumption is a main limitation for mobile phones. To minimize the power consumption of popular and traditionally power-hungry location-based services requires knowledge of how individual phone features consume power, so that those features can be utilized intelligently for optimal...... needed by methods that aim to minimize the power consumption of location-based and other services....

  9. Predicting mobility outcome one year after stroke: a prospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Port, I.G. van de; Kwakkel, G.; Schepers, V.P.; Lindeman, E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a prognostic model to predict mobility outcome one year post-stroke. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study in patients with a first-ever stroke admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. PATIENTS: A total of 217 patients with stroke (mean age 58 years) following inpatient rehabilitation

  10. Bringing Emergency Neurology to Ambulances: Mobile Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowry, Ritvij; Grotta, James C

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic stroke results from blocked arteries in the brain, with earlier thrombolysis with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or mechanical thrombectomy resulting in improved clinical outcomes. Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU) can speed up the treatment with tPA and facilitate faster triage for patients to hospitals for mechanical thrombectomy. The first registry-based MSU study in Germany demonstrated faster treatment times with tPA using a MSU, a higher proportion of patients being treated within the first "golden hour," and a suggestion of improved 3-month clinical outcomes. The first multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing MSU versus standard care was started in 2014 after the launch of the MSU in Houston, TX, demonstrating the feasibility and safety of MSU operation in the United States, and reliability of telemedicine to evaluate stroke patients for tPA eligibility. Although conclusive evidence from clinical trials to support MSUs as being cost effective and improving clinical outcomes is still needed, there are a myriad of other clinical and research applications of MSUs that could have profound implications for managing patients with neurological emergencies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Morphological classification of mobile plaques and their association with early recurrence of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Kitazono, Takanari; Okada, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the frequency and morphological characteristics of carotid mobile plaques and examined the relationship between carotid mobile plaques and recurrent strokes. The study included 94 consecutive acute stroke patients with large-artery atherosclerosis associated with extracranial carotid stenosis. We investigated the presence of mobile plaques by carotid ultrasonography and classified patients into two groups (mobile group and non-mobile group). We compared backgrounds, MRI and ultrasonographic findings, neurological severity on admission and at discharge, and the rate of early recurrent stroke between both groups. Mobile plaques were detected in 12 patients (12.8%). There were four types of mobile plaques: (1) the jellyfish-type plaque, in which the fibrous cap fluctuated like a jellyfish; (2) the streaming-band-type plaque, in which the string attached to the plaque was swaying; (3) the mobile-thrombus-type plaque, in which a mobile mass was attached to the plaque surface, and (4) the fluctuating-ulcer-type plaque, which contained a mobile substance in the plaque ulcer. Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores on admission were less severe in the mobile group than in the non-mobile group (median 1 vs. 4, respectively; p = 0.004), the rate of early recurrent stroke was significantly higher in the mobile group than in the non-mobile group (33.3 vs. 7.3%, respectively; p = 0.022). There were no significant differences in NIHSS scores at discharge between groups. Morphologically, several types of mobile plaques were detected in consecutive patients with acute stroke associated with carotid stenosis. Mobile plaques are strongly associated with an early recurrence of stroke. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually...... predicted was the need for special living facilities and support at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital, as well as six months later; 53 stroke patients with age median 68 years were included in this prospective study. It was shown that a combination of Barthel Index and CT50 had a stronger predictive...

  13. Optimizing muscle power after stroke: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavric Verna A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke remains a leading cause of disability worldwide and results in muscle performance deficits and limitations in activity performance. Rehabilitation aims to address muscle dysfunction in an effort to improve activity and participation. While muscle strength has an impact on activity performance, muscle power has recently been acknowledged as contributing significantly to activity performance in this population. Therefore, rehabilitation efforts should include training of muscle power. However, little is known about what training parameters, or load, optimize muscle power performance in people with stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate lower limb muscle power performance at differing loads in people with and without stroke. Methods A cross-sectional study design investigated muscle power performance in 58 hemiplegic and age matched control participants. Lower limb muscle power was measured using a modified leg press machine at 30, 50 and 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM strength. Results There were significant differences in peak power between involved and uninvolved limbs of stroke participants and between uninvolved and control limbs. Peak power was greatest when pushing against a load of 30% of 1RM for involved, uninvolved and control limbs. Involved limb peak power irrespective of load (Mean:220 ± SD:134 W was significantly lower (p  Conclusions Significant power deficits were seen in both the involved and uninvolved limbs after stroke. Maximal muscle power was produced when pushing against lighter loads. Further intervention studies are needed to determine whether training of both limbs at lighter loads (and higher velocities are preferable to improve both power and activity performance after stroke.

  14. Effects of virtual reality training on mobility and physical function in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Masood, Tahir

    2017-10-01

    Stroke is a common disabling condition which declines the functional and mobility level. The purpose of the case series was to determine the effect of virtual reality training on sensorimotor function and mobility level in stroke patients. Ten male (40-60 year) patients of stroke (08 Infarction, 02 Haemorrhagic) were selected from Physiotherapy department of Pakistan Railway Hospital, Rawalpindi. The additional virtual reality training (15-20 minutes) was provided 03 days per week for 06weeks along with task oriented training. All patients were assessed through Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Lower Extremity (FMA-LE) and Timed Get Up and Go Test (TUG) at baseline and after 06 weeks of training. The results showed that there was significant improvement in mobility level of stroke patients. It is concluded that combination of task oriented and virtual reality training considerably improves the physical performance and mobility level in stroke patients.

  15. A Directional Stroke Recognition Technique for Mobile Interaction in a Pervasive Computing World

    OpenAIRE

    Kostakos, Vassilis; O'Neill, Eamonn

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a common gestural interface to mobile and pervasive computing devices. We report our development of a novel technique for recognizing input strokes on a range of mobile and pervasive devices, ranging from small devices with low processing capabilities and limited input area to computers with wall-sized displays and an input area as large as can be accommodated by motion-sensing technologies such as cameras. Recent work has included implementing and testing our stroke recog...

  16. Very early mobilization following acute stroke: Controversies, the unknowns, and a way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt Julie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence that organized stroke-unit care results in better outcome has led to positive changes in stroke service delivery around the world. It is well accepted that stroke rehabilitation should commence as early as possible for optimal recovery to be achieved. Exactly how early rehabilitation should start is controversial. Early mobilization (getting up out of bed within 24 h of stroke onset is a well-established feature of acute stroke care in many Scandinavian hospitals. Elsewhere in the world, stroke protocols enforce bed rest for the first few days or foster long periods of bed rest after stroke. This paper aims to provide an overview of the topic of very early mobilization (VEM. It is divided into three sections: section 1 reviews the effects of bed rest and outlines arguments both for and against enforced bed rest after stroke; in section 2, VEM as a treatment for stroke and the limitations of existing literature in the field are described; and section 3 outlines the systematic approach that has been taken by our team of clinical researchers to the study the effect of VEM after stroke. Conclusion: VEM represents a simple, easy-to-deliver intervention, requiring little or no equipment. It is potentially deliverable to 85% of the acute stroke population and, if proven to be effective, may help reduce the significant personal and community burden of stroke. As current opinion about when mobilization should begin is divided, one way to move forward is through the conduct of a large high-quality clinical trial (such as A Very Early Rehabilitation Trial (AVERT. Although some inroads have been made, further research in this field is clearly warranted

  17. Reliability and validity of the de Morton Mobility Index in individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Tobias; Marks, Detlef; Thiel, Christian; Grüneberg, Christian

    2018-02-04

    To establish the validity and reliability of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) in patients with sub-acute stroke. This cross-sectional study was performed in a neurological rehabilitation hospital. We assessed unidimensionality, construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, minimal detectable change and possible floor and ceiling effects of the DEMMI in adult patients with sub-acute stroke. The study included a total sample of 121 patients with sub-acute stroke. We analysed validity (n = 109) and reliability (n = 51) in two sub-samples. Rasch analysis indicated unidimensionality with an overall fit to the model (chi-square = 12.37, p = 0.577). All hypotheses on construct validity were confirmed. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94) and inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.97) were excellent. The minimal detectable change with 90% confidence was 13 points. No floor or ceiling effects were evident. These results indicate unidimensionality, sufficient internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity of the DEMMI in patients with a sub-acute stroke. Advantages of the DEMMI in clinical application are the short administration time, no need for special equipment and interval level data. The de Morton Mobility Index, therefore, may be a useful performance-based bedside test to measure mobility in individuals with a sub-acute stroke across the whole mobility spectrum. Implications for Rehabilitation The de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) is an unidimensional measurement instrument of mobility in individuals with sub-acute stroke. The DEMMI has excellent internal consistency and inter-rater reliability, and sufficient construct validity. The minimal detectable change of the DEMMI with 90% confidence in stroke rehabilitation is 13 points. The lack of any floor or ceiling effects on hospital admission indicates

  18. Rasch analysis in the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Garde, B; Kreiner, S

    1995-01-01

    The study describes the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke. It was based on 74 first-stroke patients, 40 men and 34 women, each assessed three times during rehabilitation. Their median age was 69 years, and they represented all degrees of severity of paresis....... Content, construct, criterion and convergent validity were examined, as well as the inter-rater reliability. The final rating scale has three special characteristics: 1) it reflects the regularity in the recovery of mobility after stroke; 2) the sum of item scores comprises the information contained...

  19. Periodontal biomechanics: finite element simulations of closing stroke and power stroke in equine cheek teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordes Vanessa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In equine dentistry periodontal diseases, especially periapical inflammation, are frequently occurring problems. Anachoresis is believed to be the most common cause for the development of such disorders. Nevertheless, there is still no substantiated explanation why settlement of pathogen microorganisms occurs in equine periodontal tissues. It is expected that excessive strains and stresses occurring in the periodontal ligament (PDL during the horse’s chewing cycle might be a predisposing factor. In this study this assumption was examined by finite element (FE analyses on virtual 3-D models of equine maxillary and mandibular cheek teeth, established on the basis of μCT datasets. Calculations were conducted both under conditions of closing and power stroke. Results Results showed a uniform distribution of low stresses and strain energy density (SED during closing stroke, whereas during power stroke an occurrence of high stresses and SED could be observed in the PDL near the alveolar crest and in periapical regions. Conclusion The concentration of forces during power stroke in these specific areas of the PDL may cause local tissue necrosis and inflammation and thus establish a suitable environment for the settlement of microorganisms.

  20. Identification of tasks performed by stroke patients using a mobility assistive device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hester, Todd; Sherrill, Delsey M; Hamel, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Many stroke patients are prescribed canes or other mobility assistive devices. Once taken home, these mobility assistive devices are often abandoned or misused. A means for assessing the use of the cane in the home and community settings is required to assist clinicians in the prescription...... of these devices. In this study, we propose the use of wearable sensors to identify tasks performed by stroke patients with a mobility assistive device. Subjects performed ten tasks with a three-axis accelerometer attached to their ankle and a neural network was trained to identify the task being performed...

  1. Carotid Artery Stenting Successfully Prevents Progressive Stroke Due to Mobile Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Oomura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of progressive ischemic stroke due to a mobile plaque, in which carotid artery stenting successfully prevented further infarctions. A 78-year-old man developed acute multiple infarcts in the right hemisphere, and a duplex ultrasound showed a mobile plaque involving the bifurcation of the left common carotid artery. Maximal medical therapy failed to prevent further infarcts, and the number of infarcts increased with his neurological deterioration. Our present case suggests that the deployment of a closed-cell stent is effective to prevent the progression of the ischemic stroke due to the mobile plaque.

  2. Transport mobility 5 years after stroke in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Hanna C; Selander, Helena

    2018-04-01

    Background People after stroke may have residual problems with mobility that can affect their independence and mode of transport. However, there is limited knowledge about transport mobility several years after stroke. Objective The objective was to survey the outdoor mobility and transportation in an urban setting five years post-stroke. Method This cross-sectional study was based on a mail survey focusing on long-term consequences after stroke. The survey comprises a set of self-evaluated questionnaires and was sent to 457 persons, of whom 281 responded (61.5%). From the survey, items regarding transportation and mobility were selected and analyzed. Results A high level of mobility function was reported with regard to outdoor mobility and different modes of transport. However, one-fifth still reported problems with outdoor mobility and mode of transport. Some perceived barriers were reported, predominantly mobility aspects such as transfer to/from, and getting on/off specific transportation mode/s. The respondents reported some communication problems and cognitive impairments, but these were not reported as prominent barriers when using public transport. A total of 67% were active drivers and were more often men (p = 0.002), younger (p ≤ 0.001), and were less dependent at discharge from the acute hospital (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions Five years post-stroke, mobility problems were the dominant barrier reported when using transport modes. Individualized transport training is needed during rehabilitation to increase possibility to participate. Infrastructure and transportation planning should focus on older, women, and people with impairments to be able to facilitate the use of public transport and mobility.

  3. Sit-and-reach test can predict mobility of patients recovering from acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Yuk Lan; Mak, Margaret Kit

    2004-01-01

    To establish the test-retest reliability of the sit-and-reach test (SRT) and to determine the capacity of the SRT to predict mobility of patients recovering from acute stroke. Study 1 consisted of repeating the SRT to examine its reliability over trials (same day) and sessions (alternate days). Study 2 consisted of measuring performance in the SRT 7 to 10 days poststroke and measuring mobility at discharge for prospective analysis. Medical and rehabilitation wards in hospital in Hong Kong. Thirty-six subjects with acute stroke (study 1, n=10; study 2, n=26). Not applicable. Between 7 and 10 days of stroke onset, distance reached on the SRT was measured. Mobility at discharge was assessed using the transfer and locomotion scale of the FIM instrument (FIM mobility) and a timed walk test. The intertrial and intersession reliability of the SRT were rated good, with intraclass correlation coefficients of .98 and .79, respectively. Distance reached on the SRT correlated with the FIM mobility score on discharge (r=.572, P=.002) and the distance achieved on the timed walk test (r=.524, P=.006). Distance reached on the SRT accounted for 32.7% and 27.5% of the variance in the FIM mobility score at discharge and the distance achieved on the timed walk test, respectively. Performance in the SRT is reliable and can significantly predict the mobility of patients with acute stroke at discharge.

  4. Effect of Core Stability Training on Trunk Function, Standing Balance, and Mobility in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Koshiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Trunk function is important for standing balance, mobility, and functional outcome after stroke, but few studies have evaluated the effects of exercises aimed at improving core stability in stroke patients. To investigate the effectiveness of core stability training on trunk function, standing balance, and mobility in stroke patients. An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial was undertaken in a stroke rehabilitation ward, with 32 participants randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group (n = 16 each). The experimental group received 400 minutes of core stability training in place of conventional programs within total training time, while the control group received only conventional programs. Primary outcome measures were evaluated using the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), which reflects trunk function. Secondary outcome measures were evaluated by pelvic tilt active range of motion in the sagittal plane, the Balance Evaluation Systems Test-brief version (Brief-BESTest), Functional Reach test, Timed Up-and-Go test (TUG), and Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC). A general linear repeated-measures model was used to analyze the results. A treatment effect was found for the experimental group on the dynamic balance subscale and total score of the TIS ( P = .002 and P Core stability training has beneficial effects on trunk function, standing balance, and mobility in stroke patients. Our findings might provide support for introducing core stability training in stroke rehabilitation.

  5. Effects of low-intensity endurance and resistance training on mobility in chronic stroke survivors: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Nicola; Straudi, Sofia; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Argirò, Matteo; Felisatti, Michele; Nardini, Eleonora; Zambon, Christel; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Chronic stroke survivors are exposed to long-term disability and physical deconditioning, effects that may impact their independence and quality of life. Community-based programs optimizing the dose of exercise therapy that are simultaneously low risk and able to achieve high adherence should be identified. We tested the hypothesis that an 8-week, community-based, progressive mixed endurance-resistance exercise program at lower cardiovascular and muscular load yielded more mobility benefits than a higher-intensity program in chronic stroke survivors. A two-arm, parallel-group, pilot randomized, controlled clinical trial. Hospital (recruitment); community-based adapted physical activity center (training). Thirty-five chronic stroke patients (mean age: 68.4±10.4 years; 27 males). Participants were randomized to a low-intensity experimental (LI-E; N.=18) or a high-intensity active control group (HI-C; N.=17). Patients in the LI-E group performed over-ground intermittent walking (weeks 1-8) and muscle power training with portable tools (weeks 5-8); patients in the HI-C group executed treadmill walking (weeks 1-8) and strength training with gym machines (weeks 5-8). Changes in mobility, assessed using the 6-Minute Walking Distance test, were the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included quality of life (Short-Form-36 Questionnaire), gait speed (10-Meter Walking Test), balance (Berg Balance Scale) and muscle performance of the lower limbs (strength and power of the quadriceps and femoral biceps). After 8 weeks, the 6MWD revealed more improvement for the LI-E group than the HI-C group (P=0.009). The SF36 physical activity domain (P=0.012) and peak power of the femoral quadriceps and biceps were also significantly improved for the LI-E group (P=0.008 and Pmuscle power of the affected limb was the muscle parameter most correlated with mobility in the entire population. A low-intensity exercise program exhibited better results in terms of mobility, quality of life and

  6. Performance and emission characteristics of LPG powered four stroke SI engine under variable stroke length and compression ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, Hakan; Yamin, Jehad A.A.

    2008-01-01

    A computer simulation of a variable stroke length, LPG fuelled, four stroke, single cylinder, water cooled spark ignition engine was done. The engine capacity was varied by varying the stroke length of the engine, which also changed its compression ratio. The simulation model developed was verified with experimental results from the literature for both constant and variable stroke engines. The performance of the engine was simulated at each stroke length/compression ratio combination. The simulation results clearly indicate the advantages and utility of variable stroke engines in fuel economy and power issues. Using the variable stroke technique has significantly improved the engine's performance and emission characteristics within the range studied. The brake torque and power have registered an increase of about 7-54% at low speed and 7-57% at high speed relative to the original engine design and for all stroke lengths and engine speeds studied. The brake specific fuel consumption has registered variations from a reduction of about 6% to an increase of about 3% at low speed and from a reduction of about 6% to an increase of about 8% at high speed relative to the original engine design and for all stroke lengths and engine speeds studied. On the other hand, an increase of pollutants of about 0.65-2% occurred at low speed. Larger stroke lengths resulted in a reduction of the pollutants level of about 1.5% at higher speeds. At lower stroke lengths, on the other hand, an increase of about 2% occurred. Larger stroke lengths resulted in increased exhaust temperature and, hence, make the exhaust valve work under high temperature

  7. Output Power Calibration Methods for an EGPRS Mobile Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Hans

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with output power calibration of a mobile platform that supports EGPRS.Two different topics are examined. First some different measurement methods are compared concerning cost efficiency, accuracy, and speed and later measurements are carried out on a mobile platform. The output power from the mobile platform is controlled by three parameters and the influence on the output power when varying those parameters is investigated and presented. Furthermore, two methods of improv...

  8. Virtual reality exercise improves mobility after stroke: an inpatient randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Daniel; Taillon-Hobson, Anne; Bilodeau, Martin; Sveistrup, Heidi; Finestone, Hillel

    2014-06-01

    Exercise using virtual reality (VR) has improved balance in adults with traumatic brain injury and community-dwelling older adults. Rigorous randomized studies regarding its efficacy, safety, and applicability with individuals after stroke are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an adjunct VR therapy improves balance, mobility, and gait in stroke rehabilitation inpatients. A blinded randomized controlled trial studying 59 stroke survivors on an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit was performed. The treatment group (n=30) received standard stroke rehabilitation therapy plus a program of VR exercises that challenged balance (eg, soccer goaltending, snowboarding) performed while standing. The control group (n=29) received standard stroke rehabilitation therapy plus exposure to identical VR environments but whose games did not challenge balance (performed in sitting). VR training consisted of 10 to 12 thirty-minute daily sessions for a 3-week period. Objective outcome measures of balance and mobility were assessed before, immediately after, and 1 month after training. Confidence intervals and effect sizes favored the treatment group on the Timed Up and Go and the Two-Minute Walk Test, with both groups meeting minimal clinical important differences after training. More individuals in the treatment group than in the control group showed reduced impairment in the lower extremity as measured by the Chedoke McMaster Leg domain (P=0.04) immediately after training. This VR exercise intervention for inpatient stroke rehabilitation improved mobility-related outcomes. Future studies could include nonambulatory participants as well as the implementation strategies for the clinical use of VR. http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/. Unique identifier: ACTRN12613000710729. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Interventions on Mobility among Stroke Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Bradley J; Gothe, Neha P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to examine studies that examined the effectiveness of aerobic exercise interventions on mobility in long-term stroke survivors. The authors searched electronic databases for randomized control trials between January 1995 and December 2014 investigating aerobic exercise interventions and mobility in stroke survivors after the subacute phase (>6 mos). Mobility was measured using objective functional fitness tests: 6-minute walk, 10-meter walk, and up-n-go. Nine randomized control trials that compared aerobic exercise with a control group among stroke survivors (mean age, 56.95-68 yrs) were identified. Aerobic interventions lasted between 2 and 6 mos and primarily involved walking. Using the Comprehensive Meta-analysis software, it was found that two of the three mobility outcomes showed small to moderate effect sizes favoring the aerobic exercise group: 6-minute walk (g = 0.366, P aerobic exercise after the subacute phase. Future research needs to examine the precise dose and recommendation for aerobic exercise, test other exercise modalities, and use larger samples to thoroughly determine long-term exercise effects on mobility in this population.

  10. Development and content validation of the power mobility training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Farris, John P; Cain, Brett; King, Emily; VandenBerg, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    This paper outlines the development and content validation of the power mobility training tool (PMTT), an observational tool designed to assist therapists in developing power mobility training programs for children who have multiple, severe impairments. Initial items on the PMTT were developed based on a literature review and in consultation with therapists experienced in the use of power mobility. Items were trialled in clinical settings, reviewed, and refined. Items were then operationalized and an administration manual detailing scoring for each item was created. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to establish content validity via a 15 member, international expert panel. The content validity ratio (CVR) was determined for each possible item. Of the 19 original items, 10 achieved minimum required CVR values and were included in the final version of the PMTT. Items related to manoeuvring a power mobility device were merged and an item related to the number of switches used concurrently to operate a power mobility device were added to the PMTT. The PMTT may assist therapists in developing training programs that facilitate the acquisition of beginning power mobility skills in children who have multiple, severe impairments. Implications for Rehabilitation The Power Mobility Training Tool (PMTT) was developed to help guide the development of power mobility intervention programs for children who have multiple, severe impairments. The PMTT can be used with children who access a power mobility device using either a joystick or a switch. Therapists who have limited experience with power mobility may find the PMTT to be helpful in setting up and conducting power mobility training interventions as a feasible aspect of a plan of care for children who have multiple, severe impairments.

  11. Building Database-Powered Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul POCATILU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all mobile applications use persistency for their data. A common way for complex mobile applications is to store data in local relational databases. Almost all major mobile platforms include a relational database engine. These databases engines expose specific API (Application Programming Interface to be used by mobile applications developers for data definition and manipulation. This paper focus on database-based application models for several mobile platforms (Android, Symbian, Windows CE/Mobile and Windows Phone. For each selected platform the API and specific database operations are presented.

  12. Do Performance Measures of Strength, Balance, and Mobility Predict Quality of Life and Community Reintegration After Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua W; Ivanova, Tanya D; Brouwer, Brenda; Miller, Kimberly J; Bryant, Dianne; Garland, S Jayne

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the extent to which physical performance measures of strength, balance, and mobility taken at discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation can predict health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and community reintegration after 6 months. Longitudinal study. University laboratory. Adults (N=75) recruited within 1 month of discharge home from inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Not applicable. 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) for HRQoL and Subjective Index of Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO) for community reintegration. Physical performance measures were the 6-minute walk test, timed Up and Go (TUG) test, Berg Balance Scale, Community Balance and Mobility Scale, and isokinetic torque and power of hip, knee, and ankle on the paretic and nonparetic sides. Other prognostic variables included age, sex, stroke type and location, comorbidities, and motor FIM score. Separate stepwise linear regressions were performed using the SF-36 and SIPSO as dependent variables. The total paretic lower limb torque and 6-minute walk test predicted the SF-36 Physical Component Summary (adjusted R 2 =.30). The total paretic lower limb torque and TUG test predicted the SIPSO physical component (adjusted R 2 =.47). The total paretic lower limb torque significantly predicted the SF-36 Mental Component Summary, but the adjusted R 2 was low (.06). Similarly, the TUG test significantly predicted the SIPSO social component, but again the adjusted R 2 was low (.09). Measures of physical performance including muscle strength and mobility at discharge can partially predict HRQoL and community reintegration 6 months later. Further research is necessary for more accurate predictions. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prestroke Mobility and Dementia as Predictors of Stroke Outcomes in Patients Over 65 Years of Age: A Cohort Study From The Swedish Dementia and Stroke Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Contreras Escamez, Beatriz; Zupanic, Eva; Religa, Dorota; von Koch, Lena; Johnell, Kristina; von Euler, Mia; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2018-02-01

    To explore the association between prestroke mobility dependency and dementia on functioning and mortality outcomes after stroke in patients>65 years of age. Longitudinal cohort study based on SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry and Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Registry. A total of 1689 patients with dementia >65 years of age registered in SveDem and suffering a first stroke between 2007 and 2014 were matched with 7973 controls without dementia with stroke. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for intrahospital mortality, and functioning and mortality outcomes at 3 months were calculated. Functioning included level of residential assistance (living at home without help, at home with help, or nursing home) and mobility dependency (independent, needing help to move outdoors, or needing help indoors and outdoors). Prestroke dependency in activities of daily living and mobility were worse in patients with dementia than controls without dementia. In unadjusted analyses, patients with dementia were more often discharged to nursing homes (51% vs 20%; P mobility (OR 2.57; 2.20-3.02). Patients with dementia who were independent for mobility prestroke were more likely to be discharged to a nursing home compared with patients without dementia with the same prestroke mobility (37% vs 16%; P mobility limitations were associated with higher odds for poorer mobility, needing more residential assistance, and death. Patients with mobility impairments and/or dementia present a high burden of disability after a stroke. There is a need for research on stroke interventions among these populations. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mobile Interventional Stroke Teams Lead to Faster Treatment Times for Thrombectomy in Large Vessel Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Daniel; Oxley, Thomas J; Nistal, Dominic A; Mascitelli, Justin R; Wilson, Natalie; Stein, Laura; Liang, John; Turkheimer, Lena M; Morey, Jacob R; Schwegel, Claire; Awad, Ahmed J; Shoirah, Hazem; Kellner, Christopher P; De Leacy, Reade A; Mayer, Stephan A; Tuhrim, Stanley; Paramasivam, Srinivasan; Mocco, J; Fifi, Johanna T

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular recanalization treatment for acute ischemic stroke is a complex, time-sensitive intervention. Trip-and-treat is an interhospital service delivery model that has not previously been evaluated in the literature and consists of a shared mobile interventional stroke team that travels to primary stroke centers to provide on-site interventional capability. We compared treatment times between the trip-and-treat model and the traditional drip-and-ship model. We performed a retrospective analysis on 86 consecutive eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke secondary to large vessel occlusion who received endovascular treatment at 4 hospitals in Manhattan. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: trip-and-treat (n=39) and drip-and-ship (n=47). The primary outcome was initial door-to-puncture time, defined as the time between arrival at any hospital and arterial puncture. We also recorded and analyzed the times of last known well, IV-tPA (intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator) administration, transfer, and reperfusion. Mean initial door-to-puncture time was 143 minutes for trip-and-treat and 222 minutes for drip-and-ship ( P Stroke Scale for trip-and-treat compared with drip-and-ship ( P =0.0704). Compared with drip-and-ship, the trip-and-treat model demonstrated shorter treatment times for endovascular therapy in our series. The trip-and-treat model offers a valid alternative to current interhospital stroke transfers in urban environments. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Mobile Game-based Virtual Reality Program for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2018-03-08

    Stroke rehabilitation requires repetitive, intensive, goal-oriented therapy. Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to satisfy these requirements. Game-based therapy can promote patients' engagement in rehabilitation therapy as a more interesting and a motivating tool. Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs can provide personalized home-based therapy with interactive communication between patients and clinicians. In this study, a mobile VR upper extremity rehabilitation program using game applications was developed. The findings from the study show that the mobile game-based VR program effectively promotes upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. In addition, patients completed two weeks of treatment using the program without adverse effects and were generally satisfied with the program. This mobile game-based VR upper extremity rehabilitation program can substitute for some parts of the conventional therapy that are delivered one-on-one by an occupational therapist. This time-efficient, easy to implement, and clinically effective program would be a good candidate tool for tele-rehabilitation for upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. Patients and therapists can collaborate remotely through these e-health rehabilitation programs while reducing economic and social costs.

  16. Mobility in pictures: a participatory photovoice narrative study exploring powered mobility provision for children and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldner, Heather A; Logan, Samuel W; Galloway, James C

    2018-03-09

    Rehabilitation professionals are increasingly recognizing mobility as a basic human right and endorsing the efficacy of early powered mobility for children with mobility impairments to foster independence, promote socialization with peers and facilitate participation in family and community life. However, the relationship between mobility and technology provision, when considered in the context of lived experiences of children with mobility impairments and their families, is complex and understudied. Perceptions of these experiences from children's own points of view are especially limited, as is the use of participatory research methods in describing these experiences. The purpose of this study was to empower children and families as co-researchers, investigating their experiences and perspectives of powered mobility provision processes and early use of their mobility technology in their own words and images.  Methods: Two families in a major Midwest metropolitan area- one who was receiving a powered wheelchair and one who was receiving a modified powered ride-on toy car- participated as co-researchers from 2015-2016, documenting their experiences with a research camera and narrating their photos to describe meaningful or important aspects of their respective powered mobility provision processes and early use of their devices. Four themes emerged: (1) Dys/Function of Mobility Technology; (2) Daily Life, Play and Participation; (3) Emerging Self/Advocacy and (4) Complex Family/Industry Interplay.  Conclusions: These themes and experiences may inform further innovation in powered mobility practices, generate new hypotheses about the role of technology in shaping disability identity and demonstrate the feasibility and impact of using participatory methods more broadly in rehabilitation research. Implications for Rehabilitation Participatory methods may be a useful and underutilized research tool in describing the impact of powered mobility provision processes on

  17. Factors affecting mobility milestones and activities of daily living after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Masahito

    2008-01-01

    Mobility milestones are elementary movements related to activities of daily living (ADL) and have a significant influence on functional recovery after stroke. This study aimed to identify the factors affecting mobility milestones and to clarify the relationships between mobility milestones and ADL. Participants were in the acute phase after first-ever strokes (ischemic, n=77; hemorrhagic, n=84). Clinical and radiological factors within the first week were determined and their effects on mobility milestones after 4 weeks were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. After 4 weeks the patients were divided into four groups on the basis of sitting balance, standing balance, and walking ability. Then total ADL score was calculated using the Barthel index (BI), and percentage of independent patients in each 10 items of BI was transition rate of ADL for each of the four groups. Patients with ischemic stroke showed the following findings. Sitting balance was affected by severity of lower limb paralysis, consciousness level, and presence of an internal capsule lesion on computed tomography (CT) (R 2 =0.86); standing balance was influenced by severity of lower limb paralysis and consciousness level (R 2 =0.72); and walking ability was affected by severity of lower limb paralysis (R 2 =0.64). Patients with hemorrhagic stroke showed the following findings. Sitting balance was influenced by severity of lower limb paralysis, intraventricular hemorrhage on CT, blood pressure instability, and fever (R 2 =0.75); standing balance was affected by severity of lower limb paralysis, consciousness level, and presence of an internal capsule lesion (R 2 =0.58); and walking ability was influenced by severity of lower limb paralysis and presence of an internal capsule lesion (R 2 =0.70). In both types of stroke, sitting and standing balance and walking ability were directly associated with total ADL score, and sitting and standing balance became independent earlier than ADL. Severity of

  18. [Concept analysis of the nursing outcome Mobility in patients with stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaella Pessoa; de Araujo, Thelma Leite; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; Lopes, Marcos Venicios de Oliveira; Chaves, Emília Soares

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed a concept analysis of the nursing outcome Mobility in patients with stroke. A literature review was conducted, through the online access to databases: Scopus, Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Lilacs, using the descriptors: mobility, stroke, nursing and their synonyms in Portuguese and Spanish. 1.521 articles were identified, resulting in 49, after careful selection. Noteworthy are the articles published in Canada (26.7%), on 2001 (95.9%), by physiotherapists (34.6%), and in rehabilitation units (61.5%). The attributes identified for Mobility were: walking, standing, sitting, put the leg side to side, turn around, start and stop walking, stair climbing, motor function, and motor skill transfer. A model case and a contrary case were built, and identified, as antecedents: postural control and balance; and, as consequents: performs tasks inside and outside the house and wanders without difficulty. It was concluded that the concepts of Mobility found in this study need to be validated with experts in the field and in clinical practice.

  19. Exercise intervention to prevent falls and enhance mobility in community dwellers after stroke: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Ruth N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the most common disabling neurological condition in adults. Falls and poor mobility are major contributors to stroke-related disability. Falls are more frequent and more likely to result in injury among stroke survivors than among the general older population. Currently there is good evidence that exercise can enhance mobility after stroke, yet ongoing exercise programs for general community-based stroke survivors are not routinely available. This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether exercise can reduce fall rates and increase mobility and physical activity levels in stroke survivors. Methods and design Three hundred and fifty community dwelling stroke survivors will be recruited. Participants will have no medical contradictions to exercise and be cognitively and physically able to complete the assessments and exercise program. After the completion of the pre-test assessment, participants will be randomly allocated to one of two intervention groups. Both intervention groups will participate in weekly group-based exercises and a home program for twelve months. In the lower limb intervention group, individualised programs of weight-bearing balance and strengthening exercises will be prescribed. The upper limb/cognition group will receive exercises aimed at management and improvement of function of the affected upper limb and cognition carried out in the seated position. The primary outcome measures will be falls (measured with 12 month calendars and mobility. Secondary outcome measures will be risk of falling, physical activity levels, community participation, quality of life, health service utilisation, upper limb function and cognition. Discussion This study aims to establish and evaluate community-based sustainable exercise programs for stroke survivors. We will determine the effects of the exercise programs in preventing falls and enhancing mobility among people following stroke. This program, if

  20. Exercise intervention to prevent falls and enhance mobility in community dwellers after stroke: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Catherine M; Rissel, Chris; Sharkey, Michelle; Sherrington, Catherine; Cumming, Robert G; Barker, Ruth N; Lord, Stephen R; O'Rourke, Sandra D; Kirkham, Catherine

    2009-07-22

    Stroke is the most common disabling neurological condition in adults. Falls and poor mobility are major contributors to stroke-related disability. Falls are more frequent and more likely to result in injury among stroke survivors than among the general older population. Currently there is good evidence that exercise can enhance mobility after stroke, yet ongoing exercise programs for general community-based stroke survivors are not routinely available. This randomised controlled trial will investigate whether exercise can reduce fall rates and increase mobility and physical activity levels in stroke survivors. Three hundred and fifty community dwelling stroke survivors will be recruited. Participants will have no medical contradictions to exercise and be cognitively and physically able to complete the assessments and exercise program. After the completion of the pre-test assessment, participants will be randomly allocated to one of two intervention groups. Both intervention groups will participate in weekly group-based exercises and a home program for twelve months. In the lower limb intervention group, individualised programs of weight-bearing balance and strengthening exercises will be prescribed. The upper limb/cognition group will receive exercises aimed at management and improvement of function of the affected upper limb and cognition carried out in the seated position. The primary outcome measures will be falls (measured with 12 month calendars) and mobility. Secondary outcome measures will be risk of falling, physical activity levels, community participation, quality of life, health service utilisation, upper limb function and cognition. This study aims to establish and evaluate community-based sustainable exercise programs for stroke survivors. We will determine the effects of the exercise programs in preventing falls and enhancing mobility among people following stroke. This program, if found to be effective, has the potential to be implemented within

  1. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  2. A Power Saving Architecture for Web Access from Mobile Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Marco; Gregori, Enrico; Passarella, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    This work proposes new power-saving strategies for mobile access to the Web. User mobility is a key factor in the evolution of Web services. Unfortunately, the legacy approach for Web access is very inefficient when applied to mobile users. One of the critical issues is the inefficient usage of energetic resources when adopting the legacy TCP/IP architecture for Web access from mobile devices. In this paper we address this problem by proposing a new architecture,namely PS-Web, which works at ...

  3. What is Bobath? A survey of UK stroke physiotherapists' perceptions of the content of the Bobath concept to treat postural control and mobility problems after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Tyson, Sarah F.; Connell, L. A.; Busse, M. E.; Lennon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify which interventions used to treat postural control and mobility are considered part of the Bobath concept (BC). Design. Hospital-based UK stroke physiotherapists identified interventions which they perceived to be part of the BC from a pre-published list of interventions used to treat postural control and mobility problems. Interventions that >75% of participants felt were part of the BC were classified as 'definitely Bobath'. Interventions ...

  4. [Mobile computing systems in preclinical care of stroke. Results of the Stroke Angel initiative within the BMBF project PerCoMed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, V; Rashid, A; Müller-Gorchs, M; Kippnich, U; Hiermann, E; Kögerl, C; Holtmann, C; Siebler, M; Griewing, B

    2008-07-01

    Telemedical networks that apply innovative mobile information technologies (IT) are an innovative approach to improve stroke care in community settings. Within the German Stroke Angel initiative and the research project PerCoMed (Pervasive Computing in Medical Care, funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, http://www.percomed.de) the effects of such a solution were assessed by an interdisciplinary research approach. The main goal of the team of researchers and practitioners was to provide clear evidence of improvements in intersectional processes of the stroke chain survival, namely in the acute stroke processes between prehospital rescue services and hospital stroke units. Between October 2005 and October 2007 the paramedical staff of five rescue service transporters in a rural area of northern Bavaria was included in a network with the stroke unit of the Neurological Clinic Bad Neustadt. Telemedical support by the Stroke Angel computing system - a software running on a personal digital assistant (PDA) to transmit patient data from the rescue team to the hospital during patient transporting time - was established. As procedural guidance, the Stroke Angel system suggests a predefined path through the necessary emergency procedures according to the structure of the mandatory protocol and the implemented Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (LAPSS). In the empirical study the authors obtained a complete data set of 226 consecutively admitted patients for analysis in Bad Neustadt and LAPSS data of 217 patients from a second scenario in Düsseldorf. Medical, economic and technical analyses were applied. The technological robustness of the Stroke Angel system could be proven and information entered was transmitted fully and correctly. Concerning medical research questions, for both scenario locations LAPSS with a sensitivity of 68.3% and a specificity of 85.1% has to be deemed insufficient. Hence, alternative algorithms will have to be used in the next

  5. Mobility and power in networked European space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Tim; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper seeks to contribute to debates about how urban, social and critical theory can conceptualise the socio-technologies of connection, resilience, mobility, and collapse in contemporary urban space. The paper offers a theoretical frame for conceptualising this New Urban Condition, focusing...

  6. Mobile game-based virtual reality rehabilitation program for upper limb dysfunction after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Ku, Jeonghun; Lim, Hyunmi; Kim, Yeo Hyung; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-05-02

    Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to provide intensive, repetitive, and task-oriented training, and game-based therapy can enhance patients' motivation and enjoyment. The objective of the present study was to develop a mobile game-based upper extremity VR program for patients who have experienced stroke, and to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of the program. This randomized, double-blind, controlled trial included 24 patients with ischemic stroke. The intervention group (n = 12) received 30 min of conventional occupational therapy (OT) and 30 min of the mobile upper extremity rehabilitation program using a smartphone and a tablet PC (MoU-Rehab). The controls (n = 12) received conventional OT alone for 1 h per day. Rehabilitation consisted of 10 sessions of therapy, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks. The outcome measures (Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the upper extremity [FMA-UE], Brunnström stage [B-stage] for the arm and the hand, manual muscle testing [MMT], modified Barthel index [MBI], EuroQol-5 Dimension [EQ-5D], and Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) were assessed at the beginning and end of treatment, and at 1 month. User satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire. A greater improvement in the FMA-UE, B-stage, and MMT was found after treatment with the MoU-Rehab than with conventional therapy. The extent of improvements in the MBI, EQ-5D, and BDI was not significantly different between the two groups. Patients in the experimental group completed the 2-weeks treatment without adverse effects, and they were generally satisfied with MoU-Rehab. This mobile game-based VR rehabilitation program appears to be feasible and effective for promoting upper limb recovery after ischemic stroke.

  7. Power and signal transmission for mobile teleoperated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.C. Jr.; Hamel, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Appropriate means must be furnished for supplying power and for sending controlling commands to mobile teleoperated systems. Because a sizable number of possibilities are available for such applications, methods used in designing both the power and communications systems built into mobile vehicles that serve in radiological emergencies must be carefully selected. This paper describes a number of umbilical, on-board, and wireless systems used in tranmitting power that are available for mobile teleoperator services. The pros and cons of selecting appropriate methods from a list of possible communication systems (wired, fiber optic, and radio frequency) are also examined. Moreover, hybrid systems combining wireless power transmissions with command-information signals are also possible

  8. Low power offloading strategy for femto-cloud mobile network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwesha Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays offloading is a popular method of mobile cloud computing where the required computation takes place remotely inside the cloud. But whether to process an application inside the mobile device or to the cloud is a challenging issue because communication with the cloud involves latency and power consumption. This paper has proposed a method of decision making regarding whether to offload or not-to-offload an application to the cloud. According to the proposed strategy, application is offloaded only if it results in lower power consumption than local execution within the mobile device itself. If this condition is satisfied, computation time and deadline of the job are considered as the basic parameters to decide whether to offload or not. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed offloading algorithm reduces the power consumption to approximately 3–32%. To achieve power-efficiency and security both, femto-cloud architecture is used in the proposed work. In this case offloading from the mobile device to the cloud takes place through the low power and secure femtocell base station. Simulation results present that using femto-cloud architecture 70–83% and 52–66% power savings are achieved than using macrocell and microcell base stations respectively while offloading an application to the cloud.

  9. Systematic review of power mobility outcomes for infants, children and adolescents with mobility limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Roslyn; Field, Debra

    2014-10-01

    To summarize and critically appraise the evidence related to power mobility use in children (18 years or younger) with mobility limitations. Searches were performed in 12 electronic databases along with hand searching for articles published in English to September 2012 and updated February 2014. The search was restricted to quantitative studies including at least one child with a mobility limitation and measuring an outcome related to power mobility device use. Articles were appraised using American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) criteria for group and single-subject designs. The PRISMA statement was followed with inclusion criteria set a priori. Two reviewers independently screened titles, abstracts and full-text articles. AACPDM quality ratings were completed for levels I-III studies. Of 259 titles, 29 articles met inclusion criteria, describing 28 primary research studies. One study, rated as strong level II evidence, supported positive impact of power mobility on overall development as well as independent mobility. Another study, rated as moderate level III evidence, supported positive impact on self-initiated movement. Remaining studies, rated evidence levels IV and V, provided support for a positive impact on a broad range of outcomes from to International Classification of Functioning (ICF) components of body structure and function, activity and participation. Some studies suggest that environmental factors may be influential in successful power mobility use and skill development. The body of evidence supporting outcomes for children using power mobility is primarily descriptive rather than experimental in nature, suggesting research in this area is in its infancy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Power Mobility Training Methods for Children: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Hostnik, Lisa; McElroy, Rachel; Peterson, Courtney; Farris, John P

    2018-01-01

    To summarize and critically appraise the existing evidence related to power mobility training methods used in research studies conducted with children 21 years or younger. A systematic review was conducted using 16 electronic databases to identify primary source quantitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals. Data extraction, determination of level of evidence, evaluation of methodological rigor, and assessment of the risk of bias were completed. The Evidence Alert Traffic Light Grading System (EATLS) was used. Twenty-seven studies were included in the review. Levels of evidence were II to V; scientific rigor scores were 2 to 7. An overall Yellow EATLS level of evidence was found indicating that therapists should use caution when providing power mobility training interventions and measure outcomes related to established goals in areas such as development, functional skills, or use of a power mobility device.

  11. Power management in hydraulically actuated mobile equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    The focus of the current paper is on the control of hydraulic systems when utilizing the advances that electronic control may bring with regard to power management, prioritized flow sharing and anti-stall, arising from being able to control both pump, valves and engine electronically. A simple...... model of a backhoe loader is first presented. Based on this model and the dynamic properties of the system, a generally applicable power management algorithm is developed based on an optimization procedure, which takes into account the dynamics of the system and different modes of operation...

  12. Electric cars as mobile power storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the use of electric cars as a means of optimising the use of renewable energy sources. Charging the cars' batteries during periods when cheap electricity prices prevail and then using excess capacity to supply the mains with electricity during periods of peak demand is discussed. The possible use of wind for power generation is discussed and a system proposed by a leading supplier of electrical apparatus and systems is examined. Two examples of electric cars and associated power chains are looked at and tests in everyday practice are described

  13. The potential power of robotics for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukelow, Sean P

    2017-01-01

    Two decades of research on robots and upper extremity rehabilitation has resulted in recommendations from systematic reviews and guidelines on their use in stroke. Robotics are often cited for their ability to encourage mass practice as a means to enhance recovery of movement. Yet, stroke recovery is a complex process occurring across many aspects of neurologic function beyond movement. As newer devices are developed and enhanced assessments are integrated into treatment protocols, the potential of robotics to advance rehabilitation will continue to grow.

  14. Foot and ankle impairments affect balance and mobility in stroke (FAiMiS): the views and experiences of people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorst, Terry; Lyddon, Alison; Marsden, Jon; Paton, Joanne; Morrison, Stewart C; Cramp, Mary; Freeman, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    To explore the nature and impact of foot and ankle impairments on mobility and balance in community-dwelling, chronic stroke survivors. A qualitative research design using face to face semi-structured, audio recorded interviews. Thirteen community-dwelling stroke survivors, all of whom had self-reported foot and ankle impairments, were interviewed (female n = 6, mean age = 67 years, SD = 12 years, mean time since stroke = 4 years, SD = 6 years, right stroke n = 7, left stroke n = 6). A framework analysis approach was used to analyse and interpret transcribed interviews. Three themes emerged: (1) Impact. The influence of foot and ankle impairments on mobility and balance. (2) Standing out. How participants felt they "stood out" because of their impairments and wanted to be normal. (3) Help. The specific help and advice participants received in managing their problems. Foot and ankle impairments such as pain, altered somatosensory input and weakness significantly contribute to problems with community ambulation, balance and fear of falling in people with chronic stroke. Specific foot and ankle impairments may also negatively contribute to perceptions of physical appearance and self-esteem. Therapeutic management approaches within clinical practice appear to focus mostly on the gross performance of the lower limb with little emphasis on the specific assessment or treatment of the foot or ankle. Foot pain, sensory impairments and muscle weakness in the foot and ankle can impact on community ambulation, balance and fear of falling following stroke. Foot and ankle function post-stroke should be routinely assessed and monitored. Clinicians should be aware of the potentially distressing negative perceptions associated with altered gait patterns, footwear and orthotic use.

  15. Mobile platform for treatment of stroke: A case study of tele-assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Zenteno, Arturo Henry; Fernández, Francisco; Palomino-García, Alfredo; Moniche, Francisco; Escudero, Irene; Jiménez-Hernández, M Dolores; Caballero, Auxiliadora; Escobar-Rodriguez, Germán; Parra, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the technological solution of a tele-assistance process for stroke patients in acute phase in the Seville metropolitan area. The main objective of this process is to reduce time from symptom onset to treatment of acute phase stroke patients by means of telemedicine, regarding mobility between an intensive care unit ambulance and an expert center and activating the pre-hospital care phase. The technological platform covering the process has been defined following an interoperability model based on standards and with a focus on service-oriented architecture focus. Messaging definition has been designed according to the reference model of the CEN/ISO 13606, messages content follows the structure of archetypes. An XDS-b (Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing-b) transaction messaging has been designed according to Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise profile for archetype notifications and update enquiries.This research has been performed by a multidisciplinary group. The Virgen del Rocío University Hospital acts as Reference Hospital and the Public Company for Healthcare as mobility surroundings. PMID:25975806

  16. Power management in hydraulically actuated mobile equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    The focus of the current paper is on the control of hydraulic systems when utilizing the advances that electronic control may bring with regard to power management, prioritized flow sharing and anti-stall, arising from being able to control both pump, valves and engine electronically. A simple...

  17. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  18. Graphical analysis of power systems for mobile robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raade, Justin William

    The field of mobile robotics places stringent demands on the power system. Energetic autonomy, or the ability to function for a useful operation time independent of any tether, refueling, or recharging, is a driving force in a robot designed for a field application. The focus of this dissertation is the development of two graphical analysis tools, namely Ragone plots and optimal hybridization plots, for the design of human scale mobile robotic power systems. These tools contribute to the intuitive understanding of the performance of a power system and expand the toolbox of the design engineer. Ragone plots are useful for graphically comparing the merits of different power systems for a wide range of operation times. They plot the specific power versus the specific energy of a system on logarithmic scales. The driving equations in the creation of a Ragone plot are derived in terms of several important system parameters. Trends at extreme operation times (both very short and very long) are examined. Ragone plot analysis is applied to the design of several power systems for high-power human exoskeletons. Power systems examined include a monopropellant-powered free piston hydraulic pump, a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine with hydraulic actuators, and a fuel cell with electric actuators. Hybrid power systems consist of two or more distinct energy sources that are used together to meet a single load. They can often outperform non-hybrid power systems in low duty-cycle applications or those with widely varying load profiles and long operation times. Two types of energy sources are defined: engine-like and capacitive. The hybridization rules for different combinations of energy sources are derived using graphical plots of hybrid power system mass versus the primary system power. Optimal hybridization analysis is applied to several power systems for low-power human exoskeletons. Hybrid power systems examined include a fuel cell and a solar panel coupled with

  19. Wireless power transfer for electric vehicles and mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rim, Chun T

    2017-01-01

    From mobile, cable-free re-charging of electric vehicles, smart phones and laptops to collecting solar electricity from orbiting solar farms, wireless power transfer (WPT) technologies offer consumers and society enormous benefits. Written by innovators in the field, this comprehensive resource explains the fundamental principles and latest advances in WPT and illustrates key applications of this emergent technology.

  20. What is Bobath? A survey of UK stroke physiotherapists' perceptions of the content of the Bobath concept to treat postural control and mobility problems after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, S F; Connell, L A; Busse, M E; Lennon, S

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify which interventions used to treat postural control and mobility are considered part of the Bobath concept (BC). DESIGN. Hospital-based UK stroke physiotherapists identified interventions which they perceived to be part of the BC from a pre-published list of interventions used to treat postural control and mobility problems. Interventions that > 75% of participants felt were part of the BC were classified as 'definitely Bobath'. Interventions that Bobath'. Other interventions were classified as 'unsure'; those indentified by 50-74% of participants as part of the BC were classified as 'probably Bobath' and those indentified 26-49% were classified as 'probably not Bobath'. Seventy-four physiotherapists from 33 hospitals participated. Facilitation, mobilizations and practicing components of activities were most strongly associated with the BC. Exercise and the use of equipment were identified as 'not' or 'probably not Bobath'. There was uncertainty about practicing activities, teaching patients and carers and arranging independent practice. UK stroke physiotherapists perceive that the BC involves interventions that focus on facilitating movement, mobilization, practicing components of activities and some whole activities. Their views about what is not part of the BC and the areas where they are uncertain contrast with British and international teachers of the BC. Consequently, it was not possible to define a 'typical package' of treatment for postural control and mobility that represents the BC. Future research into the BC should focus on the effectiveness of specific, well-defined interventions.

  1. Determinants of mobility and self-care in older people with stroke: importance of somatosensory and perceptual functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; von Arbin, Magnus; Murray, Veronica; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2007-12-01

    Somatosensory as well as mental impairments are easily overlooked after acute stroke. Furthermore, their associations with activity limitations are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to examine this association and whether the assessment of somatosensory functions will provide information on perceptual functions after acute stroke. In 115 subjects who were > or =65 years of age, the following parameters were assessed 5 days after stroke: somatosensory (touch and proprioceptive), perceptual, and cognitive functions; depressive symptoms; mobility; and self-care. Multivariate analyses showed that normal proprioceptive function was significantly associated with better mobility. Normal perceptual and touch functions were significantly associated with better self-care. Subjects with normal proprioceptive function were 8.6 times as likely to have normal perceptual function as subjects with proprioceptive impairment. Somatosensory and perceptual functions were significantly associated with subjects' activity levels. Normal proprioceptive function also might indicate normal perceptual function.

  2. Autonomous Power Control MAC Protocol for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Battery energy limitation has become a performance bottleneck for mobile ad hoc networks. IEEE 802.11 has been adopted as the current standard MAC protocol for ad hoc networks. However, it was developed without considering energy efficiency. To solve this problem, many modifications on IEEE 802.11 to incorporate power control have been proposed in the literature. The main idea of these power control schemes is to use a maximum possible power level for transmitting RTS/CTS and the lowest acceptable power for sending DATA/ACK. However, these schemes may degrade network throughput and reduce the overall energy efficiency of the network. This paper proposes autonomous power control MAC protocol (APCMP, which allows mobile nodes dynamically adjusting power level for transmitting DATA/ACK according to the distances between the transmitter and its neighbors. In addition, the power level for transmitting RTS/CTS is also adjustable according to the power level for DATA/ACK packets. In this paper, the performance of APCMP protocol is evaluated by simulation and is compared with that of other protocols.

  3. Comparison of Mobilizing and Immobilizing Splints on Hand Motor Function in Stroke Patients: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Heydari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Among several methods for the treatment of wrist-fingers motor function impairment after stroke, splinting is a method commonly used as complementary option. But there are so many controversies surrounding its efficacy. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of mobilizing and immobilizing splints on wrist-fingers motor function after stroke. Methods: In this experimental study, 31 stroke patients were selected and divided randomly into three groups including: mobilizing splint, immobilizing splint and control group. Participants in intervention groups wore their own splints for eight weeks, five days per week and on average six hours per day. Motor function was measured at baseline and the eighth week by fugl-meyer (FM scale. The one-way ANOVA was used to compare scores of FM scale between three groups. Results: Data analysis showed significant increase in motor function only in mobilizing splint group (p=0/001 and this increase was significant compared with other groups (p=0/001. Conclusion: Based on these findings, using a mobilizing splint compared with immobilizing splint could have better functional results for treating wrist and finger motor impairment in post-stroke patients.

  4. Comparison of Mobilizing and Immobilizing Splints on Hand Motor Function in Stroke Patients: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Fard H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Among several methods for the treatment of wrist-fingers motor function impairment after stroke, splinting is a method commonly used as complementary option. But there are so many controversies surrounding its efficacy. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of mobilizing and immobilizing splints on wrist-fingers motor function after stroke.Methods: In this experimental study, 31 stroke patients were selected and divided randomly into three groups including: mobilizing splint, immobilizing splint and control group. Participants in intervention groups wore their own splints for eight weeks, five days per week and on average six hours per day. Motor function was measured at baseline and the eighth week by fugl-meyer (FM scale. The one-way ANOVA was used to compare scores of FM scale between three groups.Results: Data analysis showed significant increase in motor function only in mobilizing splint group (p=0/001 and this increase was significant compared with other groups (p=0/001.Conclusion: Based on these findings, using a mobilizing splint compared with immobilizing splint could have better functional results for treating wrist and finger motor impairment in post-stroke patients.

  5. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells and therapeutic potential of parathyroid hormone after ischemic stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wang

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major neurovascular disorder threatening human life and health. Very limited clinical treatments are currently available for stroke patients. Stem cell transplantation has shown promising potential as a regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke. The present investigation explores a new concept of mobilizing endogenous stem cells/progenitor cells from the bone marrow using a parathyroid hormone (PTH therapy after ischemic stroke in adult mice. PTH 1-34 (80 µg/kg, i.p. was administered 1 hour after focal ischemia and then daily for 6 consecutive days. After 6 days of PTH treatment, there was a significant increase in bone marrow derived CD-34/Fetal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1 positive endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in the peripheral blood. PTH treatment significantly increased the expression of trophic/regenerative factors including VEGF, SDF-1, BDNF and Tie-1 in the brain peri-infarct region. Angiogenesis, assessed by co-labeled Glut-1 and BrdU vessels, was significantly increased in PTH-treated ischemic brain compared to vehicle controls. PTH treatment also promoted neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone (SVZ and increased the number of newly formed neurons in the peri-infarct cortex. PTH-treated mice showed significantly better sensorimotor functional recovery compared to stroke controls. Our data suggests that PTH therapy improves endogenous repair mechanisms after ischemic stroke with functional benefits. Mobilizing endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells/progenitor cells using PTH and other mobilizers appears an effective and feasible regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke.

  6. Observations on Power-Efficiency Trends in Mobile Communication Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Jyrkkä

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Computing solutions used in mobile communications equipment are similar to those in personal and mainframe computers. The key differences between the implementations at chip level are the low leakage silicon technology and lower clock frequency used in mobile devices. The hardware and software architectures, including the operating system principles, are strikingly similar, although the mobile computing systems tend to rely more on hardware accelerators. As the performance expectations of mobile devices are increasing towards the personal computer level and beyond, power efficiency is becoming a major bottleneck. So far, the improvements of the silicon processes in mobile phones have been exploited by software designers to increase functionality and to cut development time, while usage times, and energy efficiency, have been kept at levels that satisfy the customers. Here we explain some of the observed developments and consider means of improving energy efficiency. We show that both processor and software architectures have a big impact on power consumption. Properly targeted research is needed to find the means to explicitly optimize system designs for energy efficiency, rather than maximize the nominal throughputs of the processor cores used.

  7. Observations on Power-Efficiency Trends in Mobile Communication Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrkkä Kari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Computing solutions used in mobile communications equipment are similar to those in personal and mainframe computers. The key differences between the implementations at chip level are the low leakage silicon technology and lower clock frequency used in mobile devices. The hardware and software architectures, including the operating system principles, are strikingly similar, although the mobile computing systems tend to rely more on hardware accelerators. As the performance expectations of mobile devices are increasing towards the personal computer level and beyond, power efficiency is becoming a major bottleneck. So far, the improvements of the silicon processes in mobile phones have been exploited by software designers to increase functionality and to cut development time, while usage times, and energy efficiency, have been kept at levels that satisfy the customers. Here we explain some of the observed developments and consider means of improving energy efficiency. We show that both processor and software architectures have a big impact on power consumption. Properly targeted research is needed to find the means to explicitly optimize system designs for energy efficiency, rather than maximize the nominal throughputs of the processor cores used.

  8. Complex Mobile Independent Power Station for Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunik, A. A.; Tolstoy, M. Y.

    2017-11-01

    A new type of a complex mobile independent power station developed in the Department of Engineering Communications and Life-Support Systems of Irkutsk National Research Technical University, is presented in this article. This station contains only solar panel, wind turbine, accumulator, diesel generator and microbial fuel cell for to produce electric energy, heat pump and solar collector to generate heat energy and also wastewater treatment plant and new complex control system. The complex mobile independent power station is intended for full power supply of a different kind of consumers located even in remote areas thus reducing their dependence from centralized energy supply systems, decrease the fossil fuel consumption, improve the environment of urban areas and solve the problems of the purification of industrial and municipal wastewater.

  9. Powered robotic exoskeletons in post-stroke rehabilitation of gait: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dennis R; Eng, Janice J

    2016-06-08

    Powered robotic exoskeletons are a potential intervention for gait rehabilitation in stroke to enable repetitive walking practice to maximize neural recovery. As this is a relatively new technology for stroke, a scoping review can help guide current research and propose recommendations for advancing the research development. The aim of this scoping review was to map the current literature surrounding the use of robotic exoskeletons for gait rehabilitation in adults post-stroke. Five databases (Pubmed, OVID MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials) were searched for articles from inception to October 2015. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to identify additional studies. Articles were included if they utilized a robotic exoskeleton as a gait training intervention for adult stroke survivors and reported walking outcome measures. Of 441 records identified, 11 studies, all published within the last five years, involving 216 participants met the inclusion criteria. The study designs ranged from pre-post clinical studies (n = 7) to controlled trials (n = 4); five of the studies utilized a robotic exoskeleton device unilaterally, while six used a bilateral design. Participants ranged from sub-acute (6 months) stroke. Training periods ranged from single-session to 8-week interventions. Main walking outcome measures were gait speed, Timed Up and Go, 6-min Walk Test, and the Functional Ambulation Category. Meaningful improvement with exoskeleton-based gait training was more apparent in sub-acute stroke compared to chronic stroke. Two of the four controlled trials showed no greater improvement in any walking outcomes compared to a control group in chronic stroke. In conclusion, clinical trials demonstrate that powered robotic exoskeletons can be used safely as a gait training intervention for stroke. Preliminary findings suggest that exoskeletal gait training is equivalent to traditional therapy for chronic stroke

  10. Mobility training using a bionic knee orthosis in patients in a post-stroke chronic state: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, Nancy N

    2012-07-23

    An emerging area of neurorehabilitation is the use of robotic devices to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of lower extremity physical therapy post-stroke. Many of the robotic devices currently available rely on computer-driven locomotive algorithms combined with partial bodyweight-supported treadmill training that drive reflex stepping with minimal patient intention during therapy. In this case series, we examined the effect of task-oriented mobility training in patients in a post-stroke chronic state using a novel, wearable, mobile, intention-based robotic leg orthosis. Three individuals, all of whom had reached a plateau with conventional bodyweight-supported treadmill training, participated in task-oriented mobility therapy (1.5 hours, two to four times per week for four weeks) with a robotic leg orthosis under supervision by a physical therapist. Participant 1 was a 59-year-old Caucasian man, who had an ischemic left stroke six years previously with resultant right hemiparesis. Participant 2 was a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with left hemiparesis after a right stroke 15 months previously. Participant 3 was a 62-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm with third degree sub-arachnoid hemorrhage 10 years ago.Immediately after training, all participants demonstrated improved gait speed (10 meter walk), stride length and walking endurance (6 minute walk) compared with baseline measurements. Improvements were maintained one month after training. Timed up and go and five times sit-to-stand were maintained for all three participants, with only one individual remaining outside the safety performance norm. Lower extremity training integrating an intention-based robotic leg orthosis may improve gait speed, endurance and community levels of participation in select patients in a post-stroke chronic state after plateauing within a bodyweight-supported treadmill training program. The wearable, mobile assistive robotic device

  11. Power And Propulsion Systems For Mobile Robotic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layuan, Li; Haiming, Zou

    1987-02-01

    Choosing the best power and propulsion systems for mobile robotic land vehicle applications requires consideration of technologies. The electric power requirements for onboard electronic and auxiliary equipment include 110/220 volt 60 Hz ac power as well as low voltage dc power. Weight and power are saved by either direct dc power distribution, or high frequency (20 kHz) ac power distribution. Vehicle control functions are performed electronically but steering, braking and traction power may be distributed electrically, mechanically or by fluid (hydraulic) means. Electric drive is practical, even for small vehicles, provided that advanced electric motors are used. Such electric motors have demonstrated power densities of 3.1 kilowatts per kilogram with devices in the 15 kilowatt range. Electric motors have a lower torque, but higher power density as compared to hydraulic or mechanical transmission systems. Power density being comparable, electric drives were selected to best meet the other requirements for robotic vehicles. Two robotic vehicle propulsion system designs are described to illustrate the implementation of electric drive over a vehicle size range of 250-7500 kilograms.

  12. Power Management of Hybrid Power Systems with Li-Fe Batteries and Supercapacitors for Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Guohui Wang; Zhiquan Dai; Yong Guan; Pengfei Dong; Lifeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an energy management strategy of a Li-Fe battery and supercapacitor hybrid power system to provide both high power density and energy density for mobile robots with fluctuating workloads. A two-phase power-optimization approach is proposed to exploit the high power density of supercapacitors and the high energy density of Li-Fe batteries. With our strategy, large peak power can be provided for a short time period whenever needed, while low power can be provided for very lo...

  13. The Effects of POWER Training in Young and Older Adults after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Hunnicutt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Approximately 35,000 strokes occur annually in adults below the age of 40, and there is disappointingly little data describing their responses to rehabilitation. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effects of Poststroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance (POWER training in young (60 years adults and to describe relationships between training-induced improvements in muscular and locomotor function. Methods. Data was analyzed from 16 individuals with chronic stroke who participated in 24 sessions of POWER training. Outcomes included muscle power generation, self-selected walking speed (SSWS, 6-minute walk test, Fugl-Meyer motor assessment, Berg Balance Scale, and Dynamic Gait Index. Results. There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. Within-group comparisons revealed significant improvements in paretic and nonparetic knee extensor muscle power generation in both groups. Additionally, young participants significantly improved SSWS. Improvements in SSWS were more strongly associated with improvements in power generation on both sides in young versus older participants. Conclusions. Younger adults after stroke seem to preferentially benefit from POWER training, particularly when increasing gait speed is a rehabilitation goal. Future research should aim to further understand age-related differences in response to training to provide optimal treatments for all individuals following stroke.

  14. Mobile tablet-based therapies following stroke: a systematic scoping review protocol of attempted interventions and the challenges encountered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Michael; Johnson, Dylan; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Ramsay, Tim

    2017-11-02

    Stroke is a growing global epidemic limiting the ability of millions to function independently due to post-stroke deficits and complications. Although specialized stroke rehabilitation improves the recovery of functional abilities, accessing rehabilitation services has become increasingly challenging as the number of stroke survivors continues to increase and rehabilitation resources remain scarce. Mobile tablet-based therapies (MTBTs) may be a resource-efficient platform for providing stroke rehabilitation services. The feasibility and challenges of offering MTBTs to stroke survivors should be well understood before expensive, large-scale clinical trials are undertaken to study treatment efficacy. A systematic scoping review will be conducted to describe attempted MTBTs following stroke and the challenges encountered by survivors and study staff. Studies of interest will evaluate MTBTs offered to adult stroke patients in response to post-stroke complications or deficits. Journal databases, gray literature sources, clinical trial registries, relevant organizational websites, and reference lists of eligible studies will be searched to identify suitable studies. Study characteristics, barriers to care, methodological challenges, patient-reported outcomes, and health outcomes will be extracted to describe MTBTs and understand the challenges encountered in context. Results will be presented using descriptive statistics, tables, figures, and narrative description to summarize the scope of the field. Trends in MTBT feasibility and common challenges will be discussed to summarize major findings and highlight research gaps. Solutions to common challenges experienced by intervention participants and study staff will be proposed. Implications for the conduct of randomized clinical trials of MTBT efficacy and the appropriateness of a systematic review and meta-analysis of completed trials will be discussed. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: uO Research ( http

  15. A neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton to assist walking post-stroke: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Lewek, Michael D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-02-25

    In persons post-stroke, diminished ankle joint function can contribute to inadequate gait propulsion. To target paretic ankle impairments, we developed a neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton. Specifically, this exoskeleton supplies plantarflexion assistance that is proportional to the user's paretic soleus electromyography (EMG) amplitude only during a phase of gait when the stance limb is subjected to an anteriorly directed ground reaction force (GRF). The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine the short-term effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on the mechanics and energetics of gait. Five subjects with stroke walked with a powered ankle exoskeleton on the paretic limb for three 5 minute sessions. We analyzed the peak paretic ankle plantarflexion moment, paretic ankle positive work, symmetry of GRF propulsion impulse, and net metabolic power. The exoskeleton increased the paretic plantarflexion moment by 16% during the powered walking trials relative to unassisted walking condition (p exoskeleton assistance appeared to reduce the net metabolic power gradually with each 5 minute repetition, though no statistical significance was found. In three of the subjects, the paretic soleus activation during the propulsion phase of stance was reduced during the powered assistance compared to unassisted walking (35% reduction in the integrated EMG amplitude during the third powered session). This feasibility study demonstrated that the exoskeleton can enhance paretic ankle moment. Future studies with greater sample size and prolonged sessions are warranted to evaluate the effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on overall gait outcomes in persons post-stroke.

  16. Mobile radiological monitoring around Nuclear Power Plant site at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.S.; Saindane, S.S.; Sharma, R.; Suri, M.M.K.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Rao, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Real time mobile radiological monitoring around nuclear facilities is required for establishing background radiation dose rate data and to detect any increase in the radiation level which is attributable to the atmospheric releases from Nuclear facilities. Mobile radiation survey using mobile monitoring systems was carried out in the Emergency Planning Zone around Tarapur Atomic Power station during plant operation, taking the wind direction also into consideration. For identifying the potential difficulties during an emergency scenario and to understand the variation of the measured values several systems/instruments were used simultaneously for mapping the dose rates. As demonstrated during this monitoring programme, 40mm x 40mm NaI(Tl) detector based Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS) which is attached with a GPS can acquire and store large amount of gamma spectra tagged with positional coordinates and can enhance the capacity of decision makers during any accidental situation. The average of dose rates measured from various locations around Tarapur Atomic Power Station is 70 - 80 nGy.h -1 . The higher dose rate in the range of 110-125 nGy.h -1 measured at one of the location is due to higher concentration of natural radioactivity mainly by 40 K which was confirmed by the gamma spectrometric measurement. (author)

  17. Effects of an aquatic therapy approach (Halliwick-Therapy) on functional mobility in subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Florian; Krakow, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of an aquatic physiotherapy method (Halliwick-Therapy) upon mobility in the post-acute phase of stroke rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Hospital for neurological rehabilitation. Adult patients after first-ever stroke in post-acute inpatient rehabilitation at least two weeks after the onset of stroke (n = 30). In the Halliwick-Therapy group (n = 14) the treatment over a period of two weeks included 45 minutes of aquatic therapy three times per week and a conventional physiotherapeutic treatment twice a week. Subjects in the control group (n = 16) received conventional physiotherapeutic treatment over a period of two weeks five times per week. The primary outcome variable was postural stability (Berg Balance Scale). Secondary outcome variables were functional reach, functional gait ability and basic functional mobility. Compared to the control group, significantly more subjects in the Halliwick-Therapy group (83.3% versus 46.7%) attained significant improvement of the Berg Balance Scale (P Halliwick-Therapy group (mean (SD) 1.25(0.86)) than in the control group (mean (SD) 0.73 (0.70)) (P Halliwick-Therapy is safe and well tolerated in stroke patients in post-acute rehabilitation and has positive effects upon some aspects of mobility.

  18. Power Management of Hybrid Power Systems with Li-Fe Batteries and Supercapacitors for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an energy management strategy of a Li-Fe battery and supercapacitor hybrid power system to provide both high power density and energy density for mobile robots with fluctuating workloads. A two-phase power-optimization approach is proposed to exploit the high power density of supercapacitors and the high energy density of Li-Fe batteries. With our strategy, large peak power can be provided for a short time period whenever needed, while low power can be provided for very long time. A set of experiments have been conducted. The experimental results show that our strategy can effectively improve the performance of mobile robots and extend the lifetime of batteries.

  19. Spectrum Reorganization and Bundling for Power Efficient Mobile Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micallef, Gilbert; Mogensen, Preben; Scheck, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    within a specific frequency band. Since some access technologies have spectrum split onto multiple bands, this results in operators installing multiple modules for each access technology. This paper quantifies the power savings that can be achieved by assuming that the available spectrum for an operator...... in the elimination of at least four separate modules in each site, reducing the power consumption of by 31%. Indirectly, this also translates into a reduced site space of 40%. These savings are crucial for mobile network operators to reach the energy and carbon emission targets they have committed for....

  20. Disciplinary power and the process of training informal carers on stroke units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Euan; Hawkins, Rebecca; Clarke, David J; Godfrey, Mary; Dickerson, Josie; McKevitt, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the process of training informal carers on stroke units using the lens of power. Care is usually assumed as a kinship obligation but the state has long had an interest in framing the carer and caring work. Training carers in healthcare settings raises questions about the power of the state and healthcare professionals as its agents to shape expectations and practices related to the caring role. Drawing on Foucault's notion of disciplinary power, we show how disciplinary forms of power exercised in interactions between healthcare professionals and carers shape the engagement and resistance of carers in the process of training. Interview and observational field note extracts are drawn from a multi-sited study of a training programme on stroke units targeting family carers of people with stroke to consider the consequences of subjecting caring to this intervention. We found that the process of training informal carers on stroke units was not simply a matter of transferring skills from professional to lay person, but entailed disciplinary forms of power intended to shape the conduct of the carer. We interrogate the extent to which a specific kind of carer is produced through such an approach, and the wider implications for the participation of carers in training in healthcare settings and the empowerment of carers. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  1. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  2. Clinical Information Systems Integration in New York City's First Mobile Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Lerario, Michael P; Navi, Babak B; Ganzman, Adam C; Ribaudo, Daniel; Mir, Saad A; Pishanidar, Sammy; Lekic, Tim; Williams, Olajide; Kamel, Hooman; Marshall, Randolph S; Hripcsak, George; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Fink, Matthew E

    2018-01-01

    Mobile stroke units (MSUs) reduce time to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. These units are widely used, but the clinical information systems underlying MSU operations are understudied.  The first MSU on the East Coast of the United States was established at New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYP) in October 2016. We describe our program's 7-month pilot, focusing on the integration of our hospital's clinical information systems into our MSU to support patient care and research efforts.  NYP's MSU was staffed by two paramedics, one radiology technologist, and a vascular neurologist. The unit was equipped with four laptop computers and networking infrastructure enabling all staff to access the hospital intranet and clinical applications during operating hours. A telephone-based registration procedure registered patients from the field into our admit/discharge/transfer system, which interfaced with the institutional electronic health record (EHR). We developed and implemented a computerized physician order entry set in our EHR with prefilled values to permit quick ordering of medications, imaging, and laboratory testing. We also developed and implemented a structured clinician note to facilitate care documentation and clinical data extraction.  Our MSU began operating on October 3, 2016. As of April 27, 2017, the MSU transported 49 patients, of whom 16 received tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Zero technical problems impacting patient care were reported around registration, order entry, or intranet access. Two onboard network failures occurred, resulting in computed tomography scanner malfunctions, although no patients became ineligible for time-sensitive treatment as a result. Thirteen (26.5%) clinical notes contained at least one incomplete time field.  The main technical challenges encountered during the integration of our hospital's clinical information systems into our MSU were onboard network failures and incomplete clinical

  3. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion...... for all students and scholars with an interest in the ‘mobilities turn’ and its contributions to a deeper understanding of the contemporary and mobile world. The entries chosen all are amongst the most creative, thought provoking, and thoughtful of this diverse field of analysis and thought. The selection...

  4. Attractive Mobile Corridors - The Power of Light Rail Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Light rail is a popular tool in urban development strategies in many European cities. One argument for choosing a rail-based solution is that it signals stability to investors and will attract development and investments in the corridor. The choice of corridor in the various light rail cities...... are based on different rationalities: generating urban growth by investments in new housing and businesses, regeneration of urban space, facilitation for a car-free urban lifestyle etc. The main argument of this paper is that light rail corridors are not only providing access, but also gentrifies...... and redistributes urban space. Furthermore light rail is not only a physical infrastructure but also an infrastructure of power that is carefully planned and designed creating both mental and physical patterns of mobilities and immobilities. Hence it is important to underline that mobility systems, such as light...

  5. Mobile Real-time Tracking of Acute Stroke Patients and Instant, Secure Inter-team Communication - the Join App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munich, Stephan A; Tan, Lee A; Nogueira, Danilo M; Keigher, Kiffon M; Chen, Michael; Crowley, R Webster; Conners, James J; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2017-09-01

    The primary correlate to survival and preservation of neurologic function in patients suffering from an acute ischemic stroke is time from symptom onset to initiation of therapy and reperfusion. Communication and coordination among members of the stroke team are essential to maximizing efficiency and subsequently early reperfusion. In this work, we aim to describe our preliminary experience using the Join mobile application as a means to improve interdisciplinary team communication and efficiency. We describe our pilot experience with the initiation of the Join mobile application between July 2015 and July 2016. With this application, a mobile beacon is transported with the patient on the ambulance. Transportation milestone timestamps and geographic coordinates are transmitted to the treating facility and instantly communicated to all treatment team members. The transport team / patient can be tracked en route to the treating facility. During our pilot study, 62 patients were triaged and managed using the Join application. Automated time-stamping of critical events, geographic tracking of patient transport and summary documents were obtained for all patients. Treatment team members had an overall favorable impression of the Join application and recommended its continued use. The Join application is one of several components of a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary effort to improve the treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The ability of the treatment team to track patient transport and communicate with the transporting team may improve reperfusion time and, therefore, improve neurologic outcomes.

  6. Stirling Isotope Power Systems for Stationary and Mobile Lunar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) places a significant emphasis on the development of a wide range of capabilities on the lunar surface as a stepping-stone to further space exploration. An important aspect of developing these capabilities will be the availability of reliable, efficient, and low-mass power systems to support both stationary and mobile applications. One candidate system to provide electrical power is made by coupling the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) with a high-performance Stirling convertor. In this paper we explore the practical power range of GPHS/Stirling convertor systems all with conductively coupled hot-end designs for use on the lunar surface. Design and off-design operations during the life of the convertor are studied in addition to considering these varying conditions on system. Unique issues concerning Stirling convertor configurations, integration of the GPHS with the Stirling convertor, controller operation, waste heat rejection, and thermal protection are explored. Of particular importance in the evaluation process is a thorough understanding of the interactions between the wide range of unique lunar environments and the selection of key systems operating characteristics and the power systems design. Additionally, as power levels rise the interface between the GPHS and Stirling and the Stirling and the radiator begins to dominate system mass and material selection becomes more important.

  7. Flexible power and bandwidth allocation in mobile satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, L. A.

    The introduction of L-band mobile communication services by spot beam satellites creates a payload design challenge due to uncertainty in the location and size of the new market to be served. A combination of payload technologies that allow a flexible allocation of power and bandwidth to any portion of the coverage area is described. Power flexibility is achieved by a novel combination of a low-level beam-forming network and a matrix power module which ensures equal sharing of power among individual amplifiers. This eliminates the loss of efficiency and increased mass when an amplifier associated with a beam must be over-designed to meet uncertainties in power distribution between beams. Flexibility in allocation of bandwidth to beams is achieved by intermediate frequency subdivision of the L-band service categories defined by ITU. These spectral subdivisions are assigned to beams by an IF interconnect matrix having beam ports and filter ports as inputs and outputs, respectively. Two such filter switch matrices are required, one for the inbound L-band to feeder link transponder, and one for the outbound feeder link to L-band transponder.

  8. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage compartment...

  9. Mobility training using a bionic knee orthosis in patients in a post-stroke chronic state: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byl Nancy N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction An emerging area of neurorehabilitation is the use of robotic devices to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of lower extremity physical therapy post-stroke. Many of the robotic devices currently available rely on computer-driven locomotive algorithms combined with partial bodyweight-supported treadmill training that drive reflex stepping with minimal patient intention during therapy. In this case series, we examined the effect of task-oriented mobility training in patients in a post-stroke chronic state using a novel, wearable, mobile, intention-based robotic leg orthosis. Case presentation Three individuals, all of whom had reached a plateau with conventional bodyweight-supported treadmill training, participated in task-oriented mobility therapy (1.5 hours, two to four times per week for four weeks with a robotic leg orthosis under supervision by a physical therapist. Participant 1 was a 59-year-old Caucasian man, who had an ischemic left stroke six years previously with resultant right hemiparesis. Participant 2 was a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with left hemiparesis after a right stroke 15 months previously. Participant 3 was a 62-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm with third degree sub-arachnoid hemorrhage 10 years ago. Immediately after training, all participants demonstrated improved gait speed (10 meter walk, stride length and walking endurance (6 minute walk compared with baseline measurements. Improvements were maintained one month after training. Timed up and go and five times sit-to-stand were maintained for all three participants, with only one individual remaining outside the safety performance norm. Conclusions Lower extremity training integrating an intention-based robotic leg orthosis may improve gait speed, endurance and community levels of participation in select patients in a post-stroke chronic state after plateauing within a bodyweight

  10. Do Smartphone Power Users Protect Mobile Privacy Better than Nonpower Users? Exploring Power Usage as a Factor in Mobile Privacy Protection and Disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunjin; Shin, Wonsun

    2016-03-01

    This study examines how consumers' competence at using smartphone technology (i.e., power usage) affects their privacy protection behaviors. A survey conducted with smartphone users shows that power usage influences privacy protection behavior not only directly but also indirectly through privacy concerns and trust placed in mobile service providers. A follow-up experiment indicates that the effects of power usage on smartphone users' information management can be a function of content personalization. Users, high on power usage, are less likely to share personal information on personalized mobile sites, but they become more revealing when they interact with nonpersonalized mobile sites.

  11. Manual mobilization of the wrist: a pilot study in rehabilitation of patients with a chronic hemiplegic hand post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedes, Fred; van der Salm, Arjan; Koel, Gerard; Oosterveld, Frits

    2014-01-01

    Prospective pilot cohort study, quasi-experimental design. Restricted hand mobility, limitation in activities and participation, due to relative immobilization of the hemiplegic hand are frequently reported after stroke. To establish whether manual mobilization of the wrist has an additional value in the treatment of the hemiplegic hand. Eighteen patients received treatment twice a week for a period of 6 weeks. Both treatment groups received therapy based upon the Dutch guidelines for stroke. In the intervention group, a 10-min manual mobilization of the wrist was integrated. The primary outcomes were active and passive wrist mobility and activity limitation. The secondary outcomes were spasticity, grip strength, and pain. Data were collected at 0, 6 and 10 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman's test, related t-test, Wilcoxon test, independent t-test, and Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistically significant differences were found in the intervention group; between T0 and T2 measurements in active wrist extension (+18°; p hand. Replication of the results is needed in a large scale randomized controlled trial. 4. Copyright © 2014 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Integration of Pneumatic Technology in Powered Mobility Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveler, Brandon; Wang, Hongwu; Gebrosky, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G; Schneider, Urs; Cooper, Rory A

    2017-01-01

    Advances in electric motors, electronics, and control systems have enhanced the capability and drivability of electric power mobility devices over the last 60 years. Yet, battery technologies used in powered mobility devices (PMDs) have not kept pace. Recent advances in pneumatic technology, primarily the high torque, low speed design of rotary piston air motors, directly align with the needs of PMD. Pneumatic technology has advantages over battery-powered technology, including lighter weight, lower operating costs, decreased environmental impact, better reliability, and increased safety. Two prototypes were created that incorporated rotary piston air motors, high-pressure air tanks, and air-pressure regulators. Prototype 1 was created by modifying an existing electric PMD. Range tests were performed to determine the feasibility of pneumatic technology and the optimal combination of components to allow the longest range possible at acceptable speeds over ideal conditions. Using a 1.44 L air tank for feasibility testing, prototype 1 was capable of traveling 800 m, which confirmed the feasibility of pneumatic technology usage in PMDs. Prototype 2 was designed based on the testing results from prototype 1. After further optimization of prototype 2, the average maximum range was 3,150 m. Prototype 2 is up to 28.3% lighter than an equivalent size electric PMD and can be fully recharged in approximately 2 minutes. It decreases the cost of PMDs by approximately $1,500, because batteries do not need to be replaced over the lifetime of the device. The results provide justification for the use of pneumatic technology in PMDs.

  13. Efficacy of virtual reality-based intervention on balance and mobility disorders post-stroke: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darekar, Anuja; McFadyen, Bradford J; Lamontagne, Anouk; Fung, Joyce

    2015-05-10

    Rehabilitation interventions involving virtual reality (VR) technology have been developed for the promotion of functional independence post stroke. A scoping review was performed to examine the efficacy of VR-based interventions on balance and mobility disorders post stroke. Twenty-four articles in the English language examining VR game-based interventions and outcomes directed at balance and mobility disorders were included. Various VR systems (customized and commercially available) were used as rehabilitation tools. Outcome measures included laboratory and clinical measures of balance and gait. Outcome measures of dynamic balance showed significant improvements following VR-based interventions as compared to other interventions. Further, it was observed that VR-based intervention may have favorable effects in improving walking speed and the ability to deal with environmental challenges, which may also facilitate independent community ambulation. VR-based therapy thus has the potential to be a useful tool for balance and gait training for stroke rehabilitation. Utilization of motor learning principles related to task-related training may have been an important factor leading to positive results. Other principles such as repetition, feedback etc. were used in studies but were not explored explicitly and may need to be investigated to further improve the strength of results. Lastly, robust study designs with appropriate attention towards the intensity and dose-response aspects of VR training, clear study objectives and suitable outcomes would further aid in determining evidence-based efficacy for VR game-based interventions in the future.

  14. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance, strength, and mobility of an older adult with chronic stroke: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayco, Christopher S; Gorgon, Edward James R; Lazaro, Rolando T

    2017-10-01

    This study described the effects of a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) program on balance, strength, and mobility in an older adult with chronic stroke. The patient was male, aged 69 years, with right hemiplegia for 17 years, and had diminished balance, balance confidence, lower extremity (LE) strength, and gait velocity. He received 1 h of PNF-based therapy thrice a week for six weeks. Outcome measures were: Mini-BESTest, limits of stability (LOS), Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), Five Time Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST), Upright Motor Control Test (UMCT), and 10 Meter Walk Test (10 MWT). The patient improved on the Mini-BESTest (25/28, from 21/28), FTSST (27.47 s, from 30.27 s), UMCT knee extension (moderate, from weak), and 10 MWT (0.82 m/s, from 0.67 m/s); and positive changes in LOS dimensions. PNF was effective in enhancing balance, strength, and mobility in an older adult with chronic stroke and may mitigate falls risk in this population. More research is needed to determine its impact in a larger sample of older people with chronic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynein-deficient flagella respond to increased viscosity with contrasting changes in power and recovery strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kate S; Gonzalez, Olivia; Dutcher, Susan K; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-09-01

    Changes in the flagellar waveform in response to increased viscosity were investigated in uniflagellate mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We hypothesized that the waveforms of mutants lacking different dynein arms would change in different ways as viscosity was increased, and that these variations would illuminate the feedback pathways from force to dynein activity. Previous studies have investigated the effects of viscosity on cell body motion, propulsive force, and power in different mutants, but the effect on waveform has not yet been fully characterized. Beat frequency decreases with viscosity in wild-type uniflagellate (uni1) cells, and outer dynein arm deficient (oda2) mutants. In contrast, the inner dynein arm mutant ida1 (lacking I1/f) maintains beat frequency at high viscosity but alters its flagellar waveform more than either wild-type or oda2. The ida1 waveform is narrower than wild-type, primarily due to an abbreviated recovery stroke; this difference is amplified at high viscosity. The oda2 mutant in contrast, maintains a consistent waveform at high and low viscosity with a slightly longer power stroke than wild-type. Analysis of the delays and shear displacements between bends suggest that direct force feedback in the outer dynein arm system may initiate switching of dynein activity. In contrast, I1/f dynein appears to delay switching, most markedly at the initiation of the power stroke, possibly by controlling inter-doublet separation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Research on DTX Technology and Power Consumption Performance of Mobile Communication Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Shui Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the power consumption of GSM and TD-SCDMA mobile communication system terminal, the paper starts with DTX (Discontinuous Transmission technology of GSM and TD-SCDMA systems, offers a detailed analysis of the DTX’s function in optimizing power consumption of GSM and TDSCDMA mobile communication system terminal and reducing system interference, and verifies DTX’s positive role in reducing the power consumption of the mobile terminal by experiment.

  17. Intelligent control system for nuclear power plant mobile robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, A.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Crochon, E.; Vacherand, F.

    1991-01-01

    In order to fully optimize the efficiency of the perception and navigation components available on a mobile robot, the upper level of a mobile robot control requires intelligence support to unload the work of the teleoperator. This knowledge-based system has to manage a priori data such as the map of the workspace, the mission, the characteristics of sensors and robot, but also, the current environment state and the running mission. It has to issue a plan to drive the sensors to focus on relevant objects or to scan the environment and to select the best algorithms depending on the current situation. The environment workspace is a nuclear power plant building. The teleoperated robot is a mobile wheeled or legged vehicle that moves inside the different floors of the building. There are three types of mission: radio-activity survey, inspection and intervention. To perform these goals the robot must avoid obstacles, pass through doors, possibly climb stairs and recognize valves and pipes. The perception control system has to provide the operator with a synthetic view of the surroundings. It manages background tasks such as obstacle detection and free space map building, and specific tasks such as beacon recognition for odometry relocalization and valve detection for maintenance. To do this, the system solves perception resources conflicts, taking into account the current states of the sensors and the current conditions such as lightness or darkness, cluttered scenes, sensor failure. A perception plan is issued from the mission goals, planned path, relocalization requirements and available perception resources. Basically, the knowledge-based system is implemented on a blackboard architecture which includes two parts: a top-down planning part and a bottom-up perception part. The results of the perception are continuously sent to the operator who can trigger new perception actions. (author)

  18. Automated Hydraulic System Design and Power Management in Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    a presentation of the used graph theory representation that is developed to represent a hydraulic open-circuit system and which is based on a numerical formulation that uniquely describe the system in terms of five set of design variables that describe respectively the topology, the components and the operating...... are found on most medium and high-end mobile hydraulic machinery. Despite the energy saving potentials that these systems posses, compared to the other open-circuit hydraulic system topologies, LS-system may still be subject to very low system efficiencies if not designed correctly. This is typically...... machines if operated in the intended and optimal work area, but due to an inappropriate system layout. Most of the power lost in open circuit hydraulic system systems is in this regard in the transmission part, i.e. hoses and fittings, and the valves used to control the system. A large part of the design...

  19. Autonomy and Housing Accessibility Among Powered Mobility Device Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Åse; Lexell, Eva Månsson; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To describe environmental barriers, accessibility problems, and powered mobility device (PMD) users’ autonomy indoors and outdoors; to determine the home environmental barriers that generated the most housing accessibility problems indoors, at entrances, and in the close exterior surroundings; and to examine personal factors and environmental components and their association with indoor and outdoor autonomy. METHOD. This cross-sectional study was based on data collected from a sample of 48 PMD users with a spinal cord injury (SCI) using the Impact of Participation and Autonomy and the Housing Enabler instruments. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used. RESULTS. More years living with SCI predicted less restriction in autonomy indoors, whereas more functional limitations and accessibility problems related to entrance doors predicted more restriction in autonomy outdoors. CONCLUSION. To enable optimized PMD use, practitioners must pay attention to the relationship between client autonomy and housing accessibility problems. PMID:26356666

  20. After heat distribution of a mobile nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.; Tang, Y. S.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze the transient afterheat temperature and pressure response of a mobile gas-cooled reactor power plant following impact. The program considers (in addition to the standard modes of heat transfer) fission product decay and transport, metal-water reactions, core and shield melting and displacement, and pressure and containment vessel stress response. Analyses were performed for eight cases (both deformed and undeformed models) to verify operability of the program options. The results indicated that for a 350 psi (241 n/sq cm) initial internal pressure, the containment vessel can survive over 100,000 seconds following impact before creep rupture occurs. Recommendations were developed as to directions for redesign to extend containment vessel life.

  1. Electric Power Substitute Meter Management via Mobile Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C. Rodelas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available EPSMvMA is composed of Digital Sub-Meter connected to different components namely the GSM module, Bluetooth module, Power Analyzer Module, LCD Module, Relay Module and Main Microcontroller module. The connection via Mobile is made possible by the modules mentioned. The software that the proponents will be dealing with in the study is C++ language, which will be used in programming the Main Microcontroller module and Visual Basic Language for the Android Phones. The Bluetooth module can access the Android Phones and connect to the digital sub-meter in a limited distance. The users will be at ease since a code embedded to the microcontroller will make the utility sub-meter produce the desired value of electricity (KWH and wherein the computed Sub-meter reading can be viewed through the LCD. This project is accommodating to those person that is always on the go and prudent.

  2. Biomechanic modeling of sit-to-stand to upright posture for mobility assessment of persons with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzà, Claudia; Stanhope, Steven J; Taviani, Antonio; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2006-05-01

    To test the suitability of using biomechanic measures associated with a minimum measured input model (MMIM) approach to assess mobility of people with chronic stroke during the execution of a sit-to-stand (STS) to upright posture motor task. Single group, observational. Institutional settings in the United States and Italy. Twenty-nine subjects with chronic unilateral lower-limb impairments and resultant mobility limitations secondary to stroke. Not applicable. Manual measurement of lower-limb strength; performance-based tests including repeated chair standing, walking speed, and standing balance; and ground reactions measured with a force platform during STS and upright posture. The ground reactions were fed to a telescopic inverted pendulum model of the musculoskeletal system. Parameters representing the model outputs were compared with performance-based and strength measures to assess, respectively, motor ability and impairment-related changes in subjects' motor strategies. The parameters derived from the model effectively differentiated between motor strategies associated with different performance-based scores, and allowed the identification of relevant difficulties encountered in STS execution. These difficulties could be associated with different strength scores. This was also true for subjects scoring the maximum in both performance-based and strength tests. The MMIM is a relatively inexpensive and noninvasive approach that enhances mobility assessment of hemiparetic subjects with different motor ability levels. It provides information that correlates well with performance-based and strength scores and, in addition, it allows for subject-specific motor strategy identification.

  3. Fall-related self-efficacy, not balance and mobility performance, is related to accidental falls in chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M Y C; Eng, J J

    2008-07-01

    Chronic stroke survivors with low hip bone density are particularly prone to fractures. This study shows that fear of falling is independently associated with falls in this population. Thus, fear of falling should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures in these patients. Chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density (BMD) are particularly prone to fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of balance, mobility and falls in this sub-group of stroke patients. Thirty-nine chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD (T-score fall-related self-efficacy. Any falls in the past 12 months were also recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of balance and mobility performance, whereas logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of falls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that after adjusting for basic demographics, fall-related self-efficacy remained independently associated with balance/mobility performance (R2 = 0.494, P fall-related self-efficacy, but not balance and mobility performance, was a significant determinant of falls (odds ratio: 0.18, P = 0.04). Fall-related self-efficacy, but not mobility and balance performance, was the most important determinant of accidental falls. This psychological factor should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures among chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD.

  4. 30 CFR 36.4 - Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment... REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 36.4 Mobile... of approval will be granted for completely assembled mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment...

  5. 77 FR 28797 - Redundancy of Communications Systems: Backup Power Private Land Mobile Radio Services: Selection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... Systems: Backup Power Private Land Mobile Radio Services: Selection and Assignment of Frequencies, and... otherwise noted. Sec. 12.2 [Removed] 0 2. Remove Sec. 12.2. PART 90--PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES 0 3... television translators on Channels 70 to 83 must operate on a secondary basis to land mobile operations in...

  6. Perspectives on Early Power Mobility Training, Motivation, and Social Participation in Young Children with Motor Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Han Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of traditional training programs (e.g., neurodevelopmental therapy in promoting independent mobility and early child development across all three International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels lacks rigorous research support. Therefore, early power mobility training needs to be considered as a feasible intervention for very young children who are unlikely to achieve independent mobility. This perspective article has three aims: (1 to provide empirical evidence of differences in early independent mobility, motivation, daily life activities, and social participation between young children with typical development and motor disabilities; (2 to discuss the contemporary concepts of and approaches to early power mobility training for young children with motor disabilities and the current need for changes to such training; and (3 to provide recommendations for early power mobility training in pediatric rehabilitation. Independent mobility is critical for social participation; therefore, power mobility can be accessible and implemented as early as possible, specifically for infants who are at risk for mobility or developmental delay. To maximize the positive effects of independent mobility on children’s social participation, early power mobility training must consider their levels of functioning, the amount of exploration and contextual factors, including individual and environmental factors.

  7. On the electromagnetic fields, Poynting vector, and peak power radiated by lightning return strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial radiation fields, Poynting vector, and total electromagnetic power that a vertical return stroke radiates into the upper half space have been computed when the speed of the stroke, nu, is a significant fraction of the speed of light, c, assuming that at large distances and early times the source is an infinitesimal dipole. The initial current is also assumed to satisfy the transmission-line model with a constant nu and to be perpendicular to an infinite, perfectly conducting ground. The effect of a large nu is to increase the radiation fields by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -1, where beta = nu/c and theta is measured from the vertical, and the Poynting vector by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -2.

  8. Minimizing the Power Consumption of Location-Based Services on Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2012-01-01

    Location-based services have to pay careful attention to their power consumption in order not to drain the batteries of mobile phones. It is not a simple task to build low power location-based services that can run for hours because such services make heavy use of many power consuming features...... of mobile phones. In this article we discuss the power consumption of location-based services and mobile phone features, survey methods for how to minimize power consumption and summarize a number of design considerations for location-based service developers....

  9. The Environment Friendly Power Source for Power Supply of Mobile Communication Base Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, N. V.; Ershov, V. V.; Evstafiev, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The article describes the technical proposals to improve environmental and resource characteristics of the autonomous power supply systems of mobile communication base stations based on renewable energy sources, while ensuring the required reliability and security of power supply. These include: the replacement of diesel-generator with clean energy source - an electrochemical generator based on hydrogen fuel cells; the use of wind turbines with a vertical axis; use of specialized batteries. Based on the analysis of the know technical solutions, the structural circuit diagram of the hybrid solar-wind-hydrogen power plant and the basic principles of the algorithm of its work were proposed. The implementation of these proposals will improve the environmental and resource characteristics.

  10. Power Management in Mobile Hydraulic Applications - An Approach for Designing Hydraulic Power Supply Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2004-01-01

    in a project to develop rules and methods for designing and controlling mobile hydraulic systems in the most energy efficient way, when also considering the operational aspects of the system. The paper first describes the thoughts and ideas behind the project and then focus on an automated approach to design......Throughout the last three decades energy consumption has become one of the primary design aspects in hydraulic systems, especially for mobile hydraulic systems, as power and cooling capacity here is at limited disposal. Considering the energy usage, this is dependent on component efficiency......, but even more important is the system topology. However, there are no rules or guidelines for what system topology to choose for a given application, in order to obtain the most energy efficient system, nor for how the energy should be distributed in the system. This paper describes the approach taken...

  11. Prospects for Building Mobile Micro Hydro Power Plants with Information Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    B. S. Akhmetov; P. T.Kharitonov; L. Sh.Balgabayeva; O. V. Kisseleva; T. S. Kartbayev

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the applicability of known renewable energy technical means as mobile power sources under the field and extreme conditions. The requirements are determined for the parameters of mobile micro HPP. The application prospectively of the mobile micro HPP with intelligent control systems is proved for this purpose. Variants of low-speed electric generators for micro HPP are given. Variants of designs for mobile micro HPP are presented with direct (gearless) transfer of torque ...

  12. Solar PV powered mobile cellular base station: Models and use cases in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderemi, BA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available cells. To this end, solar PV powered base stations have become important integration into a mobile cellular network. Thus, this article exploits the use of solar PV powered mobile cellular base station systems in South Africa. It was also found through...

  13. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics…

  14. Active video-gaming effects on balance and mobility in individuals with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stacy L; Peters, Denise M; Merlo, Angela M; Donley, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that provide feedback, increase practice with multiple repetitions, and motivate patients are essential to rehabilitation post stroke. To determine whether playing active video games results in improved balance and mobility post stroke. Thirty participants with chronic (time since stroke = 3.0 [2.9] years) hemiparesis post stroke were randomly assigned to a gaming group or normal activity control group. Gaming systems provided participants with an interactive interface of real-time movement of either themselves or an avatar on the screen. Participants played games 50-60 minutes/day, 4 days/week, for 5 weeks. The intervention was strictly game-play, in standing position, without physical therapy. The control group received no special intervention and continued with normal activity. Both groups were tested prior to, following the 5 weeks (post test), and 3 months following the completion of the study. Outcome measures included the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, Timed Up & Go, 6-minute walk test, 3-meter walk (self-selected and fast), and perception of recovery. No statistically significant differences between or within groups were found through analysis of covariance (covaried for side of hemiparesis) at post test or follow-up. Although the within-group effect sizes were primarily indexed as "small" (effect sizes before and after testing than did the control group on all 7 dependent variables analyzed. Even though the only intervention was game-play, there were small positive effects. Therapist assistance in making more optimum movement choices may be needed before significant improvements are seen with commercially available, general purpose games.

  15. The child and family experience of power mobility: a qualitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Roslyn; Field, Debra

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to critically synthesize qualitative evidence regarding the child and family experience of power mobility, and to examine how this evidence fits with current theoretical concepts. Electronic database/hand searches were undertaken in September 2012 and updated in February 2014. The searches were restricted to qualitative studies published in English before February 2014 that included at least one child under the age of 19 with a disability and described an outcome related to the use of power mobility. Inclusion criteria were set a priori. Two reviewers independently screened titles, abstracts, and full-text articles and extracted data. McMaster qualitative review forms were used for quality appraisal. Of 259 titles, 21 met inclusion criteria. From 143 codes, 15 second-order themes were developed using constant comparison and analysis. Three overarching themes emerged: power mobility experience promotes developmental change and independent mobility; power mobility enhances social relationships and engagement in meaningful life experiences; and power mobility access and use is influenced by factors in the physical, social, and attitudinal environment. This qualitative research provides rich and rigorous evidence supporting the benefits of power mobility for children and families. Numerous factors, which warrant careful consideration, influence power mobility access and use. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on the level of function in acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke patients on a neurointensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Maxine L; Darbinian, Jeanne A

    2015-07-01

    To explore the effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on the level of function (LOF) achieved by patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) stroke and to identify clinical characteristics and measures associated with walking distances >15.24m. Retrospective pre- and postintervention study. Regional neurointensive care unit. Adult patients with ICH and SAH (N=361). Daily mobility intervention based on patient's current LOF. Walking >15.24m (LOF 5) by neurointensive care unit discharge. Electronic health records for 361 patients (52.6% women; mean age, 62.1y; ICH stroke, 63.2%; aphasia, 35%; hemiplegia, 33%) were included. There was a 2.3-fold increase in patients with hemorrhagic stroke achieving a LOF of 5 by neurointensive care unit discharge after introduction of a mobility intervention. In the multivariable logistic regression model including neurointensive care unit length of stay (LOS) as a covariate, the intervention, LOF of 5 at admission, SAH stroke type, third (vs lowest) quartile of neurointensive care unit LOS, and absence of aphasia and/or hemiplegia were associated with higher likelihood of achieving a LOF of 5 (odds ratio [OR]=5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.52-11.06; OR=6.02; 95% CI, 1.45-24.96; OR=3.78; 95% CI, 1.83-7.80; OR=2.94; 95% CI, 1.16-7.47; OR=17.77; 95% CI, 6.59-47.92, respectively). A mobility intervention was strongly associated with increased distance walked by neurointensive care unit patients with acute hemorrhage at discharge and can be applied in any intensive care unit setting to promote stroke recovery. Future studies directed at building predictive models for walking achievement in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke may provide insight into individualized treatment goal setting and discharge planning. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring the power consumption of social media applications on a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunia, A. I. M.; Suherman; Rambe, A. H.; Fauzi, R.

    2018-03-01

    As fully connected social media applications become popular and require all time connection, the power consumption on mobile device battery increases significantly. As power supplied by a battery is limited, social media application should be designed to be less power consuming. This paper reports the power consumption measurement of social media running on a mobile device. Experimental circuit was developed by using a microcontroller measuring an android smartphone on a 802.11 controlled network. The experiment results show that whatsapp consumes the power less than others in stand by and chat. While other states are dominated by line. The blackberry consumes the power the worst.

  18. Extended Kalman Filtering and Pathloss modeling for Shadow Power Parameter Estimation in Mobile Wireless Communications

    OpenAIRE

    P. Pappas, George; A. Zohdy, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    In this paper accurate estimation of parameters, higher order state space prediction methods and Extended Kalman filter (EKF) for modeling shadow power in wireless mobile communications are developed. Path-loss parameter estimation models are compared and evaluated. Shadow power estimation methods in wireless cellular communications are very important for use in power control of mobile device and base station. The methods are validated and compared to existing methods, Kalman Filter (KF) with...

  19. Secure Strokes – A Security Mechanism for Authentication in Mobile Devices using User’s Behavioral Pattern of Keystrokes Dynamics with Visual Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavica Sahoo; Prithumit Deb

    2011-01-01

    The aim is to develop a security system for mobile devices that eliminates the vulnerability of PIN (4-digit) security and which reduces the high end configuration and memory space requirements of biometrics security. The issues that we will be handling in the project work is the vulnerability of PIN security in mobile devices and providing an extra layer of security through Key Strokes Dynamics based authentication system. Also the problem of authentication error rates while using natural us...

  20. Effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke: A randomized sham-controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uthra Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy on lower extremity motor recovery, balance and mobility in patients with acute stroke. Design: A randomized, sham-controlled, assessor blinded, pilot trial. Setting: Inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit. Subjects: First time onset of stroke with mean post-stroke duration of 6.41 days, able to respond to verbal instructions, and Brunnstrom recovery stage 2 and above were enrolled. Intervention: Mirror therapy group performed 30 minutes of functional synergy movements of non-paretic lower extremity, whereas control group underwent sham therapy with similar duration. In addition, both groups were administered with conventional stroke rehabilitation regime. Altogether 90 minutes therapy session per day, six days a week, for two weeks duration was administered to both groups. Outcome Measures: Lower extremity motor subscale of Fugl Meyer Assessment (FMA, Brunnel Balance Assessment (BBA and Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC. Results: Amongst the 22 patients included, equal number of patients participated in mirror group (N = 11 and control group (N = 11. Baseline variables were similar in both groups, except for Brunnstrom recovery stage. There was no statistical difference between groups, except for FAC. (FMA: P = 0.894; BBA: P = 0.358; FAC: P = 0.02. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Conclusion: Administration of mirror therapy early after stroke is not superior to conventional treatment in improving lower limb motor recovery and balance, except for improvement in mobility.

  1. Measurement of power and energy consumption of a competition-mobile-robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung Tsing-Tshih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Power and energy consumption are the two most important factors for successful operation; they also play important roles in performance identification. The measurement of power and energy consumption is a common test in the development process of a competition mobile robot. If the power of a competition mobile robot is not sufficient, the running time in the competition will be too long and winning the competition will not be possible. Thus, the power and energy consumption are basic and important measurement parameters for a competition mobile robot. In this paper, five types of hand-made competition mobile robots are successfully developed and their performances are measured. From the measurements, their powers and energy consumptions are evaluated and analyzed, respectively. The test results show large differences in the powers and energy consumptions of the five models, even though the same motors were used. The design and construction of the competition mobile robot are the key parameters that cause these huge differences. It is possible to develop the measurement techniques for power and energy consumption, quickly and precisely, to determine how to modify a competition mobile robot rapidly and efficiently to a condition optimal for a mobile robot competition.

  2. Thinking in a "Worldly" Way: Mobility, Knowledge, Power and Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Johannah; Kenway, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In order to enhance understandings of the international mobility of researchers and the implications of their mobility for knowledge production and circulation, we need to develop more sophisticated conceptual resources. Here we draw on and seek to develop ideas generated from literary theory and geography in order to highlight the links between…

  3. Mobile robot for power plant inspection and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Farnstrom, K.A.; Harvey, H.W.; Upton, R.G.; Walker, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    An all-terrain, mobile robot (called SURBOT-T) has been developed to perform remote visual, sound, and radiation surveillance within contaminated areas of nuclear power plants. The robot can be equipped with a two-armed, telerobotic manipulator system to perform remote maintenance work. The SURBOT-T vehicle has a double-articulating track base that is capable of climbing 45-deg slopes and stairs and over 16-in.-high obstacles. The overall size of SURBOT-T is 28 in. wide by 38 in. long with the front and rear tracks raised and 52 in. high with the camera lowered. With the tracks in a level position, the base provides a sturdy work platform and can ascend/descend stairs without fear of tipping over. The track can be pivoted straight down to elevate the base 14 in. and pass through water up to 24 in. deep. All motors, amplifiers, computer boards, and other electronic components are contained within a sealed housing. The color television camera, spotlight, and directional microphone are mounted on a pan/tilt, which is attached to an elevating mechanism that has 8 ft of vertical travel. An air sampler, radiation detector, and temperature/humidity probe are mounted on the vehicle. The slave manipulator arms on the vehicle can be teleoperated using master arms that are attached to a portable stand near the control console. They can also be taught to perform motions or tasks by computer control much like robot arms in the automated manufacturing industry

  4. Psychometrics of the wrist stability and hand mobility subscales of the Fugl-Meyer assessment in moderately impaired stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephen J; Hade, Erinn; Persch, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    There remains a need for a quickly administered, stroke-specific, bedside measure of active wrist and finger movement for the expanding stroke population. The wrist stability and hand mobility scales of the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (w/h UE FM) constitute a valid, reliable measure of paretic UE impairment in patients with active wrist and finger movement. The aim of this study was to determine performance on the w/h UE FM in a stable cohort of survivors of stroke with only palpable movement in their paretic wrist flexors. A single-center cohort study was conducted. Thirty-two individuals exhibiting stable, moderate upper extremity hemiparesis (15 male, 17 female; mean age=56.6 years, SD=10.1; mean time since stroke=4.6 years, SD=5.8) participated in the study, which was conducted at an outpatient rehabilitation clinic in the midwestern United States. The w/h UE FM and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were administered twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Cronbach alpha, and ordinal alpha were computed to determine reliability, and Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were computed to establish validity. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the w/h UE FM and ARAT were .95 and .99, respectively. The w/h UE FM intrarater reliability and internal consistency were greater than .80, and concurrent validity was greater than .70. This also was the first stroke rehabilitative study to apply ordinal alpha to examine internal consistency values, revealing w/h UE FM levels greater than .85. Concurrent validity findings were corroborated by Bland-Altman plots. It appears that the w/h UE FM is a promising tool to measure distal upper extremity movement in patients with little active paretic wrist and finger movement. This finding widens the segment of patients on whom the w/h UE FM can be effectively used and addresses a gap, as commonly used measures necessitate active distal upper extremity movement. © 2015 American

  5. Psychometrics of the Wrist Stability and Hand Mobility Subscales of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment in Moderately Impaired Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hade, Erinn; Persch, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background There remains a need for a quickly administered, stroke-specific, bedside measure of active wrist and finger movement for the expanding stroke population. The wrist stability and hand mobility scales of the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (w/h UE FM) constitute a valid, reliable measure of paretic UE impairment in patients with active wrist and finger movement. Objective The aim of this study was to determine performance on the w/h UE FM in a stable cohort of survivors of stroke with only palpable movement in their paretic wrist flexors. Design A single-center cohort study was conducted. Method Thirty-two individuals exhibiting stable, moderate upper extremity hemiparesis (15 male, 17 female; mean age=56.6 years, SD=10.1; mean time since stroke=4.6 years, SD=5.8) participated in the study, which was conducted at an outpatient rehabilitation clinic in the midwestern United States. The w/h UE FM and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were administered twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Cronbach alpha, and ordinal alpha were computed to determine reliability, and Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were computed to establish validity. Results Intraclass correlation coefficients for the w/h UE FM and ARAT were .95 and .99, respectively. The w/h UE FM intrarater reliability and internal consistency were greater than .80, and concurrent validity was greater than .70. This also was the first stroke rehabilitative study to apply ordinal alpha to examine internal consistency values, revealing w/h UE FM levels greater than .85. Concurrent validity findings were corroborated by Bland-Altman plots. Conclusions It appears that the w/h UE FM is a promising tool to measure distal upper extremity movement in patients with little active paretic wrist and finger movement. This finding widens the segment of patients on whom the w/h UE FM can be effectively used and addresses a gap, as commonly used measures necessitate active

  6. Hand Passive Mobilization Performed with Robotic Assistance: Acute Effects on Upper Limb Perfusion and Spasticity in Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Gobbo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This single arm pre-post study aimed at evaluating the acute effects induced by a single session of robot-assisted passive hand mobilization on local perfusion and upper limb (UL function in poststroke hemiparetic participants. Twenty-three patients with subacute or chronic stroke received 20 min passive mobilization of the paretic hand with robotic assistance. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS was used to detect changes in forearm tissue perfusion. Muscle tone of the paretic UL was assessed by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS. Symptoms concerning UL heaviness, joint stiffness, and pain were evaluated as secondary outcomes by self-reporting. Significant (p=0.014 improvements were found in forearm perfusion when all fingers were mobilized simultaneously. After the intervention, MAS scores decreased globally, being the changes statistically significant for the wrist (from 1.6±1.0 to 1.1±1.0; p=0.001 and fingers (from 1.2±1.1 to 0.7±0.9; p=0.004. Subjects reported decreased UL heaviness and stiffness after treatment, especially for the hand, as well as diminished pain when present. This study supports novel evidence that hand robotic assistance promotes local UL circulation changes, may help in the management of spasticity, and acutely alleviates reported symptoms of heaviness, stiffness, and pain in subjects with poststroke hemiparesis. This opens new scenarios for the implications in everyday clinical practice. Clinical Trial Registration Number is NCT03243123.

  7. Hand Passive Mobilization Performed with Robotic Assistance: Acute Effects on Upper Limb Perfusion and Spasticity in Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Massimiliano; Gaffurini, Paolo; Vacchi, Laura; Lazzarini, Sara; Villafane, Jorge; Orizio, Claudio; Negrini, Stefano; Bissolotti, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    This single arm pre-post study aimed at evaluating the acute effects induced by a single session of robot-assisted passive hand mobilization on local perfusion and upper limb (UL) function in poststroke hemiparetic participants. Twenty-three patients with subacute or chronic stroke received 20 min passive mobilization of the paretic hand with robotic assistance. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to detect changes in forearm tissue perfusion. Muscle tone of the paretic UL was assessed by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Symptoms concerning UL heaviness, joint stiffness, and pain were evaluated as secondary outcomes by self-reporting. Significant ( p = 0.014) improvements were found in forearm perfusion when all fingers were mobilized simultaneously. After the intervention, MAS scores decreased globally, being the changes statistically significant for the wrist (from 1.6 ± 1.0 to 1.1 ± 1.0; p = 0.001) and fingers (from 1.2 ± 1.1 to 0.7 ± 0.9; p = 0.004). Subjects reported decreased UL heaviness and stiffness after treatment, especially for the hand, as well as diminished pain when present. This study supports novel evidence that hand robotic assistance promotes local UL circulation changes, may help in the management of spasticity, and acutely alleviates reported symptoms of heaviness, stiffness, and pain in subjects with poststroke hemiparesis. This opens new scenarios for the implications in everyday clinical practice. Clinical Trial Registration Number is NCT03243123.

  8. Effect of Rocker Bar Ankle Foot Orthosis on Functional Mobility in Post-Stroke Hemiplegic Patients: Timed Up and Go and Gait Speed Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Farmani

    2016-03-01

    Discussion: RAFO led to a significant improvement in functional mobility in hemiplegic patients post stroke. This may be due to the positive effect of rocker modification on improving push off and transferring weight during the stance phase of gait.

  9. An Early Mobilization Protocol Successfully Delivers More and Earlier Therapy to Acute Stroke Patients: Further Results From Phase II of AVERT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Renske; Cumming, T.; Churilov, L.; Donnan, G.; Bernhardt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The optimal physical therapy dose in acute stroke care is unknown. The authors hypothesized that physical therapy would be significantly different between treatment arms in a trial of very early and frequent mobilization (VEM) and that immobility-related adverse events would be

  10. Swipe out Stroke: Feasibility and efficacy of using a smart-phone based mobile application to improve compliance with weight loss in obese minority stroke patients and their carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifejika, Nneka Lotea; Noser, Elizabeth Anne; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I

    2016-07-01

    Swipe out Stroke (SOS) examines the use of a smartphone-based mobile application to reduce obesity in high-risk minority stroke patients. At record-high levels in the United States, obesity disproportionately affects minorities and is highly correlated with cerebrovascular disease. Unfortunately, structured weight loss programs are expensive, and compliance significantly decreases upon program completion. Mobile health (mHealth) technology is an innovative, cost-effective way to bridge this gap. Minorities spend over 4.5 billion dollars annually on consumer electronics, making studies that utilize mHealth applications ideal for health promotion and disease prevention. SOS is a prospective, randomized-controlled trial with open blinded endpoint comparing an mHealth based dietary intervention to usual care to facilitate weight reduction. Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke survivors and their carers are recruited from the acute care service of a Houston-based comprehensive stroke center. A neurorehabilitation physician or vascular neurologist meets with participants during the index hospitalization, a baseline clinic visit, followed by visits at 1, 3, and 6 month intervals. The SOS Team focuses on feasible modifications to the Southern dietary pattern (fried foods, fatty foods, added fats, eggs, processed meats, such as bacon and ham, organ meats (e.g., liver), and sweetened drinks) and caloric restriction to facilitate a 5% reduction in total body weight. Practical barriers to adherence are addressed, such as access to transportation, financial limitations, and depression. The primary dependent measure is a reduction of total body weight. Secondary outcomes include systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and Factor VIII. SOS will determine whether a Phase III effectiveness trial of a smartphone-based mobile application to address obesity-related health disparities is warranted throughout the Southeastern United States (Stroke

  11. The Study on the Wireless Power Transfer System for Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Hyung-Nam Kim; Won-Yong Chae; Dong-Sul Shin; Ho-Sung Kim; Hee-Je Kim

    2010-01-01

    A wireless power transfer system can attribute to the fields in robot, aviation and space in which lightening the weight of device and improving the movement play an important role. A wireless power transfer system was investigated to overcome the inconvenience of using power cable. Especially a wireless power transfer technology is important element for mobile robots. We proposed the wireless power transfer system of the half-bridge resonant converter with the frequency ...

  12. Impaired voluntary neuromuscular activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Age-related alterations of neuromuscular activation may contribute to deficits in muscle power and mobility function. This study assesses whether impaired activation of the agonist quadriceps and antagonist hamstrings, including amplitude- and velocity-dependent characteristics of activa...

  13. Computer program for afterheat temperature distribution for mobile nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    ESATA computer program was developed to analyze thermal safety aspects of post-impacted mobile nuclear power plants. Program is written in FORTRAN 4 and designed for IBM 7094/7044 direct coupled system.

  14. Quantification of the probability of reaching mobility independence at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital in nonwalking early ischemic stroke patients: a multivariate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Stefano; Bragoni, Maura; Coiro, Paola; De Angelis, Domenico; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Morelli, Daniela; Venturiero, Vincenzo; Pratesi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to quantify the probability of recovery of mobility in admission nonwalking stroke survivors. We evaluated 437 of 500 consecutive patients admitted for sequelae of first ischemic stroke within the first month. We performed several logistic regressions using mobility status at discharge (independence in stair climbing; walking outside and inside, without aid or supervision; walking with cane or other aid, or need for wheelchair) as dependent variable, and several independent variables, including stratification of patients according to their Barthel Index (BI) score into 6 classes (neurological impairment, global aphasia, unilateral spatial neglect, male gender and vocational status also played a prognostic role. The probability of potential mobility recovery can be quantified at admission with better accuracy for independence in stair climbing and walking outside without any aid (percentages correctly predicted 95.4 and 91.8%, respectively). Stratification of BI score may be useful to better quantify the risk for each patient. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Estimating Energy Consumption of Mobile Fluid Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Lauren [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zigler, Bradley T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    This report estimates the market size and energy consumption of mobile off-road applications utilizing hydraulic fluid power, and summarizes technology gaps and implementation barriers. Mobile fluid power is the use of hydraulic fluids under pressure to transmit power in mobile equipment applications. The mobile off-road fluid power sector includes various uses of hydraulic fluid power equipment with fundamentally diverse end-use application and operational requirements, such as a skid steer loader, a wheel loader or an agriculture tractor. The agriculture and construction segments dominate the mobile off-road fluid power market in component unit sales volume. An estimated range of energy consumed by the mobile off-road fluid power sector is 0.36 - 1.8 quads per year, which was 1.3 percent - 6.5 percent of the total energy consumed in 2016 by the transportation sector. Opportunities for efficiency improvements within the fluid power system result from needs to level and reduce the peak system load requirements and develop new technologies to reduce fluid power system level losses, both of which may be facilitated by characterizing duty cycles to define standardized performance test methods. There are currently no commonly accepted standardized test methods for evaluating equipment level efficiency over a duty cycle. The off-road transportation sector currently meets criteria emissions requirements, and there are no efficiency regulations requiring original equipment manufacturers (OEM) to invest in new architecture development to improve the fuel economy of mobile off-road fluid power systems. In addition, the end-user efficiency interests are outweighed by low equipment purchase or lease price concerns, required payback periods, and reliability and durability requirements of new architecture. Current economics, low market volumes with high product diversity, and regulation compliance challenge OEM investment in commercialization of new architecture development.

  16. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Davide; Imeri, Federico; Gatti, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR) improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19), balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5) and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4). When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1), but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial) and balance (high heterogeneity). Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Power Mobility Training for Young Children with Multiple, Severe Impairments: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Farris, John P; Gallagher, Cailee; Hammond, Lyndsay; Webster, Lauren M; Aldrich, Naomi J

    2017-02-01

    Young children with neurodevelopmental conditions are often limited in their ability to explore and learn from their environment. The purposes of this case series were to (1) describe the outcomes of using an alternative power mobility device with young children who had multiple, severe impairments; (2) develop power mobility training methods for use with these children; and (3) determine the feasibility of using various outcome measures. Three children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Function Classification System Levels IV, V, and V) ages 17 months to 3.5 years participated in the case series. Examination included the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test (PEDI-CAT) and the Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire (DMQ). An individualized, engaging power mobility training environment was created for each participant. Intervention was provided for 60 minutes per week over 12 weeks. All participants exhibited improvements in power mobility skills. Post-intervention PEDI-CAT scores increased in various domains for all participants. Post-intervention DMQ scores improved in Participants 1 and 2. The participants appeared to make improvements in their beginning power mobility skills. Additional research is planned to further explore the impact of power mobility training in this unique population.

  18. Katanin spiral and ring structures shed light on power stroke for microtubule severing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehr, Elena; Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Szczesna, Ewa; Zuo, Xiaobing; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2017-08-07

    Microtubule-severing enzymes katanin, spastin and fidgetin are AAA ATPases critical for the biogenesis and maintenance of complex microtubule arrays in axons, spindles and cilia. Because of a lack of 3D structures, their mechanism has remained poorly understood. We report the first X-ray structure of the monomeric AAA katanin module and cryo-EM reconstructions of the hexamer in two conformations. These reveal an unexpected asymmetric arrangement of the AAA domains mediated by structural elements unique to severing enzymes and critical for their function. Our reconstructions show that katanin cycles between open spiral and closed ring conformations, depending on the ATP occupancy of a gating protomer that tenses or relaxes inter-protomer interfaces. Cycling of the hexamer between these conformations would provide the power stroke for microtubule severing.

  19. Low Power system Design techniques for mobile computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    1997-01-01

    Portable products are being used increasingly. Because these systems are battery powered, reducing power consumption is vital. In this report we give the properties of low power design and techniques to exploit them on the architecture of the system. We focus on: min imizing capacitance, avoiding

  20. Security attack detection algorithm for electric power gis system based on mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Feng, Renjun; Wang, Liming; Huang, Wei; Guo, Yajuan

    2017-05-01

    Electric power GIS is one of the key information technologies to satisfy the power grid construction in China, and widely used in power grid construction planning, weather, and power distribution management. The introduction of electric power GIS based on mobile applications is an effective extension of the geographic information system that has been widely used in the electric power industry. It provides reliable, cheap and sustainable power service for the country. The accurate state estimation is the important conditions to maintain the normal operation of the electric power GIS. Recent research has shown that attackers can inject the complex false data into the power system. The injection attack of this new type of false data (load integrity attack LIA) can successfully bypass the routine detection to achieve the purpose of attack, so that the control center will make a series of wrong decision. Eventually, leading to uneven distribution of power in the grid. In order to ensure the safety of the electric power GIS system based on mobile application, it is very important to analyze the attack mechanism and propose a new type of attack, and to study the corresponding detection method and prevention strategy in the environment of electric power GIS system based on mobile application.

  1. Wireless Power System Design for Mobile Robots used in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S. Y.; Yoo, S. J.; Lee, Kun J.; Rim, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The robots used in nuclear power plants (NPP) have received much attention in recent years due to the Fukushima nuclear accident, which is considered as one of the worst nuclear disasters. In general, the NPP robots can play important roles in fuel exchange, repair work, radiation monitoring, rescue, and scouting out NPP. Under these conditions, human access to NPP during normal and emergency operations is strictly restricted due to the risks of high level radiation and contamination. However, in practice, robots have not been widely used in NPP because of the following limitations. First, the NPP robots cannot be of multi-purpose use because of their mission complexity and uniqueness. Second, the demand of the NPP robots is low due to the limited number of NPP over the world. Third, the NPP robots developed so far have no enough confidence in spite of the improvement of robot technology. Lastly, the NPP robots cannot carry on their mission continuously due to the limited energy capacity of the battery: mobile robots should stop working every two hours to recharge their batteries and spend least twenty minutes. As the solutions for this 'energy hungry' problem, high capacity batteries, quick battery chargers, power cables, and internal combustion engines were proposed; however, they still have the problems such as limited mission time and range, frequent recharging, or exhausting emission and noise. In this paper, the wireless power transfer systems (WPTS) for NPP robots are proposed. This technology can let NPP robots free from mission time and range limits, and exhausting emission. The requirements for the NPP robots are newly proposed, and two types of WPTS, roaming and railway, are suggested in this paper

  2. Waste to real energy: the first MFC powered mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Ledezma, Pablo; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Papaharalabos, George; Melhuish, Chris; Greenman, John

    2013-10-07

    This communication reports for the first time the charging of a commercially available mobile phone, using Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) fed with real neat urine. The membrane-less MFCs were made out of ceramic material and employed plain carbon based electrodes.

  3. Concurrent neuromechanical and functional gains following upper-extremity power training post-stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Carolynn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repetitive task practice is argued to drive neural plasticity following stroke. However, current evidence reveals that hemiparetic weakness impairs the capacity to perform, and practice, movements appropriately. Here we investigated how power training (i.e., high-intensity, dynamic resistance training affects recovery of upper-extremity motor function post-stroke. We hypothesized that power training, as a component of upper-extremity rehabilitation, would promote greater functional gains than functional task practice without deleterious consequences. Method Nineteen chronic hemiparetic individuals were studied using a crossover design. All participants received both functional task practice (FTP and HYBRID (combined FTP and power training in random order. Blinded evaluations performed at baseline, following each intervention block and 6-months post-intervention included: Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT-FAS, Primary Outcome, upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, Ashworth Scale, and Functional Independence Measure. Neuromechanical function was evaluated using isometric and dynamic joint torques and concurrent agonist EMG. Biceps stretch reflex responses were evaluated using passive elbow stretches ranging from 60 to 180º/s and determining: EMG onset position threshold, burst duration, burst intensity and passive torque at each speed. Results Primary outcome: Improvements in WMFT-FAS were significantly greater following HYBRID vs. FTP (p = .049, regardless of treatment order. These functional improvements were retained 6-months post-intervention (p = .03. Secondary outcomes: A greater proportion of participants achieved minimally important differences (MID following HYBRID vs. FTP (p = .03. MIDs were retained 6-months post-intervention. Ashworth scores were unchanged (p > .05. Increased maximal isometric joint torque, agonist EMG and peak power were significantly greater following HYBRID vs. FTP (p p

  4. RecoverNow: Feasibility of a Mobile Tablet-Based Rehabilitation Intervention to Treat Post-Stroke Communication Deficits in the Acute Care Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen H Mallet

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of patients diagnosed with stroke experience some degree of aphasia. With limited health care resources, patients' access to speech and language therapies is often delayed. We propose using mobile-platform technology to initiate early speech-language therapy in the acute care setting. For this pilot, our objective was to assess the feasibility of a tablet-based speech-language therapy for patients with communication deficits following acute stroke.We enrolled consecutive patients admitted with a stroke and communication deficits with NIHSS score ≥1 on the best language and/or dysarthria parameters. We excluded patients with severe comprehension deficits where communication was not possible. Following baseline assessment by a speech-language pathologist (SLP, patients were provided with a mobile tablet programmed with individualized therapy applications based on the assessment, and instructed to use it for at least one hour per day. Our objective was to establish feasibility by measuring recruitment rate, adherence rate, retention rate, protocol deviations and acceptability.Over 6 months, 143 patients were admitted with a new diagnosis of stroke: 73 had communication deficits, 44 met inclusion criteria, and 30 were enrolled into RecoverNow (median age 62, 26.6% female for a recruitment rate of 68% of eligible participants. Participants received mobile tablets at a mean 6.8 days from admission [SEM 1.6], and used them for a mean 149.8 minutes/day [SEM 19.1]. In-hospital retention rate was 97%, and 96% of patients scored the mobile tablet-based communication therapy as at least moderately convenient 3/5 or better with 5/5 being most "convenient".Individualized speech-language therapy delivered by mobile tablet technology is feasible in acute care.

  5. The effect of different shoes on functional mobility and energy expenditure in post-stroke hemiplegic patients using ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmani, Farzad; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood; Aminian, Gholamreza; Nikoo, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi-Goghari, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses could be utilized both with and without shoes. While several studies have shown that ankle-foot orthoses improve gait abilities in hemiplegic patients, it remains unclear whether they should be used with shoes or without. The study purpose was to compare the effect of standard shoes and rocker shoes on functional mobility in post-stroke hemiplegic patients utilizing ankle-foot orthosis. Randomized clinical study. Thirty post-stroke hemiplegic patients participated in this study randomly assigned to two groups. Group I received standard shoes + ankle-foot orthosis and group II were provided with rocker shoes + ankle-foot orthosis. Their functional mobility and energy expenditure parameters including timed up and go, timed up stairs, timed down stairs, preferred walking speed, and oxygen (O2) cost (mL/kg/m) were measured. In group I, no significant changes were seen in outcome measures after wearing standard shoes. While in group II, O2 cost and timed up and go time significantly decreased, and preferred walking speed increased when patients wore rocker shoes. Also, there was a significant difference between rocker shoes and standard shoes in improvement of timed up and go, preferred walking speed, and O2 cost. When patients using ankle-foot orthosis wore rocker shoes, their functional mobility improved and oxygen cost diminished. Also, rocker shoes was significantly more effective than standard shoes in improving functional mobility parameters. This study suggests that in post-stroke hemiplegic patients using ankle-foot orthosis, wearing rocker shoes can lead to much more improved functional mobility and decreased energy expenditure compared to ankle-foot orthosis only. Thus, in stroke patients, the combination of ankle-foot orthosis-rocker shoes is recommended for both rehabilitation programs and ankle-foot orthosis efficacy investigations. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  6. RecoverNow: Feasibility of a Mobile Tablet-Based Rehabilitation Intervention to Treat Post-Stroke Communication Deficits in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Karen H; Shamloul, Rany M; Corbett, Dale; Finestone, Hillel M; Hatcher, Simon; Lumsden, Jim; Momoli, Franco; Shamy, Michel C F; Stotts, Grant; Swartz, Richard H; Yang, Christine; Dowlatshahi, Dar

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 40% of patients diagnosed with stroke experience some degree of aphasia. With limited health care resources, patients' access to speech and language therapies is often delayed. We propose using mobile-platform technology to initiate early speech-language therapy in the acute care setting. For this pilot, our objective was to assess the feasibility of a tablet-based speech-language therapy for patients with communication deficits following acute stroke. We enrolled consecutive patients admitted with a stroke and communication deficits with NIHSS score ≥1 on the best language and/or dysarthria parameters. We excluded patients with severe comprehension deficits where communication was not possible. Following baseline assessment by a speech-language pathologist (SLP), patients were provided with a mobile tablet programmed with individualized therapy applications based on the assessment, and instructed to use it for at least one hour per day. Our objective was to establish feasibility by measuring recruitment rate, adherence rate, retention rate, protocol deviations and acceptability. Over 6 months, 143 patients were admitted with a new diagnosis of stroke: 73 had communication deficits, 44 met inclusion criteria, and 30 were enrolled into RecoverNow (median age 62, 26.6% female) for a recruitment rate of 68% of eligible participants. Participants received mobile tablets at a mean 6.8 days from admission [SEM 1.6], and used them for a mean 149.8 minutes/day [SEM 19.1]. In-hospital retention rate was 97%, and 96% of patients scored the mobile tablet-based communication therapy as at least moderately convenient 3/5 or better with 5/5 being most "convenient". Individualized speech-language therapy delivered by mobile tablet technology is feasible in acute care.

  7. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corbetta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Intervention: Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Outcome measures: Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. Results: In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19, balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5 and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4. When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1, but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial and balance (high heterogeneity. Conclusion: Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. [Corbetta D, Imeri F, Gatti R (2015 Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard

  8. Space matters: the relational power of mobile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Odendaal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of mobile telephony and proliferation of digital networks imply a critical role for these technologies in overcoming the constraints of space in fragmented cities. Academic literature draws from a range of disciplines but fails to address the significance of new technologies for African and South African cities. Debates on technologies and urban spaces reflect a Northern bias and case literature that dwells on the developmental aspects of ICT do not engage with the broader significance with regards to urban change in African cities. This research addresses these gaps by examining the local transformative qualities of mobile telephony in a South African city, Durban. It focuses on the ways in which informal traders active in the city use technology. Actor-network theory was used in the analysis of the field work, uncovering material and human actors, network stabilization processes and agency in determining the transformative potential of this form of digital networking at city and local scales. Findings indicate that appropriation of technology is informed by livelihood strategies. Innovation is enabled when translation extends to appropriation. More in-depth research is needed on how technology is molded and appropriated to suit livelihoods. Throughout the research the spatial dimensions of the relationship between mobile telephony and networks were considered. The network spaces that emerge from actor relations do not correspond with the physical spaces usually considered in policy.

  9. Low wireless power transfer using inductive coupling for mobile phone charger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fareq, M; Fitra, M; Irwanto, M; Hasan, Syafruddin; Arinal, M

    2014-01-01

    A wireless power transfer (WPT) using inductive coupling for mobile phone charger is studied. The project is offer to study and fabricate WPT using inductive coupling for mobile phone charger that will give more information about distance is effect for WPT performance and WPT is not much influenced by the presence of hands, books and types of plastics. The components used to build wireless power transfer can be divided into 3 parts components, the transceiver for power transmission, the inductive coils in this case as the antenna, receiver and the rectifier which act convert AC to DC. Experiments have been conducted and the wireless power transfer using inductive coupling is suitable to be implemented for mobile phone charger.

  10. Determinants of mobile phone output power in a multinational study: implications for exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, M; Madsen, Stine Mann; di Vecchia, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The output power of a mobile phone is directly related to its radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field strength, and may theoretically vary substantially in different networks and phone use circumstances due to power control technologies. To improve indices of RF exposure...... for epidemiological studies, we assessed determinants of mobile phone output power in a multinational study. METHODS: More than 500 volunteers in 12 countries used Global System for Mobile communications software-modified phones (GSM SMPs) for approximately 1 month each. The SMPs recorded date, time, and duration...... of each call, and the frequency band and output power at fixed sampling intervals throughout each call. Questionnaires provided information on the typical circumstances of an individual's phone use. Linear regression models were used to analyse the influence of possible explanatory variables...

  11. Compliance with Australian stroke guideline recommendations for outdoor mobility and transport training by post-inpatient rehabilitation services: An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Annie; Ada, Louise; Kelly, Patrick J; Middleton, Sandy; Goodall, Stephen; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Logan, Pip; Longworth, Mark; Karageorge, Aspasia

    2015-07-29

    Community participation is often restricted after stroke, due to reduced confidence and outdoor mobility. Australian clinical guidelines recommend that specific evidence-based interventions be delivered to target these restrictions, such as multiple escorted outdoor journeys. The aim of this study was to describe post-inpatient outdoor mobility and transport training delivered to stroke survivors in New South Wales, Australia and whether therapy differed according to type, sector or location of service provider. Using an observational retrospective cohort study design, 24 rehabilitation service providers were audited. Provider types included outpatient (n = 8), day therapy (n = 9), home-based rehabilitation (n = 5) and transitional aged care services (TAC, n = 2). Records of 15 stroke survivors who had received post-hospital rehabilitation were audited per service, for wait time, duration, amount of therapy and outdoor-related therapy. A total of 311 records were audited. Median wait time for post-hospital therapy was 13 days (IQR, 5-35). Median duration of therapy was 68 days (IQR, 35-109), consisting of 11 sessions (IQR 4-19). Overall, a median of one session (IQR 0-3) was conducted outdoors per person. Outdoor-related therapy was similar across service providers, except that TAC delivered an average of 5.4 more outdoor-related sessions (95% CI 4.4 to 6.4), and 3.5 more outings into public streets (95% CI 2.8 to 4.3) per person, compared to outpatient services. The majority of service providers in the sample delivered little evidence-based outdoor mobility and travel training per stroke participant, as recommended in national stroke guidelines. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000554965.

  12. Deployment of Mobile Learning Course Materials to Android Powered Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to facilitate mobile teaching and learning by providing an alternative course material deployment method. This article suggests a course material deployment platform for small universities or individual instructors. Different from traditional course material deployment methods, the method discussed deploys course…

  13. A Survey on the Reliability of Power Electronics in Electro-Mobility Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadalla, Brwene Salah Abdelkarim; Schaltz, Erik; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Reliability is an important issue in the field of power electronics since most of the electrical energy is today processed by power electronics. In most of the electro-mobility applications, e.g. electric and hybridelectric vehicles, power electronic are commonly used in very harsh environment....... Temperature variations, vibration and also the stresses affecting the device (which can come even from the device itself or from external sources) and may cause unreliable system. Thus, designing reliable power electronic components is important for the aim of reducing the energy losses, maintenance cost...... and extending the service lifetime as well. Research within power electronics is of high interest as it has an important impact in the industry of the electro-mobility applications. According to the aforementioned explanations, this paper will provide an overview of the common factors (thermal cycles, power...

  14. Evaluation of functional mobility of patients with stroke sequela after treatment in hydrotherapy pool using the Timed Up and Go Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonçalves dos Santos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the functional mobility of patients with strokeover 12 sessions of hydrotherapy. Methods: Ten stroke patients agedbetween 5 and 85 years were evaluated by means of the Timed Up andGo test, which contains some items, such as balance, walking speed,changing directions, and standing up from a seated position. Thestudy patients performed the test before and after each hydrotherapysession (total of 12 sessions. Each individual was compared to him/herself both short-term (pre- and post-therapy and long-term (after 12 therapy sessions. Result: Comparing baseline and after 12 sessions, it was noted that the 10 patients improved their performance, with a decrease in time to execute the Timed Up and Go test. Conclusion: An exercise program in a hydrotherapy pool was beneficial for functional mobility performance improvement in stroke patients.

  15. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami S. Alabdulwahab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients.

  16. Do Trials of Resistance Training to Improve Mobility After Stroke Adhere to the American College of Sports Medicine Guidelines? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrey, Genevieve; Holland, Anne E; Mentiplay, Benjamin F; Clark, Ross A; Williams, Gavin

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether resistance training to improve mobility outcomes after stroke adheres to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines, and whether adherence was associated with better outcomes. Online databases searched from 1975 to October 30, 2016. Randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of lower limb strength training on mobility outcomes in adult participants with stroke. Two independent reviewers completed data extraction. Quality of trials was determined using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Trials were scored based on their protocol's adherence to 8 ACSM recommendations. To determine if a relation existed between total adherence score and effect size, Spearman ρ was calculated, and between individual recommendations and effect size, Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used. Thirty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria, and 34 were scored on their adherence to the guidelines. Adherence was high for frequency of training (100% of studies), but few trials adhered to the guidelines for intensity (32%), specificity (24%), and training pattern (3%). Based on the small number of studies that could be included in pooled analysis (n=12), there was no relation between overall adherence and effect size (Spearman ρ=-.39, P=.21). Adherence to the ACSM guidelines for resistance training after stroke varied widely. Future trials should ensure strength training protocols adhere more closely to the guidelines, to ensure their effectiveness in stroke can be accurately determined. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Adaptive and Integrated Low-Power Framework for Multicore Mobile Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmoo Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing multicore in mobile computing such as smartphone and IoT (Internet of Things device is a double-edged sword. It provides ample computing capabilities required in recent intelligent mobile services including voice recognition, image processing, big data analysis, and deep learning. However, it requires a great deal of power consumption, which causes creating a thermal hot spot and putting pressure on the energy resource in a mobile device. In this paper, we propose a novel framework that integrates two well-known low-power techniques, DPM (Dynamic Power Management and DVFS (Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling for energy efficiency in multicore mobile systems. The key feature of the proposed framework is adaptability. By monitoring the online resource usage such as CPU utilization and power consumption, the framework can orchestrate diverse DPM and DVFS policies according to workload characteristics. Real implementation based experiments using three mobile devices have shown that it can reduce the power consumption ranging from 22% to 79%, while affecting negligibly the performance of workloads.

  18. The effect of whole body vibration on balance, gait performance and mobility in people with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaotian; Wang, Pu; Liu, Chuan; He, Chengqi; Reinhardt, Jan D

    2015-07-01

    To examine the effect of whole body vibration on balance, gait performance and mobility among people with stroke. A systematic review was conducted by two independent reviewers who completed the article search and selection. We included randomized controlled trials published in English examining effects of whole body vibration on balance, gait, mobility, muscle strength and muscle tone in adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Articles were excluded if they were research studies on people with other primary diagnosis, abstracts published in the conferences or books. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the selected studies. Sources included Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Pubmed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, Stroke Trials Registry, and reference lists of all relevant articles. Eight randomized controlled trials (nine articles) involving 271 participants were included in this meta-analysis. No significant improvement was found regarding Berg balance scale (SMD=-0.08, 95%CI=-1.35 to 1.19, P=0.91), mobility (SMD=0.45, 95%CI=-0.46 to 1.37, P=0.33), maximal isometric contracion of knee extension strength (SMD=0.23, 95%CI=-0.27 to 0.74, P=0.36), and maximal isometric contracion of knee extension strength (SMD=0.09, 95%CI=-0.38 to 0.56, P=0.71). There was no evidence for effects of whole body vibration on balance in people with stroke. Effects of whole body vibration on mobility and gait performance remain inconclusive. More large and high-quality trials are required. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Modified ride-on toy cars for early power mobility: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Han; Galloway, James C

    2012-01-01

    Children with significantly decreased mobility have limited opportunities to explore their physical and social environment. A variety of assistive technologies are available to increase mobility; however, no single device provides the level of functional mobility that children developing typically enjoy. The purpose of this technical report is to formally introduce a new power mobility option--the modified ride-on toy car. This report will provide (a) an overview of toy car features, (b) examples of basic electrical and mechanical modifications, and (c) a brief clinical case. With creative use and customized modifications, toy cars can function as a "general learning environment" for use in the clinic, home, and school. As such, we anticipate that these cars will become a multiuse clinical tool to address not only mobility goals but also goals involving body function and structure such as posture and movement impairments.

  20. The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on strength, proprioception, balance and mobility in people with stroke: a randomized controlled cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Sarah F; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Nester, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility and potential efficacy of 'activeTENS' (that is transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) during everyday activities) by assessing the immediate effects on strength, proprioception, balance/falls risk and mobility after stroke. A paired-sample randomized cross-over trial. Twenty-nine mobile chronic stroke survivors with no pre-existing conditions limiting balance or mobility or contra-indications to TENS. University clinical research facility. A single session of 'activeTENS' delivered via a 'sock electrode' (70-130 Hz, five second cycle) plus a session of control treatment (wearing the sock electrode with no stimulation), lasting approximately two hours in total. Dorsiflexor and plantarflexor strength and proprioception using an isokinetic dyanometer, balance and falls risk (Standing Forward Reach Test) and gait speed (10-m walk test). All participants tolerated 'active TENS'. Most parameters improved during stimulation with activeTENS; balance (p = 0.009), gait speed (p = 0.002), plantarflexor strength (p = 0.008) and proprioception of plantarflexion (p = 0.029), except dorsiflexor strength (p = 0.194) and dorsiflexion proprioception (p = 0.078). The results provide initial evidence of the potential of 'active TENS' to benefit physical function after stroke which warrants further phase II trials to develop the intervention. Concerns that stimulation could have a detrimental impact on balance and increase risk of falls were not supported.

  1. Biogas container - mobile plant concept for the decentralized power generation; Biogascontainer. Mobiles Anlagenkonzept zur dezentralen Energiegewinnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warncke, Jessica; Orth, Maik [Innovations- und Bildungszentrum Hohen Luckow e.V., Hohen Luckow (Germany); Schlegel, Mathias [Rostock Univ. (Germany); Steinhagen, Katrin [ROSOMA GmbH, Rostock-Marienehe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the framework of a cooperation project of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology was developed a small biogas system, that is concepted in the order of a 40-foot standard container, that is modular structured, works energy-independent and optional can be used mobile. First rank the system was designed for biogas production in developing and emerging countries. Now there are inter alia also concrete inquiries of german partners. (orig.)

  2. Promise of a low power mobile CPU based embedded system in artificial leg control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Robert; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Huang, He; Yang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a low power embedded system using mobile processor technology (Intel Atom™ Z530 Processor) specifically tailored for a neural-machine interface (NMI) for artificial limbs. This embedded system effectively performs our previously developed NMI algorithm based on neuromuscular-mechanical fusion and phase-dependent pattern classification. The analysis shows that NMI embedded system can meet real-time constraints with high accuracies for recognizing the user's locomotion mode. Our implementation utilizes the mobile processor efficiently to allow a power consumption of 2.2 watts and low CPU utilization (less than 4.3%) while executing the complex NMI algorithm. Our experiments have shown that the highly optimized C program implementation on the embedded system has superb advantages over existing PC implementations on MATLAB. The study results suggest that mobile-CPU-based embedded system is promising for implementing advanced control for powered lower limb prostheses.

  3. Design of Mobile Operation and Maintenance System Based on Power GIS and GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing TAO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the low efficiency of operation and maintenance and the problems of management coordination caused by the coexistence of off-line operation and maintenance and multi system coexistence in current power telecommunication operation and maintenance, this paper proposes a mobile operation and maintenance system based on power GIS and GPS location technology. The system is based on the C/S architecture, and the mobile operation and maintenance terminal is connected with the operation and maintenance management terminal through wireless and wired network. In addition to meeting basic business requirements, the system integrates power GIS functions to visually demonstrate communication resources, personnel, and failures. The staff can use the wireless mobile terminal which integrated GPS module for to operate and maintain, and can locate accurately in real time.

  4. Power mobility skill progression for children and adolescents: a systematic review of measures and their clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Debra A; Livingstone, Roslyn W

    2018-03-14

    To identify and critically appraise standardized measures of power mobility skill used with children (18y or younger) with mobility limitations and explore the measures' application for 'exploratory', 'operational', and 'functional' learners. Five electronic databases were searched along with hand-searching for peer-reviewed articles published in English to July 2017 (updated 31st August 2017). Key terms included power(ed) mobility, power(ed) wheelchair, and database-specific terms. Studies included at least one child with a disability, and a detailed description of the measure of power mobility skill. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was followed with inclusion criteria set a priori. Two reviewers independently screened titles, abstracts, and full-text articles. Of 96 titles, 24 articles met inclusion criteria, describing nine measures of power mobility skill. The Wheelchair Skills Checklist, the Powered Mobility Program (PMP), and the Power Mobility Training Tool were augmented by three adaptations of the PMP. Two additional measures were further developed to create a third, the Assessment of Learning Powered mobility use. Validity evidence related primarily to content development while reliability evidence was reported on only two measures. All measures are in the initial stages of development and testing. Research investigating the measures' appropriateness for different types of learners and environments is warranted. There are four distinct measures of paediatric power mobility skill: three task-based, one process-based. Power mobility learners may be divided into three groups: exploratory, operational, and functional. Application of measures of power mobility skill differs for these three groups. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  5. Democratizing Neurorehabilitation: How Accessible are Low-Cost Mobile-Gaming Technologies for Self-Rehabilitation of Arm Disability in Stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rinne

    Full Text Available Motor-training software on tablets or smartphones (Apps offer a low-cost, widely-available solution to supplement arm physiotherapy after stroke. We assessed the proportions of hemiplegic stroke patients who, with their plegic hand, could meaningfully engage with mobile-gaming devices using a range of standard control-methods, as well as by using a novel wireless grip-controller, adapted for neurodisability. We screened all newly-diagnosed hemiplegic stroke patients presenting to a stroke centre over 6 months. Subjects were compared on their ability to control a tablet or smartphone cursor using: finger-swipe, tap, joystick, screen-tilt, and an adapted handgrip. Cursor control was graded as: no movement (0; less than full-range movement (1; full-range movement (2; directed movement (3. In total, we screened 345 patients, of which 87 satisfied recruitment criteria and completed testing. The commonest reason for exclusion was cognitive impairment. Using conventional controls, the proportion of patients able to direct cursor movement was 38-48%; and to move it full-range was 55-67% (controller comparison: p>0.1. By comparison, handgrip enabled directed control in 75%, and full-range movement in 93% (controller comparison: p<0.001. This difference between controllers was most apparent amongst severely-disabled subjects, with 0% achieving directed or full-range control with conventional controls, compared to 58% and 83% achieving these two levels of movement, respectively, with handgrip. In conclusion, hand, or arm, training Apps played on conventional mobile devices are likely to be accessible only to mildly-disabled stroke patients. Technological adaptations such as grip-control can enable more severely affected subjects to engage with self-training software.

  6. Frontal EEG delta/alpha ratio and screening for post-stroke cognitive deficits: the power of four electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiger, Emma; Sheikh, Nabeel; Rowland, Tennille; Wong, Andrew; Read, Stephen; Finnigan, Simon

    2014-10-01

    This study analysed correlations between post-stroke, quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) indices, and cognition-specific, functional outcome measures. Results were compared between QEEG indices calculated from the standard 19 versus 4 frontal (or 4 posterior) electrodes to assess the feasibility and efficacy of employing a reduced electrode montage. Resting-state EEG was recorded at the bedside within 62-101 h after onset of symptoms of middle cerebral artery, ischaemic stroke (confirmed radiologically). Relative power for delta, theta, alpha and beta, delta/alpha ratio (DAR) and pairwise-derived brain symmetry index (pdBSI) were averaged; over all electrodes (global), over F3, F4, F7, F8 (frontal) and P3, P4, T5, T6 (posterior). The functional independence measure and functional assessment measure (FIM-FAM) was administered at mean 105 days post-stroke. Total (30 items) and cognition-specific (5 items) FIM-FAM scores were correlated with QEEG indices using Spearman's coefficient, with a Bonferroni correction. Twenty-five patients were recruited, 4 died within 3 months and 1 was lost to follow-up. Hence 20 cases (10 female; 9 left hemisphere; mean age 68 years, range 38-84) were analysed. Two QEEG indices demonstrated highly-significant correlations with cognitive outcomes: frontal DAR (ρ = -0.664, p ≤ 0.001) and global, relative alpha power (ρ = 0.67, p ≤ 0.001). After correction there were no other significant correlations. Alpha activity - particularly frontally - may index post-stroke attentional capacity, which appears to be a key determinant of functional and cognitive outcomes. Likewise frontal delta pathophysiology influences such outcomes. Pending further studies, DAR from 4 frontal electrodes may inform early screening for post-MCA stroke cognitive deficits, and thereby, clinical decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. JLTV - Briefings to Industry, Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility (GVPM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-27

    25 kW (threshold) / 30 kW (objective) – Engine cranking / battery charging / low-voltage onboard and export power / regenerative braking / torque...Silent Watch operation Greater efficiency energy capture from regenerative braking in hybrid-electric vehicles DELIVERABLES: Two prototype...of 100 0 C. UNCLAS: Dist A. Approved for public release PURPOSE: Improve lead-acid battery technology by replacing conventional lead metal grids with

  8. Comparison of the effects of core stabilization and chest mobilization exercises on lung function and chest wall expansion in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Jun; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Min, Kyung-Ok

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of this study was to compare the effects of core stabilization and chest mobilization exercises on pulmonary function and chest expansion in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into two groups: a core stabilization exercise group (n=15) and a chest mobilization exercise group (n=15). Each exercise was performed 3 times per week for 30 minutes for 4 weeks, and pulmonary function and chest expansion when breathing were measured for both groups. [Results] There were significant increases in both forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second before and after intervention. Core stabilization exercise resulted in a significant increase in peak expiratory flow, and significant increases in upper and lower chest expansion were detected with chest mobilization exercise. However, no significant difference was revealed between the two groups. [Conclusion] This study suggested that both exercises were effective in some aspects of pulmonary function while core stabilization can help increase peak expiratory flow and chest mobilization can assist with chest expansion.

  9. Does power mobility training impact a child's mastery motivation and spectrum of EEG activity? An exploratory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Farris, John P; Aldrich, Naomi J; Rhodes, Samhita

    2017-08-30

    The purposes of this exploratory project were: (1) to evaluate the impact of power mobility training with a child who has multiple, severe impairments and (2) to determine if the child's spectrum of electroencephalography (EEG) activity changed during power mobility training. A single-subject A-B-A-B research design was conducted with a four-week duration for each phase. Two target behaviours were explored: (1) mastery motivation assessed via the dimensions of mastery questionnaire (DMQ) and (2) EEG data collected under various conditions. Power mobility skills were also assessed. The participant was a three-year, two-month-old girl with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, gross motor function classification system level V. Each target behaviour was measured weekly. During intervention phases, power mobility training was provided. Improvements were noted in subscale scores of the DMQ. Short-term and long-term EEG changes were also noted. Improvements were noted in power mobility skills. The participant in this exploratory project demonstrated improvements in power mobility skill and function. EEG data collection procedures and variability in an individual's EEG activity make it difficult to determine if the participant's spectrum of EEG activity actually changed in response to power mobility training. Additional studies are needed to investigate the impact of power mobility training on the spectrum of EEG activity in children who have multiple, severe impairments. Implications for Rehabilitation Power mobility training appeared to be beneficial for a child with multiple, severe impairments though the child may never become an independent, community-based power wheelchair user. Electroencephalography may be a valuable addition to the study of power mobility use in children with multiple, severe impairments. Power mobility training appeared to impact mastery motivation (the internal drive to solve complex problems and master new skills) in a child who has multiple

  10. Computer Aided Stroke-by-Stroke Visualization of Actual and Target Power Allows for Continuously Increasing Ramp Tests on Wind-Braked Rowing Ergometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treff, Gunnar; Winkert, Kay; Machus, Katja; Steinacker, Jürgen M

    2017-10-16

    Ramp tests are continuously increasing exercise tests used for determination of maximal oxygen uptake (⩒O 2 max), which is identifiable by a plateau in ⩒O 2 despite increasing mechanical power output (LOAD). On wind-braked rowing ergometers (RowErg) it is hardly feasible to ensure a continuous increase in LOAD until test termination, because neither resistance nor stroke-frequency are externally adjustable, but depend on the rower. To enable ramp tests on rowing ergometers, we produced visual stroke-by-stroke feedback showing target and actual LOAD to the rower. The software supports automatic test termination (TERM auto ) if LOAD ceases to increase. We aimed to evaluate linearity of the LOAD-increment and calculate the difference between TERM auto and test duration at subjective exhaustion (TERM exhaust ). Twenty-eight highly trained male rowers performed a ramp test until subjective exhaustion on RowErg, targeting an increment of 35W•min -1 . LOAD was measured as work per time via external force and position sensors and visualized on a computer screen. TERM auto was deactivated, but all data were logged. Test duration at TERM exhaust was subsequently compared with virtual test duration at TERM auto calculated from the log files. Regression between time and LOAD was y=167+34.6W (r=.99). Individual correlations ranged from .97 to 1.0. TERM auto caused 12-35s shorter test durations than TERM exhaust in four rowers, leading to underestimation in ⩒O 2 max of 1.2% and 3.7% in two rowers. This setup allows one to perform ramp tests on RowErg with continuously increasing LOAD until TERM auto . In particular cases ⩒O2max might be slightly underestimated at TERM auto .

  11. Integration of thermoelectrics and photovoltaics as auxiliary power sources in mobile computing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtaroglu, Ali; Yokochi, Alex; von Jouanne, Annette

    The inclusion of renewable technologies as auxiliary power sources in mobile computing platforms can lead to improved performance such as the extension of battery life. This paper presents sustainable power management characteristics and performance enhancement opportunities in mobile computing systems resulting from the integration of thermoelectric generators and photovoltaic units. Thermoelectric generators are employed for scavenging waste heat from processors or other significant components in the computer's chipset while the integration of photovoltaic units is demonstrated for generating power from environmental illumination. A scalable and flexible power architecture is also verified to effectively integrate these renewable energy sources. This paper confirms that battery life extension can be achieved through the appropriate integration of renewable sources such as thermoelectric and photovoltaic devices.

  12. Mobile test stand for evaluation of electric power plants for unmanned aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Serbezov Vladimir; Dimitrov Stamen; Rangelov Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    The absence of accurate performance data is a common problem with most civilian unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) power plant producers. The reasons for this are the small size of most of the manufacturers and the high price of precise wind tunnel testing and computer simulations. To overcome this problem at Dronamics Ltd., with support from the Department of Aeronautics of TU-Sofia, a mobile test stand for evaluation of electric power plants for unmanned aircraft was developed. The stand may be ...

  13. Optimizing MEMS-Based Storage Devices for Mobile Battery-Powered Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatib, M.G.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    An emerging storage technology, called MEMS-based storage, promises nonvolatile storage devices with ultrahigh density, high rigidity, a small form factor, and low cost. For these reasons, MEMS-based storage devices are suitable for battery-powered mobile systems such as PDAs. For deployment in such

  14. Power saving control for the mobile DVB-H receivers based on H.264/SVC standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Grinko, Vitaly; Ukhanova, Ann

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the utilization of scalable extension of H.264/AVC standard in digital video broadcasting for handheld devices. In this area the problem of mobile receiver power consumption is critically important. This paper amplifies the well-known idea of the time-slicing and allows...

  15. Power consumption analysis of constant bit rate data transmission over 3G mobile wireless networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Le; Ukhanova, Ann; Belyaev, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the power consumption of data transmission with constant bit rate over 3G mobile wireless networks. Our work includes the description of the transition state machine in 3G networks, followed by the detailed energy consumption analysis and measurement results...

  16. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Muhl, Thuy

    2017-01-01

    For use of metal supported SOFC in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast start up, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the support layer thickness of 313 μm...

  17. Assessment of learning powered mobility use--applying grounded theory to occupational performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisbeth; Durkin, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration by two grounded theory researchers, who each had developed a learning continuum instrument, led to the emergence of a new tool for assessment of learning powered mobility use. We undertook a rigorous process of comparative reanalysis that included merging, modifying, and expanding our previous research findings. A new instrument together with its facilitating strategies emerged in the course of revisits to our existing rich account of data taken from real environment powered mobility practice over an extensive time period. Instrument descriptors, categories, phases, and stages allow a facilitator to assess actual phase and plot actual occupational performance and provide a learner with the just right challenge through the learning process. Facilitating strategies are described for each of the phases and provide directions for involvement during learner performance. The learning approach is led by a belief system that the intervention is user-led, working in partnership and empowering the learner. The new assessment tool is inclusive of every potential powered mobility user because it focuses on the whole continuum of the learning process of powered mobility use from novice to expert. The new tool was appraised by clinicians and has been used successfully in clinical practice in the United Kingdom and Sweden.

  18. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Pip A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 42% of all stroke patients do not get out of the house as much as they would like. This can impede a person’s quality of life. This study is testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a new outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention by comparing it to usual care. Methods/design This is a multi-centre parallel group individually randomised, controlled trial. At least 506 participants will be recruited through 15 primary and secondary care settings and will be eligible if they are over 18 years of age, have had a stroke and wish to get out of the house more often. Participants are being randomly allocated to either the intervention group or the control group. Intervention group participants receive up to 12 rehabilitation outdoor mobility sessions over up to four months. The main component of the intervention is repeated practice of outdoor mobility with a therapist. Control group participants are receiving the usual intervention for outdoor mobility limitations: verbal advice and provision of leaflets provided over one session. Outcome measures are being collected using postal questionnaires, travel calendars and by independent assessors. The primary outcome measure is the Social Function domain of the SF36v2 quality of life assessment six months after recruitment. The secondary outcome measures include: functional ability, mobility, the number of journeys (monthly travel diaries, satisfaction with outdoor mobility, mood, health-related quality of life, resource use of health and social care. Carer mood information is also being collected. The mean Social Function score of the SF-36v2 will be compared between treatment arms using a multiple membership form of mixed effects multiple regression analysis adjusting for centre (as a fixed effect, age and baseline Social Function score as covariates and therapist as a multiple membership random effect. Regression coefficients and 95% confidence

  19. A smart mobile pouch as a biomechanical energy harvester towards self-powered smart wireless power transfer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Arunkumar; Alluri, Nagamalleswara Rao; Sudhakaran, M S P; Mok, Young Sun; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2017-07-20

    A Smart Mobile Pouch Triboelectric Nanogenerator (SMP-TENG) is introduced as a promising eco-friendly approach for scavenging biomechanical energy for powering next generation intelligent devices and smart phones. This is a cost-effective and robust method for harvesting energy from human motion, by utilizing worn fabrics as a contact material. The SMP-TENG is capable of harvesting energy in two operational modes: lateral sliding and vertical contact and separation. Moreover, the SMP-TENG can also act as a self-powered emergency flashlight and self-powered pedometer during normal human motion. A wireless power transmission setup integrated with SMP-TENG is demonstrated. This upgrades the traditional energy harvesting device into a self-powered wireless power transfer SMP-TENG. The wirelessly transferred power can be used to charge a Li-ion battery and light LEDs. The SMP-TENG opens a wide range of opportunities in the field of self-powered devices and low maintenance energy harvesting systems for portable and wearable electronic gadgets.

  20. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  1. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TIMED UP AND GO TEST AND TINETTI PERFORMANCE ORIENTED MOBILITY ASSESSMENT IN PREDICTING FALLS IN HEMIPARETIC STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Gosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke-related balance and gait deficits contribute to the large number of falls in these patients. This may be due to inappropriate reaction to external forces. Hence, one has to be able to react to external forces with appropriately timed and scaled responses to maintain balance. Therefore it is important to identify which patients have risk of falling and would benefit from fall prevention measures. To accomplish this, valid and reliable clinical scales those are easy to administer are needed. Assessment scales that predict falls have been tested in different populations. The present prospective study compares two simple scales viz. Timed Up and Go test (TUG and Performance Oriented Mobility Test (POMA in fall prediction among patients with sub acute and chronic stroke. Methodos: 50 stroke subjects were asked to perform both the tests viz. TUG and POMA one after another on the date of evaluation or Day 0 and from Day 1 falls are recorded per month up to six months. Both test results were compared for their accuracy. Results: It was found that t = -4.496 which is highly significant at (p=0.00 which proves that there is remarkable difference in means of TUG and POMA. TUG covers 0.970 and POMA covers 0.135 area in the curve and is an established fact that higher area indicates excellent accuracy. The sensitivity and specificity of TUG is 78% and 94% respectively and that of POMA is 90% and 60% respectively. Conclusion: To conclude, we can say that there is significant difference between the Timed Up and Go test and Tinetti‘s Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment score on prediction of fall in Hemiparetic Stroke patients.

  2. Power mobility with collision avoidance for older adults: user, caregiver, and prescriber perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rosalie H; Korotchenko, Alexandra; Hurd Clarke, Laura; Mortenson, W Ben; Mihailidis, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Collision avoidance technology has the capacity to facilitate safer mobility among older power mobility users with physical, sensory, and cognitive impairments, thus enabling independence for more users. Little is known about consumers' perceptions of collision avoidance. This article draws on interviews (29 users, 5 caregivers, and 10 prescribers) to examine views on design and utilization of this technology. Data analysis identified three themes: "useful situations or contexts," "technology design issues and real-life application," and "appropriateness of collision avoidance technology for a variety of users." Findings support ongoing development of collision avoidance for older adult users. The majority of participants supported the technology and felt that it might benefit current users and users with visual impairments, but might be unsuitable for people with significant cognitive impairments. Some participants voiced concerns regarding the risk for injury with power mobility use and some identified situations where collision avoidance might be beneficial (driving backward, avoiding dynamic obstacles, negotiating outdoor barriers, and learning power mobility use). Design issues include the need for context awareness, reliability, and user interface specifications. User desire to maintain driving autonomy supports development of collaboratively controlled systems. This research lays the groundwork for future development by illustrating consumer requirements for this technology.

  3. A compact Class D RF power amplifier for mobile nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, J.; Dykstra, R.; Eccles, C.; Gouws, G.; Obruchkov, S.

    2017-07-01

    A 20 MHz Class D amplifier with an output of 100 W of RF power has been developed. The compact size printed circuit board area of 50 cm2 and efficiency of 73% make it suitable for mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems. Test results show that the rise and ring down times of the amplifier are less than 0.2 μs, and it is capable of producing constant amplitude pulses as short as 2 μs. Experiments using a Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill pulse sequence with a NMR MOUSE sensor confirm that the Class D amplifier is suitable for mobile NMR applications.

  4. Output power distributions of mobile radio base stations based on network measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombi, D; Thors, B; Persson, T; Törnevik, C; Wirén, N; Larsson, L-E

    2013-01-01

    In this work output power distributions of mobile radio base stations have been analyzed for 2G and 3G telecommunication systems. The approach is based on measurements in selected networks using performance surveillance tools part of the network Operational Support System (OSS). For the 3G network considered, direct measurements of output power levels were possible, while for the 2G networks, output power levels were estimated from measurements of traffic volumes. Both voice and data services were included in the investigation. Measurements were conducted for large geographical areas, to ensure good overall statistics, as well as for smaller areas to investigate the impact of different environments. For high traffic hours, the 90th percentile of the averaged output power was found to be below 65% and 45% of the available output power for the 2G and 3G systems, respectively.

  5. Nuclear power supports sensible entry into electric mobility; Kernenergie unterstuetzt den sinnvollen Einstieg in die Elektromobilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuczera, Bernhard

    2010-10-15

    The German federal government established the environmental goal of reducing carbon emissions from 1,033 million t in 1990 by 40% to 620 million t/a by 2020. The Federal Environmental Office reports a reduction by 26% for the past economic crisis year of 2009 over the reference year. Consequently, further efforts are needed along these lines if the objective is to be reached in 2020. Towards this end, the German government and industry founded the National Electric Mobility Platform on May 3, 2010 in an effort to make Germany a lead market for electric mobility and have one million electric vehicles operate on German roads by 2020. Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel in addition demands mobility in future to be ''more independent of resources, less pollutant to the environment, and more sustainable.'' These target criteria basically are met in the power supply sector when nuclear power is used to generate electricity. Against this backdrop, perspectives of electric mobility are outlined in terms of their environmental characteristics, and various approaches to achieving adequate electricity supply are explained. In view of the boundary conditions in power technology and power economy, the agreement reached by the present coalition government on September 6, 2010 about extending the plant life of the 17 German nuclear power plants supports the objective referred to above. This compromise of coalition politics exercises a bridge function in providing for an average plant life extension of 12 years over the current plant life limitations. The federal government considers this plant life extension a key feature of its new overall energy concept, which is to be more independent of resources, less polluting to the environment, and more sustainable than the current status quo. (orig.)

  6. Channel Access and Power Control for Mobile Crowdsourcing in Device-to-Device Underlaid Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the access of a myriad of smart handheld devices in cellular networks, mobile crowdsourcing becomes increasingly popular, which can leverage omnipresent mobile devices to promote the complicated crowdsourcing tasks. Device-to-device (D2D communication is highly desired in mobile crowdsourcing when cellular communications are costly. The D2D cellular network is more preferable for mobile crowdsourcing than conventional cellular network. Therefore, this paper addresses the channel access and power control problem in the D2D underlaid cellular networks. We propose a novel semidistributed network-assisted power and a channel access control scheme for D2D user equipment (DUE pieces. It can control the interference from DUE pieces to the cellular user accurately and has low information feedback overhead. For the proposed scheme, the stochastic geometry tool is employed and analytic expressions are derived for the coverage probabilities of both the cellular link and D2D links. We analyze the impact of key system parameters on the proposed scheme. The Pareto optimal access threshold maximizing the total area spectral efficiency is obtained. Unlike the existing works, the performances of the cellular link and D2D links are both considered. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the total area spectral efficiency significantly compared to existing schemes.

  7. Pre-power-stroke cross-bridges contribute to force transients during imposed shortening in isolated muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C Minozzo

    Full Text Available When skeletal muscles are activated and mechanically shortened, the force that is produced by the muscle fibers decreases in two phases, marked by two changes in slope (P₁ and P₂ that happen at specific lengths (L₁ and L₂. We tested the hypothesis that these force transients are determined by the amount of myosin cross-bridges attached to actin and by changes in cross-bridge strain due to a changing fraction of cross-bridges in the pre-power-stroke state. Three separate experiments were performed, using skinned muscle fibers that were isolated and subsequently (i activated at different Ca²⁺ concentrations (pCa²⁺ 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 (n = 13, (ii activated in the presence of blebbistatin (n = 16, and (iii activated in the presence of blebbistatin at varying velocities (n = 5. In all experiments, a ramp shortening was imposed (amplitude 10%L₀, velocity 1 L₀•sarcomere length (SL•s⁻¹, from an initial SL of 2.5 µm (except by the third group, in which velocities ranged from 0.125 to 2.0 L₀•s⁻¹. The values of P₁, P₂, L₁, and L₂ did not change with Ca²⁺ concentrations. Blebbistatin decreased P₁, and it did not alter P₂, L₁, and L₂. We developed a mathematical cross-bridge model comprising a load-dependent power-stroke transition and a pre-power-stroke cross-bridge state. The P₁ and P₂ critical points as well as the critical lengths L₁ and L₂ were explained qualitatively by the model, and the effects of blebbistatin inhibition on P₁ were also predicted. Furthermore, the results of the model suggest that the mechanism by which blebbistatin inhibits force is by interfering with the closing of the myosin upper binding cleft, biasing cross-bridges into a pre-power-stroke state.

  8. Cross-Layer Design Approach for Power Control in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarfaraz Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In mobile ad hoc networks, communication among mobile nodes occurs through wireless medium The design of ad hoc network protocol, generally based on a traditional “layered approach”, has been found ineffective to deal with receiving signal strength (RSS-related problems, affecting the physical layer, the network layer and transport layer. This paper proposes a design approach, deviating from the traditional network design, toward enhancing the cross-layer interaction among different layers, namely physical, MAC and network. The Cross-Layer design approach for Power control (CLPC would help to enhance the transmission power by averaging the RSS values and to find an effective route between the source and the destination. This cross-layer design approach was tested by simulation (NS2 simulator and its performance over AODV was found to be better.

  9. ISRU Reactant, Fuel Cell Based Power Plant for Robotic and Human Mobile Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Russell S.; Sanders, Gerald; Simon, Thomas; McCurdy, Kerri

    2003-01-01

    Three basic power generation system concepts are generally considered for lander, rover, and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) assistant applications for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration missions. The most common power system considered is the solar array and battery system. While relatively simple and successful, solar array/battery systems have some serious limitations for mobile applications. For typical rover applications, these limitations include relatively low total energy storage capabilities, daylight only operating times (6 to 8 hours on Mars), relatively short operating lives depending on the operating environment, and rover/lander size and surface use constraints. Radioisotope power systems are being reconsidered for long-range science missions. Unfortunately, the high cost, political controversy, and launch difficulties that are associated with nuclear-based power systems suggests that the use of radioisotope powered landers, rovers, and EVA assistants will be limited. The third power system concept now being considered are fuel cell based systems. Fuel cell power systems overcome many of the performance and surface exploration limitations of solar array/battery power systems and the prohibitive cost and other difficulties associated with nuclear power systems for mobile applications. In an effort to better understand the capabilities and limitations of fuel cell power systems for Moon and Mars exploration applications, NASA is investigating the use of in-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) produced reactant, fuel cell based power plants to power robotic outpost rovers, science equipment, and future human spacecraft, surface-excursion rovers, and EVA assistant rovers. This paper will briefly compare the capabilities and limitations of fuel cell power systems relative to solar array/battery and nuclear systems, discuss the unique and enhanced missions that fuel cell power systems enable, and discuss the common technology and system attributes

  10. Effectiveness of Client-Centered "Tune-Ups" on Community Reintegration, Mobility, and Quality of Life After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Brenda; Bryant, Dianne; Garland, S Jayne

    2018-04-03

    To explore the effectiveness of a 2-week client-centered rehabilitation intervention (tune-up) delivered 6 months after inpatient discharge on community reintegration at 1 year in people with stroke. A multicenter randomized controlled trial with 2 groups: an intervention ("tune-up") group and a control group having the same exposure to assessment. Three research laboratories. Participants (N=103) with hemiparetic stroke recruited from inpatient rehabilitation units at the time of discharge. Participants randomized to the tune-up group received 1-hour therapy sessions in their home 3times/wk for 2 weeks at 6 months postdischarge focusing on identified mobility-related goals. A second tune-up was provided at 12 months. Community reintegration measured by the Subjective Index of Physical and Social Outcome at 12 months and secondary outcomes included the Berg Balance Scale and measures of mobility and health-related quality of life up to 15 months. At 12 months, both groups showed significant improvement in community reintegration (Pmobility-related and quality of life outcomes for both groups (P≤.0.5), but no group differences (P≥.30). All participants in the tune-up group met or exceeded at least 1 mobility-related goal; however, the intervention did not differentially improve community reintegration. The improvements in mobility and quality of life over the 15-month postdischarge period may be secondary to high activity levels in both study groups and exposure to regular assessment. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enersave API: Android-based power-saving framework for mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Muharum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Power consumption is a major factor to be taken into consideration when using mobile devices in the IoT field. Good Power management requires proper understanding of the way in which it is being consumed by the end-devices. This paper is a continuation of the work in Ref. [1] and proposes an energy saving API for the Android Operating System in order to help developers turn their applications into energy-aware ones. The main features heavily used for building smart applications, greatly impact battery life of Android devices and which have been taken into consideration are: Screen brightness, Colour scheme, CPU frequency, 2G/3G network, Maps, Low power localisation, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. The assessment of the power-saving API has been performed on real Android devices and also compared to the most powerful power-saving applications – DU Battery Saver and Battery Saver 2016 – currently available on the Android market. Comparisons demonstrate that the Enersave API has a significant impact on power saving when incorporated in android applications. While DU Battery Saver and Battery Saver 2016 help saving 22.2% and 40.5% of the battery power respectively, the incorporation of the Enersave API in android applications can help save 84.6% of battery power.

  12. Adaptive Power Saving Method for Mobile Walking Guidance Device Using Motion Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognize the motion of the user and the surrounding environment with multiple sensors. We developed a guidance system based on mobile device for visually impaired person that helps the user to walk safely to the destination in the previous study. However, a mobile device having multiple sensors spends more power when the sensors are activated simultaneously and continuously. We propose a method for reducing the power consumption of a mobile device by considering the motion context of the user. We analyze and classify the user’s motion accurately by means of a decision tree and HMM (Hidden Markov Model that exploit the data from a triaxial accelerometer sensor and a tilt sensor. We can reduce battery power consumption by controlling the number of active ultrasonic sensors and the frame rate of the camera used to acquire spatial context around the user. This helps us to extend the operating time of the device and reduce the weight of the device’s built-in battery.

  13. Study of variations of radiofrequency power density from mobile phone base stations with distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayinmode, B. O.; Farai, I. P.

    2013-01-01

    The variations of radiofrequency (RF) radiation power density with distance around some mobile phone base stations (BTSs), in ten randomly selected locations in Ibadan, western Nigeria, were studied. Measurements were made with a calibrated hand-held spectrum analyser. The maximum Global System of Mobile (GSM) communication 1800 signal power density was 323.91 μW m -2 at 250 m radius of a BTS and that of GSM 900 was 1119.00 μW m -2 at 200 m radius of another BTS. The estimated total maximum power density was 2972.00 μW m -2 at 50 m radius of a different BTS. This study shows that the maximum carrier signal power density and the total maximum power density from a BTS may be observed averagely at 200 and 50 m of its radius, respectively. The result of this study demonstrates that exposure of people to RF radiation from phone BTSs in Ibadan city is far less than the recommended limits by International scientific bodies. (authors)

  14. Harnessing the power of mobile technologies for collaborating, crowdsourcing, and creating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, H.

    2015-12-01

    Today's digital technologies can have a powerful influence on teaching and learning. M-learning and u-learning in particular are changing pedagogical practice. Sub categories are rapidly emerging, such as context-aware ubiquitous learning, that involve students learning subject content while immersed in authentic and relevant surroundings. Learning cultures are a nebulous blend of traditions, values, beliefs, and rituals built up over time. For a long time, education has long been conceived as classroom-based and predominantly sedentary (Merchant, 2012). Recent mobile technologies are disrupting this culture in favor of learning that is contextualized, personalized, on demand, and ubiquitous (Crompton, 2013). 21st century students are a different breed than past generations (Prensky, 2001). These students have grown up in a time that has not only altered their perceptions and practices but modified the wiring of the brain through neuroplasticity (Crompton, 2012). Students now cognitively receive information quickly through non-linear methods (Gross, 2003, Oblinger & Oblinger, 2005). They think differently. They also seem to be attached to mobile devices 24/7, although the content of the lesson does not match what they seem to be doing on the mobile devices. This presentation will showcase how to get your students to harness the power of mobile devices for educational purposes. For example, students in your classes will be using devices to collaborate on activities with Google Forms, crowdsourcing the best class questions in Slido, and screencasting thoughts and ideas to share with others with Educreations. These are examples of free apps or Web 2.0 tools that can be used on all the major mobile platforms. Crompton, H. (2013). Mobile learning: New approach, new theory. In Z. L. Berge & L. Y. Muilenburg (Eds.), Handbook of mobile learning (pp. 47-57). Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. Mcb University Press, 9(5). Oblinger, D., & Oblinger, J

  15. Effectiveness of Circuit-Based Exercises on Gait Speed, Balance, and Functional Mobility in People Affected by Stroke: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini-Rocha, Ana Clara; de Andrade, Anderson Lúcio Souza; Moraes, André Marques; Gomide Matheus, Liana Barbaresco; Diniz, Leonardo Rios; Martins, Wagner Rodrigues

    2018-04-01

    Several interventions have been proposed to rehabilitate patients with neurologic dysfunctions due to stroke. However, the effectiveness of circuit-based exercises according to its actual definition, ie, an overall program to improve strength, stamina, balance or functioning, was not provided. To examine the effectiveness of circuit-based exercise in the treatment of people affected by stroke. A search through PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database databases was performed to identify controlled clinical trials without language or date restriction. The overall mean difference with 95% confidence interval was calculated for all outcomes. Two independent reviewers assessed the risk of bias. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria, and 8 presented suitable data to perform a meta-analysis. Quantitative analysis showed that circuit-based exercise was more effective than conventional intervention on gait speed (mean difference of 0.11 m/s) and circuit-based exercise was not significantly more effective than conventional intervention on balance and functional mobility. Our results demonstrated that circuit-based exercise presents better effects on gait when compared with conventional intervention and that its effects on balance and functional mobility were not better than conventional interventions. I. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: a multicentre randomised controlled study (the Getting out of the House Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Philippa A; Armstrong, Sarah; Avery, Tony J; Barer, David; Barton, Garry R; Darby, Janet; Gladman, John R F; Horne, Jane; Leach, Simon; Lincoln, Nadina B; Mehta, Samir; Newell, Ossie; O'Neil, Kathleen; Sach, Tracey H; Walker, Marion F; Williams, Hywel C; Woodhouse, Lisa J; Leighton, Mat P

    2014-05-01

    One-third of stroke patients are dependent on others to get outside their homes. This can cause people to become housebound, leading to increased immobility, poor health, isolation and misery. There is some evidence that outdoor mobility rehabilitation can reduce these limitations. To test the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention for stroke patients. Multicentre, parallel-group randomised controlled trial, with two groups allocated at a 1 : 1 ratio plus qualitative participant interviews. Fifteen UK NHS stroke services throughout England, Scotland and Wales. A total of 568 stroke patients who wished to get out of the house more often, mean age of 71 years: 508 reached the 6-month follow-up and 10 were interviewed. Control was delivered prior to randomisation to all participants, and consisted of verbal advice and transport and outdoor mobility leaflets. Intervention was a targeted outdoor mobility rehabilitation programme delivered by 29 NHS therapists to 287 randomly chosen participants for up to 12 sessions over 4 months. Primary outcome was participant health-related quality of life, measured by the Short Form questionnaire-36 items, version 2 (Social Function domain), 6 months after baseline. Secondary outcomes were functional ability, mobility, number of journeys (from monthly travel diaries), satisfaction with outdoor mobility (SWOM), psychological well-being and resource use [health care and Personal Social Services (PSS)] 6 months after baseline. Carer well-being was recorded. All outcome measures were collected by post and repeated 12 months after baseline. Outcomes for the groups were compared using statistical significance testing and adjusted for multiple membership to account for the effect of multiple therapists at different sites. Interviews were analysed using interpretive phenomenology to explore confidence. A median of seven intervention sessions [interquartile range (IQR) 3

  17. A geographical model of radio-frequency power density around mobile phone masts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, David; Beale, Linda; Bennett, James; Toledano, Mireille B.; Hoogh, Kees de

    2012-01-01

    Public concern about possible health effects of EMF radiation from mobile phone masts has led to an increase of epidemiological studies and health risk assessments which, in turn, require adequate methods of exposure estimation. Difficulties in exposure modelling are exacerbated both by the complexity of the propagation processes, and the need to obtain estimates for large study populations in order to provide sufficient statistical power to detect or exclude the small relative risks that might exist. Use of geographical information system (GIS) techniques offers the means to make such computations efficiently. This paper describes the development and field validation of a GIS-based exposure model (Geomorf). The model uses a modified Gaussian formulation to represent spatial variations in power densities around mobile phone masts, on the basis of power output, antenna height, tilt and the surrounding propagation environment. Obstruction by topography is allowed for, through use of a visibility function. Model calibration was done using field data from 151 measurement sites (1510 antenna-specific measurements) around a group of masts in a rural location, and 50 measurement sites (658 antenna-specific measurements) in an urban area. Different parameter settings were found to be necessary in urban and rural areas to obtain optimum results. The calibrated models were then validated against independent sets of data gathered from measurement surveys in rural and urban areas, and model performance was compared with that of two commonly used path-loss models (the COST-231 adaptations of the Hata and Walfisch–Ikegami models). Model performance was found to vary somewhat between the rural and urban areas, and at different measurement levels (antenna-specific power density, total power density), but overall gave good estimates (R 2 = 0.641 and 0.615, RMSE = 10.7 and 6.7 dB m at the antenna and site-level respectively). Performance was considerably better than that of both

  18. Third-order Intermodulation Reduction in Mobile Power Amplifiers by the First Stage Bias Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Jung

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the third order intermodulation distortion (IMD3 of three-stage power amplifier (PA is analyzed using the Volterra series. The analysis explains how the total IMD3 of the three-stage power amplifier can be reduced by the first-stage bias condition. The three-stage PA, which is fabricated using InGaP/GaAs hetero-junction bipolar transistor (HBT, operates with an optimized first driver stage bias for higher P1dB and good gain flatness. The power amplifier has been designed for 1626.5 MHz~1660.5 MHz satellite mobile communications. With π/4 DQPSK modulation signals, this PA can deliver a highly linear output power of 33 dBm from 3.6V supply voltage. At 33 dBm output power, it shows a gain of 31.9 dB, a power-added efficiency (PAE of 39.8%, an adjacent channel power ratio (ACPR of -28.2 dBc at a 31.25 KHz offset frequency.

  19. Cyber Security Evaluation of the Wireless Communication for the Mobile Safeguard Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Ye, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces cyber security evaluation results and a design of the wireless communication technology to apply to safeguard systems in nuclear power plants. While wireless communication technologies can generally make mobility and efficiency on plant operation, those have seldom been installed on the nuclear I&C systems due to the negative concern of unexpected outcomes that stem from electromagnetic interference and cyber attack. New design of advanced digital safeguard and I&C systems uses computer-based systems for the safeguard and safety functions. On the other hand, those are being exposed to various types of new and existing cyber threats, vulnerabilities and risks which significantly increase the likelihood that those could be compromised. In order to employ the wireless communication technology in safeguard function, licencees assess and manage the potential for adverse effects on safeguard and safety functions so as to provide high assurance that critical functions are properly protected cyber attack. It is expected that the safeguard function, specifically on the area of real-time monitoring, logging, can be enhanced by employing the mobile safeguard devices (: smart phone, laptop, smart pad, etc). In this paper, we deal with the cyber security evaluation, which consists of threat analysis, vulnerability test, establishment of security plan, and design solutions for the wireless communication on the basis of IEEE 802.11(Wi-Fi) protocol. Proposed evaluation and design solution could be a basis for the design of wireless communication and mobile safeguard systems in nuclear power plants. (author)

  20. Day-to-Day Market Power and Efficiency in Tradable Mobility Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An active transportation and demand management framework focusing on tradable mobility credits (TMC is integrated into an agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS platform. In this framework, it is conceived that an auction market within which mobility credits can be transferred between buyers and sellers is constructed in general. The idea of ABMS is extensively incorporated to mimic system users’ daily route choices as well as market-related micro-economical decision making process under TMC circumstance. Users are able to form individual propensities towards available bid/ask choices by reinforcement learning principles. The integrated platform offers a brand new insight view of microscopic aspect of the daily operations of credit transfer market, which has hardly been obtained by prior analytical models. Day-to-day traffic dynamics and market dynamics can be captured. Besides, market MOEs, including convergence, stability, efficiency and relative market powers of buyers and sellers under different market policies are investigated.

  1. Power Optimization of Multimode Mobile Embedded Systems with Workload-Delay Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeseok Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to take the relationship between delay and workload into account in the power optimization of microprocessors in mobile embedded systems. Since the components outside a device continuously change their values or properties, the workload to be handled by the systems becomes dynamic and variable. This variable workload is formulated as a staircase function of the delay taken at the previous iteration in this paper and applied to the power optimization of DVFS (dynamic voltage-frequency scaling. In doing so, a graph representation of all possible workload/mode changes during the lifetime of a device, Workload Transition Graph (WTG, is proposed. Then, the power optimization problem is transformed into finding a cycle (closed walk in WTG which minimizes the average power consumption over it. Out of the obtained optimal cycle of WTG, one can derive the optimal power management policy of the target device. It is shown that the proposed policy is valid for both continuous and discrete DVFS models. The effectiveness of the proposed power optimization policy is demonstrated with the simulation results of synthetic and real-life examples.

  2. High Thermoelectric Power Factor of High-Mobility 2D Electron Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hiromichi; Kim, Sung Wng; Kaneki, Shota; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2018-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion is an energy harvesting technology that directly converts waste heat from various sources into electricity by the Seebeck effect of thermoelectric materials with a large thermopower ( S ), high electrical conductivity (σ), and low thermal conductivity (κ). State-of-the-art nanostructuring techniques that significantly reduce κ have realized high-performance thermoelectric materials with a figure of merit ( ZT = S 2 ∙σ∙ T ∙κ -1 ) between 1.5 and 2. Although the power factor (PF = S 2 ∙σ) must also be enhanced to further improve ZT , the maximum PF remains near 1.5-4 mW m -1 K -2 due to the well-known trade-off relationship between S and σ. At a maximized PF, σ is much lower than the ideal value since impurity doping suppresses the carrier mobility. A metal-oxide-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) structure on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is prepared. Applying a gate electric field to the MOS-HEMT simultaneously modulates S and σ of the high-mobility electron gas from -490 µV K -1 and ≈10 -1 S cm -1 to -90 µV K -1 and ≈10 4 S cm -1 , while maintaining a high carrier mobility (≈1500 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ). The maximized PF of the high-mobility electron gas is ≈9 mW m -1 K -2 , which is a two- to sixfold increase compared to state-of-the-art practical thermoelectric materials.

  3. Use of Rasch Analysis to Evaluate and Refine the Community Balance and Mobility Scale for Use in Ambulatory Community-Dwelling Adults Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Courtney L.; Brouwer, Brenda; Garland, S. Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Background The Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CB&M) is increasingly used to evaluate walking balance following stroke. Objective This study applied Rasch analysis to evaluate and refine the CB&M for use in ambulatory community-dwelling adults following stroke. Methods The CB&M content was linked to task demands and motor skill classifications. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate internal construct validity (structural validity) and refine the CB&M for use with ambulatory community-dwelling adults following stroke. The CB&M data were collected at 3 time points: at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation and at 6 and 12 months postdischarge (N=238). Rasch analysis evaluated scale dimensionality, item and person fit, item response bias, scoring hierarchy, and targeting. Disordered scoring hierarchy was resolved by collapsing scoring categories. Highly correlated and “misfitting” items were removed. Sensitivity to change was evaluated with standardized response means (SRMs) and one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The CB&M was primarily linked to closed body transport task demands. Significant item-trait interaction, disordered scoring hierarchies, and multidimensionality were found. Scoring categories were collapsed in 15/19 items, and 5 misfitting items were removed. The resulting stroke-specific 14-item unidimensional CB&M (CB&MStroke) fit Rasch model expectations, with no item response bias, acceptable targeting (13% floor effects and 0% ceiling effects), and moderate-to-strong sensitivity to change at 6 months postdischarge (SRM=0.63; 95% confidence interval=−1.523, −0.142) and 12 months postdischarge (SRM=0.73; 95% confidence interval=−2.318, −0.760). Limitations Findings are limited to a modest-sized sample of individuals with mild-to-moderate balance impairment following stroke. Conclusions The CB&MStroke shows promise as a clinical scale for measuring change in walking balance in ambulatory community-dwelling adults

  4. Point mobility of a cylindrical plate incorporating a tapered hole of power-law profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boy, Daniel J; Bowyer, Elizabeth P; Krylov, Victor V

    2011-06-01

    The paper describes the results of experimental measurements of point mobility carried out on circular plates containing tapered holes of quadratic power-law profile with attached damping layers. The obtained results are compared to the developed numerical model, as a means of validation. The profiles of the tapered hole in the plates are designed to replicate near zero reflection of quasi-plane waves from a tapered hole in geometrical acoustics approximation, also known as acoustic black hole effect. The driving point mobility measurements are provided, showing a comparison of the results for a constant thickness circular plate, a constant thickness plate with a layer of damping film applied and a plate with a quadratic power-law profile machined into the center, which is tested with a thin layer of elastic damping material attached. The results indicate a substantial suppression of resonant peaks, agreeing with a numerical model, which is based on the analytical solution available for the vibration of a plate with a central quadratic power-law profile. The paper contains results for the case of free boundary conditions on all edges of the plates, with emphasis placed on the predictions of resonant frequencies and the amplitudes of vibration and loss factor. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  5. A review of wireless power transfer for electric vehicles: Prospects to enhance sustainable mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Zicheng; Kan, Tianze; Mi, Chunting Chris; Zhang, Yiming; Zhao, Zhengming; Keoleian, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reviewed technology advances and sustainability performance of WPT for EVs. • Identified the technical bottlenecks for improving system performance. • Highlighted system performance of case studies and real-world demonstrations. • Evaluated energy, environmental, economic, and societal impacts of WPT deployment. • Defined WPT challenges and opportunities for enhancing future sustainable mobility. - Abstract: Wireless power transfer (WPT), which transmits power by an electromagnetic field across an intervening space, provides the prospect of new opportunities for electric vehicles (EVs) to enhance sustainable mobility. This review article evaluates WPT technology for EV applications from both technical and sustainability perspectives. The objectives of this review include: (1) to present the state-of-the-art technical progress and research bottlenecks in WPT development and applications in the transportation sector; (2) to characterize the demonstrations of the real-world deployment of WPT EV systems; and (3) to evaluate the sustainable performance and identify challenges and opportunities for improvement. From the technical perspective, progress on coil design, compensation topologies, and power electronics converters and control methods are reviewed with a focus on system performance. From the sustainability perspective, performance is defined in terms of energy, environmental, and economic metrics, and policy drivers and issues of health and safety are also examined.

  6. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    will cover diverse topics such as theories, concepts, methods, and approaches as well as it will explore various modes of mobilities and the relationship to everyday life practices. The selection also covers the ‘politics of mobilities’ from local urban planning schemes to geopolitical issues of refugees...

  7. Biomarkers of Atrial Cardiopathy and Atrial Fibrillation Detection on Mobile Outpatient Continuous Telemetry After Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebasigari, Denise; Merkler, Alexander; Guo, Yang; Gialdini, Gino; Kummer, Benjamin; Hemendinger, Morgan; Song, Christopher; Chu, Antony; Cutting, Shawna; Silver, Brian; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Kamel, Hooman; Furie, Karen L; Yaghi, Shadi

    2017-06-01

    Biomarkers of atrial dysfunction or "cardiopathy" are associated with embolic stroke risk. However, it is unclear if this risk is mediated by undiagnosed paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF). We aim to determine whether atrial cardiopathy biomarkers predict AF on continuous heart-rhythm monitoring after embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS). This was a single-center retrospective study including all patients with ESUS undergoing 30 days of ambulatory heart-rhythm monitoring to look for AF between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015. We reviewed medical records for clinical, radiographic, and cardiac variables. The primary outcome was a new diagnosis of AF detected during heart-rhythm monitoring. The primary predictors were atrial biomarkers: left atrial diameter on echocardiography, P-wave terminal force in electrocardiogram (ECG) lead V1, and P wave - R wave (PR) interval on ECG. A multiple logistic regression model was used to assess the relationship between atrial biomarkers and AF detection. Among 196 eligible patients, 23 (11.7%) were diagnosed with AF. In unadjusted analyses, patients with AF were older (72.4 years versus 61.4 years, P atrial diameter (39.2 mm versus 35.7 mm, P = .03). In a multivariable model, the only predictor of AF was age ≥ 60 years (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.06-8.5; P = .04). Atrial biomarkers were weakly associated with AF after ESUS. This suggests that previously reported associations between these markers and stroke may reflect independent cardiac pathways leading to stroke. Prospective studies are needed to investigate these mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of mobile phone design features affecting radiofrequency power absorbed in a human head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Sven; Kelsh, Michael A; Kuster, Niels; Sheppard, Asher R; Shum, Mona

    2013-09-01

    The US FCC mandates the testing of all mobile phones to demonstrate compliance with the rule requiring that the peak spatial SAR does not exceed the limit of 1.6 W/kg averaged over any 1 g of tissue. These test data, measured in phantoms with mobile phones operating at maximum antenna input power, permitted us to evaluate the variation in SARs across mobile phone design factors such as shape and antenna design, communication technology, and test date (over a 7-year period). Descriptive statistical summaries calculated for 850 MHz and 1900 MHz phones and ANOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the foregoing factors on SARs. Service technology accounted for the greatest variability in compliance test SARs that ranged from AMPS (highest) to CDMA, iDEN, TDMA, and GSM (lowest). However, the dominant factor for SARs during use is the time-averaged antenna input power, which may be much less than the maximum power used in testing. This factor is largely defined by the communication system; e.g., the GSM phone average output can be higher than CDMA by a factor of 100. Phone shape, antenna type, and orientation of a phone were found to be significant but only on the order of up to a factor of 2 (3 dB). The SAR in the tilt position was significantly smaller than for touch. The side of the head did not affect SAR levels significantly. Among the remaining factors, external antennae produced greater SARs than internal ones, and brick and clamshell phones produced greater SARs than slide phones. Assuming phone design and usage patterns do not change significantly over time, we have developed a normalization procedure and formula that permits reliable prediction of the relative SAR between various communication systems. This approach can be applied to improve exposure assessment in epidemiological research. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Perceiving the affordance of string tension for power strokes in badminton: expertise allows effective use of all string tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Affordances mean opportunities for action. These affordances are important for sports performance and relevant to the abilities developed by skilled athletes. In racquet sports such as badminton, different players prefer widely different string tension because it is believed to provide opportunities for effective strokes. The current study examined whether badminton players can perceive the affordance of string tension for power strokes and whether the perception of affordance itself changed as a function of skill level. The results showed that string tension constrained the striking performance of both novice and recreational players, but not of expert players. When perceptual capability was assessed, perceptual mode did not affect perception of the optimal string tension. Skilled players successfully perceived the affordance of string tension, but only experts were concerned about saving energy. Our findings demonstrated that perception of the affordance of string tension in badminton was determined by action abilities. Furthermore, experts could adjust the action to maintain a superior level of performance based on the perception of affordance.

  10. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  11. Psychometric properties of the NOMO 1.0 tested among adult powered-mobility users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Terje; Brandt, Åse; Anttila, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    (Participation Repertoire). PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate a range of psychometric properties of the NOMO 1.0 in a sample of adult powered mobility device (PMD) users. METHOD: Data collected from PMD users ( N = 248) in Denmark, Finland, and Norway as part of a larger study were analyzed using state...... scale and six components of the Frequency scale. IMPLICATIONS: The NOMO 1.0 should be used for research purposes and not for clinical practice. Better reliability should be established for the Need for Assistance and Ease/Difficulty scales prior to further psychometric testing to establish the validity...

  12. TEAPOT: a toolset for evaluating performance, power and image quality on mobile graphics systems

    OpenAIRE

    Arnau Montañés, José María; Parcerisa Bundó, Joan Manuel; Xekalakis, Polychronis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present TEAPOT, a full system GPU simulator, whose goal is to allow the evaluation of the GPUs that reside in mobile phones and tablets. To this extent, it has a cycle accurate GPU model for evaluating performance, power models for the GPU, the memory subsystem and for OLED screens, and image quality metrics. Unlike prior GPU simulators, TEAPOT supports the OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 API, so that it can simulate all commercial graphical applications available for Android systems...

  13. Real-Time Mobile Communication of Power Requirements for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Smith

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The periodic power requirements of an electric vehicle are difficult to predict because the vehicle's location, the amount of charge remaining in its batteries, and the timing of its next charge are not known. For clusters of electric vehicles, the problem is magnified, and there is a risk that the demand will strain and overload a power utility’s infrastructure. Operational managers are left with reactive management of the infrastructure that may defer or prevent a vehicle charge to balance power demands and safeguard the infrastructure. In this article, the following key concepts are analyzed to provide background on the problem and to outline the requirements of any solution: i demand uncertainty and reactive management approaches, ii electric vehicle power requirements, and iii demand-management telecommunication capabilities. Then, by abstraction, induction, and creative synthesis, a novel solution to the problem is proposed to provide real-time mobile communication of power requirements. The proposed solution has potential to create new service and business opportunities to managers and entrepreneurs.

  14. A comparison of two systems for lunar surface remote and mobile power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determan, W.R.; Otting, W.D.; Hunt, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) is now being developed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) and NASA-LeRC for space power applications. Some conceptualizations of an isotope powered FPSE have been proposed. The performance characteristics of the proposed 2.5-kWe Stirling Isotope Power (STIP) system were developed for lunar surface remote and mobile applications. The Stirling system configuration uses a nonredundant power conversion system coupled to an annular heat source assembly (HSA) using an array of sodium heat pipes which transfer energy from the annular general-purpose heat source (GPHS) stack within the HSA to the Stirling heater head. The Stirling engine uses a dual-opposed piston design with heater head coupling. The engine coolers are connected to a single-pumped coolant loop, which rejects the cycle's waste heat to a radiator. Quantitative information, such as mass, area, and efficiency, are reported for the system. The results of a qualitative evaluation of the proposed STIP system against the desirable attributes of a lunar-based isotope power system are presented. Alternate configurations are also presented

  15. Hand rehabilitation after stroke using a wearable, high DOF, spring powered exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianyao Chen; Lum, Peter S

    2016-08-01

    Stroke patients often have inappropriate finger flexor activation and finger extensor weakness, which makes it difficult to open their affected hand for functional grasp. The goal was to develop a passive, lightweight, wearable device to enable improved hand function during performance of activities of daily living. The device, HandSOME II, assists with opening the patient's hand using 11 elastic actuators that apply extension torques to finger and thumb joints. Device design and initial testing are described. A novel mechanical design applies forces orthogonal to the finger segments despite the fact that all of the device DOFs are not aligned with human joint DOF. In initial testing with seven stroke subjects with impaired hand function, use of HandSOME II significantly increased maximum extension angles and range of motion in all of the index finger joints (P<;0.05). HandSOME II allows performance of all the grip patterns used in daily activities and can be used as part of home-based therapy programs.

  16. Deep Classifiers-Based License Plate Detection, Localization and Recognition on GPU-Powered Mobile Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Tahir Hussain Rizvi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The realization of a deep neural architecture on a mobile platform is challenging, but can open up a number of possibilities for visual analysis applications. A neural network can be realized on a mobile platform by exploiting the computational power of the embedded GPU and simplifying the flow of a neural architecture trained on the desktop workstation or a GPU server. This paper presents an embedded platform-based Italian license plate detection and recognition system using deep neural classifiers. In this work, trained parameters of a highly precise automatic license plate recognition (ALPR system are imported and used to replicate the same neural classifiers on a Nvidia Shield K1 tablet. A CUDA-based framework is used to realize these neural networks. The flow of the trained architecture is simplified to perform the license plate recognition in real-time. Results show that the tasks of plate and character detection and localization can be performed in real-time on a mobile platform by simplifying the flow of the trained architecture. However, the accuracy of the simplified architecture would be decreased accordingly.

  17. The electron mobility and thermoelectric power in InSb at atmospheric and hydrostatic pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Piotrzkowski, R.; Szymanska, W.

    1981-01-01

    First, theoretical calculations of electron mobility and thermoelectric power in n-type InSb are reported at liquid nitrogen and room temperatures. All the scattering mechanisms of importance in InSb are taken into account. The calculations based upon a variational solution of the Boltzmann equation are compared with experimental results over the whole available range of electron concentrations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained using the value of deformation potential constant C = 14.6 eV. Secondly, both, experimental and theoretical investigations are made of mobility in InSb under hydrostatic pressure at 77 K within a wide range of electron concentrations. The smallest electron concentrations obtained by freezing the conduction electrons on the metastable states are of order of 1x10 12 cm -3 . Also for those smallest concentration it is possible to describe theoretically the dependence of mobility on the hydrostatic pressure using the same set of parameters as previously, and assuming some compensation of donors by acceptors. (author)

  18. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa H.; Muhl, Thuy Thanh

    2018-01-01

    For use of metal supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast startup, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the Technical...... loss, two different routes for increasing the porosity of the support layer and thus performance were explored. The first route is the introduction of gas channels by puncturing of the green tape casted support layer. The second route is modification of the co-sintering profile. In summary, the cell...... thickness and thus weight and volume was reduced and the cell power density at 0.7 V at 700°C was increased by 46% to 1.01 Wcm−2 at a fuel utilization of 48%. All modifications were performed on a stack technological relevant cell size of 12 cm × 12 cm....

  19. Agile Development of Various Computational Power Adaptive Web-Based Mobile-Learning Software Using Mobile Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadahmad, Manouchehr; Yousefzadehfard, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) aims to improve all mobile applications such as m-learning systems. This study presents an innovative method to use web technology and software engineering's best practices to provide m-learning functionalities hosted in a MCC-learning system as service. Components hosted by MCC are used to empower developers to create…

  20. Environmental feasibility study for deployment and construction of mobile gas turbine power plants in urbanized areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan Fedor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of current electrical shortage in some regions of Russia, mobile gas turbine power plants (MGTPP have become urgent in recent years. Usually they are used as back-up power sources to cover peak loads in power networks and to ensure uninterrupted power supply to consumers. This paper deals with environmental feasibility study for deployment and construction of the MGTPP in an urban setting. Technogehic factors of the MGTPP impact on the environment have been assessed and possibility of the MGTPP deployment at various sites in different regions of Russia has been identified. The necessity of using the technology of water injection into the gas turbine units combustion chamber to suppress nitrogen oxides in some cases is mentioned. Quantitative assessments of the MGTPP technogehic impact on the environment components have been performed using standard techniques. The calculations have revealed that the MGTPP specifications ensure the levels of technogehic impacts within the standard limits. The results have ensured preparation of pre-design and design documentation related to protection of the environment against the MGTPP complex technogehic impact.

  1. Physical Therapists' Guideline Adherence on Early Mobilization and Intensity of Practice at Dutch Acute Stroke Units A Country-Wide Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, Nicoline M.; van der Wees, Philip J.; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Clinical practice guidelines for patients with stroke recommend early stroke rehabilitation at acute hospital stroke units. The present study aimed to (1) explore the organization of early stroke rehabilitation; (2) investigate current practice with respect to early

  2. Powered mobility intervention: understanding the position of tool use learning as part of implementing the ALP tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisbeth; Durkin, Josephine

    2017-10-01

    To explore the knowledge necessary for adoption and implementation of the Assessment of Learning Powered mobility use (ALP) tool in different practice settings for both adults and children. To consult with a diverse population of professionals working with adults and children, in different countries and various settings; who were learning about or using the ALP tool, as part of exploring and implementing research findings. Classical grounded theory with a rigorous comparative analysis of data from informants together with reflections on our own rich experiences of powered mobility practice and comparisons with the literature. A core category learning tool use and a new theory of cognizing tool use, with its interdependent properties: motivation, confidence, permissiveness, attentiveness and co-construction has emerged which explains in greater depth what enables the application of the ALP tool. The scientific knowledge base on tool use learning and the new theory conveys the information necessary for practitioner's cognizing how to apply the learning approach of the ALP tool in order to enable tool use learning through powered mobility practice as a therapeutic intervention in its own right. This opens up the possibility for more children and adults to have access to learning through powered mobility practice. Implications for rehabilitation Tool use learning through powered mobility practice is a therapeutic intervention in its own right. Powered mobility practice can be used as a rehabilitation tool with individuals who may not need to become powered wheelchair users. Motivation, confidence, permissiveness, attentiveness and co-construction are key properties for enabling the application of the learning approach of the ALP tool. Labelling and the use of language, together with honing observational skills through viewing video footage, are key to developing successful learning partnerships.

  3. Power Dependence of the Electron Mobility Profile in a Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard H.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    The electron mobility profile is estimated in a 4.5 kW commercial Hall thruster as a function of discharge power. Internal measurements of plasma potential and electron temperature are made in the thruster channel with a high-speed translating probe. These measurements are presented for a range of throttling conditions from 150 - 400 V and 0.6 - 4.5 kW. The fluid-based solver, Hall2De, is used in conjunction with these internal plasma parameters to estimate the anomalous collision frequency profile at fixed voltage, 300 V, and three power levels. It is found that the anomalous collision frequency profile does not change significantly upstream of the location of the magnetic field peak but that the extent and magnitude of the anomalous collision frequency downstream of the magnetic peak does change with thruster power. These results are discussed in the context of developing phenomenological models for how the collision frequency profile depends on thruster operating conditions.

  4. Correlating Resolving Power, Resolution, and Collision Cross Section: Unifying Cross-Platform Assessment of Separation Efficiency in Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, James N; May, Jody C; McLean, John A

    2017-11-21

    Here we examine the relationship among resolving power (R p ), resolution (R pp ), and collision cross section (CCS) for compounds analyzed in previous ion mobility (IM) experiments representing a wide variety of instrument platforms and IM techniques. Our previous work indicated these three variables effectively describe and predict separation efficiency for drift tube ion mobility spectrometry experiments. In this work, we seek to determine if our previous findings are a general reflection of IM behavior that can be applied to various instrument platforms and mobility techniques. Results suggest IM distributions are well characterized by a Gaussian model and separation efficiency can be predicted on the basis of the empirical difference in the gas-phase CCS and a CCS-based resolving power definition (CCS/ΔCCS). Notably traveling wave (TWIMS) was found to operate at resolutions substantially higher than a single-peak resolving power suggested. When a CCS-based R p definition was utilized, TWIMS was found to operate at a resolving power between 40 and 50, confirming the previous observations by Giles and co-workers. After the separation axis (and corresponding resolving power) is converted to cross section space, it is possible to effectively predict separation behavior for all mobility techniques evaluated (i.e., uniform field, trapped ion mobility, traveling wave, cyclic, and overtone instruments) using the equations described in this work. Finally, we are able to establish for the first time that the current state-of-the-art ion mobility separations benchmark at a CCS-based resolving power of >300 that is sufficient to differentiate analyte ions with CCS differences as small as 0.5%.

  5. Controller Development for a Separate Meter-In Separate Meter-Out Fluid Power Valve for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian

    equal to the controlled flow rate times the pressure drop across the orifice. By a constant flow rate the best energy efficiency is therefore obtained by keeping the pressure drop across the orifice as low as possible. More orifices are commonly included in a single valve. A specific type of valve....... And to develop controllers for a valve prototype whereby the two mentioned fluid streams may be controlled separately. First an introduction to mobile fluid power systems is given. It is explained that the future trend within mobile fluid power systems goes towards integration of sensors and microprocessors...

  6. The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich; Fassbender, Klaus; Hussain, M Shazam; Ebinger, Martin; Turc, Guillaume; Uchino, Ken; Davis, Stephen; Alexandrov, Anne; Grotta, James

    2017-12-01

    Background The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization was formed in 2016 as an international consortium of medical practitioners involved in pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute stroke. Aims PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization's mission is to improve stroke outcomes by supporting research and advocacy for pre-hospital stroke treatment in Mobile Stroke Units. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will provide a platform to enhance collaborative research across the spectrum of acute stroke management in the pre-hospital setting. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will also facilitate the appropriate proliferation and distribution of Mobile Stroke Units by providing a forum for professional communication, resource for public education, and stimulus for government, industry, and philanthropic support. Summary of review In this "white paper", we describe the evidence supporting pre-hospital stroke treatment, progress to date, practical issues such as application in various environments and staffing, planned research initiatives, and organizational structure. Conclusions PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization is not-for-profit, with membership open to anyone involved (or hoping to become involved) in pre-hospital stroke care. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization has a Steering Committee comprised of members from Europe, U.S., Canada, Australia, and other regions having a Mobile Stroke Unit in operation. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization convenes satellite meetings for membership at the International Stroke Conference and European Stroke Congress each year to address the PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization mission. The first research collaborations agreed upon are to: (1) develop a list of common data elements to be collected by all Mobile Stroke Unit programs and entered into a common research database, and (2) develop a protocol for investigating the natural history of hyper-acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

  7. Improved method for positioning mobile phones based on series of measured reception power levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Martin; Majewski, Kurt; Schmitz, Heiko; Stadelmeyer, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Finding the position of a mobile user has become important for many wireless applications. There are many methods, which fulfill this task but require extensions of the network or the terminals. The technique presented here is based on the received signal powers obtained from standard measurements. It uses a restricted search area and a time series of measurements. The search area is determined by the intersection of the maximum area covered by the serving cell and a ring determined from round-trip time measurements. A Viterbi-like algorithm is used to compare the time series of reception power levels measured by the handset with predicted values from the network planning process. It returns a weighted average of possible positions. Since only standard measurements are used, no changes of the network or the handsets are required, making the method inexpensive. Furthermore, the method can be used for traffic localization. The method has actually been implemented by Siemens for GSM. Extensive field trials in an operating network in Germany showed an accuracy of 130 meters in urban environments and about 300 meters in suburban and rural areas. Since similar measurements exist in UMTS networks, the method is applicable in UTRAN as well.

  8. Mobile low power total reflexion x-ray fluorescence spectrometer with pg-detection-limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietsch, R.; Holz, Th.; Mai, H. [Fraunhofer Institute Material and Beam Technology, Dresden, (Germany); Waldschlaeger, U. [I.U.T. GmbH, Berlin, (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    Full text: Total reflexion x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is an efficient tool in trace element analysis. Conventional laboratory spectrometers can achieve detection limits in the pg-range. Unfortunately high power X-ray tubes (i.e. some kW) and LN{sub 2}-cooled Si(Li)-detectors are sometimes not applicable within mobile TXRF-spectrometers. Therefore a portable device for TXRF (PicoTAX{sub PS}) has been developed and the latest results will be presented. This device is a very compact combination of an air-cooled low power X-ray tube (Mo-anode, 40W) a Peltier-cooled PlN-diode detector and a high quality flat primary Ni/C X-ray mirror (2t= 7.84 nm, N100, R> 80%). The background radiation is reduced by means of this particular mirror. That way the achievable detection limits are comparable with conventional 1.5 kW TXRF- spectrometers. The characteristic parameters of X-ray source, detector and Ni/C mirror will be presented. Additionally, the performance of this portable TXRF-system will be demonstrated by selected examples. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc. 1 fig.

  9. Mobile test stand for evaluation of electric power plants for unmanned aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbezov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of accurate performance data is a common problem with most civilian unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV power plant producers. The reasons for this are the small size of most of the manufacturers and the high price of precise wind tunnel testing and computer simulations. To overcome this problem at Dronamics Ltd., with support from the Department of Aeronautics of TU-Sofia, a mobile test stand for evaluation of electric power plants for unmanned aircraft was developed. The stand may be used statically, or may be installed on the roof of an automobile. The measurement system of the stand is based on popular hardware that is used in radio controlled models and in general automation. The verification of the measurement system is performed by comparing static test results with data published by the manufacturer of the tested electric motor. Tests were carried out with 2 different types of propellers and the results were compared with published results for common propellers as well as with results of theoretical studies. The results are satisfactory for practical applications. The use of this type of test stands can be a cheap and effective alternative for research and development start-up companies like Dronamics.

  10. Development of a general-purpose mobile robot for use in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Yague, M.A.; Linares, F.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, the Space Division of CONSTRUCCIONES AERONAUTICAS (CASA) and EQUIPOS NUCLEARES (ENSA) have participated in several national and international robotics programs in the respective space and nuclear areas. In mid-1992, they decided to jointly undertake the development of a mobile inspection and maintenance robot for Nuclear Power Plants. The success of such a multidisciplinary project was ensured by the way both companies complement each other and by their previous development. Work was begun on the feasibility study and specifications, for which technical meetings were held with personnel from the Medical and Health Physics Association of the utilities (AMYS) and several Nuclear Power Plants. The result of these conversations was a preliminary system design along with the specifications with which the system must comply. With these results, a report and job plan were prepared for construction of two prototypes and submitted to the INI (National Institute of Industry Shareholder of both CASA and ENSA), which decided to finance this second Phase of Development by charging it to the Group's Research Development Fund

  11. Solid Waste from Four-stroke Medium Speed Engine Power Plant Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Smart, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the solid-state waste generated in power plants based on internal combustion engine (ICE) technology, supplied by the Wärtsilä Energy Solutions division. This thesis, which characterizes and quantifies the waste, was done to enhance the ability of supporting customers in issues related to social and environmental impact assessment, environmental permits, waste management planning, etc. The Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability and the E...

  12. The effects of posterior talar glide and dorsiflexion of the ankle plus mobilization with movement on balance and gait function in patient with chronic stroke: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Lim Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was to evaluate the effects of weight-bearing-based mobilization with movement (WBBMWM on balance and gait in stroke patients. Methods: Thirty stroke patients participated in this study. All individuals were randomly assigned to either WBMWM group (n = 15 or weight-bearing with placebo mobilization with movement group (control, n = 15. Individuals in the WBMWM group were trained for 10 glides of 5 sets a day, 5 times a week during 4 weeks. Furthermore, individuals in the control group were trained for 10 lunges of 5 sets a day, 5 times a week during 4 weeks. All individuals were measured weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT, static balance ability, timed up and go test (TUG, and dynamic gait index (DGI in before and after intervention. Results: The result showed that WBBMWM group and control group had significantly increased in WBLT, postural sway speed, total postural sway path length with eyes open and closed, TUG and DGI (P < 0.05. In particular, the WBMWM group showed significantly greater improvement than control group in WBLT, static balance measures, TUG, and DGI (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Therefore, WBMWM improved ankle range of motion, balance, and gait in stroke patients. These results suggest that WBBMWM is feasible and suitable for individuals with a stroke.

  13. Low-power, open-path mobile sensing platform for high-resolution measurements of greenhouse gases and air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lei; Sun, Kang; Miller, David J.; Pan, Dan; Golston, Levi M.; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    A low-power mobile sensing platform has been developed with multiple open-path gas sensors to measure the ambient concentrations of greenhouse gases and air pollutants with high temporal and spatial resolutions over extensive spatial domains. The sensing system consists of four trace gas sensors including two custom quantum cascade laser-based open-path sensors and two LICOR open-path sensors to measure CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O mixing ratios simultaneously at 10 Hz. In addition, sensors for meteorological and geolocation data are incorporated into the system. The system is powered by car batteries with a low total power consumption (~200 W) and is easily transportable due to its low total mass (35 kg). Multiple measures have been taken to ensure robust performance of the custom, open-path sensors located on top of the vehicle where the optics are exposed to the harsh on-road environment. The mobile sensing system has been integrated and installed on top of common passenger vehicles and participated in extensive field campaigns (>400 h on-road time with >18,000 km total distance) in both the USA and China. The simultaneous detection of multiple trace gas species makes the mobile sensing platform a unique and powerful tool to identify and quantify different emission sources through mobile mapping.

  14. The Mobile Limiters of TJ-II: Power and Particle Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cal, E. de la

    1998-01-01

    For mobile limiters have been designed for the TJ-II stellerator to reduce thermal loads on the vacuum vessel and its protections at the region of the central hard core (groove) and to characterise the scrap off layer plasma. The role of the mobile limiters for particle and thermal load control is analysed for the different operating phases of TJ-II. The task of impurity control will be treated in a future report. A simplified model has been used to estimate the termal loads on the limiters. The conclusion is that a new design for the limiter heads will be necessary for the neutral beam injection (NBI)-phase at high power density, if acceptable efficiencies of thermal removal is desired. The rexperimental measurements which will be made in the first phase (ECH) with the temperature and Lagmuir probes installed in the diagnosed limiter-heads will be essential for the optimisation of the future limiter-shape. For particle control it will be absolutely necessary to use first wall conditioning techniques (e.g. boronization), since no active pumping method is foreseen for TJ-II. Again, this point will be more critical in the NBI-phase, due to the large particle fluxes to the first wall and due to possible thermal gas, desorption caused by local overheating of plasma-facing surfaces. The role of magnetic topology on plasma-wall interaction is finally analysed. A configuration has been found in which the limiters act as divertor plates (Natural Island Divertor). This inherent flexibility for changing the magnetic topology of TJ-II should be exploited in order to find the most favourable operating scenarios for the high powder injection phase

  15. Mobile Election

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Elena; Lovitskii, Vladimir; Thrasher, Michael; Traynor, David

    2009-01-01

    Mobile phones have the potential of fostering political mobilisation. There is a significant political power in mobile technology. Like the Internet, mobile phones facilitate communication and rapid access to information. Compared to the Internet, however, mobile phone diffusion has reached a larger proportion of the population in most countries, and thus the impact of this new medium is conceivably greater. There are now more mobile phones in the UK than there are people (ave...

  16. Resolving powers of >7900 using linked scans: how well does resolving power describe the separation capability of differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Brandon G; Harris, Rachel A; Isenberg, Samantha L; Glish, Gary L

    2015-10-21

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DIMS) separations are described using similar terminology to liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, and drift tube ion mobility spectrometry. The characterization and comparison of all these separations are typically explained in terms of resolving power, resolution, and/or peak capacity. A major difference between these separations is that DIMS separations are in space whereas the others are separations in time. However, whereas separations in time can, in theory, be extended infinitely, separations in space, such as DIMS separations, are constrained by the physical dimensions of the device. One method to increase resolving power of DIMS separations is to use helium in the DIMS carrier gas. However, ions have a greater mobility in helium which causes more ions to be neutralized due to collisions with the DIMS electrodes or electrode housing, i.e. the space constraints. This neutralization of ions can lead to the loss of an entire peak, or peaks, from a DIMS scan. To take advantage of the benefits of helium use while reducing ion losses, linked scans were developed. During a linked scan the amount of helium present in the DIMS carrier gas is decreased as the compensation field is increased. A comparison of linked scans to compensation field scans with constant helium is presented herein. Resolving powers >7900 are obtained with linked scans. However, this result highlights the limitation of using resolving power as a metric to describe DIMS separations.

  17. Effect of pneumatic compressing powered orthosis in stroke patients: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sil; Yoon, Yong-Soon; Sohn, Min Kyun; Kwak, Soo-Hyun; Choi, Jong Ho; Oh, Ji Sun

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a knee-ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles (PKAFO). Twenty-three hemiplegic patients (age, 59.6±13.7 years) were assessed 19.7±36.6 months after brain lesion. The 10-m walking time was measured as a gait parameter while the individual walked on a treadmill. Walking speed (m/s), step cycle (cycle/s), and step length (m) were also measured on a treadmill with and without PKAFO, and before and after gait training. Clinical parameters measured before and after gait training included Korean version of Modified Bathel Index (K-MBI), manual muscle test (MMT), and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) of hemiplegic ankle. Gait training comprised treadmill walking for 20 minutes, 5 days a week for 3 weeks at a comfortable speed. The 10-m walking time, walking speed, step length, and step cycle were significantly greater with PKAFO than without PKAFO, and after gait training (both p<0.05). K-MBI was improved after gait training (p<0.05), but MMT and MAS were not. PKAFO may improve gait function in hemiplegic patients. It can be a useful orthosis for gait training in hemiplegic patients.

  18. Electromagnetic tolerance - power supply and mobile phone. Proceedings. 2. ed.; ElektroMagnetische Vertraeglichkeit - Energieversorgung and Mobilfunk. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virnich, M.H. (comp.)

    2006-07-01

    Within the scope of the fifth meeting ''Energy supply and mobile phone'', held at March 22nd and 23rd, 2006, at Stuttgart (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (a) Demagnetization of steel components of buildings (Adrian Nussbaumer); (b) ''Dirty Power'' - Overtones by means of non-linear consumers (Guenter Hoeck); (c) ''Clean Power'' - Efficient filtration of overtones (Gerd Bajog, Heiko Vachek); (d) Principle-caused defect currents and magnetic fields in TN-C and TN-C-S systems (Martin Schauer); (e) From transformator of the power supply network to the connection at home - possibilities and limits of the avoidance of magnetic fields by means of defect currents from the operator of the power supply network (Rene Mathys); (f) necessity of the readjusting of building installations to up-to-date TN-S systems: questions and answers to this theme (Burkhrard Schulze, Martin Schauer); (g) A statistically based tool for the evaluation of immissions from mobile phones (Uwe Muenzenberg); (h) The mobile phone study of the country Liechtenstein (Stefan M. Larass-Greger); (i) Results from the UMTS interview of the town Attendorn in October, 2005 (Wolfgang Hillike); (j) Mobile phones in the hands of children - Project day for school classes according to the theme ''mobile phone'' (Sabine Metter, Stephan Streil); (k) When is high frequent radiation pulsed ? (Martin H. Virnich); (l) Introduction in digital TETRA bundle transmittance systems in Germany (Peter Damerau); (m) How do immissions of TETRA base stations influence the human health detrimentally? (Gerard J. Hyland); (n) Experiences with TETRA bundle transmittance in Great Britain: case examples (Andy Davidson).

  19. Measurement-based harmonic current modeling of mobile storage for power quality study in the distribution system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenge Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicles (EVs can be utilized as mobile storages in a power system. The use of battery chargers can cause current harmonics in the supplied AC system. In order to analyze the impact of different EVs with regardto their number and their emission of current harmonics, a generic harmonic current model of EV types was built and implemented in the power system simulation tool PSS®NETOMAC. Based on the measurement data for different types of EVs three standardized harmonic EV models were developed and parametrized. Further, the identified harmonic models are used by the computation of load flow in a modeled, German power distribution system. As a benchmark, a case scenario was studied regarding a high market penetration of EVs in the year 2030 for Germany. The impact of the EV charging on the power distribution system was analyzed and evaluated with valid power quality standards.

  20. Design and Evaluation of the Kinect-Wheelchair Interface Controlled (KWIC) Smart Wheelchair for Pediatric Powered Mobility Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondervan, Daniel K; Secoli, Riccardo; Darling, Aurelia Mclaughlin; Farris, John; Furumasu, Jan; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2015-01-01

    Children with severe disabilities are sometimes unable to access powered mobility training. Thus, we developed the Kinect-Wheelchair Interface Controlled (KWIC) smart wheelchair trainer that converts a manual wheelchair into a powered wheelchair. The KWIC Trainer uses computer vision to create a virtual tether with adaptive shared-control between the wheelchair and a therapist during training. It also includes a mixed-reality video game system. We performed a year-long usability study of the KWIC Trainer at a local clinic, soliciting qualitative and quantitative feedback on the device after extended use. Eight therapists used the KWIC Trainer for over 50 hours with 8 different children. Two of the children obtained their own powered wheelchair as a result of the training. The therapists indicated the device allowed them to provide mobility training for more children than would have been possible with a demo wheelchair, and they found use of the device to be as safe as or safer than conventional training. They viewed the shared control algorithm as counter-productive because it made it difficult for the child to discern when he or she was controlling the chair. They were enthusiastic about the video game integration for increasing motivation and engagement during training. They emphasized the need for additional access methods for controlling the device. The therapists confirmed that the KWIC Trainer is a useful tool for increasing access to powered mobility training and for engaging children during training sessions. However, some improvements would enhance its applicability for routine clinical use.

  1. Design of an off-grid hybrid PV/wind power system for remote mobile base station: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulualem T. Yeshalem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a clear challenge to provide reliable cellular mobile service at remote locations where a reliable power supply is not available. So, the existing Mobile towers or Base Transceiver Station (BTSs uses a conventional diesel generator with backup battery banks. This paper presents the solution to utilizing a hybrid of photovoltaic (PV solar and wind power system with a backup battery bank to provide feasibility and reliable electric power for a specific remote mobile base station located at west arise, Oromia. All the necessary modeling, simulation, and techno-economic evaluation are carried out using Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewable (HOMER software. The best optimal system configurations namely PV/Battery and PV/Wind/Battery hybrid systems are compared with the conventional stand-alone diesel generator (DG system. Findings indicated that PV array and battery is the most economically viable option with the total net present cost (NPC of $\\$$57,508 and per unit cost of electricity (COE of $\\$$0.355. Simulation results show that the hybrid energy systems can minimize the power generation cost significantly and can decrease CO2 emissions as compared to the traditional diesel generator only. The sensitivity analysis is also carried out to analysis the effects of probable variation in solar radiation, wind speed, diesel price and average annual energy usage of the system load in the optimal system configurations.

  2. The African Mobile Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks......This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks...

  3. Understanding the Provision of Assistive Mobility and Daily Living Devices and Service Delivery to Veterans After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairalla, John A; Winkler, Sandra L; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether facility-level, structural factors affect the provision of assistive devices and services. A retrospective design was used. Activities of daily living and mobility-related devices were categorized into 11 types. Logistic regression models were performed for each type of device, controlling for patient-level and facility-level covariates. Non-veteran-level factors significantly affect the provision of assistive devices, even after covariate adjustment. Increased rehabilitation clinician staffing by 1 full-time equivalent position was associated with increased provision odds of 1%-5% for 5 of 11 types of devices. Lower facility complexity was significantly associated with increased provision odds of 35%-59% for 3 types of devices and with decreased provision odds of 16%-69% for 3 types of devices. System-level factors, in addition to patient need, significantly affect the provision of assistive devices. Provision guidelines could assist clinicians in making decisions about device provision. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  5. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  6. Improvement in the Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries by Means of Powered Wheelchairs Driven by Dual Power Wheels and Mobile Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Pien Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study unites researchers from the fields of psychology, occupational therapy, and engineering to improve the holistic physical and psychological well-being of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI by using assistive devices (i.e., wheelchairs and mobile technology (i.e., cell phone and network. These technologies are used to bring persons with SCI through the difficult period of rehabilitation and to return them to their daily life in school or the working environment. First, a SpinoAid Application (APP is developed to motivate persons with SCI to participate in the community after their injury. Second, we integrate mobile technology with a mobility assistive device to design a smart wheelchair, which is innovated by transforming the pushrim of a manually driven wheelchair into a rim motor. After the rim motor is combined with a battery, a brake, and a controller to become a power wheel, two power wheels are installed on both sides of the wheelchair to become a powered wheelchair. Third, a SmartChair APP is developed with the main functions of reminding persons with SCI to perform exercises, recording the physical condition and the wheelchair using status, and building up a social network for information sharing to increase their exercise habit, prevent cumulative injuries or discomfort of the upper extremities, and enhance their health and quality of life.

  7. A test-retest reliability study of the Barthel Index, the Rivermead Mobility Index, the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale and the Frenchay Activities Index in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J; Forster, A; Young, J

    2001-10-15

    To assess the test-retest reliability of a range of outcome measures in stroke patients. Twenty-two patients > 1 year post-stroke were tested twice at an interval of 1 week using the Barthel Index (BI); the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI); the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL); and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI). The mean difference (bias) and reliability coefficient (random error) were calculated for the total scores. Percentage agreement and the kappa coefficient were used to analyse individual items. The mean differences and reliability coefficients were BI 0.4 +/- 2.0, RMI 0.3 +/- 2.2, the NEADL 0.6 +/- 5.6, FAI -0.6 +/- 7.1. There was little bias between assessments. The performance of the BI and RMI were better with lower random error. The NEADL and FAI did not perform as well having larger random error components. Percentage agreements were generally high especially for the BI (>75%) and RMI (>85%), but there was considerable variation in the kappa coefficients. Measurement of basic activities of daily living and mobility as measured by the BI and RMI is reliable post-stroke. Measurements used to assess extended activities of daily living were less reliable in this study.

  8. 3D gait analysis of lower extremity muscle group power in healthy subjects and subacute stroke patients, and task-specific gait interventions in early stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincks, John

    2010-01-01

    Denne ph.d. afhandling omhandler 3D ganganalyse af raske og apopleksipatienter. Formålet med afhandlingen var at estimere referenceværdier for power i et udvalg af underekstremitetens muskelgrupper, samt at estimere ændringer i muskelgruppers power, når ganghastigheden øges blandt raske og apople...

  9. Power Management of MEMS-Based Storage Devices for Mobile Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatib, M.G.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2008-01-01

    Because of its small form factor, high capacity, and expected low cost, MEMS-based storage is a suitable storage technology for mobile systems. MEMS-based storage devices should also be energy efficient for deployment in mobile systems. The problem is that MEMS-based storage devices are mechanical,

  10. Texting Capital: Mobile Phones, Social Transformation, and the Reproduction of Power in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy-Tioco, Cecilia S.

    2013-01-01

    The mobile phone has arguably become the most ubiquitous information communication technology (ICT) in the world, including in the developing world. Introduced in the Philippines in the early 1990s, mobile phone penetration is expected to reach 100 percent in 2013, an interesting phenomenon since a third of the country lives below the poverty…

  11. Energy and Power Measurements for Network Coding in the Context of Green Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paramanathan, Achuthan; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2013-01-01

    commercial mobile phones, namely, the Samsung S3, Samsung Ace, and the Sony Xperia, and considering a wide range of generation sizes and field sizes. We compare this processing energy to that of transmitting packets over the WiFi air interface of the mobile phones and show that the former can be up to two...

  12. Mechanical Implementation and Simulation of MoboLab, A Mobile Robot for Inspection of Power Transmission Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud Saadat Foumani

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first phase in development of a mobile robot that can navigate aerial power transmission lines completely unattended by human operator. Its ultimate purpose is to automate inspection of power transmission lines and their equipments. The authors have developed a scaled functional model of such a mobile robot with a preliminary simple computer based on-off controller. MoboLab (Mobile Laboratory navigates a power transmission line between two strain towers. It can maneuver over obstructions created by line equipments such as insulators, warning spheres, dampers, and spacer dampers. It can also easily negotiate the towers by its three flexible arms. MoboLab has an internal main screw which enables the robot to move itself or its two front and rear arms independently through changing gripped points. When the front arm gets close to an obstacle, the arm detaches from the line and goes down, the robot moves forward, the arm passes the obstacle and grippes the line again. In a same way another arms pass the obstacle.

  13. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  14. Cross-Layer Design Approach for Power Control in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sarfaraz Ahmed; T. Senthil Kumaran; S. Syed Abdul Syed; S. Subburam

    2015-01-01

    In mobile ad hoc networks, communication among mobile nodes occurs through wireless medium The design of ad hoc network protocol, generally based on a traditional “layered approach”, has been found ineffective to deal with receiving signal strength (RSS)-related problems, affecting the physical layer, the network layer and transport layer. This paper proposes a design approach, deviating from the traditional network design, toward enhancing the cross-layer interaction among different layers, ...

  15. Simulation and Performance Analysis of Lithium Battery Bank Mounted on the Hybrid Power System for Mobile Public Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busono, Pratondo; Kartini, Evvy

    2013-07-01

    Mobile medical clinic has been proposed to serve homeless people, people in the disaster area or in the remote area where no health service exist. At that site, a number of essential services such as primary health care, general health screening, medical treatment and emergency/rescue operations are required. Such services usually requires on board electrical equipments such as refrigerators, komputer, power tools and medical equipments. To supply such electrical equipments, it needs extra auxiliary power sources, in addition of standard automotive power supply. The auxiliary power source specifically design to supply non automotive load which may have similar configuration, but usually uses high power alternator rated and larger deep cycle on board battery bank. This study covers the modeling and dynamic simulation of auxiliary power source/battery to supply the medical equipment and other electrical equipments on board. It consists a variable speed diesel generator set, photovoltaic (PV) generator mounted on the roof of the car, a rechargable battery bank. As an initial step in the system design, a simulation study was performed. The simulation is conducted in the system level. Simulation results shows that dynamical behaviour by means of current density, voltage and power plot over a chosen time range, and functional behaviour such as charging and discharging characteristic of the battery bank can be obtained.

  16. The Influence of Social Networks on the Development of Recruitment Actions that Favor User Interface Design and Conversions in Mobile Applications Powered by Linked Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R. Palos-Sanchez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the most important influence factors in the literature, which have the greatest influence on the conversions obtained in a mobile application powered by linked data. With the study of user interface design and a small user survey (n = 101,053, we studied the influence of social networks, advertising, and promotional and recruitment actions in conversions for mobile applications powered by linked data. The analysis of the users’ behavior and their application in the design of the actions to promote and capture constitutes an important part of the current theories of digital marketing. However, this study shows that its results may be contradictory and depend on other factors and circumstances when mobile applications powered by linked data are considered. The predictive value, reached by the developed model, may be useful for professionals and researchers in the field of digital marketing and the user interface design in mobile applications powered by linked data.

  17. A Survey on Efficient Power Consumption Method for Continuous Location-Based Spatial Queries in Mobile Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In today’s growing world saving of time and energy is much considerable. Mobile users are very common for human beings. It is beneficial in use not only for call but also for different uses i.e. find a particular place in unknown city or place. It saves both time and energy towards searching the place. Many researchers have been done in this regard. But they have problem like consuming time and speed to search the location by mobile. Approach: This paper proposed algorithm based on circular location finder (CLF. There are many algorithms available like proxy based location search for continuous near neighbor (CNN, estimated valid region (EVR, and estimated window vector (EWV for region search. These are not efficient in sense of consumption of time and energy. Results: Based on our study, circular location finder (CLF increases approximately 68% speed and decrease 3 times power consumption taken by mobile application. CLF algorithm is efficient in both speed and power consumption

  18. Techno-Economic Evaluation of a Stand-Alone Power System Based on Solar Power/Batteries for Global System for Mobile Communications Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Alsharif

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in cellular networks is receiving significant attention from academia and the industry due to its significant potential economic and ecological influence. Energy efficiency and renewable energy are the main pillars of sustainability and environmental compatibility. Technological advancements and cost reduction for photovoltaics are making cellular base stations (BSs; a key source of energy consumption in cellular networks powered by solar energy sources a long-term promising solution for the mobile cellular network industry. This paper addresses issues of deployment and operation of two solar-powered global system for mobile communications (GSM BSs that are being deployed at present (GSM BS 2/2/2 and GSM BS 4/4/4. The study is based on the characteristics of South Korean solar radiation exposure. The optimum criteria as well as economic and technical feasibility for various BSs are analyzed using a hybrid optimization model for electric renewables. In addition, initial capital, replacement, operations, maintenance, and total net present costs for various solar-powered BSs are discussed. Furthermore, the economic feasibility of the proposed solar system is compared with conventional energy sources in urban and remote areas.

  19. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited older adults: preserved single fiber function despite lower whole muscle size, quality and rate of neuromuscular activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kieran F; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J; Patten, Carolynn; Carabello, Robert J; Cloutier, Gregory J; Phillips, Edward M; Krivickas, Lisa S; Frontera, Walter R; Fielding, Roger A

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power would be significantly lower in mobility-limited elders relative to both healthy groups and sought to characterize the physiological mechanisms associated with the reduction of muscle power with aging. Computed tomography was utilized to assess mid-thigh body composition and calculate specific muscle power and strength. Surface electromyography was used to assess rate of neuromuscular activation and muscle biopsies were taken to evaluate single muscle fiber contractile properties. Peak muscle power, strength, muscle cross-sectional area, specific muscle power and rate of neuromuscular activation were significantly lower among mobility-limited elders compared to both healthy groups (P ≤ 0.05). Mobility-limited older participants had greater deposits of intermuscular adipose tissue (P mobility-limited elders relative to both healthy groups. Male gender was associated with greater decrements in peak and specific muscle power among mobility-limited participants. Impairments in the rate of neuromuscular activation and concomitant reductions in muscle quality are important physiological mechanisms contributing to muscle power deficits and mobility limitations. The dissociation between age-related changes at the whole muscle and single fiber level suggest that, even among older adults with overt mobility problems, contractile properties of surviving muscle fibers are preserved in an attempt to maintain overall muscle function.

  20. The Influence of Social Networks on the Development of Recruitment Actions that Favor User Interface Design and Conversions in Mobile Applications Powered by Linked Data

    OpenAIRE

    Palos-Sanchez, Pedro R.; Saura, Jose Ramon; Debasa, Felipe

    2018-01-01

    This study analyzes the most important influence factors in the literature, which have the greatest influence on the conversions obtained in a mobile application powered by linked data. With the study of user interface design and a small user survey (n = 101,053), we studied the influence of social networks, advertising, and promotional and recruitment actions in conversions for mobile applications powered by linked data. The analysis of the users’ behavior and their application in the design...

  1. New Technology for Microfabrication and Testing of a Thermoelectric Device for Generating Mobile Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narashimha S.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of fabrication and testing of a thermoelectric power generation module. The module was fabricated using a new "flip-chip" module assembly technique that is scalable and modular. This technique results in a low value of contact resistivity ( surfaces. Under mild testing, a power of 22 mW/sq cm was obtained from small (electrical power of practical and usable magnitude for remote applications using thermoelectric power generation technologies.

  2. The Effect of Water Injection on the Control of In-Cylinder Pressure and Enhanced Power Output in a Four-Stroke Spark-Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrui Wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results for liquid water injection (WI into a cylinder during the compression and expansion strokes of an internal combustion engine (ICE, with the aim of achieving an optimal in-cylinder pressure and improving power output using CFD simulation. Employing WI during the compression stroke at 80° of crank angle (CA before top dead centre (bTDC resulted in the reduction of compression work due to a reduction in peak compression pressure by a margin of about 2%. The decreased peak compression pressure also yielded the benefit of a decrease in NOx emission by a margin of 34% as well as the prevention of detonation. Using WI during the expansion stroke (after top dead centre–aTDC revealed two stages of the in-cylinder pressure: the first stage involved a decrease in pressure by heat absorption, and the second stage involved an increase in the pressure as a result of an increase in the steam volume via expansion. For the case of water addition (WA 3.0% and a water temperature of 100 °C, the percentage decrease of in-cylinder pressure was 2.7% during the first stage and a 2.5% pressure increase during the second stage. Water injection helped in reducing the energy losses resulting from the transfer of heat to the walls and exhaust gases. At 180° CA aTDC, the exhaust gas temperature decreased by 42 K, 89 K, and 136 K for WA 1.0, WA 2.0, and WA 3.0, respectively. Increasing the WI temperature to 200 °C resulted in a decrease of the in-cylinder pressure by 1.0% during the first stage, with an increase of approximately 4.0% in the second stage. The use of WI in both compression and expansion strokes resulted in a maximum increase of in-cylinder pressure of about 7%, demonstrating the potential of higher power output.

  3. A NEW MODEL OF AUTONOMOUS MOBILE ROBOTS WITH LIGHTS AND ITS COMPUTATIONAL POWER

    OpenAIRE

    寺井, 智史

    2016-01-01

    We study gathering problem for robots that move on a two dimensional plane. Robots are autonomous, anonymous, and have light that represents robot’s state. Gathering algorithm for n=2 robots is proposed in previous research. We propose a new model of robots with lights and athering algorithm. Key Words :distributed , mobile robots , light

  4. Can the ubiquitous power of mobile phones be used to improve health outcomes in developing countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Warren A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ongoing policy debate about the value of communications technology in promoting development objectives is diverse. Some view computer/web/phone communications technology as insufficient to solve development problems while others view communications technology as assisting all sections of the population. This paper looks at evidence to support or refute the idea that fixed and mobile telephones is, or could be, an effective healthcare intervention in developing countries. Methods A Web-based and library database search was undertaken including the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, (nursing & allied health, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM, POPLINE, BIOSIS, and Web of Science, AIDSearch (MEDLINE AIDS/HIV Subset, AIDSTRIALS & AIDSDRUGS databases. Results Evidence can be found to both support and refute the proposition that fixed and mobile telephones is, or could be, an effective healthcare intervention in developing countries. It is difficult to generalize because of the different outcome measurements and the small number of controlled studies. There is almost no literature on using mobile telephones as a healthcare intervention for HIV, TB, malaria, and chronic conditions in developing countries. Clinical outcomes are rarely measured. Convincing evidence regarding the overall cost-effectiveness of mobile phone " telemedicine" is still limited and good-quality studies are rare. Evidence of the cost effectiveness of such interventions to improve adherence to medicines is also quite weak. Conclusion The developed world model of personal ownership of a phone may not be appropriate to the developing world in which shared mobile telephone use is important. Sharing may be a serious drawback to use of mobile telephones as a healthcare intervention in terms of stigma and privacy, but its magnitude is unknown. One advantage, however, of telephones with respect to adherence to medicine in chronic care models is its ability to create

  5. Inspection Robot Based Mobile Sensing and Power Line Tracking for Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-erdene Byambasuren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Smart sensing and power line tracking is very important in a smart grid system. Illegal electricity usage can be detected by remote current measurement on overhead power lines using an inspection robot. There is a need for accurate detection methods of illegal electricity usage. Stable and correct power line tracking is a very prominent issue. In order to correctly track and make accurate measurements, the swing path of a power line should be previously fitted and predicted by a mathematical function using an inspection robot. After this, the remote inspection robot can follow the power line and measure the current. This paper presents a new power line tracking method using parabolic and circle fitting algorithms for illegal electricity detection. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking method by simulation and experimental results.

  6. Inspection Robot Based Mobile Sensing and Power Line Tracking for Smart Grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byambasuren, Bat-Erdene; Kim, Donghan; Oyun-Erdene, Mandakh; Bold, Chinguun; Yura, Jargalbaatar

    2016-02-19

    Smart sensing and power line tracking is very important in a smart grid system. Illegal electricity usage can be detected by remote current measurement on overhead power lines using an inspection robot. There is a need for accurate detection methods of illegal electricity usage. Stable and correct power line tracking is a very prominent issue. In order to correctly track and make accurate measurements, the swing path of a power line should be previously fitted and predicted by a mathematical function using an inspection robot. After this, the remote inspection robot can follow the power line and measure the current. This paper presents a new power line tracking method using parabolic and circle fitting algorithms for illegal electricity detection. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking method by simulation and experimental results.

  7. Green heterogeneous small-cell networks: Toward reducing the CO2 emissions of mobile communications industry using uplink power adaptation

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous small cell networks, or Het- SNets, are considered as a standard part of future mobile networks in which multiple lowpower low-cost user deployed base stations complement the existing macrocell infrastructure. This article proposes an energy-efficient deployment of the cells where the small cell base stations are arranged around the edge of the reference macrocell, and the deployment is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) deployment. The proposed deployment ensures an increase in the network spectral and energy efficiency by facilitating cell edge mobile users with small cells. Moreover, COE deployment guarantees reduction of the carbon footprint of mobile operations by employing adaptive uplink power control. In order to calibrate the reduction in CO2 emissions, this article quantifies the ecological and associated economical impacts of energy savings in the proposed deployment. Simulation results quantify the improvements in CO2 emissions and spectral and energy gains of the proposed COE deployment compared to macro-only networks and typical small cell deployment strategies where small cells are randomly deployed within a given macrocell. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Novel Roaming and Stationary Tethered Aerial Robots for Continuous Mobile Missions in Nuclear Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Beom W. Gu; Su Y. Choi; Young Soo Choi; Guowei Cai; Lakmal Seneviratne; Chun T. Rim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs) for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs) for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce th...

  9. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  10. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  11. Spatio-temporal modelling of electrical supply systems to optimize the site planning process for the "power to mobility" technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Florian; Zink, Roland

    2016-04-01

    The transformation of the energy sector towards decentralized renewable energies (RE) requires also storage systems to ensure security of supply. The new "Power to Mobility" (PtM) technology is one potential solution to use electrical overproduction to produce methane for i.e. gas vehicles. Motivated by these fact, the paper presents a methodology for a GIS-based temporal modelling of the power grid, to optimize the site planning process for the new PtM-technology. The modelling approach is based on a combination of the software QuantumGIS for the geographical and topological energy supply structure and OpenDSS for the net modelling. For a case study (work in progress) of the city of Straubing (Lower Bavaria) the parameters of the model are quantified. The presentation will discuss the methodology as well as the first results with a view to the application on a regional scale.

  12. Development of Proof-of-Concept Units for the Advanced Medium-Sized Mobile Power Sources (AMMPS) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriulli, JB

    2002-04-03

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of the proof-of-concept units within the Advanced Medium-sized Mobile Power Sources (AMMPS) program. The design used a small, lightweight diesel engine, a permanent magnet alternator, power electronics and digital controls as outlined in the philosophy detailed previously. One small proof-of-concept unit was completed and delivered to the military. The unit functioned well but was not optimized at the time of delivery to the military. A tremendous amount of experience was gained during this phase that can be used in the development of any follow-on AMMPS production systems. Lessons learned and recommendations for follow-on specifications are provided. The unit demonstrated that significant benefits are possible with the new design philosophy. Trade-offs will have to be made but many of the advantages appear to be within the technical grasp of the market.

  13. Predicting Optimal Resolving Power for Ambient Pressure Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, Abu B.; Gribb, Molly M.; Hill, Herbert H

    2010-01-01

    Although diffusion theory predicts that IMS resolving power increases with the square root of the voltage applied across the drift tube, in practice there exists an optimum voltage above which resolving power decreases. This optimum voltage was determined to be both compound and initial ion pulse width-dependent. A “conditional” resolving power equation is introduced that can be used to quickly approximate realistic resolving powers for specific instrumental operating parameters and compounds. Using four common environmental contaminants [trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and methyl iso-butyl ketone (MIBK)], diffusion-limited (theoretical), Rd, conditional, Rc, and actual (or measured), Rm, IMS resolving powers were determined and compared for a small IMS instrument designed for subsurface measurements. Detection limits determined at the optimal resolving power for the environmental contaminants ranged from 18 parts per trillion volume-to-volume (pptv) to 80 parts per billion volume-to-volume (ppbv). The maximal measured resolving power for our small, ambient-pressure stand-alone IMS ranged from 42 to 54, yielding an IMS resolving power efficiency, defined as Rm/Rc × 100%, of 56 to 74% of the maximal conditional resolving power possible. PMID:18683951

  14. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited adults: preserved single muscle fibre function despite reduced whole muscle size, quality and neuromuscular activiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power woul...

  15. Governmental mobility : the power effects of the movement of detained asylum seekers around Britain's detention estate.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the ways in which mobility can have governmental effects in the context of the management of asylum seekers awaiting deportation from the UK. Drawing upon the case of Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre, a facility for the incarceration of immigration deportees near Oxford, the paper makes the case that the way asylum seekers are moved between detention centres within the UK has implications for the way they are represented to both asylum activists and asylum secto...

  16. Achieving Better Buying Power for Mobile Open Architecture Software Systems Through Diverse Acquisition Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    Ozone Platform, OpenJDK (OSS Java Development Kernel for Android app development), and the NASA World Wind Java SDK; programming languages like Java or C...Google Chrome Web browser running on a secure Android mobile device). OA seems to simply suggest software system architectures incorporating OSS/CSS... translate into another programming language, etc.) overall system configurations, interconnections, or interfaces. Fourth, lacking these three, the

  17. Acute-phase predictors of 6-month functional outcome in Italian stroke patients eligible for In-Hospital Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Marco; Fugazzaro, Stefania; Agosti, Maurizio; Sola, Carlotta; Di Carlo, Antonio; Cecconi, Lorenzo; Ferro, Salvatore

    2018-01-23

    to assess early post-stroke prognostic factors in patients admitted for post-acute phase rehabilitation. a one-year multicenter prospective project was conducted in four Italian regions on 352 patients who were hospitalized after a first stroke and were eligible for post-acute rehabilitation. Clinical data were collected in the Stroke or Acute Care Units (acute phase), then in Rehabilitation Units (post-acute phase) and, subsequently, after a 6-month post-stroke period (follow-up). Clinical outcome measures were represented using the Barthel Index (BI) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the most important prognostic index. mRS score, minor neurologic impairment and early out-of-bed mobilization (within 2 days after the stroke) proved to be important factors related to a better recovery according to BI (power of prediction = 37%). Similarly, age, pre-morbid mRS score and early out-of-bed mobilization were seen to be significant factors in achieving better overall participation and activity according to the mRS (power of prediction = 48%). BI at admission and certain comorbidities were also significant prognostic factors correlated with a better outcome. according to the BI and mRS, early mobilization is an early predictor of favorable outcome.

  18. Use of natural gas, methanol, and ethanol fuel emulsions as environmentally friendly energy carriers for mobile heat power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanov, V. A.; Lopatin, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    The need for using environmentally friendly energy carriers for mobile heat power plants (HPPs) is grounded. Ecologically friendly sources of energy, such as natural gas as well as renewable methyl and ethyl alcohols, are investigated. In order to develop, determine, and optimize the composition of environmentally friendly energy carriers for an HPP, the latter has been tested when working on diesel fuel (DF), compressed natural gas (CNG), and methanol and ethanol fuel emulsions (MFE, EFE). It has been experimentally established that, for the application of environmentally friendly energy carriers for a 4Ch 11.0/12.5 diesel engine of a mobile fuel and power plant, it is necessary to maintain the following ratio of components when working on CNG: 80% gas and 20% DF primer portion. When working on an alcohol mixture, emulsions of the following composition were used: 25% alcohol (methanol or ethanol), 0.5% detergent-dispersant additive succinimide C-5A, 7% water, and 67.5% DF. When this diesel passed from oil DF to environmentally friendly energy sources, it allowed for the reduction of the content of exhaust gases (EG) (1) when working on CNG with recirculation of exhaust gases (EGR) (recirculation was used to eliminate the increased amount of nitric oxides by using CNG): carbon black by 5.8 times, carbon dioxide by 45.9%, and carbon monoxide by 23.8%; (2) when working on MFE: carbon black by 6.4 times, nitrogen oxides by 29.6%, carbon dioxide by 10.1%, and carbon oxide by 47.6%; (3) when working on EFE: carbon black by 4.8 times; nitrogen oxides by 40.3%, carbon dioxide by 26.6%, and carbon monoxide by 28.6%. The prospects of use of environmentally friendly energy carriers in diesels of mobile HPPs, such as natural gas, ethanol, and methanol, has been determined.

  19. A comparison of radioisotope Brayton and Stirling system for lunar surface mobile power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    A study was performed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell 2.5-kWe modular dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) using a Stirling power conversion system. The results of this study were compared with similar results performed under the DIPS program using a Brayton power conversion system. The study indicated that the Stirling power module has 20% lower mass and 40% lower radiator area than the Brayton module. However, the study also revealed that because the Stirling power module requires a complex heat pipe arrangment to transport heat from the isotope to the Stirling heater head and a pumped NaK heat rejection loop, the Stirling module is much more difficult to integrate with the isotope heat source and heat rejection system

  20. Facilitating Stroke Management using Modern Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Park, Eunjeong; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2013-09-01

    Information technology and mobile devices may be beneficial and useful in many aspects of stroke management, including recognition of stroke, transport and triage of patients, emergent stroke evaluation at the hospital, and rehabilitation. In this review, we address the contributions of information technology and mobile health to stroke management. Rapid detection and triage are essential for effective thrombolytic treatment. Awareness of stroke warning signs and responses to stroke could be enhanced by using mobile applications. Furthermore, prehospital assessment and notification could be streamlined for use in telemedicine and teleradiology. A mobile telemedicine system for assessing the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores has shown higher correlation and fast assessment comparing with face-to-face method. Because the benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent, treatment should be initiated as quickly as possible. In-hospital communication between multidisciplinary team members can be enhanced using information technology. A computerized in-hospital alert system using computerized physician-order entry was shown to be effective in reducing the time intervals from hospital arrival to medical evaluations and thrombolytic treatment. Mobile devices can also be used as supplementary tools for neurologic examination and clinical decision-making. In post-stroke rehabilitation, virtual reality and telerehabilitation are helpful. Mobile applications might be useful for public awareness, lifestyle modification, and education/training of healthcare professionals. Information technology and mobile health are useful tools for management of stroke patients from the acute period to rehabilitation. Further improvement of technology will change and enhance stroke prevention and treatment.

  1. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  2. Use of fuel cells to meet military requirements for mobile power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrukaitis, E.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The use of fuel cell technology in military applications will depend on safe, high energy density systems being developed. An important part of using this technology is also the development of alternative hydrogen producing fuels with high energy densities and are easy to transport. Fuel cells are now a very large R and D effort for several military applications around the world. The major reason is because of the high power demands needed requires electrical energy sources that far exceed the capabilities of batteries currently being fielded for portable applications. Fuel cells are regarded as highly efficient, tactical energy converters that can be adapted for wide range of power requirements. They are potentially the lowest weight power source when coupled with batteries or capacitors to form hybrid systems. Generally electrical power is needed to support a number of applications from ultra-high power for electrical pulses (radios, sensors) to reliable, conditioned power for command and control systems. In the future, sustained power for electric drive systems, will also be required. Some of the promising applications in the military and the R and D challenges that remain to reach performance and reliability targets suitable for military requirements will be discussed. (author)

  3. A New Extended Kalman Filtering for Shadow/Fading Power Estimation in Mobile Communications

    OpenAIRE

    George P. Pappas; Subramaniam Ganesan; Mohamed A. Zohdy

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a New Extended Kalman filter (NEKF) approach to improve local mean power estimation. The method is being validated using a GUI system model and then compared to existing methods, Kalman Filter (KF) with Gaussian and Non-Gaussian noise environments. Our analysis is showing that NEKF is a more accurate method in most situations. NEKF can accurately estimate the parameters and predict states in discrete nonlinear state-space for modeling shadow power.

  4. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  5. SIMON [Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator] combines radiation hardness with computer power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    SIMON - the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator - has been under development at the US Department of Energy's (DoE's) Savannah River Laboratory for four years. The robot's on-board intelligence units are designed to be radiation-resistant, making it able to function for extended periods within a remotely operated facility. In its current form, SIMON is being developed by the laboratory's Robotics Group for use in the site's production reactors, but it can be adapted for use in any nuclear facility, including commercial reactors. The challenge for Savannah River Laboratory engineers was to eliminate the need for human inspection of certain components. To do this, they designed a robot that could do three things for reactor operators: measure radiation; measure temperature; and provide televised views inside the reactor facility. To be useful, the robot has to be extremely mobile, and its components had to be able to survive months without maintenance in the radiation, temperature and humidity encountered in nuclear facilities. The robot also had to be cost-effective. (author)

  6. Possible alternatives for diesel powered mobile equipment for the conditions of deep mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paraszczak, J.; Kotersi, O [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The challenges associated with mining at considerable depths were discussed. Mines such as Kidd Creek, LaRonde and Creighton are deeper than 2500 m. High rock temperature is among the challenges that operators face in such conditions. Conventional diesel powered load-hauling equipment constitute an additional source of heat and noxious gases. As such, more intense ventilation is needed in order to keep ambient temperature and air quality at a level that is acceptable for human workers. This paper examined possible alternatives for diesel powered equipment, including those that are commercially available as well as those that are underdevelopment or in the prototype stage. The equipment was reviewed with reference to the required infrastructure, stage of technology development and progress. The flexibility, practicality and economic viability of the equipment was also investigated. The potential for its use in deep Canadian mines was discussed along with the most promising drive alternatives for vehicles designed for deep mine operations. Electric drives have proven to be effective in many mining applications since they have significant advantages over diesel drives. The characteristics of cable powered equipment, trolley-wire powered equipment, and battery powered equipment were described. The key advantages and disadvantages of hybrid diesel electric equipment were also reviewed along with the viability of power plants based on the use of hydrogen. The principle types of hydrogen power plants include hydrogen combustion engines; HY-Drive systems and fuel cells. It was concluded that although there is no viable alternative for diesel engines at present, Canadian mining companies operating at great depths have made significant progress in these fields and remain among the leaders in mining innovation. 17 refs.

  7. A case report on the use of a novel optokinetic chart stimulation intervention for the restoration of voluntary movement and mobility in a patient with an acute hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambira, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to report on the use of novel optokinetic chart stimulation to achieve recovery of affected upper limb and affected lower limb voluntary movements and full recovery of mobility in a patient with an acute hemorrhagic stroke. An optokinetic chart was moved in front of the patient: from side to side, up and down and finally forwards and backwards. Specific active-assisted exercises of affected shoulder anti-gravity muscles were also carried out. These were external rotation, abduction, flexion and a combination of these through the D2F proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) pattern. Oxford score improved from 0/5 on admission to 3/5 on discharge, after 8 weeks, while Barthel Index improved from 0/20 to 20/20. STREAM scores improved from 1/70 on admission to 18/70 a month after admission and 70 /70 at follow-up 3 months after discharge. Optokinetic chart stimulation led to restoration of voluntary movement on the affected side as well as restoration of independent mobility. Further research on the use of the optokinetic chart to enhance neural plasticity for restoration of voluntary movement and mobility is recommended.

  8. Inter-generational micro-class mobility during and after socialism: The power, education, autonomy, capital, and horizontal (PEACH) model in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippényi, Zoltán; Gerber, Theodore P

    2016-07-01

    We propose a theoretical model of how occupational mobility operates differently under socialism than under market regimes. Our model specifies four vertical dimensions of occupational resources-power, education, autonomy, and capital-plus a horizontal dimension consisting of linkages among occupations in the same economic branch. Given the nature of state socialist political-economic institutions, we expect power to exhibit much stronger effects in the socialist mobility regime, while autonomy and capital should play greater stratifying roles after the market transition. Education should have stable effects, and horizontal linkages should diminish in strength with market reforms. We estimate our model's parameters using data from surveys conducted in Hungary during and after the socialist period. We adopt a micro-class approach, though we test it against approaches that use more aggregated class categories. Our model provides a superior fit to other mobility models, and our results confirm our hypotheses about the distinctive features of the state socialist mobility regime. Mobility researchers often look for common patterns characterizing mobility in all industrialized societies. Our findings suggest that national institutions can produce fundamentally distinct patterns of mobility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel Roaming and Stationary Tethered Aerial Robots for Continuous Mobile Missions in Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom W. Gu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  10. Novel roaming and stationary tethered aerial robots for continuous mobile missions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Beom W.; Choi, Su Y.; Rim, Chun T.; Choi, Young Soo; Cai, Guowei; Seneviratne, Lakmal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs) for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs) for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively

  11. Wideband LTE power amplifier with integrated novel analog pre-distorter linearizer for mobile wireless communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthirajoo, Eswaran; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Kanesan, Jeevan; Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a new circuit to extend the linear operation bandwidth of a LTE (Long Term Evolution) power amplifier, while delivering a high efficiency is implemented in less than 1 mm2 chip area. The 950 µm × 900 µm monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier (PA) is fabricated in a 2 µm InGaP/GaAs process. An on-chip analog pre-distorter (APD) is designed to improve the linearity of the PA, up to 20 MHz channel bandwidth. Intended for 1.95 GHz Band 1 LTE application, the PA satisfies adjacent channel leakage ratio (ACLR) and error vector magnitude (EVM) specifications for a wide LTE channel bandwidth of 20 MHz at a linear output power of 28 dBm with corresponding power added efficiency (PAE) of 52.3%. With a respective input and output return loss of 30 dB and 14 dB, the PA's power gain is measured to be 32.5 dB while exhibiting an unconditional stability characteristic from DC up to 5 GHz. The proposed APD technique serves to be a good solution to improve linearity of a PA without sacrificing other critical performance metrics.

  12. Novel roaming and stationary tethered aerial robots for continuous mobile missions in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Beom W.; Choi, Su Y.; Rim, Chun T. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cai, Guowei; Seneviratne, Lakmal [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs) for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs) for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  13. Wideband LTE power amplifier with integrated novel analog pre-distorter linearizer for mobile wireless communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswaran Uthirajoo

    Full Text Available For the first time, a new circuit to extend the linear operation bandwidth of a LTE (Long Term Evolution power amplifier, while delivering a high efficiency is implemented in less than 1 mm2 chip area. The 950 µm × 900 µm monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC power amplifier (PA is fabricated in a 2 µm InGaP/GaAs process. An on-chip analog pre-distorter (APD is designed to improve the linearity of the PA, up to 20 MHz channel bandwidth. Intended for 1.95 GHz Band 1 LTE application, the PA satisfies adjacent channel leakage ratio (ACLR and error vector magnitude (EVM specifications for a wide LTE channel bandwidth of 20 MHz at a linear output power of 28 dBm with corresponding power added efficiency (PAE of 52.3%. With a respective input and output return loss of 30 dB and 14 dB, the PA's power gain is measured to be 32.5 dB while exhibiting an unconditional stability characteristic from DC up to 5 GHz. The proposed APD technique serves to be a good solution to improve linearity of a PA without sacrificing other critical performance metrics.

  14. Early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godecke, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions. Trials in this early time window are few. Although the seminal AVERT trial suggests that a cautious approach is necessary immediately (stroke, early mobility training and mobilization appear well tolerated, with few reasons to delay initiating some rehabilitation within the first week. The results of large clinical trials of early aphasia therapy are on the horizon, and examples of targeted upper limb treatments with better patient selection are emerging. Early rehabilitation trials are complex, particularly those that intervene across acute and rehabilitation care settings, but these trials are important if we are to optimize recovery potential in the critical window for repair. Concerted efforts to standardize 'early' recruitment, appropriately stratify participants and implement longer term follow-up is needed. Trial standards are improving. New recommendations from a recent Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable will help drive new research.

  15. Mobile Test Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Power Mobile Test capabilities are utilized to conduct electrical power quality testing on aircraft and helicopters. This capability allows that the...

  16. Mobility and muscle strength in male former elite endurance and power athletes aged 66-91 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderoos, S; Wasenius, N; Laine, M K; Kujala, U M; Mälkiä, E; Kaprio, J; Sarna, S; Bäckmand, H M; Kettunen, J A; Heinonen, O J; Jula, A M; Aunola, S; Eriksson, J G

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare mobility and muscle strength in male former elite endurance and power athletes aged 66-91 years (n = 150; 50 men in both former elite athlete groups and in their control group). Agility, dynamic balance, walking speed, chair stand, self-rated balance confidence (ABC-scale), jumping height, and handgrip strength were assessed. Former elite power athletes had better agility performance time than the controls (age- and body mass index, BMI-adjusted mean difference -3.6 s; 95% CI -6.3, -0.8). Adjustment for current leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and prevalence of diseases made this difference non-significant (P = 0.214). The subjects in the power sports group jumped higher than the men in the control group (age- and BMI-adjusted mean differences for vertical squat jump, VSJ 4.4 cm; 95% CI 2.0, 6.8; for countermovement jump, CMJ 4.0 cm; 95% CI 1.7, 6.4). Taking current LTPA and chronic diseases for adjusting process did not improve explorative power of the model. No significant differences between the groups were found in the performances evaluating dynamic balance, walking speed, chair stand, ABC-scale, or handgrip strength. In conclusion, power athletes among the aged former elite sportsmen had greater explosive force production in their lower extremities than the men in the control group. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. GeoguideRome, urban geotourism offer powered by mobile application technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Alessia; Grangier, Lucien; Reynard, Emmanuel; Kaiser, Christian; Del Monte, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Geoheritage studies have been highly intensified and diversified in recent years. This field of research has a strong applicability, especially in interdisciplinary and sustainable forms of tourism. For this purpose the most modern technologies are used for supporting the dissemination of research results, in particular for educational purposes (Kenteris et al., 2011 and references therein). This is the case of smartphone and tablet applications developed by the Institute of Geography and Sustainability of Lausanne University (IGD), devoted to geotourist itineraries. This work presents the application developed for the city of Rome, based on the itinerary proposed by the Earth Sciences Department of the Sapienza University (Del Monte et al., 2013; Pica et al., 2015). The Aeterna Urbs, with more than 3000 years of historical development, is a very good place to develop urban geotourism, especially because most of the cultural places are related to morphological features (Pica et al., 2015). As shown by the Geoguide Lausanne (Reynard et al., 2015) - a virtual itinerary showing the relationships between geology/geomorphology, climate/hydrology, and urban development in Lausanne (Switzerland) - and TOURinSTONES - a virtual guide on the rocks used for the construction of urban monuments and infrastructures in the city of Turin (Italy) - the urban context has the advantage of easily showing the links between natural features and human activities. From a technical point of view the application is an updated version of Geoguide Lausanne using jQuery Mobile as development framework, which allowed for increasing the usability and solved some gaps of the previous versions. The contents are organized the same way as for the Geoguide Lausanne, proposing three educational themes, an itinerary arranged in georeferenced stops shown by images and described in their characterizing aspects. The themes are Geology, History and Legends. By means of the relationships between them they

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  19. RFID Guardian: A Battery-powered Mobile Device for RFID Privacy Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieback, M.R.; Crispo, B.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    RFID tags are tiny, inexpensive, inductively powered computers that are going to replace bar codes on many products, but which have many other uses as well. For example, they will allow smart washing machines to check for incompatible clothes (e.g., white shirts and red socks) and smart

  20. Lab-on-a-robot: integrated microchip CE, power supply, electrochemical detector, wireless unit, and mobile platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Valdez, David C; Bergeron, Phillip; Mora, Maria F; Garcia, Carlos D; Ayon, Arturo

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the fabrication of a wireless mobile unit containing an electrochemical detection module and a 3-channel high-voltage power supply (HVPS) designed for microchip CE is described. The presented device consists of wireless global positioning system controlled robotics, an electrochemical detector utilizing signal conditioning analog circuitry and a digital feedback range controller, a HVPS, an air pump, and a CE microchip. A graphical user interface (LabVIEW) was also designed to communicate wirelessly with the device, from a distant personal computer communication port. The entire device is integrated and controlled by digital hardware implemented on a field programmable gate array development board. This lab-on-a-robot is able to navigate to a global position location, acquire an air sample, perform the analysis (injection, separation, and detection), and send the data (electropherogram) to a remote station without exposing the analyst to the testing environment.

  1. Gait characteristics of hemiparetic stroke survivors in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of severe handicap. Deficiencies in walking may present significant challenges to mobility, resulting in abnormal and inefficient gait patterns in stroke survivors. This study compared the gait characteristics of hemiparetic stroke survivors and those of healthy individuals and determined the ...

  2. Portfolio Purchasing Decision for Mobile Power Equipment of B2C E-Commerce Export Retailer Based on CVaR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchun, Wan; Qiucen, Chen

    2017-11-01

    Purchasing is an important part of export e-commerce of B2C, which plays an important role on risk and cost control in supply management. From the perspective of risk control, the paper construct a CVaR model for portfolio purchase. We select a heavy sales mobile power equipment from a typical B2C e-commerce export retailer as study sample. This study optimizes the purchasing strategy of this type of mobile power equipment. The research has some reference for similar enterprises in purchasing portfolio decision.

  3. Mobile Open-Source Solar-Powered 3-D Printers for Distributed Manufacturing in Off-Grid Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. King

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing in areas of the developing world that lack electricity severely restricts the technical sophistication of what is produced. More than a billion people with no access to electricity still have access to some imported higher-technologies; however, these often lack customization and often appropriateness for their community. Open source appropriate tech­nology (OSAT can over­come this challenge, but one of the key impediments to the more rapid development and distri­bution of OSAT is the lack of means of production beyond a specific technical complexity. This study designs and demonstrates the technical viability of two open-source mobile digital manufacturing facilities powered with solar photovoltaics, and capable of printing customizable OSAT in any com­munity with access to sunlight. The first, designed for com­munity use, such as in schools or maker­spaces, is semi-mobile and capable of nearly continuous 3-D printing using RepRap technology, while also powering multiple computers. The second design, which can be completely packed into a standard suitcase, allows for specialist travel from community to community to provide the ability to custom manufacture OSAT as needed, anywhere. These designs not only bring the possibility of complex manufacturing and replacement part fabrication to isolated rural communities lacking access to the electric grid, but they also offer the opportunity to leap-frog the entire conventional manufacturing supply chain, while radically reducing both the cost and the environmental impact of products for developing communities.

  4. Scanning and mobile multi-axis DOAS measurements of SO2 and NO2 emissions from an electric power plant in Montevideo, Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frins, E.; Bobrowski, N.; Osorio, M.; Casaballe, N.; Belsterli, G.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2014-12-01

    In March 2012 the emissions of NO2 and SO2 from a power station located on the east side of Montevideo Bay (34° 53‧ 10″ S, 56° 11‧ 49″ W) were quantified by simultaneously using mobile and scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (in the following mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS, respectively). The facility produces electricity by means of two technologies: internal combustion motors and steam generators. The motors are powered with centrifuged heavy oil and produce a maximum power of 80 MW approximately. The steam generators produce approximately 305 MW and are powered with heavy fuel oil. We compare the emissions obtained from the measured slant column densities (mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS) with the emissions estimated from fuel mass balance. On one occasion it was possible to distinguish between the two types of sources, observing two plumes with different SO2 and NO2 emission rates. During the period of the campaign the mean SO2 emission flux was determined to be 0.36 (±0.12) kg s-1 and 0.26 (±0.09) kg s-1 retrieved from mobile and scanning DOAS respectively, while the calculated SO2 flux from the sulphur content of the fuel was 0.34 (±0.03) kg s-1. The average NO2 flux calculated from mobile DOAS was determined to be 11 (±3) × 10-3 kg s-1. Using the scanning DOAS approach a mean NO2 flux of 5.4 (±1.7) × 10-3 kg s-1 was obtained, which is significantly lower than by the mobile measurements. The differences between the results of mobile MAX-DOAS measurements and scanning DOAS measurements are most probably caused by the variability and the limited knowledge of the wind speed and direction.

  5. Mobile solutions using high-power lasers; Problemloesungen mit mobilen Hochleistungslasern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Oliver [LASER on demand GmbH, Langenhagen (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Nowadays conventional processing methods are used if large workpieces require on-site cutting, welding or surface treatment. However, these applications benefit from laser processing due to high precision, flexibility, low heat input and distortion. The spectrum of work extends from the decontamination of radioactive contaminated components in nuclear power plants, welding with CNC milling machines through to the use of hand-held or mechanized systems for the processing of large or untransportable workpieces. (orig.)

  6. Risk governance for mobile phones, power lines, and other EMF technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, Leeka; Swanson, John; Kandel, Shaiela; Malloy, Timothy F

    2010-10-01

    Power-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) have been present in industrialized countries since the late 19th century and a considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated as to potential health effects. The mainstream scientific view is that even if there is a risk, it is unlikely to be of major public-health significance. EMFs from cellular communications and other radio-frequency technologies have increased rapidly in the last decade. This technology is constantly changing, which makes continued research both more urgent and more challenging. While there are no persuasive data suggesting a health risk, research and particularly exposure assessment is still immature. The principal risk-governance issue with power frequencies is how to respond to weak and uncertain scientific evidence that nonetheless causes public concern. For radio-frequency electromagnetic fields, the issue is how to respond to large potential consequences and large public concern where only limited scientific evidence exists. We survey these issues and identify deficits in risk governance. Deficits in problem framing include both overstatement and understatement of the scientific evidence and of the consequences of taking protective measures, limited ability to detect early warnings of risk, and attempted reassurance that has sometimes been counterproductive. Other deficits relate to the limited public involvement mechanisms, and flaws in the identification and evaluation of tradeoffs in the selection of appropriate management strategies. We conclude that risk management of EMFs has certainly not been perfect, but for power frequencies it has evolved and now displays many successful features. Lessons from the power-frequency experience can benefit risk governance of the radio-frequency EMFs and other emerging technologies.

  7. Scalable single point power extraction for compact mobile and stand-alone solar harvesting power sources based on fully printed organic photovoltaic modules and efficient high voltage DC/DC conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Valverde, Rafael; Villarejo, José A.; Hösel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Patterns for fully printed polymer solar cells are presented that inherently enable scaling of the power output with single point electrical energy connection is presented. Connection is made to only one end of the printed foil that can be rolled out for light energy harvesting. The power level...... (AM1.5G, 1000 W m−2). As a demonstration we present a scalable fully integrated and compact power unit for mobile applications comprising solar energy harvesting OPV modules, power conversion and storage. Applications possible include electrical charging of mobile devices, illumination using LED lamps...... takes place in a HVDC–DC converter that is tailored specifically for operation with polymer solar cells by regulation on the input side. The system charges a lithium-polymer battery thus enabling storage of 82 Wh for a printed OPV foil measuring 0.305 m×9 m having a nominal power output of at least 15 W...

  8. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  9. Efficiency Study of Vertical Distance Variations in Wireless Power Transfer for E-Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhar, Morteza Ghorbani; Ouyang, Ziwei; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    of the aims of the companies and universities. However, in low VD, system performance becomes highly sensitive, due to the magnetic coupling strength. The focus of this paper is to analyze the effects of decreasing the vertical distances to WPT resonance tank efficiency’s. Finally, some of the most......A Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) system is a safe, convenient and smart charging solution for Electric Vehicle (EV) users. However, a drawback of WPT systems is reduced efficiency in comparison to conventional wired charging due to lower coupling. By increasing the volume of EVs in the market...

  10. Damage effect and mechanism of the GaAs high electron mobility transistor induced by high power microwave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Chang-Chun, Chai; Yin-Tang, Yang; Jing, Sun; Zhi-Peng, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present the damage effect and mechanism of high power microwave (HPM) on AlGaAs/GaAs pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (pHEMT) of low-noise amplifier (LNA). A detailed investigation is carried out by simulation and experiment study. A two-dimensional electro-thermal model of the typical GaAs pHEMT induced by HPM is established in this paper. The simulation result reveals that avalanche breakdown, intrinsic excitation, and thermal breakdown all contribute to damage process. Heat accumulation occurs during the positive half cycle and the cylinder under the gate near the source side is most susceptible to burn-out. Experiment is carried out by injecting high power microwave into GaAs pHEMT LNA samples. It is found that the damage to LNA is because of the burn-out at first stage pHEMT. The interiors of the damaged samples are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Experimental results accord well with the simulation of our model. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339900) and the Open Fund of Key Laboratory of Complex Electromagnetic Environment Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2015-0214.XY.K).

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of the achievable separation power in resistive-glass atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnik, Mark; Fernández, Facundo M

    2010-07-15

    We present a detailed investigation of the performance of our previously reported nanoelectrospray high-resolution resistive-glass atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometer constructed with monolithic resistive-glass desolvation and drift regions. Using experimental spectral data and theoretical pulse width and diffusion variables, we compare theoretical and experimental resolving powers achievable under a variety of field strengths and ion gate pulse widths. The effects of instrumental and operational parameters on the resolution achievable in chromatographic terms are also discussed. Following characterization of the separation power of the instrument, experimental spectral peak width data is fitted by a least-squares procedure to a pre-existing semi-empirical model developed to study contributions to peak width other than initial pulse width and diffusional broadening. The model suggests possible contributions to the final measured peak width from electric field inhomogeneity and minor contributions from instrumental parameters such as anode size, anode-to-anode grid distance and drift gas flow rate. The model also reveals an unexpected ion gate width dependence on the final measured peak width that we attribute to non-ideal performance of the Bradbury-Nielsen ion gate and limitations in the design of our pulsing-electronics. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. How can the curation of hands-on STEM activities power successful mobile apps and websites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello, D.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) is University of California, Berkeley's public science center. Over the last decade, the Center for Technology Innovation at LHS has partnered with many institutions to establish a strong track record of developing successful technology solutions to support STEM teaching and learning within informal environments. Curation by subject-matter experts has been at the heart of many educational technology products from LHS and its partners that are directed at educators and families. This work includes: (1) popular digital libraries for inquiry-based activities at Howtosmile.org (NSF DRL #0735007) and NASA Earth and Space science education resources at NASAwavelength.org; and novel mobile apps like DIY Sun Science (NASA NNX10AE05G) and DIY Human Body (NIH 5R25OD010543) designed to scaffold exploration of STEM phenomena at home. Both NASA Wavelength and DIY Sun Science arose out of long-term collaborations with the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), and other NASA-funded organizations, in partnership with NASA through cooperative agreements. This session will review the development, formative evaluation, and usage metrics for these two Earth and Space science-themed educational technology products directly relevant to the AGU community. Questions reviewed by presenters will include: What makes a good hands-on activity, and what essential information do educators depend on when searching for programming additions? What content and connections do families need to explore hands-on activities? How can technology help incorporate educational standards into the discovery process for learning experiences online? How do all these components drive the design and user experience of websites and apps that showcase STEM content?

  13. Mobile Energy Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mingqing; Xiong, Mingliang; Deng, Hao; Liu, Qingwen; Wu, Jun; Xia, Pengfei

    2018-01-01

    Similar to the evolution from wired Internet to mobile Internet (MI), the growing demand of power delivery anywhere and anytime appeals for power grid transformation from wired to mobile domain. We propose here the next generation of power delivery network -- mobile energy internet (MEI) for wireless energy transfer within a mobile range from several meters to tens of meters. MEI will be a significant complement for Internet of things (IoT), because battery charging is one of the biggest head...

  14. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  15. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, L. G.; Nielsen, M. K.F.; Simonsen, C.

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very...... not appear to be a major mechanistic factor mediating neuroplasticity in mobility-limited older adults....

  17. Development of mobile manipulator for maintenance work in containment vessels of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, Takeo; Nishihara, Masatoshi; Hosaka, Shigetaka; Nakayama, Junji; Sato, Masatoshi; Ishida, Michiyasu

    1985-01-01

    The teleoperation system with robot is described for in the containment vessels of nuclear power plants. We have developed a high level robot system as the practical use level. The robot is designed to execute the locomotions and manipulations required for closing and opening the valve, tightening the bolt and others. The robot consists of a locomotor with four legs and two driving wheels, an articulated manipulator with seven joints, and an ITV arm with stereo-camera. The size of the robot is small, that is about 500 mm in length, 500 mm in width, 1200 mm in height and 420 kg in weight. The robot can be operated in a hostile environment, which has a 10 6 R gamma ray dose, 70 deg C temperature, 100 % relative humidity. We have added an advanced control method in order to reduce the operator's load. Also, an interlock and a fail-safe control are installed in the robot system. (author)

  18. Measurement of Fine Particles From Mobile and Stationary Sources, and Reducing the Air Conditioner Power Consumption in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Eli Henry

    We study the PM2.5and ultrafine exhaust emissions from a new natural gas-fired turbine power facility to better understand air pollution in California. To characterize the emissions from new natural gas turbines, a series of tests were performed on a GE LMS100 gas turbine. These tests included PM2.5 and wet chemical tests for SO2/SO 3 and NH3, as well as ultrafine (less than 100 nm in diameter) particulate matter measurements. The turbine exhaust had an average particle number concentration that was 2.3x103 times higher than ambient air. The majority of these particles were nanoparticles; at the 100 nm size, stack particle concentrations were about 20 times higher than ambient, and increased to 3.9x104 times higher on average in the 2.5 - 3 nm particle size range. This study also found that ammonia emissions were higher than expected, but in compliance with permit conditions. This was possibly due to an ammonia imbalance entering the catalyst, some flue gas bypassing the catalyst, or not enough catalyst volume. SO3 accounted for an average of 23% of the total sulfur oxides emissions measured. Some of the SO3 is formed in the combustion process, it is likely that the majority formed as the SO2 in the combustion products passed across the oxidizing CO catalyst and SCR catalyst. The 100 MW turbine sampled in this study emitted particle loadings similar to those previously measured from turbines in the SCAQMD area, however, the turbine exhaust contained far more particles than ambient air. The power consumed by an air conditioner accounts for a significant fraction of the total power used by hybrid and electric vehicles especially during summer. This study examined the effect of recirculation of cabin air on power consumption of mobile air conditioners both in-lab and on-road. Real time power consumption and vehicle mileage were recorded by an On Board Diagnostic monitor and carbon balance method. Vehicle mileage improved with increased cabin air recirculation. The

  19. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  20. Mobile telephones: a comparison of radiated power between 3G VoIP calls and 3G VoCS calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Dragan; Bragard, Guillaume; Picard, Dominique; Chauvin, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the mean RF power radiated by mobile telephones during voice calls in 3G VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) using an application well known to mobile Internet users, and to compare it with the mean power radiated during voice calls in 3G VoCS (Voice over Circuit Switch) on a traditional network. Knowing that the specific absorption rate (SAR) is proportional to the mean radiated power, the user's exposure could be clearly identified at the same time. Three 3G (High Speed Packet Access) smartphones from three different manufacturers, all dual-band for GSM (900 MHz, 1800 MHz) and dual-band for UMTS (900 MHz, 1950 MHz), were used between 28 July and 04 August 2011 in Paris (France) to make 220 two-minute calls on a mobile telephone network with national coverage. The places where the calls were made were selected in such a way as to describe the whole range of usage situations of the mobile telephone. The measuring equipment, called "SYRPOM", recorded the radiation power levels and the frequency bands used during the calls with a sampling rate of 20,000 per second. In the framework of this study, the mean normalised power radiated by a telephone in 3G VoIP calls was evaluated at 0.75% maximum power of the smartphone, compared with 0.22% in 3G VoCS calls. The very low average power levels associated with use of 3G devices with VoIP or VoCS support the view that RF exposure resulting from their use is far from exceeding the basic restrictions of current exposure limits in terms of SAR.

  1. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  2. Excellent cross-cultural validity, intra-test reliability and construct validity of the Dutch Rivermead Mobility Index in patients after stroke undergoing rehabilitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, L.D.; Green, J.; Kluis, K.R. de; Molenaar, I.W.; Bagley, P.; Smith, J.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cross-cultural validity of international Dutch-English comparisons when using the Dutch Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), and the intra-test reliability and construct validity of the Dutch RMI. METHODS: Cross-cultural validity was studied in a combined data-set of Dutch

  3. EXCELLENT CROSS-CULTURAL VALIDITY, INTRA-TEST RELIABILITY AND CONSTRUCT VALIDITY OF THE DUTCH RIVERMEAD MOBILITY INDEX IN PATIENTS AFTER STROKE UNDERGOING REHABILITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Leo D.; Green, John; De Kluis, Kiki R. A.; Molenaar, Ivo W.; Bagley, Pam; Smith, Jane; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cross-cultural validity of international Dutch-English comparisons when using the Dutch Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), and the intra-test reliability and construct validity of the Dutch RMI. Methods: Cross-cultural validity was studied in a combined data-set of Dutch

  4. Power of Peer Support to Change Health Behavior to Reduce Risks for Heart Disease and Stroke for African American Men in a Faith-Based Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohye; Schorr, Erica; Hadidi, Niloufar Niakosari; Kelley, Robin; Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Lindquist, Ruth

    2018-02-01

    Peer support has powerful potential to improve outcomes in a program of health behavior change; yet, how peer support is perceived by participants, its role, and how it contributes to intervention efficacy is not known, especially among African Americans. The purpose of this study was to identify the subjectively perceived experience and potential contributions of peer support to the outcomes of a peer group behavioral intervention designed to change health behavior to reduce risks for heart disease and stroke in African American men in a faith-based community. A peer support group intervention was implemented to increase health knowledge and to improve health behaviors in line with the American Heart Association's Life Simple 7 domains (get active, control cholesterol, eat better, manage blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, and stop smoking). Fourteen peer group sessions and eight follow-up interviews with program participants were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Seven key themes emerged, including (1) enhancing access to health behavior information and resources, (2) practicing and applying problem-solving skills with group feedback and support, (3) discussing health behavior challenges and barriers, (4) sharing health behavior changes, (5) sharing perceived health outcome improvements and benefits, (6) feelings of belonging and being cared for, and (7) addressing health of family and community. Qualitative findings revealed a positive perception of peer support and greater understanding of potential reasons why it may be an effective strategy for African American men.

  5. The Mars Hopper: a radioisotope powered, impulse driven, long-range, long-lived mobile platform for exploration of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven D. Howe; Robert C. O' Brien; William Taitano; Doug Crawford; Nathan Jerred; Spencer Cooley; John Crapeau; Steve Hansen; Andrew Klein; James Werner

    2011-02-01

    Planetary exploration mission requirements are becoming more demanding. Due to the increasing cost, the missions that provide mobile platforms that can acquire data at multiple locations are becoming more attractive. Wheeled vehicles such as the MER rovers have proven extremely capable but have very limited range and cannot traverse rugged terrain. Flying vehicles such as balloons and airplanes have been proposed but are problematic due to the very thin atmospheric pressure and the strong, dusty winds present on Mars. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has designed an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its lifetime - a Mars Hopper. The Mars Hopper concept utilizes energy from radioisotopic decay in a manner different from any existing radioisotopic power sources—as a thermal capacitor. By accumulating the heat from radioisotopic decay for long periods, the power of the source can be dramatically increased for short periods. The platform will be able to "hop" from one location to the next every 5-7 days with a separation of 5-10 km per hop. Preliminary designs show a platform that weighs around 52 kgs unfueled which is the condition at deployment. Consequently, several platforms may be deployed on a single launch from Earth. With sufficient lifetime, the entire surface of Mars can be mapped in detail by a couple dozen platforms. In addition, Hoppers can collect samples from all over the planet, including gorges, mountains and crevasses, and deliver them to a central location for eventual pick-up by a Mars Sample Return mission. The status of the Mars Hopper development project at the CSNR is discussed.

  6. Naphthacenodithiophene Based Polymers-New Members of the Acenodithiophene Family Exhibiting High Mobility and Power Conversion Efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Knall, Astrid Caroline

    2016-08-18

    Wide-bandgap conjugated polymers with a linear naphthacenodithiophene (NDT) donor unit are herein reported along with their performance in both transistor and solar cell devices. The monomer is synthesized starting from 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene with a double Fries rearrangement as the key step. By copolymerization with 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) via a palladium-catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction, NDT-BT co-polymers with high molecular weights and narrow polydispersities are afforded. These novel wide-bandgap polymers are evaluated as the semiconducting polymer in both organic field effect transistor and organic photovoltaic applications. The synthesized polymers reveal an optical bandgap in the range of 1.8 eV with an electron affinity of 3.6 eV which provides sufficient energy offset for electron transfer to PC70BM acceptors. In organic field effect transistors, the synthesized polymers demonstrate high hole mobilities of around 0.4 cm2 V–1 s–1. By using a blend of NDT-BT with PC70BM as absorber layer in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, power conversion efficiencies of 7.5% are obtained. This value is among the highest obtained for polymers with a wider bandgap (larger than 1.7 eV), making this polymer also interesting for application in tandem or multijunction solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  7. Non-Model-Based Control of a Wheeled Vehicle Pulling Two Trailers to Provide Early Powered Mobility and Driving Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders Td Vr, David A

    2018-01-01

    Non-model-based control of a wheeled vehicle pulling two trailers is proposed. It is a fun train for disabled children consisting of a locomotive and two carriages. The fun train has afforded opportunities for both disabled and able bodied young people to share an activity and has provided early driving experiences for disabled children; it has introduced them to assistive and powered mobility. The train is a nonlinear system and subject to nonholonomic kinematic constraints, so that position and state depend on the path taken to get there. The train is described, and then, a robust control algorithm using proportional-derivative filtered errors is proposed to control the locomotive. The controller was not dependent on an accurate model of the train, because the mass of the vehicle and two carriages changed depending on the number, size, and shape of children and wheelchair seats on the train. The controller was robust and stable in uncertainty. Results are presented to show the effectiveness of the approach, and the suggested control algorithm is shown to be acceptable without knowing the exact plant dynamics.

  8. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  9. Simulating Global AeroMACS Airport Ground Station Antenna Power Transmission Limits to Avoid Interference With Mobile Satellite Service Feeder Uplinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091 to 5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low Earth orbit from transmitters at global airports was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on antenna distribution, gain patterns, duty cycle, and antenna tilt was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power from global airports required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  10. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  11. Chair Rise Peak Power in Daily Life Measured With a Pendant Sensor Associates With Mobility, Limitation in Activities, and Frailty in Old People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Regterschot, G Ruben H; Geraedts, Hilde; Baldus, Heribert; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical relevance of sensor-based daily life chair rise performance measured in old people. A pendant-sensor was worn during standardized tests and in daily life to detect chair rise transfers and analyze transfer peak power. Linear correlations between mean, median, 25th, and 75th percentile transfer peak powers in daily life and mean peak power in standardized tests were evaluated with Pearson correlation ( r). Associations between transfer peak powers in different experiments and outcomes of a clinical mobility test [timed-up-and-go (TUG)], a test of limitation in activities [Groningen activity restriction scale (GARS)], and a frailty test [Groningen frailty indicator (GFI)] were evaluated with Spearman correlation (ρ). Twenty-five old people (70-85 years) participated in the study. The results showed that chair rise peak powers assessed based upon one-week of daily life activities significantly correlated with peak power measured in standardized tests (r: [0.66, 0.74], p Chair rise peak power in daily life significantly associated with TUG scores (ρ: [-0.71, -0.58], ), GARS (ρ: [-0.62, -0.48], ), and GFI (ρ: [-0.52, -0.43], ). Chair rise peak powers in daily life had stronger associations with clinical measurements than standardized tests. In addition, chair rise peak powers measured in old people using assistive devices was significantly lower compared to those not using assistive devices. These results indicate usefulness of the pendant-sensor-based chair rise performance analysis in continuous monitoring and assessment of mobility, limitations in activities and frailty associated variables in old people's daily life.

  12. Power- and Delay-Aware Mobile Application-Data Flow Adaptation: the MobiHealth System Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wac, K.E.; Bargh, Mortaza S.; Pawar, P.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Peddemors, Arjan; Bults, Richard G.A.; Mun, L.K.; Cuntai, G.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging healthcare applications rely on personal mobile devices to monitor patient vital signs and to send it to the hospitals-backend servers for further analysis. However, these personal mobile devices have limited resources that must be used optimally in order to meet the requirements of

  13. The Power to Mobilize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; de Vreese, Claes Holger; Albæk, Erik

    their informational behavior in election campaign times, what information young voters actually receive and whether the exposure to campaign related news via social media affects their electoral behavior. Our study therefore examines, using a smartphone-based media diary, how the first time voters of today use social......The first time voters of today grew up completely in a convergent media environment where social media platforms combine formerly distinct media channels; and they increasingly receive political news via these platforms (Mitchell, Gottfried & Matsa, 2015). Little is known so far how this changes...... media channels to inform about an upcoming election. To this end, Danish first-time voters (n=364) were surveyed over three weeks leading up to the national election in 2015. Our study indicates that social media platforms are their main information source for campaign news and that such platforms can...

  14. Effects of Robot-assisted Gait Training Combined with Functional Electrical Stimulation on Recovery of Locomotor Mobility in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Young Jun; Chang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Ju Hyeok; Lee, Kyeong Bong; Park, Yoo Jung; Ha, Hyun Geun; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of robot-assisted gait training combined with functional electrical stimulation on locomotor recovery in patients with chronic stroke. [Subjects] The 20 subjects were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n = 10) that received a combination of robot-assisted gait training and functional electrical stimulation on the ankle dorsiflexor of the affected side or a control group (n = 10) that received robot-assisted gait training only. [Methods] Both groups received the respective therapies for 30 min/day, 3 days/week for 5 weeks. The outcome was measured using the Modified Motor Assessment Scale (MMAS), Timed Up-and-Go Test (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and gait parameters through gait analysis (Vicon 370 motion analysis system, Oxford Metrics Ltd., Oxford, UK). All the variables were measured before and after training. [Results] Step length and maximal knee extension were significantly greater than those before training in the experimental group only. Maximal Knee flexion showed a significant difference between the experimental and control groups. The MMAS, BBS, and TUG scores improved significantly after training compared with before training in both groups. [Conclusion] We suggest that the combination of robot-assisted gait training and functional electrical stimulation encourages patients to actively participate in training because it facilitates locomotor recovery without the risk of adverse effects.

  15. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility in irradiated power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupac, D.; Galloway, K.F.; Khosropour, P.; Anderson, S.R.; Schrimpf, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    An effective approach to separating the effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge on mobility degradation in irradiated MOSFETs is demonstrated. It is based on analyzing mobility data sets which have different functional relationships between the radiation-induced-oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge. Separation of effects of oxide-trapped charge and interface-trapped charge is possible only if these two trapped charge components are not linearly dependent. A significant contribution of oxide-trapped charge to mobility degradation is demonstrated and quantified

  16. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  17. Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems for Web-Based and Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    acquisition of OA Web/mobile software components  Franchising  Enterprise licensing  Metered usage  Advertising supported  Subscription  Free...ecosystems Software component supply network for OA system components: Component IP license and cybersecurity requirements propagate from/to Producers... Licenses (for the NitroDesk Touchdown product) * LGPL 2.1 * Sony Mobile * Ical4j from Ben Fortuna * Jesse Anderson * Public Domain Declaration

  18. Effects of Power Training on Mobility and Gait Biomechanics in Old Adults with Moderate Mobility Disability : Protocol and Design of the Potsdam Gait Study (POGS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, Chantal M. I.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Beurskens, Rainer; Lenzen-Grossimlinghaus, Romana; Gäbler, Martijn; Granacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Background: Walking speed decreases in old age. Even though old adults regularly participate in exercise interventions, we do not know how the intervention-induced changes in physical abilities produce faster walking. The Potsdam Gait Study (POGS) will examine the effects of 10 weeks of power

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, L G; Nielsen, M K F; Simonsen, C; Andersen, M; Caserotti, P

    2017-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very high extent, it may be particularly effective in terms of eliciting increases in systemic BDNF levels. We examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on mature BDNF (mBDNF) and total BDNF (tBDNF) in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 47 older men and women: n=22 in the training group (TG: progressive high intensity power training, 2 sessions per week; age 82.7±5.4years, 55% women) and n=25 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age 82.2±4.5years, 76% women). Following overnight fasting, basal serum levels of mBDNF and tBDNF were assessed (human ELISA kits) at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, mBDNF and tBDNF levels were comparable in the two groups, TG and CG. Post-intervention, no significant within-group or between-group changes were observed in mBDNF or tBDNF. Moreover, when divided into responder tertiles based upon changes in mBDNF and tBDNF (i.e. decliners, maintainers, improvers), respectively, comparable findings were observed for TG and CG. Altogether, basal systemic levels of serum mBDNF and tBDNF are not affected in mobility-limited older adults following 12-weeks of power training, and do not appear to be a major mechanistic factor mediating neuroplasticity in mobility-limited older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Limited change in dune mobility in response to a large decrease in wind power in semi-arid northern China since the 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J.A.; Swinehart, J.B.; Lu, H.; Miao, X.; Cha, P.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The climatic controls on dune mobility, especially the relative importance of wind strength, remain incompletely understood. This is a key research problem in semi-arid northern China, both for interpreting past dune activity as evidence of paleoclimate and for predicting future environmental change. Potential eolian sand transport, which is approximately proportional to wind power above the threshold for sand entrainment, has decreased across much of northern China since the 1970s. Over the same period, effective moisture (ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration) has not changed significantly. This "natural experiment" provides insight on the relative importance of wind power as a control on dune mobility in three dunefields of northern China (Mu Us, Otindag, and Horqin), although poorly understood and potentially large effects of human land use complicate interpretation. Dune forms in these three regions are consistent with sand transport vectors inferred from weather station data, suggesting that wind directions have remained stable and the stations adequately represent winds that shaped the dunes. The predicted effect of weaker winds since the 1970s would be dune stabilization, with lower sand transport rates allowing vegetation cover to expand. Large portions of all three dunefields remained stabilized by vegetation in the 1970s despite high wind power. Since the 1970s, trends in remotely sensed vegetation greenness and change in mobile dune area inferred from sequential Landsat images do indicate widespread dune stabilization in the eastern Mu Us region. On the other hand, expansion of active dunes took place farther west in the Mu Us dunefield and especially in the central Otindag dunefield, with little overall change in two parts of the Horqin dunes. Better ground truth is needed to validate the remote sensing analyses, but results presented here place limits on the relative importance of wind strength as a control on dune mobility in the

  1. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  2. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Platz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL. Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™. Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™ indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  3. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  4. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  6. Large thermoelectric power factor in Pr-doped SrTiO3-δ ceramics via grain-boundary-induced mobility enhancement

    KAUST Repository

    Mehdizadeh Dehkordi, Arash

    2014-04-08

    We report a novel synthesis strategy to prepare high-performance bulk polycrystalline Pr-doped SrTiO3 ceramics. A large thermoelectric power factor of 1.3 W m-1 K-1 at 500 °C is achieved in these samples. In-depth investigations of the electronic transport and microstructure suggest that this significant improvement results from a substantial enhancement in carrier mobility originating from the formation of Pr-rich grain boundaries. This work provides new directions to higher performance oxide thermoelectrics as well as possibly other properties and applications of this broadly functional perovskite material. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Achieving Better Buying Power Through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems for Web-Based and Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    business models for software app/widget development and deployment include (in no particular order) the following: (1) franchising , (2) enterprise...dominate much of the online markets for Web-based or mobile device apps/widgets. Small businesses may further be advantaged by their utilization of shared

  8. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die within minutes. Strokes happen more in some populations and geographic areas. Stroke death declines have stalled in 3 out of every 4 states. Blacks have the highest stroke death rates among all ...

  9. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  10. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  11. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  12. Staging Mobilities / Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, urban research has taken a ‘mobilities turn’. There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not ‘just happen.’ Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and lived...... asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities? The theoretical framing in the Staging mobilities book is applied to four in-depth cases in the accompanying volume Designing mobilities.This book explore how places, sites...

  13. Understanding Life After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelmblink, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is an acute, neurological dysfunction of vascular origin with sudden occurrence and it influences physical, cognitive and psychological functions. Initial treatment aims at eliminating or reducing the brain damage. Soon, however, the influence of the stroke on the entire life of stroke survivors has to be considered. This thesis explores the meaning of life after stroke to 19 elderly stroke survivors during the first year post stroke. Survivors were interviewed twice and the interviews...

  14. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Simple Techniques Can Help Memory after a Stroke Self-Esteem after Stroke Cognitive Challenges After Stroke Depression Trumps ... spasticity), fatigue and more. Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, recovery, ...

  15. Fast decision algorithms in low-power embedded processors for quality-of-service based connectivity of mobile sensors in heterogeneous wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaraíz-Simón, María D; Gómez-Pulido, Juan A; Vega-Rodríguez, Miguel A; Sánchez-Pérez, Juan M

    2012-01-01

    When a mobile wireless sensor is moving along heterogeneous wireless sensor networks, it can be under the coverage of more than one network many times. In these situations, the Vertical Handoff process can happen, where the mobile sensor decides to change its connection from a network to the best network among the available ones according to their quality of service characteristics. A fitness function is used for the handoff decision, being desirable to minimize it. This is an optimization problem which consists of the adjustment of a set of weights for the quality of service. Solving this problem efficiently is relevant to heterogeneous wireless sensor networks in many advanced applications. Numerous works can be found in the literature dealing with the vertical handoff decision, although they all suffer from the same shortfall: a non-comparable efficiency. Therefore, the aim of this work is twofold: first, to develop a fast decision algorithm that explores the entire space of possible combinations of weights, searching that one that minimizes the fitness function; and second, to design and implement a system on chip architecture based on reconfigurable hardware and embedded processors to achieve several goals necessary for competitive mobile terminals: good performance, low power consumption, low economic cost, and small area integration.

  16. Voluntary muscle activation improves with power training and is associated with changes in gait speed in mobility-limited older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Skjødt, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    of training group (TG: 12weeks of progressive high-load power training, 2 sessions per week; age: 82.3±1.3years, 56% women) and n=21 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age: 81.6±1.1years, 67% women). Knee extensor muscle thickness...... (ultrasonography), strength (isokinetic dynamometry), voluntary activation (interpolated twitch technique), and gait speed (2-min maximal walking test) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, TG and CG were comparable for all measures. Post-intervention, significant between-group changes (TG...... in association with physical function. This study examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on outcomes of voluntary muscle activation and gait speed in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 37 older men and women with a usual gait speed...

  17. Mobile marketing for mobile games

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Giang

    2016-01-01

    Highly developed mobile technology and devices enable the rise of mobile game industry and mobile marketing. Hence mobile marketing for mobile game is an essential key for a mobile game success. Even though there are many articles on marketing for mobile games, there is a need of highly understanding mobile marketing strategies, how to launch a mobile campaign for a mobile game. Besides that, it is essential to understand the relationship between mobile advertising and users behaviours. There...

  18. Application of mobile agent technology with portable information device to the maintenance support of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Ito, Yo; Sato, Hisashi; Kitamura, Masaharu

    2004-01-01

    A support system for trouble shooting activities has been developed based on the distributed DB and mobile agent technology. The main purpose of the proposed system is to provide field workers with effective functions for realizing trouble-shooting with the aid of the mobile agents, which performs data retrieval from DB and fault diagnosis. In the proposed scheme of trouble shooting support, a portable information device is utilized by the maintenance personnel, which is connected to the local data base (LDB) via wireless network. The important point is that these functions can be accessed by the field workers through wearable information device with the lower cognitive burden. The prototype system has been developed using the JAVA-based Aglets Framework SDK and applied to the actual objective system. It has been confirmed through the experiments that the developed prototype system is capable of performing the tasks to support diagnostic activities. (author)

  19. Copeptin Levels in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Stroke Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Rozanski, Michal; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim E; Winter, Benjamin; Koch, Peter M; Nolte, Christian H; Hertel, Sabine; Ziera, Tim; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-09-01

    Copeptin levels are increased in patients diagnosed with stroke and other vascular diseases. Copeptin elevation is associated with adverse outcome, predicts re-events in patients with transient ischemic attack and is used in ruling-out acute myocardial infarction. We evaluated whether copeptin can also be used as a diagnostic marker in the prehospital stroke setting. We prospectively examined patients with suspected stroke on the Stroke Emergency Mobile-an ambulance that is equipped with computed tomography and point-of-care laboratory. A blood sample was taken from patients immediately after arrival. We analyzed copeptin levels in patients with final hospital-based diagnosis of stroke or stroke mimics as well as in vascular or nonvascular patients. In addition, we examined the associations of symptom onset with copeptin levels and the prognostic value of copeptin in patients with stroke. Blood samples of 561 patients were analyzed. No significant differences were seen neither between cerebrovascular (n=383) and other neurological (stroke mimic; n=90) patients (P=0.15) nor between vascular (n=391) and nonvascular patients (n=170; P=0.57). We could not detect a relationship between copeptin levels and time from onset to blood draw. Three-month survival status was available in 159 patients with ischemic stroke. Copeptin levels in nonsurviving patients (n=8: median [interquartile range], 27.4 [20.2-54.7] pmol/L) were significantly higher than in surviving patients (n=151: median [interquartile range], 11.7 [5.2-30.9] pmol/L; P=0.024). In the prehospital setting, copeptin is neither appropriate to discriminate between stroke and stroke mimic patients nor between vascular and nonvascular patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01382862. The Pre-Hospital Acute Neurological Therapy and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke Patients study (PHANTOM-S) was registered (NCT01382862). This sub-study was observational and not registered separately

  20. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the dynamics of power in processes of creativity, and show its paradoxical nature as both a bridge and a barrier to creativity in organisations. Recent social psychological experimental research (Slighte, de Dreu & Nijstad, 2011) on the relation between power...... and floating source for empowering people in the organisation. We will explore and discuss here the potentials, challenges and pitfalls of power in relation to creativity in the life of organisations today. The aim is to demonstrate that power struggles may be utilised as constructive sources of creativity...

  1. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Tistad, Malin; Koch, Lena von

    2016-01-01

    the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke...... stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading...

  2. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  3. Mobile Service Platform: A Middleware for Nomadic Mobile Service Provisioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halteren, Aart; Pawar, P.

    Nowadays mobile devices are characterized by higher processing power, lower costs, multiple network interfaces, ability to support multiple auxiliary devices and connect to the Internet using a wireless network. The applications collecting statistics concerning the mobile user, computational and

  4. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  5. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  6. Effects of alkylate fuel on exhaust emissions and secondary aerosol formation of a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke scooter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardini, Alessandro A.; Platt, Stephen M.; Clairotte, Michael; El Haddad, Imad; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Ježek, Irena; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Slowik, Jay G.; Manfredi, Urbano; Prévôt, André S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs; Astorga, Covadonga

    2014-09-01

    Regulated and unregulated emissions from a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke scooter were characterized during a legislative driving cycle in a certified laboratory. Scooter exhaust was analyzed at the tailpipe, in a dilution tunnel, and partly collected in a mobile smog chamber for photochemical ageing. We present evidence that the photochemically aged exhaust from a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke scooter produces considerable amounts of secondary organic aerosol: from 1.5 to 22.0 mg/km, and from 5.5 to 6.6 mg/km, respectively. Tests were repeated after replacing the standard petrol and synthetic lube oil with an alkylate fuel (with low content of aromatic compounds) and ultra-clean lube oil (low ash forming potential). We observed emission reduction (with some exceptions) for several gaseous and particulate phase species, in particular for carbon monoxide (from 8% up to 38% and from 31% to 50%, for the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke scooters, respectively), particulate mass (from 32% up to 75% for the 2-stroke scooter), aromatic compounds (89% and 97% for the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke scooter, respectively), and secondary organic aerosol (from 87% to 100% and 99% for the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke scooters, respectively). We attribute the organic aerosol reduction to the low content of aromatics in the alkylate fuel.

  7. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  8. Telemedicine Based on Mobile Devices and Mobile Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Lidong Wang; Cheryl Ann Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets support kinds of mobile computing and services. They can access to the cloud or offload the computation-intensive part to the cloud computing resources. Mobile cloud computing (MCC) integrates the cloud computing into the mobile environment, which extends mobile devices’ battery lifetime, improves their data storage capacity and processing power, and improves their reliability and information security. In this paper, the applications of smartphon...

  9. Resource interaction in relation to power: how startups strategize to cope with the challenges of mobilizing and leveraging resources in asymmetrical power relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oukes, Tamara; von Raesfeld Meijer, Ariane M.

    2014-01-01

    The resource interaction approach provides a set of basic principles concerning how resources interact at a network level. This paper further elaborates on the resource interaction approach by investigating the role of power in the technological development of a medical device over time. In the

  10. Consideration of potentials of environmental reliefs by means of a freater use of small, electric-powered vehicles within the scope of the project 'e-mobility'. Final report; Betrachtung der Umweltentlastungspotenziale durch den verstaerkten Einsatz von kleinen, batterieelektrischen Fahrzeugen im Rahmen des Projekts ''E-Mobility''. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Florian; Harthan, Ralph; Hermann, Hauke; Kasten, Peter; Loreck, Charlotte; Seebach, Dominik; Timpe, Christof; Zimmer, Wiebke

    2011-10-15

    Based on the findings of the fleet test 'e-mobility Berlin' and in combination with our own experiences, data analysis and simulation of the Eco-Institute (Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany), possible environmental effects of electric-powered vehicles are to be quantified up to 2030. Besides direct effects, also indirect effects on the electricity industry and emissions are considered. Regulatory framework of electric mobility are discussed.

  11. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar Power Optimization Tool for Onsite Needs (SPOT-ON) User’s Guide for Apple Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    SPOT-ON Table Surface type and fractional albedo Desert 0.30 Forest 0.15 Dark soil 0.10 Snow 0.55 Crops 0.20 3 Fig. 2 Site view...type and fractional albedo .........................................................2 1 1. Introduction The Solar Power Optimization Tool...available in a day). The surface input is used by the app to assign a surface albedo ,3 which affects the resultant irradiance value. See the Table or Fig. 2

  13. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  14. Are activity limitations associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in stroke patients? A cross-sectional, clinical survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2009-01-01

    stroke patients were invited to complete four activity limitations measurements: Barthel Index, mobility velocity, mobility distance, mobility aids and one LUTS measurement: the Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire. Of 519 stroke patients, 482 subjects were eligible. Results......Objective. To assess self-reported activity limitations in a clinical sample of stroke patients and to identify their association with prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Material and methods. A cross-sectional, clinical survey was initiated whereby...... time that activity limitations are closely related to LUTS in stroke patients and that rehabilitation should also be directed towards the treatment of LUTS....

  15. Principles of expert fuzzy controller design: AI mobile wall climbing robots for decontamination of nuclear power-station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradetsky, V.G.; Ul'yanov, S.; Slesarev, Y.V.; Pospelov, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The arrangement principles for a complex control framework of artificial intelligence control systems are introduced. The notions of intelligence levels with the top boundary (intelligence in large) and the bottom boundary (intelligence in small) are defined. A special methodology for the design of an artificial intelligence control system design for the decontamination of a nuclear power plant using a wall climbing robot with different intelligence levels is presented. The application of WARP (Weight Associative Rule Processor) to the design of an automatic fuzzy controller for the fuzzy correction of the motion of the manipulator and WCR is examined

  16. GEO-ENVIRONMENTAL DUE DILIGENCE AIMED AT SELECTION OF SITES DESIGNATED FOR ACCOMMODATION OF MOBILE GAS TURBINE POWER PLANTS IN RECREATIONAL LANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan' Fedor Fedorovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile gas turbine plants (MGTP are the key sources of power designated to improve the safety of power supply in case of power deficit. In Russia, their pilot launch was initiated 5 - 6 years ago, and since then, they have demonstrated their high efficiency. In view of the upcoming Winter Olympic Games, organizations responsible for continuous power supply have resolved to build three MGTPs in Sochi. As Sochi is located in the natural area of preferential protection that has been granted Federal significance, construction and operation of the aforementioned facilities requires a detailed geo-environmental due diligence. Significant efforts have been exerted to substantiate the accommodation of MGTPs in three different sites and to identify the maximal number of power generators per site with account for the ecological restrictions imposed onto the natural areas of preferential protection. The impact produced by MGTPs on the environment depends on their technological features and the appropriate natural and anthropogenic properties of their sites and adjacent lands. Therefore, selection of new sites must be backed by the assessment of negative consequences. This requirement applies mainly to recreational lands. Recent sources report that the principal factors of negative impact of MGTPs include the chemical pollution of the ambient air and the noise pollution of residential buildings located in the immediate proximity to MGTPs. Factors of secondary importance include the pollution of surface and underground waters, soils, intrusion into the geological environment, production of waste, thermal and electromagnetic pollutions. The authors assess different factors of impact produced by MGTPs on the environment. As a result of the geo-ecological due diligence it has been discovered that the maximal number of power generators per site must not exceed 2-4, if the oxide emission technology is employed. At the same time, failure to employ the above

  17. Development of a mobile game based on virtual reality tools to sensitize the population about the nuclear power plant's emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lucas H.H.; Mol, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. do E.; Legey, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    The Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plant's emergency plan, it is the bunch of instructions that every citizen must adopt in case of an emergency situation. It is highly important, that all the people living in the power plant's surroundings truly understand every single step of the plan, because only in this way people will know how to react in case of a necessity. To hit this goals, the Brazil's Electronuclear, made educational booklets, in the shape of comic books, trying to guide the population about the plan. On the other hand, we have an increasingly connected world, making possible that digital games, be very well accepted by the population. So this project has as an objective, developing a digital tool, in form of a mobile game that shows in a playful and interactive way for the user, the emergency plan, complementing the educational process and social actions made by many institutions. With the information taken from the booklets, objects and buildings were modeled in Autodesk 3Ds Max, allied with the Unity 3D Game Engine, to make a city, inspired in Angra do Reis (RJ). The player has to follow all the security protocols giving by the Eletronuclear according with the rules provided by the National Nuclear Energy Commission. Is expected, with this game that will be available for the Eletronuclear that more people have the chance to know and believe in the efficiency of the emergency plan already established. (author)

  18. Development of a mobile game based on virtual reality tools to sensitize the population about the nuclear power plant's emergency plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lucas H.H.; Mol, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. do E.; Legey, Ana Paula [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário Carioca (Unicarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plant's emergency plan, it is the bunch of instructions that every citizen must adopt in case of an emergency situation. It is highly important, that all the people living in the power plant's surroundings truly understand every single step of the plan, because only in this way people will know how to react in case of a necessity. To hit this goals, the Brazil's Electronuclear, made educational booklets, in the shape of comic books, trying to guide the population about the plan. On the other hand, we have an increasingly connected world, making possible that digital games, be very well accepted by the population. So this project has as an objective, developing a digital tool, in form of a mobile game that shows in a playful and interactive way for the user, the emergency plan, complementing the educational process and social actions made by many institutions. With the information taken from the booklets, objects and buildings were modeled in Autodesk 3Ds Max, allied with the Unity 3D Game Engine, to make a city, inspired in Angra do Reis (RJ). The player has to follow all the security protocols giving by the Eletronuclear according with the rules provided by the National Nuclear Energy Commission. Is expected, with this game that will be available for the Eletronuclear that more people have the chance to know and believe in the efficiency of the emergency plan already established. (author)

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association ( P =6×10 - 4 ) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at P risk and stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P =1.2×10 - 9 , 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Test Your Stroke Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9-1-1. Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? High blood pressure Heart disease Smoking High cholesterol Diabetes Show Answer All of these are risk factors for stroke. If you smoke - quit. If you have high ...

  1. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  2. Stroke Connection Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Submit A Story Edit Module Show Tags Stroke Rehabilitation Two-Part Series Making the Best Decisions at ... first part of a two-part series on stroke rehab, we offer guidance for the decision-making process ...

  3. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your friend. Being around friends can help with healing. Preventing Strokes Some strokes can be prevented in ... Why Does Hair Turn Gray? What Are Wrinkles? Alzheimer Disease Your Brain & Nervous System Why Exercise Is ...

  4. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  5. Programming the Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Firtman, Maximiliano

    2010-01-01

    Today's market for mobile apps goes beyond the iPhone to include BlackBerry, Nokia, Windows Phone, and smartphones powered by Android, webOS, and other platforms. If you're an experienced web developer, this book shows you how to build a standard app core that you can extend to work with specific devices. You'll learn the particulars and pitfalls of building mobile apps with HTML, CSS, and other standard web tools. You'll also explore platform variations, finicky mobile browsers, Ajax design patterns for mobile, and much more. Before you know it, you'll be able to create mashups using Web 2.

  6. Ultra-low turn-on voltage and on-resistance vertical GaN-on-GaN Schottky power diodes with high mobility double drift layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Houqiang; Huang, Xuanqi; Chen, Hong; Lu, Zhijian; Baranowski, Izak; Zhao, Yuji

    2017-10-01

    This letter reports the implementation of double-drift-layer (DDL) design into GaN vertical Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) grown on free-standing GaN substrates. This design balances the trade-off between desirable forward turn-on characteristics and high reverse breakdown capability, providing optimal overall device performances for power switching applications. With a well-controlled metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process, the doping concentration of the top drift layer was reduced, which served to suppress the peak electric field at the metal/GaN interface and increase the breakdown voltages of the SBDs. The bottom drift layer was moderately doped to achieve low on-resistance to reduce power losses. At forward bias, the devices exhibited a record low turn-on voltage of 0.59 V, an ultra-low on-resistance of 1.65 mΩ cm2, a near unity ideality factor of 1.04, a high on/off ratio of ˜1010, and a high electron mobility of 1045.2 cm2/(V s). Detailed comparisons with conventional single-drift-layer (SDL) GaN vertical SBDs indicated that DDL design did not degrade the forward characteristics of the SBDs. At reverse bias, breakdown voltages of the DDL GaN SBDs were considerably enhanced compared to those of the conventional SDL devices. These results showed that GaN vertical SBDs with DDL designs are promising candidates for high efficiency, high voltage, high frequency power switching applications.

  7. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  8. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  9. Mobility Device Quality Affects Participation Outcomes for People With Disabilities: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magasi, Susan; Wong, Alex; Miskovic, Ana; Tulsky, David; Heinemann, Allen W

    2018-01-01

    To test the effect that indicators of mobility device quality have on participation outcomes in community-dwelling adults with spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and stroke by using structural equation modeling. Survey, cross-sectional study, and model testing. Clinical research space at 2 academic medical centers and 1 free-standing rehabilitation hospital. Community-dwelling adults (N=250; mean age, 48±14.3y) with spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Not applicable. The Mobility Device Impact Scale, Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Social Function (version 2.0) scale, including Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities, and the 2 Community Participation Indicators' enfranchisement scales. Details about device quality (reparability, reliability, ease of maintenance) and device type were also collected. Respondents used ambulation aids (30%), manual (34%), and power wheelchairs (30%). Indicators of device quality had a moderating effect on participation outcomes, with 3 device quality variables (repairability, ease of maintenance, device reliability) accounting for 20% of the variance in participation. Wheelchair users reported lower participation enfranchisement than did ambulation aid users. Mobility device quality plays an important role in participation outcomes. It is critical that people have access to mobility devices and that these devices be reliable. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Breaking up sitting time after stroke (BUST-Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Heidi; Dunstan, David W; Bernhardt, Julie; Walker, Frederick R; Patterson, Amanda; Callister, Robin; Dunn, Ashlee; Spratt, Neil J; English, Coralie

    2017-06-01

    Rationale Prolonged sitting is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and morbidity. The metabolic and cardiovascular effects of breaking up sitting time in people with stroke are unknown. Aims and hypotheses To determine the (i) metabolic and cardiovascular effects and (ii) safety and feasibility of an experimental protocol to break up uninterrupted sitting in people with stroke. We hypothesize that activity breaks will attenuate the effects of uninterrupted sitting on glucose and insulin metabolism, blood pressure, lipid profiles, and plasma fibrinogen and that it will be both safe and feasible. Sample size estimate Based on previous estimates of population variability (SD 1% glucose and 30% insulin), 19 paired observations (i.e. participants) will achieve a power of 0.9 to detect a difference of 0.8% in glucose and 24% in insulin area under the curve (two-tailed testing, α = 0.05). Methods and design People with stroke will complete three experimental conditions one week apart in randomized order: (a) uninterrupted sitting, (b) prolonged sitting with intermittent walking, and (c) prolonged sitting with intermittent standing exercises. Serial blood samples will be collected and blood pressure measured at 30 min intervals for 8 h. Study outcomes Primary outcome will be postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Secondary outcomes will include fibrinogen concentrations, blood pressure, and adverse events and protocol feasibility. Discussion This is the first important step in determining the cardiovascular effects of breaking up sitting time after stroke. Findings will guide future studies testing behavioral strategies to reduce sitting time for the purpose of lowering recurrent stroke risk.

  11. Mobilities, Futures & the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freudendal-Pedersen, Malene; Kesselring, Sven

    2016-01-01

    significant attention to these shifts in societies’ discursive patterns and structures. For making up powerful and strong visions and policies for sustainable cities, ‘collaborative storytelling’ plays a key role. The theoretical outset for the research project ‘Mobilities, Futures & the City’, which grounds......The future of cities and regions will be strongly shaped by the mobilities of people, goods, modes of transport, waste and information. In many ways, the ‘why and ‘for what’ often get lost in discourses on planning and designing mobilities. The predominant planning paradigm still conceptualizes...... the future of cities and mobilities as a matter of rather more efficient technologies than of social cohesion, integration and connectivity. Sustainable mobility needs the mobilities of ideas and concepts and the reflexivity of policies. Communicative planning theory and the ‘argumentative turn’ have given...

  12. RF-MEMS for future mobile applications: experimental verification of a reconfigurable 8-bit power attenuator up to 110 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannacci, J; Tschoban, C

    2017-01-01

    RF-MEMS technology is proposed as a key enabling solution for realising the high-performance and highly reconfigurable passive components that future communication standards will demand. In this work, we present, test and discuss a novel design concept for an 8-bit reconfigurable power attenuator, manufactured using the RF-MEMS technology available at the CMM-FBK, in Italy. The device features electrostatically controlled MEMS ohmic switches in order to select/deselect the resistive loads (both in series and shunt configuration) that attenuate the RF signal, and comprises eight cascaded stages (i.e. 8-bit), thus implementing 256 different network configurations. The fabricated samples are measured (S-parameters) from 10 MHz to 110 GHz in a wide range of different configurations, and modelled/simulated with Ansys HFSS. The device exhibits attenuation levels (S21) in the range from  −10 dB to  −60 dB, up to 110 GHz. In particular, S21 shows flatness from 15 dB down to 3–5 dB and from 10 MHz to 50 GHz, as well as fewer linear traces up to 110 GHz. A comprehensive discussion is developed regarding the voltage standing wave ratio, which is employed as a quality indicator for the attenuation levels. The margins of improvement at design level which are needed to overcome the limitations of the presented RF-MEMS device are also discussed. (paper)

  13. Hybrid drive for mobile machinery; Hybridantrieb fuer mobile Arbeitsmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burow, Walter; Brun, Marco; Schoulen, Kai [DEUTZ AG, Koeln (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    In 2007 Deutz manufactured and sold round about 285.000 diesel engines in the power range from about 10 to 500 kW. Approximately 50% of these engines have been used in mobile machinery. Here mobile machinery is considered as all kind of construction, material handling and airside equipments. In the context of predevelopment Deutz analyses alternative concepts and solutions for future power trains of those mobile machinery. (orig.)

  14. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death.......5%) or 1 month (6.9%), respectively. After the age of 60 years, women had more severe strokes than men. Up to ages in the mid-60s, no difference in the risk of death from stroke was seen between the 2 sexes. For people aged >65 years, however, the risk gradually became greater in men than in women...

  15. Early versus late rehabilitation for stroke survivors: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshiur Rahman Khasru

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the optimum time of rehabilitation initiation after stroke in terms of disabilities, mobility and fall risk assessment. Data were collected prospectively at seven tertiary level health care centers in Bangladesh during the 36 months period from 2013 to 2016. All respondents were divided into four groups based on the initiation of rehabilitation as: a 0-24 hours, b 25-72 hours, c 4-7 days and d 8-60 days. Results show that significant improvement on stroke recovery, disabilities reduction, improvement in mobility restriction and reduction of fall risks in all the four groups but more improvement was observed in 0-24 hour’s group during follow-up after 3 and 12 weeks. On multinomial logistic regression analysis, the independent factors shows the mobility restriction and fall risk were more in the younger patients, male gender, married, hemorrhagic lesion and bilateral stroke.

  16. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  17. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  18. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  19. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  20. Improved parent-reported mobility and achievement of individual goals on activity and participation level after functional power-training in young children with cerebral palsy: a double-baseline controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vulpen, Liesbeth F; de Groot, Sonja; Rameckers, Eugene A; Becher, Jules G; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    2018-03-07

    In children with cerebral palsy (CP), strength training programs to improve walking capacity and participation in activities of daily living are commonly used in clinical practice, despite lacking evidence of its effectiveness. It has been suggested that strength training with high movement velocity could be more effective than traditional resistance training to improve functional abilities such as walking. In a recently published study, we have demonstrated the positive effects of functional high-velocity resistance (power) training on muscle strength and walking capacity in young children with CP. Whether this type of training is also effective in achieving individual predefined goals in daily activities and self-reported mobility limitations, has not yet been described however. To evaluate the effect of functional power-training on parent-reported mobility and achievement of individual goals on activity and participation level in young children with CP. A double-baseline design was used to compare a 14-week period usual care with a 14-week period of functional power-training (3 times a week) and a follow-up period of 14-weeks. Twenty-two children with spastic CP (13 bilateral, GMFCS level I (N=10) and level II (N=12), mean age 7.5 years (SD 1.8, range 4-10 y)) and their parents participated. Outcome measures were goal attainment scaling (GAS) of individual daily activity related treatment goals, mobility performance as measured using the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS-5m, 50m and 500m), and the parent-reported Mobility Questionnaire (MobQues). After power-training, 86% of children achieved or exceeded their goal, compared with 14% in the usual care period (pfunctional power-training was 10 times higher, compared with the usual care period (Relative Risk=10.0 with 95%CI 1.4 - 71.3). No changes were found in the FMS-5m and FMS-50m categories. Improvement on the MobQues was significantly greater after power-training compared with usual care (7.9% (95% CI 2.7 - 13

  1. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  2. Ischemic stroke destabilizes circadian rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Jimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central circadian pacemaker is a remarkably robust regulator of daily rhythmic variations of cardiovascular, endocrine, and neural physiology. Environmental lighting conditions are powerful modulators of circadian rhythms, but regulation of circadian rhythms by disease states is less clear. Here, we examine the effect of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythms in rats using high-resolution pineal microdialysis. Methods Rats were housed in LD 12:12 h conditions and monitored by pineal microdialysis to determine baseline melatonin timing profiles. After demonstration that the circadian expression of melatonin was at steady state, rats were subjected to experimental stroke using two-hour intralumenal filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The animals were returned to their cages, and melatonin monitoring was resumed. The timing of onset, offset, and duration of melatonin secretion were calculated before and after stroke to determine changes in circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion. At the end of the monitoring period, brains were analyzed to determine infarct volume. Results Rats demonstrated immediate shifts in melatonin timing after stroke. We observed a broad range of perturbations in melatonin timing in subsequent days, with rats exhibiting onset/offset patterns which included: advance/advance, advance/delay, delay/advance, and delay/delay. Melatonin rhythms displayed prolonged instability several days after stroke, with a majority of rats showing a day-to-day alternation between advance and delay in melatonin onset and duration. Duration of melatonin secretion changed in response to stroke, and this change was strongly determined by the shift in melatonin onset time. There was no correlation between infarct size and the direction or amplitude of melatonin phase shifting. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating

  3. Mobile lighting apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  4. Evaluation of predictive factors influencing community reintegration in adult patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajide Ayinla Olawale

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Patients with stroke are faced with gait, balance, and fall difficulties which could impact on their community reintegration. In Nigeria, community reintegration after stroke has been understudied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictors of community reintegration in adult patients with stroke. Materials and Methods: Participants were 91 adult patients with stroke. Gait variables, balance self-efficacy, community balance/mobility, and fall self-efficacy were assessed using Rivermead Mobility Index, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Community Balance and Mobility Scale, and Falls Efficacy Scale-International respectively. Reintegration to Normal Living Index was used to assess satisfaction with community reintegration. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient was used to determine the relationship between community reintegration and gait spatiotemporal variables, balance performance, and risk of fall. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine predictors of community reintegration (P ≤ 0.05. Results: There was significant positive relationship between community reintegration and cadence (r = 0.250, P = 0.017, functional mobility (r = 0.503, P = 0.001, balance self-efficacy (r = 0.608, P = 0.001, community balance/mobility (r = 0.586, P = 0.001, and duration of stroke (r = 0.220, P = 0.036. Stride time (r = −0.282, P = 0.073 and fall self-efficacy (r = 0.566, P = 0.001 were negatively correlated with community reintegration. Duration of stroke, balance self-efficacy, community balance/mobility, and fall self-efficacy (52.7% of the variance were the significant predictors of community reintegration. Conclusion: Community reintegration is influenced by cadence, functional mobility, balance self-efficacy, community balance/mobility, and duration of stroke. Hence, improving balance and mobility during rehabilitation is important in enhancing community reintegration in patients with stroke.

  5. Enhanced Power Conversion Efficiency of P3HT : PC71BM Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells by Doping a High-Mobility Small Organic Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molecular doping with TIPS-pentacene on the photovoltaic performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs with a structure of ITO/ZnO/poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT : [6,6]-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM : TIPS-pentacene/MoOx/Ag was systematically investigated by adjusting TIPS-pentacene doping ratios ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 wt%. The device with 0.6 wt% TIPS-pentacene exhibited the enhanced short-circuit current and fill factor by 1.23 mA/cm2 and 7.8%, respectively, resulting in a maximum power conversion efficiency of 4.13%, which is one-third higher than that of the undoped one. The photovoltaic performance improvement was mainly due to the balanced charge carrier mobility, enhanced crystallinity, and matched cascade energy level alignment in TIPS-pentacene doped active layer, resulting in the efficient charge separation, transport, and collection.

  6. Effect of stroke on fall rate, location and predictors: a prospective comparison of older adults with and without stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Simpson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The literature suggests that stroke is a major risk factor for falls, but there is a lack of prospective, controlled studies which quantify fall-risk after stroke. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates, location and predictors among individuals recently discharged home from stroke rehabilitation to age and sex matched controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A sample of 80 people with stroke and 90 controls received baseline assessments of balance, mobility and balance confidence. Falls were recorded prospectively over 13 months for both groups. Group differences in fall rates and contribution of clinical measures to falls were determined using negative binomial regression. Fall location was compared between groups using χ(2 statistics. The rate of falls for individuals with stroke was 1.77 times the rate for the control group. People with stroke were more likely to fall at home. Poorer balance (Berg Balance Scale was associated with greater falls for both stroke and control groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.908 and IRR: 0.877 respectively. A faster Timed Up and Go Test was associated with greater falls for the stroke group (IRR: 0.955 while better walking endurance (Six Minute Walk Test was associated with greater falls for the controls (IRR: 1.004. Balance confidence was not an independent predictor in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals recently discharged home are at greater risk of falling than individuals without stroke. Attention to home environment is warranted. Balance function can predict falls for both people with stroke and age and sex matched controls. Increased mobility may increase exposure to fall opportunities.

  7. Effect of stroke on fall rate, location and predictors: a prospective comparison of older adults with and without stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lisa A; Miller, William C; Eng, Janice J

    2011-04-29

    The literature suggests that stroke is a major risk factor for falls, but there is a lack of prospective, controlled studies which quantify fall-risk after stroke. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates, location and predictors among individuals recently discharged home from stroke rehabilitation to age and sex matched controls. A sample of 80 people with stroke and 90 controls received baseline assessments of balance, mobility and balance confidence. Falls were recorded prospectively over 13 months for both groups. Group differences in fall rates and contribution of clinical measures to falls were determined using negative binomial regression. Fall location was compared between groups using χ(2) statistics. The rate of falls for individuals with stroke was 1.77 times the rate for the control group. People with stroke were more likely to fall at home. Poorer balance (Berg Balance Scale) was associated with greater falls for both stroke and control groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.908 and IRR: 0.877 respectively). A faster Timed Up and Go Test was associated with greater falls for the stroke group (IRR: 0.955) while better walking endurance (Six Minute Walk Test) was associated with greater falls for the controls (IRR: 1.004). Balance confidence was not an independent predictor in either group. Individuals recently discharged home are at greater risk of falling than individuals without stroke. Attention to home environment is warranted. Balance function can predict falls for both people with stroke and age and sex matched controls. Increased mobility may increase exposure to fall opportunities.

  8. Hemiplegic limb synergies in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2006-02-01

    To describe the extent to which the voluntary movements of hemiparetic stroke patients are restricted to the hemiplegic limb synergies (which are marked by the inability to master individual joint movements) described by Brunnström. The study also aimed to describe the extent to which the synergies are related to functioning. In a prospective observational study design, 64 consecutive hemiparetic stroke patients were assessed with Brunnström's hemiplegic limb synergies, the modified Ashworth scale for spasticity, the Rivermead mobility index, and the Barthel ADL index. Three months after stroke, 8 of the 64 patients were moving completely or partly within the synergies. All patients whose movements were restricted to the synergies also exhibited spasticity. Hemiparetic patients whose movements were restricted to the synergies had significantly worse functioning scores than hemiparetic patients whose movements were not restricted to the synergies although severe disabilities were seen in both groups. Three months after stroke, the voluntary movements of only 13% of hemiparetic stroke patients were restricted to the synergies. The synergies were associated with spasticity and activity limitations. The use of the synergies might only be suitable for a small fraction of hemiparetic patients-namely, those displaying spasticity.

  9. Mobility management in mobile IP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medidi, Sirisha; Golshani, Forouzan

    2002-07-01

    There is an emerging interest in integrating mobile wireless communication with the Internet based on the Ipv6 technology. Many issues introduced by the mobility of users arise when such an integration is attempted. This paper addresses the problem of mobility management, i.e., that of tracking the current IP addresses of mobile terminals and sustaining active IP connections as mobiles move. The paper presents some architectural and mobility management options for integrating wireless access to the Internet. We then present performance results for Mobile IPv4, route optimization and Mobile IPv6.

  10. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Stroke And Substance Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chitsaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: stroke in recreational substance users can be an indirect complication, like endocarditis and cardio embolism in parenteral drug users. With some drug like cocaine, stroke appear to be the result of a direct effect. In young subjects without other risk factors provide persuasive evidence for causality . OPIATES: Heroine is the most abused opiate drug, which is administered by injection, by snorting or by smoking. Stroke affects heroin users by diverse mechanisms,. Injectors are at risk of infections endocarditis, which carries risk for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Cerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage usually occurs after rupture of a septic (mycotic aneurysm. Heroine users can are also at risk for hemorrhagic stroke secondary to liver failure with deranged clotting and to heroin nephropathy with uremia or malignant hypertension. In some heroin users the drug it self is directly causal due to vasculitis, hypersensitivity and immunologic changes. Embolization of foreign material to brain due to mixed of heroine with quinine can cause cerebral embolism. AMPHETAMINE AND other psychostimulants: In abuser of amphetamine hemorrhagic stroke can occur, oral, intravenous, nasal, and inhalational routes of administration have been reported. Most were chronic user, but in several patients, stroke followed a first exposure. Some of amphetamine induced intracranial hemorrhages are secondary to acute hypertension, some to cerebral vacuities, and some to a combination of two. Decongestants and diet pills: Phenylpropanolamine (PPA, an amphetamine – like drug, in decongestants and diet pills, induce acute hypertension, sever headache, psychiatric symptoms, seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. Ephedrine and pseudo ephedrine are present in decongestants and bronchodilators and induce headache, tachyarrhythmia, hypertensive emergency, and hemorrhagic and occlusive stroke. Ecstasy, 3,4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamin (MDMA with amphetamine like can

  12. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available.

  13. Prehospital Unassisted Assessment of Stroke Severity Using Telemedicine A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; Cambron, Melissa; Van Dyck, Rita; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van de Casseye, Rohny; Convents, Andre; Hubloue, Ives; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We evaluated the feasibility and the reliability of remote stroke severity quantification in the prehospital setting using the Unassisted TeleStroke Scale (UTSS) via a telestroke ambulance system and a fourth-generation mobile network. Methods The technical feasibility and the

  14. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke--from symptom recognition to thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M W; Kurz, K D; Farbu, E

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of stroke has changed in the recent years from rehabilitation to an emergency approach. We review existing data from symptom recognition to thrombolysis and identify challenges in the different phases of patient treatment. Implementation of treatment in dedicated stroke units with a multidisciplinary team exclusively treating stroke patients has led to significant reduction of stroke morbidity and mortality. Yet, first the introduction of treatment with intravenous rtPA (IVT) has led to the 'time is brain' concept where stroke is conceived as an emergency. As neuronal death in stroke is time dependent, all effort should be laid on immediate symptom recognition, rapid transport to the nearest hospital with a stroke treatment facility and diagnosis and treatment as soon as possible. The main cause of prehospital delay is that patients do not recognize that they suffered a stroke or out of other reasons do not call the Emergency Medical Services immediately. Educational stroke awareness campaigns may have an impact in increasing the number of patients eligible for rtPA treatment and can decrease the prehospital times if they are directed both to the public and to the medical divisions treating stroke. Stroke transport times can be shortened by the use of helicopter and a stroke mobile--an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner--may be helpful to decrease time from onset to treatment start in the future. Yet, IVT has several limitations such as a narrow time window and a weak effect in ischemic strokes caused by large vessel occlusions. In these cases, interventional procedures and the concept of bridging therapy, a combined approach of IVT and intraarterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy, might improve recanalization rates and patient outcome. As neuronal death in stroke patients occurs in a time-dependent fashion, all effort should be made to decrease time from symptom onset to treatment start with rtPA: major challenges are stroke

  16. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  17. European Stroke Science Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattle, Heinrich P.; Brainin, Michael; Chamorro, Angel; Diener, Hans Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Leys, Didier; Norrving, Bo; Ward, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The European Stroke Organisation (ESO) held its first European Stroke Science Workshop in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (15-17 December 2011). Stroke experts based in Europe were invited to present and discuss their current research. The scope of the workshop was to review the most recent findings of selected topics in stroke, to exchange ideas, to stimulate new research and to enhance collaboration between European stroke research groups. Seven scientific sessions were held, each starting with a keynote lecture to review the state of the art of the given topic, followed by 4 or 5 short presentations by experts. They were asked to limit their presentations to 10 slides containing only recent information. The meeting was organized by the executive committee of the ESO (Heinrich Mattle, chairman, Michael Brainin, Angel Chamorro, Werner Hacke, Didier Leys) and supported by the European Stroke Conference (Michael Hennerici). In this article we summarize the main contents of this successful workshop. PMID:22836350

  18. Identification of Barriers to Stroke Awareness and Risk Factor Management Unique to Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to risk factor control may differ by race/ethnicity. The goal of this study was to identify barriers to stroke awareness and risk factor management unique to Hispanics as compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs. We performed a prospective study of stroke patients from an academic Stroke Center in Arizona and surveyed members of the general community. Questionnaires included: the Duke Social Support Index (DSSI, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC Scale, a stroke barriers questionnaire, and a Stroke Awareness Test. Of 145 stroke patients surveyed (72 Hispanic; 73 NHW, Hispanics scored lower on the Stroke Awareness Test compared to NHWs (72.5% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.029. Hispanic stroke patients also reported greater barriers related to medical knowledge, medication adherence, and healthcare access (p < 0.05 for all. Hispanics scored higher on the “powerful others” sub-scale (11.3 vs. 10, p < 0.05 of the MHLC. Of 177 members of the general public surveyed, Hispanics had lower stroke awareness compared to NHWs and tended to have lower awareness than Hispanic stroke patients. These results suggest that Hispanic stroke patients perceive less control over their health, experience more healthcare barriers, and demonstrate lower rates of stroke literacy. Interventions for stroke prevention and education in Hispanics should address these racial/ethnic differences in stroke awareness and barriers to risk factor control.

  19. Mobile agents basic concepts, mobility models, and the tracy toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mobile agents are software nomads that act as your personal representative, working autonomously through networks. They are able to visit network nodes directly using available computing power and are not limited by platform. This emerging field is now poised to become a cornerstone for new Web-based ubiquitous computing environments. Mobile Agents provides a practical introduction to mobile agent technology and surveys the state of the art in mobile agent research. Students and researchers can use the book as an introduction to the concepts and possibilities of this field and as an overview of ongoing research. Developers can use it to identify the capabilities of the technology to decide if mobile agents are the right solution for them. Practioners can also gain hands-on experience in programming mobile agents through exploration of the source code for a complete mobile agent environment available through the companion website.*Summarizes the state of the art in mobile agent research*Identifies the benefits...

  20. Mobile Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Alamuri, Lavanya

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this project was to get an understanding of how companies adopt mobile as an advertising medium. The literature review aided in framing a draft of the factors that affect mobile advertising adoption and possible forms of mobile advertising. Considering the scope of the thesis work, branding strategy, service costs, personalization and privacy and platform were considered to be the factors that could affect the mobile advertising adoption. A few possible forms on mobile device we...

  1. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  2. Mobile ad hoc networking

    CERN Document Server

    John Wiley & Sons

    2004-01-01

    "Assimilating the most up-to-date information on research and development activities in this rapidly growing area, Mobile Ad Hoc Networking covers physical, data link, network, and transport layers, as well as application, security, simulation, and power management issues in sensor, local area, personal, and mobile ad hoc networks. Each of the book's sixteen chapters has been written by a top expert and discusses in-depth the most important topics in the field. Mobile Ad Hoc Networking is an excellent reference and guide for professionals seeking an in-depth examination of topics that also provides a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art."--Jacket.

  3. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied the ...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  4. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  5. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    that of ‘mobilities design’. The book revolves around the following research question: How are design decisions and interventions staging mobilities? It builds upon the Staging Mobilities model (Jensen 2013) in an explorative inquiry into the problems and potentials of the design of mobilities. The exchange value...... between mobilities and design research is twofold. To mobilities research this means getting closer to the ‘material’, and to engage in the creative, explorative and experimental approaches of the design world which offer new potentials for innovative research. Design research, on the other hand, might...... enter into a fruitful relationship with mobilities research, offering a relational and mobile design thinking and a valuable base for a reflective design practice around the ubiquitous structures, spaces and systems of mobilities....

  6. Mobility Divides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    Contemporary mobilities are cultural and social manifestations, and the mobile practices in the everyday life of billions of humans are re-configuring senses of place, self, other and relationships to the built environment. The way ‘mobile situations’ are staged in designed and built environments...... designs, but also how the situated and embodied mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from below’ in concrete acts of choice concerning modes of mobilities, ways of moving and interacting. The ‘staging mobilites’ framework opens up to an understanding of the meaning of ‘mobilities design...

  7. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  8. Mobile Workforce, Mobile Technology, Mobile Threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies' introduction into the world of safeguards business processes such as inspection creates tremendous opportunity for novel approaches and could result in a number of improvements to such processes. Mobile applications are certainly the wave of the future. The success of the application ecosystems has shown that users want full fidelity, highly-usable, simple purpose applications with simple installation, quick responses and, of course, access to network resources at all times. But the counterpart to opportunity is risk, and the widespread adoption of mobile technologies requires a deep understanding of the threats and vulnerabilities inherent in mobile technologies. Modern mobile devices can be characterized as small computers. As such, the threats against computing infrastructure apply to mobile devices. Meanwhile, the attributes of mobile technology that make it such an obvious benefit over traditional computing platforms all have elements of risk: pervasive, always-on networking; diverse ecosystems; lack of centralized control; constantly shifting technological foundations; intense competition among competitors in the marketplace; the scale of the installation base (from millions to billions); and many more. This paper will explore the diverse and massive environment of mobile, the number of attackers and vast opportunities for compromise. The paper will explain how mobile devices prove valuable targets to both advanced and persistent attackers as well as less-skilled casual hackers. Organized crime, national intelligence agencies, corporate espionage are all part of the landscape. (author)

  9. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Functional Recovery Following Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Young; Shin, Sung Bong; Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the factors related to upper extremity functional improvement following inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in stroke patients. Forty-one stroke patients received low-frequency rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere according to a standard protocol, in addition to conventional physical and occupational therapy. The rTMS-treated patients were divided into two groups according to their responsiveness to rTMS measured by the self-care score of the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI): responded group (n=19) and non-responded group (n=22). Forty-one age-matched stroke patients who had not received rTMS served as controls. Neurological, cognitive and functional assessments were performed before rTMS and 4 weeks after rTMS treatment. Among the rTMS-treated patients, the responded group was significantly younger than the non-responded group (51.6±10.5 years and 65.5±13.7 years, respectively; p=0.001). Four weeks after rTMS, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Brunnstrom recovery stage and upper extremity muscle power scores were significantly more improved in the responded group than in the control group. Besides the self-care score, the mobility score of the K-MBI was also more improved in the responded group than in the non-responded group or controls. Age is the most obvious factor determining upper extremity functional responsiveness to low-frequency rTMS in stroke patients.

  10. Immune interventions in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  11. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  12. National Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Event Join a Stroke Challenge Team Comeback Trail Tell Your Story Community Presentations Faces of Stroke Volunteer With Us ... in a video presentation. Watch Video ... to feel the right side of her body. Kathryn’s friends performed the FAST exam and soon ...

  13. Diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarenwattananon, A.; Khandji, A.; Brust, J.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the development of cerebral angiography 60 years ago, there has been a proliferation of increasingly sophisticated, expensive, and, fortunately, safe imaging techniques for patients with cerebrovascular disease. In addition, occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke are now recognized as having a wide variety of possible causes. This chapter addresses the different imaging options available for particular kinds of stroke

  14. The Optimal Golf Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchinger, Mikael; Durigen, Susan; Dahl, Johan Rambech

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary investigation into aspects of the game of golf. A series of models is proposed for the golf stroke, the momentum transfer between club and ball and the flight of the ball.Numerical and asymptotic solutions are presented reproducing many of the features observed...... in the golf stroke of a professional golfer....

  15. MOBILE COMPUTING AND MCOMMERCE SECURITY ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Prakash; Balachandra

    2014-01-01

    The radical evolution of computers and advancement of technology in the area of hardware (smaller size, weight, low power consumption and cost, high performance) and communications has introduced the notion of mobile computing. Mobile Commerce is an evolving area of e-commerce, where users can interact with service providers through a mobile and wireless network using mobile device for information retrieval and transaction processing. Mobile wireless market is increasing by lea...

  16. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  17. Editorial: Mobile (March 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kunz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Open source software and hardware has become an accepted way of developing new and interesting applications in many information and communication technology domains: operating systems, databases, Web infrastructure, and applications. It's not surprising that with the increasing popularity of mobile handheld devices, users and researchers have explored the power of open approaches to providing innovative new applications and services in this domain. However, unlike personal computers and the Internet, mobile handsets were tightly controlled by mobile network operators (MNOs who developed a vertical ecosystem by integrating the communication infrastructure, the handheld device hardware, and often the applications installed on those devices. The software and protocols running the mobile communications infrastructure and devices are often standardized by membership-only bodies, where large MNOs and manufacturers have a predominant influence. These players invest significant financial resources into shaping the industry along their vision to gain a competitive advantage. A current example is the ongoing battle about the dominant radio access technology for 4G cellular systems: LTE vs. Wimax. These trends have changed recently. Companies such as Google, Nokia, or Openmoko and Industry Alliances such as the Open Handset Alliance are providing the core building blocks, both in hardware as well as software, of increasingly open mobile devices. This issue of the OSBR reviews the relevant trends in the open mobile platform space from a number of perspectives. As the articles in these issue show, there is a lot of exciting ongoing work that brings the power of open source development to the mobile space. This trend is not just confined to the mobile devices as there are also efforts in the development of open mobile infrastructure elements and whole systems.

  18. The Danish Stroke Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated...... at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. MAIN VARIABLES: The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes...... of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients...

  19. Increased reward in ankle robotics training enhances motor control and cortical efficiency in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ronald N; Rietschel, Jeremy C; Roy, Anindo; Jung, Brian C; Diaz, Jason; Macko, Richard F; Forrester, Larry W

    2014-01-01

    Robotics is rapidly emerging as a viable approach to enhance motor recovery after disabling stroke. Current principles of cognitive motor learning recognize a positive relationship between reward and motor learning. Yet no prior studies have established explicitly whether reward improves the rate or efficacy of robotics-assisted rehabilitation or produces neurophysiologic adaptations associated with motor learning. We conducted a 3 wk, 9-session clinical pilot with 10 people with chronic hemiparetic stroke, randomly assigned to train with an impedance-controlled ankle robot (anklebot) under either high reward (HR) or low reward conditions. The 1 h training sessions entailed playing a seated video game by moving the paretic ankle to hit moving onscreen targets with the anklebot only providing assistance as needed. Assessments included paretic ankle motor control, learning curves, electroencephalograpy (EEG) coherence and spectral power during unassisted trials, and gait function. While both groups exhibited changes in EEG, the HR group had faster learning curves (p = 0.05), smoother movements (p power (p mobility.

  20. Neuropsychology and the relearning of motor skills following stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, J; Mulder, T

    Regaining independent mobility is one of the most important goals in physical therapy with patients suffering from the consequences of stroke. Both physical therapy and occupational therapy are learning processes in which the patient has to remaster old skills or has to learn novel skills. It is

  1. Mobile economy

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key

    2004-01-01

    Mobile economy : Transaktionen, Prozesse, Anwendungen und Dienste ; 4. Workshop Mobile Commerce, 02.-03. Februar 2004, Univ. Augsburg / K. Turowski ... (Hrsg.). - Bonn : Ges. für Informatik, 2004. - 189 S. : Ill., graph. Darst. - (GI-Edition : Proceedings ; 42)

  2. Health, function and disability in stroke patients in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara P. B. Carvalho-Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Stroke patients commonly have impairments associated with reduction in functionality. Among these impairments, the motor impairments are the most prevalent. The functional profile of these patients living in the community who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil has not yet been established Objective To describe the functional profile of stroke patients who are users of the primary health-care services in Brazil, looking at one health-care unit in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Method From medical records and home visits, data were collected regarding health status, assistance received following the stroke, personal and environmental contextual factors, function and disability, organized according to the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. Test and instruments commonly applied in the assessment of stroke patients were used. Results Demographic data from all stroke patients who were users of the health-care unit (n=44, age: 69.23±13.12 years and 67±66.52 months since the stroke participated of this study. Most subjects presented with disabilities, as changes in emotional function, muscle strength, and mobility, risks of falling during functional activities, negative self-perception of quality of life, and perception of the environment factors were perceived as obstacles. The majority of the patients used the health-care unit to renew drug prescriptions, and did not receive any information on stroke from health professionals, even though patients believed it was important for patients to receive information and to provide clarifications. Conclusion Stroke patients who used primary health-care services in Brazil have chronic disabilities and health needs that require continuous health attention from rehabilitation professionals. All of these health needs should be considered by health professionals to provide better management as part of

  3. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  4. Post-stroke depression among stroke survivors attending two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burden of stroke worldwide is increasing rapidly. There is paucity of data on post-stroke depression (PSD) among stroke survivors in Uganda, despite the high prevalence of PSD reported elsewhere. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed adult participants with confirmed first stroke with a ...

  5. Perception of stroke among patients with stroke | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perception of patients to stroke is variable. The aim of this study was to determine the perception of stroke among stroke patients. The study was carried out between January 2004 - December 2004 on all the patients presenting with features of stroke at the Federal Medical Center Ido, Nigeria. Data were collected by ...

  6. Cerebrorenal interaction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Beyond the original meaning of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as high-risk state for future dialysis, CKD is now known as an established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Stroke is a major player of cardiovascular disease and has deep two-way relationships with CKD. CKD is an evident risk factor for stroke. Meta-analyses of cohort studies and trials indicate that proteinuria/albuminuria increases the risk of stroke by 71-92%, and reduced glomerular filtration rate increases the risk by 43%. In addition, CKD has a strong relationship with subclinical brain damage including white matter changes, microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and carotid atherosclerosis. CKD is prevalent in acute stroke patients; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate stroke patients and 39% of total intracerebral hemorrhage patients in our institute. Acute and chronic management of stroke are influenced by CKD. Therapeutic effects of several antithrombotic and thrombolytic agents, including recently-developed novel oral anticoagulants, are affected by renal function. Moreover, reduced glomerular filtration rate is independently associated with increased 1- and 10-year mortalities in the end. Stroke also has deep relationships with end-stage kidney disease. Stroke occurs much more commonly in dialysis patients than general population or CKD patients without need for dialysis. The triggers of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with end-stage kidney disease include special characteristics unique to dialysis, such as drastic hemodynamic change, dialysate and anticoagulants, and vascular calcification. As cohorts of dialysis patients become older, more hypertensive, and more diabetic than before, stroke become more prevalent and more serious events in dialysis clinics. Now, clinicians should have much interest in the association between CKD and cerebrovascular diseases, so-called the cerebro-renal interaction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Mobile marketing

    OpenAIRE

    KLEČKOVÁ, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to provide a comprehensive overview of the mobile marketing and analyze selected campaigns of Czech mobile marketing in comparison to world successful campaigns. The research contained studying of available literature about the theme to gain general knowledge about the issue. The theoretical part of the thesis contains predominantly various definitions of mobile marketing and its tools, advantages of these tools and some information about Mobile Marketing Assoc...

  8. Mobile marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Gause, Matěj

    2012-01-01

    The goal of bachelor's thesis on the theme "Mobile marketing" is to outline its development and why is this new phenomen so important for all modern companies around the world. The work is not about simple description of mobile marketing media but it vividly informs about the latest trends and news from the world of mobile apps and games. It presents the most successful mobile apps which registered more than billion downloads and from their unique characteristics it unveils great potential of...

  9. EFFICACY OF MELDONIUM IN ACUTE PERIOD OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As long as systemic thrombolysis is indicated to not more than 10% of patients with ischemic stroke, the search for medical agents for basic treatment of stroke is an important problem of today’s neurology.Aim: To evaluate efficacy of meldonium in patients with acute ischemic stroke.Materials and methods: One hundred and fourteen patients were assessed in the acute period of strokes in the internal carotid artery system. The main group included 70 patients who were given meldonium (Mildronate in addition to their basic treatment regimen. The drug was administered intravenously in daily drop infusions at dose of 10 ml of 10% solution for 10 days, thereafter they were switched to oral treatment at 250 mg daily for 2 to 3 weeks. The control group consisted of 40 patients who received only basic treatment regimen. Both groups were compatible for their age, gender distribution, severity of stroke and degree of neurologic dysfunction.Results: In the patients who were given meldonium in addition to basic treatment of ischemic stroke, neurological deficiency, assessed by NIHSS, scored significantly better than in those from the control group (3.1 ± 0.1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.17, p < 0.05. Also, they had significantly less disability on modified Rankin scale (1.3 ± 0.03 vs. 1.07 ± 0.07, p < 0.01 and more improvement in mobility as per Rivermead mobility index (3.6 ± 0.17 vs. 2.9 ± 0.25, p < 0.05.Conclusion: The addition of meldonium to the set of medical treatment in ischemic stroke patients gives positive results reflecting a decreased neurological deficiency, increased levels of mobility and daily activities.

  10. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    Within the so-called ‘mobilities turn’ (Adey 2010; Cresswell 2006; Urry 2007) much research has taken place during the last decade bringing mobilities into the centre of sociological analysis. However, the materiality and spatiality of artefacts, infrastructures, and sites hosting mobilities are ......: motorway ecologies, bicycle systems design, urban shopping malls and a train transit hub....

  11. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    utilitarian transport from A to B; they constitute a rich societal phenomenon with, for example, social, cultural, sensorial, emotional, and material dimensions. The article proposes two fruitful links between the mobilities turn and the designerly examination of mobilities spaces. First, the mobilities turn...

  12. Subversive Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelle, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    The article approaches mobility through a cultural history of urban conflict. Using a case of “The Copenhagen Trouble,“ a series of riots in the Danish capital around 1900, a space of subversive mobilities is delineated. These turn-of-the-century riots points to a new pattern of mobile gathering...

  13. Intensive mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...

  14. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paanalahti, Markku; Berzina, Guna; Lundgren-Nilsson, Åsa; Arndt, Toni; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2018-03-05

    To examine if the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) core set for stoke contains problems that are relevant for the persons living with stroke as expressed in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Cross-sectional study of 242 persons with previous stroke. The agreement between the perceived problems in the SIS items and problems in the categories of Comprehensive ICF Core Set for stroke were analyzed using percent of agreement and Kappa statistic. The analyses between 57 items of the SIS and 31 second-level categories of the ICF were conducted. The problems in domains of "Mobility", "Activities of daily living", "Hand function", "Strength" in the SIS had moderate agreement when compared to ICF categories. The SIS domains of "Emotion" and "Communication", as well as some aspects of the "Memory" had slight or fair agreement with corresponding ICF categories. The results of the study suggest that there is acceptable agreement between persons after stroke and health professionals in the physical aspects, but rather poor agreement in the cognitive and emotional aspects of functioning. Health professionals do not fully capture the magnitude of emotional or social problems experienced by persons after stroke when using the ICF Core Set as a framework for evaluation. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF Core Set for Stroke provides comprehensive list of possible health and health related outcomes for persons after stroke. Problems reported in condition-specific patient-reported outcome scales can be important in decision making in rehabilitation. Patients and health professionals tend to agree more on physical than cognitive problems. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

  15. Telestroke a viable option to improve stroke care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Padma V; Sudhan, Paulin; Khurana, Dheeraj; Bhatia, Rohit; Kaul, Subash; Sylaja, P N; Moonis, Majaz; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai

    2014-10-01

    In India, stroke care services are not well developed. There is a need to explore alternative options to tackle the rising burden of stroke. Telemedicine has been used by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) to meet the needs of remote hospitals in India. The telemedicine network implemented by ISRO in 2001 presently stretches to around 100 hospitals all over the country, with 78 remote/rural/district health centers connected to 22 specialty hospitals in major cities, thus providing treatment to more than 25 000 patients, which includes stroke patients. Telemedicine is currently used in India for diagnosing stroke patients, subtyping stroke as ischemic or hemorrhagic, and treating accordingly. However, a dedicated telestroke system for providing acute stroke care is needed. Keeping in mind India's flourishing technology sector and leading communication networks, the hub-and-spoke model could work out really well in the upcoming years. Until then, simpler alternatives like smartphones, online data transfer, and new mobile applications like WhatsApp could be used. Telestroke facilities could increase the pool of patients eligible for thrombolysis. But this primary aim of telestroke can be achieved in India only if thrombolysis and imaging techniques are made available at all levels of health care. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  16. Mobile Collocated Interactions With Wearables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucero, Andrés; Wilde, Danielle; Robinson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Research on mobile collocated interactions has been looking at situations in which collocated users engage in collaborative activities using their mobile devices, thus going from personal/individual toward shared/multiuser experiences and interactions. However, computers are getting smaller, more...... powerful, and closer to our bodies. Therefore, mobile collocated interactions research, which originally looked at smartphones and tablets, will inevitably move towards fully integrated wearable technologies. The focus of this workshop is to bring together a community of researchers, designers...

  17. Third European Stroke Science Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dichgans, Martin; Planas, Anna M.; Biessels, Geert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; van der Worp, Bart|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189855010; Sudlow, Cathie; Norrving, B.; Lees, Kennedy; Mattle, Heinrich P.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Eibsee, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, November 19 to 21, 2015: The European Stroke Organization convened >120 stroke experts from 27 countries to discuss latest results and hot topics in clinical, translational, and basic stroke research. Since its inception in 2011, the European Stroke Science

  18. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  19. Mobile Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place...... is a ‘mobile sense making’ where signs and materially situated meanings connect to the moving human body and thus create particular challenges and complexities of making sense of the world. The chapter includes notions of mobility systems and socio-technical networks in order to show how a ‘semiotic layer’ may...... work to afford or restrict mobile practices....

  20. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  1. Persuasive Mobile Health Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Wylie, Carlos; Coulton, Paul

    With many industrialized societies bearing the cost of an increasingly sedentary lifestyle on the health of their populations there is a need to find new ways of encouraging physical activity to promote better health and well being. With the increasing power of mobile phones and the recent emergence of personal heart rate monitors, aimed at dedicated amateur runners, there is now a possibility to develop “Persuasive Mobile Health Applications” to promote well being through the use of real-time physiological data and persuade users to adopt a healthier lifestyle. In this paper we present a novel general health monitoring software for mobile phones called Heart Angel. This software is aimed at helping users monitor, record, as well as improve their fitness level through built-in cardio-respiratory tests, a location tracking application for analyzing heart rate exertion over time and location, and a fun mobile-exergame called Health Defender.

  2. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation...... and the mobile user situation. The analysis is based on an empirical survey involving ten medical doctors and a monolingual app designed to support cognitive lexicographic functions, cf. (Tarp 2006:61-64). In test A the doctors looked up five medical terms while sitting down at a desk and in test B the doctors......:565), and it was found that the information access success of the mobile user situation is lower than that of the stationary user situation, primarily because users navigate in the physical world and in the mobile device at the same time. The data also suggest that the mobile user situation is not fully compatible...

  3. Wireless power pad with local power activation for portable devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waffenschmidt, E.; Zheglov, V.

    2007-01-01

    Wireless power transfer by magnetic induction offers a simple to use way to recharge mobile devices like e.g. mobile phone, music players or medical sensors. As shown by a previous report and an existing Power Pad demonstrator, wireless inductive power transfer is possible with a good power

  4. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cost of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    . The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls......BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...

  6. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit stroke merupakan penyebab kematian dan kecacatan kronik yang paling tinggi pada kelompok umur diatas usia 45 tahun terbanyak di Indonesia. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengidentifikasi determinan utama yang berhubungan dengan penyakit stroke pada masyarakat di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa Bogor. Analisis lanjut terhadap 1.912 responden subset baseline data penelitian “Studi Kohort Faktor Risiko Penyakit Tidak Menular” Data dikumpulkan dengan metode wawancara pada penduduk tetap di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa, Kecamatan Bogor Tengah, Bogor tahun 2012. Diagnosis stroke berdasarkan anamnesis dan pemeriksaan dokter spesialis syaraf. Variabel independen meliputi karakteristik sosiodemografi, status kesehatan dan perilaku berisiko. Data dianalisis dengan uji regresi logistik ganda. Penyakit stroke ditemukan pada 49 (2,6% orang. Determinan utama stroke meliputi hipertensi (OR = 4,20; IK 95% = 2,20 – 8,03, penyakit jantung koroner (OR = 2,74; IK 95% = 1,51 – 4,99, diabetes melitus (OR = 2,89; IK 95% = 1,47 – 5,64, dan status ekonomi miskin (OR = 1,83 ; IK 95% = 1,03 – 3,33. Pencegahan penyakit stroke dilakukan dengan peningkatan edukasi (kampanye/penyuluhan melalui pengendalian faktor risiko utama yaitu hipertensi dan pencegahan terjadinya penyakit degeneratif lain yaitu penyakit jantung koroner dan diabetes melitus. Stroke disease is the leading cause of death and chronic disabi lity in most over the age of 45 years in Indonesia. The aim of study was to identify the major determinants of stroke disease in Kebon Kalapa community in Bogor. A deep analyze was conducted in 1.912 respondents based on the subset of baseline data “Risk Factors Cohort Study of Non Communicable Diseases.” Data was collected by interviews on Kebon Kalapa community, Bogor in 2012. Stroke diagnosis was determined by anamnesis and neu-rological examination with specialist. Independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, health status and risk behavior

  7. The Migraine?Stroke Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like head...

  8. Social Mobility, Equality, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Roby, Pamela A.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the dangers of having education as the sole route to social mobility and advocates the development of alternate socioeconomic models to meritocracy" (where the power lies with those with merit), such as mixed job- education experiences. (JM)

  9. Mobile Applications for Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  10. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of getting ... disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do to ...

  11. Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... negotiate the provision of reasonable accommodations in the workplace. When can a stroke patient begin rehabilitation? Rehabilitation ... at home gives people the advantage of practicing skills and developing compensatory strategies in the context of ...

  12. A Stroke of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author reflects on foreign-language learning by his EFL students as well as his own foreign-language learning. He concludes by musing on the possible and fantastical devastation on language-ability wrought by strokes.

  13. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  14. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. NINDS is conducting a public awareness campaign across the United States to educate people about ...

  15. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    of coordination necessary in cooperative work, but focuses, we argue, mainly on the temporal aspects of cooperative work. As a supplement, the concept of mobility work focuses on the spatial aspects of cooperative work. Whereas actors seek to diminish the amount of articulation work needed in collaboration......We posit the concept of Mobility Work to describe efforts of moving about people and things as part of accomplishing tasks. Mobility work can be seen as a spatial parallel to the concept of articulation work proposed by the sociologist Anselm Strauss. Articulation work describes efforts...... by constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and...

  16. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the nexus between design (architecture, urban design, service design, etc.) and mobilities as a new and emerging research field. In this paper, we apply a “situational mobilities” perspective and take point of departure in the pragmatist question: “What design decisions...... and interventions affords this particular mobile situation?” The paper presents the contours of an emerging research agenda within mobilities research. The advent of “mobilities design” as an emerging research field points towards a critical interest in the material as well as practical consequences of contemporary......-making. The paper proposes that increased understanding of the material affordances facilitated through design provides important insight to planning and policymaking that at times might be in risk of becoming too detached from the everyday life of the mobile subject within contemporary mobilities landscapes....

  17. Telestroke in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Jacques; Joubert, Lynette B; de Bustos, Elizabeth Medeiros; Ware, Dallas; Jackson, David; Harrison, Terrence; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a high-frequency disorder placing a significant burden on the health care systems, being the foremost cause of complex chronic disability in adults. Devising systems that can enhance the prevention of stroke recurrence is an important priority and challenge in both the developed and the developing world. The potential for recurrent stroke can be substantially reduced by effective management of vascular risk factors. Telestroke is a tool with potential application to improve risk management of stroke survivors. Lack of acknowledgment of existing practices as well as lack of awareness of potential financial barriers to diffusion of telestroke can lead to limited implementation. Telestroke offers service providers the opportunity to access large numbers of stroke survivors targeting secondary prevention. The ideal 'telestroke model' provides service support, education for the patient and caregiver, as well as integration of specialist and primary care services. Effective use of technological advances, with adequate recognition of the importance of human interaction in the long-term management of a largely elderly population of stroke survivors is challenging but possible. Telestroke should be systems- and not technology-driven. Barriers in the implementation of telestroke have been identified as insufficient planning of IT infrastructure, lack of long-term vision for sustainability, a lack of contextual perspective as well as poor communication across domains. Future telestroke models should provide effective action in an integrated model of care recognizing and involving all existing players and practices. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  19. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakawah MO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Obadah Nakawah, Eugene C Lai Stanely H. Appel Department of Neurology, Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months. Keywords: vascular dyskinesia, stroke, movement disorders

  20. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  1. Improving public education about stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a common and serious disease. Most studies have shown that basic public knowledge about what a stroke is, symptoms of a stroke, and the proper reaction to a stroke is quite deficient. The fact that a stroke affects cognitive, communicative, and motor functions may partially explain the poor reaction to acute stroke symptoms. Several educational studies, using diverse formats and messaging paradigms, have been shown to positively affect public knowledge of stroke symptoms. Such efforts have often used mass media public education campaigns with an emphasis on recognizing symptoms of an acute stroke. Some have been able to demonstrate an increase in the chance of patients (or by-standers) calling 911 and seeking emergency care. However, many programs were of brief duration, and their long-term benefits are uncertain. Continual educational efforts will be needed to improve stroke knowledge and increase the percentage of patients who seek emergency care. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. The experience of living with stroke in low urban and rural socioeconomic areas of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maleka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of stroke on stroke survivors are profound and affecttheir quality of life. The aim of this study was to establish the experience of peopleliving with stroke in low socioeconomic urban and rural areas of South Africa.A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was used to collect data.Participants were identified from stroke registers and recruited from PHC clinicsin Soweto, Gauteng and Limpopo provinces. Participants had to have had a stroke,be above the age of 18 and had lived in the community six months to a year followingtheir stroke. The researcher or research assistant conducted the interviews ofparticipants who had had strokes as well as their caregivers in the home language of the participants. The interviewswere audio taped, transcribed and translated into English. A thematic content analysis was done.Thirty two participants were interviewed, 13 from Soweto, Gauteng, and 19 from rural Limpopo provinces. Theresults suggest that the sudden, overwhelming transformation as a result of a stroke forms a background for loss ofcommunity mobility, social isolation, role reversal within the family and community, loss of role within the family andcommunity, loss of meaningful activities of daily living, loss of hope and threat to livelihood amongst stroke survivorsliving in low socioeconomic areas of South Africa.An overwhelming picture of despondency was found, with few positive stories told in both settings. The themesidentified from the interviews reflected the experience and issues that a patient with stroke has to deal with in lowsocioeconomic areas of South Africa.

  3. Mobil marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Engelová, Kateřina

    2006-01-01

    Mobil marketing - reklama a podpora prodeje prostřednictvím mobilních telefonů. Technologické a kulturní předpoklady vzniku tohoto odvětví. Mobil marketing a marketingový mix, možnosti synergie. Nástroje mobil marketingu - reklamní SMS a MMS, lokační služby, soutěže, ankety a hlasování, věrnostní systémy, mobilní obsah. Subjekty mobil marketingu. M-komerce. Využití pro podnikové aplikace.

  4. The building as a power plant. Net plus energy building with e-mobility; Das Gebaeude als Kraftwerk. Netto-Plusenergiegebaeude mit E-Mobilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, M. Norbert [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Gebaeude- und Solartechnik

    2011-07-01

    Energy designers do not consider the building technology isolated from the architecture. Instead, sustainable, functional and innovative solutions are developed in an integrated process with all persons involved. The user comfort, the overall energy efficiency, the selection of ecologically compatible materials as well as the relation between building and sustainable mobility belong to the context of holistic planning.

  5. Pain following stroke, initially and at 3 and 18 months after stroke, and its association with other disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, D K; Welmer, A-K

    2012-10-01

    A general hypothesis is that pain following stroke (PFS) causes disabilities. However, the clinical implication of PFS on other disabilities after stroke and vice versa has not been fully investigated. The aims of this observational study were to analyze the correlation between PFS and other disabilities at different time points after stroke, whether PFS can be a predictor of coming disabilities and whether other disabilities can be predictors of coming PFS. Patients with a first-ever stroke were assessed initially (n = 109), and at 3 (n = 95) and 18 months (n = 66) after stroke for PFS, mobility, self-care as well as touch, proprioceptive, muscle tone, and movement functions. PFS was correlated to impaired upper extremity movement function on all occasions, while the correlations between PFS and other disabilities varied across the three occasions. Initial PFS and PFS at 3 months did not independently predict coming disabilities. Initial mobility limitation independently predicted PFS at 3 months and impaired touch function, initially and at 3 months, independently predicted PFS at 18 months. No other disabilities independently predicted coming PFS. The present results do not support the hypothesis that PFS causes other disabilities. Our results indicate that PFS is correlated to other disabilities; however, no ultimate conclusions can be drawn on causality. PFS was not a predictor of coming disabilities, while some disabilities were predictors of coming PFS. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  6. Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation after a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation After a Stroke Past ... to help them recover successfully. What is post-stroke rehabilitation? Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills lost to ...

  7. Mobile Semiotics - signs and mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is about how to comprehend the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The paper explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. The theoretical scope...... is therefore an attempt to mobilize semiotics by drawing on a central body of theory within and adjacent to the discipline. For instance the founding works of C. S. Peirce will be related to the contemporary notions of ‘geosemiotics’ by Scollon & Scollon. The paper’s theoretical claim is that semiotics hold...... a potential for mobilities studies if the awareness of seeing the environment as a semiotic layer and system can be sensitized to the insights of the ‘mobilities turn’. Empirically the paper tentatively explores the usefulness of a mobile semiotics approach to cases such as street signage, airport design...

  8. Mobile phones and mobile communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Richard; Donner, Jonathan

    With staggering swiftness, the mobile phone has become a fixture of daily life in almost every society on earth. In 2007, the world had over 3 billion mobile subscriptions. Prosperous nations boast of having more subscriptions than people. In the developing world, hundreds of millions of people who...... could never afford a landline telephone now have a mobile number of their own. With a mobile in our hand many of us feel safer, more productive, and more connected to loved ones, but perhaps also more distracted and less involved with things happening immediately around us. Written by two leading...... researchers in the field, this volume presents an overview of the mobile telephone as a social and cultural phenomenon. Research is summarized and made accessible though detailed descriptions of ten mobile users from around the world. These illustrate popular debates, as well as deeper social forces at work...

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea exaggerates cognitive dysfunction in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Wanhua; Cai, Sijie; Sheng, Qi; Pan, Shenggui; Shen, Fang; Tang, Qing; Liu, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is very common in stroke survivors. It potentially worsens the cognitive dysfunction and inhibits their functional recovery. However, whether OSA independently damages the cognitive function in stroke patients is unclear. A simple method for evaluating OSA-induced cognitive impairment is also missing. Forty-four stroke patients six weeks after onset and 24 non-stroke patients with snoring were recruited for the polysomnographic study of OSA and sleep architecture. Their cognitive status was evaluated with a validated Chinese version of Cambridge Prospective Memory Test. The relationship between memory deficits and respiratory, sleeping, and dementia-related clinical variables were analyzed with correlation and multiple linear regression tests. OSA significantly and independently damaged time- and event-based prospective memory in stroke patients, although it had less power than the stroke itself. The impairment of prospective memory was correlated with increased apnea-hypopnea index, decreased minimal and mean levels of peripheral oxygen saturation, and disrupted sleeping continuity (reduced sleep efficiency and increased microarousal index). The further regression analysis identified minimal levels of peripheral oxygen saturation and sleep efficiency to be the two most important predictors for the decreased time-based prospective memory in stroke patients. OSA independently contributes to the cognitive dysfunction in stroke patients, potentially through OSA-caused hypoxemia and sleeping discontinuity. The prospective memory test is a simple but sensitive method to detect OSA-induced cognitive impairment in stroke patients. Proper therapies of OSA might improve the cognitive function and increase the life quality of stroke patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mini-Stroke vs. Regular Stroke: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is a ministroke different from a regular stroke? Answers from Jerry W. Swanson, M.D. When ... brain, spinal cord or retina, which may cause stroke-like symptoms but does not damage brain cells ...

  11. Mobile Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryana, Bijan; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a country specific comparative mobile usability study is presented, using Iran and Turkey as the two chosen emerging/emergent nation exemplars of smartphone usage and adoption. In a focus group study, three mobile applications were selected by first-time users of smartphones...

  12. Mobile phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Almost the entire Norwegian population has cell phone. The usefulness of the cell phone is great, but can use a mobile phone to health or discomfort? How can exposure be reduced? NRPA follows research and provides advice on mobile phone use. (AG)

  13. Urban Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2015 NAF Symposium in Malmö, Sweden. The aim of the 2015 NAF Symposium “Urban Mobility – Architectures, Geographies and Social Space” was to facilitate a cross-disciplinary discussion on urban mobility in which the juxtaposition of different...

  14. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Kraywinkel, Klaus; Heidrich, Jan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Wagner, Markus; Berger, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. S...

  16. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2012-01-01

    Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke. Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention. Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001). Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

  17. World Stroke Organization Global Stroke Services Guidelines and Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Norrving, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention,...

  18. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...... of resource sharing takes a wider and deeper meaning, creating the foundations for a global real-time multidimensional resource pool, the underlying infrastructure for shareconomy. Above all, this is an inspiring book for anyone who is concerned about the future of wireless and mobile communications networks...

  19. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    In recent years, the social sciences have taken a “mobilities turn.” There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not “just happen.” Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and li......, the book asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities?...... that mobility is more than movement between point A and B. It explores how the movement of people, goods, information, and signs influences human understandings of self, other and the built environment. Moving towards a new understanding of the relationship between movement, interaction and environments...

  20. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary society is marked and defined by the ways in which mobile goods, bodies, vehicles, objects, and data are organized, moved and staged. On the backgound of the ‘mobilities turn’ (for short review paper on this see; Sheller 2011, Vannini 2010) this paper proposes a further development....... There is a need for research targeting the material, physical and design-oriented dimensions of the multiple mobilities from the local to the global. Despite its cross-disciplinary identity the ‘mobilities turn’ has not sufficiently capitalized from the potential in exploring issues of material design...... of life’ for billions of people in the everyday life. This paper is structured in three parts. After the general introduction we present the mobilities theory perspective of ‘staging mobilities’ and connects this to the empirical phenomenon of parking lots and their design. The paper ends in section three...