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Sample records for stroke mortality clinical

  1. Thirty-day stroke mortality and associated clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although stroke mortality in developing countries is more than 85%, the case fatality in Uganda is not known. Objective We determined 30 day case fatality, associated clinical and laboratory presentations among adult stroke patients admitted to Mulago Hospital. Design Prospective descriptive study. Setting Mulago national ...

  2. Stroke Mortality, Clinical Presentation and Day of Arrival: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. O'Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies report that acute stroke patients who present to the hospital on weekends have higher rates of 28-day mortality than similar patients who arrive during the week. However, how this association is related to clinical presentation and stroke type has not been systematically investigated. Methods and Results. We examined the association between day of arrival and 28-day mortality in 929 validated stroke events in the ARIC cohort from 1987–2004. Weekend arrival was defined as any arrival time from midnight Friday until midnight Sunday. Mortality was defined as all-cause fatal events from the day of arrival through the 28th day of followup. The presence or absence of thirteen stroke signs and symptoms were obtained through medical record review for each event. Binomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR; 95% CI for the association between weekend arrival and 28-day mortality for all stroke events and for stroke subtypes. The overall risk of 28-day mortality was 9.6% for weekday strokes and 10.1% for weekend strokes. In models controlling for patient demographics, clinical risk factors, and event year, weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day mortality (0.87; 0.51, 1.50. When stratified by stroke type, weekend arrival was not associated with increased odds of mortality for ischemic (1.17, 0.62, 2.23 or hemorrhagic (0.37; 0.11, 1.26 stroke patients. Conclusions. Presence or absence of thirteen signs and symptoms was similar for weekday patients and weekend patients when stratified by stroke type. Weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day all-cause mortality or differences in symptom presentation for strokes in this cohort.

  3. Risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates for stroke: evidence from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry (AuSCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Kilkenny, Monique F; Levi, Christopher R; Lannin, Natasha A; Thrift, Amanda G; Kim, Joosup; Grabsch, Brenda; Churilov, Leonid; Dewey, Helen M; Hill, Kelvin; Faux, Steven G; Grimley, Rohan; Castley, Helen; Hand, Peter J; Wong, Andrew; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Gill, Melissa; Crompton, Douglas; Middleton, Sandy; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-05-01

    Hospital data used to assess regional variability in disease management and outcomes, including mortality, lack information on disease severity. We describe variance between hospitals in 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs) for stroke, comparing models that include or exclude stroke severity as a covariate. Cohort design linking Australian Stroke Clinical Registry data with national death registrations. Multivariable models using recommended statistical methods for calculating 30-day RAMRs for hospitals, adjusted for demographic factors, ability to walk on admission, stroke type, and stroke recurrence. Australian hospitals providing at least 200 episodes of acute stroke care, 2009-2014. Hospital RAMRs estimated by different models. Changes in hospital rank order and funnel plots were used to explore variation in hospital-specific 30-day RAMRs; that is, RAMRs more than three standard deviations from the mean. In the 28 hospitals reporting at least 200 episodes of care, there were 16 218 episodes (15 951 patients; median age, 77 years; women, 46%; ischaemic strokes, 79%). RAMRs from models not including stroke severity as a variable ranged between 8% and 20%; RAMRs from models with the best fit, which included ability to walk and stroke recurrence as variables, ranged between 9% and 21%. The rank order of hospitals changed according to the covariates included in the models, particularly for those hospitals with the highest RAMRs. Funnel plots identified significant deviation from the mean overall RAMR for two hospitals, including one with borderline excess mortality. Hospital stroke mortality rates and hospital performance ranking may vary widely according to the covariates included in the statistical analysis.

  4. Combination of five clinical data as prognostic factors of mortality after ischemic stroke

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    Rizaldy Taslim Pinzon

    2017-04-01

    Age, high random blood glucose level, complications, metabolic encephalopathy risk and the use of ventilators are associated with mortality after ischemic stroke. The predictive mortality score can be used to assess the prognosis of patients with ischemic stroke.

  5. Predictors of stroke - associated mortality in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Tonduangu, K; Muyeno, K; Phanzu, M; Kebolo Baku, A; Muvova, D; Lelo, T; Odio, W; Lukoki, L; Bikangi Nkiabungu, F; Kilembe, M; Tshiamala, P; Katalay, L; Mwema, M; Muyembe, T

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the association of the stroke-related mortality with gender, age, ethnicity, social class, blood pressure, fibrinogen, selected clinical data and meteorologic parameters in hospitalized Africans. A series of 1032 consecutively hospitalized incident cases of acute stroke between 1987 and 1991 was studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to estimate the risk (odds ratio=OR) of stroke mortality for meteorologic parameters on the month before the accident onset and selected sociodemophysiological variables on the day of admission. The variables significantly associated with stroke mortality in multivariate analysis were male sex (OR= 2.3 [1.3 - 4.1]), low social class (OR= 2.0 [1.2 - 4.0]), migrant tribes (OR= 1.7 [1.5 - 1.8]), ischemic stroke (OR= 1.4 [1.2 - 1.6]), heart rate >=100 bpm (OR= 1.1 [1.0 - 1.2]), age > or =60 years (OR= 1.03 [1.01 - 1.06]), systolic blood pressure> 160 mmHg (OR= 1. 02 [1.01 - 1.03]), and fibrinogen > or =400 mg/dl (OR= 1.01 [1.002 - 1. 02]). However, diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg and global radiation< 340 Cal/cm(2)/day were significantly (p< 0.05) and inversely associated with stroke mortality. Our results indicate that male sex, older age, low social class, migration, ischemic stroke and higher baseline levels of heart rate, systolic blood pressure and fibrinogen are significant predictors of stroke mortality, but lower global radiation and higher diastolic blood pressure are inversely linked.

  6. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...

  7. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

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    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  8. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microbleeds, Mortality, and Stroke in Alzheimer Disease: The MISTRAL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedictus, Marije R; Prins, Niels D; Goos, Jeroen D C; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2015-05-01

    Microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared with the general elderly population. In addition, microbleeds have been found to predict mortality in AD. To investigate whether microbleeds in AD increase the risk for mortality, stroke (including intracerebral hemorrhage), and cardiovascular events. The MISTRAL (do MIcrobleeds predict STRoke in ALzheimer's disease) Study is a longitudinal cohort study within the memory clinic-based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. We selected all patients with AD with a baseline visit between January 2, 2002, and December 16, 2009, and microbleeds (n = 111) and matched those (1:2) for age, sex, and magnetic resonance imaging scanner to 222 patients with AD without microbleeds. After a minimal follow-up of 3 years, information on all-cause mortality, stroke-related mortality, and cardiovascular mortality was obtained between November 1, 2012, and May 1, 2014. In addition, we obtained information on the occurrence of incident stroke or transient ischemic attack, cardiovascular events, and nursing home admittance. Stroke-related mortality, incident stroke, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients had a mean (SD) age of 71.2 (7.8) years and 127 (42%) were female. Compared with having no microbleeds, microbleeds in lobar locations were associated with an increased risk for stroke-related mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 33.9; 95% CI, 2.5-461.7), whereas nonlobar microbleeds were associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR, 12.0; 95% CI, 3.2-44.7). In addition, lobar microbleeds were associated with an increased risk for incident stroke (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5-10.1) and nonlobar microbleeds with an increased risk for cardiovascular events (HR, 6.2; 95% CI, 1.5-25.0). Even higher risks for incident stroke and cardiovascular events were found in patients using antithrombotic medication. All 5 patients with an intracerebral hemorrhage had lobar microbleeds at baseline; 4 of them used antithrombotics

  10. Stroke mortality and its predictors in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Stroke mortality has been noted to be higher in blacks in biracial studies. There have been few studies on stroke mortality and its predictors in Nigeria. This study examines mortality of stroke and its predictors in a Northern Nigerian teaching hospital.

  11. Stroke mortality and its predictors in a Nigerian teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Stroke mortality has been noted to be higher in blacks in biracial studies. There have been few studies on stroke mortality and its predictors in Nigeria. This study examines mortality of stroke and its predictors in a Northern Nigerian teaching hospital.

  12. Polysomnographic indicators of mortality in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsaing, Laura B; Iversen, Helle K; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to assess polysomnographic indicators of increased mortality risk in patients with stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: We performed polysomnographies in 63 acute stroke/TIA patients. Mortality data were collected from a national database after...... a 19-37-month follow-up period. RESULTS: Of the 57 stroke and 6 TIA patients, 9 stroke patients died during follow-up. All nine had moderate or severe sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs). Binarily divided, the group with the highest apnea hypopnea index (AHI) had an almost 10-fold higher...... mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) 9.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.20-78.29; p = 0.033) compared to the patients with the lowest AHI. The patients with the longest versus shortest nocturnal wake time had a higher mortality (HR 8.78; 95 % CI 1.1-71.8; p = 0.0428). Lung disease increased mortality (HR 9...

  13. Proteinuria and clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke.

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    Kumai, Y; Kamouchi, M; Hata, J; Ago, T; Kitayama, J; Nakane, H; Sugimori, H; Kitazono, T

    2012-06-12

    The impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke is still not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate how CKD and its components, proteinuria and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), affect the clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke. The study subjects consisted of 3,778 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours of onset from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry. CKD was defined as proteinuria or low eGFR (Stroke Scale during hospitalization), in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score at discharge of 2 to 6). The effects of CKD, proteinuria, and eGFR on these outcomes were evaluated using a multiple logistic regression analysis. CKD was diagnosed in 1,320 patients (34.9%). In the multivariate analyses after adjusting for confounding factors, patients with CKD had significantly higher risks of neurologic deterioration, in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome (p relationship between the eGFR level and each outcome was found. CKD is an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Proteinuria independently contributes to the increased risks of neurologic deterioration, mortality, and poor functional outcome, but the eGFR may not be relevant to these outcomes.

  14. Incorporating Stroke Severity Into Hospital Measures of 30-Day Mortality After Ischemic Stroke Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Wang, Yongfei; Qin, Li; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C; Cormier, Nicole; Dorsey, Karen; McNamara, Robert L; Suter, Lisa G; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bernheim, Susannah M

    2017-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services publicly reports a hospital-level stroke mortality measure that lacks stroke severity risk adjustment. Our objective was to describe novel measures of stroke mortality suitable for public reporting that incorporate stroke severity into risk adjustment. We linked data from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke registry with Medicare fee-for-service claims data to develop the measures. We used logistic regression for variable selection in risk model development. We developed 3 risk-standardized mortality models for patients with acute ischemic stroke, all of which include the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score: one that includes other risk variables derived only from claims data (claims model); one that includes other risk variables derived from claims and clinical variables that could be obtained from electronic health record data (hybrid model); and one that includes other risk variables that could be derived only from electronic health record data (electronic health record model). The cohort used to develop and validate the risk models consisted of 188 975 hospital admissions at 1511 hospitals. The claims, hybrid, and electronic health record risk models included 20, 21, and 9 risk-adjustment variables, respectively; the C statistics were 0.81, 0.82, and 0.79, respectively (as compared with the current publicly reported model C statistic of 0.75); the risk-standardized mortality rates ranged from 10.7% to 19.0%, 10.7% to 19.1%, and 10.8% to 20.3%, respectively; the median risk-standardized mortality rate was 14.5% for all measures; and the odds of mortality for a high-mortality hospital (+1 SD) were 1.51, 1.52, and 1.52 times those for a low-mortality hospital (-1 SD), respectively. We developed 3 quality measures that demonstrate better discrimination than the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' existing stroke mortality measure, adjust for

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY OF STROKE IN YOUNG

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    Kumbha Thulasi Ram

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRIDUCTION : Stroke is one of the important causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Incidence of stroke steadily increases with age. Experts are concerned of the emerging stroke epidemic in India. Stroke affecting the young has potentially devastating consequence son the individual and his family. Certain risk factors are unique to the young. I t needs more studies for identification and modification of risk factors. The study aims to evaluate clinical features, risk factors, etiology and mortality of stroke in young patients. METHODS : 74 young patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in this study. A detailed history was taken from young stroke patients, systemic examination and required investigations were done. Data was collected in standardized proforma and analysed. RESULTS: Stroke in young accounts for 7.95% of stroke cases of all age groups. The mean age of the patients was 34.66 ± 7.48 years. Among 74 patients, 47(63.51% were male and 27(36.49% were female. Seizures, decreased consciousness, speech involvement and motor deficit were observed in 33.78%, 44.59%, 22.97% and 100% of cases respectively. 82.43% patients had ischemic and 17.57% patients had hemorrhagic stroke. Among ischemic stroke, large artery atherosclerosis was 16.21%, tuberculous meningoencephalitis with vasculitis was 16.21%, lacunar stroke was 10.81%, CVT was 10.81% and cardio embolic stroke was 6.76%. Smoking (59.45%, alcoholism (58.10%, hypertension (43.24%, coronary artery disease (8.10%, diabetes mellitus (10.81%, elevated total cholesterol (25.67%, elevated low density lipo proteins (22.97%, elevated triglycerides (27.02% and low HDL (22.97% were important risk factors. Carotid doppler was abnormal in 9.45% of patients. 6.76% patients had mitral stenosis in echocardiogram. Low protein C and protein S were found in 1.35% of patients. Eight (10.81% patients died during the hospital stay. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The major risk

  16. Mortality study for a decade: ischemic stroke in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier J. García Zacarías

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are among the top three causes of death in Cuba and the world, about 80 % of these patients belong to Ischemic Stroke. The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical and developmental profile of patients who died of Ischemic Stroke. A descriptive, prospective research, cross- sectional study was made, the sample included all deaths from ischemic stroke at the University Hospital "Camilo Cienfuegos" Sancti Spiritus, between January 1st, 2001 and December 31, 2010, and persons over 60 years of age with necropsy performed. Atherothrombotic stroke was the most frequent category, the highest mortality rates were observed in persons over 80 years of age and in females, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and transient ischemic attack were the main significant medical history; most patients were admitted in the stroke unit and died in Middle Progressive Care, cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension and hypostatic bronchopne umonia were complications and specific main causes of most frequent death. Value of cerebral edema and hypostatic bronchopneumonia as clinical complications and causes of death in patients investigated is confirmed.

  17. National Trends in Patients Hospitalized for Stroke and Stroke Mortality in France, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoffre, Camille; de Peretti, Christine; Gabet, Amélie; Grimaud, Olivier; Woimant, France; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Olié, Valérie

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men in France. In young adults (ie, stroke was observed at a local scale between 1985 and 2011. After the implementation of the 2010 to 2014 National Stroke Action Plan, this study investigates national trends in patients hospitalized by stroke subtypes, in-hospital mortality, and stroke mortality between 2008 and 2014. Hospitalization data were extracted from the French national hospital discharge databases and mortality data from the French national medical causes of death database. Time trends were tested using a Poisson regression model. From 2008 to 2014, the age-standardized rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke increased by 14.3% in patients stroke was stable (+2.0%), irrespective of age and sex. The proportion of patients hospitalized in stroke units substantially increased. In-hospital mortality decreased by 17.1% in patients with ischemic stroke. From 2008 to 2013, stroke mortality decreased, except for women between 45 and 64 years old and for people aged ≥85 years. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors and improved stroke management may explain the increase in the rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke. The decrease observed for in-hospital stroke mortality may be because of recent improvements in acute-phase management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    higher mortality risk (HR, 1.564; 95% CI, 1.441-1.696). The increased risk was, however, time-dependent; initially, risk was 4-fold, after 1 week it was 2.5-fold, and after 3 weeks it was 1.5-fold. After 3 months stroke type did not correlate to mortality. Conclusion-Strokes are generally more severe......Background and Purpose-Stroke patients with hemorrhagic (HS) and ischemic strokes were compared with regard to stroke severity, mortality, and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods-A registry started in 2001, with the aim of registering all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds...... information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  19. Preadmission Use of Glucocorticoids and 30-Day Mortality After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Schmidt, Morten; Dekkers, Olaf M; Christiansen, Christian F; Pedersen, Lars; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic impact of glucocorticoids on stroke mortality remains uncertain. We, therefore, examined whether preadmission use of glucocorticoids is associated with short-term mortality after ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study using medical registries in Denmark. We identified all patients with a first-time inpatient diagnosis of stroke between 2004 and 2012. We categorized glucocorticoid use as current use (last prescription redemption ≤90 days before admission), former use, and nonuse. Current use was further classified as new or long-term use. We used Cox regression to compute 30-day mortality rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), controlling for confounders. We identified 100 042 patients with a first-time stroke. Of these, 83 735 patients had ischemic stroke, 11 779 had ICH, and 4528 had SAH. Absolute mortality risk was higher for current users compared with nonusers for ischemic stroke (19.5% versus 10.2%), ICH (46.5% versus 34.4%), and SAH (35.0% versus 23.2%). For ischemic stroke, the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio was increased among current users compared with nonusers (1.58, 95% CI: 1.46-1.71), driven by the effect of glucocorticoids among new users (1.80, 95% CI: 1.62-1.99). Current users had a more modest increase in the adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratio for hemorrhagic stroke (1.26, 95% CI: 1.09-1.45 for ICH and 1.40, 95% CI: 1.01-1.93 for SAH) compared with nonusers. Former use was not substantially associated with mortality. Preadmission use of glucocorticoids was associated with increased 30-day mortality among patients with ischemic stroke, ICH, and SAH. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The influence of neighborhood unemployment on mortality after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrath, Michael; Wellmann, Jürgen; Diederichs, Claudia; Binse, Lisa; Kalic, Marianne; Heuschmann, Peter Ulrich; Berger, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of neighborhood characteristics on mortality after stroke. Aim of our study was to analyze the influence of district unemployment as indicator of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES-NH) on poststroke mortality, and to compare these results with the mortality in the underlying general population. Our analyses involve 2 prospective cohort studies from the city of Dortmund, Germany. In the Dortmund Stroke Register (DOST), consecutive stroke patients (N=1883) were recruited from acute care hospitals. In the Dortmund Health Study (DHS), a random general population sample was drawn (n=2291; response rate 66.9%). Vital status was ascertained in the city's registration office and information on district unemployment was obtained from the city's statistical office. We performed multilevel survival analyses to examine the association between district unemployment and mortality. The association between neighborhood unemployment and mortality was weak and not statistically significant in the stroke cohort. Only stroke patients exposed to the highest district unemployment (fourth quartile) had slightly higher mortality risks. In the general population sample, higher district unemployment was significantly associated with higher mortality following a social gradient. After adjustment for education, health-related behavior and morbidity was made the strength of this association decreased. The impact of SES-NH on mortality was different for stroke patients and the general population. Differences in the association between SES-NH and mortality may be partly explained by disease-related characteristics of the stroke cohort such as homogeneous lifestyles, similar morbidity profiles, medical factors, and old age. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stroke outcome in clinical trial patients deriving from different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Atula, Sari; Bath, Philip M W; Grotta, James; Hacke, Werner; Lyden, Patrick; Marler, John R; Sacco, Ralph L; Lees, Kennedy R

    2009-01-01

    Stroke incidence and outcome vary widely within and across geographical locations. We examined whether differences in index stroke severity, stroke risk factors, mortality, and stroke outcome across geographical locations remain after adjusting for case mix. We analyzed 3284 patients from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA). We used logistic regression to examine the incidence of mild index stroke, functional, and neurological outcomes after accounting for age, medical history, year of trial recruitment, and initial stroke severity in the functional and neurological outcome analyses. We examined mortality between geographical regions using a Cox proportional hazards model, accounting for age, initial stroke severity, medical history, and year of trial recruitment. Patients enrolled in the USA and Canada had the most severe index strokes. Those recruited in Austria and Switzerland had the best functional and neurological outcomes at 90 days (P<0.05), whereas those enrolled in Germany had the worst functional outcome at 90 days (P=0.013). Patients enrolled in Austria, Switzerland, Belgium, Netherlands, Finland, Germany, Greece, Israel, Spain, and Portugal had a significantly better survival rate when compared with those enrolled in USA and Canada. Patients enrolled in trials after 1998 had more severe index strokes, with no significant difference in outcome compared with those enrolled before 1998. We identified regional variations in index stroke severity, outcome, and mortality for patients enrolled in ischemic stroke clinical trials over the past 13 years that were not fully explained by case mix. Index stroke severity was greater in patients enrolled after 1998, with no significant improvement in outcomes compared to those enrolled before 1998.

  2. Neighborhood cohesion is associated with reduced risk of stroke mortality.

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    Clark, Cari Jo; Guo, Hongfei; Lunos, Scott; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Beck, Todd; Evans, Denis A; Mendes de Leon, Carlos; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2011-05-01

    Greater social cohesion is related to lower rates of coronary heart disease, but its relation to stroke risk is unstudied. This study examined whether neighborhood social cohesion was protective against stroke mortality and incidence. Data come from 5789 participants (60% female; 62% black; mean age, 74.7 years) in a longitudinal study of chronic diseases in the elderly. Stroke mortality, ascertained through December 31, 2007, was verified through the National Death Index; 186 stroke deaths were identified in 11 years of follow-up. Stroke incidence was determined in a subset (N=3816) with linkage to Medicare claims files; 701 first-ever strokes were identified. Cohesion was measured by 6 items assessing frequency of contact and social interactions with neighbors; items were z-scored and averaged. Individual scores were averaged across 82 census block groups, forming a neighborhood-level measure of social cohesion. Marginal Cox proportional hazard models tested the association of neighborhood-level cohesion with stroke mortality and incidence. Each 1-point increase in cohesion related to a 53% reduced risk of stroke mortality (hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.90), adjusting for relevant covariates, including sociodemographics, known stroke risk factors, and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status. A race×cohesion interaction (P=0.04) revealed cohesion was protective in whites (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.67) but not blacks (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.35 to 3.86). Cohesion was unrelated to stroke incidence (P>0.5). Neighborhood-level social cohesion was independently protective against stroke mortality. Research is needed to further examine observed race differences and pathways by which cohesion is health-protective.

  3. Fraction of stroke mortality attributable to alcohol consumption in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y E, Razvodovsky

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is an international health problem with high associated human and economic costs. The mortality rate from stroke in Russia is one of the highest in the world. Risk factors identification is therefore a high priority from the public health perspective. Epidemiological evidence suggests that binge drinking is an important determinant of high stroke mortality rate in Russia. The aim of the present study was to estimate the premature stroke mortality attributable to alcohol abuse in Russia on the basis of aggregate-level data of stroke mortality and alcohol consumption. Age-standardized sex-specific male and female stroke mortality data for the period 1980-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA time series analysis. The results of the analysis suggest that 26.8% of all male stroke deaths and 18.4% female stroke deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. The estimated alcohol-attributable fraction for men ranged from 16.2% (75+ age group) to 57,5% (30-44 age group) and for women from 21.7% (60-74 age group) and 43.5% (30- 44 age group). The outcomes of this study provide support for the hypothesis that alcohol is an important contributor to the high stroke mortality rate in Russian Federation. Therefore prevention of alcohol-attributable harm should be a major public health priority in Russia. Given the distribution of alcohol-related stroke deaths, interventions should be focused on the young and middle-aged men and women.

  4. Microbleeds, Mortality, and Stroke in Alzheimer Disease The MISTRAL Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedictus, M.R.; Prins, N.D.; Goos, J.D.C.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared with the general elderly population. In addition, microbleeds have been found to predict mortality in AD. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether microbleeds in AD increase the risk for mortality, stroke (including

  5. Identification of stroke mimics among clinically diagnosed acute strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiyatorn, Lojana; Saksornchai, Pichaya; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch

    2013-09-01

    Stroke is a clinically syndrome of a sudden onset of neurological deficit in a vascular cause. Stroke mimics is the non-vascular disorders with stroke-like clinical symptoms. It is important to distinguish true stroke from mimics since treatment plan may differ To determine the incidence of the stroke mimics and identify their etiologies. All non-contrast head CT of the patients with clinically diagnosed stroke who immediately received imaging upon arrival at the emergency department of the university hospital were retrospectively reviewed in 12-month period between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Medical records, laboratory results, MRI, and 6-month clinical follow-up records were reviewed for final diagnosis. Seven hundred four patients were included in this study, including 363 (51.5%) men and 341 (48.5%) women with range in age from 24 to 108 years. Amongst those, 417 (59.2%) were ischemic stroke, 80 (11.40%) were hemorrhagic stroke, 186 (26.4%) were stroke-mimics, and 21 (3%) were inconclusive. The etiologies among stroke-mimics were metabolic/intoxication (35, 18.8%), sepsis (28, 15.0%), seizure (21, 11.3%), syncope (20, 10.8%), subdural hemorrhage (14, 7.5%), vertigo (11, 6.0%), brain tumor (10, 5.30%), central nervous system infection (5, 2.7%), others (26, 14.0%), and unspecified (16, 8.6%). Incidence rates and etiologies of the stroke mimics were similar to the western reports. However the frequency of each mimic was not.

  6. The site of embolization related to infarct size, oedema and clinical outcome in a rat stroke model - further translational stroke research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten; Rasmussen, Rune S; Johansen, Flemming F

    2010-01-01

    Reliable models are essential for translational stroke research to study the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke in an effort to find therapies that may ultimately reduce oedema, infarction and mortality in the clinic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between the site...... of arterial embolization and the subsequent oedema, infarction and clinical outcome in a rat embolic stroke model....

  7. Co-morbidities and mortality associated with intracranial bleeds and ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Jason; Natalwala, Ammar; Mann, Jake; Uppal, Hardeep; Mummadi, Sangha Mitra; Haque, Amirul; Aziz, Amir; Potluri, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and acquired disability; however, there has been no comprehensive comparison of co-morbid risk factors between different stroke subtypes. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors and mortality for subdural haematoma (SDH), subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We compiled a database of all patients admitted with these conditions to a large teaching hospital in Birmingham, United Kingdom during the period 2000-2007 using the International Classification of Disease (ICD) 10th revision codes. Generalised linear models were constructed to calculate relative risks (RRs) associated with co-morbidities. In total, 4804 patients were admitted with diagnoses of SDH (1004), SAH (807), ischaemic stroke (2579) and haemorrhagic stroke (414). Patients with SDH were less likely to have pneumonia (0.492, 95% CI, 0.330-0.734; p ischaemic heart disease (0.56, 95% CI, 0.40-0.79; p ischaemic stroke. Epilepsy was positively associated with ischaemic stroke (1.94, 95% CI, 1.36-2.76; p ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes (41% and 40% respectively, vs. 73% in SDH and 64% in SAH; p < 0.001). These findings may guide clinical risk stratification, and improve the prognostic information given to patients.

  8. Mortality and use of psychotropic medication in patients with stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Baandrup, Lone; Iversen, Helle K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study sought to describe whether psychotropic medication may have long-term side effects in patients with stroke compared with controls. SETTING: Use of national register data from healthcare services were identified from the Danish National Patient Registry in Denmark. Information...... about psychotropic medication use was obtained from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate all-cause mortality in relation to the use of benzodiazepines, antidepressants and antipsychotics in patients with stroke and matched controls. PARTICIPANTS: Patients...... with a diagnosis of stroke and either no drug use or preindex use of psychotropic medication (n=49,968) and compared with control subjects (n=86,100) matched on age, gender, marital status and community location. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE: All-cause mortality. RESULTS: All-cause mortality was higher in patients...

  9. Clinical Characteristics of Stroke Occurring while Bathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Oshima, Takeo; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Mayanagi, Keita; Imai, Akira

    2017-07-01

    Stroke can occur during any human activity. Although cardiac arrests or drowning accidents while bathing have been studied extensively, there are few studies focusing on stroke occurring while bathing. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical characteristics of stroke occurring while bathing and the association between stroke and drowning accidents. Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2015 on 1939 patients with stroke (1224 cerebral infarctions [CIs], 505 intracerebral hemorrhages [ICHs], and 210 subarachnoid hemorrhages [SAHs]) were reviewed to identify patients who sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing-related strokes to strokes occurring during other activities was evaluated. Moreover, the demographics of these 2 groups were compared in each stroke type. Among the 1939 patients, 78 (CI, 32; ICH, 28; and SAH, 18) sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing to other activities in the SAH group was the highest (8.6%), followed by the ICH group (5.5%), whereas that in the CI group was the lowest (2.6%). Regardless of stroke type, only a minority of patients were found to have collapsed inside the bathtub. The higher ratio of bathing in hemorrhagic strokes may indicate that there is a small risk of hemorrhagic stroke while bathing in vulnerable subjects. This retrospective study did not establish a causal relationship between bathing and stroke nor identify risk factors, which means that future prospective studies are warranted. The finding that the great majority of bathing-related stroke patients were found to have collapsed outside the bathtub suggests that the involvement of stroke in drowning accidents in the bathtub may be small. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tmbul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  11. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tombul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Odabas, F.O.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+9-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  12. Pediatric Stroke: Clinical Findings and Radiological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on radiological approach in pediatric stroke including both ischemic stroke (Arterial Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis and hemorrhagic stroke. Etiopathology and main clinical findings are examined as well. Magnetic Resonance Imaging could be considered as the first-choice diagnostic exam, offering a complete diagnostic set of information both in the discrimination between ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and in the identification of underlying causes. In addition, Magnetic Resonance vascular techniques supply further information about cerebral arterial and venous circulation. Computed Tomography, for its limits and radiation exposure, should be used only when Magnetic Resonance is not available and on unstable patients.

  13. Development, expansion, and use of a stroke clinical trials resource for novel exploratory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Bath, Philip; Brady, Marian; Davis, Stephen; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Donnan, Geoffrey; Fisher, Marc; Hacke, Werner; Hanley, Daniel F; Luby, Marie; Tsivgoulis, G; Wahlgren, Nils; Warach, Steven; Lees, Kennedy R

    2012-02-01

    Analysis of reliable registry data can direct future research to influence clinical care. Data from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive have been used to test hypotheses and inform trial design. We sought to expand Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into a broader stroke resource with new opportunities for research and international collaboration. Using procedures initially developed for an acute stroke trial archive, we invited trialists to lodge data on rehabilitation, secondary prevention, intracerebral haemorrhage, imaging, and observational stroke studies. We have extended Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into six subsections: Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Acute (n = 28 190 patients' data), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab (n = 10 194), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 1829), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Imaging (n = 1300), and Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus (n = 6573). Enrollment continues, with commitments for the contribution of six further trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, 13 trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab, and one registry to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus. Data on age, type of stroke, medical history, outcomes by modified Rankin scale and Barthel Index (BI), mortality, and adverse events are available for analyses. The Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive network encourages the development of young investigators and provides opportunities for international peer review and collaboration. Application of the original Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive concepts beyond acute stroke trials can extend the value of clinical research at low cost, without threatening commercial or intellectual property interests. This delivers valuable research output to inform

  14. Rural versus urban academic hospital mortality following stroke in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Richard; Bussières, Sylvain; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Turcotte, Stéphane; Légaré, France; Plant, Jeff; Poitras, Julien; Archambault, Patrick M; Dupuis, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death in Canada. While stroke care has improved dramatically over the last decade, outcomes following stroke among patients treated in rural hospitals have not yet been reported in Canada. To describe variation in 30-day post-stroke in-hospital mortality rates between rural and urban academic hospitals in Canada. We also examined 24/7 in-hospital access to CT scanners and selected services in rural hospitals. We included Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) data on adjusted 30-day in-hospital mortality following stroke from 2007 to 2011 for all acute care hospitals in Canada excluding Quebec and the Territories. We categorized rural hospitals as those located in rural small towns providing 24/7 emergency physician coverage with inpatient beds. Urban hospitals were academic centres designated as Level 1 or 2 trauma centres. We computed descriptive data on local access to a CT scanner and other services and compared mean 30-day adjusted post-stroke mortality rates for rural and urban hospitals to the overall Canadian rate. A total of 286 rural hospitals (3.4 million emergency department (ED) visits/year) and 24 urban hospitals (1.5 million ED visits/year) met inclusion criteria. From 2007 to 2011, 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke were significantly higher in rural than in urban hospitals and higher than the Canadian average for every year except 2008 (rural average range = 18.26 to 21.04 and urban average range = 14.11 to 16.78). Only 11% of rural hospitals had a CT-scanner, 1% had MRI, 21% had in-hospital ICU, 94% had laboratory and 92% had basic x-ray facilities. Rural hospitals in Canada had higher 30-day in-hospital mortality rates following stroke than urban academic hospitals and the Canadian average. Rural hospitals also have very limited local access to CT scanners and ICUs. These rural/urban discrepancies are cause for concern in the context of Canada's universal health care system.

  15. Long-term mortality after stroke among adults aged 18 to 50 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Arntz, R.M.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Long-term data on mortality after first-ever stroke in adults aged 18 through 50 years are scarce and usually restricted to ischemic stroke. Moreover, expected mortality not related to first-ever stroke is not taken in account. OBJECTIVES To investigate long-term mortality and cause of

  16. Assessment scales in stroke: clinimetric and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison JK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer K Harrison,1 Katherine S McArthur,2 Terence J Quinn21Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: As stroke care has developed, there has been a need to robustly assess the efficacy of interventions both at the level of the individual stroke survivor and in the context of clinical trials. To describe stroke-survivor recovery meaningfully, more sophisticated measures are required than simple dichotomous end points, such as mortality or stroke recurrence. As stroke is an exemplar disabling long-term condition, measures of function are well suited as outcome assessment. In this review, we will describe functional assessment scales in stroke, concentrating on three of the more commonly used tools: the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index. We will discuss the strengths, limitations, and application of these scales and use the scales to highlight important properties that are relevant to all assessment tools. We will frame much of this discussion in the context of "clinimetric" analysis. As they are increasingly used to inform stroke-survivor assessments, we will also discuss some of the commonly used quality-of-life measures. A recurring theme when considering functional assessment is that no tool suits all situations. Clinicians and researchers should chose their assessment tool based on the question of interest and the evidence base around clinimetric properties.Keywords: Barthel Index, clinimetrics, clinical trial, disability, methodology, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes Health Stroke Scale, scales, stroke, outcomes

  17. Association of dialysis with in-hospital disability progression and mortality in community-onset stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Tomoko; Hanafusa, Norio; Yasunaga, Hideo; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2018-02-22

    End-stage renal disease is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, but the effect on post-stroke clinical outcomes has not been thoroughly investigated. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, which includes administrative claims and discharge abstract data, we examined the association between risk factors including dialysis therapy and in-hospital disability progression or mortality in patients with community-onset stroke. We extracted data of patients aged ≥20 years old who were admitted to the hospital within 3 days after onset of stroke between July 2010 and March 2013. The disability level was divided into modified Rankin Scale (mRS) 0-1, 2-3, 4-5, and 6 (death). Disability progression was defined as an increase in disability level. Odds ratios for in-hospital disability progression and mortality were calculated using logistic regression models. Of 435,403 patients, 7,562 (1.7%) received dialysis therapy. The median length of stay was 21 and 20 days for patients with and without dialysis, respectively. During the hospital stay, disability progressed in 100,402 (23.1%) patients and 45,919 (10.5%) died. Patients on dialysis had a higher prevalence of disability progression (26.8%) and mortality (13.1%) compared to those without dialysis (23.0% and 10.5%, respectively). Dialysis was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital disability progression (odds ratio, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-1.66) and mortality (odds ratio 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-1.84). These risks were comparable among subtypes of stroke. Dialysis was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital disability progression and mortality among patients with community-onset stroke, regardless of stroke subtype. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. High Mortality among 30-Day Readmission after Stroke: Predictors and Etiologies of Readmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amre M. Nouh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough some risk factors for stroke readmission have been reported, the mortality risk is unclear. We sought to evaluate etiologies and predictors of 30-day readmissions and determine the associated mortality risk.MethodsThis is a retrospective case–control study evaluating 1,544 patients admitted for stroke (hemorrhagic, ischemic, or TIA from January 2013 to December 2014. Of these, 134 patients readmitted within 30 days were identified as cases; 1,418 other patients, with no readmissions were identified as controls. Patients readmitted for hospice or elective surgery were excluded. An additional 248 patients deceased on index admission were included for only a comparison of mortality rates. Factors explored included socio-demographic characteristics, clinical comorbidities, stroke characteristics, and length of stay. Chi-square test of proportions and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify independent predictors of 30-day stroke readmissions. Mortality rates were compared for index admission and readmission and among readmission diagnoses.ResultsAmong the 1,544 patients in the main analysis, 67% of index stroke admissions were ischemic, 22% hemorrhagic, and 11% TIA. The 30-day readmission rate was 8.7%. The most common etiologies for readmission were infection (30%, recurrent stroke and TIA (20%, and cardiac complications (14%. Significantly higher proportion of those readmitted for recurrent strokes and TIAs presented within the first week (p = 0.039 and had a shorter index admission length of stay (p = 0.027. Risk factors for 30-day readmission included age >75 (p = 0.02, living in a facility prior to index stroke (p = 0.01, history of prior stroke (p = 0.03, diabetes (p = 0.03, chronic heart failure (p ≤ 0.001, atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03, index admission to non-neurology service (p < 0.01, and discharge to other than home (p < 0.01. On multivariate analysis, index

  19. Post-stroke seizures are clinically underestimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Carla; Martins, Hugo; Peralta, Ana Rita; Casimiro, Carlos; Morgado, Carlos; Franco, Ana Catarina; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Canhão, Patrícia; Pinho E Melo, Teresa; Paiva, Teresa; Ferro, José M

    2017-09-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is the leading cause of epilepsy in adults, although post-stroke seizures reported frequency is variable and few studies used EEG in their identification. To describe and compare EEG and clinical epileptic manifestations frequency in patients with an anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. Prospective study of acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients, consecutively admitted to a Stroke Unit over 24 months and followed-up for 1 year. All patients underwent standardized clinical and diagnostic assessment. Seizure occurrence was clinically evaluated during hospitalization and by a telephone interview at 6 months and a clinical appointment at 12 months after stroke. Video-EEG was performed in the first 72 h (1st EEG), daily after the 1st EEG for the first 7 days after the stroke, or later if neurological worsening, at discharge, and at 12 months. 151 patients were included (112 men) with a mean age of 67.4 (11.9) years. In the 1st year after stroke, 38 patients (25.2%) had an epileptic seizure. During hospitalization, 27 patients (17.9%) had epileptiform activity (interictal or ictal) in the EEG, 7 (25.9%) of them electrographic seizures. During the first week after stroke, 22 (14.6%) patients had a seizure and 4 (2.6%) non-convulsive status epilepticus criteria. Five (22.7%) acute symptomatic seizures were exclusively electrographic. At least one remote symptomatic seizure occurred in 23 (16%) patients. In the first 7 days after stroke, more than one-fifth of patients with seizures had exclusively electrographic seizures. Without a systematic neurophysiological evaluation the frequency of post-stroke seizures are clinically underestimated.

  20. Ischemic stroke mortality tendency (2000-2009) and prognostic factors. ICTUS Study-Extremadura (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Redondo, F J; Consuegra-Sánchez, L; Ramírez-Moreno, J M; Lozano, L; Escudero, V; Fernández-Bergés, D

    2013-05-01

    Mortality due to stroke is high in our setting. However, we do not know its magnitude and course in a recent decade. Thus, we have assessed the global inhospital mortality and that at 1 year of stroke in patients seen in a regional hospital as well as its prognostic factors. A one-year follow-up historical cohort study was performed of patients admitted at Don Benito-Villanueva de la Serena Regional Hospital (Badajoz) with diagnosis of ischemic stroke (1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009). Epidemiological, clinical data all cause death information were collected. A total of 2.228 patients (50.8% male), mean age 71 (SD 10) years were recruited. In-hospital mortality rate was 15.3% and mortality rate at 1 year was 16.9%, with no significant changes during the 10-year study period. Risk factors for greater in-hospital mortality were age, previous renal and heart failure and not performing diagnostic tests. Factors associated with 1-year all-cause mortality were age, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation and also not performing diagnostic tests. During the study, use of diagnostic tests and treatment with statin, heparin and antihypertensive medication on discharge increased. Patients admitted due to ischemic stroke, in a regional hospital presented a 1 year mortality rate of 29.6%. This tendency did not improve during the 10-year study period. Mortality was associated to greater age, comorbidities and not performing diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Survival and clinical outcome of dogs with ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Toft, Nils; Westrup, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate survival time, possible predictors of survival and clinical outcome in dogs with ischaemic stroke. A retrospective study of dogs with a previous diagnosis of ischaemic stroke diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed....... The association between survival and the hypothesised risk factors was examined using univariable exact logistic regression. Survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Twenty-two dogs were identified. Five dogs (23%) died within the first 30days of the stroke event. Median survival in 30-day...... survivors was 505days. Four dogs (18%) were still alive by the end of the study. Right-sided lesions posed a significantly increased risk of mortality with a median survival time in dogs with right-sided lesions of 24days vs. 602days in dogs with left sided lesions (P=0.006). Clinical outcome was considered...

  2. Epidemiology of stroke in The Netherlands from 1972 to 1994: the end of the decline in stroke mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, J. B.; Limburg, M.; Kleijnen, J.; Bonsel, G. J.; Tijssen, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, stroke was responsible for the death of 4,994 men and 7,601 women in the Netherlands, corresponding to 7.5% of all deaths in men and 11.4% in women. Age-adjusted stroke mortality declined by 39% for men and by 45% for women between 1972 and 1994. However, the decline in mortality levelled

  3. Readmission, mortality, and first-year medical costs after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Chang, Ku-Chou; Huang, Yu-Ching; Hung, Jen-Wen; Chiu, Hsien-Hsueh Elley; Chen, Jin-Jong; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and mortality in Taiwan, resulting in a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. The purpose of this study was to characterize disease burden by evaluating readmissions, mortality, and medical cost during the first year after acute stroke under the National Health Insurance (NHI) program. This retrospective cohort study extracted information about patients hospitalized with acute stroke from claims data of 200,000 randomly sampled NHI enrollees in Taiwan, with a 1-year follow-up duration. The incidence of the first-year adverse events (AEs) indicated by readmissions or mortality, and the amount of the first-year medical cost (FYMC) were assessed with predictive factors explored. Additionally, we also estimated the cost per life and life-year saved. There were 2368 first-ever stroke patients in our study, including those with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) 3.3%, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) 17.9%, ischemic stroke (IS) 49.8%, and transient ischemic attack/other ill-defined cerebrovascular diseases (TIA/unspecified) 29.0%; each stroke type was identified with an all-cause AE of 59.0%, 63.0%, 48.6%, and 46.8%, respectively. Readmissions were mainly because of acute recurrent stroke or the late effects of previous stroke, respiratory disease/infections, heart/circulatory disease, and diseases of the digestive system. Advanced age, hemorrhagic stroke type, respiratory distress/infections, and greater comorbidities were predictive of increased AE risk. Admission to neurology/rehabilitation wards, undertaking neurosurgery, or use of inpatient/outpatient rehabilitation was less likely to incur AEs. Initial hospitalization, readmission, and ambulatory care constituted 44%, 29%, and 27%, respectively, of FYMC with the initial length of stay being the most reliable predictor. The FYMCs were NT $217,959, $246,358, $168,003, and $122,084 for SAH, ICH, IS, and TIA/unspecified, respectively. The cost per life saved were estimated

  4. Survival and clinical outcome of dogs with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredal, H; Toft, N; Westrup, U; Motta, L; Gideon, P; Arlien-Søborg, P; Skerritt, G C; Berendt, M

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate survival time, possible predictors of survival and clinical outcome in dogs with ischaemic stroke. A retrospective study of dogs with a previous diagnosis of ischaemic stroke diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. The association between survival and the hypothesised risk factors was examined using univariable exact logistic regression. Survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Twenty-two dogs were identified. Five dogs (23%) died within the first 30days of the stroke event. Median survival in 30-day survivors was 505days. Four dogs (18%) were still alive by the end of the study. Right-sided lesions posed a significantly increased risk of mortality with a median survival time in dogs with right-sided lesions of 24days vs. 602days in dogs with left sided lesions (P=0.006). Clinical outcome was considered excellent in seven of 17 (41%) 30-day survivors. Another seven 30-day survivors experienced new acute neurological signs within 6-17months of the initial stroke event; in two of those cases a new ischaemic stroke was confirmed by MRI. In conclusion, dogs with ischaemic stroke have a fair to good prognosis in terms of survival and clinical outcome. However, owners should be informed of the risk of acute death within 30days and of the possibility of new neurological events in survivors. Mortality was increased in dogs with right-sided lesions in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Meta-Analysis of Perioperative Stroke and Mortality in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Aditya; Thiagarajan, Karthy; Van Ham, Raymond; Gleason, Thomas G; Mulukutla, Suresh; Schindler, John T; Jeevanantham, Vinodh; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a rapidly evolving safe method with decreasing incidence of perioperative stroke. There is a void in literature concerning the impact of stroke after TAVI in predicting 30-day stroke-related mortality. The primary aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether perioperative stroke increases risk of stroke-related mortality after TAVI. Online databases, using relevant keywords, and additional related records were searched to retrieve articles involving TAVI and stroke after TAVI. Data were extracted from the finalized studies and analyzed to generate a summary odds ratio (OR) of stroke-related mortality after TAVI. The stroke rate and stroke-related mortality rate in the total patient population were 3.07% (893 of 29,043) and 12.27% (252 of 2,053), respectively. The all-cause mortality rate was 7.07% (2,053 of 29,043). Summary OR of stroke-related mortality after TAVI was estimated to be 6.45 (95% confidence interval 3.90 to 10.66, p York Heart Association class III/IV status, previous stroke, valve type, and implantation route. All failed to exhibit any significant associations with the OR. In conclusion, perioperative strokes after TAVI are associated with >6 times greater risk of 30-day stroke-related mortality. Transapical TAVI is not associated with increased stroke-related mortality in patients who suffer from perioperative stroke. Preventative measures need to be taken to alleviate the elevated rates of stroke after TAVI and subsequent direct mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Post-Stroke Mortality, Stroke Severity, and Preadmission Antipsychotic Medicine Use – A Population-Based Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Larsen, Karen Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: It has been suggested that antipsychotic medication may be neuroprotective and may reduce post-stroke mortality, but studies are few and ambiguous. We aimed to investigate the post-stroke effects of preadmission antipsychotic use. Methods: We conducted a nationwide......, population-based cohort study of 81,143 persons admitted with stroke in Denmark from 2003–2010. Using Danish health care databases, we extracted data on preadmission use of antipsychotics and confounding factors. We examined the association between current, former, and never use of antipsychotics and stroke...... severity, length of hospital stay, and 30-day post-stroke mortality using logistic regression analysis, survival analysis, and propensity score matching. Results: Current users of antipsychotics had a higher risk of severe or very severe stroke on The Scandinavian Stroke Scale than never users...

  7. Serum Alkaline Phosphatase, Phosphate, and In-Hospital Mortality in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongke; You, Shoujiang; Chen, Juping; Zhai, Guojie; Du, Huaping; Luo, Yi; Dong, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yongjun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Zhang, Yonghong

    2018-01-01

    The clinical impacts of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and phosphate on early death are not fully understood in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We examined the associations between serum ALP, phosphate, and in-hospital mortality after ischemic stroke. Serum ALP and phosphate were measured in 2944 ischemic stroke patients from 22 hospitals in Suzhou City from December 2013 to May 2014. Cox proportional hazard models and restricted cubic splines were used to estimate the relationships between serum ALP and phosphate (both as categorical and continuous variables) and risk of in-hospital mortality. During hospitalization, 111 patients (3.7%) died from all causes. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) of the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile of ALP was 2.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.00) for early death. Restricted cubic spline analysis indicated a significant linear association between ALP and death (P-linearity = .017). A U-shaped association of phosphate with in-hospital mortality was observed (P-nonlinearity = .011). Compared with the third quartile of phosphate (1.08-1.21 mmol/L), HRs of the lowest and highest quartiles for early death were 2.17 (1.15-4.08) and 1.70 (.88-3.30), respectively. Sensitivity analyses further confirmed our findings. We observed a graded relationship between serum ALP levels and risk of early death in patients with acute ischemic stroke. There was a U-shaped association between phosphate and all-cause mortality with significantly increased risk among patients with lower phosphate levels. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardioembolic but Not Other Stroke Subtypes Predict Mortality Independent of Stroke Severity at Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Ganti Stead

    2011-01-01

    Results. The study population consisted of 500 patients who resided in the local county or the surrounding nine-county area. No patients were lost to followup. Two hundred and sixty one (52.2% were male, and the mean age at presentation was 73.7 years (standard deviation, SD = 14.3. Subtypes were as follows: large artery atherosclerosis 97 (19.4%, cardioembolic 144 (28.8%, small vessel disease 75 (15%, other causes 19 (3.8%, and unknown 165 (33%. One hundred and sixty patients died: 69 within the first 30 days, 27 within 31–90 days, 29 within 91–365 days, and 35 after 1 year. Low 90-, 180-, and 360-day survival was seen in cardioembolic strokes (67.1%, 65.5%, and 58.2%, resp., followed for cryptogenic strokes (78.0%, 75.3%, and 71.1%. Interestingly, when looking into the cryptogenic category, those with insufficient information to assign a stroke subtype had the lowest survival estimate (57.7% at 90 days, 56.1% at 180 days, and 51.2% at 1 year. Conclusion. Cardioembolic ischemic stroke subtype determined by TOAST criteria predicts long-term mortality, even after adjusting for age and stroke severity.

  9. Prior antiplatelet drug use and short-term mortality in older patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Galvani, Matteo; Bonetti, Francesco; Prandini, Stefano; Magon, Stefania; Gasperini, Beatrice; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Cherubini, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Some studies suggest that previous treatment with antiplatelet agents (AA) might reduce ischemic stroke severity and improve outcomes in terms of clinical deficits or mortality. We evaluated the effect of the prior chronic use of AA on short-term (30 days) mortality in a sample of consecutive patients with AIS. Four hundred thirty-nine older patients (>65 years) with "major" AIS (modified Rankin scale ≥ 3) consecutively admitted to the University ward of Internal Medicine or Geriatrics were enrolled. Stroke was classified according to Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP). Data recorded included: (1) clinical features; (2) medical history including home therapies, and vascular risk factors; (3) routine clinical chemistry analyzes (verb)/analyses (noun). Short-term (30 days) mortality was 27.6%. One hundred fifteen subjects (26.2%) were taking AA before admission. Compared with subjects not treated, subjects taking AA were characterized by higher prevalence of recurrent stroke (35% vs. 22%). In this group, a trend toward a higher prevalence of congestive heart failure (CHF), smoking, and altered levels of consciousness (ALC) was noted. Stroke type and short-term mortality (33% vs. 26.2%; odds ratio=OR=1.25; 95% confidence interval=CI=0.75-2.10, age and gender adjusted) were not different between the two groups. Adjustment for glucose, CHF, previous stroke, smoking, and ALC did not change mortality risk (OR=0.83; 95%CI=0.40-1.72). We conclude that in older patients hospitalized for "major" AIS, prior use of AA was not associated with any benefit in terms of short-term mortality both in patients with first, as well as in those with recurrent ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke in China.

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    Qian He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence and burden of stroke in China is increasing rapidly. However, little is known about trends in mortality during stroke hospitalization. The objectives of this study were to assess trends of in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke and explore influence factors of in-hospital death after stroke in China. METHODS: 109 grade III class A hospitals were sampled by multistage stratified cluster sampling. All patients admitted to hospitals between 2007 and 2010 with a discharge diagnosis of stroke were included. Trends in in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke were assessed. Influence factors of in-hospital death after stroke were explored using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall stroke hospitalizations increased from 79,894 in 2007 to 85,475 in 2010, and in-hospital mortality of stroke decreased from 3.16% to 2.30% (P<0.0001. The percentage of severe patients increased while odds of mortality (2010 versus 2007 decreased regardless of stroke type: subarachnoid hemorrhage (OR 0.792, 95% CI = 0.636 to 0.987, intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 0.647, 95% CI = 0.591 to 0.708, and ischemic stroke (OR 0.588, 95% CI = 0.532 to 0.649. In multivariable analyses, older age, male, basic health insurance, multiple comorbidities and severity of disease were linked to higher odds of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality of stroke hospitalizations decreased likely reflecting advancements in stroke care and prevention. Decreasing of mortality with increasing of severe stroke patients indicated that we should pay more attention to rehabilitation and life quality of stroke patients. Specific individual and hospital-level characteristics may be targets for facilitating further declines.

  11. Sleep Duration and the Risk of Mortality From Stroke in Japan: The Takayama Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kawachi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have assessed the associations between sleep duration and stroke subtypes. We examined whether sleep duration is associated with mortality from total stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke in a population-based cohort of Japanese men and women. Methods: Subjects included 12 875 men and 15 021 women aged 35 years or older in 1992, who were followed until 2008. The outcome variable was stroke death (ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and total stroke. Results: During follow-up, 611 stroke deaths (354 from ischemic stroke, 217 from hemorrhagic stroke, and 40 from undetermined stroke were identified. Compared with 7 h of sleep, ≥9 h of sleep was significantly associated with an increased risk of total stroke and ischemic stroke mortality after controlling for covariates. Hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were 1.51 (95% CI, 1.16–1.97 and 1.65 (95% CI, 1.16–2.35 for total stroke mortality and ischemic stroke mortality, respectively. Short sleep duration (≤6 h of sleep was associated with a decreased risk of mortality from total stroke (HR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59–1.01, although this association was of borderline significance (P = 0.06. The trends for total stroke and ischemic stroke mortality were also significant (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0002, respectively. There was a significant risk reduction of hemorrhagic stroke mortality for ≤6 h of sleep as compared with 7 h of sleep (HR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42–0.98; P for trend = 0.08. The risk reduction was pronounced for men (HR 0.31; 95% CI, 0.16–0.64. Conclusions: Data suggest that longer sleep duration is associated with increased mortality from total and ischemic stroke. Short sleep duration may be associated with a decreased risk of mortality from hemorrhagic stroke in men.

  12. Early warning score predicts acute mortality in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljehult, J; Christensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Clinical deterioration and death among patients with acute stroke are often preceded by detrimental changes in physiological parameters. Systematic and effective tools to identify patients at risk of deterioration early enough to intervene are therefore needed. The aim of the study...... was calculated. Death within 30 days was used as outcome. Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) and a Kaplan-Meier curve were computed to examine the prognostic validity of EWS. RESULTS: A total of 24 patients (8.8%) died within 30 days. The prognostic performance was high for both...... tool for identifying patients at risk of dying after acute stroke. Readily available physiological parameters are converted to a single score, which can guide both nurses and physicians in clinical decision making and resource allocation....

  13. Predictors of in-hospital mortality among stroke patients in Uyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death in most industrialized countries. Several reports indicate that it is also becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria and other developing countries. Aim: To identify risk factors and predictors of in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for stroke in a ...

  14. Short- and Long-Term Mortality and Stroke Risk After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lars; Terkelsen, Christian J.; Søndergaard, Lars

    2018-01-01

    No published studies have compared the outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with the outcome in the general population. Thus, it is unknown whether TAVI restores normal life expectancy and stroke risk. Furthermore, despite the increasing use of TAVI, only little is known......-cause mortality and stroke. During the first 90 days, the risk of the combined end point, the stroke risk, and mortality were significantly higher among TAVI patients compared with controls (9.4%, 7.5%, and 2.5%, respectively, in TAVI patients compared with 2.0%, 1.6%, and 0.5% in controls). After 90 days......, more patients were treated by transfemoral access; fewer needed blood transfusions, hospital stays were shorter, and the overall mortality rate decreased. In conclusion, 90 days after TAVI, the stroke risk and mortality of the TAVI patients were comparable with the stroke risk and mortality...

  15. Impact of Stroke Center Certification on Mortality After Ischemic Stroke: The Medicare Cohort From 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Schold, Jesse D; Uchino, Ken

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of hospitals have been certified as primary stroke centers (PSCs). It remains unknown whether the action toward PSC certification has improved the outcome of stroke care. This study aimed to understand whether PSC certification reduced stroke mortality. We examined Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged ≥65 years who were hospitalized between 2009 and 2013 for ischemic stroke. Hospitals were classified into 3 groups: new PSCs, the hospitals that received initial PSC certification between 2009 and 2013 (n=634); existing PSCs, the PSCs certified before 2009 (n=785); and non-SCs, the hospitals that have never been certified as PSCs (n=2640). Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the mortality among the 3 groups. Existing PSCs were significantly larger than new PSCs as reflected by total number of beds and annual stroke admission ( P stroke certification may reduce stroke mortality and overcome the disadvantage of being smaller hospitals. Further study of other outcome measures will be useful to improve stroke system of care. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Outdoor air pollution as a possible modifiable risk factor to reduce mortality in post-stroke population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desikan, Anita

    2017-03-01

    Outdoor air pollution is a known risk factor for mortality and morbidity. The type of air pollutant most reliably associated with disease is particulate matter (PM), especially finer particulate matter that can reach deeper into the lungs like PM 2.5 (particulate matter diameter pollution. This review focuses on one subgroup, long-term stroke survivors, and the emerging evidence suggesting that survivors of a stroke may be at a higher risk from the deleterious effects of PM pollution. While the mechanisms for mortality are still under debate, long-term stroke survivors may be vulnerable to similar mechanisms that underlie the well-established association between PM pollution and cardiovascular disease. The fact that long-term stroke survivors of ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, strokes appear to be more vulnerable to the risk of death from higher PM pollution may also bolster the connection to ischemic heart disease. Survivors of an ischemic stroke may be more vulnerable to dying from higher concentrations of PM pollution than the general population. The clinical implications of this association suggest that reduced exposure to PM pollution may result in fewer deaths amongst stroke survivors.

  17. Outdoor air pollution as a possible modifiable risk factor to reduce mortality in post-stroke population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Desikan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor air pollution is a known risk factor for mortality and morbidity. The type of air pollutant most reliably associated with disease is particulate matter (PM, especially finer particulate matter that can reach deeper into the lungs like PM2.5 (particulate matter diameter < 2.5 μm. Some subpopulations may be particularly vulnerable to PM pollution. This review focuses on one subgroup, long-term stroke survivors, and the emerging evidence suggesting that survivors of a stroke may be at a higher risk from the deleterious effects of PM pollution. While the mechanisms for mortality are still under debate, long-term stroke survivors may be vulnerable to similar mechanisms that underlie the well-established association between PM pollution and cardiovascular disease. The fact that long-term stroke survivors of ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, strokes appear to be more vulnerable to the risk of death from higher PM pollution may also bolster the connection to ischemic heart disease. Survivors of an ischemic stroke may be more vulnerable to dying from higher concentrations of PM pollution than the general population. The clinical implications of this association suggest that reduced exposure to PM pollution may result in fewer deaths amongst stroke survivors.

  18. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kono, Syoichiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of acute phase blood pressure in patients with acute ischemic stroke by determining whether or not it contributes to clinical outcome. We studied 515 consecutive patients admitted within the first 48 hours after the onset of ischemic strokes, employing systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements recorded within 36 hours after admission. High blood pressure was defined when the mean of at least 2 blood pressure measurements was ≥200 mmHg systolic and/or ≥110 mmHg diastolic at 6 to 24 hours after admission or ≥180 mmHg systolic and/or ≥105 mmHg diastolic at 24 to 36 hours after admission. The high blood pressure group was found to include 16% of the patients. Age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, stroke history, carotid artery stenosis, leukoaraiosis, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and mortality were not significantly correlated with either the high blood pressure or non-high blood pressure group. High blood pressure on admission was significantly associated with a past history of hypertension, kidney disease, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on discharge and the length of stay. On logistic regression analysis, with no previous history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and kidney disease were independent risk factors associated with the presence of high blood pressure [odds ratio (OR), 1.85 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-3.22), 1.89 (95% CI: 1.11-3.22), and 3.31 (95% CI: 1.36-8.04), respectively]. Multi-organ injury may be presented in acute stroke patients with high blood pressure. Patients with high blood pressure had a poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Income Inequality, Economic Growth and Stroke Mortality in Brazil: Longitudinal and Regional Analysis 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincens, Natalia; Stafström, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke accounts for more than 10% of all deaths globally and most of it occurs in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Income inequality and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita has been associated to stroke mortality in developed countries. In LMIC, GDP per capita is considered to be a more relevant health determinant than income inequality. This study aims to investigate if income inequality is associated to stroke mortality in Brazil at large, but also on regional and state levels, and whether GDP per capita modulates the impact of this association. Stroke mortality rates, Gini index and GDP per capita data were pooled for the 2002 to 2009 period from public available databases. Random effects models were fitted, controlling for GDP per capita and other covariates. Income inequality was independently associated to stroke mortality rates, even after controlling for GDP per capita and other covariates. GDP per capita reduced only partially the impact of income inequality on stroke mortality. A decrease in 10 points in the Gini index was associated with 18% decrease in the stroke mortality rate in Brazil. Income inequality was independently associated to stroke mortality in Brazil.

  20. Stroke-related mortality in a tertiary care hospital in Andalusia: Analysis and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Moreno, J F; Fernández-Pérez, M D; Triguero-Cueva, L; Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, R; Herrera-García, J D; Espigares-Molero, A; Mínguez-Castellanos, A

    Stroke is a very common cause of death, especially in southern Spain. The present study analyses in-hospital mortality associated with stroke in an Andalusian tertiary care hospital. We gathered the files of all patients who had died at Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves in Granada in 2013 and whose death certificates indicated stroke as the cause of death. We also gathered stroke patients discharge data and compared them to that of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A total of 825 patients had a diagnosis of stroke (96 deaths, 11.6%); of these, 562 had ischaemic stroke (44 deaths, 7.8%) and 263 haemorrhagic stroke (52 deaths, 19.7%). Patients with haemorrhagic stroke therefore showed greater mortality rate (OR=2.9). Patients in this group died after a shorter time in hospital (median, 4 vs 7 days; mean, 6 days). However, patients with ischaemic stroke were older and presented with more comorbidities. On the other hand, 617 patients had a diagnosis of ACS (36 deaths, 5.8%). The mortality odds ratio (MOR) was 2.1 (stroke/SCA). Around 23% of the patients who died from stroke were taking anticoagulants. 60% of the deceased patients with ischaemic stroke and 20% of those with haemorrhagic stroke had atrial fibrillation (AF); 35% of the patients with ischaemic stroke and AF were taking anticoagulants. Stroke is associated with higher admission and in-hospital mortality rates than SCA. Likewise, patients with haemorrhagic stroke showed higher mortality rates than those with ischaemic stroke. Patients with fatal stroke usually had a history of long-term treatment with anticoagulants; 2 thirds of the patients with fatal ischaemic stroke and atrial fibrillation were not receiving anticoagulants. According to our results, optimising prevention in patients with AF may have a positive impact on stroke-related in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Cohort-specific trends in stroke mortality in seven European countries were related to infant mortality rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amiri, M.; Kunst, A. E.; Janssen, F.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To assess, in a population-based study, whether secular trends in cardiovascular disease mortality in seven European countries were correlated with past trends in infant mortality rate (IMR) in these countries. Study Design and Setting: Data on ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke

  2. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and early clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sungwook; Arima, Hisatomi; Bertmar, Carin; Clarke, Stephen; Herkes, Geoffrey; Krause, Martin

    2018-04-15

    The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is closely linked to mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether NLR is associated with early clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We collated data from a tertiary hospital's stroke registry including admitted patients with a first-ever acute ischemic stroke within 72 h of onset. White blood cell counts and peripheral differential counts were measured on admission. Early clinical outcomes were in-hospital mortality and disability at discharge assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Among 1131 stroke patients, 454 patients were included and classified into tertile groups based on NLR on admission. Patients in higher tertiles of NLR were likely to have severe neurologic deficit at discharge. Higher NLR tertiles were associated with an unfavourable shift of mRS score (p < .0001). This association remained significant after adjustment for clinical and laboratory variables including age, sex, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, stroke severity, and glucose level (p = .032 for trend). However, risk of death or major disability (score of 3-6 on mRS) and in-hospital mortality were not significantly different across NLR tertile groups. In patients with acute ischemic stroke, NLR was predictive of short-term functional outcome. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mortality Reduction for Fever, Hyperglycemia, and Swallowing Nurse-Initiated Stroke Intervention: QASC Trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; Coughlan, Kelly; Mnatzaganian, George; Low Choy, Nancy; Dale, Simeon; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Levi, Chris; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Ward, Jeanette; Cadilhac, Dominique A; McElduff, Patrick; Hiller, Janet E; D'Este, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Implementation of nurse-initiated protocols to manage fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction decreased death and disability 90 days poststroke in the QASC trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) conducted in 19 Australian acute stroke units (2005-2010). We now examine long-term all-cause mortality. Mortality was ascertained using Australia's National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression compared time to death adjusting for correlation within stroke units using the cluster sandwich (Huber-White estimator) method. Primary analyses included treatment group only unadjusted for covariates. Secondary analysis adjusted for age, sex, marital status, education, and stroke severity using multiple imputation for missing covariates. One thousand and seventy-six participants (intervention n=600; control n=476) were followed for a median of 4.1 years (minimum 0.3 to maximum 70 months), of whom 264 (24.5%) had died. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were generally well balanced by group. The QASC intervention group had improved long-term survival (>20%), but this was only statistically significant in adjusted analyses (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-1.07; P =0.13; adjusted HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99; P =0.045). Older age (75-84 years; HR, 4.9; 95% CI, 2.8-8.7; P stroke severity (HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9; P disease (including stroke) was listed either as the primary or secondary cause of death in 80% (211/264) of all deaths. Our results demonstrate the potential long-term and sustained benefit of nurse-initiated multidisciplinary protocols for management of fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction. These protocols should be a routine part of acute stroke care. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12608000563369. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Designated Stroke Center Status and Hospital Characteristics as Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality among Hemorrhagic Stroke Patients in New York, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatollari, Hajere J; Colello, Anna; Eisenberg, Bonnie; Brissette, Ian; Luna, Jorge; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Willey, Joshua Z

    2017-01-01

    Although designated stroke centers (DSCs) improve the quality of care and clinical outcomes for ischemic stroke patients, less is known about the benefits of DSCs for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Compared to non-DSCs, hospitals with the DSC status have lower in-hospital mortality rates for hemorrhagic stroke patients. We believed these effects would sustain over a period of time after adjusting for hospital-level characteristics, including hospital size, urban location, and teaching status. We evaluated ICH (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision; ICD-9: 431) and SAH (ICD-9: 430) hospitalizations documented in the 2008-2012 New York State Department of Health Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System inpatient sample database. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between DSC status and in-hospital mortality. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs adjusted for clustering of patients within facilities, other hospital characteristics, and individual level characteristics. Planned secondary analyses explored other hospital characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality. In 6,352 ICH and 3,369 SAH patients in the study sample, in-hospital mortality was higher among those with ICH compared to SAH (23.7 vs. 18.5%). Unadjusted analyses revealed that DSC status was related with reduced mortality for both ICH (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.8) and SAH patients (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.7). DSC remained a significant predictor of lower in-hospital mortality for SAH patients (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-0.9) but not for ICH patients (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.6-1.0) after adjusting for patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, hospital size, teaching status and location. Admission to a DSC was independently associated with reduced in-hospital mortality for SAH patients but not for those with ICH. Other patient and hospital characteristics may explain the benefits of DSC

  5. The role of clinical pathway on the outcomes of ischemic stroke patients at Bethesda Hospital Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Diana Alexandra, Iwan Dwiprahasto, Rizaldy Pinzon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke becomes world health problem all over the world because it is the causal factor of high mortality and disability. Good and well-organized process of healthcare service will improve the outcome of the patients with stroke. Clinical pathway may be used as clear standard to help reduce unnecessary variations of medical treatment and measure. The study aimed at finding out the correlation between the use of clinical pathway and the outcome of the patients with ischemic stroke in Bethesda Hospital Yogyakarta. It was an observational and analytic study with cohort restorative study design. The author compared the outcomes of acute ischemic stroke between the group with clinical pathway and the group without the clinical pathway. Data was collected using consecutive sampling from the electronic registry and medical record data of the patients from January 1st, 2011 to December 31st, 2011. It was conducted to 124 patients with ischemic stroke assigned to two groups (the first groups of 62 patients with clinical pathway and the second groups of 62 patients without clinical pathway. The basic characteristics of the two groups were the same. The results of the analysis showed that there was a significant decrease in the incidence of complication and a significant increase in the use of antiplatelete drugs, antidiabetic drugs and statin as secondary preventive measure of the recurrent stroke. There was not any significant difference in the duration of the hospitalized healthcare, the financing and the mortality between the two observation groups. The study indicated that the use of the clinical pathway in the stroke treatment improved the outcome of the patients with stroke. It was necessary to conduct further study to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinical pathway in improving the outcome of the patients with bigger number of the subjects and the longer period of time.

  6. [Physio- and occupational therapy pathways of stroke patients and stroke mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschke, D; Schnitzer, S; Kuhlmey, A; Schenk, L

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the relationship between adherence to clinical guidelines and survival time in the first year after stroke. The sample comprises all clients of the Deutsche BKK, a large German health insurance company, who received acute inpatient care for stroke in 2007, who survived the hospital stay by at least 14 days, and who had motor deficits at the end of their acute treatment (n=1 791). 3 types of treatment that differ in the degree of adherence to clinical guidelines are identified ("Frühreha-Plus">"Standard-Plus">"Nur Akut"). There is a positive relationship between adherence to clinical guidelines and survival time, even when relevant covariates are controlled. The hazard-ratios are 0.49 for "Frühreha-Plus" and 0.65 for "Standard-Plus" compared to "Nur Akut". Healthcare processes should be organized on the basis of cross-sector collaboration and in line with the recommendations of the guidelines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Clinical review: Therapy for refractory intracranial hypertension in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttler, Eric; Schellinger, Peter D; Aschoff, Alfred; Zweckberger, Klaus; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of patients with large hemispheric ischaemic stroke accompanied by massive space-occupying oedema represents one of the major unsolved problems in neurocritical care medicine. Despite maximum intensive care, the prognosis of these patients is poor, with case fatality rates as high as 80%. Therefore, the term 'malignant brain infarction' was coined. Because conservative treatment strategies to limit brain tissue shift almost consistently fail, these massive infarctions often are regarded as an untreatable disease. The introduction of decompressive surgery (hemicraniectomy) has completely changed this point of view, suggesting that mortality rates may be reduced to approximately 20%. However, critics have always argued that the reduction in mortality may be outweighed by an accompanying increase in severe disability. Due to the lack of conclusive evidence of efficacy from randomised trials, controversy over the benefit of these treatment strategies remained, leading to large regional differences in the application of this procedure. Meanwhile, data from randomised trials confirm the results of former observational studies, demonstrating that hemicraniectomy not only significantly reduces mortality but also significantly improves clinical outcome without increasing the number of completely dependent patients. Hypothermia is another promising treatment option but still needs evidence of efficacy from randomised controlled trials before it may be recommended for clinical routine use. This review gives the reader an integrated view of the current status of treatment options in massive hemispheric brain infarction, based on the available data of clinical trials, including the most recent data from randomised trials published in 2007.

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors and 5-year mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has improved over the recent years and may have improved survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the up-to-date prognostic significance of cardiovascular risk factors for 5-year survival in a large unselected ischemic stroke...... population. METHODS: We studied 905 ischemic stroke patients from the community-based Copenhagen Stroke Study. Patients had a CT scan and stroke severity was measured by the Scandinavian Stroke Scale on admission. A comprehensive evaluation was performed by a standardized medical examination...... by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...

  9. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and 5-year Mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has improved over the recent years and may have improved survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the up-to-date prognostic significance of cardiovascular risk factors for 5-year survival in a large unselected ischemic stroke...... population. METHODS: We studied 905 ischemic stroke patients from the community-based Copenhagen Stroke Study. Patients had a CT scan and stroke severity was measured by the Scandinavian Stroke Scale on admission. A comprehensive evaluation was performed by a standardized medical examination...... by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...

  10. Stroke care: Experiences and clinical research in stroke units in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobindram Arjundas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: S troke is the second commonest cause of death in India with crude overall prevalence rate of 220 per 100,000. With an increasing aging population at risk, the stroke burden in India can be expected to reach epidemic proportions. Materials and Methods: The first protocol-based prospective studies, funded by private agencies was conducted in Madras Institute of Neurology in 1984-86. The results led to establishment of the first stroke unit in Tamil Nadu state, in the institute. The first all-India hospital-based studies in acute stroke was completed as INDIAN COOPERATIVE ACUTE STROKE STUDIES (ICASS I and ICASS II with WHO STEP ONE by members of the Indian Stroke Association between 2000-2005. This has generated very useful data for our country. Results: Mortality in 1984-86 was 40%. Stroke unit in the institute dropped it to 12%. About 10 years later, ICASS studies showed a further fall of mortality to 8%, which is the current international figure in the west. Morbidity pattern showed about half return to their original activities. But about one third are left totally disabled needing prolonged care, for which fiscal, social and rehab provisions have to be done on a national basis. Conclusions: The progress and success of care of Stroke in the last three decades, from treatment in medical and neurology wards to specialized stroke units is presented. The main risk factors are hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease across the country. Hypertension alone or with the other two diseases was present in 72% of cases. Prevention and treatment of these factors will reduce the stroke burden, mortality and morbidity of strokes. The Stroke-team concept can be extended to the smallest hospitals in our country.

  11. Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Meisterernst, Julia; Schlager, Markus; Mono, Marie-Luise; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kägi, Georg; Jung, Simon; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke. Methods We studied 570 consecutive patients treated in a tertiary stroke center. Dysphagia was evaluated by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). We investigated the relationship of dysphagia with pneumonia, length of hospital stay and discharge destination and compared rates of favourable clinical outcome and mortality at 3 months between dysphagic patients and those without dysphagia. Results Dysphagia was diagnosed in 118 of 570 (20.7%) patients and persisted in 60 (50.9%) at hospital discharge. Thirty-six (30.5%) patients needed nasogastric tube because of severe dysphagia. Stroke severity rather than infarct location was associated with dysphagia. Dysphagic patients suffered more frequently from pneumonia (23.1% vs. 1.1%, pdysphagia. At 3 months, dysphagic patients less often had a favourable outcome (35.7% vs. 69.7%; pdysphagia to be an independent predictor of discharge destination and institutionalization at 3 months, while severe dysphagia requiring tube placement was strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion Dysphagia still affects a substantial portion of stroke patients and may have a large impact on clinical outcome, mortality and institutionalization. PMID:26863627

  12. Analysis of clinical and imaging characters and prognosis in patients with epilepsy after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongguang; Zeng Huiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between clinical, imaging characters and prognosis in patients with epilepsy after stroke. Methods: In total 78 cases of post-stroke epilepsy were studied retrospectively out of 840 cases. Results: The incidence of post-stroke epilepsy was 9.29%. The early-stage epilepsy (less than 2 weeks) accounted for 61.54%. The major type of seizure were partial seizure and general tonic-clonic seizure. The incidence was higher in patients with cerebral hemorrhage or with lesions involving the cortex. Symptomatolytic medication was effective. Compared with non-epilepsy group, the mortality of epilepsy was higher. Conclusion: Post-stroke epilepsy is usually accompanied with cortical focus, which is more often seen in patients with cerebral hemorrhage than in patients with cerebral infarction. Post-stroke epilepsy responses well to the medication but indicates a poor prognosis

  13. Acute effect of ambient air pollution on stroke mortality in the China air pollution and health effects study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Zhang, Yuhao; Yang, Chunxue; Zhao, Zhuohui; Xu, Xiaohui; Kan, Haidong

    2013-04-01

    There have been no multicity studies on the acute effects of air pollution on stroke mortality in China. This study was undertaken to examine the associations between daily stroke mortality and outdoor air pollution (particulate matter air pollution with daily stroke mortality. Air pollution was associated with daily stroke mortality in 8 Chinese cities. In the combined analysis, an increase of 10 μg/m(3) of 2-day moving average concentrations of particulate matter air pollution and risk of stroke mortality. To our knowledge, this is the first multicity study in China, or even in other developing countries, to report the acute effect of air pollution on stroke mortality. Our results contribute to very limited data on the effect of air pollution on stroke for high-exposure settings typical in developing countries.

  14. Stroke Risk Perception in Atrial Fibrillation Patients is not Associated with Clinical Stroke Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournaise, Anders; Skov, Jane; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Leppin, Anja

    2015-11-01

    Clinical risk stratification models, such as the CHA2DS2-VASc, are used to assess stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. No study has yet investigated whether and to which extent these patients have a realistic perception of their personal stroke risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the association between AF patients' stroke risk perception and clinical stroke risk. In an observational cross-sectional study design, we surveyed 178 AF patients with a mean age of 70.6 years (SD 8.3) in stable anticoagulant treatment (65% treatment duration >12 months). Clinical stroke risk was scored through the CHA2DS2-VASc, and patients rated their perceived personal stroke risk on a 7-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between clinical stroke risk assessment and patients' stroke risk perception (rho = .025; P = .741). Approximately 60% of the high-risk patients had an unrealistic perception of their own stroke risk, and there was no significant increase in risk perception from those with a lower compared with a higher risk factor load (χ(2) = .010; P = .522). Considering possible negative implications in terms of lack of motivation for lifestyle behavior change and adequate adherence to the treatment and monitoring of vitamin K antagonist, the apparent underestimation of risk by large subgroups warrants attention and needs further investigation with regard to possible behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Infratentorial posterior circulation stroke in a Nigerian population: Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and predictors of outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman Femi Owolabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior circulation stroke (PCS, though less common, differs from stroke in anterior circulation in many aspects. Relatively, it portends a poorer prognosis. However, there is a paucity of data from African countries, in particular, where stroke is a menace. Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the etiology, clinical characteristics, outcome, and predictors of outcome in a cohort of patients with IPCS in Northwestern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Out of 595 patients with stroke, we prospectively analyzed 57 patients with PCS in a Tertiary Care Center in Kano, Northwestern Nigeria. Patients were analyzed for demographic data, risk factors, clinical characteristics, stroke subtypes, mortality, and predictors of mortality. Results: Posterior circulation ischemic stroke accounted for 57 (9.6% of 595 of all strokes seen in the study period. They comprised 44 males (mean age 47.8 ± 17.7 and 13 females (mean age 46.3 ± 13.7. Overall, their age ranged between 24 and 90 (mean age 47.4 ± 16.7. However, 52.7% of the patients were < 45 years of age. The most common site affected was the cerebellum seen in 33 (57.9% patients. Hypertension was the most common risk factor (86%. Headache and vertigo were the most common features accounting for 83.6% and 86.3%, respectively. Thirty-eight (66.7% patients had an ischemic stroke. Twenty-one (36.8% of the patients died during the 1-month period of follow-up. Independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia on admission and hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions: IPCS occurred in a relatively younger age group. Headache and vertigo were the most common symptoms. The independent predictors of death in the study were hyperglycemia at presentation and hemorrhagic stroke.

  16. Eighteen-year trends in stroke mortality and the prognostic influence of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morten; Jacobsen, Jacob B; Johnsen, Søren P; Bøtker, Hans E; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2014-01-28

    To examine 18-year trends in short-term and long-term stroke mortality and the prognostic influence of comorbidity. We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, covering all Danish hospitals, we identified all 219,354 patients with a first-time hospitalization for stroke during 1994-2011. We computed standardized 30-day, 1-year, and 5-year mortality by sex. Comorbidity categories were defined by Charlson Comorbidity Index scores of 0 (none), 1 (moderate), 2 (severe), and 3 or more (very severe). Calendar periods of diagnosis (1994-1998, 1999-2003, 2004-2008, and 2009-2011) and comorbidity categories were compared by means of mortality rate ratios based on Cox regression. Over time, the 30-day mortality rate ratio adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidity decreased by approximately 45% for ischemic stroke (standardized risk decreased from 17.2% in 1994-1998 to 10.6% in 2009-2011) and by 35% for intracerebral hemorrhage (from 43.2% to 33.8%). The absolute mortality reduction occurred for all levels of comorbidity. Five-year mortality risk decreased from 56.4% in 1994-1998 to 46.1% in 2004-2008 for ischemic stroke and from 66.1% to 61.0% for intracerebral hemorrhage. Comparing very severe comorbidity with no comorbidity, 30-day and 5-year mortality rate ratios were both approximately 2.5-fold increased for ischemic stroke and 1.7-fold increased for intracerebral hemorrhage. Short- and long-term mortality improved considerably between 1994 and 2011 for all types of stroke. Short-term mortality improved regardless of comorbidity burden. However, comorbidity burden was a strong prognostic factor for both short- and long-term mortality.

  17. Stroke subtypes, risk factors and mortality rate in northwest of Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhoudi, Mehdi; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2017-01-01

    data, risk factors, types and mortality. Methods: A retrospective study was done in two university tertiary referral hospitals in Tabriz, northwest of Iran, from March 2008 to April 2013. Patients diagnosed with stroke were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, stroke subtypes, duration...... of hospitalization, stroke risk factors and hospital mortality rate were recorded for all the patients. Results: A total number of 5355 patients were evaluated in the present study. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 13.8 years, and 50.6% were men. Final diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made in 76.......5% of the patients, intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH) with or without intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in 14.3% and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 9.2%. Stroke risk factors among the patients were hypertension in 68.8% of the patients, diabetes mellitus (DM) in 23.9%, smoking in 12.6% and ischemic heart diseases...

  18. Relationship between Kidney Dysfunction and Ischemic Stroke Outcomes: Albuminuria, but Not Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate, Is Associated with the Risk of Further Vascular Events and Mortality after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Dong-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria are known to be associated with ischemic stroke outcomes. In this study, we investigated the longitudinal relationships of the two markers with mortality, vascular events and functional outcomes in a stroke cohort. A total of 295 patients with acute ischemic stroke were prospectively recruited in a single center between May 2012 and February 2015. Renal dysfunction was defined as a decreased eGFR (albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g). Good functional outcome at 6 months was defined as a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2, and the occurrence of major vascular events (stroke, acute coronary syndrome or peripheral artery occlusion) or death was monitored. The associations between renal dysfunction and mortality, major vascular events, and 6-month functional outcome were evaluated by the Cox proportional hazards model and logistic regression analysis. Unadjusted and adjusted hazards ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve for composite adverse events (major vascular events or death) was also computed according to the presence or absence of albuminuria. Albuminuria, not eGFR, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.028; HR 2.15; 95% CI 1.09-4.25) and major vascular events (P = 0.044; HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.02-4.94) in the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, alcohol history, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and eGFR. In addition, albuminuria was negatively associated with 6-month functional outcome in the multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, alcohol history and eGFR (P = 0.001; OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.20-0.65), but the association disappeared when NIHSS score was

  19. Perioperative Stroke and Mortality After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Karthy; Jeevanantham, Vinodh; Van Ham, Raymond; Gleason, Thomas G; Badhwar, Vinay; Chang, YueFang; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2017-11-01

    Perioperative stroke rate after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) varies between 1.3% and 6.2%, whereas the operative mortality ranges between 1% and 16.4%. The aim of this study was to determine whether perioperative stroke is a risk factor for operative mortality after SAVR by performing a meta-analysis of relevant studies. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched to retrieve relevant literature. Screening of the articles was done independently on the basis of predetermined criteria. Data from the relevant studies were extracted and a random effects model was used to calculate the odds of mortality among patients with perioperative strokes after aortic valve replacement compared with those without such strokes. Subgroup analyses of patients (1) aged above and below 70 years and (2) undergoing isolated valve replacement procedure were performed. Metaregression to check for association of effect estimate and (1) sex, (2) mechanical valve replacement, (3) New York Heart Association class III/IV, (4) left ventricle ejection fraction York Heart Association class III/IV, (4) left ventricle ejection fraction <30%, and (5) preoperative atrial fibrillation. Patients with perioperative strokes after SAVR have nearly 5 times greater odds of experiencing operative mortality compared with those without. Thus, perioperative strokes are associated with increased risk of early mortality and require further examination of preventive strategies.

  20. Higher Total Serum Cholesterol Levels Are Associated With Less Severe Strokes and Lower All-Cause Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen; Kammersgaard, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Evidence of a causal relation between serum cholesterol and stroke is inconsistent. We investigated the relation between total serum cholesterol and both stroke severity and poststroke mortality to test the hypothesis that hyperch....

  1. Neuromuscular stimulation after stroke: from technology to clinical deployment.

    OpenAIRE

    IJzerman, M.J.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, electrical or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used to support the rehabilitation of stroke patients. One of the earliest applications of NMES included the use of external muscle stimulation to correct drop-foot after stroke. During the last few decades various clinical applications have been used for the upper and lower limb. Despite a growing body of literature on the use of NMES, its application in stroke is still limited to a few clinical groups ...

  2. Increased Vascular Disease Mortality Risk in Prediabetic Korean Adults Is Mainly Attributable to Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hoon; Kwon, Tae Yeon; Yu, Sungwook; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Yousung; Kim, Sin Gon

    2017-04-01

    Prediabetes is a known risk factor for vascular diseases; however, its differential contribution to mortality risk from various vascular disease subtypes is not known. The subjects of the National Health Insurance Service in Korea (2002-2013) nationwide cohort were stratified into normal glucose tolerance (fasting glucose disease and its subtypes-ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke. When adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index, IFG stage 2, but not stage 1, was associated with significantly higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-1.34) and vascular disease mortality (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.08-1.49) compared with normal glucose tolerance. Among the vascular disease subtypes, mortality from ischemic stroke was significantly higher (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.18-2.18) in subjects with IFG stage 2 but not from ischemic heart disease and hemorrhagic stroke. The ischemic stroke mortality associated with IFG stage 2 remained significantly high when adjusted other modifiable vascular disease risk factors (HR, 1.51; 95% CI: 1.10-2.09) and medical treatments (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.19-2.57). Higher IFG degree (fasting glucose, 110-125 mg/dL) was associated with increased all-cause and vascular disease mortality. The increased vascular disease mortality in IFG stage 2 was attributable to ischemic stroke, but not ischemic heart disease or hemorrhagic stroke in Korean adults. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Higher leukocyte count is associated with higher risk of 3-year mortality in non-diabetic patients with first-ever ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yi; Peng, Tsung-I; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Meng; Chen, Kuan-Hsing

    2012-05-15

    Leukocyte count predicted the risk of first-time myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine the role of elevated leukocyte count in non-diabetic patients admitted for acute first-ever ischemic stroke on clinical presentation and 3-year mortality. We studied 462 patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke without diabetes mellitus or active infection at admission. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to their leukocyte count. A white blood cell (WBC) count ≥ 10,000/μL was defined as an elevated leukocyte count, otherwise as normal. Clinical presentation, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. 64 patients (13.9%) had elevated leukocytes. Multivariate logistic regression showed that an elevated platelet count was positively associated with the elevated leukocyte count, while a low serum sodium level was negatively associated with an elevated leukocyte count (P=0.008, P=0.003, respectively). An elevated leukocyte count was associated with a higher risk of a stroke in evolution (P=0.021). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that an elevated leukocyte count is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality [P=0.010, HR=3.26 (1.33-7.98)]. In conclusion, higher leukocyte counts during the acute stroke stage are associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality in patients with acute, first-ever ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Readmission, mortality, and first-year medical costs after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuei-Chen Lee

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Half of the patients encountered readmission or death during the first year after stroke. Patients with advanced age, more complications, or comorbidities during initial stay tended to be highly vulnerable to AE occurrence, whereas TIA/unspecified stroke carried no less risk for AEs. FYMC or estimated cost per life saved for IS or TIA/unspecified was lower relative to SAH or ICH; however, their estimated cost per life-year saved became higher because of reduced life expectancy.

  5. Dietary intakes of glutamic acid and glycine are associated with stroke mortality in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Chisato; Wada, Keiko; Tamura, Takashi; Kawachi, Toshiaki; Konishi, Kie; Tsuji, Michiko; Nakamura, Kozue

    2015-04-01

    Dietary intakes of glutamic acid and glycine have been reported to be associated with blood pressure. However, the link between intakes of these amino acids and stroke has not been studied. We aimed to examine the association between glutamic acid and glycine intakes and the risk of mortality from stroke in a population-based cohort study in Japan. The analyses included 29,079 residents (13,355 men and 15,724 women) of Takayama City, Japan, who were aged 35-101 y and enrolled in 1992. Their body mass index ranged from 9.9 to 57.4 kg/m(2). Their diets were assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths from stroke were ascertained over 16 y. During follow-up, 677 deaths from stroke (328 men and 349 women) were identified. A high intake of glutamic acid in terms of a percentage of total protein was significantly associated with a decreased risk of mortality from total stroke in women after controlling for covariates; the HR (95% CI) for the highest vs. lowest quartile was 0.72 (0.53, 0.98; P-trend: 0.03). Glycine intake was significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality from total and ischemic stroke in men without history of hypertension at baseline; the HRs (95% CIs) for the highest vs. lowest tertile were 1.60 (0.97, 2.51; P-trend: 0.03) and 1.88 (1.01, 3.52; P-trend: 0.02), respectively. There was no association between animal or vegetable protein intake and mortality from total and any subtype of stroke. The data suggest that glutamic acid and glycine intakes may be associated with risk of stroke mortality. Given that this is an initial observation, our results need to be confirmed. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Differences in blood pressure control and stroke mortality across Spain: the Prevención de Riesgo de Ictus (PREV-ICTUS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redón, Josep; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Lozano, José V; Martí-Canales, Juan C; Llisterri, José L; Aznar, Jose; González-Esteban, Jorge

    2007-04-01

    The objective was to assess the stroke risk and prevalence of the cardiovascular risk factors and to analyze their relationship with the specific stroke rates of mortality in each of the autonomic communities of Spain. We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional study of population >60 years old in Spanish primary care centers. In all of the subjects, clinical, biochemical, and electrocardiographic data were obtained, and the 10-year stroke risk was calculated using the Framingham score. Mortality rates of stroke, age and sex adjusted, were obtained for each of the autonomic communities from the Ministry of Health. A total of 7343 subjects (mean age: 71.6 years, 53.4% women, 34.4% obese, and 27.1% diabetic subjects) were analyzed. A total of 73% were already diagnosed with hypertension. Among hypertensive subjects, 29.1% had blood pressure on therapeutic objective, and, of the total population, 35.7% had blood pressure under control. ECG-left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 12.9% of the subjects. The estimated stroke risk was 19.6%. Stroke mortality rates were significantly related to the estimated 10-year stroke risk (r=0.41; P<0.05) in each autonomic community. Poor hypertension control (P=-0.42; P<0.05) and prevalence of ECG-left ventricular hypertrophy (P=0.52; P<0.05) were the main factors related to the stroke mortality rates after controlling by age, sex, obesity, diabetes, and urban setting. Differences in stroke mortality throughout the autonomic communities of Spain were associated with indexes of worse blood pressure handling, low control rates, and high left-ventricular hypertrophy.

  7. Residential Proximity to High Traffic Roadways and Post-Stroke Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa H.; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Lue, Shih-Ho; Gold, Diane; Schwartz, Joel; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Living in areas with higher levels of ambient air pollution has been associated with a higher incidence of ischemic stroke and all-cause mortality, but less is known about the relationship between traffic related pollution and long term survival following stroke. Methods We identified consecutive patients admitted to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with ischemic stroke between 1999 and 2008 and determined distance to the nearest roadway with an average daily traffic count >10,000 vehicles/day. Categories of residential proximity were defined as ≤100 meters (m), 100 to 200, 200 to ≤400 or > 400m from a busy roadway. We identified deaths through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index and used Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for medical history, and socioeconomic factors to calculate hazard ratios for the association between residential proximity to a high traffic roadway and all-cause mortality. Results Among 1683 stroke patients with complete data, there were 950 deaths [median follow-up = 4.6 years]. We observed higher post-stroke mortality among people living closer to high traffic roadways. Patients living ≤100m from high traffic roadways had a 20% (95% CI: 1%, 43%) higher rate of post-stroke mortality than patients living >400m away (p-trend=0.02). Conclusions In this study, living close to a high traffic roadway was associated with an elevated mortality rate. This relationship remained statistically significant after adjustment for individual and neighborhood- level factors, providing evidence that traffic-related pollution is associated with a higher mortality rate among stroke survivors. PMID:23721619

  8. Cholesterol Levels Are Associated with 30-day Mortality from Ischemic Stroke in Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Kuan; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Hsu, Shih-Pin; Chen, Chih-Hung; Lien, Li-Ming; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Chen, An-Chih; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chi, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ta-Chang; Sun, Yu; Lee, Siu-Pak; Sung, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Chiang, Tsuey-Ru; Lin, Shinn-Kuang; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Ma, Henry; Wen, Chi-Pang; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the impact of serum cholesterol levels on 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke in dialysis patients. From the Taiwan Stroke Registry data, we identified 46,770 ischemic stroke cases, including 1101 dialysis patients and 45,669 nondialysis patients from 2006 to 2013. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 1.46-fold greater in the dialysis group than in the nondialysis group (1.75 versus 1.20 per 1000 person-days). The mortality rates were 1.64, .62, 2.82, and 2.23 per 1000 person-days in dialysis patients with serum total cholesterol levels of cholesterol levels of 120-159 mg/dL, the corresponding adjusted hazard ratios of mortality were 4.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-17.4), 8.06 (95% CI = 2.02-32.2), and 6.89 (95% CI = 1.59-29.8) for those with cholesterol levels of cholesterol levels of ≥160 mg/dL or <120 mg/dL on admission are at an elevated hazard of 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke - A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman, A.; Pedersen, Lars; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relationship between process and outcome measures among patients with stroke is unclear. Objectives: To examine the association between quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke in a nationwide population-based follow-up study. Methods: Using data from The Danish...... National Indicator Project, a quality improvement initiative with participation of all Danish hospital departments caring for patients with stroke, we identified 29,573 patients hospitalized with stroke between January 13, 2003 and October 31, 2005. Quality of care was measured in terms of 7 specific...... criteria: early admission to a stroke unit, early initiation of antiplatelet or oral anticoagulant therapy, early examination with computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scan, and early assessment by a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, and of nutritional risk. Data on 30- and 90-day...

  10. Efficacy of a clinical stroke score in monitoring complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of a clinical stroke score in monitoring complications in acute ischaemic stroke patients could be used as an independent prognostic factor. ... Onset and types of complications were documented within the duration of the study period, using a questionnaire and laboratory investigations. Results: Fifty-nine [67.8%] ...

  11. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epidemiological data on stroke in Zimbabwe are scarce and few clinical studies have been performed to date. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of patients admitted for stroke during the year 2012 was performed at three tertiary hospitals. Sociodemographic data were recorded alongside ...

  12. Stroke mortality and its predictors in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mias, cardiac disorders, vasculitis, heavy alcohol con- sumption and cigarette smoking4. Additional well recognized risk factors are Sickle cell disease, oral contraceptives, vasculitic lesions and hy- percoagulable states4. More recently, HIV and hyper- homocysteinaemia have been noted as novel risk fac- tors for stroke5.

  13. Management of stroke: a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Kumar, Amit

    2009-06-01

    Stroke is defined as repidly developing symptoms or signs of loss of cerebral function with no apparent cause other than vascular origin. The issues to be addressed when making diagnosis of stroke are : (1) is it a stroke? (2) What pathological type of stroke? (3) Where is the lesion? (4) What caused it? Differential diagnosis of stroke is chronic subdural haematoma, brain tumour, hypoglycaemic, metabolic encephalopathies, postictal neurological deficit and functional. CT or MRI is important investigation while dealing with a stroke patient. In treating acute stroke one has to go through the objectives eg, optimising the patient's chance of survival, minimising the risk and degree of disability and preventing recurrence. One has to think of genera care required in management of stroke. Control of blood pressure and blood sugar is important. Specific treatment includes aspirin, t-PA, low molecular weight heparin, calcium antagonists though some reservation persists over efficacy. Psychological support, cognitive impairment, motor and sensory impairment are to be addressed. Functional rehabilitation interventions, log-term management and secondary prevention are to be cared for.

  14. Basic and clinical research advances in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan MA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common cerebrovascular disease worldwide, which seriously affects life quality of survivals and results in huge economic burden of families and society. In terms of clinical treatment for ischemic stroke, apart from thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, the occurrence and successful application of endovascular thrombectomy in patients of ischemic stroke is a major breakthrough. Meanwhile, many novel clinical drugs for ischemic stroke therapy have entered into clinical trials. Most of basic and clinical researches have showed promising results in ischemic stroke therapy. This review mainly summarizes the progress of research during the period of Twelfth Five-Year Plan for National Economic and Social Development on treatment of ischemic stroke, including omics technologies, gene therapy, microRNA (miRNA interference and stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential since many clinical trials have been completed or are ongoing. The development and mutual transformation of basic and clinical research will provide valuable and comprehensive information for the precise treatment of ischemic stroke.

  15. Effects of interstate migration on the geographic distribution of stroke mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, D J; Peterson, P M

    1995-04-01

    This study examines the effects of lifetime net interstate migration on the geographic distribution of stroke mortality in the United States. National Center for Health Statistics and Bureau of the Census data were used to map the geographic distribution of age-adjusted, race-, and race/sex-specific stroke mortality rates by interstate migration status for natives, outmigrants, nonmigrants, inmigrants, and residents in the United States for 1979 to 1981. High age-adjusted stroke mortality rates were significantly clustered in the southeastern United States for both whites and blacks; in addition, for whites, low-rate states were concentrated in some Mountain and northeastern states. Migrant status did not change this large-scale pattern, but individual states showed significant migration effects, which varied in magnitude and direction. Among whites, states that benefited from migration, with markedly lower stroke mortality rates among residents than natives, included Arizona, Colorado, District of Columbia, and Florida, whereas states that suffered from migration included California, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Nevada, and Oklahoma. Among blacks, only Colorado showed an apparent large benefit from migration, whereas 21 states suffered from migration. Although the overall large-scale spatial distribution of resident stroke mortality rates cannot be explained by migration effects, some individual states had rates that were strongly influenced by migration. Patterns of mortality among migrant groups in Sun Belt retirement destination states probably result from differential selection effects for retirement migration in older adults. Patterns of mortality for black migrants to the North are probably influenced by "carryover" effects from their origin states.

  16. Trends in mortality following mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villwock, Mark R; Padalino, David J; Deshaies, Eric M

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke has been growing in popularity while the therapeutic benefit of MT has been increasingly debated. Our objective was to examine national trends in mortality following MT. We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample (2012) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2008-2011) for patients with a primary diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke that received MT. Temporal trends in mortality were examined using Spearman's rank correlation. To account for confounding factors, mortality was further analyzed in binary logistic regression. Hospitals performing MT comprised 8% of all hospitals treating ischemic stroke. The percentage of stroke cases treated with MT increased from 0.6% of cases in 2008 to 1.1% in 2012, totaling 16 307 MT cases in a 5 year period. Inhospital mortality decreased over the study period from 25.4% in 2008 to 16.1% in 2012 (r=-0.081, ptrend is increasing. Mortality following MT has been showing a steady decline over the past 5 years. This may be a result of a learning curve, improved patient selection, and/or device improvements. Randomized trials remain essential to evaluate the potential benefit of endovascular devices and identify the most appropriate patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Clinically significant change in stroke volume in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolferen, Serge A; van de Veerdonk, Marielle C; Mauritz, Gert-Jan; Jacobs, Wouter; Marcus, J Tim; Marques, Koen M J; Bronzwaer, Jean G F; Heymans, Martijn W; Boonstra, Anco; Postmus, Pieter E; Westerhof, Nico; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2011-05-01

    Stroke volume is probably the best hemodynamic parameter because it reflects therapeutic changes and contains prognostic information in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stroke volume directly reflects right ventricular function in response to its load, without the correction of compensatory increased heart rate as is the case for cardiac output. For this reason, stroke volume, which can be measured noninvasively, is an important hemodynamic parameter to monitor during treatment. However, the extent of change in stroke volume that constitutes a clinically significant change is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the minimal important difference (MID) in stroke volume in PH. One hundred eleven patients were evaluated at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up with a 6-min walk test (6MWT) and cardiac MRI. Using the anchor-based method with 6MWT as the anchor, and the distribution-based method, the MID of stroke volume change could be determined. After 1 year of treatment, there was, on average, a significant increase in stroke volume and 6MWT. The change in stroke volume was related to the change in 6MWT. Using the anchor-based method, an MID of 10 mL in stroke volume was calculated. The distribution-based method resulted in an MID of 8 to 12 mL. Both methods showed that a 10-mL change in stroke volume during follow-up should be considered as clinically relevant. This value can be used to interpret changes in stroke volume during clinical follow-up in PH.

  18. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  19. A STUDY ON THE CLINICAL CORRELATION OF THE GLYCAEMIC STATUS AND STROKE EVENTS AMONG STROKE PATIENTS ADMITTED IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ghanachandra Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Stroke is a common cause of chronic debilitating disease as a result of the vascular related effect of certain part of the brain. Also the mortality due to the nature of stroke either Intracerebral Haemorrhage (ICH or Cerebral Infarction (Ischaemic stroke vary, the earlier causing more fatality. The risk factors of the ICH or the Ischaemic stroke vary to certain degree. Glycaemic state of stroke patients affects the outcome of them. It is of importance to establish clinical correlation of the glycaemic status of the stroke patients with the type and extent of the lesion documented by Computerised Tomography (CT scan of brain for development of preventive measures and clinical management of such patients for better outcome. Hence, this study was conducted among stroke patients who were admitted in Medicine wards, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS, Porompat, Manipur. DATA AND METHODS A study of stroke cases was undertaken in patients who were admitted to Medicine wards, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS, Porompat, Manipur from January 2011 till December 2014. All the patients were investigated with CT scan brain, Blood sugar along with Glycosylated Haemoglobin (HbA1C besides other routine tests and recorded. RESULT Out of the 200 stroke patients registered in 48 months, 120 patients were having hyperglycaemia. All the patients with stress hyperglycaemia were haemorrhagic. 85.71% of the cases among known diabetes were also haemorrhagic. CONCLUSION Glycaemic state of patients presented in stroke gives a picture of clinical difference. The size of the lesion measured by CT scan of brain also varies among different types of hyperglycaemia and the prognosis of the patients and showed that those patients with higher glucose level had haemorrhagic lesions with bigger size and had higher mortality rate. The deteriorating glucose tolerance with age also contributes to the increased incidence

  20. Impact of stroke unit in a public hospital on length of hospitalization and rate of early mortality of ischemic stroke patients

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    Maria Sheila G. Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We ascertained whether a public health stroke unit reduces the length of hospitalization, the rate of inpatient fatality, and the mortality rate 30 days after the stroke. Methods We compared a cohort of stroke patients managed on a general neurology/medical ward with a similar cohort of stroke patients managed in a str oke unit. The in-patient fatality rates and 30-day mortality rates were analyzed. Results 729 patients were managed in the general ward and 344 were treated at a comprehensive stroke unit. The in-patient fatality rates were 14.7% for the general ward group and 6.9% for the stroke unit group (p<0.001. The overall mortality rate 30 days after stroke was 20.9% for general ward patients and 14.2% for stroke unit patients (p=0.005. Conclusions We observed reduced in-patient fatalities and 30-day mortality rates in patients managed in the stroke unit. There was no impact on the length of hospitalization.

  1. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality for Stroke in Douala, Cameroon

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    N. Y. Mapoure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to describe complications in hospitalized patients for stroke and to determine the predictive factors of intrahospital mortality from stroke at the Douala General Hospital (DGH in Cameroon. Patients and Methods. A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2012, at the DGH. All the patients who were aged more than 15 years with established diagnosis of stroke were included. A univariate analysis was done to look for factors associated with the risk of death, whilst the predictive factors of death were determined in a multivariate analysis following Cox regression model. Results. Of the 325 patients included patients, 68.1% were males and the mean age was 58.66 ± 13.6 years. Ischaemic stroke accounted for 52% of the cases. Sepsis was the leading complications present in 99 (30.12% cases. Independent predicting factors of in-hospital mortality were Glasgow Coma Scale lower than 8 (HR = 2.17 95% CI 4.86–36.8; P=0.0001, hyperglycaemia at admission (HR = 3.61 95% CI 1.38–9.44; P=0.009, and hemorrhagic stroke (HR = 5.65 95% CI 1.77–18; P=0.003. Conclusion. The clinician should systematically diagnose and treat infectious states and hyperglycaemia in stroke.

  2. Time to Computerized Tomography Scan, Age, and Mortality in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Kidd, Andrew C; Kwok, Chun Shing; Musgrave, Stanley D; Redmayne, Oliver; Metcalf, Anthony K; Ngeh, Joseph; Nicolson, Anne; Owusu-Agyei, Peter; Shekhar, Raj; Walsh, Kevin; Day, Diana J; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Bachmann, Max O; Potter, John F

    2016-12-01

    Time to computerized tomography (CT) is important to institute appropriate and timely hyperacute management in stroke. We aimed to evaluate mortality outcomes in relation to age and time to CT scan. We used routinely collected data in 8 National Health Service trusts in East of England between September 2008 and April 2011. Stroke cases were prospectively identified and confirmed. Odds ratios (ORs) for unadjusted and adjusted models for age categories (24 hours) and in-hospital and early (<7 days) mortality outcomes were calculated. Of the 7693 patients (mean age 76.1 years, 50% male) included, 1151 (16%) died as inpatients and 336 (4%) died within 7 days. Older patients and those admitted from care home had a significantly longer time from admission until CT (P < .001). Patients who had earlier CT scans were admitted to stroke units more frequently (P < .001) but had higher in-patient (P < .001) and 7-day mortality (P < .001). Whereas older age was associated with increased odds of mortality outcomes, longer time to CT was associated with significantly reduced mortality within 7 days (corresponding ORs for the above time periods were 1.00, .61 [95% confidence interval {CI}: .39-.95], .39 [.24-.64], and .16 [.08-.33]) and in-hospital mortality (ORs 1.00, .86 [.64-1.15], .57 [.42-.78] and .71 [.52-.98]). Older age was associated with a significantly longer time to CT. However, using CT scan time as a benchmarking tool in stroke may have inherent limitations and does not appear to be a suitable quality marker. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence, incidence, and mortality of stroke in the chinese island populations: a systematic review.

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    Xiaomei Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In China, there are 2.5 million new stroke cases each year and 7.5 million stroke survivors. However, stroke incidence in some island populations is obviously lower compared with inland regions, perhaps due to differences in diet and lifestyle. As the lifestyle in China has changed significantly, along with dramatic transformations in social, economic and environmental conditions, such changes have also been seen in island regions. Thus, we analyzed stroke in the Chinese island regions over the past 30 years. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to identify reliable and comparable epidemiologic evidence about stroke in the Chinese island regions between 1980 and 2013. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility and the quality of the articles and disagreement was resolved by discussion. Owing to the great heterogeneity among individual study estimates, a random-effects or fixed-effects model was used to incorporate the heterogeneity among records into a pooled estimate for age-standardized rates. Age-standardized rates were calculated by the direct method with the 2000 world population if included records provided the necessary information. RESULTS: During the past three decades, the overall pooled age-standardized prevalence of stroke is 6.17 per 1000 (95% CI 4.56-7.78, an increase from 5.54 per 1000 (95% CI 3.88-7.20 prior to 2000 to 8.34 per 1000 (95% CI 5.98-10.69 after 2000. However, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The overall pooled age-standardized incidence of stroke is 120.42 per 100,000 person years (95% CI 26.17-214.67. Between 1982 and 2008, the incidence of stroke increased and mortality declined over time. CONCLUSIONS: Effective intervention and specific policy recommendations on stroke prevention should be required, and formulated in a timely fashion to effectively curb the increased trend of stroke in Chinese island regions.

  4. Prevalence, incidence, and mortality of stroke in the chinese island populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomei; Zhu, Bo; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Zou, Safeng; Shi, Jingpu

    2013-01-01

    In China, there are 2.5 million new stroke cases each year and 7.5 million stroke survivors. However, stroke incidence in some island populations is obviously lower compared with inland regions, perhaps due to differences in diet and lifestyle. As the lifestyle in China has changed significantly, along with dramatic transformations in social, economic and environmental conditions, such changes have also been seen in island regions. Thus, we analyzed stroke in the Chinese island regions over the past 30 years. We conducted a systematic review to identify reliable and comparable epidemiologic evidence about stroke in the Chinese island regions between 1980 and 2013. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility and the quality of the articles and disagreement was resolved by discussion. Owing to the great heterogeneity among individual study estimates, a random-effects or fixed-effects model was used to incorporate the heterogeneity among records into a pooled estimate for age-standardized rates. Age-standardized rates were calculated by the direct method with the 2000 world population if included records provided the necessary information. During the past three decades, the overall pooled age-standardized prevalence of stroke is 6.17 per 1000 (95% CI 4.56-7.78), an increase from 5.54 per 1000 (95% CI 3.88-7.20) prior to 2000 to 8.34 per 1000 (95% CI 5.98-10.69) after 2000. However, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. The overall pooled age-standardized incidence of stroke is 120.42 per 100,000 person years (95% CI 26.17-214.67). Between 1982 and 2008, the incidence of stroke increased and mortality declined over time. Effective intervention and specific policy recommendations on stroke prevention should be required, and formulated in a timely fashion to effectively curb the increased trend of stroke in Chinese island regions.

  5. Trends in Mortality from Ischemic Heart Disease, Stroke, and Stomach Cancer: from past to future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Amiri (Masoud)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe common occurrence of chronic diseases – such as ischemic heart diseases (IHD, stroke, and stomach cancer in most populations and the attendant mortality, loss of independence, impaired quality of life, and social and economic costs are compelling reasons for public health

  6. Body mass index, initial neurological severity and long-term mortality in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Wi-Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is believed to increase the risks of ischemic stroke or coronary heart disease; however, regarding outcome after established vascular diseases, recent unexpected evidence has suggested that an increased body mass index (BMI) might have beneficial effects (obesity paradox). The aim of this study was to evaluate the independent association between BMI and long-term mortality after ischemic stroke. A total of 1,592 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were prospectively included through our stroke cohort. In this study, the levels of BMI were classified based on guidelines for the Asian-Pacific population. Initial neurological severity was estimated by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Information on mortality was collected until the end of 2009, and the median follow-up period was 4 years. To examine the association between BMI and long-term mortality, we used Cox's proportional regression analysis. During follow-up, 23% of patients died. Linear regression analysis showed that the level of BMI was inversely related to initial neurological severity (p = 0.002). In the model of adjustment of age and gender using Cox's proportional regression analysis, this inverse trend was also significant (reference, normal weight; hazard ratio of underweight, 2.45; overweight, 0.77; obesity, 0.60). However, after adjustment of all covariates, including initial neurological severity, only the harmful effect of underweight remained significant (2.79; 95% CI, 1.92-4.05); however, beneficial effects of overweight and obesity did not. Our study showed that an independent association between BMI and long-term mortality after ischemic stroke was found only in underweight patients. The obesity paradox phenomenon seems to be limited, and might not be interpreted as a direct causal relationship due to a strong association with initial neurological severity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Association of the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in microRNAs 130b, 200b, and 495 with Ischemic Stroke Susceptibility and Post-Stroke Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkwon Kim

    Full Text Available The microRNA (miRNA is a small non-coding RNA molecule that modulates gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Platelets have a crucial role in both hemostasis and thrombosis, a condition that can occlude a cerebral artery and cause ischemic stroke. miR-130b, miR-200b, and miR-495 are potential genetic modulators involving platelet production and activation. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in these miRNAs might potentially contribute to the susceptibility to ischemic stroke and post-stroke mortality. This study included 523 ischemic stroke patients and 400 control subjects. We investigated the association of three miRNA SNPs (miR-130bT>C, miR-200bT>C, and miR-495A>C with ischemic stroke prevalence and post-stroke mortality. In the multivariate logistic regression, there was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of miR-130bT>C, miR-200bT>C, or miR-495A>C between the ischemic stroke and control groups. In the subgroup analysis based on ischemic stroke subtype, the miR-200b CC genotype was less frequently found in the large-artery atherosclerosis stroke subtype compared with controls (TT+CT vs CC; adjusted odds ratio for CC, 0.506; 95% confidence interval, 0.265-0.965. During a mean follow-up period of 4.80 ± 2.11 years after stroke onset, there were 106 all-cause deaths among the 523 stroke patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis did not find a significant association between post-stroke mortality and three miRNA SNPs. Our findings suggest that the functional SNP of miR-200b might be responsible for the susceptibility to large-artery atherosclerotic stroke.

  8. Cause-Specific Mortality after Stroke: Relation to Age, Sex, Stroke Severity, and Risk Factors in a 10-Year Follow-Up Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, UB; Olsen, TS; Andersen, KK

    2013-01-01

    We investigated cause-specific mortality in relation to age, sex, stroke severity, and cardiovascular risk factor profile in the Copenhagen Stroke Study cohort with 10 years of follow-up. In a Copenhagen community, all patients admitted to the hospital with stroke during 1992-1993 (n = 988) were...... registered on admission. Evaluation included stroke severity, computed tomography scan, and a cardiovascular risk profile. Cause of death within 10 years according to death certificate information was classified as stroke, heart/arterial disease, or nonvascular disease. Competing-risks analyses were...... after 10 years (18%). Stroke was the dominant cause of death during first year, with an absolute risk of 20.2% versus 5.2% for heart/arterial disease and 6.5% for nonvascular disease. The subsequent absolute risk of death per year was 2.8% for stroke, 4.5% for heart/arterial disease, and 5...

  9. Stroke Prevalence, Mortality and Disability-Adjusted Life Years in Children and Youth Aged 0-19 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; deVeber, Gabrielle; Feigin, Valery L

    2015-01-01

    research and the resulting evidence-based strategies for stroke prevention and management. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence, mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for ischemic stroke (IS), hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and all stroke types combined globally from 1990 to 2013. METHODOLOGY...... and consistent estimates of prevalence and mortality. Stroke-specific disability weights were used to estimate years lived with disability and DALYs. Means and 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) were calculated for prevalence, mortality and DALYs. The median of the percent change and 95% UI were determined...... increases in the global prevalence rates of childhood IS, as well as significant decreases in the global death rate and DALYs rate of all strokes in those of age 0-19 years. While prevalence rates for childhood IS and HS decreased significantly in developed countries, a decline was seen only in HS...

  10. Stroke rehabilitation and risk of mortality: a population-based cohort study stratified by age and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Ni, Cheng-Hua; Li, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Lin, Li-Fong; Shen, Hsiu-Nien

    2015-06-01

    To determine the survival of patients with stroke for up to 10 years after a first-time stroke and to investigate whether stroke rehabilitation within the first 3 months reduced long-term mortality in these patients. We used the medical claims data for a random sample of 1 million insured Taiwanese registered in the year 2000. A total of 7767 patients admitted for a first-time stroke between 2000 and 2005; 1285 (16.7%) received rehabilitation within the first 3 months after stroke admission. The other 83.3% of patients served as a comparison cohort. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk of mortality in relation to the rehabilitation intervention. In all, 181 patients with rehabilitation and 1123 controls died, representing respective mortality rates of 25.0 and 32.7 per 1000 person-years. Rehabilitation was significantly associated with a lower risk of mortality (hazard ratio .68, 95% confidence interval .58-.79). Such a beneficial effect tended to be more obvious as the frequency of rehabilitation increased (P for the trend Stroke rehabilitation initiated in the first 3 months after a stroke admission may significantly reduce the risk of mortality for 10 years after the stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke: Ready for clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie-Claire; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-09-01

    The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke research has increased dramatically over the last decade with two emerging and potentially useful functions identified. Firstly, the use of single pulse TMS as a tool for predicting recovery of motor function after stroke, and secondly, the use of repetitive TMS (rTMS) as a treatment adjunct aimed at modifying the excitability of the motor cortex in preparation for rehabilitation. This review discusses recent advances in the use of TMS in both prediction and treatment after stroke. Prediction of recovery after stroke is a complex process and the use of TMS alone is not sufficient to provide accurate prediction for an individual after stroke. However, when applied in conjunction with other tools such as clinical assessment and MRI, accuracy of prediction using TMS is increased. rTMS temporarily modulates cortical excitability after stroke. Very few rTMS studies are completed in the acute or sub-acute stages after stroke and the translation of altered cortical excitability into gains in motor function are modest, with little evidence of long term effects. Although gains have been made in both of these areas, further investigation is needed before these techniques can be applied in routine clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sex Differences in Stroke Incidence, Prevalence, Mortality and Disability-Adjusted Life Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Bennett, Derrick A; Krishnamurthi, Rita V

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accurate information on stroke burden in men and women are important for evidence-based healthcare planning and resource allocation. Previously, limited research suggested that the absolute number of deaths from stroke in women was greater than in men, but the incidence and mortality...... incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and healthy years lost due to disability were estimated as part of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 Study. Data inputs included all available information on stroke incidence, prevalence and death and case fatality rates...... ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) incidence (per 100,000) in men (IS 132.77 (95% UI 125.34-142.77); HS 64.89 (95% UI 59.82-68.85)) exceeded those of women (IS 98.85 (95% UI 92.11-106.62); HS 45.48 (95% UI 42.43-48.53)). IS incidence rates were lower in 2013 compared with 1990 rates for both...

  13. Modeling of in hospital mortality determinants in myocardial infarction patients, with and without stroke: A national study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The data and determinants of mortality due to stroke in myocardial infarction (MI patients are unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate the differences in risk factors for hospital mortality among MI patients with and without stroke history. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective, cohort study; 20,750 new patients with MI from April, 2012 to March, 2013 were followed up and their data were analyzed according to having or not having the stroke history. Stroke and MI were defined based on the World Health Organization′s definition. The data were analyzed by logistic regression in STATA software. Results: Of the 20,750 studied patients, 4293 had stroke history. The prevalence of stroke in the studied population was derived 20.96% (confidence interval [CI] 95%: 20.13-21.24. Of the patients, 2537 (59.1% had ST-elevation MI (STEMI. Mortality ratio in patients with and without stroke was obtained 18.8% and 10.3%, respectively. The prevalence of risk factors in MI patients with and without a stroke is various. The adjusted odds ratio of mortality in patients with stroke history was derived 7.02 (95% CI: 5.42-9 for chest pain resistant to treatment, 2.39 (95% CI: 1.97-2.9 for STEMI, 3.02 (95% CI: 2.5-3.64 for lack of thrombolytic therapy, 2.2 (95% CI: 1.66-2.91 for heart failure, and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.6-2.9 for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion: With regards to the factors associated with mortality in this study, it is particularly necessary to control the mortality in MI patients with stroke history. More emphasis should be placed on the MI patients with the previous stroke over those without in the interventions developed for prevention and treatment, and for the prevention of avoidable mortalities.

  14. C-reactive protein and homocysteine predict long-term mortality in young ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Halvor; Nyland, Harald; Idicula, Titto; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine on follow-up and subsequent mortality in young ischemic stroke patients in a population-based study. Young ischemic stroke patients were followed-up on average 6 years after the index stroke. CRP and homocysteine levels were measured and risk factors were recorded, including myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, and cancer. Stroke outcome was measured using the modified Rankin Scale score. Subsequent survival was obtained by examining the official population registry. Cox regression analyses were performed. In total, 198 patients were included in this study (82 [41%] women and 116 [59%] men). The mean age on follow-up was 47.8 years. In total, 36 (18.2%) patients died during the subsequent mean follow-up of 12.4 years. Cox regression analysis revealed that mortality was associated with CRP (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05; P=.001) and homocysteine levels (HR 1.04; P=.02) in patients without dissection. Kaplan-Meier curves grouped by dichotomized CRP (CRP≤1 v >1 mg/L) showed increasing separation between the survival curves, and likewise for dichotomized homocysteine (≤9 v >9 μg/L). There is an independent association between CRP and homocysteine levels obtained several years after ischemic stroke in young adults and subsequent mortality, even when adjusting for traditional risk factors. This association seems to continue for at least 12 years after the measurements. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of light rail transit on traffic-related pollution and stroke mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sug; Sener, Ipek Nese

    2017-09-01

    This paper evaluates the changes in vehicle exhaust and stroke mortality for the general public residing in the surrounding area of the light rail transit (LRT) in Houston, Texas, after its opening. The number of daily deaths due to stroke for 2002-2005 from the surrounding area of the original LRT line (exposure group) and the control groups was analyzed using an interrupted time-series analysis. Ambient concentrations of acetylene before and after the opening of LRT were also compared. A statistically significant reduction in the average concentration of acetylene was observed for the exposure sites whereas the reduction was negligible at the control site. Poisson regression models applied to the stroke mortality data indicated a significant reduction in daily stroke mortality after the opening of LRT for the exposure group, while there was either an increase or a considerably smaller reduction for the control groups. The findings support the idea that LRT systems provide health benefits for the general public and that the reduction in motor-vehicle-related air pollution may have contributed to these health benefits.

  16. Comparing the decline in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in neighbouring countries with different healthcare systems.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, K

    2013-06-04

    OBJECTIVE: To examine age and gender specific trends in coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke mortality in two neighbouring countries, the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI). DESIGN: Epidemiological study of time trends in CHD and stroke mortality. SETTING\\/PATIENTS: The populations of the ROI and NI, 1985-2010. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Directly age standardised CHD and stroke mortality rates were calculated and analysed using joinpoint regression to identify years where the slope of the linear trend changed significantly. This was performed separately for specific age groups (25-54, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-84 years) and by gender. Annual percentage change (APC) and 95% CIs are presented. RESULTS: There was a striking similarity between the two countries, with percentage change between 1985 and 1989 and between 2006 and 2010 of 67% and 69% in CHD mortality, and 64% and 62% in stroke mortality for the ROI and NI, respectively. However, joinpoint analysis identified differences in the pace of change between the two countries. There was an accelerated pace of decline (negative APC) in mortality for both CHD and stroke in both countries from the mid-1990s (APC ROI -8% (95% CI -9.5 to 6.5) and NI -6.6% (-6.9 to -6.3)), but the accelerated decrease started later for CHD mortality in the ROI. In recent years, a levelling off in CHD mortality was observed in the 25-54 year age group in NI and in stroke mortality for men and women in the ROI. CONCLUSIONS: While differences in the pace of change in mortality were observed at different time points, similar, substantial decreases in CHD and stroke mortality were achieved between 1985 and 1989 and between 2006 and 2010 in the ROI and NI despite important differences in health service structures. There is evidence of a levelling in mortality rates in some groups in recent years.

  17. Current clinical practices in stroke rehabilitation: regional pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Oelschlager, Ashley; Agah, Arvin; Pohl, Patricia S; Ahmad, S Omar; Liu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the current physical and occupational therapy practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Midwest. The insights gained from this pilot study will be used in a future study aimed at understanding stroke rehabilitation practices across the nation. Researchers and clinicians in the field of stroke rehabilitation were interviewed, and past studies in the literature were analyzed. Through these activities, we developed a 37-item questionnaire that was sent to occupational and physical therapists practicing in Kansas and Missouri who focus on the care of people who have had a stroke (n = 320). A total of 107 respondents returned a com pleted questionnaire, which gives a response rate of about 36%. The majority of respondents had more than 12 years of experience treating patients with stroke. Consensus of 70% or more was found for 80% of the items. The preferred approaches for the rehabilitation of people who have had a stroke are the Bobath and Brunnstrom methods, which are being used by 93% and 85% of the physical and occupational therapists, respectively. Even though some variability existed in certain parts of the survey, in general clinicians agreed on different treatment approaches in issues dealing with muscle tone, weakness, and limited range of motion in stroke rehabilitation. Some newer treatment approaches that have been proven to be effective are practiced only by a minority of clinicians. The uncertainty among clinicians in some sections of the survey reveals that more evidence on clinical approaches is needed to ensure efficacious treatments.

  18. Comparison of short term mortality in ischemic stroke patients with or without stress hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, W; Zaidi, S.B.H.; Waheed, S.; Khan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare short term mortality in non-diabetic ischemic stroke patients with or without stress hyperglycemia. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at Neurology Department of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from Jan 2010 to Jul 2012 for a total duration of six months. Material and Methods: Non-diabetic ischemic stroke patients were included in the study and they were divided in two groups. Each group had 75 patients. Group 'I' (Normoglycemic or control group) had normal blood glucose level while group 'II' (Hyperglycaemic or cohort) had hyperglycaemia on presentation or over next 72 hours. Prognosis in terms of patient either being dead or alive was determined within or at 4 weeks of admission in both groups. Data were entered and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences SPSS version 10. Descriptive statistics were calculated for both qualitative and quantitative variables. For comparison of short term mortality in hyperglycaemic and normoglycemic stroke patients, chi-square test was applied. p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Short term mortality was higher in cohort (hyperglycemic) group as compared to control (normoglycemic) group (34.7 percent vs. 14.7 percent). Relative risk was 2.36. The groups had a statistically significant difference in the short term mortality within four weeks with a Chi-Square 'p' value of 0.004 (p=0.004). Conclusion: Short term mortality in non-diabetic ischemic stroke patients with stress hyperglycemia is higher than those patients who do not have stress hyperglycemia. (author)

  19. Epidemiology and clinical presentation of stroke in Upper Egypt (desert area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Tallawy HN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy N El Tallawy,1 Wafaa M Farghaly,1 Reda Badry,1 Nermin A Hamdy,2 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Nabil A Metwally,3 Enas M Hassan,2 Sayed S Elsayed,2 Mohamed A Yehia,2 Wael T Soliman2 1Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut, 2Department of Neurology, El Minia University, El-Minia City, 3Department of Neurology, Al-Azhar University (Assuit Branch, Assiut, Egypt Background: Stroke is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Four out of five strokes occur in the low- and middle-income countries. This study aims to find lifetime prevalence of stroke in Upper Egypt and to identify clinical presentations and possible risk factors of stroke in this population.Methods: This is a door-to-door (every door study conducted on all inhabitants in Al Kharga district (representative of western desert and Al Quseir city (representative of eastern desert. The study was conducted in two stages, and every stage consisted of three phases (screening, diagnostic, and investigatory.Results: The total lifetime prevalence of stroke was 8.5/1,000 in the population aged 20 years and more. It increased with advancing age and was higher among males than females among all age groups except in the childbearing period (20 years to <40 years of age. Lifetime prevalence of ischemic stroke (7.2/1,000 was higher than hemorrhagic stroke (1.1/1,000. Hemiparesis and hemiplegia were the commonest presentation of stroke. Headache, vomiting, and vertigo were found to be significantly more common accompaniments of hemorrhagic stroke. The most common risk factor was hypertension, followed by hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: The total lifetime prevalence of stroke in the population aged 20 years and more in Upper Egypt (desert area lies within the range that is recorded in developing countries. Clinical presentation and risk factors are similar to those recorded from developing and developed countries. Keywords: stroke

  20. Enhancing the Alignment of the Preclinical and Clinical Stroke Recovery Research Pipeline: Consensus-Based Core Recommendations From the Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable Translational Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Dale; Carmichael, S Thomas; Murphy, Timothy H; Jones, Theresa A; Schwab, Martin E; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Clarkson, Andrew N; Dancause, Numa; Weiloch, Tadeusz; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Nilsson, Michael; McCullough, Louise D; Joy, Mary T

    2017-08-01

    Stroke recovery research involves distinct biological and clinical targets compared to the study of acute stroke. Guidelines are proposed for the pre-clinical modeling of stroke recovery and for the alignment of pre-clinical studies to clinical trials in stroke recovery.

  1. Prevalence of Positive Troponin and Echocardiogram Findings and Association With Mortality in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Peter; Khoury, Jane; Eckerle, Bryan; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Mathew L; De Los Rios la Rosa, Felipe; Mackey, Jason; Adeoye, Opeolu; Martini, Sharyl; Ferioli, Simona; Kissela, Brett M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-05-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients may have raised serum cardiac troponin levels on admission, although it is unclear what prognostic implications this has, and whether elevated levels are associated with cardiac causes of stroke or structural cardiac disease as seen on echocardiogram. We investigated the positivity of cardiac troponin and echocardiogram testing within a large biracial AIS population and any association with poststroke mortality. Within a catchment area of 1.3 million, we screened emergency department admissions from 2010 using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition , discharge codes 430 to 436 and ascertained all physician-confirmed AIS cases by retrospective chart review. Hypertroponinemia was defined as elevation in cardiac troponin above the standard 99th percentile. Multiple logistic regression was performed, controlling for stroke severity, history of cardiac disease, and all other stroke risk factors. Of 1999 AIS cases, 1706 (85.3%) had a cardiac troponin drawn and 1590 (79.5%) had echocardiograms. Hypertroponinemia occurred in 353 of 1706 (20.7%) and 160 of 1590 (10.1%) had echocardiogram findings of interest. Among 1377 who had both tests performed, hypertroponinemia was independently associated with echocardiogram findings (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 2-4.2). When concurrent myocardial infarctions (3.5%) were excluded, hypertroponinemia was also associated with increased mortality at 1 year (35%; odds ratio, 3.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-5.6) and 3 years (60%; odds ratio, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-4.11). Hypertroponinemia in the context of AIS without concurrent myocardial infarction was associated with structural cardiac disease and long-term mortality. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether further cardiac evaluation might improve the long-term mortality rates seen in this group. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Prediction of Clinical Outcome in Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke from a Single CT Scan on Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Chiranjib; Das, Kamalesh; Ghosh, Mrinalkanti; Khandakar, M R

    2012-10-01

    From a single CT scan in primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), clinical outcome can be assessed on admission by using the CT scan parameters. The study aims to find out how hematoma volume, location of stroke, midline shift, intraventricular extension of bleed and ventricle compression influence the clinical outcome in patients with acute ICH. Non-contrast CT scan was done on admission in hospital for every patient with acute hemorrhagic stroke and was analyzed accordingly. Clinical assessments were done in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Mean hematoma volume associated with death before 30 days is 33.16 cm(3) (P 30 cm(3) (OR = 27.857), brain stem hemorrhage (OR = 6.000), intraventricular extension of bleed from other location (OR = 7.846), presence of ventricular compression alone (OR = 2.700) and in combination with midline shift of ≥ 5 mm (OR = 2.124). From a single CT scan during hospital admission, mortality and morbidity in next 30 days can be predicted. A hematoma volume >30 cm(3), brain stem hematoma, intraventricular extension of bleed and ventricular compression along and with midline shift are associated with early mortality in ICH.

  3. The Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Dysphagia Following Acute Stroke: a Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah E; Miles, Anna; Fink, John N; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2018-03-30

    Cough reflex testing has been evaluated as a component of the clinical swallowing assessment as a means of identifying patients at risk of aspiration during swallowing. A previous study by our research group found good sensitivity and specificity of the cough reflex test for identifying patients at risk of aspiration post-stroke, yet its use did not decrease pneumonia rates, contrary to previous reports. The aim of this study was to expand on our earlier work by implementing a clinical management protocol incorporating cough reflex testing within the same healthcare setting and compare patient outcomes to those from the original study and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with acute stroke who were managed using the Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol (DiSP). Secondarily, to compare those outcomes to historical data prior to implementation of the DiSP. This clinical audit measured outcomes from 284 patients with acute stroke managed per the DiSP, which guides use of videofluoroscopic swallowing study and patient management based on clinical exam with cough reflex testing. Data from our previous trial were included for comparison of pre- and post-DiSP patient outcomes. Data collection took place between November 2012 and April 2016 at four urban hospitals within New Zealand. Following implementation of the DiSP, the rate of aspiration pneumonia (10%) was substantially lower than the pre-DiSP rate (28%), with no pneumonia readmissions within 3 months. Pneumonia-related mortality was unchanged. By 3 months, 81% of the patients were on a normal diet and 67% had returned home, compared to pre-DiSP outcomes of 55% and 55% respectively. Previous work has suggested that simply implementing cough reflex testing in dysphagia management may not be sufficient to improve patient outcomes. The present study adds to this picture by suggesting that the true variable of influence may be the way in which the results of the test are applied to patient care. There is a strong case

  4. Mortality, stroke, and heart failure in atrial fibrillation cohorts after ablation versus propensity-matched cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Julian We; Hunter, Tina D; Hussain, Wajid; March, Jamie L; Wong, Tom; Markides, Vias

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine from key clinical outcomes whether catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased survival. Using routinely collected hospital data, ablation patients were matched to two control cohorts using direct and propensity score methodology. Four thousand nine hundred ninety-one ablation patients were matched 1:1 with general AF controls without ablation. Five thousand four hundred seven ablation patients were similarly matched to controls who underwent cardioversion. We examined the rates of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (stroke/TIA), heart failure hospitalization, and death. Matched populations had very similar comorbidity profiles, including nearly identical CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc risk distribution ( p =0.6948 and p =0.8152 vs general AF and cardioversion cohorts). Kaplan-Meier models showed increased survival after ablation for all outcomes compared with both control cohorts ( p vs general AF, p =0.0087 for stroke/TIA, p vs cardioversion). Cox regression models also showed improved survival after ablation for all outcomes compared with the general AF cohort (hazard ratio [HR]=0.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.3-0.6, p stroke/TIA; HR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.6, p stroke/TIA; HR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.3-0.6, p stroke/TIA, and heart failure compared with a matched general AF population and a matched population who underwent cardioversion. Potential confounding of outcomes was minimized by very tight cohort matching.

  5. MRI white Matter Lesions in a Stroke Clinic Population: Correlation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral white matter lesions (WML) on MRI have been related not only to age but also to cerebrovascular disorders. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of WML in a population of patients attending a stroke clinic and relate it to the presence of carotid atherosclerosis as determined by increased carotid ...

  6. Incidence of Depression After Stroke, and Associated Risk Factors and Mortality Outcomes, in a Large Cohort of Danish Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese S. H.; Wium-Andersen, Ida K.; Wium-Andersen, Marie K.

    2016-01-01

    Importance: More than 30 million people live with a stroke diagnosis worldwide. Depression after stroke is frequent, and greater knowledge of associated risk factors and outcomes is needed to understand the etiology and implications of this disabling complication. Objectives: To examine whether......, history of depression, and stroke severity (in patients with stroke). The associations were strongest for the reference population. In both populations, depressed individuals, especially those with new onset, had increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for new-onset depression, 1.89 [95% CI, 1...

  7. Impact of Modified Transesophageal Echocardiography on Mortality and Stroke after Cardiac Surgery: A Large Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. Jansen Klomp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of perioperative screening with modified transesophageal echocardiography (A-View method. We compared, in consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2006 and 2014, 30-day mortality and in-hospital stroke incidence, operated either with perioperative modified TEE screening (intervention group or only with conventional TEE screening (control group. Of the 8,605 study patients, modified TEE was applied in 1,391 patients (16.2%. Patients in the intervention group were on average older (71 versus 68 years, p<0.001 and more often females (31.0% versus 28.0%, p<0.001 and had a higher predicted mortality (EuroSCORE I: 5.9% versus 4.0%, p<0.001. The observed 30-day mortality was 2.2% and 2.5% in both groups, respectively, with multivariable and propensity-score adjusted relative risks (RRs of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.50–1.00, p=0.05 and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.45–0.98, p=0.04. In-hospital stroke was 2.9% and 2.1% in both groups, respectively, with adjusted RRs of 1.03 (95% CI: 0.73–1.45 and 1.01 (95% CI: 0.71–1.43. In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, use of perioperative screening for aortic atherosclerosis with modified TEE was associated with lower postoperative mortality, but not stroke, as compared to patients operated on without such screening.

  8. The confounding of race and geography: how much of the excess stroke mortality among African Americans is explained by geography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongyan; Howard, George; Coffey, Christopher S; Roseman, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    The excess stroke mortality among African Americans and Southerners is well known. Because a higher proportion of the population living in the 'Stroke Belt' is African American, then a portion of the estimated excess risk of stroke death traditionally associated with African-American race may be attributable to geography (i.e., race and geography are 'confounded'). In this paper we estimate the proportion of the excess stroke mortality among African Americans that is attributable to geography. The numbers of stroke deaths at the county level are available from the vital statistics system of the US. A total of 1,143 counties with a population of at least 500 whites and 500 African Americans were selected for these analyses. The black-to-white stroke mortality ratio was estimated with and without adjustment for county of residence for those aged 45-64 and for those aged 65 and over. The difference in the stroke mortality ratio before versus after adjustment for county provides an estimate of the proportion of the excess stroke mortality inappropriately attributed to race (that is in fact attributable to geographic region). For ages 45-64, the black-to-white stroke mortality ratio was reduced from 3.41 to 3.04 for men, and from 2.82 to 2.60 for women, suggesting that between 10 and 15% of the excess mortality traditionally attributed to race is rather due to geography. Over the age of 65, the black-to-white stroke mortality ratio was reduced from 1.31 to 1.27 for men, and from 1.097 to 1.095 for women, suggesting that between 2 and 13% of the excess mortality attributed to black race is actually attributable to geography. The reductions of all the four age strata gender groups were highly significant. These results suggest that a significant, although relatively small, proportion of the excess mortality traditionally attributed to race is rather a factor of geography. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Elevated plasma homocysteine upon ischemic stroke is associated with increased long-term mortality in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Ioanna; Klironomos, Stefanos; Kostulas, Konstantinos; Sjostrand, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide, despite preventive and therapeutic advances during the last twenty years. Blood-borne biomarkers have been studied in association to short- and long-term outcome, in order to investigate possible modifiable predictors of disability and death. Increased homocysteine has been associated with increased vascular risk and unfavorable outcome, but homocysteine lowering treatment has not consistently been successful in risk reduction. The aim of this study was to investigate homocysteine levels upon acute ischemic stroke in association to long-term mortality. Of 622 patients included in our hospital-based registry, 331 survived the first month after admission, and had a diagnosis of ischemic stroke and available homocysteine values. All-cause and vascular mortality were investigated based on the national patient- and cause of death-registries. Survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate time to death and predictors of outcome. Of 331 patients, 148 (45%) had low homocysteine (homocysteine (> = 13 micromol/L). During 10 years of follow-up (median 5.5 years), 47 patients (32%) with low homocysteine and 94 (51%) with high homocysteine died (phomocysteine group, and was 80 months in the high homocysteine group (p with log-rank test 0.002). High homocysteine was not independently associated with increased risk for death after adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and eGFR (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.86-1.93; p = 0.2). Subgroup analysis by sex showed that high homocysteine was an independent predictor of mortality in women after adjustment for age and vascular comorbidities (HR 1.85; 95% CI 1.03-3.31; p = 0.04), but not in men (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.52-1.43; p = 0.6). Increased plasma homocysteine (> = 13 micromol/L) upon acute ischemic stroke was not independently associated with mortality in our study. In the subgroup of women, high homocysteine was associated with increased five-year risk of death

  10. Stroke Prevalence, Mortality and Disability-Adjusted Life Years in Adults Aged 20-64 Years in 1990-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Moran, Andrew E; Feigin, Valery L

    2015-01-01

    in younger adults. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate prevalence, mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and their trends for total, ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) in the world for 1990-2013 in adults aged 20-64 years. METHODOLOGY: Stroke prevalence, mortality and DALYs......-specific disability weights were used to compute years lived with disability and DALYs. Means and 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) were calculated for prevalence, mortality and DALYs. The median of the percent change and 95% UI were determined for the period from 1990 to 2013. RESULTS: In 2013, in younger adults aged...... services for stroke is required to substantially narrow these disparities. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  11. Critical Periods after Stroke Study: Translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Dromerick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 795,000 Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 hours of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2-3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test at one year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial.

  12. Critical periods after stroke study: translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromerick, Alexander W.; Edwardson, Matthew A.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Giannetti, Margot L.; Barth, Jessica; Brady, Kathaleen P.; Chan, Evan; Tan, Ming T.; Tamboli, Irfan; Chia, Ruth; Orquiza, Michael; Padilla, Robert M.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Mapstone, Mark E.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Federoff, Howard J.; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS) is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 h of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2–3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 1 year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial. PMID

  13. Mortality and institutionalization in early survivors of stroke: the effects of cognition, vascular mild cognitive impairment, and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodaty, Henry; Altendorf, Annette; Withall, Adrienne; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2010-01-01

    We explored th effects of vascular mild cognitive impairment (VaMCI), vascular dementia (VaD), and other predictors on mortality and institutionalization in early survivors of ischemic stroke without previous dementia who had been admitted to a stroke unit. A total of 202 consecutive consenting eligible ischemic stroke survivors and a matched sample of 97 community controls were followed for up to 10 years. Data for 167 patients who underwent detailed assessment 3-6 months after stroke were analyzed to determine predictors of outcomes. Cumulative mortality rates for patients (and controls) were 27% (4%) for the first 5 years and rose to 83% (10%) by 10 years. Predictors of mortality were older age, any cognitive impairment, less independent function, and less education. Nursing home admission rates were 24% at 5 years and 32% at 10 years for patients and 0 for controls over 8.9 years. Predictors of institutionalization were less independent function and older age. Patients with ischemic stroke who survive the first week have moderate, lower-than-expected mortality rates in the first 5 years that increase thereafter. VaMCI, VaD, and functional decline are predictors of mortality, while functional decline and older age predict institutionalization. Copyright © 2010 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating clinical effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing stroke: the CAPAMIS Study, 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Corcoles, Angel; Ochoa-Gondar, Olga; Rodriguez-Blanco, Teresa; de Diego-Cabanes, Cinta; Satue-Gracia, Eva; Vila-Rovira, Angel; Torrente Fraga, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Cerebrovascular benefits using the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) are controversial. This study assessed clinical effectiveness of PPV23 in preventing ischemic stroke in people older than 60 years. We conducted a population-based cohort study involving 27,204 individuals of 60 years or older in Tarragona, Spain, who were prospectively followed from December 01, 2008, until November 30, 2011. Outcomes were neuroimaging-confirmed ischemic stroke, 30-day mortality from stroke, and all-cause death. Pneumococcal vaccination effectiveness was evaluated by Cox regression analyses, estimating hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, and influenza vaccine status. Cohort members were followed for a total of 76,033 person-years, of which 29,065 were for vaccinated subjects. Overall, 343 cases of stroke, 45 deaths from stroke, and 2465 all-cause deaths were observed. Pneumococcal vaccination did not alter the risk of stroke (multivariable HR: 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: .83-1.30; P=.752), death from stroke (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: .61-2.13; P=.686), and all-cause death (HR: .97; 95% CI: .89-1.05; P=.448). In analyses focused on people with and without a history of cerebrovascular disease, the PPV23 did not emerge effective in preventing any analyzed event, but influenza vaccine emerged independently associated with a reduced risk of death from stroke (HR: .51; 95% CI: .28-.93; P=.029) and all-cause death (HR: .73; 95% CI: .67-.81; Pvaccine in reducing specific- and all-cause mortality risk in the general population older than 60 years. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Correlates, Ethnic Differences, and Prognostic Implications of Perivascular Spaces in Transient Ischemic Attack and Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kui-Kai; Li, Linxin; Lovelock, Caroline E; Zamboni, Giovanna; Chan, Tsz-Tai; Chiang, Man-Fung; Lo, Kin-Ting; Küker, Wilhelm; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    Perivascular spaces (PVSs) are considered markers of small vessel disease. However, their long-term prognostic implications in transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke patients are unknown. Ethnic differences in PVS prevalence are also unknown. Two independent prospective studies were conducted, 1 comprising predominantly whites with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (OXVASC [Oxford Vascular] study) and 1 comprising predominantly Chinese with ischemic stroke (University of Hong Kong). Clinical and imaging correlates, prognostic implications for stroke and death, and ethnic differences in basal ganglia (BG) and centrum semiovale (CS) PVSs were studied with adjustment for age, sex, vascular risk factors, and scanner strength. Whites with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (n=1028) had a higher prevalence of both BG and CS-PVSs compared with Chinese (n=974; >20 BG-PVSs: 22.4% versus 7.1%; >20 CS-PVSs: 45.8% versus 10.4%; P stroke (adjusted hazard ratio compared with 20 PVSs: HR, 1.82; 1.18-2.80; P =0.011) but not intracerebral hemorrhage ( P =0.10) or all-cause mortality ( P =0.16). CS-PVSs were not associated with recurrent stroke ( P =0.57) or mortality ( P =0.072). Prognostic associations were similar in both cohorts. Over and above ethnic differences in frequency of PVSs in transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke patients, BG and CS-PVSs had similar risk factors, but although >20 BG-PVSs were associated with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic stroke, CS-PVSs were not. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lorente

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Substance P (SP, a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31 had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30 (p < 0.001. We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541–18.470; p = 0.008 after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Neuromuscular stimulation after stroke: from technology to clinical deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJzerman, Maarten J; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2009-04-01

    Since the early 1960s, electrical or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used to support the rehabilitation of stroke patients. One of the earliest applications of NMES included the use of external muscle stimulation to correct drop-foot after stroke. During the last few decades various clinical applications have been used for the upper and lower limb. Despite a growing body of literature on the use of NMES, its application in stroke is still limited to a few clinical groups that provide dedicated clinical services. Some explanations for the limited use are the sometimes conflicting clinical evidence, the size of the effects or the complicated use of the technology itself. This review points out three directions for future research. First, we need to expand our knowledge on brain plasticity and the use of different electrical stimulation strategies to modulate the neural system. Second, we foresee an increase in therapies combining different training principles, for example, the combination of NMES and robotics or neuromodulating drugs. Finally, with the ever-increasing pressure on healthcare budgets, it is expected that clinical and economic evidence will become more relevant in transferring these interventions to a wider community.

  18. Deep learning guided stroke management: a review of clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rui; Badgeley, Marcus; Mocco, J; Oermann, Eric K

    2018-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability, and outcome is directly related to timely intervention. Not all patients benefit from rapid intervention, however. Thus a significant amount of attention has been paid to using neuroimaging to assess potential benefit by identifying areas of ischemia that have not yet experienced cellular death. The perfusion-diffusion mismatch, is used as a simple metric for potential benefit with timely intervention, yet penumbral patterns provide an inaccurate predictor of clinical outcome. Machine learning research in the form of deep learning (artificial intelligence) techniques using deep neural networks (DNNs) excel at working with complex inputs. The key areas where deep learning may be imminently applied to stroke management are image segmentation, automated featurization (radiomics), and multimodal prognostication. The application of convolutional neural networks, the family of DNN architectures designed to work with images, to stroke imaging data is a perfect match between a mature deep learning technique and a data type that is naturally suited to benefit from deep learning's strengths. These powerful tools have opened up exciting opportunities for data-driven stroke management for acute intervention and for guiding prognosis. Deep learning techniques are useful for the speed and power of results they can deliver and will become an increasingly standard tool in the modern stroke specialist's arsenal for delivering personalized medicine to patients with ischemic stroke. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Early Mortality and Associated Factors among Patients with Stroke Admitted to a Large Teaching Hospital in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeng'o, Kigocha; Chillo, Pilly; Gray, William K; Walker, Richard W; Matuja, William

    2017-04-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide and 85.5% of stroke deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries due to stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate correlates and predictors of 30-day mortality in stroke patients in urban Tanzania. A prospective 30-day follow-up study was conducted at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We recruited all patients with stroke seen at the Emergency Medicine Department and medical wards. Patients underwent medical history and physical examination including full neurological examination. For those who met the criteria for the diagnosis of stroke according to the World Health Organization, further data were collected, including cholesterol, creatinine, fasting blood glucose, full blood picture, human immunodeficiency virus serology, and electrocardiogram. Patients were followed up at 30 days from the date of stroke onset. The date and the cause of death of those participants who died within 30 days of stroke onset were recorded. A total of 224 patients were recruited into the study, with follow-up data available on 186 (83.0%). At 30 days post stroke, 124 patients (66.7%) were still alive. Mortality was significantly higher among stroke patients who were over 65 years of age. Of the 62 who died, 54% died of aspiration pneumonia and 21% of septicemia. Patients with infection were 4.4 times more likely to die than thosewithout (P = .001). Poststroke mortality rates were high. Many deaths were potentially preventable. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Erqou, Sebhat; Kaptoge, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... and nonvascular outcomes. STUDY SELECTION: Long-term prospective studies that recorded Lp(a) concentration and subsequent major vascular morbidity and/or cause-specific mortality published between January 1970 and March 2009 were identified through electronic searches of MEDLINE and other databases, manual...

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL STROKE OR TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK, INCLUDED INTO THE LIS-2 REGISTER (LYUBERTSY STUDY OF MORTALITY IN PATIENTS AFTER STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To provide final data on the three-year period of the inclusion of patients; to give most accurate "portrait" of patients hospitalized with a brain stroke within the framework of the LIS-2 register (Lyubertsy study of mortality in patients after stroke.Material and methods. All patients (n=960 admitted to the Lyubertsy district hospital №2 with stroke for the period from 01.2009 to 12.2011 were included into the study.Results. Men accounted for 37.5%, women - 62.5%, mean age was 71.1±9.8 years. The history of hypertension was present in 833 patients (86.8%, atrial fibrillation in 252 (26.8% patients, 199 (20.7% patients had previously undergone stroke. In-hospital mortality was 21.6% (207 patients had died; mean age 72.9±9.8 years. Low frequency of the antihypertensive therapy (34.5%, lipid-lowering therapy (0.7%, antiplatelet agents (5.7%, anticoagulation therapy prescription in patients with atrial fibrillation was detected.Conclusion. Insufficient assignment of drugs with a proven effect on the prognosis in patients with risk factors prior to the development of the reference stroke draws attention. High incidence of recurrent strokes indicates an underactive secondary prevention.

  2. γ-Glutamyl Transferase as a Risk Factor for All-Cause or Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among 5912 Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Qiang; Cao, Jian-Lei; Zhao, Sheng-Jie; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Deng, Ai-Jun

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of the measurement of serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) concentrations at admission with 1-year all-cause or cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This prospective, multicenter cohort study was conducted in 4 stroke centers in China. Baseline GGT measurements were tested. The relationship of GGT to the risk of death from all-cause or CVD was examined among 1-year follow-up patients. We recorded results from 5912 patients with stroke. In those patients, 51.0% were men, and the median age was 61 years. In both men and women, high GGT was significantly associated with total mortality from all-cause or CVD ( P mortality from all-cause and CVD, respectively. With an area under the curve of 0.69 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.73), GGT showed a significantly greater discriminatory ability to predict all-cause mortality as compared with others factors. GGT improved the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (area under the curve of the combined model, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.78]; P mortality in patients with ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Ischemic Posterior Circulation Stroke: A Review of Anatomy, Clinical Presentations, Diagnosis and Current Management

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    Amre eNouh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior circulation (PC strokes represent approximately 20% of all ischemic strokes. In contrast to the anterior circulation (AC several differences in presenting symptoms, clinical evaluation, diagnostic testing and management strategy exist which may present a challenge to the treating physician. This review will discuss the anatomical, etiological and clinical classification of PC strokes, identify diagnostic pitfalls and overview current therapeutic regimens.

  4. Imaging findings and referral outcomes of rapid assessment stroke clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widjaja, E.; Manuel, D.; Hodgson, T.J.; Connolly, D.J.A.; Coley, S.C.; Romanowski, C.A.J.; Gaines, P.; Cleveland, T.; Thomas, S.; Griffiths, P.D.; Doyle, C.; Venables, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A rapid assessment stroke clinic (RASC) was established to provide a rapid diagnostic service to individuals with suspected transient cerebral or ocular ischaemia or recovered non-hospitalized strokes. In this report we review imaging findings and clinical outcomes of patients proceeding to the carotid surgery programme. METHODS: Between October 2000 and December 2002, 1339 people attended the RASC. The findings of head CT and carotid Doppler ultrasound of the 1320 patients who underwent brain and carotid imaging were reviewed, and the number subsequently proceeding to carotid angiography and intervention was reported. RESULTS: CT head scans were normal in 57% of cases; 38% demonstrated ischaemia or infarction; and 3% yielded incidental or other significant findings not related to ischaemia. On screening with carotid Doppler ultrasound, 7.5% showed greater than 50% stenosis on the symptomatic side. A total of 83 patients (6.2%) proceeded to cerebral angiography and 65 (4.8%) underwent carotid endarterectomy or endovascular repair. CONCLUSION: Rapid-access neurovascular clinics are efficient in selecting patients for carotid intervention, but this is at a cost and the number of potential strokes prevented is small. Alternative management pathways based on immediate medical treatment need to be evaluated

  5. A lower baseline glomerular filtration rate predicts high mortality and newly cerebrovascular accidents in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kai; Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Zhipeng; Ding, Jianping; Song, Haiqing

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is gradually recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cardio-/cerebrovascular disease. This study aimed to examine the association of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and clinical outcomes at 3 months after the onset of ischemic stroke in a hospitalized Chinese population.Totally, 972 patients with acute ischemic stroke were enrolled into this study. Modified of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations were used to calculate eGFR and define CKD. The site and degree of the stenosis were examined. Patients were followed-up for 3 months. Endpoint events included all-cause death and newly ischemic events. The multivariate logistic model was used to determine the association between renal dysfunction and patients' outcomes.Of all patients, 130 patients (13.4%) had reduced eGFR (<60 mL/min/1.73 m), and 556 patients had a normal eGFR (≥90 mL/min/1.73 m). A total of 694 patients suffered from cerebral artery stenosis, in which 293 patients only had intracranial artery stenosis (ICAS), 110 only with extracranial carotid atherosclerotic stenosis (ECAS), and 301 with both ICAS and ECAS. The patients with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m had a higher proportion of death and newly ischemic events compared with those with a relatively normal eGFR. Multivariate analysis revealed that a baseline eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m increased the risk of mortality by 3.089-fold and newly ischemic events by 4.067-fold. In further analysis, a reduced eGFR was associated with increased rates of mortality and newly events both in ICAS patients and ECAS patients. However, only an increased risk of newly events was found as the degree of renal function deteriorated in ICAS patients (odds ratio = 8.169, 95% confidence interval = 2.445-14.127).A low baseline eGFR predicted a high mortality and newly ischemic events at 3 months in ischemic stroke patients. A low baseline eGFR was also a strong independent predictor for newly

  6. Mortality and nursing care dependency one year after first ischemic stroke: an analysis of German statutory health insurance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Claudia; Koller, Daniela; Glaeske, Gerd; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Aphasia, dementia, and depression are important and common neurological and neuropsychological disorders after ischemic stroke. We estimated the frequency of these comorbidities and their impact on mortality and nursing care dependency. Data of a German statutory health insurance were analyzed for people aged 50 years and older with first ischemic stroke. Aphasia, dementia, and depression were defined on the basis of outpatient medical diagnoses within 1 year after stroke. Logistic regression models for mortality and nursing care dependency were calculated and were adjusted for age, sex, and other relevant comorbidity. Of 977 individuals with a first ischemic stroke, 14.8% suffered from aphasia, 12.5% became demented, and 22.4% became depressed. The regression model for mortality showed a significant influence of age, aphasia, and other relevant comorbidity. In the regression model for nursing care dependency, the factors age, aphasia, dementia, depression, and other relevant comorbidity were significant. Aphasia has a high impact on mortality and nursing care dependency after ischemic stroke, while dementia and depression are strongly associated with increasing nursing care dependency.

  7. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-06

    Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in non lacunar ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia R. Balian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic transformation is a complex phenomenon where brain tissue bleeds, which could be associated or not to an increase in the neurological deficit after the acute ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. We performed a prospective analysis of the clinical records and images of patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. Demographics, vascular risk factors, previous medications and the information of the event in patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were here compared. We included in this study 747 patients with non-lacunar stroke, the mean age was 77 ± 11 years and 61% were females. In the univariate analysis, the age, a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease and the previous use of oral anticoagulation resulted statistically significant. In the multivariate analysis of logistic regression adjusted by age and vascular risk factors: the age > 80 years (OR 3.6, CI 95% 1.8-7.6, the pulse pressure > 60 mmHg at admission (OR 5.3, CI 95% 3.2-9.1, the chronic kidney disease (OR 3, CI 95% 2.5-3.8 and the presence of previous atrial fibrillation (OR 3.5, CI 95% 2.1-6.1 were associated with and increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation. The predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in our cohort showed a relationship with severe vascular illness. The identification of these patients could influence therapeutic decisions that could increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation

  9. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Adami

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012.Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60-I64. Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0.There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15-49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54 in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32 in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90. During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67 in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11 in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05. There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group.We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults.

  10. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Fernando; Figueiredo, Francisco Winter dos Santos; Paiva, Laércio da Silva; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Santos, Edige Felipe de Sousa; Martins, Bruno Luis; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60–I64). Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference) and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0. Results There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15–49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54) in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32) in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90). During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67) in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11) in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05). There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group. Conclusion We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults. PMID:27332892

  11. Perceived Walking Speed, Measured Tandem Walk, Incident Stroke, and Mortality in Older Latino Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Elfassy, Tali; Lee, Anne; Odden, Michelle C; Thekkethala, Divya; Wright, Clinton B; Glymour, Maria M; Haan, Mary N

    2017-05-01

    Walking speed is associated with functional status and all-cause mortality. Yet the relationship between walking speed and stroke, also a leading cause of disability, remains poorly understood, especially in older Latino adults who suffer from a significant burden of stroke. A total of 1,486 stroke-free participants from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, aged 60 and older at baseline in 1998-1999, were followed annually through 2010. Participants reported their usual walking speed outdoors which was classified into slow, medium, or fast. We also assessed timed tandem walk ability (unable or eight or more errors vs less than eight errors). We ascertained three incident stroke endpoints: total stroke, nonfatal stroke, and fatal stroke. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for stroke at different walking speed and timed tandem walk categories. Over an average of 6 years of follow-up (SD = 2.8), the incidence rate of total strokes was 23.2/1,000 person-years for slow walkers compared to 15.6/1,000 person-years for medium walkers, and 7.6/1,000 person-years for fast walkers. In Cox models adjusted for sociodemographics, cardiovascular risk, cognition and functional status, and self-rated health, the hazard of total stroke was 31% lower for medium walkers (HR: 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47, 1.02) and 56% lower for fast walkers (HR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.82) compared with slow walkers. We found similar associations with timed tandem walk ability (fully adjusted HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45, 0.98). Our findings suggest perceived walking speed captures more than self-rated health alone and is a strong risk factor for stroke risk in Latino older adults.

  12. Alcohol consumption and the risk of morbidity and mortality for different stroke types - a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Roerecke Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have suggested a complex relationship between alcohol consumption and stroke, dependent on sex, type of stroke and outcome (morbidity vs. mortality. We undertook a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies assessing the association between levels of average alcohol consumption and relative risks of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes separately by sex and outcome. This meta-analysis is the first to explicitly separate morbidity and mortality of alcohol-attributable stroke and thus has implications for public health and prevention. Methods Using Medical Subject Headings (alcohol drinking, ethanol, cerebrovascular accident, cerebrovascular disorders, and intracranial embolism and thrombosis and the key word stroke, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CABS, WHOlist, SIGLE, ETOH, and Web of Science databases between 1980 to June 2009 was performed followed by manual searches of bibliographies of key retrieved articles. From twenty-six observational studies (cohort or case-control with ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes the relative risk or odds ratios or hazard ratios of stroke associated with alcohol consumption were reported; alcohol consumption was quantified; and life time abstention (manually estimated where data for current abstainers were given was used as the reference group. Two reviewers independently extracted the information on study design, participant characteristics, level of alcohol consumption, stroke outcome, control for potential confounding factors, risk estimates and key criteria of study quality using a standardized protocol. Results The dose-response relationship for hemorrhagic stroke had monotonically increasing risk for increasing consumption, whereas ischemic stroke showed a curvilinear relationship, with a protective effect of alcohol for low to moderate consumption, and increased risk for higher exposure. For more than 3 drinks on average/day, in general women had

  13. Clinical characteristics of stroke occurring in the toilet: Are older adults more vulnerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Miyatake, Satoru; Mayanagi, Keita; Yoshii, Masami; Nakatsukasa, Masashi

    2018-02-01

    While autonomic imbalance during defecation/micturition can cause hemodynamic instability, stroke occurring in the toilet has rarely been investigated. The objective of the present study was to clarify the frequency and clinical characteristics of toilet-related stroke. Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2015 on 1939 patients with acute stroke (1224 cerebral infarctions [CI], 505 intracerebral hemorrhages [ICH] and 210 subarachnoid hemorrhages [SAH]) were reviewed to identify patients with a toilet-related stroke. For each stroke type, the ratios of stroke occurring during defecation/micturition to those occurring during other activities were calculated. Subsequently, how patients with toilet-related stroke were brought to medical attention was investigated. Whether older patients (aged >65 years) had an elevated ratio of toilet-related stroke was investigated in each stroke type. A total of 108 patients (41 CI, 37 ICH and 30 subarachnoid hemorrhages) sustained a stroke in the toilet. The ratio of toilet-related stroke was highest in subarachnoid hemorrhages (14.3%), followed by ICH (7.3%). Circadian differences existed among the three stroke types: toilet-related CI were more likely to occur in the night-time than ICH. Patients with toilet-related CI were significantly more likely to sustain cardioembolic stroke. In all three stroke types, toilet-related stroke in CI, but not in hemorrhagic strokes. The toilet is a closed space where stroke occurs disproportionately frequently. Effort to reduce the incidence of toilet-related strokes is warranted, as early patient detection is not always feasible. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 250-255. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Clinical phenomenology and mortality in Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, Maria I; Burton, M Caroline; Chang, Megan T; Rummans, Teresa A; Cha, Stephen S; Leavitt, Jacqueline A; Boeve, Bradley F

    2013-03-01

    Despite existing diagnostic criteria for Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), clinical manifestations vary greatly. We examined the clinical course and mortality of patients diagnosed with CBS. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with CBS. We collected demographic and clinical information and medical burden scores. Kaplan-Meier mortality curves were compared using log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis and hazard ratio (HR). Mortality was compared to expected mortality from Minnesota population. Seventy-seven patients with CBS had a mean age of 79.5 (standard deviation ± 13.0) and were predominantly Caucasian (97%) and female (73%). In all, 20 (26%) subsequently developed a dementia syndrome, most often Lewy body. A total of 46 (60%) deaths occurred with an average follow-up time of 33.0 months. Characteristics associated with mortality included older age (75-84 [HR 3.34, P = .029], >85 [HR 4.58, P = .007]) and renal disease (HR 3.39 with 95% confidence interval 1.31-8.80, P = .012). Medical burden scores were not associated with overall mortality. Mortality was high compared to Minnesota population (P < .0001). A large proportion of patients with CBS developed dementia, and there was a high mortality rate associated with older age and renal disease. Medical burden was not associated with mortality.

  15. Recanalization and Mortality Rates of Thrombectomy With Stent-Retrievers in Octogenarian Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrilla, G.; Carreón, E.; Zamarro, J.; Espinosa de Rueda, M.; García-Villalba, B.; Marín, F.; Hernández-Fernández, F.; Morales, A.; Fernández-Vivas, M.; Núñez, R.; Moreno, A.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundOur objective was to evaluate the effect of treatment with stent-retrievers in octogenarians suffering an acute ischemic stroke.MethodsA total of 150 consecutive patients with acute stroke who were treated with stent-retrievers between April 2010 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into those <80 years old (n = 116) and those ≥80 (n = 34). Baseline characteristics, procedure data, and endpoints (postprocedural NIHSS, death, and mRS at 3 months) were compared.ResultsHigh blood pressure, atrial fibrillation, and anticoagulation were more frequent in octogenarians (p = 0.01, 0.003, and 0.04 respectively). There were no differences between both groups regarding previous intravenous thrombolysis (32.4 vs. 48.3 %, p = 0.1), preprocedural NIHSS (18.1 vs. 16.8, p = 0.3), procedure time (74.5 (40–114) min vs. 63 (38–92) min, p = 0.2), revascularization time (380.5 (298–526.3) min vs. 350 (296.3–452.8), p = 0.3), TICI ≥ 2B (88.2 vs. 93.9 %, p = 0.1), and symptomatic haemorrhage (5.9 vs. 2.6 %, p = 0.3). Discharge NIHSS was higher in octogenarians (9.7 vs. 6.5, p = 0.03). Death and 3-month mRS ≥3 were more frequent in octogenarians (35.3 vs. 17.2 %, p = 0.02 and 73.5 vs. 37.1 %, p = 0.02). ICA-involvement and prolonged revascularization involved higher mortality (66.7 vs. 27.6 %, p = 0.03) and worse mRS (50 vs. 24.4 %, p = 0.06) in octogenarians.ConclusionsIn our series, treatment with stent-retrievers in octogenarians with acute ischemic stroke achieved good rates of recanalization but with a high mortality rate. ICA involvement and revascularization times beyond 6 hours associated to a worse prognosis. These data might be of value in the design of prospective studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of the endovascular treatments in octogenarians

  16. Recanalization and Mortality Rates of Thrombectomy With Stent-Retrievers in Octogenarian Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrilla, G., E-mail: gpr1972@gmail.com [Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Service of Interventional Neuroradiology (Spain); Carreón, E. [Service of Neurology Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca (Spain); Zamarro, J.; Espinosa de Rueda, M.; García-Villalba, B. [Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Service of Interventional Neuroradiology (Spain); Marín, F. [Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Department of Cardiology (Spain); Hernández-Fernández, F. [Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Service of Interventional Neuroradiology (Spain); Morales, A. [Service of Neurology Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca (Spain); Fernández-Vivas, M.; Núñez, R. [Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Intensive Care Unit (Spain); Moreno, A. [Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Service of Interventional Neuroradiology (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    BackgroundOur objective was to evaluate the effect of treatment with stent-retrievers in octogenarians suffering an acute ischemic stroke.MethodsA total of 150 consecutive patients with acute stroke who were treated with stent-retrievers between April 2010 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into those <80 years old (n = 116) and those ≥80 (n = 34). Baseline characteristics, procedure data, and endpoints (postprocedural NIHSS, death, and mRS at 3 months) were compared.ResultsHigh blood pressure, atrial fibrillation, and anticoagulation were more frequent in octogenarians (p = 0.01, 0.003, and 0.04 respectively). There were no differences between both groups regarding previous intravenous thrombolysis (32.4 vs. 48.3 %, p = 0.1), preprocedural NIHSS (18.1 vs. 16.8, p = 0.3), procedure time (74.5 (40–114) min vs. 63 (38–92) min, p = 0.2), revascularization time (380.5 (298–526.3) min vs. 350 (296.3–452.8), p = 0.3), TICI ≥ 2B (88.2 vs. 93.9 %, p = 0.1), and symptomatic haemorrhage (5.9 vs. 2.6 %, p = 0.3). Discharge NIHSS was higher in octogenarians (9.7 vs. 6.5, p = 0.03). Death and 3-month mRS ≥3 were more frequent in octogenarians (35.3 vs. 17.2 %, p = 0.02 and 73.5 vs. 37.1 %, p = 0.02). ICA-involvement and prolonged revascularization involved higher mortality (66.7 vs. 27.6 %, p = 0.03) and worse mRS (50 vs. 24.4 %, p = 0.06) in octogenarians.ConclusionsIn our series, treatment with stent-retrievers in octogenarians with acute ischemic stroke achieved good rates of recanalization but with a high mortality rate. ICA involvement and revascularization times beyond 6 hours associated to a worse prognosis. These data might be of value in the design of prospective studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of the endovascular treatments in octogenarians.

  17. Acute-phase reactants and cytokines in ischemic stroke: do they have any relationship with short-term mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, M; Sebe, A; Acikalin, A; Akpinar, O; Koc, F; Ay, M O; Gulen, M; Topal, M; Satar, S

    2013-10-01

    Many unknown risk factors play a role in the etiopathogenesis of stroke. The appearance of inflammatory cells within the damaged tissue after cerebral ischemia suggests that an inflammatory response may play a role in stroke pathogenesis. In our study, we examined whether an association exists between the acute-phase reactants and the levels of cytokines, the volume and diameter of the stroke, and short-term mortality in patients who were diagnosed as acute ischemic a stroke after admission to the Emergency Department. A total of 50 consecutive patients who applied to the Emergency Service with acute ischemic stroke were enrolled in the study. Their stroke volume were calculated and serum samples were obtained as soon as they arrived into the Emergency Service. The patients were evaluated according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). There was no significant correlations between stroke volume and levels of cytokine and acute-phase reactants in dead patient group or in living patient group. A correlation and statistical significance was found between stroke volume and hospital stay time in living patient group. In addition, GCS and NIHSS scores were correlated with stroke volume and was found a significant statistically. Scales such as GKS and NIHHS, which evaluate the functional state of patients, are the best indicators for defining prognosis in our daily practices. In addition, we found a positive correlation between levels of CRP (C reactive protein) and prognosis. However, we did not observe a statistically significant correlation between prognosis and other acute-phase reactants such as TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, fibrinogen, and leukocytes.

  18. Functional Outcomes, Subsequent Healthcare Utilization, and Mortality of Stroke Postacute Care Patients in Taiwan: A Nationwide Propensity Score-matched Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Ning; Lu, Wan-Hsuan; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Chung, Chih-Ping; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the benefits of the national stroke postacute care (PAC) program on clinical outcomes and subsequent healthcare utilization. Propensity score-matched case-control study using the National Health Insurance data. A total of 1480 stroke cases receiving PAC services and 3159 matched controls with similar stroke severity but without PAC services. Demographic characteristics, functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index, Lawton-Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Functional Oral Intake Scale, Mini-Nutritional Assessment, Berg Balance Test, Usual Gait Speed Test, 6-Minute Walk Test, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (modified sensation and motor), Mini-Mental State Examination, Motor Activity Log, and the Concise Chinese Aphasia Test), subsequent healthcare utilization (90-day stroke re-admission and emergency department visits), and 90-day mortality. After propensity score matching, baseline characteristics, stroke severity, and status of healthcare utilization before index stroke admission were similar between cases and controls. After PAC services, the case group obtained significant improvement in all functional domains and may have reduced subsequent disability. Among all functional assessments, balance was the most significantly improved domain and was suggestive for the reduction of subsequent falls risk and related injuries. Compared with controls, patients receiving PAC services had significantly lower 90-day hospital re-admissions [11.1% vs 21.0%, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.47 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-0.64], stroke-related re-admissions (2.1% vs 8.8%, aOR 0.22, 95% CI 0.12-0.41), and emergency department visits (13.5% vs 24.0%, aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.37-0.65), but the 90-day mortality rate remained similar between groups (1.4% case group vs 2.0% control group, aOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.29-1.62). PAC significantly improved the recovery of stroke patients in all functional domains through the program, with universal interorganizational

  19. Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of long-term excess mortality after ischemic stroke in young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Arntz, R.M.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2015-01-01

    Adults with stroke at a young age (18-50 years) remain at an increased risk of death for decades. It is unclear what cause underlies this long-term excess mortality and whether this is sex and time specific. Therefore, we investigated sex-specific temporal changes in cause of death after transient

  20. Perinatal stroke in Saudi children: clinical features and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the clinical features and presentations of perinatal stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the risk factors. Patients with perinatal stroke were identified from within a cohort of 104 Saudi children who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology at King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Neuroimaging for suspected cases of stroke consisted of cranial CT, MRI, or both. During the study period, 23 (22%) of 104 children (aged one months to 12 years) were diagnosed to have had perinatal stroke. The male: female ratio was 1.6:1. Ten (67%) of the 15 children who had unilateral ischemic involvement had their lesion in the left hemisphere. The presentation of the ischemic result was within 24-72 hours of life in 13 (57%) patients, and in 6 children (26%), motor impairment was recognized at or after the age of 4 months. Nine children (39%) had seizures at presentation. Pregnancy, labor, and delivery risk factors were ascertained in 18 (78%) cases. The most common of these included emergency cesarean section in 5 cases, and instrumental delivery in other 5. Screening for prothrombotic risk factors detected abnormalities in 6 (26%) patients on at least one test carried out between 2 months and 9 years of age. Four children (17%) had low protein C, which was associated low protein S and raised anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) in one patient, and low antithrombin III in another. Low proteins S was detected in a 42-month-old boy. The abnormality in the sixth child was confined to raised ACA. The present study highlights the non-specific features by which stroke presents during the neonatal period. The data are in keeping with the potential role for inherited and acquired thrombophilia as being the underlying cause. However, the high prevalence of

  1. Relationship of Self-Rated Health to Stroke Incidence and Mortality in Older Individuals with and without a History of Stroke: A Longitudinal Study of the MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing (CFAS) Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nahal; van der Linde, Rianne; Parker, Richard; Savva, George; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Brayne, Carol; Mant, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Poor self-rated health (SRH) has been associated with increased risk of death and poor health outcomes even after adjusting for confounders. However its' relationship with disease-specific mortality and morbidity has been less studied. SRH may also be particularly predictive of health outcomes in those with pre-existing conditions. We studied whether SRH predicts new stroke in older people who have never had a stroke, or a recurrence in those with a prior history of stroke. MRC CFAS I is a multicentre cohort study of a population representative sample of people in their 65th year and older. A comprehensive interview at baseline included questions about presence of stroke, self-rated health and functional disability. Follow-up at 2 years included self-report of stroke and stroke death obtained from death certificates. Multiple logistical regression determined odds of stroke at 2 years adjusting for confounders including disability and health behaviours. Survival analysis was performed until June 2014 with follow-up for up to 13 years. 11,957 participants were included, of whom 11,181 (93.8%) had no history of stroke and 776 (6.2%) one or more previous strokes. Fewer with no history of stroke reported poor SRH than those with stroke (5 versus 21%). In those with no history of stroke, poor self-rated health predicted stroke incidence (OR 1.5 (1.1-1.9)), but not stroke mortality (OR 1.2 (0.8-1.9)) at 2 years nor for up to 13 years (OR 1.2(0.9-1.7)). In those with a history of stroke, self-rated health did not predict stroke incidence (OR 0.9(0.6-1.4)), stroke mortality (OR 1.1(0.5-2.5)), or survival (OR 1.1(0.6-2.1)). Poor self-rated health predicts risk of stroke at 2 years but not stroke mortality among the older population without a previous history of stroke. SRH may be helpful in predicting who may be at risk of developing a stroke in the near future.

  2. Accuracy of Emergency Medical Services Dispatcher and Crew Diagnosis of Stroke in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Judy; Band, Roger; Abboud, Michael E; Pajerowski, William; Guo, Michelle; David, Guy; Mechem, C Crawford; Messé, Steven R; Carr, Brendan G; Mullen, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    Accurate recognition of stroke symptoms by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is necessary for timely care of acute stroke patients. We assessed the accuracy of stroke diagnosis by EMS in clinical practice in a major US city. Philadelphia Fire Department data were merged with data from a single comprehensive stroke center to identify patients diagnosed with stroke or TIA from 9/2009 to 10/2012. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression identified variables associated with correct EMS diagnosis. There were 709 total cases, with 400 having a discharge diagnosis of stroke or TIA. EMS crew sensitivity was 57.5% and PPV was 69.1%. EMS crew identified 80.2% of strokes with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) ≥5 and symptom duration 270 min (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.25-0.68). EMS dispatchers identified 90 stroke cases that the EMS crew missed. EMS dispatcher or crew identified stroke with sensitivity of 80% and PPV of 50.9%, and EMS dispatcher or crew identified 90.5% of patients with NIHSS ≥5 and symptom duration <6 h. Prehospital diagnosis of stroke has limited sensitivity, resulting in a high proportion of missed stroke cases. Dispatchers identified many strokes that EMS crews did not. Incorporating EMS dispatcher impression into regional protocols may maximize the effectiveness of hospital destination selection and pre-notification.

  3. Risk factors, clinical presentation, and neuroimaging findings of neonatal perforator stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Raets, Marlou M A; Lequin, Maarten; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    2013-08-01

    To date, studies on neonatal stroke have mainly focused on cortical stroke. We have focused on perforator strokes, noncortical strokes in the arterial vascular perforator area. We sought to identify risk factors and evaluate clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings for neonatal perforator stroke, which seems to be under-recognized. All infants admitted to our tertiary intensive care unit in ≈12 years, whose perforator stroke was diagnosed with postnatal brain imaging, were enrolled in this study. Demographic, perinatal, and postnatal data were evaluated. Seventy-nine perforator strokes were detected in 55 patients (28 boys), with a median gestational age of 37 1/7 weeks (range 24 1/7 to 42 1/7 weeks, 25 preterm). Perforator stroke was asymptomatic in most patients (58%). Initial diagnosis was predominantly made with cranial ultrasound (80%) in the first week of life (60%). Risk factors for stroke were present in all cases: maternal, fetal, and perinatal. Likely pathogenic mechanisms were prolonged birth asphyxia (16%), hypoxia or hypotension (15%), embolism (15%), infection (15%), acute blood loss (9%), and birth trauma (9%). Previously described risk factors for developing neonatal main artery stroke are probably also associated with neonatal perforator stroke. Perforator stroke is often asymptomatic, but cranial ultrasound is a reliable diagnostic tool in diagnosing perforator stroke.

  4. Impact of heart rate on admission on mortality and morbidity in acute ischaemic stroke patients - results from VISTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, C H; Erdur, H; Grittner, U; Schneider, A; Piper, S K; Scheitz, J F; Wellwood, I; Bath, P M W; Diener, H-C; Lees, K R; Endres, M

    2016-12-01

    Elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with worse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its predictive value in acute stroke patients is less well established. We investigated the effects of HR on admission in acute ischaemic stroke patients. Using the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) database, the association between HR in acute stroke patients without atrial fibrillation and the pre-defined composite end-point of (recurrent) ischaemic stroke, transient ischaemic attack (TIA), myocardial infarction (MI) and vascular death within 90 days was analysed. Pre-defined secondary outcomes were the composite end-point components and any death, decompensated heart failure and degree of functional dependence according to the modified Rankin Scale after 90 days. HR was analysed as a categorical variable (quartiles). In all, 5606 patients were available for analysis (mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 13; mean age 67 years; mean HR 77 bpm; 44% female) amongst whom the composite end-point occurred in 620 patients (11.1%). Higher HR was not associated with the composite end-point. The frequencies of secondary outcomes were 3.2% recurrent stroke (n = 179), 0.6% TIA (n = 35), 1.8% MI (n = 100), 6.8% vascular death (n = 384), 15.0% any death (n = 841) and 2.2% decompensated heart failure (n = 124). Patients in the highest quartile (HR> 86 bpm) were at increased risk for any death [adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.40 (1.11-1.75)], decompensated heart failure [adjusted hazard ratio 2.20 (1.11-4.37)] and worse modified Rankin Scale [adjusted odds ratio 1.29 (1.14-1.52)]. In acute stroke patients, higher HR (>86 bpm) is linked to mortality, heart failure and higher degree of dependence after 90 days but not to recurrent stroke, TIA or MI. © 2016 EAN.

  5. Snoring Is Not Associated With All-Cause Mortality, Incident Cardiovascular Disease, or Stroke in the Busselton Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nathaniel S.; Wong, Keith K.H.; Cullen, Stewart R.J.; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To ascertain whether objectively measured snoring increases mortality, cardiovascular disease, or stroke risk over the effects of obstructive sleep apnea and other established risk factors. Design: Community-based cohort. Participants: 400 residents of the Western Australian town of Busselton. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea were quantified via the percentage of the night spent snoring and the respiratory disturbance index as measured by a single night recording in November-December 1990 by a home sleep apnea monitoring device (MESAM IV), along with a range of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Follow-up for deaths and cardiovascular hospitalizations was ascertained via record linkage until the end of 2007. Results: Our analytical sample of 380 people was made up of the 397 people for whom the authors had follow-up data, minus 17 people who reported a previous stroke or heart attack at baseline (n = 380/400 = 95% of cohort). Snoring was observed for a mean/median of 32.0/27.4% of the night (standard deviation = 23.9%; range = 0-97.2%). There were 46 deaths, 68 cardiovascular events, and 24 strokes during 17 yr of follow-up. Snoring as either a categoric or continuous variable was not significantly associated with death, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in both unadjusted Cox regression models and in models that adjusted for obstructive sleep apnea and other risk factors. Conclusions: No measure of snoring was associated with all-cause mortality, or incident cardiovascular disease or stroke over 17 yr in this community-based sample. Citation: Marshall NS; Wong KKH; Cullen SRJ; Knuiman MW; Grunstein RR. Snoring is not associated with all-cause mortality, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in the Busselton Health Study. SLEEP 2012;35(9):1235–1240. PMID:22942501

  6. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Eroles Luis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420 and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364. Hypertension (53.2%, vascular malformations (6.4%, haematological conditions (4.3% and anticoagulation (2.1% were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9. Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56, intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74 and age (OR = 1.23, were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome.

  7. Reducing recurrent stroke: methodology of the motivational interviewing in stroke (MIST) randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita; Witt, Emma; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; McPherson, Kathryn; Davis-Martin, Kelly; Bennett, Derrick; Rush, Elaine; Suh, Flora; Starkey, Nicola; Parag, Varsha; Rathnasabapathy, Yogini; Jones, Amy; Brown, Paul; Te Ao, Braden; Feigin, Valery L

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent stroke is prevalent in both developed and developing countries, contributing significantly to disability and death. Recurrent stroke rates can be reduced by adequate risk factor management. However, adherence to prescribed medications and lifestyle changes recommended by physicians at discharge after stroke is poor, leading to a large number of preventable recurrent strokes. Using behavior change methods such as Motivational Interviewing early after stroke occurrence has the potential to prevent recurrent stroke. The overall aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in improving adherence to medication and lifestyle changes recommended by treating physicians at and after hospital discharge in stroke patients 12 months poststroke to reduce risk factors for recurrent stroke. Recruitment of 430 first-ever stroke participants will occur in the Auckland and Waikato regions. Randomization will be to intervention or usual care groups. Participants randomized to intervention will receive four motivational interviews and five follow-up assessments over 12 months. Nonintervention participants will be assessed at the same time points. Primary outcome measures are changes in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein levels 12 months poststroke. Secondary outcomes include self-reported adherence and barriers to prescribed medications, new cardiovascular events (including stroke), changes in quality of life, and mood. The results of the motivational interviewing in stroke trial will add to our understanding of whether motivational interviewing may be potentially beneficial in the management of stroke and other diseases where similar lifestyle factors or medication adherence are relevant. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  8. Clinically significant change in stroke volume in pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wolferen, S.A.; van de Veerdonk, M.C.; Mauritz, G.J.; Jacobs, W.; Marcus, J.T.; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Heijmans, M.W.; Boonstra, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Westerhof, N.; Noordegraaf, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stroke volume is probably the best hemodynamic parameter because it reflects therapeutic changes and contains prognostic information in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stroke volume directly reflects right ventricular function in response to its load, without the correction of compensatory

  9. The influence of individual socioeconomic status on the clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with different neighborhood status in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Liu, Baoxin; Meng, Guilin; Shang, Bo; Jie, Qiqiang; Wei, Yidong; Liu, Xueyuan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Socioeconomic status (SES) is being recognized as an important factor in both social and medical problems. The aim of present study is to examine the relationship between SES and ischemic stroke and investigate whether SES is a predictor of clinical outcomes among patients with different neighborhood status from Shanghai, China. Methods: A total of 471 first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 18-80 years were enrolled in this retrospective study. The personal SES of each patient was evaluated using a summed score derived from his or her educational level, household income, occupation, and medical reimbursement rate. Clinical adverse events and all-cause mortality were analyzed to determine whether SES was a prognostic factor, its prognostic impact was then assessed based on different neighborhood status using multivariable Cox proportional hazard models after adjusting for other covariates. Results: The individual SES showed a significant positive correlation with neighborhood status (r = 0.370; P status, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed clinical adverse events and deaths were still higher in the low SES patients (all P status are independent prognostic factors for ischemic stroke (all P status, lower individual SES was significantly associated with clinical adverse events and mortality (all P status are significantly associated with the prognosis after ischemic stroke. A lower personal SES as well as poorer neighborhood status may significantly increase risk for adverse clinical outcomes among ischemic stroke patients. PMID:28138313

  10. Ischaemic stroke, haemorrhage, and mortality in older patients with chronic kidney disease newly started on anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population based study from UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shankar; de Lusignan, Simon; McGovern, Andrew; Correa, Ana; Hriskova, Mariya; Gatenby, Piers; Jones, Simon; Goldsmith, David; Camm, A John

    2018-02-14

    To assess the association between anticoagulation, ischaemic stroke, gastrointestinal and cerebral haemorrhage, and all cause mortality in older people with atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease. Propensity matched, population based, retrospective cohort analysis from January 2006 through December 2016. The Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database population of almost 2.73 million patients from 110 general practices across England and Wales. Patients aged 65 years and over with a new diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of disease epidemiology collaboration creatinine equation. Patients with a previous diagnosis of atrial fibrillation or receiving anticoagulation in the preceding 120 days were excluded, as were patients requiring dialysis and recipients of renal transplants. Receipt of an anticoagulant prescription within 60 days of atrial fibrillation diagnosis. Ischaemic stroke, cerebral or gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and all cause mortality. 6977 patients with chronic kidney disease and newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation were identified, of whom 2434 were on anticoagulants within 60 days of diagnosis and 4543 were not. 2434 pairs were matched using propensity scores by exposure to anticoagulant or none and followed for a median of 506 days. The crude rates for ischaemic stroke and haemorrhage were 4.6 and 1.2 after taking anticoagulants and 1.5 and 0.4 in patients who were not taking anticoagulant per 100 person years, respectively. The hazard ratios for ischaemic stroke, haemorrhage, and all cause mortality for those on anticoagulants were 2.60 (95% confidence interval 2.00 to 3.38), 2.42 (1.44 to 4.05), and 0.82 (0.74 to 0.91) compared with those who received no anticoagulation. Giving anticoagulants to older people with concomitant atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease was associated with an increased rate of ischaemic stroke and haemorrhage but a

  11. Apathy among institutionalized stroke patients: prevalence and clinical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Almenkerk, Suzanne; Smalbrugge, Martin; Depla, Marja F I A; Eefsting, Jan A; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2015-02-01

    Apathy is a frequent neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke. In the under-researched population of institutionalized stroke patients, we aimed to explore the prevalence of apathy, its clinical correlates, and the relation to the amount of stimulating activities in the nursing home (NH). A cross-sectional, observational study. Dutch NHs. 274 chronic stroke patients. Data were collected through observation lists that were filled out in structured interviews with qualified nurse assistants who knew the residents well. The lists comprised the NH-version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES10), the Barthel Index, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire, and sections of the Resident Assessment Instrument for Long-Term Care Facilities. Attending physicians and therapists provided additional information. Apathy (AES10 score ≥30) was present in 28% of residents. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that this apathy was independently related to (moderate, severe) cognitive impairment (odds ratio [OR] 11.30 [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.96-25.74], OR 5.54 [95% CI: 2.48-12.40]), very severe ADL-dependency (OR 12.10 [95% CI: 1.35-108.66]), and being >12 hours per day in bed (OR 2.10 [95% CI: 1.07-4.13]). It was not related to depressive mood symptoms (OR 1.75 [95% CI: 0.91-3.37]). Only in residents aged less than 80 years were a higher amount of activities independently related to a lower AES10 score (-0.70 [95% CI: -1.18 to -0.20] points per four extra activities in a 4-week period). Apathy is prevalent in largely one-quarter of institutionalized stroke patients, and that is most strongly related to cognitive impairment in this explorative study. We discuss the need for research on the relation with distinct dimensions of depression and fatigue as partly overlapping constructs, and on (individualized) stimulating activities as a possible intervention method. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Predicting activities after stroke : what is clinically relevant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.; Kollen, B. J.

    Knowledge about factors that determine the final outcome after stroke is important for early stroke management, rehabilitation goals, and discharge planning. This narrative review provides an overview of current knowledge about the prediction of activities after stroke. We reviewed the pattern of

  13. STANDARDIZING THE STRUCTURE OF STROKE CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC RESEARCH DATA: THE NINDS STROKE COMMON DATA ELEMENT (CDE) PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Warach, Steven; Janis, Scott; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Becker, Kyra; Benavente, Oscar; Broderick, Joseph; Dromerick, Alexander W.; Duncan, Pamela; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Johnston, Karen; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Meschia, James F.; Schwamm, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke initiated development of stroke-specific Common Data Elements (CDEs) as part of a project to develop data standards for funded clinical research in all fields of neuroscience. Standardizing data elements in translational, clinical and population research in cerebrovascular disease could decrease study start-up time, facilitate data sharing, and promote well-informed clinical practice guidelines. Methods A Working Group of diverse experts in cerebrovascular clinical trials, epidemiology, and biostatistics met regularly to develop a set of Stroke CDEs, selecting among, refining, and adding to existing, field-tested data elements from national registries and funded trials and studies. Candidate elements were revised based on comments from leading national and international neurovascular research organizations and the public. Results The first iteration of the NINDS stroke-specific CDEs comprises 980 data elements spanning nine content areas: 1) Biospecimens and Biomarkers; 2) Hospital Course and Acute Therapies; 3) Imaging; 4) Laboratory Tests and Vital Signs; 5) Long Term Therapies; 6) Medical History and Prior Health Status; 7) Outcomes and Endpoints; 8) Stroke Presentation; 9) Stroke Types and Subtypes. A CDE website provides uniform names and structures for each element, a data dictionary, and template case report forms (CRFs) using the CDEs. Conclusion Stroke-specific CDEs are now available as standardized, scientifically-vetted variable structures to facilitate data collection and data sharing in cerebrovascular patient-oriented research. The CDEs are an evolving resource that will be iteratively improved based on investigator use, new technologies, and emerging concepts and research findings. PMID:22308239

  14. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  15. C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortality: an individual participant meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Lowe, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    .18-1.49) for ischaemic stroke; 1.34 (1.18-1.52) for vascular mortality; and 1.34 (1.20-1.50) for non-vascular mortality. INTERPRETATION: CRP concentration has continuous associations with the risk of coronary heart disease, ischaemic stroke, vascular mortality, and death from several cancers and lung disease......-person variation in risk factor levels. RESULTS: Log(e) CRP concentration was linearly associated with several conventional risk factors and inflammatory markers, and nearly log-linearly with the risk of ischaemic vascular disease and non-vascular mortality. Risk ratios (RRs) for coronary heart disease per 1-SD...... higher log(e) CRP concentration (three-fold higher) were 1.63 (95% CI 1.51-1.76) when initially adjusted for age and sex only, and 1.37 (1.27-1.48) when adjusted further for conventional risk factors; 1.44 (1.32-1.57) and 1.27 (1.15-1.40) for ischaemic stroke; 1.71 (1.53-1.91) and 1.55 (1...

  16. Evaluation of the modifying effects of unfavourable genotypes on classical clinical risk factors for ischaemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Szolnoki, Z; Somogyvari, F; Kondacs, A; Szabo, M; Fodor, L; Bene, J; Melegh, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Ischaemic stroke is a frequent heterogeneous multifactorial disease that is affected by a number of genetic mutations and environmental factors. We hypothesised the clinical importance of the interactions between common, unfavourable genetic mutations and clinical risk factors in the development of ischaemic stroke.

  17. Clinical diagnosis of stroke: need for audit | Imam | Annals of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a common disease and in developing countries its diagnosis relies heavily on clinical features because of the dearth of radiological facilities. To ensure that the diagnosis of stroke is as accurate as possible, it is imperative that clinical skills are kept at the optimum. One such method of doing this is by ...

  18. Increasing Area Deprivation and Socioeconomic Inequalities in Heart Disease, Stroke, and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Working Age Populations, United States, 1969-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal K. Singh, PhD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We examined the extent to which area- and individual-level socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular-disease (CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality among United States men and women aged 25-64 years changed between 1969 and 2011. Methods: National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate area- and individual-level socioeconomic gradients in mortality over time. Rate ratios and log-linear and Cox regression were used to model mortality trends and differentials. Results: Area socioeconomic gradients in mortality from CVD, heart disease, and stroke increased substantially during the study period. Compared to those in the most affluent group, individuals in the most deprived area group had, respectively 35%, 29%, and 73% higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality in 1969, but 120-121% higher mortality in 2007-2011. Gradients were steeper for women than for men. Education, income, and occupation were inversely associated with CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality, with individual-level socioeconomic gradients being steeper during 1990-2002 than in 1979-1989. Individuals with low education and incomes had 2.7 to 3.7 times higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality risks than their counterparts with high education and income levels. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Although mortality declined for all US groups during 1969-2011, socioeconomic disparities in mortality from CVD, heart disease and stroke remained marked and increased over time because of faster declines in mortality among higher socioeconomic groups. Widening disparities in mortality may reflect increasing temporal areal inequalities in living conditions, behavioral risk factors such as smoking, obesity and physical inactivity, and access to and use of health services. With social inequalities and prevalence of smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity on the rise, most segments of the working

  19. Increasing Area Deprivation and Socioeconomic Inequalities in Heart Disease, Stroke, and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Working Age Populations, United States, 1969-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gopal K; Siahpush, Mohammad; Azuine, Romuladus E; Williams, Shanita D

    2015-01-01

    We examined the extent to which area- and individual-level socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular-disease (CVD), heart disease, and stroke mortality among United States men and women aged 25-64 years changed between 1969 and 2011. National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate area- and individual-level socioeconomic gradients in mortality over time. Rate ratios and log-linear and Cox regression were used to model mortality trends and differentials. Area socioeconomic gradients in mortality from CVD, heart disease, and stroke increased substantially during the study period. Compared to those in the most affluent group, individuals in the most deprived area group had, respectively 35%, 29%, and 73% higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality in 1969, but 120-121% higher mortality in 2007-2011. Gradients were steeper for women than for men. Education, income, and occupation were inversely associated with CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality, with individual-level socioeconomic gradients being steeper during 1990-2002 than in 1979-1989. Individuals with low education and incomes had 2.7 to 3.7 times higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality risks than their counterparts with high education and income levels. Although mortality declined for all US groups during 1969-2011, socioeconomic disparities in mortality from CVD, heart disease and stroke remained marked and increased over time because of faster declines in mortality among higher socioeconomic groups. Widening disparities in mortality may reflect increasing temporal areal inequalities in living conditions, behavioral risk factors such as smoking, obesity and physical inactivity, and access to and use of health services. With social inequalities and prevalence of smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity on the rise, most segments of the working-age population in low- and middle-income countries will likely experience increased cardiovascular

  20. Effects of Transferring to the Rehabilitation Ward on Long-Term Mortality Rate of First-Time Stroke Survivors: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2017-12-01

    To assess the long-term health outcomes of acute stroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Long-term mortality rates of first-time stroke survivors during hospitalization were compared among the following sets of patients: patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward, patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward, and patients receiving no rehabilitation. Retrospective cohort study. Patients (N = 11,419) with stroke from 2005 to 2008 were initially assessed for eligibility. After propensity score matching, 390 first-time stroke survivors were included. None. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess differences in 5-year poststroke mortality rates. Based on adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), the patients receiving rehabilitation without being transferred to the rehabilitation ward (adjusted HR, 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-3.57) and patients receiving no rehabilitation (adjusted HR, 4.00; 95% CI, 2.55-6.27) had significantly higher mortality risk than the patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward. Mortality rate of the stroke survivors was affected by age ≥65 years (compared with age stroke (adjusted HR, 1.55), stroke severity (Stroke Severity Index [SSI] score≥20, compared with SSI scorestroke survivors transferred to the rehabilitation ward had a 5-year mortality rate 2.2 times lower than those who received rehabilitation without transfer to the rehabilitation ward and 4 times lower than those who received no rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Admission body temperature predicts long-term mortality after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Rungby, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Body temperature is considered crucial in the management of acute stroke patients. Recently hypothermia applied as a therapy for stroke has been demonstrated to be feasible and safe in acute stroke patients. In the present study, we investigated the predictive role of admission body temperature...

  2. Outcome Determinants of Stroke in a Brazilian Primary Stroke Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo W. Kuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke mortality in Brazil is one of the highest among Western countries. Nonetheless, stroke outcome determinants are still poorly known in this country. In this study we evaluate outcome determinants of stroke in a primary stroke center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and outcome data of patients with ischemic stroke (IS, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH admitted at “Hospital Paulistano,” São Paulo, Brazil. In-hospital mortality and functional outcome determinants were assessed. Univariate and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results. Three hundred forty-one patients were included in the study, 52.2% being male with 66.8±15.7 years. The stroke type distribution was IS: 59.2%, TIA: 29.6%, and ICH: 11.1%. ICH was associated with greater severity and poorer functional outcome. The determinants of poorer functional outcome were higher NIHSS, lower Glasgow score, and lower oxygen saturation level. The most important mortality determinant was the presence of visual symptoms. Conclusions. The stroke mortality and stroke outcome determinants found in the present study do not remarkably differ from studies carried out in developed countries. Stroke prognosis studies are crucial to better understand the high burden of stroke in Brazil.

  3. Poststroke Epilepsy Is Associated With a High Mortality After a Stroke at Young Age: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntz, R.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Poststroke epilepsy is a common complication after a young stroke. We investigated the association between poststroke epilepsy and mortality. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study among 631 patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke,

  4. Benefits of clinical facilitators on improving stroke care in acute hospitals: a new programme for Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Tara; Moss, Karen; Francis, Linda; Borschmann, Karen; Kilkenny, Monique F; Denisenko, Sonia; Bladin, Christopher F; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2017-07-01

    Care gaps for stroke lead to preventable disability and deaths. The Victorian State Government implemented a programme of employing clinical Facilitators on a fixed-term basis for up to 3 years (2008-2011) in eight hospitals to improve stroke care. The Facilitators were to establish stroke units where absent, implement evidence-based management protocols and provide staff education within an agreed work plan. To determine if the Facilitator role was associated with improved stroke care and to describe factors supporting or mitigating enhancements to care. A mixed methods design was employed with historical control using patient-level audit data (pre-Facilitator: n = 600; post-Facilitator: n = 387) and qualitative data from independently conducted semistructured interviews with hospital staff, including clinicians, executives and facilitators (n = 10 focus groups; 75 respondents). Stroke units, clinical pathways and outpatient clinics for managing transient ischaemic attacks (TIA) were established. Compared with the pre-Facilitator period, significant increases in patient access to stroke unit care (53% vs 86%, P team motivation and cohesiveness and increasing interest in stroke care. Ongoing barriers included limited resources to operate TIA clinics effectively, staff turnover requiring ongoing education, inconsistency in compliance with protocols and, in some hospitals, the need for formalised medical leadership. Fixed-term employment of Facilitators was effective in positively influencing stroke care in hospitals through a range of change management strategies where stroke-specific expertise had been previously limited. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Exogenous stem cells pioneer a biobridge to the advantage of host brain cells following stroke: New insights for clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marci G Crowley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke continues to maintain its status as one of the top causes of mortality within the United States. Currently, the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drug in place for stroke patients, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, has a rigid therapeutic window, closing at approximately 4.5 h after stroke onset. Due to this short time frame and other restrictions, such as any condition that increases a patient's risk for hemorrhaging, it has been predicted that <5% of ischemic stroke patients benefit from tPA. Given that rehabilitation therapy remains the only other option for stroke victims, there is a clear unmet clinical need for treatment available for the remaining 95%. While still considered an experimental treatment, the utilization of stem cell therapies for stroke holds consistent promise. Copious preclinical studies report the capacity for transplanted stem cells to rescue the brain parenchyma surrounding the stroke-induced infarct core. At present, the exact mechanisms in which stem cells contribute a robust therapeutic benefit remains unclear. Following stem cell administration, researchers have observed cell replacement, an increase in growth factors, and a reduction in inflammation. With a deeper understanding of the precise mechanism of stem cells, these therapies can be optimized in the clinic to afford the greatest therapeutic benefit. Recent studies have depicted a unique method of endogenous stem cell activation as a result of stem cell therapy. In both traumatic brain injury and stroke models, transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs facilitated a pathway between the neurogenic niches of the brain and the damaged area through extracellular matrix remodeling. The biobridge pioneered by the MSCs was utilized by the endogenous stem cells, and these cells were able to travel to the damaged areas distal to the neurogenic niches, a feat unachievable without prior remodeling. These studies broaden our understanding of stem

  6. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N.; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E.; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Objectives Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. Methods An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Results Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Conclusions Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance. PMID:23949045

  7. mortality after clinical management of aids-associated cryptococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 91 No. 5 May 2014. MORTALITY AFTER CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF AIDS-ASSOCIATED CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS IN KENYA. R.Baldassarre, MD, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, R. Mdodo, Mphil, MS, DrPH, University of Alabama at ...

  8. Uric acid predicts mortality and ischaemic stroke in subjects with diastolic dysfunction: the Tromsø Study 1994-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvik, Jon V; Schirmer, Henrik; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Storhaug, Hilde M; Jenssen, Trond G; Eriksen, Bjørn O; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Wilsgaard, Tom; Solbu, Marit D

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether serum uric acid predicts adverse outcomes in persons with indices of diastolic dysfunction in a general population. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1460 women and 1480 men from 1994 to 2013. Endpoints were all-cause mortality, incident myocardial infarction, and incident ischaemic stroke. We stratified the analyses by echocardiographic markers of diastolic dysfunction, and uric acid was the independent variable of interest. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated per 59 μmol/L increase in baseline uric acid. Multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards models showed that uric acid predicted all-cause mortality in subjects with E/A ratio 1.5 (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09-2.09, P for interaction between E/A ratio category and uric acid = 0.02). Elevated uric acid increased mortality risk in persons with E-wave deceleration time 220 ms (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.12 and HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.26, respectively; P for interaction = 0.04). Furthermore, in participants with isovolumetric relaxation time ≤60 ms, mortality risk was higher with increasing uric acid (HR 4.98, 95% CI 2.02-12.26, P for interaction = 0.004). Finally, elevated uric acid predicted ischaemic stroke in subjects with severely enlarged left atria (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.03-2.53, P for interaction = 0.047). Increased uric acid was associated with higher all-cause mortality risk in subjects with echocardiographic indices of diastolic dysfunction, and with higher ischaemic stroke risk in persons with severely enlarged left atria.

  9. Clinical characteristics associated with mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Takumi; Hamada, Yukihiro; Yamagishi, Yuka; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    The presence of anaerobes in the blood stream is known to be associated with a higher rate of mortality. However, few prognostic risk factor analyses examining whether a patient's background characteristics are associated with the prognosis have been reported. We performed a retrospective case-controlled study to assess the prognostic factors associated with death from anaerobic bacteremia. Seventy-four patients with anaerobic bacteremia were treated between January 2005 and December 2014 at Aichi Medical University Hospital. The clinical information included drug susceptibility was used for analysis of prognostic factors for 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed an association between the 30-day mortality rate and malignancy (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.08-12.31) and clindamycin resistance (OR: 7.93, 95% CI: 2.33-27.94). The result of Kaplan-Meier analysis of mortality showed that the 30-day survival rate was 83% in clindamycin susceptible and 38.1% in clindamycin resistant anaerobes causing bacteremia. The result of log-rank test also showed that susceptibility to clindamycin affected mortality (P anaerobic bacteremia with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. The results of this study are important for the early and appropriate management of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of stroke services in Anglia stroke clinical network to examine the variation in acute services and stroke outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Abraham

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide. A series of national stroke audits in the UK highlighted the differences in stroke care between hospitals. The study aims to describe variation in outcomes following stroke and to identify the characteristics of services that are associated with better outcomes, after accounting for case mix differences and individual prognostic factors. Methods/Design We will conduct a cohort study in eight acute NHS trusts within East of England, with at least one year of follow-up after stroke. The study population will be a systematically selected representative sample of patients admitted with stroke during the study period, recruited within each hospital. We will collect individual patient data on prognostic characteristics, health care received, outcomes and costs of care and we will also record relevant characteristics of each provider organisation. The determinants of one year outcome including patient reported outcome will be assessed statistically with proportional hazards regression models. Self (or proxy completed EuroQol (EQ-5D questionnaires will measure quality of life at baseline and follow-up for cost utility analyses. Discussion This study will provide observational data about health service factors associated with variations in patient outcomes and health care costs following hospital admission for acute stroke. This will form the basis for future RCTs by identifying promising health service interventions, assessing the feasibility of recruiting and following up trial patients, and provide evidence about frequency and variances in outcomes, and intra-cluster correlation of outcomes, for sample size calculations. The results will inform clinicians, public, service providers, commissioners and policy makers to drive further improvement in health services which will bring direct benefit to the patients.

  11. Spontaneous swallow frequency compared with clinical screening in the identification of dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous swallow frequency analysis (SFA) with clinical screening protocols for identification of dysphagia in acute stroke. In all, 62 patients with acute stroke were evaluated for spontaneous swallow frequency rates using a validated acoustic analysis technique. Independent of SFA, these same patients received a routine nurse-administered clinical dysphagia screening as part of standard stroke care. Both screening tools were compared against a validated clinical assessment of dysphagia for acute stroke. In addition, psychometric properties of SFA were compared against published, validated clinical screening protocols. Spontaneous SFA differentiates patients with versus without dysphagia after acute stroke. Using a previously identified cut point based on swallows per minute, spontaneous SFA demonstrated superior ability to identify dysphagia cases compared with a nurse-administered clinical screening tool. In addition, spontaneous SFA demonstrated equal or superior psychometric properties to 4 validated, published clinical dysphagia screening tools. Spontaneous SFA has high potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke with psychometric properties equal or superior to clinical screening protocols. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Variability in Clinical Presentation of Neonatal Stroke: Report of Four Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Sonia; Angelis, Dimitrios; Bennett, Robert; Kola, Bhargavi; Hughes, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal stroke can be a cause of long term neurodevelopmental disability, seizures, and impaired cognitive function. We present four cases of neonatal stroke, associated with different risk factors and clinical presentations. Two of these newborns were born to mothers with no prenatal care.

  13. Lipoprotein(a), ferritin, and albumin in acute phase reaction predicts severity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke in North Indian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Baidarbhi; Vishnoi, Gaurav; Goswami, Binita; Gowda, Srinivas H; Chowdhury, Debashish; Agarwal, Sarita

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis and prognosis of stroke. We studied the behavior of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], ferritin, and albumin as acute phase reactants and their roles in the severity and mortality of stroke. We recruited 100 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and 120 controls. Blood samples were drawn on days 1 and 7 and at both 3 and 6 months. Stroke was classified using Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Stroke severity was assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Prognosis at 6 months was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale, and mortality was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), Lp(a), ferritin, and albumin were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoturbidimetry, and chemiluminescence commercial kits, respectively. Levels of IL-6, Lp(a), and ferritin were consistently higher among cases than controls (P acute phase reactant while albumin acted as a negative acute phase reactant. There was no association between Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype and elevated serum levels of Lp(a), albumin, and ferritin. Lp(a) and ferritin were high in patients with severe stroke. Albumin was negatively correlated with stroke severity. Serum levels of Lp(a) ≥ 77 mg/dL, albumin ≤ 3.5 g/dL, and ferritin ≥ 370 ng/dL is associated with a significantly increased risk of having a poorer outcome in stroke. Serum levels of Lp(a) >77 mg/dL and albumin 77 mg/dL and albumin <3.5 g/dL had increased mortality. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CORRELATION C-REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVELS WITH CLINICAL OUTCOME INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE STROKE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Catur Arisetianto; Hari Purnomo; Eko Arisetijono Marhendraputro; Widodo Mardi Santoso

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Intracerebral hemorrhage stroke remains a major health problem and disability. Increased levels of markers of inflammatory factors after hemorrhage stroke was able to predict poor clinical outcome. Until now, the role of C Reactive Protein (CRP) in the local inflammatory response and clinical determinants output remains unclear. Aims to investigate the correlation of CRP level with poor clinical outcome as measured by Barthel Index. Methods and material. This study was...

  15. Neuromuscular stimulation after stroke: from technology to clinical deployment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Geurts, Alexander C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, electrical or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used to support the rehabilitation of stroke patients. One of the earliest applications of NMES included the use of external muscle stimulation to correct drop-foot after stroke. During the last few decades

  16. Neuromuscular stimulation after stroke: from technology to clinical deployment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, M.J.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, electrical or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used to support the rehabilitation of stroke patients. One of the earliest applications of NMES included the use of external muscle stimulation to correct drop-foot after stroke. During the last few decades

  17. Apathy and depressive symptoms in older people and incident myocardial infarction, stroke, and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurelings LSM

    2018-04-01

    interval [CI] 1.08–1.36, a 37% higher risk of stroke (95% CI 1.18–1.59, and a 47% higher risk of all-cause mortality (95% CI 1.38–1.56. Participants with depressive symptoms had a comparably higher risk of stroke (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.18–1.56 and all-cause mortality (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35–1.53, but not of MI (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.91–1.29. Associations for isolated apathy and isolated depressive symptoms were comparable. Sensitivity analyses according to risk of bias yielded similar results.Conclusion: Our findings stress the clinical importance of recognizing apathy independently of depressive symptoms, and could help physicians identify persons at increased risk of vascular disease. Keywords: apathy, older people, depression, cardiovascular disease, meta-analysis, stroke, myocardial infarction

  18. Accuracy of Emergency Medical Services Dispatcher and Crew Diagnosis of Stroke in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Jia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAccurate recognition of stroke symptoms by Emergency Medical Services (EMS is necessary for timely care of acute stroke patients. We assessed the accuracy of stroke diagnosis by EMS in clinical practice in a major US city.Methods and resultsPhiladelphia Fire Department data were merged with data from a single comprehensive stroke center to identify patients diagnosed with stroke or TIA from 9/2009 to 10/2012. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression identified variables associated with correct EMS diagnosis. There were 709 total cases, with 400 having a discharge diagnosis of stroke or TIA. EMS crew sensitivity was 57.5% and PPV was 69.1%. EMS crew identified 80.2% of strokes with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS ≥5 and symptom duration <6 h. In a multivariable model, correct EMS crew diagnosis was positively associated with NIHSS (NIHSS 5–9, OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.41–4.89; NIHSS ≥10, OR 4.56, 95% CI 2.29–9.09 and weakness (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.35–3.85, and negatively associated with symptom duration >270 min (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.25–0.68. EMS dispatchers identified 90 stroke cases that the EMS crew missed. EMS dispatcher or crew identified stroke with sensitivity of 80% and PPV of 50.9%, and EMS dispatcher or crew identified 90.5% of patients with NIHSS ≥5 and symptom duration <6 h.ConclusionPrehospital diagnosis of stroke has limited sensitivity, resulting in a high proportion of missed stroke cases. Dispatchers identified many strokes that EMS crews did not. Incorporating EMS dispatcher impression into regional protocols may maximize the effectiveness of hospital destination selection and pre-notification.

  19. Older patients with acute stroke in Denmark: quality of care and short-term mortality. A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnum, K.D.; Sorensen, H.T.; Ingeman, A.

    2008-01-01

    -up study in Denmark. METHODS: we identified 29,549 patients admitted with stroke between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Danish National Indicator Project (DNIP). Data on 30- and 90-day mortality were obtained from the Civil Registration System. We compared proportions of patients receiving adequate....... CONCLUSIONS: elderly stroke patients in Denmark receive a lower quality of care than do younger stroke patients, however, the age-related differences are modest for most examined quality-of-care criteria and do not appear to explain the higher mortality among older patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  20. Unilateral versus bilateral upper limb training after stroke: the ULTRA-Stroke clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, A.E.Q.; Peper, C.E.; Nienhuys, K.; Zijp, N.I.; Beek, P.J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Unilateral and bilateral training protocols for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke represent conceptually contrasting approaches with the same ultimate goal. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared the merits of modified constraint-induced movement therapy,

  1. Left Ventricular Geometry Determines Prognosis and Reverse J-Shaped Relation Between Blood Pressure and Mortality in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Soon; Park, Jun-Bean; Kim, Yerim; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Sohn, Dae-Won; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2018-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the prognostic significance of left ventricular (LV) mass and geometry in ischemic stroke survivors, as well as the LV geometry-specific differences in the blood pressure-mortality relationship. LV mass and geometry are well-known prognostic factors in various populations; however, there are no data on their role in ischemic stroke patients. We prospectively recruited 2,328 consecutive patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke to our institute between 2002 and 2010. Of these, 2,069 patients were analyzed in whom echocardiographic data were available to assess LV mass and geometry. All-cause mortality was significantly greater in patients with concentric hypertrophy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.417; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.045 to 1.920) and concentric remodeling (HR: 1.540; 95% CI: 1.115 to 2.127) but nonsignificantly in those with eccentric hypertrophy (HR: 1.388; 95% CI: 0.996 to 1.935) compared with normal geometry in multivariate analyses. Relative wall thickness was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (HR: 1.149 per 0.1-U increase in relative wall thickness; 95% CI: 1.021 to 1.307), whereas LV mass index was not (HR: 1.003 per 1 g/m 2 increase in LV mass index; 95% CI: 0.999 to 1.007). Similar results were observed with cardiovascular mortality. In multivariable fractional polynomials, patients with altered LV geometry showed reverse J-curve relationships between acute-phase systolic blood pressure and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, with the highest risks in the lower extremes, whereas those with normal geometry did not. Echocardiographic assessment of LV geometry provided independent and additive prognostic information in ischemic stroke patients. A reverse J-shaped relation of mortality with blood pressure was found in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum Potassium Is Positively Associated With Stroke and Mortality in the Large, Population-Based Malmö Preventive Project Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda S; Mattsson, Nick; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Wollmer, Per; Söderholm, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Low serum potassium is associated with stroke in populations with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus but has not been studied in a mainly healthy population. We aimed to study the relation between serum potassium and incident stroke and mortality in the Malmö Preventive Project, a large cohort with screening in early mid-life and follow-up >25 years. Serum potassium measurements and covariates were available in 21 353 individuals (79% men, mean age 44 years). Mean follow-up time was 26.9 years for stroke analyses and 29.3 years for mortality analyses. There were 2061 incident stroke events and 8709 deaths. Cox regression analyses adjusted for multiple stroke risk factors (age, sex, height, weight, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, serum sodium, current smoking, prevalent diabetes mellitus, prevalent coronary artery disease, and treatment for hypertension) were fitted. There was an independent, linear association between serum potassium, per mmol/L increase, and both stroke (hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.52; P stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage and in both hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Serum potassium, measured in early mid-life, was linearly associated with both incidence of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage and all-cause mortality. An interaction with serum sodium implies that factors related to electrolyte balance and incident hypertension may be mediating factors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Stroke treatment in Stroke Unit: from scientific evidences to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Stornello

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In themanagement of stroke disease, evidences fromthe literature demonstrate that the introduction of stroke units, hospital wards with dedicated beds providing intensive care within 48 hours of symptoms’ onset, produced a real improvement in the outcome, reducing in-hospital fatality cases and increasing the proportion of patients independently living in long term follow-up. Discussion: The article focuses on stroke disease-management, suggesting a stroke integrated approach for the admission of patients on dedicated beds, in order to extend the ‘‘stroke care’’ approach outcomes to as many hospitals as possible in Italy. This approach implies the set up of a stroke network for an effective patients’ stratification according to the severity of the illness at debut; the set up of an integrated team of specialists in hospital management of the acute phase (first 48 hours and a timely rehabilitation treatment. Ultimately the hospital should be organized according to department’s semi-intensive areas in order to assure to the patients, in the early stage of the disease, a timely high intensity care aimed to improve the long term outcome.

  4. Clinical and laboratory factors associated with mortality in dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroch, Atul; Arya, Vivek; Sinha, Nitin; Taneja, R S; Sahai, Pooja; Mahajan, R K

    2017-04-01

    Dengue is endemic in more than 100 countries, giving rise to an increased number of deaths in the last five years in the South-East Asian region. We report our findings from a retrospective study of adults admitted with confirmed dengue at our institution. We studied the clinical and laboratory parameters associated with mortality in these patients. Of the 172 hospitalised patients studied, 156 (90.69 %) recovered while 16 (9.3%) died. Univariate analysis showed altered sensorium on presentation, lower haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, higher serum creatinine, higher serum transaminase and lower serum albumin levels to be significantly associated with mortality in dengue. Further, using stepwise multivariate logistic regression, altered sensorium ( P = 0.006) and hypoalbuminemia ( P = 0.013) were identified as independent predictors of mortality in dengue. Identification of these parameters early in the course of disease should prompt intensification of treatment in dengue cases.

  5. [Impact of daily mean temperature, cold spells, and heat waves on stroke mortality a multivariable Meta-analysis from 12 counties of Hubei province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y Q; Yu, C H; Bao, J Z

    2017-04-10

    Objective: To assess the acute effects of daily mean temperature, cold spells, and heat waves on stroke mortality in 12 counties across Hubei province, China. Methods: Data related to daily mortality from stroke and meteorology in 12 counties across Hubei province during 2009-2012, were gathered. Distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was first used, to estimate the county-specific associations between daily mean temperature, cold spells, heat waves and stroke mortality. Multivariate Meta-analysis was then applied to pool the community-specific relationships between temperature and stroke mortality (exposure-response relationship) as well as both cold- and- heat-associated risks on mortality at different lag days (lag-response relationship). Results: During 2009-2012, a total population of 6.7 million was included in this study with 42 739 persons died of stroke. An average of 2.7 (from 0.5 to 6.0) stroke deaths occurred daily in each county, with annual average mean temperature as 16.6 ℃ (from 14.7 ℃ to 17.4 ℃) during the study period. An inverse J-shaped association between temperature and stroke mortality was observed at the provincial level. Pooled mortality effect of cold spells showed a 2-3-day delay and lasted about 10 days, while effect of heat waves appeared acute but attenuated within a few days. The mortality risks on cold-spell days ranged from 0.968 to 1.523 in 12 counties at lag 3-14, with pooled effect as 1.180 (95 %CI: 1.043-1.336). The pooled mortality risk (ranged from 0.675 to 2.066) on heat-wave days at lag 0-2 was 1.114 (95 %CI: 1.012-1.227). Conclusions: An inverse J-shaped association between temperature and stroke mortality was observed in Hubei province, China. Both cold spells and heat waves were associated with increased stroke mortality, while different lag patterns were observed in the mortality effects of heat waves and cold spells.

  6. Predictors of intensive care unit admission and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke: investigating the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngen, Belma Doğan; Tunç, Abdulkadir; Aras, Yeşim Güzey; Gündoğdu, Aslı Aksoy; Güngen, Adil Can; Bal, Serdar

    2017-07-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality among stroke patients and the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program on stroke patients. This prospective study enrolled 181 acute ischemic stroke patients aged between 40 and 90 years. Demographical characteristics, laboratory tests, diffusion-weighed magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) time, nutritional status, vascular risk factors, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and modified Rankin scale (MRS) scores were recorded for all patients. One-hundred patients participated in the pulmonary rehabilitation program, 81 of whom served as a control group. Statistically, one- and three-month mortality was associated with NIHSS and MRS scores at admission and three months (pstroke patients. We believe that a pulmonary rehabilitation program, in addition to general stroke rehabilitation programs, can play a critical role in improving survival and functional outcomes. NCT03195907 . Trial registration date: 21.06.2017 'Retrospectively registered'.

  7. Computed tomography scanning and stroke mortality in an urban medical unit in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Lekoubou

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In this resource-limited environment, the absence of brain imaging on admission was associated with high in-hospital death from stroke, which was only partially explained by delayed hospitalization with severe disease. These results stressed the importance of scaling up acute stroke management in low- and middle-income countries.

  8. Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Stroke Mortality in China: Data From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenkun; Hu, Songbo; Sang, Shuping; Luo, Lisha; Yu, Chuanhua

    2017-02-01

    Stroke has been the leading cause of death in China. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term trends of stroke mortality in China between 1994 and 2013. The mortality data were obtained from the GBD 2013 (Global Burden of Disease Study 2013) and were analyzed with the age-period-cohort framework. We found that the net drift was -2.665% (95% confidence interval, -2.854% to -2.474%) per year for men and -4.064% (95% confidence interval, -4.279% to -3.849%) per year for women, and the local drift values were below 0 in all age groups (Pstroke rose exponentially with age for both sexes after controlling for period deviations. The estimated period and cohort relative risks were found in similar monotonic downward patterns (significantly with Pstroke in China are likely to be related to improvements in medical care and techniques, spectacular economic growth and fast urbanization, and better early life nutrition conditions of Chinese people. Besides, better education and better awareness of stroke-related knowledge in successive generations could also probably play a role. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Winter excess in hospital admissions, in-patient mortality and length of acute hospital stay in stroke: a hospital database study over six seasonal years in Norfolk, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Woodhouse, Peter R; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have examined the incidence and mortality of stroke in relation to season. However, the evidence is conflicting partly due to variation in the populations (community vs. hospital-based), and in climatic conditions between studies. Moreover, they may not have been able to take into account the age, sex and stroke type of the study population. We hypothesized that the age, sex and type of stroke are major determinants of the presence or absence of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. We analyzed a hospital-based stroke register from Norfolk, UK to examine our prior hypothesis. Using Curwen's method, we performed stratified sex-specific analyses by (1) seasonal year and (2) quartiles of patients' age and stroke subtype and calculated the winter excess for the number of admissions, in-patient deaths and length of acute hospital stay. There were 5,481 patients (men=45%). Their ages ranged from 17 to 105 years (median=78 years). There appeared to be winter excess in hospital admissions, deaths and length of acute hospital stay overall accounting for 3/100,000 extra admissions (winter excess index of 3.4% in men and 7.6% in women) and 1/100,000 deaths (winter excess index of 4.7 and 8.6% in women) due to stroke in winter compared to non-winter periods. Older patients with non-haemorrhagic stroke mainly contribute to this excess. If our findings are replicated throughout England and Wales, it is estimated that there are 1,700 excess admissions, 600 excess in-patient deaths and 24,500 extra acute hospital bed days each winter, related to stroke within the current population of approximately 60 million. Further research should be focused on the determinants of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. This may subsequently reduce the morbidity and mortality by providing effective preventive strategies in future. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. From the stroke unit to the stroke competence center: corresponding beneficial clinical and financial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, A; Förster, A; Hennerici, M G; Bäzner, H

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of the diagnosis related groups (DRG) system in Germany has radically influenced the organization of in-hospital patient treatment. Case-mix-index and duration of treatment in a stroke unit (SU) play a central role. Our SU started in 1998 and was gradually extended to the current "Stroke Competence Center" (SCC), with a total capacity of 29 patients. The SCC combines acute treatment, work-up and post-stroke management by the same specialized team. We aimed primarily at demonstrating the financial effects of this concept. Data from stroke patients treated in our SU/SCC between 2004 and 2009 were analyzed. We analyzed the number of treated stroke patients, number of thrombolytic treatments, the number of cases coded with procedure codes OPS 8-981.x and the ratio of OPS 8-981.0 (24-72 h on SU) to the higher remunerated OPS 8-981.1 (>72 h on SU). The number of treated patients increased by 118.3% (from 469 in 2004 to 1024 in 2009). The number of thrombolyses per year has more than quadrupled (2004: 46, 2009: 253, i.e. 25% of SU patients). The introduction of the stroke center concept lead to a great increase in the ratio of the higher rewarded OPS 8-981.1 to OPS 8-981.0 (from 1.5 in 2005 to 5.21 in 2009). Our data demonstrates that the SCC concept leads to a greater financial potential, while offering considerable medical advantages concerning more effective stroke treatment and work-up as well as improved flow of information and enhanced individual patient-physician relationship.

  11. Ethnic Comparison of Clinical Characteristics and Ischemic Stroke Subtypes Among Young Adult Patients With Stroke in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kazuma; Ito, Cherisse S; King, Sage L

    2017-01-01

    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI) with ischemic stroke have younger age of stroke onset compared with whites. However, ethnic differences in stroke subtypes in this population have been inadequately studied. Consecutive young adult patients (aged ≤55 years) who were hospitalized for ischemic stroke between 2006 and 2012 at a tertiary center in Honolulu were studied. Clinical characteristics and stroke subtypes based on pathophysiological TOAST classification (Trial of Org 10172) of NHOPI and Asians were compared with whites. A total of 427 consecutive young adult (mean age, 46.7±7.8 years) patients (NHOPI 45%, Asians 38%, and whites 17%) were studied. NHOPI had a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, prosthetic valve, higher body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, and lower high-density lipoprotein than whites (all PStroke subtype distribution was not different between the ethnic groups. Specifically, the prevalence of small-vessel disease was similar between NHOPI (26.6%), whites (28.4%), and Asians (24.8%). In the univariate analyses, the use of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator was lower among NHOPI (4.7%; P=0.01) and Asians (3.1%; P=0.002) than among whites (12.5%). In the multivariable model, NHOPI (odds ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.98) and Asians (odds ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.74) were less likely to be treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator than whites. NHOPI have greater cardiovascular risk factors than whites, but there were no differences in stroke subtypes between the ethnic groups. Furthermore, NHOPI and Asians may be less likely to be treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator than whites. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Clinical Trials of Adult Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.

  13. Clinical Effectiveness of Statin Therapy After Ischemic Stroke: Primary Results From the Statin Therapeutic Area of the Patient-Centered Research Into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research (PROSPER) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Emily C; Greiner, Melissa A; Xian, Ying; Fonarow, Gregg C; Olson, DaiWai M; Schwamm, Lee H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Smith, Eric E; Maisch, Lesley; Hannah, Deidre; Lindholm, Brianna; Peterson, Eric D; Pencina, Michael J; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2015-10-13

    In patients with ischemic stroke, data on the real-world effectiveness of statin therapy for clinical and patient-centered outcomes are needed to better inform shared decision making. Patient-Centered Research Into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research (PROSPER) is a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded research program designed with stroke survivors to evaluate the effectiveness of poststroke therapies. We linked data on patients ≥65 years of age enrolled in the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Registry to Medicare claims. Two-year to postdischarge outcomes of those discharged on a statin versus not on a statin were adjusted through inverse probability weighting. Our coprimary outcomes were major adverse cardiovascular events and home time (days alive and out of a hospital or skilled nursing facility). Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, all-cause readmission, cardiovascular readmission, and hemorrhagic stroke. From 2007 to 2011, 77 468 patients who were not taking statins at the time of admission were hospitalized with ischemic stroke; of these, 71% were discharged on statin therapy. After adjustment, statin therapy at discharge was associated with a lower hazard of major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-0.94), 28 more home-time days after discharge (PStatin therapy at discharge was not associated with increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.23). Among statin-treated patients, 31% received a high-intensity dose; after risk adjustment, these patients had outcomes similar to those of recipients of moderate-intensity statin. In older ischemic stroke patients who were not taking statins at the time of admission, discharge statin therapy was associated with lower risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and nearly 1 month more home time during the 2-year period after hospitalization. © 2015 American Heart Association

  14. Variations in Kinematics during Clinical Gait Analysis in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, C?line; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-tem...

  15. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in stroke patients: a cross-sectional, clinical survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were primarily to investigate the prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a clinical sample of stroke patients and secondly to identify factors associated with LUTS.......The aims of this study were primarily to investigate the prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a clinical sample of stroke patients and secondly to identify factors associated with LUTS....

  16. Impact of stroke type on survival and functional health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A.; Reitsma, J. B.; Limburg, M.; van den Bos, G. A.; de Haan, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    In a cohort 760 consecutive stroke patients (23 hospitals in the Netherlands), we studied prognosis in relation to stroke type and focused on (a) short-term and long-term mortality, and (b) long-term functional health. Based on clinical and CT data, we distinguished infratentorial strokes from

  17. Statins and clinical outcome of acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statin therapy is considered an effective measure for the prevention of ischemic stroke. Several recent studies have indicated that treatment with statins, prior to the onset of acute ischemic stroke, may also substantially reduce the severity of stroke and the degree of patient disability. The purpose of the present review is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of statin pretreatment on functional outcome of acute ischemic stroke and to assess potential adverse events associated with statin use. Methods Relevant articles on the role of statins in acute ischemic stroke were identified via MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and by manual searches of the references of identified papers. Clinical studies (most were prospective cohort studies assessing statin therapy for acute ischemic stroke were selected for the review. Only two randomized controlled clinical trials met the criteria to be included in the analysis. Clinical outcome was assessed based on the degree of disability determined with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to measure stroke severity. Recurrence of stroke in patients who had suffered from a previous stroke was analyzed with and without statin therapy. Incidence and severity of adverse reactions was reviewed. Because there were too many differences in study outcome measures, a quantitative analysis of data was deemed inappropriate. A qualitative summary of the data was consequently completed. Results Thirteen reports were systematically reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of statins in the pretreatment of acute ischemic stroke. Pretreatment with statins was found to reduce the recurrence of stroke and to result in more favorable outcomes for patients. The beneficial effects of prior statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke were shown to be especially profound in whites, diabetics, elderly patients with

  18. Serum cholinesterase activities distinguish between stroke patients and controls and predict 12-month mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Assayag, Einor; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Ofek, Keren

    2010-01-01

    To date there is no diagnostic biomarker for mild stroke, although elevation of inflammatory biomarkers has been reported at early stages. Previous studies implicated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) involvement in stroke, and circulating AChE activity reflects inflammatory response, since acetylcholine...... suppresses inflammation. Therefore, carriers of polymorphisms that modify cholinergic activity should be particularly susceptible to inflammatory damage. Our study sought diagnostic values of AChE and Cholinergic Status (CS, the total capacity for acetylcholine hydrolysis) in suspected stroke patients....... For this purpose, serum cholinesterase activities, butyrylcholinesterase-K genotype and inflammatory biomarkers were determined in 264 ischemic stroke patients and matched controls during the acute phase. AChE activities were lower (P...

  19. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... searches of reference lists, and discussion with collaborators. DATA EXTRACTION: Individual records were provided for each of 126,634 participants in 36 prospective studies. During 1.3 million person-years of follow-up, 22,076 first-ever fatal or nonfatal vascular disease outcomes or nonvascular deaths...... were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta...

  20. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta-analysis...... broadly continuous in shape. In the 24 cohort studies, the rates of CHD in the top and bottom thirds of baseline Lp(a) distributions, respectively, were 5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-5.9) per 1000 person-years and 4.4 (95% CI, 4.2-4.6) per 1000 person-years. The risk ratio for CHD, adjusted...

  1. How motorcycle helmets affect trauma mortality: Clinical and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jwo-Leun; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Huang, Hung-Chang; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2017-08-18

    Motorcycles are the most popular vehicles in Taiwan, where more than 14.8 million motorcycles (1 motorcycle per 1.6 people) are in service. Despite the mandatory helmet law passed in 1997, less than 80% of motorcyclists in Taiwan wear helmets. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of using motorcycle helmets on fatality rates. A clinical data set including 2,868 trauma patients was analyzed; the cross-sectional registration database was administered by a university medical center in Central Taiwan. A path analysis framework and multiple logistic regressions were used to estimate the marginal effect of helmet use on mortality. Using a helmet did not directly reduce the mortality rate but rather indirectly reduced the mortality rate through intervening variables such as the severity of head injuries, number of craniotomies, and complications during therapeutic processes. Wearing a helmet can reduce the fatality rate by 1.3%, the rate of severe head injury by 34.5%, the craniotomy rate by 7.8%, and the rate of complications during therapeutic processes by 1.5%. These rates comprise 33.3% of the mortality rate for people who do not wear helmets, 67.3% of the severe head injury rate, 60.0% of the craniotomy rate, and 12.2% of the rate of complications during therapeutic processes. Wearing a helmet and trauma system designation are crucial factors that reduce the fatality rate.

  2. Clinical and laboratory predictors of deep vein thrombosis after acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Ibrahim O; Roberts, Lara N; Patel, Raj; Pathansali, Rohan; Kalra, Lalit; Arya, Roopen

    2016-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication of acute stroke, but the new incidence in the era of improved specialist input in stroke care is yet unknown. The models for VTE diagnosis is well established, but prediction models to target at-risk patients for pharmacological prophylaxis is lacking and requires further research, particularly in the aftermath of acute stroke. To predict DVT after acute stroke using markers of haemostatic activation and stroke severity scores. We examined the clinical utility of laboratory factors such as thrombin generation, D-dimer, fibrinogen alongside clinical factors (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Barthel Index) in the prediction of asymptomatic DVT, among 92 consecutively admitted patients. One in five patients (19.6%) had objectively confirmed DVT (6 proximal, 12 distal). Thrombolytic therapy did not protect against DVT, with 21% (6/29) of patients treated with r-tPA went on to develop DVT. Thrombin generation and fibrinogen had no clinical utility, but D-dimer at baseline and week 2 had high clinical potential in the prediction of asymptomatic DVT (2425ng/mL versus 1010ng/mL; p=0.001) and (2240 Vs 970ng/mL; pstroke severity, and are functionally less able, with lower Barthel index (p=0.05), and high National Institute of Health Stroke Score (p=0.07). Thrombolytic therapy and specialist stroke intervention does not protect against DVT risk. D-dimer concentration within 48h of acute stroke is independently associated with development of DVT. This observation would require confirmation in a large study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of Ginkgo biloba on functional outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouei, Darioush Savadi; Rikhtegar, Reza; Hashemilar, Mazyar; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Sharifi-Bonab, Mohsen; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, Elyar; Zarrintan, Sina; Sharifipour, Ehsan

    2013-11-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cerebrovascular disease with potential morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of thrombolytic therapy in some centers, risk factor modification and rehabilitation therapy are the mainstays of stroke management. There is supporting evidence that Ginkgo biloba may afford neuroprotection and improve the outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial, we assessed the efficacy of G biloba on functional outcome in patients with acute stroke. The National Institutes of Heath Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to measure functional outcome. A total of 102 patients with acute ischemic stroke were studied. All patients received either G biloba or placebo tablets for 4 months. This trial was registered to the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (www.irct.ir; trial IRCT138804212150N1). There were 52 patients who received G biloba and 50 patients who were in the placebo group. Age, sex distribution, previous medical condition, and laboratory data did not have any significant difference between the 2 groups (P>.05). The mean difference of 4-month follow-up NIHSS scores and NIHSS scores at admission was 4.7±2.7 and 4.1±3.0 in the G biloba and placebo groups, respectively (P>.05). The primary outcome-a 50% reduction in the 4-month follow-up NIHSS score compared to the baseline NIHSS score-was reached in 17 patients (58.6%) and 5 patients (18.5%) in the G biloba and placebo groups, respectively (Pbiloba group compared to the placebo group (Pbiloba may have protective effects in ischemic stroke. Therefore, the administration of G biloba is recommended after acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C.; Herholz, Sibylle C.; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits. PMID:26124731

  5. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  6. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eRosslau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions or expression (music production abilities, and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a right-sided stroke, patients with a left-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  7. The Association between Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 Levels and Clinical Prognosis in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Yaşar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent studies report that the insulin-like growth factor system may be involved in stroke pathogenesis, and is reported to increase myelination, maturation, cell proliferation and neuronal sprouting of the central nervous system. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the role of insulin-like growth factor system in ischemic stroke pathogenesis and its association with the prognosis by investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels in patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: : Sixty-eight patients and 20 healthy individuals were included to this study. Clinical evaluation of the patients was performed according to National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and functional outcomes were graded according to Modified Rankin Scale. Bamford classification was used for the clinical classification of ischemic strokes, and the TOAST system for etiological classification. Each patient's levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were measured on the first, fifth and thirtieth day of ischemic stroke. RESULTS: Only the levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 on the day of 5 were significantly decreased compared to the control group. The decrease in IGF-1 values was associated with an increased risk of death and was accompanied by clinical worsening and decreased functionality. CONCLUSION: It has been concluded that the levels of investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 may affect mortality risk, clinical condition and functionality outcomes in patients presenting with ischemic stroke, and further studies are needed for the investigation of different effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 in future.

  8. Short- and long-term prognosis for very old stroke patients. The Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J

    2004-01-01

    stroke onset. By way of multiple logistic regression and survival analyses very old age was independently related to short- and long-term mortality and nursing home placement independent of other clinical characteristics. RESULTS: 16% of patients were 85 years or older at the time of stroke onset. More...... stroke very old age predicted mortality or nursing home placement (OR 3.9; 95% CI 2.1-7.3), and long-term mortality (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.6-2.5). However, other factors such as onset stroke severity, pre-existing disability and atrial fibrillation were also significant independent predictors of prognosis......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The very old are expected to become a growing part of the stroke population in the industrialised part of the world. The aims of this study were to evaluate clinical characteristics of patients aged 85 years or more at stroke onset and to investigate very old age...

  9. Issues in recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors to clinical trials: the AMBULATE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Gemma; Dean, Catherine M; Ada, Louise

    2010-07-01

    Recruitment to clinical trials is often slow and difficult, with a growing body of research examining this issue. However there is very little work related to stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the success and efficiency of recruitment of community-dwelling stroke survivors over the first two years of a clinical trial aiming to improve community ambulation. Recruitment strategies fell into 2 broad categories: (i) advertisement (such as newspaper advertising and media releases), and (ii) referral (via hospital and community physiotherapists, a stroke liaison officer and other researchers). Records were kept of the number of people who were screened, were eligible and were recruited for each strategy. The recruitment target of 60 in the first two years was not met. 111 stroke survivors were screened and 57 were recruited (i.e., a recruitment rate of 51%). The most successful strategy was referral via hospital-based physiotherapists (47% of recruited participants) and the least successful were media release and local newspaper advertising. The referral strategies were all more efficient than any of the advertisement strategies. In general, recruitment was inefficient and costly in terms of human resources. Given that stroke research is underfunded, it is important to find efficient ways of recruiting stroke survivors to clinical trials. An Australian national database similar to other disease-specific data bases (such as the National Cancer Database) is under development. In the interim, recruiting for several clinical trials at once may increase efficiency.

  10. Impact on clinical and cost outcomes of a centralized approach to acute stroke care in London: a comparative effectiveness before and after model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Maree Hunter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In July 2010 a new multiple hub-and-spoke model for acute stroke care was implemented across the whole of London, UK, with continuous specialist care during the first 72 hours provided at 8 hyper-acute stroke units (HASUs compared to the previous model of 30 local hospitals receiving acute stroke patients. We investigated differences in clinical outcomes and costs between the new and old models. METHODS: We compared outcomes and costs 'before' (July 2007-July 2008 vs. 'after' (July 2010-June 2011 the introduction of the new model, adjusted for patient characteristics and national time trends in mortality and length of stay. We constructed 90-day and 10-year decision analytic models using data from population based stroke registers, audits and published sources. Mortality and length of stay were modelled using survival analysis. FINDINGS: In a pooled sample of 307 patients 'before' and 3156 patients 'after', survival improved in the 'after' period (age adjusted hazard ratio 0.54; 95% CI 0.41-0.72. The predicted survival rates at 90 days in the deterministic model adjusted for national trends were 87.2% 'before' % (95% CI 86.7%-87.7% and 88.7% 'after' (95% CI 88.6%-88.8%; a relative reduction in deaths of 12% (95% CI 8%-16%. Based on a cohort of 6,438 stroke patients, the model produces a total cost saving of £5.2 million per year at 90 days (95% CI £4.9-£5.5 million; £811 per patient. CONCLUSION: A centralized model for acute stroke care across an entire metropolitan city appears to have reduced mortality for a reduced cost per patient, predominately as a result of reduced hospital length of stay.

  11. Clinical presentation and diffusion weighted MRI of acute cerebral infarction. The Bergen Stroke Study

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    Waje-Andreassen Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No large study has compared the yield of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI with clinical examination in order to differentiate lacunar stroke from other stroke subtypes. This differentiation is important for guiding further investigations and treatment. Methods Consecutive patients admitted with cerebral infarction were classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project scale. Based on DWI and CT stroke was classified as lacunar (LI and non-lacunar (NLI. Acute ischemic lesion Results DWI was performed in 419 (69% patients. Among patients with lacunar syndrome (LACS 45 (40.5% had NLI on DWI. All patients with total anterior syndrome (TACS and 144 (88.3% with partial anterior syndrome (PACS had NLI on DWI. Conclusion DWI is important among patients presenting with clinical symptoms suggestive of lacunar syndrome to differentiate between LI and NLI. On the other hand, there is good correspondence between TACS or PACS and NLI on DWI.

  12. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

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    Wentao Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod (FTY720 is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke

  13. Unilateral versus bilateral upper limb training after stroke: The upper limb training after stroke clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Delden, AL; Peper, CE; Nienhuys, KN; Zijp, NI; Beek, PJ; Kwakkel, G

    2013-01-01

    This article is available open access through the publisher’s website at the link below. Copyright © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose — Unilateral and bilateral training protocols for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke represent conceptually contrasting approaches with the same ultimate goal. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared the merits of modified constraint-induced movement therapy, modified bilateral arm training with rhythmic auditory cueing,...

  14. Serum Potassium Is Positively Associated With Stroke and Mortality in the Large, Population-Based Malmö Preventive Project Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Linda S; Mattsson, Nick; Sajadieh, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    analyses. There were 2061 incident stroke events and 8709 deaths. Cox regression analyses adjusted for multiple stroke risk factors (age, sex, height, weight, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, serum sodium, current smoking, prevalent diabetes mellitus, prevalent coronary artery disease......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Low serum potassium is associated with stroke in populations with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus but has not been studied in a mainly healthy population. We aimed to study the relation between serum potassium and incident stroke and mortality......, and treatment for hypertension) were fitted. RESULTS: There was an independent, linear association between serum potassium, per mmol/L increase, and both stroke (hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.52; P

  15. Profile Of Stroke In Nigerians: A Prospective Clinical Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CT scan is recommended for all cases of stroke for definitive diagnosis and timely as well as accurate management. Introduction Les accidents vasculaires cérébraux (AVC) causent une mortalité et un handicap importants dans la population adulte entraînant également une forte charge émotionnelle au sein des familles et ...

  16. CT and Clinical Predictors of Fatigue at One Month after Stroke

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    Mansur A. Kutlubaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common and distressing consequence of stroke, and the aetiology of post-stroke fatigue (PSF is poorly understood. It is unclear whether chronic brain changes [cerebral atrophy and white matter lesions (WML], stroke lesion location or certain clinical features are related to its development. The aim of this study was to identify, in patients with acute stroke, whether features in different brain regions on routine CT imaging or routinely collected clinical features predicted PSF at 1 month. Methods: In total, 107 patients (62% male with acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke were assessed for fatigue (Fatigue Assessment Scale, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at 1 month. Admission brain CT was rated using a structured scoring system for (i severity of atrophy and (ii severity of WML in different regions of the brain, and (iii site of acute and previous vascular lesions. Results: Cerebral atrophy of mild or greater severity was present in 84 patients (77.5% and WML of mild or greater severity was present in 54 patients (50.5% in at least one of the evaluated brain regions. There was no association between PSF and severity of atrophy or WML, or presence of acute or previous vascular lesions. We used the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP classification to explore the possible influence of lesion location because a minority of the patients (37.4% had visible acute lesions. Fatigue scores were higher in patients with clinically diagnosed posterior strokes (p = 0.046, in females (p = 0.05 and in those with higher depression and anxiety scores (ρ = 0.52; p 2 = 0.254. Stroke subtype (according to the OCSP classification was marginally predictive (β = 0.17; p = 0.05 and sex was not statistically significant (β = 0.15; p = 0.08. Conclusions: Features on routine post-stroke CT do not appear to associate with fatigue at 1 month. However, clinically diagnosed posterior strokes as well as female

  17. Usefulness of diffusion-weighted images in the evolving stroke: correlation with clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Sook; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Kim, Dong Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Lee, Seung Ik; Lee, Byung In; Suh, Bum Chun

    2000-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of repeat diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) during the acute ischemic stroke stage for the prediction of evolving stroke and clinical course. Fifteen patients with acute ischemic stroke in MCA territory (less than 24 hours, 5 patients; greater than 24 hours, 10 patients; M:F =3D (:6; age 28-75 (mean, 61) years) were involved in this prospective study. All patients underwent initial DWI, follow-up DWI (within two weeks of the first attack) and T2WI (2-5 months later to assess final infarction territory). The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used for clinical evaluation. 'Evolving stroke' was defined as progression NIHSS after admission. For statistical analysis, Fisher's exact test was used and a p value less than 0.05 was considered significant.In six patients (40%), the diagnosis was evolving stroke. In four of these (67%), follow-up DWI showed that the infarction territory was more extensive. Evolving stroke occurred 24-72 hours after the onset of symptoms. DWI obtained 72 hours after onset showed that one patient had developed new infarction. Patients in whom enlarged infarction territory was seen on follow-up DWI showed progression of NIHSS within three days of onset, while those in whom follow-up DWI demonstrated no change showed an improved NIHSS (p less than 0.05). Those who underwent initial DWI within 24 hours of onset showed larger infarction territory on follow-up DWI than those who underwent initial DWI later than this (p greater than 0.05). Repeat DWI during the acute ischemic stroke stage might be useful for the evaluation of evolving stroke. (author)

  18. The validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for the prediction of the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke, and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Pankow, James; Lindström, Jaana; Jousilahti, Pekka; Hu, Gang; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2005-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease shares several risk factors with type 2 diabetes. We tested whether the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), recently developed in a Finnish population to estimate the future risk of diabetes, would also identify individuals at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, and total mortality in this same population. Independent risk factor surveys were conducted in 1987, 1992, and 1997 in Finland, comprising 8268 men and 9457 women aged 25-64 years and free of CHD and stroke at baseline. During the follow-up until the end of 2001, 699 incident acute CHD events, 324 acute stroke events, and 765 deaths occurred. The data were analysed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the Cox-regression model. The areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were 71% for CHD, 73% for stroke, and 68% for total mortality in men and 78, 68, and 72% in women, respectively. The addition of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking increased the AUC values modestly (the change of the absolute values from 2.6 to 6.5%), but the additional use of plasma glucose had only a slight effect on the AUC values for CHD and stroke. The FINDRISC is a reasonably good predictor of CHD, stroke and total mortality.

  19. Clinical Pregenetic Screening for Stroke Monogenic Diseases: Results From Lombardia GENS Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Markus, Hugh Stephen; Quaglini, Silvana; Arbustini, Eloisa; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Micieli, Giuseppe; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Taroni, Franco; Gellera, Cinzia; Baratta, Silvia; Penco, Silvana; Mosca, Lorena; Grasso, Maurizia; Carrera, Paola; Ferrari, Maurizio; Cereda, Cristina; Grieco, Gaetano; Corti, Stefania; Ronchi, Dario; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Obici, Laura; Parati, Eugenio A; Pezzini, Alessando; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Verrengia, Elena P; Bono, Giorgio; Mazucchelli, Francesca; Zarcone, Davide; Calloni, Maria Vittoria; Perrone, Patrizia; Bordo, Bianca Maria; Colombo, Antonio; Padovani, Alessandro; Cavallini, Anna; Beretta, Simone; Ferrarese, Carlo; Motto, Cristina; Agostoni, Elio; Molini, Graziella; Sasanelli, Francesco; Corato, Manuel; Marcheselli, Simona; Sessa, Maria; Comi, Giancarlo; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Guidotti, Mario; Uccellini, Davide; Capitani, Erminio; Tancredi, Lucia; Arnaboldi, Marco; Incorvaia, Barbara; Tadeo, Carlo Sebastiano; Fusi, Laura; Grampa, Giampiero; Merlini, Giampaolo; Trobia, Nadia; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Braga, Massimiliano; Vitali, Paolo; Baron, Pierluigi; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Candelise, Livia

    2016-07-01

    Lombardia GENS is a multicentre prospective study aimed at diagnosing 5 single-gene disorders associated with stroke (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, Fabry disease, MELAS [mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes], hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and Marfan syndrome) by applying diagnostic algorithms specific for each clinically suspected disease We enrolled a consecutive series of patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted in stroke units in the Lombardia region participating in the project. Patients were defined as probable when presenting with stroke or transient ischemic attack of unknown etiopathogenic causes, or in the presence of young age at onset, or positive familial history or of specific clinical features. Patients fulfilling diagnostic algorithms specific for each monogenic disease (suspected) were referred for genetic analysis. In 209 patients (57.4±14.7 years), the application of the disease-specific algorithm identified 227 patients with possible monogenic disease. Genetic testing identified pathogenic mutations in 7% of these cases. Familial history of stroke was the only significant specific feature that distinguished mutated patients from nonmutated ones. The presence of cerebrovascular risk factors did not exclude a genetic disease. In patients prescreened using a clinical algorithm for monogenic disorders, we identified monogenic causes of events in 7% of patients in comparison to the 1% to 5% prevalence reported in previous series. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. A study of factors delaying hospital arrival and predictors of mortality in patients presenting to emergency department with Stroke: A developing state scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Nagaraja

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke has recently become available in India but its success depends on initiating the treatment in the narrow therapeutic time window. There is commonly a delay of several hours before patients with acute stroke seek medical attention. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted to assess the factors influencing this delay in admission of acute stroke cases. 134cases (101 males, 33 females of acute stroke that arrived within 72 hours at our hospital casualty were recruited. A standardized structured questionnaire was given to patients or their attendants. Results: The median time to casualty arrival was 9 hours with 13.4% cases arriving within 3 hours and 36.5 % cases within 6 hours. Distances from hospital, referral, belief in myths and alternate medicine and low threat perception of symptoms of stroke were independent factors associated with delay in arrival. Living in city, day time onset, urgency shown by attendant, availability of transport and presence of family history were associated with early arrival. There was no correlation with patients' or attendants' sex, educational status, history of previous stroke or transient ischemic attack, subtype or severity of stroke, time of stroke and availability of transport. 134 patients (65.7% were from rural population, 55.22%-smokers, 46.76%-alcoholics with mean (SD age of 53.83+/-18.02years [significantly lower in females (mean difference=9.73years p=0.002], were admitted and diagnosed to have stroke. 87.3% had first episode of stroke and 12.7 had more than one episode of stroke. ICF rate was 26.1%. ICF rate has no relation with age (p=0.516, sex (p=0.460, number of episodes (0.795, underlying hypertension (p=0.905. Odds of diabetics dying were 12 times higher than non-diabetics. Inpatient mortality was also significantly higher in smokers compared with non-smokers (p=0.004, in patients with right-sided compared with left

  1. Magnesium Sulfate in Acute Stroke: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Mousavi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Administration of magnesium sulfate has neuroprotective effects and reduces infarct volume in animal models of stroke. Previous small clinical trials have reported beneficial effect of magnesium on the outcome in patients with stroke. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study , investigated the benefit of magnesium sulfate the administration given intravenously as a neuroprotective. Methods: Patients who had cortical infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory (superior or inferior division with moderate neurologic deficits (Orgogozo scale score greater than 30 and less than 70 and onset less than 24 hours were included. The patients were treated with magnesium sulfate (4gr stat and 1gr/hr or placebo for 4 days and examined by a blind investigator. NIH Stroke Scale was obtained on admission and fifth day after stroke. Results: Eighteen patients were given treatment and nineteen patients were given placebo who demonstrated significant beneficial effects on the difference between NIH Stroke Scales on the day of admission and day 5 (3.16 ± 0.98 vs. 1.84 ± 1.06; p = 0.000 respectively. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium sulfate had significant beneficial effect on acute phase of stroke patients and, as a result, may reduce duration of admission. Keywords: Stroke, Magnesium sulfate, Neuroprotective.

  2. The "DOC" screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H; Cayley, Megan L; Lanctôt, Krista L; Murray, Brian J; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E; Sicard, Michelle N; Lien, Karen; Sahlas, Demetrios J; Herrmann, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Cognitive impairment ("DOC") are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool ("DOC" screen) to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment. All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines. 1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes), less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index), had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens. Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may facilitate improved identification and treatment

  3. The "DOC" screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Swartz

    Full Text Available Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and Cognitive impairment ("DOC" are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool ("DOC" screen to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment.All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines.1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes, less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA. 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index, had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens.Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may facilitate improved identification and

  4. The taxonomy statistic uncovers novel clinical patterns in a population of ischemic stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tukiendorf

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a simple taxonomic approach for clinical data mining elaborated by Marczewski and Steinhaus (M-S, whose performance equals the advanced statistical methodology known as the expectation-maximization (E-M algorithm. We tested these two methods on a cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The comparison of both methods revealed strong agreement. Direct agreement between M-S and E-M classifications reached 83%, while Cohen's coefficient of agreement was κ = 0.766(P < 0.0001. The statistical analysis conducted and the outcomes obtained in this paper revealed novel clinical patterns in ischemic stroke patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Marczewski-Steinhaus' taxonomic approach as a tool for the detection of novel patterns of data in ischemic stroke patients and the prediction of disease outcome. In terms of the identification of fairly frequent types of stroke patients using their age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, and diabetes mellitus (DM status, when dealing with rough characteristics of patients, four particular types of patients are recognized, which cannot be identified by means of routine clinical methods. Following the obtained taxonomical outcomes, the strong correlation between the health status at moment of admission to emergency department (ED and the subsequent recovery of patients is established. Moreover, popularization and simplification of the ideas of advanced mathematicians may provide an unconventional explorative platform for clinical problems.

  5. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  6. Variations in Kinematics during Clinical Gait Analysis in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, Céline; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-temporal and kinematic joint parameters were analyzed during 3 groups of consecutive gait trials (1–3, 4–6 and 7–9). Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables from the joint kinematic waveforms and to identify the parts of the gait cycle which changed during the gait analysis session. The results showed that i) spontaneous gait velocity and the other spatio-temporal parameters significantly increased, and ii) gait variability decreased, over the last 6 gait trials compared to the first 3, for hemiplegic patients but not healthy subjects. Principal component analysis revealed changes in the sagittal waveforms of the hip, knee and ankle for hemiplegic patients after the first 3 gait trials. These results suggest that at the beginning of the gait analysis session, stroke patients exhibited phase of adaptation,characterized by a “cautious gait” but no fatigue was observed. PMID:23799100

  7. Clinical course of brain stroke in the persons exposed to ionizing radiation under the production conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchmanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose was to study the risk factors and clinical course of brain strokes in professionally exposed workers being employed in plutonium production in comparison with a control group. The method and materials of study -clinical supervision and clinical database creation on 162 cases of brain stroke (128 males and 34 females) developed among professionally exposed workers. Age of patient varied from 21 to 68 years (in average -51.6 y.). The control group consisted of patients with the same diagnosis, worked on the same enterprise, but non-exposed to radiation. Data on the totally accumulated dose of external gamma radiation were received on the base of the individual dosimeters (from 0.1 cSv to 52 cSv, in average about 13 cSv); the plutonium-239 body content was estimated accordingly to the level of urine radionuclide excretion (from 0.4 kBq to 1.6 kBq, in average about 0.33 kBq). Muscle's hypertinsion and pathological great-toe reflexes in paretic legs and hands, hemianopsia, impressive and ataxic aphasia prevailed in the patients with ischemic brain strokes in system of internal carotid artery, exposed to radiation. The changes of muscle's tension, ataxia and nystagmus were marked more often in the professionals with ischemic brain strokes in system of vertebrobasilar artery. The illness proceeded more easy and with smaller frequency of frustration of consciousness and algesthesia, irrespective of a type ischemic brain strokes in the people exposed to ionizing radiation, than in patients of non-irradiated group. It was found that the arterial hypertension appeared to be the main risk factor for the brain stroke in both groups of patients (in 81.48% and 91.15% of cases). There was no marked differences in significance of risk factors and in main clinical parameters of various types of ischemic brain strokes among the patients professionally exposed to radiation in comparison with a control group. (author)

  8. INFLAMMATORY MARKERS IN ACUTE ISCHAEMIC STROKE IN RELATION TO CLINICAL SEVERITY AND EARLY OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gopi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Biochemical markers of inflammation could be useful to predict severity of stroke in acute phase. Stroke is the third cause of mortality and the first cause of disability. Recent literature have demonstrated that inflammation contributes to all phases of atherosclerosis. The results of researchers suggest that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease. The aim of the study is to assess the1. Level of peripheral inflammatory markers in acute ischaemic stroke and their relation to severity of acute stroke. 2. Value of inflammatory markers in predicting the short-term outcome and disability at the end of six months. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective case control study for 6 months done from September 2014 to August 2016 in 100 patients of acute ischaemic stroke within first 5 days of symptom onset in comparison >18 years of age with 50 age and sex matched controls. Blood samples for all cases and controls were sent for erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR, hs-C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, serum ferritin, serum albumin and S. gamma-glutamyl transferase at admission. RESULTS The mean values of ESR, NLR, hs-CRP in all the cases are higher when compared to the controls and are statistically significant, whereas the mean values of MPV, S. ferritin, S. albumin and GGT in cases are lower when compared to controls, but are within normal range and difference is statistically significant except ferritin. ESR, hs-CRP has significant correlation with severity of acute ischaemic stroke. The mean values of these markers increased with increase in severity. Serum albumin has significant correlation with severity of acute ischaemic stroke with mean values of these markers decreasing with increase in severity of stroke. There is no significant correlation of the inflammatory markers in present study with the short-term outcome. CONCLUSION Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non

  9. Global aphasia as a predictor of mortality in the acute phase of a first stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F F Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish whether vascular aphasic syndromes can predict stroke outcomes. METHOD: Thirty-seven adults were evaluated for speech and language within 72 hours after a single first-ever ischemic brain lesion, in blind association to CT and/or MR. RESULTS: Speech or language disabilities were found in seven (87.5% of the eight deceased patients and twenty-six (89.7% of the twenty-nine survivors. Global aphasia was identified in eleven patients, all with left hemisphere lesions (nine mute; five deceased, consisting on a risk factor for death in the acute stroke phase (ρ=0.022. Age (z=1.65; ρ>0.09, thrombolysis (ρ=0.591, infarct size (ρ=0.076 and side (ρ=0.649 did not significantly influence survival. Absence of aphasia did not predict a better evolution, regardless of the affected hemisphere. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was similar for all patient groups. CONCLUSION: Global aphasia in acute stroke can adversely affect prognosis, translated into impairment of dominant perisylvian vascular territories, with mutism as an important semiological element.

  10. All-Cause Mortality up to and After Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Events in European Middle-Aged Men: The PRIME Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majed, Bilal; Montaye, Michèle; Wagner, Aline; Arveiler, Dominique; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Tafflet, Muriel; Ferrieres, Jean; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Kee, Frank; Evans, Alun; Amouyel, Philippe; Prugger, Christof; Empana, Jean-Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to investigate prospectively the all-cause mortality risk up to and after coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke events in European middle-aged men. The study population comprised 10 424 men 50 to 59 years of age recruited between 1991 and 1994 in France (N=7855) and Northern Ireland (N=2747) within the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction. Incident CHD and stroke events and deaths from all causes were prospectively registered during the 10-year follow-up. In Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis, CHD and stroke events during follow-up were used as time-dependent covariates. A total of 769 CHD and 132 stroke events were adjudicated, and 569 deaths up to and 66 after CHD or stroke occurred during follow-up. After adjustment for study country and cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratios of all-cause mortality were 1.58 (95% confidence interval 1.18-2.12) after CHD and 3.13 (95% confidence interval 1.98-4.92) after stroke. These findings support continuous efforts to promote both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome: risk factors, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim, L C D; Maia, F M; Rodrigues, C E M

    2017-04-01

    Neurologic disorders are among the most common and important clinical manifestations associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), mainly those that affect the central nervous system (CNS). Risk of cerebrovascular events in both conditions is increased, and stroke represents one of the most severe complications, with an incidence rate between 3% and 20%, especially in the first five years of diagnosis. This article updates the data regarding the risk factors, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and treatment of stroke in SLE and APS.

  12. Clinical and Demographic Characteristics Associated With Suboptimal Primary Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Prevention: Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Grace M; Calvert, Melanie; Feltham, Max G; Ryan, Ronan; Finnikin, Samuel; Marshall, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Primary prevention of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is important to reduce the burden of these conditions; however, prescribing of prevention drugs is suboptimal. We aimed to identify individual clinical and demographic characteristics associated with potential missed opportunities for prevention therapy with lipid-lowering, anticoagulant, or antihypertensive drugs before stroke/TIA. We analyzed anonymized electronic primary care records from a UK primary care database that covers 561 family practices. Patients with first-ever stroke/TIA, ≥18 years, with diagnosis between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013, were included. Missed opportunities for prevention were defined as people with clinical indications for lipid-lowering, anticoagulant, or antihypertensive drugs but not prescribed these drugs before their stroke/TIA. Mixed-effect logistic regression models evaluated the relationship between missed opportunities and individual clinical/demographic characteristics. The inclusion criteria were met by 29 043 people with stroke/TIA. Patients with coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, peripheral arterial disease, or diabetes mellitus were at less risk of a missed opportunity for prescription of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive drugs. However, patients with a 10-year cardiovascular disease risk ≥20% but without these diagnoses had increased risk of having a missed opportunity for prescription of lipid-lowering drugs or antihypertensive drugs. Women were less likely to be prescribed anticoagulants but more likely to be prescribed antihypertensive drugs. The elderly (≥85 years of age) were less likely to be prescribed all 3 prevention drugs, compared with people aged 75 to 79 years. Knowing the patient characteristics predictive of missed opportunities for stroke prevention may help primary care identify and appropriately manage these patients. Improving the management of these groups may reduce their risk and potentially prevent

  13. Relationship between tap water hardness, magnesium, and calcium concentration and mortality due to ischemic heart disease or stroke in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Schouten, L.J.; Mons, M.N.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting results on the relationship between the hardness of drinking water and mortality related to ischemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke have been reported. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the possible association between tap water calcium or magnesium concentration and total hardness

  14. Mortality in Dutch hospitals: trends in time, place and cause of death after admission for myocardial infarction and stroke. An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobbe, Laurentius C. J.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; de Bruin, Agnes; Westert, Gert P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patterns in time, place and cause of death can have an important impact on calculated hospital mortality rates. Objective is to quantify these patterns following myocardial infarction and stroke admissions in Dutch hospitals during the period 1996-2003, and to compare trends in the

  15. Stroke mortality and trends from 1990 to 2006 in 39 countries from Europe and Central Asia: implications for control of high blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redon, Josep; Olsen, Michael H; Cooper, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to extend our understanding of international trends in stroke and major sequelae in Europe and countries peripheral to Europe by assessing: (1) current mortality rates, (2) the most recent 15-year prevalence trends, and (3) the relationship between systolic b...

  16. Overcoming practical challenges to conducting clinical research in the inpatient stroke rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grace B; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Whyte, Ellen M; Matthews, Judith T

    2015-10-01

    There is a shortage of published empirical studies conducted in acute inpatient stroke rehabilitation, though such studies are greatly needed in order to shed light on the most efficacious inpatient stroke rehabilitation interventions. The inherent challenges of inpatient research may dissuade researchers from undertaking this important work. This paper describes our institution's experience devising practical solutions to research barriers in this setting. Through concentrated efforts to overcome research barriers, such as by cultivating collaborative relationships and capitalizing on unanticipated benefits, we successfully facilitated conduct of five simultaneous inpatient stroke studies. Tangible benefits realized include increased effectiveness of research participant identification and enrollment, novel collaborative projects, innovative clinical care initiatives, and enhanced emotional and practical support for patients and their families. We provide recommendations based on lessons learned during our experience, and discuss benefits of this collaboration for our research participants, clinical staff, and the research team.

  17. Poststroke Epilepsy Is Associated With a High Mortality After a Stroke at Young Age: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, Renate M; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Maaijwee, Noortje A M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2015-08-01

    Poststroke epilepsy is a common complication after a young stroke. We investigated the association between poststroke epilepsy and mortality. We performed a prospective cohort study among 631 patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke, aged 18 to 50 years. Survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were used to estimate cumulative mortality and hazard ratios for patients with and without epilepsy. After mean follow-up of 12.5 years (SD 8.6), 76 (12.0%) developed poststroke epilepsy. Case fatality was 27.4% for patients with poststroke epilepsy and 2.1% for those without. Poststroke epilepsy was associated with 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-14.0) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9). Epilepsy is a common problem after a young stroke and is associated with an increased short-term and long-term mortality. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Using the ICF to clarify team roles and demonstrate clinical reasoning in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempest, Stephanie; McIntyre, Anne

    2006-05-30

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is advocated as a tool to structure rehabilitation and a universal language to aid communication, within the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). The ICF may also facilitate clarification of team roles and clinical reasoning for intervention. This article aims to explore both factors in stroke rehabilitation. Following a review of the literature, a summary was presented and discussed with clinicians working within stroke rehabilitation, to gather expert opinions. The discussions were informal, being part of service development and on-going education. The clinicians summarised key themes for the potential use of the ICF within clinical practice. Two key themes emerged from the literature and expert opinion for the potential use of the ICF in stroke rehabilitation: (i) to aid communication and structure service provision, (ii) to clarify team roles and aid clinical reasoning. Expert opinion was that clarification of team roles needs to occur at a local level due to the skill mix, particular interests, setting and staffing levels within individual teams. The ICF has the potential to demonstrate/facilitate clinical reasoning, especially when different MDT members are working on the same intervention. There is potential for the ICF to be used to clarify team roles and demonstrate clinical reasoning within stroke rehabilitation. Further experiential research is required to substantiate this view.

  19. Modelling the potential impact of a sugar-sweetened beverage tax on stroke mortality, costs and health-adjusted life years in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Manyema

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke poses a growing human and economic burden in South Africa. Excess sugar consumption, especially from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs, has been associated with increased obesity and stroke risk. Research shows that price increases for SSBs can influence consumption and modelling evidence suggests that taxing SSBs has the potential to reduce obesity and related diseases. This study estimates the potential impact of an SSB tax on stroke-related mortality, costs and health-adjusted life years in South Africa. Methods A proportional multi-state life table-based model was constructed in Microsoft Excel (2010. We used consumption data from the 2012 South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, previously published own and cross price elasticities of SSBs and energy balance equations to estimate changes in daily energy intake and BMI arising from increased SSB prices. Stroke relative risk, and prevalent years lived with disability estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study and modelled disease epidemiology estimates from a previous study, were used to estimate the effect of the BMI changes on the burden of stroke. Results Our model predicts that an SSB tax may avert approximately 72 000 deaths, 550 000 stroke-related health-adjusted life years and over ZAR5 billion, (USD400 million in health care costs over 20 years (USD296-576 million. Over 20 years, the number of incident stroke cases may be reduced by approximately 85 000 and prevalent cases by about 13 000. Conclusions Fiscal policy has the potential, as part of a multi-faceted approach, to mitigate the growing burden of stroke in South Africa and contribute to the achievement of the target set by the Department of Health to reduce relative premature mortality (less than 60 years from non-communicable diseases by the year 2020.

  20. The H2 robotic exoskeleton for gait rehabilitation after stroke: early findings from a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortole, Magdo; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Zhu, Fangshi; Moreno, Juan C; Francisco, Gerard E; Pons, Jose L; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2015-06-17

    Stroke significantly affects thousands of individuals annually, leading to considerable physical impairment and functional disability. Gait is one of the most important activities of daily living affected in stroke survivors. Recent technological developments in powered robotics exoskeletons can create powerful adjunctive tools for rehabilitation and potentially accelerate functional recovery. Here, we present the development and evaluation of a novel lower limb robotic exoskeleton, namely H2 (Technaid S.L., Spain), for gait rehabilitation in stroke survivors. H2 has six actuated joints and is designed to allow intensive overground gait training. An assistive gait control algorithm was developed to create a force field along a desired trajectory, only applying torque when patients deviate from the prescribed movement pattern. The device was evaluated in 3 hemiparetic stroke patients across 4 weeks of training per individual (approximately 12 sessions). The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Houston. The main objective of this initial pre-clinical study was to evaluate the safety and usability of the exoskeleton. A Likert scale was used to measure patient's perception about the easy of use of the device. Three stroke patients completed the study. The training was well tolerated and no adverse events occurred. Early findings demonstrate that H2 appears to be safe and easy to use in the participants of this study. The overground training environment employed as a means to enhance active patient engagement proved to be challenging and exciting for patients. These results are promising and encourage future rehabilitation training with a larger cohort of patients. The developed exoskeleton enables longitudinal overground training of walking in hemiparetic patients after stroke. The system is robust and safe when applied to assist a stroke patient performing an overground walking task. Such device opens the opportunity to study means

  1. Effects of Normobaric Hyperoxia in Severe Acute Stroke: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazdeh, Mehrdokht; Taher, Abbas; Torabian, Saadat; Seifirad, Soroush

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen therapy might increase damaged tissue oxygenation, turn on the aerobic pathway, and save neurons from death and could improve clinical outcome of the patients with stroke and head trauma. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is accompanied by some unfavorable effects. Results of normobaric oxygen therapy on clinical outcomes of patients with stroke were controversial up till now.  This study was therefore designed to evaluate effects of normobaric hyperoxia on clinical outcomes of patients with severe acute stroke. A total of 52 consecutive patients with stroke who meet the inclusion criteria of the study were entered into this randomized controlled clinical trial. The patients in the case group underwent oxygen therapy with Venturi mask for first 12 hours of admission. The patients were examined for neurologic defects at the time of discharge and after six months using both Barthel and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) neurologic disability scoring systems. There was no significant sex difference between the two groups (P=0.5). There was no statistically significant difference between ischemic-hemorrhagic stroke constitutions of two groups (P=0.2). There were no significant difference in Barthel index scores of both groups at the time of discharge as well as the follow-up examination (P=0.7) According to the mRS scoring system, there was no difference between the patients of both groups at the time of admission (P= 0.8), however after treatment there was a significant difference between mRS scores of the treated group compared to the controls (P=0.04). According to the results of this study, normobaric oxygen therapy in the first 12 hours of accident could improve long time outcome of the patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.

  2. Large-Scale Phase Synchrony Reflects Clinical Status After Stroke: An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Teiji; Hattori, Noriaki; Uno, Yutaka; Kitajo, Keiichi; Hatakenaka, Megumi; Yagura, Hajime; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Tomomi; Nagasako, Michiko; Otomune, Hironori; Miyai, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Stroke-induced focal brain lesions often exert remote effects via residual neural network activity. Electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques can assess neural network modifications after brain damage. Recently, EEG phase synchrony analyses have shown associations between the level of large-scale phase synchrony of brain activity and clinical symptoms; however, few reports have assessed such associations in stroke patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of hemispheric phase synchrony in stroke patients by calculating its correlation with clinical status. This cross-sectional study included 19 patients with post-acute ischemic stroke admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Interhemispheric phase synchrony indices (IH-PSIs) were computed in 2 frequency bands (alpha [α], and beta [β]), and associations between indices and scores of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA) were analyzed. For further assessments of IH-PSIs, ipsilesional intrahemispheric PSIs (IntraH-PSIs) as well as IH- and IntraH-phase lag indices (PLIs) were also evaluated. IH-PSIs correlated significantly with FIM scores and NIHSS scores. In contrast, IH-PSIs did not correlate with FMA scores. IntraH-PSIs correlate with FIM scores after removal of the outlier. The results of analysis with PLIs were consistent with IH-PSIs. The PSIs correlated with performance on the activities of daily living scale but not with scores on a pure motor impairment scale. These results suggest that large-scale phase synchrony represented by IH-PSIs provides a novel surrogate marker for clinical status after stroke.

  3. Time Elapsed After Ischemic Stroke and Risk of Adverse Cardiovascular Events and Mortality Following Elective Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads E; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2014-01-01

    than 6 months prior, 1.45 (95% CI, 0.95-2.20) for stroke 6 to less than 12 months prior, and 1.46 (95% CI, 1.21-1.77) for stroke 12 months or more prior to surgery compared with patients without stroke. Cubic regression splines performed on the stroke subgroup supported that risk leveled off after 9...

  4. Clinical evaluation of patients with migraine induced stroke in mashhad, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Kavian; Sharifi, Atena; Nikbin, Zeynab; Fadaei, Sahar; Meybodi, Meysam Aghaei; Moshfegh, Mehdi; Hosseini, Mohammad Reza; Sarabi, Mohammad Reza Gerami; Maarufi, Parham

    2010-01-01

    Migraine Induced Stroke (MIS) is an important cause of brain infarction in the young people. Consecutive patients with MIS admitted in Ghaem hospital, Mashhad during 2006-2010 enrolled a prospective clinical study. All of the patients suspected to MIS had brain MRI with a 0.5 Tesla generation, Philips NT Intra, Netherland. All of the MIS patients underwent a standard battery of diagnostic investigations for detecting etiology of stroke. Disability of MIS patients was detected based on the modified Rankin scale at 90 days post stroke. 32 MIS patients (18 females, 14 males) with mean age 37.2 ± 3.8 years ranged 15-58 years were evaluated. Hypodense area of infarction corresponding to clinical manifestations was detected in MRI in 32% of our MIS patients. The mean disability score in our MIS patients was 1.09 ± 0.32, which is significantly lower than other stroke patients (z = 2.55, P = 0.007) MIS is an important cause of stroke in Persian young adults which have good prognosis.

  5. Differences in coronary heart disease, stroke and cancer mortality rates between England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland: the role of diet and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Peter; Morgan, Robert David; Webster, Premila; Rayner, Mike

    2011-11-03

    Introduction It is unclear how much of the geographical variation in coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and cancer mortality rates within the UK is associated with diet. The aim of this study is to estimate how many deaths from CHD, stroke and cancer would be delayed or averted if Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland adopted a diet equivalent in nutritional quality to the English diet. Methods Mortality data for CHD, stroke and 10 diet-related cancers for 2007-2009 were used to calculate the mortality gap (the difference between actual mortality and English mortality rates) for Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Estimates of mean national consumption of 10 dietary factors were used as baseline and counterfactual inputs in a macrosimulation model (DIETRON). An uncertainty analysis was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation with 5000 iterations. Results The mortality gap in the modelled scenario (achieving the English diet) was reduced by 81% (95% credible intervals: 62% to 108%) for Wales, 40% (33% to 51%) for Scotland and 81% (67% to 99%) for Northern Ireland, equating to approximately 3700 deaths delayed or averted annually. For CHD only, the mortality gap was reduced by 88% (69% to 118%) for Wales, 58% (47% to 72%) for Scotland, and 88% (70% to 111%) for Northern Ireland. Conclusion Improving the average diet in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland to a level already achieved in England could have a substantial impact on reducing geographical variations in chronic disease mortality rates in the UK. Much of the mortality gap between Scotland and England is explained by non-dietary risk factors.

  6. Anemia is associated with bleeding and mortality, but not stroke, in patients with atrial fibrillation: Insights from the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenbrink, B Daan; Alings, Marco; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H; Lopes, Renato D; Hylek, Elaine M; Thomas, Laine; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Hanna, Michael; Keltai, Matyas; Steg, P Gabriel; De Caterina, Raffaele; Wallentin, Lars; van Gilst, Wiek H

    2017-03-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are prone to cardiovascular events and anticoagulation-related bleeding complications. We hypothesized that patients with anemia are at increased risk for these outcomes. We performed a post hoc analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial, which included >18,000 patients with AF randomized to warfarin (target international normalized ratio, 2.0-3.0) or apixaban 5 mg twice daily. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to determine if anemia (defined as hemoglobin ARISTOTLE population. Patients with anemia were older, had higher mean CHADS 2 and HAS-BLED scores, and were more likely to have experienced previous bleeding events. Anemia was associated with major bleeding (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.62-2.28; P<.0001) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.46-1.93; P<.0001) but not stroke or systemic embolism (adjusted HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.70-1.21). The benefits of apixaban compared with warfarin on the rates of stroke, mortality, and bleeding events were consistent in patients with and without anemia. Chronic anemia is associated with a higher incidence of bleeding complications and mortality, but not of stroke, in anticoagulated patients with AF. Apixaban is an attractive anticoagulant for stroke prevention in patients with AF with or without anemia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are activity limitations associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in stroke patients? A cross-sectional, clinical survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2009-01-01

    stroke patients were invited to complete four activity limitations measurements: Barthel Index, mobility velocity, mobility distance, mobility aids and one LUTS measurement: the Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire. Of 519 stroke patients, 482 subjects were eligible. Results......Objective. To assess self-reported activity limitations in a clinical sample of stroke patients and to identify their association with prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Material and methods. A cross-sectional, clinical survey was initiated whereby...... time that activity limitations are closely related to LUTS in stroke patients and that rehabilitation should also be directed towards the treatment of LUTS....

  8. Prophylactic antibiotics after acute stroke for reducing pneumonia in patients with dysphagia (STROKE-INF): a prospective, cluster-randomised, open-label, masked endpoint, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Lalit; Irshad, Saddif; Hodsoll, John; Simpson, Matthew; Gulliford, Martin; Smithard, David; Patel, Anita; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene

    2015-11-07

    Post-stroke pneumonia is associated with increased mortality and poor functional outcomes. This study assessed the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis for reducing pneumonia in patients with dysphagia after acute stroke. We did a prospective, multicentre, cluster-randomised, open-label controlled trial with masked endpoint assessment of patients older than 18 years with dysphagia after new stroke recruited from 48 stroke units in the UK, accredited and included in the UK National Stroke Audit. We excluded patients with contraindications to antibiotics, pre-existing dysphagia, or known infections, or who were not expected to survive beyond 14 days. We randomly assigned the units (1:1) by computer to give either prophylactic antibiotics for 7 days plus standard stroke unit care or standard stroke unit care only to patients clustered in the units within 48 h of stroke onset. We did the randomisation with minimisation to stratify for number of admissions and access to specialist care. Patient and staff who did the assessments and analyses were masked to stroke unit allocation. The primary outcome was post-stroke pneumonia in the first 14 days, assessed with both a criteria-based, hierarchical algorithm and by physician diagnosis in the intention-to-treat population. Safety was also analysed by intention to treat. This trial is closed to new participants and is registered with isrctn.com, number ISRCTN37118456. Between April 21, 2008, and May 17, 2014, we randomly assigned 48 stroke units (and 1224 patients clustered within the units) to the two treatment groups: 24 to antibiotics and 24 to standard care alone (control). 11 units and seven patients withdrew after randomisation before 14 days, leaving 1217 patients in 37 units for the intention-to-treat analysis (615 patients in the antibiotics group, 602 in control). Prophylactic antibiotics did not affect the incidence of algorithm-defined post-stroke pneumonia (71 [13%] of 564 patients in antibiotics group vs 52

  9. Minimal Clinically Important Difference for Safe and Simple Novel Acute Ischemic Stroke Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Jessica S; Kaplan, Brett D; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2017-11-01

    Determining the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) is essential for evaluating novel therapies. For acute ischemic stroke, expert surveys have yielded MCIDs that are substantially higher than the MCIDs observed in actual expert behavior in guideline writing and clinical practice, potentially because of anchoring bias. We administered a structured, internet-based survey to a cross-section of academic stroke neurologists in the United States. Survey responses assessed demographic and clinical experience, and expert judgment of the MCID of the absolute increase needed in the proportion of patients achieving functional independence at 3 months to consider a novel, safe neuroprotective agent as clinically worthwhile. To mitigate anchoring bias, the survey response framework used a base 1000 rather than base 100 patient framework. Survey responses were received from 122 of 333 academic stroke neurologists, there were 23% women, 72.8% had ≥6 years of practice experience, and neurovascular disease accounted for more than half of practice time in >70%. Responder-nonresponder and continuum of resistance tests indicated that responders were representative of the full expert population. Among respondents, the median MCID was 1.3% (interquartile range, 0.8% to >2%). Stroke expert responses to MCID surveys are affected by anchoring and centrality bias. When survey design takes these into account, the expert-derived MCID for a safe acute ischemic stroke treatment is 1.1% to 1.5%, in accord with actual physician behavior in guideline writing and clinical practice. This revised MCID value can guide clinical trial design and grant-funding and regulatory agency decisions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Forkert, Nils D; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA), to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a 'map of stroke'.

  11. The gap between clinical gaze and systematic assessment of movement disorders after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, H.J.M.; Meskers, C.G.M.; De Groot, J.H.; Klomp, A.; Arendzen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Movement disorders after stroke are still captured by clinical gaze and translated to ordinal scores of low resolution. There is a clear need for objective quantification, with outcome measures related to pathophysiological background. Neural and non-neural contributors to joint behavior

  12. Are clinical characteristics associated with upper-extremity hypertonia in severe ischaemic supratentorial stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A. van; Hendricks, H.T.; Pasman, J.W.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The primary goal of this study was to identify clinical risk factors, in addition to muscle weakness, for upper-extremity hypertonia in patients with severe ischaemic supratentorial stroke. The secondary goal was to investigate the time course of upper-extremity hypertonia in these

  13. Review of Self-Awareness and Its Clinical Application in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Daniel P. K.; Liu, Karen P. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to explore, following a literature review, the concepts of self-awareness, its assessment, and intervention for self-awareness deficits, as well as its clinical significance in stroke rehabilitation; and (ii) to apply the concepts of self-awareness in the context of a rehabilitation program. The search was…

  14. A cluster randomized trial to assess the impact of clinical pathways for patients with stroke: rationale and design of the Clinical Pathways for Effective and Appropriate Care Study [NCT00673491

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri Antonella

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with stroke should have access to a continuum of care from organized stroke units in the acute phase, to appropriate rehabilitation and secondary prevention measures. Moreover to improve the outcomes for acute stroke patients from an organizational perspective, the use of multidisciplinary teams and the delivery of continuous stroke education both to the professionals and to the public, and the implementation of evidence-based stroke care are recommended. Clinical pathways are complex interventions that can be used for this purpose. However in stroke care the use of clinical pathways remains questionable because little prospective controlled data has demonstrated their effectiveness. The purpose of this study is to determine whether clinical pathways could improve the quality of the care provided to the patients affected by stroke in hospital and through the continuum of the care. Methods Two-arm, cluster-randomized trial with hospitals and rehabilitation long-term care facilities as randomization units. 14 units will be randomized either to arm 1 (clinical pathway or to arm 2 (no intervention, usual care. The sample will include 238 in each group, this gives a power of 80%, at 5% significance level. The primary outcome measure is 30-days mortality. The impact of the clinical pathways along the continuum of care will also be analyzed by comparing the length of hospital stay, the hospital re-admissions rates, the institutionalization rates after hospital discharge, the patients' dependency levels, and complication rates. The quality of the care provided to the patients will be assessed by monitoring the use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures during hospital stay and rehabilitation, and by the use of key quality indicators at discharge. The implementation of organized care will be also evaluated. Conclusion The management of patients affected by stroke involves the expertise of several professionals, which can

  15. Trends of Non-Accidental, Cardiovascular, Stroke and Lung Cancer Mortality in Arkansas Are Associated with Ambient PM2.5 Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Cecile G. Chalbot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular and stroke mortality rates in Arkansas are among the highest in the USA. The annual trends of stroke and cardiovascular mortality are barely correlated to smoking cessation; while the prevalence of risk factors such as obesity; cholesterol and hypertension increased over the 1979–2007 period. The study determined the effect of chronic exposure to PM2.5 on non-accidental; cardiovascular; stroke and lung cancer mortality in Arkansas over the 2000–2010 period using the World Health Organization’s log-linear health impact model. County chronic exposures to PM2.5 were computed by averaging spatially-resolved gridded concentrations using PM2.5 observations. A spatial uniformity was observed for PM2.5 mass levels indicating that chronic exposures were comparable throughout the state. The reduction of PM2.5 mass levels by 3.0 μg/m3 between 2000 and 2010 explained a significant fraction of the declining mortality. The effect was more pronounced in southern and eastern rural Arkansas as compared to the rest of the state. This study provides evidence that the implementation of air pollution regulations has measurable effects on mortality even in regions with high prevalence of major risk factors such as obesity and smoking. These outcomes are noteworthy as efforts to modify the major risk factors require longer realization times.

  16. Clinical and imaging features associated with intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications in patients with ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Arda [Mersin University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Akpinar, Erhan [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat [Hacettepe University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications (ICAC), a frequent finding on imaging studies, are predictive of future stroke risk in population-based studies. The clinical significance of this observation among ischemic stroke patients is however less clear. In this study, we analyzed ICAC burden in relation to vascular risk factor profile, stroke etiology, and extent of craniocervical vascular calcifications in a consecutive series of ischemic stroke patients. The burden of ICAC was determined both on non-contrast CT and CT-angiography source images by semiquantitative scoring algorithms. The distribution of vascular risk factors, etiologic stroke subtype, and calcification burden in other craniocervical arteries was assessed among patients with no ICAC, mild-moderate ICAC, and severe ICAC. Of 319 patients included into the study, 28 % had no ICAC, 35 % had mild-moderate ICAC, and 37 % had severe ICAC on CT angiography. Independent factors associated with ICAC burden in multivariate analysis included age (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.006), and coronary artery disease (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a stroke etiology of large artery atherosclerosis or cardioaortic embolism was significantly related to higher ICAC burden (p = 0.006). Patients with severe ICAC were more likely to harbor calcifications in other vascular beds (p < 0.001). All of these findings persisted when analyses were repeated with CT-based ICAC burden assessments. ICAC burden reflects a continuum of atherosclerotic disease involving carotid arteries together with other craniocervical vascular beds. ICAC is significantly associated with stroke of large vessel or cardioembolic origin. This information might help the clinician in prioritizing etiologic work-up in the acute period. (orig.)

  17. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Strokes Based on Variant Vascular Anatomy of the Posterior Circulation: Clinical Deficits and Imaging Territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Melissa M; Chen, Stephen R; Diaz-Marchan, Pedro; Schomer, Donald; Kumar, Vinodh A

    2018-04-01

    We report imaging findings of 3 patients with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarcts who presented with atypical clinical findings of cerebellar strokes. AICA strokes are rare, and diagnosis can be difficult because of the high variability of the posterior circulation vascular anatomy. We describe the embryology and variant anatomy of AICA so that clinicians can understand and recognize the patterns of these infarcts. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bowel Movement Frequency, Laxative Use, and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-05-05

    The associations of bowel movement frequency and laxative use with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are unclear. A total of 72 014 subjects (29 668 men and 42 346 women) aged 40 to 79 years, without a history of CVD or cancer, completed a lifestyle questionnaire at baseline between 1988 and 1990 that included information on bowel movement frequency (daily, every 2-3 days, or once every 4 or more days) and laxative use (yes or no), and were followed-up until 2009. During the subjects' 1 165 569 person-years of follow-up, we documented 977 deaths from coronary heart disease (561 men and 416 women), 2024 from total stroke (1028 men and 996 women), 1127 from ischemic stroke (606 men and 521 women), and 828 from hemorrhagic stroke (388 men and 440 women). The prevalence of CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, stress, depression, and physical inactivity, was higher in laxative users and in those with a lower frequency of bowel movements. The multivariable HRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of laxative users were as follows: 1.56 (95% CI, 1.21-2.03) for coronary heart disease and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.07-1.76) for ischemic stroke in men, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for total stroke, and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.17-1.79) for ischemic stroke in women. Similar results were observed even after the exclusion of deaths that occurred early in the follow-up period. A significant association between bowel movement frequency and mortality from CVD was not observed. Constipation could be a marker of exposure to CVD risk factors, and laxative use could be a risk factor for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

  19. Bowel Movement Frequency, Laxative Use, and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Kubota

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The associations of bowel movement frequency and laxative use with cardiovascular disease (CVD are unclear. Methods: A total of 72 014 subjects (29 668 men and 42 346 women aged 40 to 79 years, without a history of CVD or cancer, completed a lifestyle questionnaire at baseline between 1988 and 1990 that included information on bowel movement frequency (daily, every 2–3 days, or once every 4 or more days and laxative use (yes or no, and were followed-up until 2009. Results: During the subjects’ 1 165 569 person-years of follow-up, we documented 977 deaths from coronary heart disease (561 men and 416 women, 2024 from total stroke (1028 men and 996 women, 1127 from ischemic stroke (606 men and 521 women, and 828 from hemorrhagic stroke (388 men and 440 women. The prevalence of CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, stress, depression, and physical inactivity, was higher in laxative users and in those with a lower frequency of bowel movements. The multivariable HRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs] of laxative users were as follows: 1.56 (95% CI, 1.21–2.03 for coronary heart disease and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.07–1.76 for ischemic stroke in men, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08–1.49 for total stroke, and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.17–1.79 for ischemic stroke in women. Similar results were observed even after the exclusion of deaths that occurred early in the follow-up period. A significant association between bowel movement frequency and mortality from CVD was not observed. Conclusions: Constipation could be a marker of exposure to CVD risk factors, and laxative use could be a risk factor for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

  20. What is Clinical Efficacy of Transesophageal Echocardiography in Patients With Cryptogenic Stroke?: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Michael E; Van Woerkom, Ryan C; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Wingerchuk, Dean M; O'Carroll, Cumara B

    2018-01-01

    Adults with cryptogenic stroke often undergo transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) because this is the gold-standard for evaluation of potential proximal sources of emboli. The risks of performing this invasive test must be weighed against its clinical efficacy and limitations, determined by the rate of positive findings, and the impact on clinical outcome for the patient. To critically appraise current evidence regarding the rate of positive TEE findings in cryptogenic stroke patients, and analyze the implications of these findings on management decisions and outcomes. The objective was addressed through the development of a structured, critically appraised topic. We incorporated a clinical scenario, background information, a structured question, literature search strategy, critical appraisal, results, evidence summary, commentary, and bottom line conclusions. Participants included consultant and resident neurologists, a medical librarian, and vascular neurology and cardiology content experts. TEE commonly identifies abnormalities, including aorta atherosclerosis in 51%, patent foramen ovale in 43%, and atrial septal aneurysm in 13% of patients. Findings such as left-sided chamber thrombus or intracardiac tumor that definitively warrant a change in management by guideline-supported use of anticoagulation are less common, occurring in ∼3% of patients. TEE identifies potential causal sources of embolus in patients with cryptogenic stroke that leads to changes in management and outcomes at least 3% of the time. Other findings, particularly aorta atherosclerosis, are identified much more commonly but the causal link to stroke is uncertain, thus changes in management in these cases is variable and data describing resulting outcomes are lacking.

  1. Clinical Approach to the Standardization of Oriental Medical Diagnostic Pattern Identification in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, many stroke patients receive oriental medical care, in which pattern-identification plays a major role. Pattern-identification is Oriental Medicine's unique diagnostic system. This study attempted to standardize oriental medical pattern-identification for stroke patients. This was a community-based multicenter study that enrolled stroke patients within 30 days after their ictus. We assessed the patients' general characteristics and symptoms related to pattern-identification. Each patient's pattern was determined when two doctors had the same opinion. To determine which variables affect the pattern-identification, binary logistic regression analysis was used with the backward method. A total of 806 stroke patients were enrolled. Among 480 patients who were identified as having a certain pattern, 100 patients exhibited the Fire Heat Pattern, 210 patients the Phlegm Dampness Pattern, nine patients the Blood Stasis Pattern, 110 patients the Qi Deficiency Pattern, and 51 patients the Yin Deficiency Pattern. After the regression analysis, the predictive logistic equations for the Fire Heat, Phlegm Dampness, Qi Deficiency, and Yin Deficiency patterns were determined. The Blood Stasis Pattern was omitted because the sample size was too small. Predictive logistic equations were suggested for four of the patterns. These criteria would be useful in determining each stroke patient's pattern in clinics. However, further studies with large samples are necessary to validate and confirm these criteria.

  2. The feasibility and validity of the comprehensive ICF core set for stroke in Chinese clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Li, Huagang; Guo, Yi; Xie, Yuxiao; Ge, Ruidong; Qiu, Zhuoying

    2014-02-01

    To inspect the feasibility and content validity of the comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core set for stroke by describing relevant aspects of functioning, disability and environmental factors affected in Chinese patients post stroke. Multicentre, cross-sectional study. Department of rehabilitation medicine. The content validity was evaluated using frequency and percentage of 208 patients with a mean age of 60 years post stroke in China. Aspects of body function and structure, activity and participation, and environmental factors in the comprehensive ICF core set for stroke. Six ICF categories of body function were identified as a problem in over 90% (n = 187) of the patients (functions of the cardiovascular system and neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions). Impairments of brain, upper and lower extremity were identified as a problem in over 50% (n = 104) of the patients. Four ICF categories of activities and participation were documented as a problem in 100% (n = 208) of the patients (domestic and civic life). In environmental factors, nine ICF categories were documented as barriers by more than 10% (n = 20) and fewer than 50% (n = 104) of the patients (products and technology, physical geography, societal attitudes, services, systems and polices). Six ICF categories were identified as facilitators in over 90% (n = 187) of the patients (support and relationships and attitudes). The findings suggest that it is feasible to apply the comprehensive ICF core set for stroke in the Chinese clinical setting, after the appropriate reduction of some categories according to Chinese patients' characteristics and culture.

  3. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  4. Ultrasonographic and clinical study of post-stroke painful hemiplegic shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Rania E.; Amin, Mohamed A.; Aboelsafa, Ashraf A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the work: To describe the structural abnormalities of the painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) by ultrasound (U/S) and their relationship with some clinical variables. Materials and methods: Eighty consecutive patients with post-stroke PHS were subjected to both clinical assessment and ultrasonographic examination of both shoulders. Ultrasonographic imaging data were classified into five grades. Results: The biceps tendon sheath effusion (51.25%) and the SA–SD bursitis (43.75%) were...

  5. [THE CLINICAL LABORATORY MARKERS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ATHEROTHROMBOTIC STROKE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, L N; Shmonin, A A; Emanuel, Yu V; Stolyarov, M S; Bondareva, E A; Mazing A V; Lazareva, N M; Kholopova, I V; Blinova, T V; Kharitonova, T V; Lapin, S V; Emanuel, V L; Melnikova, E V

    2015-10-01

    The laboratory biomarkers can effect on choice of tactics of treatment in patients with atherosclerotic stenosis ofcarotids and high risk of stroke. However, nowadays there is no established laboratory criteria of significant atherosclerotic affection of internal carotid. The purpose of study was to investigate informativeness of biomarkers of atherosclerosis in clinical molecuIar panel of expertise system of determining risk of stroke in patients with significant stenosis of carotid. The study included patients with 50-90% atherosclerotic stenosis of internal carotid in acute period of atherothrombotic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (group 1), patients with stable 50-90% atherosclerotic stenosis of inner carotid having no vascular events during 30 days before engaging into study (group II) and group of healthy volunteers without atherosclerosis of inner carotid. The examination of patients included anamnesis collection, evaluation of neurological status, analysis of serum level of biomarkers of atherosclerosis (lipoprotein-associatedphospholipase A2 (LP-PL A2), serum protein A associated with pregnancy (PA PP-A), lipoprotein (a) (LP(a)), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), C-reactive protein detected by highly sensitive technique (hsCRP) and lipid spectrum of blood) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, duplex ultrasound scanning of brachiocephalic arteries. The stroke risk factors of other etiology were chosen as exclusion criteria except atherothrombotic one. The Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied to establish group differences. The Data Mining techniques were applied to establish patterns of analyzing sample. Out of 356 examined patients, 30 patients of group 1, 51 patients of group II and 16 healthy volunteers were included in the study. All patients were comparable by gender and age (50-80 years). The serum level of hsCRP and ADMA in the group of patients of acutest period of ischemic stroke was significantly higher than in groups of

  6. Cerebrorenal interaction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Beyond the original meaning of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as high-risk state for future dialysis, CKD is now known as an established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Stroke is a major player of cardiovascular disease and has deep two-way relationships with CKD. CKD is an evident risk factor for stroke. Meta-analyses of cohort studies and trials indicate that proteinuria/albuminuria increases the risk of stroke by 71-92%, and reduced glomerular filtration rate increases the risk by 43%. In addition, CKD has a strong relationship with subclinical brain damage including white matter changes, microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and carotid atherosclerosis. CKD is prevalent in acute stroke patients; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate stroke patients and 39% of total intracerebral hemorrhage patients in our institute. Acute and chronic management of stroke are influenced by CKD. Therapeutic effects of several antithrombotic and thrombolytic agents, including recently-developed novel oral anticoagulants, are affected by renal function. Moreover, reduced glomerular filtration rate is independently associated with increased 1- and 10-year mortalities in the end. Stroke also has deep relationships with end-stage kidney disease. Stroke occurs much more commonly in dialysis patients than general population or CKD patients without need for dialysis. The triggers of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with end-stage kidney disease include special characteristics unique to dialysis, such as drastic hemodynamic change, dialysate and anticoagulants, and vascular calcification. As cohorts of dialysis patients become older, more hypertensive, and more diabetic than before, stroke become more prevalent and more serious events in dialysis clinics. Now, clinicians should have much interest in the association between CKD and cerebrovascular diseases, so-called the cerebro-renal interaction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Comparison of statistical and clinical predictions of functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D Thompson

    Full Text Available To determine whether the predictions of functional outcome after ischemic stroke made at the bedside using a doctor's clinical experience were more or less accurate than the predictions made by clinical prediction models (CPMs.A prospective cohort study of nine hundred and thirty one ischemic stroke patients recruited consecutively at the outpatient, inpatient and emergency departments of the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh between 2002 and 2005. Doctors made informal predictions of six month functional outcome on the Oxford Handicap Scale (OHS. Patients were followed up at six months with a validated postal questionnaire. For each patient we calculated the absolute predicted risk of death or dependence (OHS≥3 using five previously described CPMs. The specificity of a doctor's informal predictions of OHS≥3 at six months was good 0.96 (95% CI: 0.94 to 0.97 and similar to CPMs (range 0.94 to 0.96; however the sensitivity of both informal clinical predictions 0.44 (95% CI: 0.39 to 0.49 and clinical prediction models (range 0.38 to 0.45 was poor. The prediction of the level of disability after stroke was similar for informal clinical predictions (ordinal c-statistic 0.74 with 95% CI 0.72 to 0.76 and CPMs (range 0.69 to 0.75. No patient or clinician characteristic affected the accuracy of informal predictions, though predictions were more accurate in outpatients.CPMs are at least as good as informal clinical predictions in discriminating between good and bad functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The place of these models in clinical practice has yet to be determined.

  8. Mortality After Clinical Management of Aids-Associated Cryptococcal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is an increasingly prevalent infection among HIV/AIDS patients and is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa. The short-term prognosis and management of patients with CM may be improved by identifying factors leading to mortality in patients with CM.

  9. Oleander toxicity – the clinical spectrum and mortality predictors: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institutional assessment and treatment protocols based on the infrastructure and expertise available are the need of the hour. Prompt first aid, critical assessment and timely referral for cardiac pacing can cut down mortality to a large extent. Keywords: Oleander poisoning; Cardiac glycoside toxicity; Mortality predictors ...

  10. CLINICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS OF ABNORMAL TORTUOSITY OF PRECEREBRAL ARTERIES IN ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Poplavskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inherited connective tissue pathology is the most frequent genetic abnormality. Weakness of connective tissue in this group of disorders is manifested not only by excessive joint mobility, but also by abnormalities in other organs and systems, including vessels. In inherited connective tissue disorders brain artery aneurysms and abnormal vascular tortuosity is found that can be a risk factor for stroke.Aim: To study frequency of abnormal tortuosities of brachiocephalic vessels in post-ischemic stroke patients, as well as efficacy of secondary stroke prevention in such patients.Materials and methods: One hundred and seventy two adult patients with ischemic stroke were examined. Neurological deficiency was assessed with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and with the modified Rankin scale. Abnormalities of precerebral arteries were found by ultrasound dopplerography and duplex scanning. To diagnose any abnormalities of connective tissue, clinical and genetic analysis, dermatoglyphic assessment and scoring of excessive joint mobility (Beyton scale were used.Results: Abnormal tortuosity of precerebral arteries is found in 47% of patients with ischemic stroke. The screening performed in 25 of such patients showed connective tissue disorders in one third of them (in 2 patients, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, in 2 patients, connective tissue dysplasia, in 4 patients, mild symptoms of abnormal connective tissue, such as excessive joint mobility scoring to 1–2. In patients without inherited syndromes, some dermatoglyphic traits were found, i.e., distal shift of the axial palmar triradius, higher frequency of patterns on the skin of the thenar, lower pattern frequency on the skin of the hypothenar, higher frequency of simple digital patterns (A and T, lower frequency of complex patterns, such as whorls (W, lower palmar and digital ridgecounts. The results of secondary stroke prevention with antiplatelet agents, antihypertensives

  11. Association Between Onset-to-Door Time and Clinical Outcomes After Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Ryu; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Matsushita, Tomonaga; Hata, Jun; Kiyuna, Fumi; Fukuda, Kenji; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    The role of early hospital arrival in improving poststroke clinical outcomes in patients without reperfusion treatment remains unclear. This study aimed to determine whether early hospital arrival was associated with favorable outcomes in patients without reperfusion treatment or with minor stroke. This multicenter, hospital-based study included 6780 consecutive patients (aged, 69.9±12.2 years; 63.9% men) with ischemic stroke who were prospectively registered in Fukuoka, Japan, between July 2007 and December 2014. Onset-to-door time was categorized as T 0-1 , ≤1 hour; T 1-2 , >1 and ≤2 hours; T 2-3 , >2 and ≤3 hours; T 3-6 , >3 and ≤6 hours; T 6-12 , >6 and ≤12 hours; T 12-24 , >12 and ≤24 hours; and T 24- , >24 hours. The main outcomes were neurological improvement (decrease in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≥4 during hospitalization or 0 at discharge) and good functional outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale score of 0-1). Associations between onset-to-door time and main outcomes were evaluated after adjusting for potential confounders using logistic regression analysis. Odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) increased significantly with shorter onset-to-door times within 6 hours, for both neurological improvement ( T 0- 1 , 2.79 [2.28-3.42]; T 1-2 , 2.49 [2.02-3.07]; T 2-3 , 1.52 [1.21-1.92]; T 3-6 , 1.72 [1.44-2.05], with reference to T 24- ) and good functional outcome ( T 0-1 , 2.68 [2.05-3.49], T 1-2 2.10 [1.60-2.77], T 2-3 1.53 [1.15-2.03], T 3-6 1.31 [1.05-1.64], with reference to T 24- ), even after adjusting for potential confounding factors including reperfusion treatment and basal National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. These associations were maintained in 6216 patients without reperfusion treatment and in 4793 patients with minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤4 on hospital arrival). Early hospital arrival within 6 hours after stroke onset is associated with favorable outcomes after

  12. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome and the risk of stroke and all-cause mortality: insights from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaqiong; Wang, Xiaoyun; Jiang, Yongrong; Ma, Honglan; Chen, Li; Lai, Chenglin; Peng, Chunrong; He, Caiyun; Sun, Chaofeng

    2017-12-01

    Many epidemiologic literatures have investigated the link between PCOS and long-term stroke risk and all-cause mortality, but the results are surprisingly conflicting. A meta-analysis was performed to examine the link between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the risk of stroke, death from any cause, and assessed whether BMI might explain a higher risk of stroke. We searched the PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases with no restrictions. Nine Cohort studies were identified, involving a total of 237,647 subjects. Compared with those without PCOS, subjects with PCOS were significantly associated with a increased risk of developing stroke (OR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.09-1.70; p = .007). However, no significant association was observed between PCOS and all-cause death (OR = 1.21; 95% CI 0.88-1.66; p = .25). Moreover, after pooling the five studies with risk estimates adjusted for BMI, the association between PCOS and stroke was slightly attenuated, although the odds ratios did not reach statistical significance (OR = 1.24; 95% CI 0.98-1.59). In conclusion, PCOS is associated with significant increased risk for stroke, while there is no consistent evidence to indicate that PCOS influences all-cause death outcomes. Increased BMI is an important contributor to the relationship between PCOS and stroke risk. Further study is needed to clarify which subgroups of subjects with the PCOS are at higher risk for stroke and should focus on developing reliable device for risk stratification.

  13. Clinical course of brain stroke in the persons exposed to ionizing radiation under the production conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchmanov, A. [State Research Center of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    The purpose was to study the risk factors and clinical course of brain strokes in professionally exposed workers being employed in plutonium production in comparison with a control group. The method and materials of study -clinical supervision and clinical database creation on 162 cases of brain stroke (128 males and 34 females) developed among professionally exposed workers. Age of patient varied from 21 to 68 years (in average -51.6 y.). The control group consisted of patients with the same diagnosis, worked on the same enterprise, but non-exposed to radiation. Data on the totally accumulated dose of external gamma radiation were received on the base of the individual dosimeters (from 0.1 cSv to 52 cSv, in average about 13 cSv); the plutonium-239 body content was estimated accordingly to the level of urine radionuclide excretion (from 0.4 kBq to 1.6 kBq, in average about 0.33 kBq). Muscle's hypertinsion and pathological great-toe reflexes in paretic legs and hands, hemianopsia, impressive and ataxic aphasia prevailed in the patients with ischemic brain strokes in system of internal carotid artery, exposed to radiation. The changes of muscle's tension, ataxia and nystagmus were marked more often in the professionals with ischemic brain strokes in system of vertebrobasilar artery. The illness proceeded more easy and with smaller frequency of frustration of consciousness and algesthesia, irrespective of a type ischemic brain strokes in the people exposed to ionizing radiation, than in patients of non-irradiated group. It was found that the arterial hypertension appeared to be the main risk factor for the brain stroke in both groups of patients (in 81.48% and 91.15% of cases). There was no marked differences in significance of risk factors and in main clinical parameters of various types of ischemic brain strokes among the patients professionally exposed to radiation in comparison with a control group. (author)

  14. Patterns of blood pressure response during intensive BP lowering and clinical events: results from the secondary prevention of small subcortical strokes trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Elaine; Scherzer, Rebecca; Odden, Michelle C; Shlipak, Michael; White, Carole L; Field, Thalia S; Benavente, Oscar; Pergola, Pablo E; Peralta, Carmen A

    2018-04-01

    We applied cluster analysis to identify discrete patterns of concomitant responses of systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) during intensive BP lowering; and to evaluate their clinical relevance and association with risk of mortality, major vascular events (MVEs), and stroke. We used an unsupervised cluster procedure to identify distinct patterns of BP change during the first 9 months of anti-hypertensive therapy intensification among 1,331 participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial who were previously randomized to lower BP target (SBP < 130 mm Hg) after lacunar stroke. The cluster procedure partitioned participants into three groups in the lower SBP target arm, persons with: 1) mildly elevated baseline SBP and minimal visit-to-visit BP variability (mild reducers); 2) moderately elevated baseline SBP and moderate visit-to-visit BP variability (moderate reducers); and 3) very elevated baseline SBP with very large visit-to-visit BP variability during intensification (large reducers). In the lower SBP target group, moderate reducers had a higher risk of death (adjusted HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.0-2.7]), MVE (adjusted HR 2.1 [95% CI 1.4-3.2]), and stroke (adjusted HR 2.6[95% CI 1.7-4.1]) compared to mild reducers. Large reducers had the highest risk of death (adjusted HR 2.3 [95% CI 1.2-4.4]), but risk of MVE (HR = 1.7 [95%CI 0.9-3.1]) and stroke (HR = 1.6 [95%CI: 0.8-3.5]) were not statistically significantly different compared to mild reducers. Among persons with prior lacunar stroke, baseline BP levels, and BP variability in the setting of intensive BP lowering can identify discrete groups of persons at higher risk of adverse outcomes.

  15. Time to treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and outcome of stroke in clinical practice: retrospective analysis of hospital quality assurance data with comparison with results from randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbinger, Christoph; Reuter, Björn; Stock, Christian; Sauer, Tamara; Wiethölter, Horst; Bruder, Ingo; Rode, Susanne; Kern, Rolf; Ringleb, Peter; Hennerici, Michael G; Hacke, Werner

    2014-05-30

    To study the time dependent effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischaemic stroke in daily clinical practice. A retrospective cohort study using data from a large scale, comprehensive population based state-wide stroke registry in Germany. All 148 hospitals involved in acute stroke care in a large state in southwest Germany with 10.4 million inhabitants. Data from 84,439 patients with acute ischaemic stroke were analysed, 10,263 (12%) were treated with thrombolytic therapy and 74,176 (88%) were not treated. Primary endpoint was the dichotomised score on a modified Rankin scale at discharge ("favourable outcome" score 0 or 1 or "unfavourable outcome" score 2-6) analysed by binary logistic regression. Patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) were categorised according to time from onset of stroke to treatment. Analogous analyses were conducted for the association between rtPA treatment of stroke and in-hospital mortality. As a co-primary endpoint the chance of a lower modified Rankin scale score at discharge was analysed by ordinal logistic regression analysis (shift analysis). After adjustment for characteristics of patients, hospitals, and treatment, rtPA was associated with better outcome in a time dependent pattern. The number needed to treat ranged from 4.5 (within first 1.5 hours after onset; odds ratio 2.49) to 18.0 (up to 4.5 hours; odds ratio 1.26), while mortality did not vary up to 4.5 hours. Patients treated with rtPA beyond 4.5 hours (including mismatch based approaches) showed a significantly better outcome only in dichotomised analysis (odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.55) but the mortality risk was higher (1.45, 1.08 to 1.92). The effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy in daily clinical practice might be comparable with the effectiveness shown in randomised clinical trials and pooled analysis. Early treatment was associated with favourable outcome in daily clinical practice, which underlines the

  16. Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persenius, Mona; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Eva

    2015-09-01

    To describe nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality in Swedish stroke wards. A high risk of undernutrition places great demand on nutritional care in stroke wards. Evidence-based guidelines exist, but healthcare professionals have reported low interest in nutritional care. The Donabedian framework of structure, process and outcome is recommended to monitor and improve nutrition quality. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, a web-based questionnaire regarding nutritional care quality was delivered to eligible participants. Most clinical nursing leaders reported structure indicators, e.g. access to dieticians. Among process indicators, regular assessment of patients' swallowing was most frequently reported in comprehensive stroke wards compared with other stroke wards. Use of outcomes to monitor nutrition quality was not routine. Wards using standard care plans showed significantly better results. Using the structure, process and outcome framework to examine nutrition quality, quality-improvement needs became visible. To provide high-quality nutrition, all three structure, process and outcome components must be addressed. The use of care pathways, standard care plans, the Senior Alert registry, as well as systematic use of outcome measures could improve nutrition quality. To assist clinical nursing leaders in managing all aspects of quality, structure, process and outcome can be a valuable framework. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS): early clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Patrick D; Allgren, Robin L; Ng, Ken; Akins, Paul; Meyer, Brett; Al-Sanani, Fahmi; Lutsep, Helmi; Dobak, John; Matsubara, Bradley S; Zivin, Justin

    2005-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and feasibility of mild therapeutic hypothermia using an endovascular temperature management system in awake acute ischemic stroke patients. The Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS) study was an uncontrolled, multicenter development and feasibility study of conscious patients (n = 18) presenting within 12 hours of onset of an acute ischemic stroke at 5 clinical sites in the United States. Enrolled patients were to undergo core temperature management using an endovascular cooling system to induce and maintain mild, therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature of 33.0 degrees C) for a period of either 12 or 24 hours, followed by controlled rewarming to 36.5 degrees C over the subsequent 12-hour period. Nine patients underwent 12 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming, and 6 patients underwent 24 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming. Three patients underwent <1.5 hours of hypothermia due to clinical or technical issues. We also developed an antishivering regimen using buspirone and meperidine administered prophylactically to suppress shivering. The endovascular cooling catheter was well tolerated, with acceptable adverse event rates. Increasing the duration of hypothermia administration from 12 hours to 24 hours did not appear to increase the incidence or severity of adverse effects. Endovascular cooling with a proactive antishivering regimen can be accomplished in awake stroke patients. Further studies are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  18. Do clinical assessments, steady-state or daily-life gait characteristics predict falls in ambulatory chronic stroke survivors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Wittink, Harriet; van de Port, Ingrid G.; Van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This exploratory study investigated to what extent gait characteristics and clinical physical therapy assessments predict falls in chronic stroke survivors. Design: Prospective study. Subjects: Chronic fall-prone and non-fall-prone stroke survivors. Methods: Steady-state gait

  19. Strategies to improve recruitment and retention of older stroke survivors to a randomized clinical exercise trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Boros, Daniella; Coull, Bruce M

    2014-03-01

    Relatively few exercise randomized clinical trials (RCTs) among stroke survivors have reported the effectiveness of recruitment and retention strategies, despite its central importance to study integrity. Our objective is to examine recruitment and retention strategies used among a group of older community-dwelling stroke survivors for an exercise RCT. Recruitment strategies were multidimensional using both paid (ie, newspaper, radio and, television) and unpaid advertisements (ie, staff visits, flyers, and brochures placed at outpatient rehabilitation centers, physician offices, and community facilities working with older adults; free media coverage of the study, presentations at stroke support groups, relatives/friends, and study Web site) to obtain referrals. Retention strategies centered on excellent communication, the study participants' needs, and having dedicated study staff. Attrition rates and adherence to the intervention were used to examine the effectiveness of these retention strategies. A total of 393 referrals were received, 233 persons were screened, and 145 stroke survivors enrolled in the study. During 3 years of study recruitment, we achieved 97% of our enrollment target. We enrolled 62% of those screened. Study enrollment from paid advertising was 21.4% (n = 31), whereas unpaid advertisements resulted in 78.6% (n = 114) of our participants. Attrition was 10% (n = 14 dropouts), and adherence to the intervention was 85%. Recruitment and retention of participants in an exercise RCT are time and labor intensive. Multiple recruitment and retention strategies are required to ensure an adequate sample of community-dwelling stroke survivors. Many of these strategies are also relevant for exercise RCTs among adults with other chronic illnesses. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical implications of eye deviation on admission CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payabvash, S; Qureshi, I; Qureshi, A I

    2016-12-01

    To determine the frequency and prognostic value of eye deviation detected on the admission computed tomography (CT) of acute ischaemic stroke patients. The clinical and imaging data from the Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trials 1 and 2 were analysed. Two reviewers evaluated all admission CT images for the presence of eye deviation, and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). The admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and 3-month modified Rankin scale (mRs) scores were ascertained. Disability or death was defined as mRS score >2, at 3-month follow-up. Of 1,223 patients included in the present series, 352 (28.8%) had rightward and 331 (27.1%) had leftward eye deviation on admission CT. Patients with eye deviation on CT had higher admission NIHSS score and larger middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarct volume (based on ASPECTS). The presence of eye deviation on CT was associated with higher rates of haemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours (19.8% versus 13.5%, p=0.004), and higher rates of disability or death at 3-month follow-up (53.1% versus 35.7%, pMediation analysis showed that radiological eye deviation relation with higher rate of disability or death is predominantly due to its association with higher admission NIHSS scores, lower ASPECTS, and to a lesser extent patients' older age. The presence of eye deviation on CT examination of acute ischaemic stroke patients is associated with larger anterior circulation stroke volumes, higher risk of 24-hour haemorrhagic transformation, and 3-month disability or death. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advancing non-invasive neuromodulation clinical trials in children: Lessons from perinatal stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Applications of non-invasive brain stimulation including therapeutic neuromodulation are expanding at an alarming rate. Increasingly established scientific principles, including directional modulation of well-informed cortical targets, are advancing clinical trial development. However, high levels of disease burden coupled with zealous enthusiasm may be getting ahead of rational research and evidence. Experience is limited in the developing brain where additional issues must be considered. Properly designed and meticulously executed clinical trials are essential and required to advance and optimize the potential of non-invasive neuromodulation without risking the well-being of children and families. Perinatal stroke causes most hemiplegic cerebral palsy and, as a focal injury of defined timing in an otherwise healthy brain, is an ideal human model of developmental plasticity. Advanced models of how the motor systems of young brains develop following early stroke are affording novel windows of opportunity for neuromodulation clinical trials, possibly directing neuroplasticity toward better outcomes. Reviewing the principles of clinical trial design relevant to neuromodulation and using perinatal stroke as a model, this article reviews the current and future issues of advancing such trials in children. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychiatric morbidity in stroke patients attending a neurology clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specific diagnoses recorded were depression (19.2%), generalised anxiety disorder (9.6%), harmful alcohol use (2.4%); dementia, somatoform disorder, phobia and delusional disorder each had a prevalence of 1.2%. Clinical and sociodemographic variables were not significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity.

  3. Successful Reperfusion With Mechanical Thrombectomy Is Associated With Reduced Disability and Mortality in Patients With Pretreatment Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score ≤6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Consoli, Arthuro; Redjem, Hocine; Coskun, Oguzhan; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Labreuche, Julien; Preda, Cristian; Ruiz Guerrero, Clara; Decroix, Jean-Pierre; Rodesch, Georges; Mazighi, Mikael; Blanc, Raphaël; Piotin, Michel; Lapergue, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    In acute ischemic stroke patients, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score (ASPECTS) is correlated with infarct volume and is an independent factor of functional outcome. Patients with pretreatment DWI-ASPECTS ≤6 were excluded or under-represented in the recent randomized mechanical thrombectomy trials. Our aim was to assess the impact of reperfusion in pretreatment DWI-ASPECTS ≤6 patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy. We analyzed data collected between January 2012 and August 2015 in a bicentric prospective clinical registry of consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy. Every patient with a documented internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusion with pretreatment DWI-ASPECTS ≤6 was eligible for this study. The primary end point was a favorable outcome defined by a modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 at 90 days. Two hundred and eighteen patients with a DWI-ASPECTS ≤6 were included. Among them, 145 (66%) patients had successful reperfusion at the end of mechanical thrombectomy. Reperfused patients had an increased rate of favorable outcome (38.7% versus 17.4%; P =0.002) and a decreased rate of mortality at 3 months (22.5% versus 39.1%; P =0.013) compared with nonreperfused patients. The symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate was not different between the 2 groups (13.0% versus 14.1%; P =0.83). However, in patients with DWI-ASPECTS <5, favorable outcome was low (13.0% versus 9.5%; P =0.68) with a high mortality rate (45.7% versus 57.1%; P =0.38) with or without successful reperfusion. Successful reperfusion is associated with reduced mortality and disability in patients with a pretreatment DWI-ASPECTS ≤6. Further data from randomized studies are needed, particularly in patients with DWI-ASPECTS <5. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Establishing the minimal clinically important difference of the Barthel Index in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Wang, Chun-Hou; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chen, Pau-Chung; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the change scores of the Barthel Index (BI) in follow-up or outcome studies has been hampered by the fact that its minimal clinically important difference (MCID) has not been determined. This article was written to establish the MCID of the BI in stroke patients. Both anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to establish the MCID. In the anchor-based method, 43 stroke inpatients participated in a follow-up study designed to determine the MCID of the BI using patients' global ratings of the activities of daily living function on a 15-point Likert-type scale. The mean change scores on the 20-point scale of the BI of the MCID group, based on the patients' ratings on the Likert-type scale, served as the first estimate of the MCID. In the distribution-based method, 56 chronic stroke patients participated in the test-retest reliability study to determine the MCID of the BI. One standard error of measurement (SEM) served as the second estimate for the MCID. The larger MCID value of the 2 estimates was chosen as the MCID of the BI. In the anchor-based study, there were 20 patients in the MCID group, with a mean change score of 1.85 points (ie, the first MCID estimate). In the distribution-based study, the SEM based on test-retest agreement was 1.45 points (ie, the second MCID estimate). The MCID of the BI in stroke patients was estimated to be 1.85 points. The authors' results, within the limitations of their design, suggest that if the mean BI change score within a stroke group has reached 1.85 points in a study, the change score on the BI can be perceived by patients as important and beyond measurement error (ie, such a change score is clinically important).

  5. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied the ...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  6. Impact of pretreatment noncontrast CT Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on clinical outcome after intra-arterial stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Albert J; Zaidat, Osama O; Chaudhry, Zeshan A; Berkhemer, Olvert A; González, R Gilberto; Goyal, Mayank; Demchuk, Andrew M; Menon, Bijoy K; Mualem, Elan; Ueda, Dawn; Buell, Hope; Sit, Siu Po; Bose, Arani

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of intra-arterial treatment remains uncertain. Because most centers performing IAT use noncontrast CT (NCCT) imaging, it is critical to understand the impact of NCCT findings on treatment outcomes. This study aimed to compare functional independence and safety among patients undergoing intra-arterial treatment stratified by the extent of ischemic change on pretreatment NCCT. The study cohort was derived from multicenter trials of the Penumbra System. Inclusion criteria were anterior circulation proximal occlusion, evaluable pretreatment NCCT, and known time to reperfusion. Ischemic change was quantified using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and stratified into 3 prespecified groups for comparison: 0 to 4 (most ischemic change) versus 5 to 7 versus 8 to 10 (least ischemic change). A total of 249 patients were analyzed: 40 with ASPECTS 0 to 4, 83 with ASPECTS 5 to 7, and 126 with ASPECTS 8 to 10. For ASPECTS 0 to 4, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10, respectively, good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, 0-2) rates were 5%, 38.6%, and 46% (P<0.0001), and mortality rates were 55%, 28.9%, and 19% (P=0.0001). The only significant pairwise differences were between ASPECTS 0 to 4 and other groups. Symptomatic hemorrhage was more common with lower ASPECTS (P=0.02). Shorter time to reperfusion was significantly associated with better outcomes among patients with ASPECTS 8 to 10 (P=0.01). A similar relationship was seen for ASPECTS 5 to 7 but was not statistically significant. No such relationship was seen for ASPECTS 0 to 4. NCCT seems useful for excluding patients with the greatest burden of ischemic damage from futile intra-arterial treatment, which is unlikely to result in patient functional independence and increases the risk of hemorrhage.

  7. Therapeutic Effect of Virtual Reality on Post-Stroke Patients: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira da Fonseca, Erika; Ribeiro da Silva, Nildo Manoel; Pinto, Elen Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to check the therapeutic effect of virtual reality associated with conventional physiotherapy on gait balance and the occurrence of falls after a stroke. This was a randomized, blinded clinical trial conducted with post-stroke patients, randomized into two groups-treatment group and control group-and subjected to balance assessments by the Dynamic Gait Index and investigation of falls before and after 20 intervention sessions. Statistically significant difference was considered at P < .05. We selected 30 patients, but there were three segment losses, resulting in a total of 13 patients in the control group and 14 in the treatment group. There was an improvement in gait balance and reduced occurrence of falls in both groups. After intervention, the differences in gait balance in the control group (P = .047) and the reduction in the occurrence of falls in the treatment group (P = .049) were significant. However, in intergroup analysis, there was no difference in the two outcomes. Therapy with games was a useful tool for gait balance rehabilitation in post-stroke patients, with repercussions on the reduction of falls. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical predictors of fever in stroke patients: relevance of nasogastric tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscari, A; Puddu, G M; Conte, C; Falcone, R; Kolce, B; Lega, M V; Zoli, M

    2015-09-01

    Fever frequently occurs in stroke patients and worsens their prognosis. However, only few studies have assessed the determinants of fever in acute stroke, and no study has specifically addressed the possible prediction of the development of fever. This investigation included 536 patients with acute stroke and a body temperature =37.5°C starting after 24 h). Among the clinical variables available during the first 24 h from admission, those predictive of the subsequent appearance of fever were searched for. One hundred further patients had a temperature >37°C during the first 24 h. In univariate analysis, many variables were predictive of the subsequent development of fever, but in multivariate analysis, only the following four predictors remained significant (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], P value): nasogastric tube (4.0 [2.2-7.4], 37°C during the first 24 h were as follows: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (P nasogastric tube was the strongest and most significant one. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Intravenous Injection of Clinical Grade Human MSCs After Experimental Stroke: Functional Benefit and Microvascular Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, Anack; Favre, Isabelle; Rome, Claire; De Fraipont, Florence; Grillon, Emmanuelle; Coquery, Nicolas; Mathieu, Herv; Mayan, Virginie; Naegele, Bernadette; Hommel, Marc; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Barbier, Emmanuel Luc; Remy, Chantal; Detante, Olivier

    2016-12-13

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in adults. Many current clinical trials use intravenous (IV) administration of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). This autologous graft requires a delay for ex vivo expansion of cells. We followed microvascular effects and mechanisms of action involved after an IV injection of human BM-MSCs (hBM-MSCs) at a subacute phase of stroke. Rats underwent a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) or a surgery without occlusion (sham) at day 0 (D0). At D8, rats received an IV injection of 3 million hBM-MSCs or PBS-glutamine. In a longitudinal behavioral follow-up, we showed delayed somatosensory and cognitive benefits 4 to 7 weeks after hBM-MSC injection. In a separate longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, we observed an enhanced vascular density in the ischemic area 2 and 3 weeks after hBM-MSC injection. Histology and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed an overexpression of angiogenic factors such as Ang1 and transforming growth factor-1 (TGF-1) at D16 in hBM-MSC-treated MCAo rats compared to PBS-treated MCAo rats. Altogether, delayed IV injection of hBM-MSCs provides functional benefits and increases cerebral angiogenesis in the stroke lesion via a release of endogenous angiogenic factors enhancing the stabilization of newborn vessels. Enhanced angiogenesis could therefore be a means of improving functional recovery after stroke.

  10. A Clinical Research Study of Cognitive Dysfunction and Affective Impairment after Isolated Brainstem Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Fu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the function of the cerebellum in neurocognition has been well-documented, the similar role of the brainstem has yet to be fully elucidated. This clinical research study aimed to combine data relating to neuropsychological assessments and P300 to explore cognitive dysfunction and affective impairment following brainstem stroke. Thirty-four patients with isolated brainstem stroke and twenty-six healthy controls were recruited; for each patient, we collated data pertaining to the P300, Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination III (ACE-III, Montreal Cognitive Assessment Chinese version (MoCA, trail-making test (TMT, Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Digit Spans (DS, Stroop test, Self Rating Depression Scale (SDS, and Self Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS. Significance was analyzed using an independent T-test or the Mann-Whitney U-test. Correlation was analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis or Spearman's correlation analysis. Collectively, data revealed that brainstem stroke caused mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and that visuospatial, attention, linguistic, and emotional disturbances may occur after isolated brainstem stroke. Cognitive decline was linked to P300 latency, ACE-III, and MoCA; P300 latency was correlated with ACE-III. Patients with right brainstem lesions were more likely to suffer memory decline. The present study provides initial data relating to the role of the brainstem in neurocognition, and will be useful for further understanding of vascular cognitive and affective impairment.

  11. White matter structure and clinical characteristics of stroke patients: A diffusion tensor MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Ryo; Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Senoo, Atsushi

    2016-03-15

    Fractional anisotropy has been used in many studies that examined post-stroke changes in white matter. This study was performed to clarify cerebral white matter changes after stroke using generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). White matter structure was visualized using diffusion tensor imaging in 72 patients with post-stroke arm paralysis. Exercise-related brain regions were examined in cerebral white matter using GFA. The relationship between GFA and clinical characteristics was examined. Overall, the mean GFA of the lesioned hemisphere was significantly lower than that of the non-lesioned hemisphere (PBrodmann area 5 of the non-lesioned hemisphere. Age correlated negatively with GFA in Brodmann areas 5 and 7 of the lesioned hemisphere. Though these results may be due to a decrease in the frequency of use of the paralyzed limb over time, GFA overall was significantly and negatively affected by the subject's age. The GFA values of patients with paralysis of the dominant hand were significantly different from those of patients with paralysis of the nondominant hand in Brodmann areas 4 and 6 of the non-lesioned hemisphere and Brodmann area 4 of the lesioned hemisphere (P<0.05). The stroke size and location were not associated with GFA differences. Differences between the GFA of the lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres varied depending on the affected brain region, age at onset of paralysis, and paralysis of the dominant or non-dominant hand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in acute stroke: initial clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federau, C.; Becce, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R.; Sumer, S.; Wintermark, M.; O'Brien, K.

    2014-01-01

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging is an MRI perfusion technique that uses a diffusion-weighted sequence with multiple b values and a bi-compartmental signal model to measure the so-called pseudo-diffusion of blood caused by its passage through the microvascular network. The goal of the current study was to assess the feasibility of IVIM perfusion fraction imaging in patients with acute stroke. Images were collected in 17 patients with acute stroke. Exclusion criteria were onset of symptoms to imaging >5 days, hemorrhagic transformation, infratentorial lesions, small lesions 2 . Image quality was assessed by two radiologists, and quantitative analysis was performed in regions of interest placed in the stroke area, defined by thresholding the apparent diffusion coefficient maps, as well as in the contralateral region. IVIM perfusion fraction maps showed an area of decreased perfusion fraction f in the region of decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. Quantitative analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in both IVIM perfusion fraction f (0.026 ± 0.019 vs. 0.056 ± 0.025, p = 2.2 . 10 -6 ) and diffusion coefficient D compared with the contralateral side (3.9 ± 0.79 . 10 -4 vs. 7.5 ± 0.86 . 10 -4 mm 2 /s, p = 1.3 . 10 -20 ). IVIM perfusion fraction imaging is feasible in acute stroke. IVIM perfusion fraction is significantly reduced in the visible infarct. Further studies should evaluate the potential for IVIM to predict clinical outcome and treatment response. (orig.)

  13. Right ventricular stroke work index as a negative predictor of mortality and initial hospital stay after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Hilary F; Schulze, P Christian; Kato, Tomoko S; Bacchetta, Matthew; Thirapatarapong, Wilawan; Bartels, Matthew N

    2013-06-01

    Studies have shown that patients with poor pre-lung transplant (LTx) right ventricular (RV) function have prolonged post-operative ventilation time and intensive care stay as well as a higher risk of in-hospital death. RV stroke work index (RVSWI) calculates RV workload and contractility. We hypothesized that patients with higher RV workload capacity, indicated by higher RVSWI, would have better outcomes after LTx. A retrospective record review was performed on all LTx patients between 2005 and 2011 who had right heart catheterizations (RHC) 1-year before LTx. In addition, results for echocardiograms and cardiopulmonary exercise testing within 1-year of RHCs were gathered. Mean RVSWI was 9.36 ± 3.59 for 115 patients. There was a significant relation between mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), RVSWI, RV end-diastolic diameter (RVEDd), left atrial dimension (LAD), peak and resting pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide, minute ventilation /volume of carbon dioxide production, and 1-year mortality after LTx. Contrary to our hypothesis, those who survived had lower RVSWI than those who died within 1 year (8.99 ± 3.38 vs 11.6 ± 4.1, p = 0.026). Hospital length of stay significantly correlated with mPAP, RVSWI, left ventricular ejection fraction, percentage of fractional shortening, RVEDd, RV fractional area change, LAD, and RV wall thickness in diastole. Intensive care length of stay also significantly correlated with these variables and with body mass index. RVSWI was significantly different between groups of different RV function, indicating that increased RVSWI is associated with impairment of RV structure and function in patients undergoing LTx evaluation. This study demonstrates an association between 1-year mortality, initial hospital and intensive care length of stay, and pre-LTx RVSWI. Increased mPAP is a known risk for outcomes in LTx patients. Our findings support this fact and also show increased mortality with elevation of RVSWI, demonstrating the value

  14. A STUDY ON CLINICAL AND PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF GAMMA-GLUTAMYL TRANSFERASE IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriram Ganesh R. T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is one of the major health problems in many countries. There is supporting evidence suggesting that Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT enzyme has an active involvement in atherosclerosis through its oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms. With this background, we conducted a study among acute stroke patients with an aim and objective to evaluate the relationship between stroke and serum GGT levels and to assess the severity of various types of stroke in relation to the levels of serum GGT enzyme. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 50 acute stroke patients and 50 normal individuals as controls participated in the study. Stroke patients were advised for routine haematological investigations, serum GGT estimation and plain CT of brain. RESULTS Out of the 50 acute stroke patients who participated in our study, 32 patients had elevated levels of serum GGT and 3 patients had drastically elevated levels of GGT (>100 IU/L. A statistically significant relationship was found between ischaemic stroke and GGT with a p-value of 0.0418. CONCLUSION Gamma-glutamyl transferase estimation in acute stroke patients may serve as a reliable and feasible clinical test for the physician to initially stratify patient risk and provide prompt therapy.

  15. Feasibility of Applying the Extended ICF Core Set for Stroke to Clinical Settings in Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hyo Jong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential feasibility of application of the extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for stroke. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 40 stroke outpatients (>6 months after onset) admitted to the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine for comprehensive rehabilitation. Clinical information of the patients were respectively evaluated to link to the 166 second-level categories of the extended ICF Core Set for stroke. Results Clinical information could be linked to 111 different ICF categories, 58 categories of the body functions component, eight categories of the body structures component, 38 categories of the activities and participation component, and seven categories of the environmental factors component. Conclusion The body functions component might be feasible for application of the extended ICF Core Set for stroke to clinical settings. The activities and participation component and environmental factors component may not be directly applied to clinical settings without additional evaluation tools including interview and questionnaire. PMID:25750873

  16. Mortality, stroke, and heart failure in atrial fibrillation cohorts after ablation versus propensity-matched cohorts

    OpenAIRE

    Jarman, Julian WE; Hunter, Tina D; Hussain, Wajid; March, Jamie L; Wong, Tom; Markides, Vias

    2017-01-01

    Julian WE Jarman,1 Tina D Hunter,2 Wajid Hussain,1 Jamie L March,3 Tom Wong,1 Vias Markides1 1Cardiology & Electrophysiology, Heart Rhythm Centre, NIHR Cardiovascular Research Unit, The Royal Brompton Hospital, and National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK; 2Health Outcomes Research, CTI Clinical Trial and Consulting Services, Inc., Cincinnati, OH, 3Health Economics and Market Access, Biosense Webster, Inc., Diamond Bar, CA, USA Background: We sought to determine...

  17. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  18. Zoledronic acid and clinical fractures and mortality after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Magaziner, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were assi...

  19. National data on stroke outcomes in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Thepsuthammarat, Kaewjai; Tiamkao, Somsak; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem worldwide. There are limited data on national stroke prevalence and outcomes after the beginning of the thrombolytic therapy era in Thailand. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with mortality in stroke patients in Thailand using the national reimbursement databases. Clinical data retrieved included individuals under the universal coverage, social security, and civil servant benefit systems between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010. The stroke diagnosis code was based on the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision system including G45 (transient cerebral ischemic attacks and related syndromes), I61 (intracerebral hemorrhage), and I63 (cerebral infarction). The prevalence and stroke outcomes were calculated from these coded data. Factors associated with death were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. We found that the most frequent stroke subtype was cerebral infarction with a prevalence of 122 patients per 100,000 of population, an average length of hospital stay of 6.8 days, an average hospital charge of 20,740 baht (∼$USD 691), a mortality rate of 7%, and thrombolytic prescriptions of 1%. The significant factors associated with stroke mortality were septicemia, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, status epilepticus, and heart failure. In conclusion, the prevalence and outcomes of stroke in Thailand were comparable with other countries. The era of thrombolytic therapy has just begun in Thailand. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of clinical efficacy of intraarterial thrombolysis for acute cerebral ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qinghua; Zhou Shi; Song Jie; Wang Xuejian; He Yujie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of local intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) with urokinase in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: One hundred and sixty two patients with acute ischemic stroke were treated with LIT by using urokinase and relationship of recanalization for different occluded arteries with the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) scores three months later was analyzed. Results: Angiography showed occlusion of the cerebral artery in 162 patients, among which 119(73.5%) patients showed the sites in the internal carotid artery system, with 27 occlusions in the internal carotid artery (ICA) trunk, 63 (38.89%) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and 29 (17.9%) in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) , and the remaining 43 (26.5%) patients of vertebrobasilar artery (VBA); successful recanalization was achieved in 103 (63.58%) patients, including 11 (40.7%), 49 (77.8%), 20 (69.0%) and 23 (53.3%), respectively, after intraarterial infusion of urokinase. Unsuccessful recanalization occurred in 59 patients (36.42%). Followed up for 90 days, 90 (55.6%) patients obtained a good outcome; 72(44.44%) had poor prognosis including 20(12.35%) deaths. 8 patients associated with hemorrhage (4.9%) 73 with reperfusion injury (45.1%) and 5 arterial re-occlusion (3.1%). Based on statistic analysis, ICA trunk and VBA had low ratio of successful recanalization with poor clinic prognosis MCA and ACA possessed high ratio of successful recanalization and good clinic outcomes. There was a significant relationship between arterial recanalization rate and clinic prognosis (r=0.86). Conclusions: Successful recanalization of cerebral occlusive artery by using intra-arterial thrombolysis could improve clinic prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Clinical prognosis has a significant relationship with both initial treatment time and arterial recanalization rate. (authors)

  1. Multi-professional audit supports clinical governance in projecting and implementing a new stroke care area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute stroke have better outcomes in terms of survival or regaining independence if they receive organized inpatient care in a specific setting (Stroke Unit, SU where a coordinated multidisciplinary team can ensure the best level of care. The clinical governance of an SU requires a systematic monitoring of diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic processes through a structured audit. The entire project and set up of a new SU in Bentivoglio, Italy, were based on a model that focused on multidisciplinary teamwork and clinical governance. An audit based on the Benjamin audit cycle followed every step of the set up of the new SU. Markers from national and international guidelines and from the Italian Regional Audit, together with a specific database were used. The audit showed a high level of care and a significant improvement in the majority of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic parameters. Only a few markers (i.e. waiting times for ultrasound tomography and prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy required specific projects in order to improve the results. Our experience confirmed that a structured audit can support clinical governance of an SU by monitoring clinical processes and quality of care. Such an audit involves the whole professional team and shows the effects of any single actions. It also helps integration and co-operation among staff. Furthermore, a structured audit is a useful instrument for professional accountability for both qualitative and quantitative aspects of care.

  2. A randomized clinical trial of oral hygiene care programmes during stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruoxi; Lam, Otto L T; Lo, Edward C M; Li, Leonard S W; McGrath, Colman

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of an advanced oral hygiene care programme (AOHCP) and a conventional oral hygiene care programme (COHCP) in improving oral hygiene, and reducing gingival bleeding among patients with stroke during outpatient rehabilitation. Subjects were randomized to receive (i) the COHCP comprising a manual toothbrush, toothpaste, and oral hygiene instruction, or (ii) the AOHCP comprising a powered toothbrush, 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse, toothpaste, and oral hygiene instruction. Dental plaque, gingival bleeding, and other clinical oral health outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of the clinical trial, and the end of observation period. Development of infectious complications was also monitored. Participants of both programmes had a significant reduction in the percentages of sites with moderate to abundant dental plaque (poral hygiene care programmes were effective in terms of plaque and gingival bleeding control, the AOHCP was more effective than the COHCP in reducing dental plaque and gingival bleeding. This study highlighted the value of oral hygiene programmes within stroke outpatient rehabilitation and provides evidence to advocate for the inclusion of oral hygiene care programmes within stroke outpatient rehabilitation for patients with normal cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical impacts of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2004-01-01

    The progress of the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the cerebral stroke patients was remarkable, and it became possible to evaluate a brain perfusion or function. Here, we describe about the clinical application of the neuronal tracts and brain perfusion evaluation using 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. The subjects were patients with internal cerebral hemorrhage and major cerebral occlusive diseases. Three dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were accepted to estimate the damages of neurnal tracts. Perfusion weighted images with the contrast medium were performed for a quantitative evaluation. The pyramidal tracts were depicted well with 3DAC imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value generated from DTI can predict the outcome of the motor dysfunction in each patient at early stage. Cerebral blood volume calculated from perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) was correlated with and cerebral vascular reserve capacity. 3.0 Tesla MR imaging may develop in cerebral stroke patients in near future. (author)

  4. Post-stroke depression: Main phenomenological clusters and their relationships with clinical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Davide; Marra, Camillo; Gainotti, Guido

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the principal psychopathological dimensions of post-stroke depression (PSD) through the assessment of the factorial structure of the Post-Stroke Depression Rating Scale (PSDRS). We enrolled ninety-eight subjects with PSD, who underwent the PSDRS, MMSE and Barthel Index. Information about demographic, clinical, and neuroanatomical factors was collected. The factor analysis extracted three factors accounting for 63.4% of the total variance, and identified as: 1) "Depressive and Anxious Symptoms" (DAS); 2) "Lack of Emotional Control" (LEC); 3) "Reduced Motivation" (RM). On multivariate statistics, DAS severity was predicted by previous history of mood disorders and Barthel Index; LEC severity was predicted by Barthel Index; RM severity was predicted by age. The PSDRS displayed a reliable factor structure that agreed with previous interpretation of PSD. In particular, core depressive symptoms seem to be related to premorbid personality and functional status, whereas apathy/anhedonia may be connected to brain aging.

  5. Variation in Clinical Practice of Intravenous Thrombolysis in Stroke in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auke Bauer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands in 2010, 11% of patients with ischemic stroke received intravenous thrombolysis (IVT, varying from 4 to 26% between hospitals. The aim of this study was to investigate variation in clinical practice and organization of IVT in relationship to performance and outcome. In all 84 Dutch hospitals performing IVT, a stroke neurologist was approached using a web-based survey. The response rate was 82%. The study showed considerable variation. For example, door-to-needle time ranged from 25 to 80 min. High blood pressure was actively lowered before performing IVT by 57% of neurologists, while 35% chose to wait. 28% started IVT without knowledge of laboratory results. Better follow-up data are needed to see whether this variation results in differences in outcome.

  6. ExStroke Pilot Trial of the effect of repeated instructions to improve physical activity after ischaemic stroke: a multinational randomised controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Gudrun; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Zeng, Xianrong

    2009-01-01

    training programme before discharge and at five follow-up visits during 24 months. Control patients had follow-up visits with the same frequency but without instructions in physical activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physical activity assessed with the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) at each......OBJECTIVES: To investigate if repeated verbal instructions about physical activity to patients with ischaemic stroke could increase long term physical activity. DESIGN: Multicentre, multinational, randomised clinical trial with masked outcome assessment. SETTING: Stroke units in Denmark, China...... infarction, or falls and fractures. CONCLUSION: Repeated encouragement and verbal instruction in being physically active did not lead to a significant increase in physical activity measured by the PASE score. More intensive strategies seem to be needed to promote physical activity after ischaemic stroke...

  7. ExStroke Pilot Trial of the effect of repeated instructions to improve physical activity after ischaemic stroke: a multinational randomised controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Gudrun; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Zeng, Xianrong

    2009-01-01

    training programme before discharge and at five follow-up visits during 24 months. Control patients had follow-up visits with the same frequency but without instructions in physical activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physical activity assessed with the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) at each......OBJECTIVES: To investigate if repeated verbal instructions about physical activity to patients with ischaemic stroke could increase long term physical activity. DESIGN: Multicentre, multinational, randomised clinical trial with masked outcome assessment. SETTING: Stroke units in Denmark, China......, Poland, and Estonia. PARTICIPANTS: 314 patients with ischaemic stroke aged >or=40 years who were able to walk-157 (mean age 69.7 years) randomised to the intervention, 157 (mean age 69.4 years) in the control group. INTERVENTIONS: Patients randomised to the intervention were instructed in a detailed...

  8. The Effect of Electromagnetic Field Treatment on Recovery from Ischemic Stroke in a Rat Stroke Model: Clinical, Imaging, and Pathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Segal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability. Effects of stroke include significant deficits in sensory-motor skills and cognitive abilities. At present, there are limited effective interventions for postacute stroke patients. In this preliminary research we studied a new noninvasive, very low intensity, low frequency, electromagnetic field treatment (VLIFE, targeting a neural network, on an in vivo stroke rat model. Eighteen rats were divided into three groups: sham (M1 and two treatment groups which were exposed to VLIFE treatment for 4 weeks, one using theta waves (M2 and another using beta waves (M3; all groups were followed up for an additional month. Results indicate that the M2 and M3 treated groups showed recovery of sensorimotor functional deficits, as demonstrated by Modified Neurological Severity Score and forelimb placement tests. Brain MRI imaging results show a decrease in perilesional edema and lateral ventricle widening in the treated groups. Fiber tracts’ imaging, following VLIFE treatment, showed a higher white matter integrity compared to control. Histological findings support neural regeneration processes. Our data suggest that VLIFE treatment, targeting a specific functional neural network by frequency rather than location, promotes neuronal plasticity after stroke and, as a result, improves clinical recovery. Further studies will investigate the full potential of the treatment.

  9. Clinical Variables Associated with Hydration Status in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Acute stroke patients with dysphagia are at increased risk for poor hydration. Dysphagia management practices may directly impact hydration status. This study examined clinical factors that might impact hydration status in acute ischemic stroke patients with dysphagia. A retrospective chart review was completed on 67 ischemic stroke patients who participated in a prior study of nutrition and hydration status during acute care. Prior results indicated that patients with dysphagia demonstrated elevated BUN/Cr compared to non-dysphagia cases during acute care and that BUN/Cr increased selectively in dysphagic patients. This chart review evaluated clinical variables potentially impacting hydration status: diuretics, parenteral fluids, tube feeding, oral diet, and nonoral (NPO) status. Exposure to any variable and number of days of exposure to each variable were examined. Dysphagia cases demonstrated significantly more NPO days, tube fed days, and parenteral fluid days, but not oral fed days, or days on diuretics. BUN/Cr values at discharge were not associated with NPO days, parenteral fluid days, oral fed days, or days on diuretics. Patients on modified solid diets had significantly higher mean BUN/Cr values at discharge (27.12 vs. 17.23) as did tube fed patients (28.94 vs. 18.66). No difference was noted between these subgroups at baseline (regular diet vs. modified solids diets). Any modification of solid diets (31.11 vs. 17.23) or thickened liquids (28.50 vs. 17.81) resulted in significantly elevated BUN/Cr values at discharge. Liquid or diet modifications prescribed for acute stroke patients with dysphagia may impair hydration status in these patients.

  10. Multidetector computed tomography angiography in clinically suspected hyperacute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation: an etiological workup in a cohort of Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Torres Pacheco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective The potential of computed tomography angiography (CTA was assessed for early determination of stroke subtypes in a Brazilian cohort of patients with stroke. Method From July 2011 to July 2013, we selected patients with suspected hyperacute stroke (< 6 hours. Intracranial and cervical arteries were scrutinized on CTA and their imaging features were correlated with concurrent subtype of stroke. Results Stroke was documented in 50/106 selected patients (47.2% based on both clinical grounds and imaging follow-up (stroke group, with statistically significant arterial stenosis and vulnerable plaques on CTA. Intracranial large artery disease was demonstrated in 34% of patients in the stroke group. Partial territorial infarct prevailed (86% while artery-to-artery embolization was the most common stroke mechanism (52%. Conclusion Multidetector CTA was useful for the etiologic work-up of hyperacute ischemic stroke and facilitated the knowledge about the topographic pattern of brain infarct in accordance with its causative mechanism.

  11. Susceptibility-diffusion mismatch in middle cerebral artery territory acute ischemic stroke: clinical and imaging implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payabvash, Seyedmehid; Taleb, Shayandokht; Benson, John C; Hoffman, Benjamin; Oswood, Mark C; McKinney, Alexander M; Rykken, Jeffrey B

    2017-07-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested a correlation between susceptibility-diffusion mismatch and perfusion-diffusion mismatch in acute ischemic stroke patients. Purpose To determine the clinical and imaging associations of susceptibility-diffusion mismatch in patients with acute ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Material and Methods Consecutive patients with MCA territory acute ischemic stroke, who had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 24 h of symptom onset or time last-seen-well, were included. Two neuroradiologists reviewed SWI scans for SWI-DWI mismatch defined by regionally increased vessel number or diameter on SWI extending beyond the DWI hyperintensity territory in the affected hemisphere. The stroke severity at admission was evaluated using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Poor clinical outcome was defined by a 3-month modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score >2. Results The SWI-DWI mismatch was identified in 44 (29.3%) of 150 patients included in this study. Patients with SWI-DWI mismatch had smaller admission infarct volumes (31.2 ± 44.7 versus 55.9 ± 117.7 mL, P = 0.045) and were younger (60.4 ± 18.9 versus 67.1 ± 15.5, P = 0.026). After correction for age, admission NIHSS score, and infarct volume, the SWI-DWI mismatch was associated with a 22.6% lower rate of poor clinical outcome using propensity score matching ( P = 0.032). In our cohort, thrombolytic therapy showed no significant effect on outcome. Conclusion The presence of SWI-DWI mismatch in acute MCA territory ischemic infarct is associated with smaller infarct volume. Moreover, SWI-DWI mismatch was associated with better outcome after correction for infarct size, severity of admission symptoms, and age.

  12. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  13. Association between clinical condition and F-waves changes in the acute phase of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To relate F-waves with clinical and laboratory exams in the acute phase of stroke. Methods Inclusion criteria for this cross-sectional study were: hemiplegia, absence of previous cranial trauma, myopathy, diabetes, alcoholism or other known causes of peripheral neuropathy, and normal sensory and motor conduction. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, glycemia, glucosilate hemoglobin, and CPK were obtained at admission by routine blood exams. After hospital admission, the F-wave latencies and persistence were obtained from the deep peroneal nerve using symmetrical techniques. Results Evaluation of 20 individuals – mean age 66 years, 50% male and 85% Caucasian – showed association of F-wave persistence with glycemia (r = 0.71; p < 0.001 and NIHSS categorized (NIHSS 1-7 = 65.0 x NIHSS 9-23 = 100; p = 0.004. Multivariate analysis found only association of F-wave persistence with glycemia β = 0.59 (0.44–0.74; p < 0.001. Conclusion The increase in the persistence of F-waves are associated with hyperglycemia in the acute phase of stroke.

  14. Clinical evaluation of a non-immersive virtual environment in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmans, Judi; Gladman, John; Hilton, Dave; Walker, Marion; Sunderland, Alan; Cobb, Sue; Pridmore, Tony; Thomas, Shirley

    2009-02-01

    We describe our attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of a virtual environment developed to rehabilitate stroke patients in the task of making a hot drink. Single case studies were performed in 13/138 (9%) stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in a UK stroke unit. Participants in AB/BA (n = 5) and ABA (n = 2) design studies received 5 one-hour sessions of attention control training (A phase) and 5 one-hour sessions of virtual environment training (B phase). An AB design with random duration of A and B phases (minimum duration of A and B phases 3 and 5 days respectively, with total duration of 3 weeks) was used in 6 participants. Visual inspection of scores across all cases showed a trend towards improvement over time in both real and virtual hot drink making ability in both control and intervention phases. There was no significant difference (Wilcoxon, p > 0.05) in the improvements in real and virtual hot drink making ability during all control and intervention phases in the 13 cases. Ceiling effects limited the evaluation of effectiveness in 5 of the 8 cases in which daily performance measures were used. Few people in this setting were suitable for this intervention. The case studies showed no evidence of a strong effect of this intervention, but we had great difficulty in performing single case studies. We conclude that more testing and development of this system is required before it is subjected to rigorous testing of clinical effectiveness.

  15. Clinical and imaging features associated with an increased risk of early and late stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, A R; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T V

    2015-01-01

    intracranial disease; (v) a failure to recruit intracranial collaterals; (vi) low GSM; (vii) MR diagnosis of intra-plaque haemorrhage; (vii) spontaneous embolisation on TCD; and (viii) increased FDG uptake in the carotid plaque on PET. Clinical/imaging parameters associated with a lower risk of stroke include......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to identify clinical and/or imaging parameters that are associated with an increased (decreased) risk of early/late stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease. IN THE FIRST 14 DAYS: Natural history studies suggest that 8-15% of patients with 50......-99% stenoses will suffer a stroke within 72 hours of their index symptom. Currently, there are insufficient validated data to identify highest-risk patients for emergency carotid endarterectomy (CEA), but an increased risk of stroke appears to be predicted by (i) an ABCD(2) score of 4-7; (ii) the presence...

  16. Glycemia in Acute Stroke II study: a call to improve post-stroke hyperglycemia management in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B; Sanz-Cuesta, B E; Gutiérrez-Fernández, M; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Lisbona, A; Madero-Jarabo, R; Delgado-Mederos, R; Gállego-Cullere, J; Rodríguez-Yáñez, M; Martínez-Zabaleta, M; Freijo, M; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Portilla, J C; Gil-Núñez, A; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of conventional glucose management, which aimed to maintain glucose levels stroke (IS) in a clinical practice setting. This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study of patients with acute IS. Patients were classified into four groups based on their initial 48-h capillary glucose levels and the administration of and response to corrective treatment: (i) untreated and maximum glucose levels <155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L) within the first 48 h; (ii) treated and good responders [glucose levels persistently <155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L)]; (iii) treated and non-responders [any glucose values ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L) during the 24 h after the start of corrective treatment]; and (iv) untreated with any glucose value ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L). The primary outcome was death or dependence at 3 months (blinded rater). A total of 213 patients were included. Ninety-seven (45.5%) patients developed glucose levels ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L), 69 (71.1%) underwent corrective treatment and 31 patients underwent no corrective treatment at the physician's discretion [28 of whom had isolated values ≥155 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L)]. Only 11 (16%) patients responded to conventional treatment, whereas 58 (84%) patients were non-responsive. Non-responders showed a twofold higher risk of death or dependence at 3 months (odds ratio, 2.472; 95% confidence interval, 1.096-5.576; P = 0.029). Lack of response to conventional treatment for glucose management in acute IS is frequent and associated with poor outcomes. © 2017 EAN.

  17. Clinical Information Systems Integration in New York City's First Mobile Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Lerario, Michael P; Navi, Babak B; Ganzman, Adam C; Ribaudo, Daniel; Mir, Saad A; Pishanidar, Sammy; Lekic, Tim; Williams, Olajide; Kamel, Hooman; Marshall, Randolph S; Hripcsak, George; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Fink, Matthew E

    2018-01-01

     Mobile stroke units (MSUs) reduce time to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. These units are widely used, but the clinical information systems underlying MSU operations are understudied.  The first MSU on the East Coast of the United States was established at New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYP) in October 2016. We describe our program's 7-month pilot, focusing on the integration of our hospital's clinical information systems into our MSU to support patient care and research efforts.  NYP's MSU was staffed by two paramedics, one radiology technologist, and a vascular neurologist. The unit was equipped with four laptop computers and networking infrastructure enabling all staff to access the hospital intranet and clinical applications during operating hours. A telephone-based registration procedure registered patients from the field into our admit/discharge/transfer system, which interfaced with the institutional electronic health record (EHR). We developed and implemented a computerized physician order entry set in our EHR with prefilled values to permit quick ordering of medications, imaging, and laboratory testing. We also developed and implemented a structured clinician note to facilitate care documentation and clinical data extraction.  Our MSU began operating on October 3, 2016. As of April 27, 2017, the MSU transported 49 patients, of whom 16 received tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Zero technical problems impacting patient care were reported around registration, order entry, or intranet access. Two onboard network failures occurred, resulting in computed tomography scanner malfunctions, although no patients became ineligible for time-sensitive treatment as a result. Thirteen (26.5%) clinical notes contained at least one incomplete time field.  The main technical challenges encountered during the integration of our hospital's clinical information systems into our MSU were onboard network failures and incomplete clinical

  18. Nursing interventions in stroke care delivery: An evidence-based clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofanidis, Dimitrios; Gibbon, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    Generally, nursing interventions during the acute stages following a stroke aim at preventing secondary brain injury (intracranial hypertension), maintaining the airways (due to paralysis of the pharynx muscles), providing general body support (vital signs, fluid and electrolyte balance), and anticipating the occurrence of complications (atelectasis and pneumonia). This literature review is to prioritize nursing interventions for acute stroke and to update nursing roles and input considering recommended levels of evidence of care to date. A systematic review was undertaken, and databases searched were Electronic Library Information Navigator (ELIN), Medline and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature from 1990 to 2015, using the OVID interface. The search originally yielded 400 articles of which 65 were selected for analysis and 12 of these included evidence synthesis (class I-IV, level A-Good Clinical Practice [GCP]). To facilitate early patient recovery, advanced nursing care should include the routine practice of a wide range of specific nursing interventions such as continence management, pressure area care, swallowing management, and early mobilization. Other important nursing interventions include the prevention of pulmonary thromboembolism and early antiplatelet therapy. For over 20 years, it has been established that specialized stroke care save lives, reduce disability, shorten length of stay, and generally have been associated with improved patient outcomes. Highly specialized nursing input is of paramount importance in achieving optimum patient outcomes and high quality of interdisciplinary care, providing a comprehensive, interactive, and holistic approach for both acute stroke and rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in acute stroke: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federau, C.; Becce, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) and University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sumer, S.; Wintermark, M. [University of Virginia, Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); O' Brien, K. [University of Geneva, Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging is an MRI perfusion technique that uses a diffusion-weighted sequence with multiple b values and a bi-compartmental signal model to measure the so-called pseudo-diffusion of blood caused by its passage through the microvascular network. The goal of the current study was to assess the feasibility of IVIM perfusion fraction imaging in patients with acute stroke. Images were collected in 17 patients with acute stroke. Exclusion criteria were onset of symptoms to imaging >5 days, hemorrhagic transformation, infratentorial lesions, small lesions <0.5 cm in minimal diameter and hemodynamic instability. IVIM imaging was performed at 3 T, using a standard spin-echo Stejskal-Tanner pulsed gradients diffusion-weighted sequence, using 16 b values from 0 to 900 s/mm{sup 2}. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists, and quantitative analysis was performed in regions of interest placed in the stroke area, defined by thresholding the apparent diffusion coefficient maps, as well as in the contralateral region. IVIM perfusion fraction maps showed an area of decreased perfusion fraction f in the region of decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. Quantitative analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in both IVIM perfusion fraction f (0.026 ± 0.019 vs. 0.056 ± 0.025, p = 2.2 . 10{sup -6}) and diffusion coefficient D compared with the contralateral side (3.9 ± 0.79 . 10{sup -4} vs. 7.5 ± 0.86 . 10{sup -4} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 1.3 . 10{sup -20}). IVIM perfusion fraction imaging is feasible in acute stroke. IVIM perfusion fraction is significantly reduced in the visible infarct. Further studies should evaluate the potential for IVIM to predict clinical outcome and treatment response. (orig.)

  20. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  1. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  2. [Perinatal mortality in dogs. Clinical, bacteriological and pathological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, M; Remmers, C

    1990-08-01

    1. In intensively operated dog breeding kennels bacterial infections are very significant in perinatal mortality. 2. Staph. aureus, Streptococci (type G) and also beta-haemolytic E. coli were transmitted intra-uterine or by the infected genital tract to the puppies. In many cases they are the cause of septicaemic death of the puppies. 3. A second important cause of infection is subclinical mastitis of the bitch, leading to septicaemic death of newborn puppies. 4. Prophylactic hygienic measures make possible a prognosis concerning the risk of perinatal death. This includes examinations of the dog and the bitch ante coitum, bacteriological examination of the genital tract of the bitch, and a bacteriological examination of the milk before the date of birth. 5. Prophylactic hygienic measures in combination with antibiotic treatment of the bitch or the puppies could reduce the losses of puppies to less than 10%.

  3. Maternal Morbidity and Mortality: Identifying Opportunities to Improve Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Patricia M; Sisson, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of why women die during pregnancy, childbirth, or postpartum offers valuable insight into strategies aimed at preventing maternal deaths and arresting the progression in the severity of a complication. The rate of severe maternal morbidity and maternal mortality in the United States has been trending upward in recent years and has garnered national attention with concentration on bolstering reviews of maternal deaths and implementing patient safety initiatives. The obstetric nurse is in a unique position to improve maternal outcomes through the anticipation, recognition, and communication of the early warning signs of impending deterioration in maternal condition. Presented in the context of the conceptual model of Stephen Covey's Circle of Influence, the professional nurse can proactively influence maternal outcomes directly, with actions defined by the scope of professional nursing practice or indirectly through professional interactions with others. Advancing one's education, knowledge, and technical skills broadens the influential capacity.

  4. Time to angiographic reperfusion and clinical outcome after acute ischaemic stroke: an analysis of data from the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS III) phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pooja; Yeatts, Sharon D; Mazighi, Mikael; Broderick, Joseph P; Liebeskind, David S; Demchuk, Andrew M; Amarenco, Pierre; Carrozzella, Janice; Spilker, Judith; Foster, Lydia D; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D; Palesch, Yuko Y; Jauch, Edward C; Haley, E Clarke; Vagal, Achala; Tomsick, Thomas A

    2014-06-01

    The IMS III trial did not show a clinical benefit of endovascular treatment compared with intravenous alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator) alone for moderate or severe ischaemic strokes. Late reperfusion of tissue that was no longer salvageable could be one explanation, as suggested by previous exploratory studies that showed an association between time to reperfusion and good clinical outcome. We sought to validate this association in a preplanned analysis of data from the IMS III trial. We used data for patients with complete proximal arterial occlusions in the anterior circulation who received endovascular treatment and achieved angiographic reperfusion (score on Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction scale of grade 2-3) during the endovascular procedure (within 7 h of symptom onset). We used logistic regression to model good clinical outcome (defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2 at 3 months) as a function of the time to reperfusion. We prespecified variables to be considered for adjustment, including age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, sex, and baseline blood glucose concentration. Of 240 patients who were otherwise eligible for inclusion in our analysis, 182 (76%) achieved angiographic reperfusion. Mean time from symptom onset to reperfusion (ie, procedure end) was 325 min (SD 52). Increased time to reperfusion was associated with a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome (unadjusted relative risk for every 30-min delay 0·85 [95% CI 0·77-0·94]; adjusted relative risk 0·88 [0·80-0·98]). Delays in time to angiographic reperfusion lead to a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome in patients after moderate to severe stroke. Rapid reperfusion could be crucial for the success of future acute endovascular trials. US National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reliability of carotid doppler performed in a dedicated stroke prevention clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, N; Lari, H; Saqqur, M; Amir, N; Khan, K; Mouradian, M; Salam, Abdul; Romanchuk, H; Shuaib, A

    2005-08-01

    Doppler ultrasound (DUS) is used as a screening tool to assess internal carotid artery (ICA) disease. Recent reports suggest that the DUS may be inaccurate in over 28% of patients. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of DUS, when performed in a dedicated stroke prevention clinic (SPC). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients who had a DUS performed in our SPC, followed by conventional cerebral angiography. Three groups of patients were defined. Group 1 had DUS measured ICA stenosis of >50%; Group II had a DUS measured ICA stenosis of 50%--a misclassification rate of 0%. Group III consisted of five patients in whom DUS showed complete ICA occlusion. The angiogram confirmed the occlusion in all five patients--a misclassification rate of 0%. Overall, misclassification rate was 1.45% (95% CI: 0 - 4.3%). Doppler ultrasound when performed in a stroke prevention clinic (SPC), has a high accuracy in measuring ICA stenosis of >50%. Doppler ultrasound is reliable in detecting complete ICA occlusion and finally DUS is a reliable screening tool to rule out clinically significant ICA stenosis.

  6. Clinical effects of using HEXORR (Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot) for movement therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sasha Blue; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2013-11-01

    The goals of this pilot study were to quantify the clinical benefits of using the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot for hand rehabilitation after stroke and to determine the population best served by this intervention. Nine subjects with chronic stroke (one excluded from analysis) completed 18 sessions of training with the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot and a preevaluation, a postevaluation, and a 90-day clinical evaluation. Overall, the subjects improved in both range of motion and clinical measures. Compared with the preevaluation, the subjects showed significant improvements in range of motion, grip strength, and the hand component of the Fugl-Meyer (mean changes, 6.60 degrees, 8.84 percentage points, and 1.86 points, respectively). A subgroup of six subjects exhibited lower tone and received a higher dosage of training. These subjects had significant gains in grip strength, the hand component of the Fugl-Meyer, and the Action Research Arm Test (mean changes, 8.42 percentage points, 2.17 points, and 2.33 points, respectively). Future work is needed to better manage higher levels of hypertonia and provide more support to subjects with higher impairment levels; however, the current results support further study into the Hand Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot treatment.

  7. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  8. Television viewing time and mortality from stroke and coronary artery disease among Japanese men and women -- the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Satoyo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Wada, Yasuhiko; Tanabe, Naohito; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Shogo; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    No study has examined the association between television (TV) viewing time and mortality from stroke and coronary artery disease (CAD) in Japanese. A total of 35,959 men and 49,940 women aged 40-79 years without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer were followed from 1988-1990 until 2009. During 19.2 median years of follow-up, there were 2,553 deaths from stroke, 1,206 from CAD and 5,835 from total CVD. Compared with viewing TV for TV viewing. The multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) for ≥6 h/day of TV viewing were 1.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.37) for stroke, 1.33 (1.03-1.72) for CAD and 1.19 (1.06-1.34) for total CVD. The corresponding HRs for each 1-h/day increment in TV viewing time were 1.01 (0.99-1.04), 1.04 (1.01-1.08) and 1.02 (1.01-1.04), respectively. The excess risk of mortality from CAD and total CVD was somewhat attenuated after further adjustment for potential mediators such as history of hypertension and diabetes: the multivariable HRs for ≥6 h/day of TV viewing were 1.24 (0.96-1.61) and 1.14 (1.02-1.28). The corresponding HRs for each 1-h/day increment in TV viewing time were 1.03 (1.00-1.07) and 1.01 (1.00-1.03). Prolonged TV viewing was associated with a small but significant increase in mortality from CAD and total CVD in Japanese.

  9. Predicting long-term outcome after acute ischemic stroke: a simple index works in patients from controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Inke R; Ziegler, Andreas; Bluhmki, Erich; Hacke, Werner; Bath, Philip M W; Sacco, Ralph L; Diener, Hans C; Weimar, Christian

    2008-06-01

    An early and reliable prognosis for recovery in stroke patients is important for initiation of individual treatment and for informing patients and relatives. We recently developed and validated models for predicting survival and functional independence within 3 months after acute stroke, based on age and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score assessed within 6 hours after stroke. Herein we demonstrate the applicability of our models in an independent sample of patients from controlled clinical trials. The prognostic models were used to predict survival and functional recovery in 5419 patients from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA). Furthermore, we tried to improve the accuracy by adapting intercepts and estimating new model parameters. The original models were able to correctly classify 70.4% (survival) and 72.9% (functional recovery) of patients. Because the prediction was slightly pessimistic for patients in the controlled trials, adapting the intercept improved the accuracy to 74.8% (survival) and 74.0% (functional recovery). Novel estimation of parameters, however, yielded no relevant further improvement. For acute ischemic stroke patients included in controlled trials, our easy-to-apply prognostic models based on age and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score correctly predicted survival and functional recovery after 3 months. Furthermore, a simple adaptation helps to adjust for a different prognosis and is recommended if a large data set is available.

  10. The “DOC” screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H.; Cayley, Megan L.; Lanctôt, Krista L.; Murray, Brian J.; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Sicard, Michelle N.; Lien, Karen; Sahlas, Demetrios J.; Herrmann, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Cognitive impairment (“DOC”) are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool (“DOC” screen) to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment. Methods All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines. Findings 1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes), less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index), had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens. Conclusions Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may

  11. Intake of trans fat and all-cause mortality in the Reasons for Geographical and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiage, James N; Merrill, Peter D; Robinson, Cody J; Cao, Yue; Malik, Talha A; Hundley, Barrett C; Lao, Ping; Judd, Suzanne E; Cushman, Mary; Howard, Virginia J; Kabagambe, Edmond K

    2013-05-01

    A high intake of trans fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and is associated with increased LDL cholesterol, inflammation, diabetes, cancer, and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relation between trans fat intake and all-cause mortality has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between trans fat intake and all-cause mortality. We used data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study-a prospective cohort study of white and black men and women residing in the continental United States. Energy-adjusted trans fat intake was categorized into quintiles, and Cox-regression was used to evaluate the association between trans fat intake and all-cause mortality. During 7 y of follow-up, there were 1572 deaths in 18,513 participants included in REGARDS. From the first to the fifth quintile of trans fat intake, the mortality rates per 1000 person-years of follow-up (95% CIs) were 12.8 (11.3, 14.5), 14.3 (12.7, 16.2), 14.6 (13.0, 16.5), 19.0 (17.1, 21.1), and 23.6 (21.5, 25.9), respectively. After adjustment for demographic factors, education, and risk factors for mortality, the HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality were 1.00, 1.03 (0.86, 1.23), 0.98 (0.82, 1.17), 1.25 (1.05, 1.48), and 1.24 (1.05, 1.48), respectively (P-trend = 0.004). The population attributable risk due to trans fat intake was 7% (95% CI: 5%, 8%). Higher trans fat intake is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality.

  12. A clinical study on perforator stroke resulting from Wingspan stent angioplasty for symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ziliang; Xu Haowen; Li Tianxiao; Zhu Liangfu; Li Zhaoshuo; Xue Jiangyu; Bai Weixing; Li Li; Guan Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence, potential hazards and effective countermeasure for perforator stroke (PS) resulting from stent angioplasty of symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis. Methods: Peri-operation PS complications of 258 patients receiving Gateway balloon-Wingspan stenting for severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis were analyzed. The incidence, clinical course, and prognosis of PS resulting from stenting were recorded. Special attention was given to the anatomical features, clinical manifestation and video materials of patients with PS. χ 2 test was used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and fifty-five patients received stent angioplasty successfully and 7 patients had PS (incidence rate 2.7%). The patients with basilar artery stenosis had a higher incidence of PS resulting from intracranial stenting (6.1%, 4/66) than patients with middle cerebral artery stenosis (2.5%, 3/118) (χ 2 =2.320, P= 0.025). The potential hazards for PS included preoperative perforator stroke adjacent to the stenotic segment and prominent dissection during operation. Six patients presented symptoms after awake from general anaesthesia and one had symptoms 3 hours after stenting. One deteriorated gradually and the others reached the maximum deficit almost at once. At the follow-up of 3 months, 3 patients were disabled and scored one, two, two by mRS respectively. Conclusion: The incidence of PS resulting from intracranial stenting was low and the prognosis was not disastrous. Stenosis at basilar artery and preoperative perforator stroke adjacent to the stenotic segment were potential risk factors for PS complication. Proper maneuver of angioplasty may decrease the incidence of PS and improve the prognosis. (authors)

  13. Effectiveness of Conventional Rehabilitation Therapy on Postural Stability and Clinic in Stroke Patients with Hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Inanir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiviness of conventional rehabilitation in patients with stroke on static and dynamic balance as well as clinical assessment Methods: Twelve patients with stroke, 7 (58.33% of them being male and 5 (41.66% female, ranging from 51 to 75 in age who were treated in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation clinic were involved in this study. The patients were treated with conventional rehabilitation. All individuals were evaluated using balance tests before (Group 1 and after (Group 2 the treatment. Balance level and postural control has been assessed through Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Trunk Control Test (TCT and Biodex Stability System (BSS, motor level through BMIE, ambulation state through Functional Ambulatory Scale (FAS and functional state in daily activities through Functional Independence Measure (FIM. The same tests were repeated while the patients were being discharged. Results: The mean age of the study population was 65,83±4,38 years, the average Body Mas Index (BMI was 30,55±6,94. In the evaluations according to FIM, FAS, TCT and BBS differences between the mean of patients before and after the rehabilitation were significantly higher for the post-treatment (p=0.001, p=0.001, p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. In the evaluations according to Overall Stability Index (OSI, Antero-Posterior Stability Index (APSI and Medio-Lateral Stability Index (MLSI differences between the mean of patients before and after the rehabilitation were significantly higher for the pre-treatment (p=0.001, p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. Conclusion: It can be stated that this approach is effective and useful in restoring static and dynamic balance as well as in obtaining an effective improvement in the treatment of patients with stroke through conventional treatment. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 446-455

  14. Intravenous Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation for Stroke: Phase1/2a Clinical Trial in a Homogeneous Group of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakai, Chiaki; Soma, Toshihiro; Kasahara, Yukiko; Stern, David M; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Daimon, Takashi; Yamahara, Kenichi; Doi, Kaori; Kohara, Nobuo; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of transplanting autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells into patients suffering severe embolic stroke. Major inclusion criteria included patients with cerebral embolism, age 20-75 years, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score displaying improvement of ≤ 5 points during the first 7 days after stroke, and NIHSS score of ≥ 10 on day 7 after stroke. Bone marrow aspiration (25 or 50 mL; N = 6 patients in each case) was performed 7-10 days poststroke, and bone marrow mononuclear cells were administrated intravenously. Mean total transplanted cell numbers were 2.5 × 10(8) and 3.4 × 10(8) cells in the lower and higher dose groups, respectively. No apparent adverse effects of administering bone marrow cells were observed. Compared with the lower dose, patients receiving the higher dose of bone marrow cells displayed a trend toward improved neurologic outcomes. Compared with 1 month after treatment, patients receiving cell therapy displayed a trend toward improved cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen consumption 6 months after treatment. In comparison with historical controls, patients receiving cell therapy had significantly better neurologic outcomes. Our results indicated that intravenous transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells is safe and feasible. Positive results and trends favoring neurologic recovery and improvement in cerebral blood flow and metabolism by cell therapy underscore the relevance of larger scale randomized controlled trials using this approach.

  15. Effect of Dysphagia Screening Strategies on Clinical Outcomes After Stroke: A Systematic Review for the 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Kent, David M; Bulsara, Ketan R; Leung, Lester Y; Lichtman, Judith H; Reeves, Mathew J; Towfighi, Amytis; Whiteley, William N; Zahuranec, Darin B

    2018-03-01

    Dysphagia screening protocols have been recommended to identify patients at risk for aspiration. The American Heart Association convened an evidence review committee to systematically review evidence for the effectiveness of dysphagia screening protocols to reduce the risk of pneumonia, death, or dependency after stroke. The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched on November 1, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dysphagia screening protocols or quality interventions with increased dysphagia screening rates and reporting outcomes of pneumonia, death, or dependency. Three RCTs were identified. One RCT found that a combined nursing quality improvement intervention targeting fever and glucose management and dysphagia screening reduced death and dependency but without reducing the pneumonia rate. Another RCT failed to find evidence that pneumonia rates were reduced by adding the cough reflex to routine dysphagia screening. A smaller RCT randomly assigned 2 hospital wards to a stroke care pathway including dysphagia screening or regular care and found that patients on the stroke care pathway were less likely to require intubation and mechanical ventilation; however, the study was small and at risk for bias. There were insufficient RCT data to determine the effect of dysphagia screening protocols on reducing the rates of pneumonia, death, or dependency after stroke. Additional trials are needed to compare the validity, feasibility, and clinical effectiveness of different screening methods for dysphagia. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Oleander toxicity – the clinical spectrum and mortality predictors: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    Oleander poisoning ranks second in the list being ... poisoningand to devise a standard assessment protocol in oleander-poisoned patients. This .... poisoning. Clin. Toxicol. (Phila). 2009;47(3):206-12. 2. Bandara V, Weinstein SA, White J, Eddleston. M. A review of the natural history, toxinology, diagnosis and clinical ...

  17. Cerebral oxygen transport failure?: decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels after ischemic stroke predict poor outcome and mortality: STroke: RelevAnt Impact of hemoGlobin, Hematocrit and Transfusion (STRAIGHT)--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellert, Lars; Martin, Evgenia; Sykora, Marek; Bauer, Harald; Gussmann, Philipp; Diedler, Jennifer; Herweh, Christian; Ringleb, Peter A; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten; Bösel, Julian

    2011-10-01

    Although conceivably relevant for penumbra oxygenation, the optimal levels of hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) in patients with acute ischemic stroke are unknown. We identified patients from our prospective local stroke database who received intravenous thrombolysis based on multimodal magnet resonance imaging during the years 1998 to 2009. A favorable outcome at 3 months was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score≤2 and a poor outcome as a modified Rankin Scale score≥3. The dynamics of Hemoglobin (Hb), Hematocrit (Hct), and other relevant laboratory parameters as well as cardiovascular risk factors were retrospectively assessed and analyzed between these 2 groups. Of 217 patients, 114 had a favorable and 103 a poor outcome. In a multivariable regression model, anemia until day 5 after admission (odds ratio [OR]=2.61; 95% CI, 1.33 to 5.11; P=0.005), Hb nadir (OR=0.81; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.99; P=0.038), and Hct nadir (OR=0.93; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.99; P=0.038) remained independent predictors for poor outcome at 3 months. Mortality after 3 months was independently associated with Hb nadir (OR=0.80; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98; P=0.028) and Hb decrease (OR=1.34; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.76; P=0.04) as well as Hct decrease (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.23; P=0.027). Poor outcome and mortality after ischemic stroke are strongly associated with low and further decreasing Hb and Hct levels. This decrease of Hb and Hct levels after admission might be more relevant and accessible to treatment than are baseline levels.

  18. Clinical and EEG features of ischemic stroke patients with abnormal discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-lei YANG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical and EEG features of ischemic stroke patients with abnormal discharges.  Methods Clinical data and 24-hour EEG monitoring of 162 ischemic stroke patients were analyzed retrospectively. One-year follow-up was carried out and post-ischemic epilepsy was diagnosed.  Results Among 162 ischemic stroke patients, 24-hour EEG was abnormal in 87 cases (53.70%. According to the correspondence of site of infarcts and abnormal discharges, these 87 cases were classified into 2 groups: matched group (N = 24, 27.59% and unmatched group (N = 63, 72.41%. There was no significant difference between 2 groups in terms of Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP and TOAST classification (P = 0.792, 0.111, while there was significant difference between 2 groups on the site of infarcts (P = 0.000. In matched group, the infarcts were mainly located in cortex (N = 23, 95.83%. However, in unmatched group, the infarcts were mainly located in cortex and basal ganglia (N = 27, 42.86%, or in basal ganglia only (N = 24, 38.10%. In matched group, 24-hour EEG showed slowing of background activities, and sharp waves and sharp and slow wave complex which were corresponding to the infarct sites. The abnormal discharges could only be recorded around the infarct unilaterally. In unmatched group, the epileptiform discharges were recorded in both contralateral and ipsilateral ischemic hemispheres, usually with widespread slow waves and asymmetric background. The infarcts were limited, but abnormal discharges were widespread. For example, the infarct was located in deep brain, while scalp abnormal discharges were recorded. Although there was no significant difference in terms of epilepsy incidence between 2 groups (P = 0.908, the types of epilepsy were statistically different between 2 groups (P = 0.000. In matched group, the main type was partial seizure. But in unmatched group, the main types of epilepsy were secondary generalized seizure and

  19. Relationship between clinical and instrumental balance assessments in chronic post-stroke hemiparesis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Carraro, Elena; Contessa, Paola; Guiotto, Annamaria; Masiero, Stefano; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-08-13

    Stroke is often associated with balance deficits that increase the risk of falls and may lead to severe mobility disfunctions or death. The purpose of this study is to establish the relation between the outcome of instrumented posturography and of the most commonly used clinical balance tests, and investigate their role for obtaining reliable feedback on stroke patients' balance impairment. Romberg test was performed on 20 subjects, 10 hemiplegic post-stroke subjects (SS, 69.4 ± 8.2 years old) and 10 control subjects (CS, 61.6 ± 8.6 years old), with 1 Bertec force plate. The following parameters were estimated from the centre of pressure (CoP) trajectory, which can be used to define subjects' performance during the balance task: sway area; ellipse (containing 95% of the data); mean CoP path and velocity in the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral directions. The following clinical scales and tests were administered to the subjects: Tinetti Balance test (TB); Berg Balance test (BBT); Time up and go test (TUG), Fugl-Meyer (lower limbs) (FM), Motricity Index (lower limbs), Trunk Control Test, Functional Independence Measure. Comparison between SS and CS subjects was performed by using the Student t-test. The Pearson Correlation coefficient was computed between instrumental and clinical parameters. Mean ± standard deviation for the balance scales scores of SS were: 12.5 ± 3.6 for TB, 42.9 ± 13.1 for BBT, 24 s and 75 cent ± 25 s and 70 cent for TUG. Correlation was found among some CoP parameters and both BBT and TUG in the eyes open and closed conditions (0.9 ≤ R ≤ 0.8). Sway area correlated only with TUG. Statistically significant differences were found between SS and CS in all CoP parameters in eyes open condition (p CoP path and velocity (p balance outcomes, indicating that they might measure different aspects of balance control. Consistently with previous findings in healthy and pathological subjects, our results

  20. Four-year follow-up of transient ischemic attacks, strokes, and mimics: a retrospective transient ischemic attack clinic cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipankar; Bowen, Emily; Foy, Chris

    2015-05-01

    There is limited information on outcomes from rapid access transient ischemic attack (TIA) clinics. We present 4-year outcomes of TIAs, strokes, and mimics from a UK TIA clinic database. All patients referred between April 2010 and May 2012 were retrospectively identified and outcomes determined. End points were stroke, myocardial infarction, any vascular event (TIA, stroke, or myocardial infarction), and all-cause death. Data were analyzed by survival analysis. Of 1067 patients, 31.6% were TIAs, 18% strokes, and 50.4% mimics. Median assessment time was 4.5 days from onset and follow-up was for 34.9 months. Subsequent strokes occurred in 7.1% of patients with TIA, 10.9% of patients with stroke, and 2.0% of mimics at the end of follow-up. Stroke risk at 90 days was 1.3% for patients diagnosed as TIA or stroke. Compared with mimics, hazard ratios for subsequent stroke were 3.88 (1.90-7.91) for TIA and 5.84 (2.81-12.11) for stroke. Hazard ratio for any subsequent vascular event was 2.91 (1.97-4.30) for TIA and 2.83 (1.81-4.41) for stroke. Hazard ratio for death was 1.68 (1.10-2.56) for TIA and 2.19 (1.38-3.46) for stroke. Our results show a lower 90-day stroke incidence after TIA or minor stroke than in earlier studies, suggesting that rapid access daily TIA clinics may be having a significant effect on reducing strokes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Prognostic factors related to clinical outcome following thrombectomy in ischemic stroke (RECOST Study). 50 patients prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costalat, V.; Lobotesis, K.; Machi, P.; Mourand, I.; Maldonado, I.; Heroum, C.; Vendrell, J.F.; Milhaud, D.; Riquelme, C.; Bonafé, A.; Arquizan, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: New thrombectomy devices allow successful and rapid recanalization in acute ischemic stroke. Nevertheless prognostics factors need to be systematically analyzed in the context of these new therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to analyze prognostic factors related to clinical outcome following Solitaire FR thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. Methods: Fifty consecutive ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion were included. Three treatment strategies were applied; rescue therapy, combined therapy, and standalone thrombectomy. DWI ASPECT score < 5 was the main exclusion criterion after initial MRI (T2, T2*, TOF, FLAIR, DWI). Sexes, age, time to recanalization were prospectively collected. Clinical outcome was assessed post treatment, day one and discharge by means of a NIHSS. Three months mRS evaluation was performed by an independent neurologist. The probability of good outcome at 3 months was assessed by forward stepwise logistic regression using baseline NIHSS score, Glasgow score at entrance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, blood–brain barrier disruption on post-operative CT, embolic and hemorrhagic post procedural complication, ischemic brain lesion extension on 24 h imaging, NIHSS at discharge, ASPECT score, and time to recanalization. All variables significantly associated with the outcome in the univariate analysis were entered in the model. The significance of adding or removing a variable from the logistic model was determined by the maximum likelihood ratio test. Odds-ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: At 3 months 54% of patients had a mRS 0–2, 70% in MCA, 44% in ICA, and 43% in BA with an overall mortality rate of 12%. Baseline NIHSS score (p = 0.001), abnormal Glasgow score at entrance (p = 0.053) hyperglycemia (p = 0.023), dyslipidemia (p = 0.031), blood–brain barrier disruption (p = 0.022), embolic and hemorrhagic post procedural complication, ischemic brain lesion

  2. Prognostic factors related to clinical outcome following thrombectomy in ischemic stroke (RECOST Study). 50 patients prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costalat, V., E-mail: vincentcost@hotmail.com [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Lobotesis, K., E-mail: kyriakos@lobotesis.co.uk [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Machi, P., E-mail: paolo.machi@gmail.com [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Mourand, I., E-mail: i-mourand@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neurology, Montpellier (France); Maldonado, I., E-mail: imaldonado@terra.com.br [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Heroum, C., E-mail: c-heroum@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neurology, Montpellier (France); Vendrell, J.F., E-mail: jf-vendrell@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Milhaud, D., E-mail: d-milhaud@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neurology, Montpellier (France); Riquelme, C., E-mail: c-riquelme@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Bonafé, A., E-mail: a-bonafe@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neuroradiology, Montpellier (France); Arquizan, C., E-mail: c-arquizan@chu-montpellier.fr [CHU Montpellier, Neurology, Montpellier (France)

    2012-12-15

    Background and aims: New thrombectomy devices allow successful and rapid recanalization in acute ischemic stroke. Nevertheless prognostics factors need to be systematically analyzed in the context of these new therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to analyze prognostic factors related to clinical outcome following Solitaire FR thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. Methods: Fifty consecutive ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion were included. Three treatment strategies were applied; rescue therapy, combined therapy, and standalone thrombectomy. DWI ASPECT score < 5 was the main exclusion criterion after initial MRI (T2, T2*, TOF, FLAIR, DWI). Sexes, age, time to recanalization were prospectively collected. Clinical outcome was assessed post treatment, day one and discharge by means of a NIHSS. Three months mRS evaluation was performed by an independent neurologist. The probability of good outcome at 3 months was assessed by forward stepwise logistic regression using baseline NIHSS score, Glasgow score at entrance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, blood–brain barrier disruption on post-operative CT, embolic and hemorrhagic post procedural complication, ischemic brain lesion extension on 24 h imaging, NIHSS at discharge, ASPECT score, and time to recanalization. All variables significantly associated with the outcome in the univariate analysis were entered in the model. The significance of adding or removing a variable from the logistic model was determined by the maximum likelihood ratio test. Odds-ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: At 3 months 54% of patients had a mRS 0–2, 70% in MCA, 44% in ICA, and 43% in BA with an overall mortality rate of 12%. Baseline NIHSS score (p = 0.001), abnormal Glasgow score at entrance (p = 0.053) hyperglycemia (p = 0.023), dyslipidemia (p = 0.031), blood–brain barrier disruption (p = 0.022), embolic and hemorrhagic post procedural complication, ischemic brain lesion

  3. Adherence of physical therapy with clinical practice guidelines for the rehabilitation of stroke in an active inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M S, Ajimsha; Kooven, Smithesh; Al-Mudahka, Noora

    2018-03-09

    Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to help practitioners and patients to make decisions about appropriate health care. Clinical practice guideline adherence analysis is the best way to fine tune the best practices in a health care industry with international benchmarks. To assess the physical therapist's adherence to structured stroke clinical practice guidelines in an active inpatient rehabilitation center in Qatar. Department of Physical therapy in the stroke rehabilitation tertiary referral hospital in Qatar. A retrospective chart audit was performed on the clinical records of 216 stroke patients discharged from the active inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit with a diagnosis of stroke in 2016. The audit check list was structured to record the adherence of the assessment, goal settings and the management domains as per the "Physical Therapy After Acute Stroke" (PAAS) guideline. Of the 216 case files identified during the initial search, 127 files were ultimately included in the audit. Overall adherence to the clinical practice guideline was 71%, a comparable rate with the studies analyzing the same in various international health care facilities. Domains which were shared by interdisciplinary teams than managed by physical therapy alone and treatments utilizing sophisticated technology had lower adherence with the guideline. A detailed strength and weakness breakdown were then conducted. This audit provides an initial picture of the current adherence of physical therapy assessment and management with the stroke physical therapy guideline at a tertiary rehabilitation hospital in the state of Qatar. An evaluation of the guideline adherence and practice variations helps to fine tune the physical therapy care to a highest possible standard of practice. Implications for Rehabilitation  • An evaluation of the guideline adherence and practice variations helps to fine tune the rehabilitation care to the highest possible standard

  4. Clinical and echocardiographic predictors of mortality in acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talal Dahhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of adding quantitative assessments of cardiac function from echocardiography to clinical factors in predicting the outcome of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE. Methods Patients with a diagnosis of acute PE, based on a positive ventilation perfusion scan or computed tomography (CT chest angiogram, were identified using the Duke University Hospital Database. Of these, 69 had echocardiograms within 24–48 h of the diagnosis that were suitable for offline analysis. Clinical features that were analyzed included age, gender, body mass index, vital signs and comorbidities. Echocardiographic parameters that were analyzed included left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (EF, regional, free wall and global RV speckle-tracking strain, RV fraction area change (RVFAC, Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE, pulmonary artery acceleration time (PAAT and RV myocardial performance (Tei index. Univariable and multivariable regression statistical analysis models were used. Results Out of 69 patients with acute PE, the median age was 55 and 48 % were female. The median body mass index (BMI was 27 kg/m2. Twenty-nine percent of the cohort had a history of cancer, with a significant increase in cancer prevalence in non-survivors (57 % vs 29 %, p = 0.02. Clinical parameters including heart rate, respiratory rate, troponin T level, active malignancy, hypertension and COPD were higher among non-survivors when compared to survivors (p ≤ 0.05. Using univariable analysis, NYHA class III symptoms, hypoxemia on presentation, tachycardia, tachypnea, elevation in Troponin T, absence of hypertension, active malignancy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD were increased in non-survivors compared to survivors (p ≤ 0.05. In multivariable models, RV Tei Index, global and free (lateral wall RVLS were found to be negatively associated with survival probability after

  5. "Clinical-CT mismatch" and the response to systemic thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David M; Hill, Michael D; Ruthazer, Robin; Coutts, Shelagh B; Demchuk, Andrew M; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Wunderlich, Olaf; von Kummer, Rudiger

    2005-08-01

    Mismatch between clinical deficits and imaging lesions in acute stroke has been proposed as a method of identifying patients who have hypoperfused but still have viable brain, and may be especially apt to respond to reperfusion therapy. We explored this hypothesis using a combined database including 4 major clinical trials of intravenous (IV) thrombolytic therapy. To determine what the radiological correlates of a "matched" functional deficit are, we calculated the relationship between the ASPECT score of the 24-hour (follow-up) CT scan and the 24-hour National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on the subsample with ASPECT scores performed at this time (n=820). Based on this empirical relationship, we computed the absolute difference between the observed baseline ASPECT score and the "expected" score (ie, matched) based on baseline NIHSS for all patients (n=2131). We tested whether patients with better than expected baseline ASPECTS were more likely to benefit from IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activation (rtPA). At 24 hours, there was a strong, linear, negative correlation between NIHSS and ASPECTS (r2=0.33, P<0.0001); on average, an increase of 10 points on NIHSS corresponded to a decrease of approximately 3 points on ASPECTS. At baseline, the average degree of mismatch between the observed and "expected" ASPECTS was 2.1 points (interquartile range, 1.0 to 3.4). However, multiple analyses failed to reveal a consistent relationship between the degree of clinical-CT mismatch at baseline and a patient's likelihood of benefiting from IV rtPA. Clinical-CT mismatch using ASPECT scoring does not reliably identify patients more or less likely to benefit from IV rtPA.

  6. Clinical Outcome And Arginine Serum of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Supplemented by Snakehead Fish Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudjonarko, Dwi; Retnaningsih; Abidin, Zainal

    2018-02-01

    Background: Levels of arginine associated with clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Arginine is a protein needed to synthesis nitric oxide (NO), a potential vasodilator and antioxidant. Snakehead fish is a source of protein which has antioxidant activity. Snakehead fish contains mineral, vitamin, and amino acids. One of the amino acids that were found quite high in snakehead fish extract is arginine. The aim of this study was done to determine the effect of snakehead fish extracts (SFE) on serum arginin levels and clinical outcome of AIS patients. Methods: It was double-blind randomized pretest-posttest control group design, with. AIS patients were divided into two groups i.e. snakehead fish extracts (SFE) and control. SFE group were administered 15 grams SFE for 7 days . Arginine serum levels and clinical outcome (measured by National Institute of Health Stroke Scale = NIHSS) were measured before and after treatment, other related factors were also analyzed in Logistic regression. Results: A total of 42 subjects who were performed random allocation as SFE or control group. There was no differences in subject characteristics between the two groups. There was a differences Δ arginine serum levels between SFE and control (33.6±19.95 μmol/L 0.3±2.51 μmol/L p<0.001). Change in NIHSS score in SFE improved significantly compared to the control group (4.14 ± 2.03; 2.52 ± 1.81;p=0.009 ). Logistic regression analysis showed only female gender factor that affected on improvement of NIHSS (OR=7; p=0,01). Conclusion: There is Clinical outcome improvement and enhancement of arginine serum levels in AIS patient with snakehead fish extract supplementation.

  7. Trends for coronary heart disease and stroke mortality among migrants in England and Wales, 1979-2003: slow declines notable for some groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, S; Rosato, M; Teyhan, A

    2008-04-01

    To examine trends in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in migrants to England and Wales. Cross-sectional. Age-standardised and sex-specific death rates and rate ratios 1979-83, 1989-93 and 1999-2003. Coronary mortality fell among migrants, more so in the second decade than the first. Rate ratios for coronary mortality remained higher for men and women from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and South Asia, and lower for men from Jamaica, other Caribbean countries, West Africa, Italy and Spain. Rate ratios increased for men from Jamaica (1979-83: 0.45, 0.40 to 0.50; 1999-2003: 0.81, 0.73 to 0.90), Pakistan (1979-83: 1.14, 1.04 to 1.25; 1999-2003: 1.93, 1.81 to 2.06), Bangladesh (1979-83: 1.36, 1.15 to 1.60; 1999-2003: 2.11, 1.90 to 2.34), Republic of Ireland (1979-1983: 1.18, 1.15 to 1.21; 1999-2003: 1.45, 1.39 to 1.52) and Poland (1979-83: 1.17, 1.09 to 1.25; 1999-2003: 1.97, 1.57 to 2.47), and for women from Jamaica (1979-83: 0.63, 0.52 to 0.77; 1999-2003: 1.23, 1.06 to 1.42) and Pakistan (1979-83: 1.14, 0.88 to 1.47; 1999-2003: 2.45, 2.19 to 2.74), owing to smaller declines in death rates than those born in England and Wales. Rate ratios for stroke mortality remained higher for migrants. As a result of smaller declines, rate ratios increased for men from Pakistan (1979-1983: 0.99, 0.76 to 1.29; 1999-2003: 1.58, 1.35 to 1.85), Scotland (1979-1983: 1.11, 1.04 to 1.19; 1999-2003: 1.30, 1.19 to 1.42) and Republic of Ireland (1979-1983: 1.27, 1.19 to 1.36; 1999-2003: 1.67, 1.52 to 1.84). For groups with higher mortality than people born in England and Wales, mortality remained higher. Smaller declines led to increasing disparities for some groups and to excess coronary mortality for women from Jamaica. Maximising the coverage of prevention and treatment programmes is critical.

  8. Dependence of the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy at ischemic stroke from clinical and paraclinical predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Іванна Михайлівна Мельнічек

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work. The aim of the work is an assessment of informativeness of several clinical and paraclinical predictors in prognostics of the results of effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy at the most acute period of ishemic stroke with the further definition of the most significant ones for achieving the least neurologic deficiency.Methods of research: There were retrospectively considered 61 patients 60,5±7,8 years old with ishemic stroket who sucsessfully underwent thrombolytic therapy as an intravenous administration of Actilyse. These patients demonstrated the next factors of gemostasis: prothrombin time, prothrombin index, fibrinogen. For the research there were also used the scales of neurological deficiency activisation (Rankin and NIHSS; ultrasound of the magistral arteries and extracranial CT of brain; methods of mathematical statistics (the definition of chances and confidence intervals ratio, Pirson and Student criteria, verification of hypothesis about the law of distribution and equality of the mean values in the both samplings.Results. There were defined the most informative factors in prognostication of the good result after thrombolytic therapy. There was formed the list of output factors that the results of actilyse thrombolytic therapy effectiveness in Lviv region are depending on. There was grounded the necessity of laboratory data monitoring in patients with stroke for receiving the best results of thrombolytic therapy.There was established that thrombolytic therapy of ishemic stroke must begin as early as possible (in computed tomography department if possible for receiving the maximal effectiveness. There was detected that ultrasound of magistral vessels that supply brain with blood is necessary for all patients who are candidates for thrombolytic therapy because the stenosis of the vessel lumen more than 60 % significantly worsens an effectiveness of treatment

  9. Estimating Fugl-Meyer clinical scores in stroke survivors using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Din, Silvia; Patel, Shyamal; Cobelli, Claudio; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Clinical assessment scales to evaluate motor abilities in stroke survivors could be used to individualize rehabilitation interventions thus maximizing motor gains. Unfortunately, these scales are not widely utilized in clinical practice because their administration is excessively time-consuming. Wearable sensors could be relied upon to address this issue. Sensor data could be unobtrusively gathered during the performance of motor tasks. Features extracted from the sensor data could provide the input to models designed to estimate the severity of motor impairments and functional limitations. In previous work, we showed that wearable sensor data collected during the performance of items of the Wolf Motor Function Test (a clinical scale designed to assess functional capability) can be used to estimate scores derived using the Functional Ability Scale, a clinical scale focused on quality of movement. The purpose of the study herein presented was to investigate whether the same dataset could be used to estimate clinical scores derived using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (a clinical scale designed to assess motor impairments). Our results showed that Fugl-Meyer Assessment Test scores can be estimated by feeding a Random Forest with features derived from wearable sensor data recorded during the performance of as few as a single item of the Wolf Motor Function Test. Estimates achieved using the proposed method were marked by a root mean squared error as low as 4.7 points of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Test scale.

  10. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage: Clinical and computed tomography findings in predicting in-hospital mortality in Central Africans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Lelo Tshikwela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH constitutes now 52% of all strokes. Despite of its deadly pattern, locally there is no clinical grading scale for ICH-related mortality prediction. The first objective of this study was to develop a risk stratification scale (Kinshasa ICH score by assessing the strength of independent predictors and their association with in-hospital 30-day mortality. The second objective of the study was to create a specific local and African model for ICH prognosis. Materials and Methods: Age, sex, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, smoking, alcohol intake, and neuroimaging data from CT scan (ICH volume, Midline shift of patients admitted with primary ICH and follow-upped in 33 hospitals of Kinshasa, DR Congo, from 2005 to 2008, were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: A total of 185 adults and known hypertensive patients (140 men and 45 women were examined. 30-day mortality rate was 35% (n=65. ICH volume>25 mL (OR=8 95% CI: 3.1-20.2; P 7 mm, a consequence of ICH volume, was also a significant predictor of mortality. The Kinshasa ICH score was the sum of individual points assigned as follows: Presence of coma coded 2 (2 × 2 = 4, absence of coma coded 1 (1 × 2 = 2, ICH volume>25 mL coded 2 (2 × 2=4, ICH volume of ≤25 mL coded 1(1 × 2=2, left hemispheric site of ICH coded 2 (2 × 1=2, and right hemispheric site of hemorrhage coded 1(1 × 1 = 1. All patients with Kinshasa ICH score ≤7 survived and the patients with a score >7 died. In considering sex influence (Model 3, points were allowed as follows: Presence of coma (2 × 3 = 6, absence of coma (1 × 3 = 3, men (2 × 2 = 4, women (1 × 2 = 2, midline shift ≤7 mm (1 × 3 = 3, and midline shift >7 mm (2 × 3 = 6. Patients who died had the Kinshasa ICH score ≥16. Conclusion: In this study, the Kinshasa ICH score seems to be an accurate method for distinguishing those ICH patients who need continuous and special management

  11. The cost of first-ever stroke in Valle d’Aosta, Italy: linking clinical registries and administrative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottacchi Edo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the most relevant reasons of death and disability worldwide. Many cost of illness studies have been performed to evaluate direct and indirect costs of ischaemic stroke, especially within the first year after the acute episode, using different methodologies. Methods We conducted a longitudinal, retrospective, bottom-up cost of illness study, to evaluate clinical and economic outcomes of a cohort of patients affected by a first cerebrovascular event, including subjects with ischaemic, haemorrhagic or transient episodes. The analysis intended to detect direct costs, within 1, 2 and 3 years from the index event. Clinical patient data collected in regional disease registry were integrated and linked to regional administrative databases to perform the analysis. Results The analysis of costs within the first year from the index event included 800 patients. The majority of patients (71.5% were affected by ischaemic stroke. Overall, per patient costs were €7,079. Overall costs significantly differ according to the type of stroke, with costs for haemorrhagic stroke and ischaemic stroke amounting to €9,044 and €7,289. Hospital costs, including inpatient rehabilitation, were driver of expenditure, accounting for 89.5% of total costs. The multiple regression model showed that sex, level of physical disability and level of neurological deficit predict direct healthcare costs within 1 year. The analysis at 2 and 3 years (per patient costs: €7,901 and €8,874, respectively showed that majority of costs are concentrated in the first months after the acute event. Conclusions This cost analysis highlights the importance to set up significant prevention programs to reduce the economic burden of stroke, which is mostly attributable to hospital and inpatient rehabilitation costs immediately after the acute episode. Although some limitation typical of retrospective analyses the approach of linking clinical and

  12. Perioperative mortality in cats and dogs undergoing spay or castration at a high-volume clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J K; Bard, K M; Tucker, S J; Diskant, P D; Dingman, P A

    2017-06-01

    High volume spay-neuter (spay-castration) clinics have been established to improve population control of cats and dogs to reduce the number of animals admitted to and euthanazed in animal shelters. The rise in the number of spay-neuter clinics in the USA has been accompanied by concern about the quality of animal care provided in high volume facilities, which focus on minimally invasive, time saving techniques, high throughput and simultaneous management of multiple animals under various stages of anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine perioperative mortality for cats and dogs in a high volume spay-neuter clinic in the USA. Electronic medical records and a written mortality log were used to collect data for 71,557 cats and 42,349 dogs undergoing spay-neuter surgery from 2010 to 2016 at a single high volume clinic in Florida. Perioperative mortality was defined as deaths occurring in the 24h period starting with the administration of the first sedation or anesthetic drugs. Perioperative mortality was reported for 34 cats and four dogs for an overall mortality of 3.3 animals/10,000 surgeries (0.03%). The risk of mortality was more than twice as high for females (0.05%) as for males (0.02%) (P=0.008) and five times as high for cats (0.05%) as for dogs (0.009%) (P=0.0007). High volume spay-neuter surgery was associated with a lower mortality rate than that previously reported in low volume clinics, approaching that achieved in human surgery. This is likely to be due to the young, healthy population of dogs and cats, and the continuous refinement of techniques based on experience and the skills and proficiency of teams that specialize in a limited spectrum of procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stem cell-based treatments against stroke: observations from human proof-of-concept studies and considerations regarding clinical applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Roland Doeppner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke remains a heavy burden for industrialized countries. The only causal therapy is the recanalization of occluded vessels via thrombolysis, which due to a narrow time window still can be offered only to a minority of patients. Since the majority of patients continues to exhibit neurological deficits even following successful thrombolysis, restorative therapies are urgently needed that promote brain remodeling and repair once stroke injury has occurred. Due to their unique properties of action, stem cell-based strategies gained increasing interest during recent years. Using various stroke models in both rodents and primates, the transplantation of stem cells, namely of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or neural progenitor cells (NPCs, has been shown to promote neurological recovery most likely via indirect bystander actions. In view of promising observations, clinical proof-of-concept studies are currently under way, in which effects of stem and precursor cells are evaluated in human stroke patients. In this review we summarize already published studies, which due to the broad experience in other medical contexts mostly employed bone marrow-derived MSCs by means of intravenous transplantation. With the overall number of clinical trials limited in number, only a fraction of these studies used non-treated control groups, and only single studies were adequately blinded. Despite these limitations, first promising results justify the need for more elaborate clinical trials in order to make stem cell transplantation a success for stroke treatment in the future.

  14. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) offer unique insight into acute ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These techniques may offer the ability to apply pathophysiology to accurately individualize acute stroke reperfusion treatment, including ...

  15. Safety and Efficacy of MLC601 in Iranian Patients after Stroke: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Harandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the safety and efficacy of MLC601 (NeuroAid as a traditional Chinese medicine on motor recovery after ischemic stroke. Methods. This study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on 150 patients with a recent (less than 1 month ischemic stroke. All patients were given either MLC601 (100 patients or placebo (50 patients, 4 capsules 3 times a day, as an add-on to standard stroke treatment for 3 months. Results. Sex, age, elapsed time from stroke onset, and risk factors in the treatment group were not significantly different from placebo group at baseline (P>.05. Repeated measures analysis showed that Fugl-Meyer assessment was significantly higher in the treatment group during 12 weeks after stroke (P<.001. Good tolerability to treatment was shown, and adverse events were mild and transient. Conclusion. MLC601 showed better motor recovery than placebo and was safe on top of standard ischemic stroke medications especially in the severe and moderate cases.

  16. Infant mortality and prenatal care: contributions of the clinic in the light of Canguilhem and Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Paula Pereira de; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Pimpão, Fernanda Demutti

    2012-01-01

    This review study aimed to verify how studies conducted in Brazil have related infant mortality to prenatal care and to present contributions of the clinic in the light of Canguilhem and Foucault for qualification of the care. An integrative literature review was conducted from searches in the databases SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE and BDENF for the period 2000 to 2009. The relationship between infant mortality and prenatal care is related to the insufficient number of consultations or to the quality of the care provided. Even when the number of and routine consultations in the prenatal care were adequate, avoidable deaths were present. For the qualification of prenatal care, it is suggested that the clinical knowledge and other elements that comprise the process of human living are considered, in order that the clinical view is enlarged and articulated to the technologies available in the health system and, together, they are able to contribute to the reduction of infant mortality in Brazil.

  17. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  18. Do knowledge brokers facilitate implementation of the stroke guideline in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Mia; Schröder, Carin; Post, Marcel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Visser-Meily, Anne

    2013-10-23

    The implementation of clinical practice guidelines in rehabilitation practice is often troublesome and incomplete. An intervention to enhance the implementation of guidelines is the knowledge transfer program built around the activities of a knowledge broker (KB).This study investigates the use of KBs to implement guideline recommendations for intensive therapy and physical activity for patients post-stroke in 22 stroke units in hospitals and rehabilitation centers in The Netherlands. This study includes a quantitative evaluation with a non controlled pre-post intervention design and a mixed methods process evaluation. From each stroke unit, enterprising nurses and therapists will be recruited and trained as KB. The KB will work for one year on the implementation of the guideline recommendations in their team. To evaluate the effectiveness of the KB, a questionnaire will be administered to patients, health professionals and KBs at baseline (T0) and after one year (T1). Furthermore, semi structured interviews with 5 KBs will be performed at T1.The primary outcome of this implementation project will be the support health professionals give patients to exercise and be physically active, as reported by patients and health professionals themselves. The support immediately after the intervention is compared with the support at the start of the intervention.Additionally we will explore the influence of socio-demographic characteristics of health professionals and determinants identified in the Theory of Planned Behavior (intention, attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control) on the change of supportive behavior of health professionals. Finally, KBs will complete a questionnaire on their own psychological and social demographic characteristics and on organizational conditions needed for health-care improvement such as time, workforce, sponsoring and support from management. With this study we will gain insight in when and why knowledge brokers seem to be

  19. Computerised mirror therapy with Augmented Reflection Technology for early stroke rehabilitation: clinical feasibility and integration as an adjunct therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Simon; Ferreira Dos Santos, Luara; Morkisch, Nadine; Jettkowski, Katrin; Sillis, Moran; Devan, Hemakumar; Kanagasabai, Parimala S; Schmidt, Henning; Krüger, Jörg; Dohle, Christian; Regenbrecht, Holger; Hale, Leigh; Cutfield, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    New rehabilitation strategies for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation employing visual stimulation show promising results, however, cost-efficient and clinically feasible ways to provide these interventions are still lacking. An integral step is to translate recent technological advances, such as in virtual and augmented reality, into therapeutic practice to improve outcomes for patients. This requires research on the adaptation of the technology for clinical use as well as on the appropriate guidelines and protocols for sustainable integration into therapeutic routines. Here, we present and evaluate a novel and affordable augmented reality system (Augmented Reflection Technology, ART) in combination with a validated mirror therapy protocol for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. We evaluated components of the therapeutic intervention, from the patients' and the therapists' points of view in a clinical feasibility study at a rehabilitation centre. We also assessed the integration of ART as an adjunct therapy for the clinical rehabilitation of subacute patients at two different hospitals. The results showed that the combination and application of the Berlin Protocol for Mirror Therapy together with ART was feasible for clinical use. This combination was integrated into the therapeutic plan of subacute stroke patients at the two clinical locations where the second part of this research was conducted. Our findings pave the way for using technology to provide mirror therapy in clinical settings and show potential for the more effective use of inpatient time and enhanced recoveries for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Computerised Mirror Therapy is feasible for clinical use Augmented Reflection Technology can be integrated as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention for subacute stroke patients in an inpatient setting Virtual Rehabilitation devices such as Augmented Reflection Technology have considerable potential to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

  20. Correction: PAIS: paracetamol (acetaminophen in stroke; protocol for a randomized, double blind clinical trial. [ISCRTN74418480

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kappelle L Jaap

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen In Stroke (PAIS study is a phase III multicenter, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of high-dose acetaminophen in patients with acute stroke. The trial compares treatment with a daily dose of 6 g acetaminophen, started within 12 hours after the onset of symptoms, with matched placebo. The purpose of this study is to assess whether treatment with acetaminophen for 3 days will result in improved functional outcome through a modest reduction in body temperature and prevention of fever. The previously planned statistical analysis based on a dichotomization of the scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS may not make the most efficient use of the available baseline information. Therefore, the planned primary analysis of the PAIS study has been changed from fixed dichotomization of the mRS to a sliding dichotomy analysis. Methods Instead of taking a single definition of good outcome for all patients, the definition is tailored to each individual patient's baseline prognosis on entry into the trial. Conclusion The protocol change was initiated because of both advances in statistical approaches and to increase the efficiency of the trial by improving statistical power. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials [ISCRTN74418480

  1. Brain Stroke Detection by Microwaves Using Prior Information from Clinical Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Irishina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave tomographic imaging is an inexpensive, noninvasive modality of media dielectric properties reconstruction which can be utilized as a screening method in clinical applications such as breast cancer and brain stroke detection. For breast cancer detection, the iterative algorithm of structural inversion with level sets provides well-defined boundaries and incorporates an intrinsic regularization, which permits to discover small lesions. However, in case of brain lesion, the inverse problem is much more difficult due to the skull, which causes low microwave penetration and highly noisy data. In addition, cerebral liquid has dielectric properties similar to those of blood, which makes the inversion more complicated. Nevertheless, the contrast in the conductivity and permittivity values in this situation is significant due to blood high dielectric values compared to those of surrounding grey and white matter tissues. We show that using brain MRI images as prior information about brain's configuration, along with known brain dielectric properties, and the intrinsic regularization by structural inversion, allows successful and rapid stroke detection even in difficult cases. The method has been applied to 2D slices created from a database of 3D real MRI phantom images to effectively detect lesions larger than 2.5 × 10−2 m diameter.

  2. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  3. Quality of Acute Care and Long-Term Quality of Life and Survival: The Australian Stroke Clinical Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Andrew, Nadine E; Lannin, Natasha A; Middleton, Sandy; Levi, Christopher R; Dewey, Helen M; Grabsch, Brenda; Faux, Steve; Hill, Kelvin; Grimley, Rohan; Wong, Andrew; Sabet, Arman; Butler, Ernest; Bladin, Christopher F; Bates, Timothy R; Groot, Patrick; Castley, Helen; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainty exists over whether quality improvement strategies translate into better health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and survival after acute stroke. We aimed to determine the association of best practice recommended interventions and outcomes after stroke. Data are from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry during 2010 to 2014. Multivariable regression was used to determine associations between 3 interventions: received acute stroke unit (ASU) care and in various combinations with prescribed antihypertensive medication at discharge, provision of a discharge care plan, and outcomes of survival and HRQoL (EuroQoL 5-dimensional questionnaire visual analogue scale) at 180 days, by stroke type. An assessment was also made of outcomes related to the number of processes patients received. There were 17 585 stroke admissions (median age 77 years, 47% female; 81% managed in ASUs; 80% ischemic stroke) from 42 hospitals (77% metropolitan) assessed. Cumulative benefits on outcomes related to the number of care processes received by patients. ASU care was associated with a reduced likelihood of death (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.56) and better HRQoL (coefficient, 21.34; 95% confidence interval, 15.50-27.18) within 180 days. For those discharged from hospital, receiving ASU+antihypertensive medication provided greater 180-day survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.52) compared with ASU care alone (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.76). HRQoL gains were greatest for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage who received care bundles involving discharge processes (range of increase, 11%-19%). Patients with stroke who receive best practice recommended hospital care have improved long-term survival and HRQoL. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. [Nutrition for elderly acute stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Lisa; Iversen, Per Ole; Hauge, Truls

    2008-09-11

    Elderly people have an increased risk of malnutrition due to biological and physiological changes and underlying disease. Almost 90% of the stroke patients are older than 65 years, and the consequences of acute stroke may lead to additional nutritional problems. This paper reviews nutritional therapy for stroke patients. PubMed was searched (non-systematically) for prospective cohort studies of occurrence, diagnostics and consequences of undernutrition in stroke patients. Randomized trials were examined to identify clinical effects of oral protein and energy supplements or tube feeding on nutritional status and intake, functional status, infections, length of stay, quality of life and mortality. 8-35% of stroke patients are undernourished. Body weight is one of the most important parameters for assessment of nutritional status. Dysphagia occurs in up to 80% of patients with acute stroke and increases the risk of undernutrition, which again leads to prolonged length of stay, reduced functional status and poorer survival. Early nasogastric tube feeding does not increase the risk of pneumonia and may improve survival after six months. Oral supplements lead to a significantly improved nutritional intake in undernourished stroke patients, as well as improved nutritional status and survival in undernourished elderly. Nutritional treatment can improve the clinical outcome after an acute stroke, provided that there are good procedures for follow-up and monitoring of the treatment.

  5. Predictors of mortality and differences in clinical features among patients with Cryptococcosis according to immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizendine, Kyle D; Baddley, John W; Pappas, Peter G

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an invasive fungal infection causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Prognostic factors are largely derived from trials conducted prior to the modern era of antifungal and potent combination antiretroviral therapies, immunosuppression, and transplantation. Data describing the clinical features and predictors of mortality in a modern cohort are needed. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients at our institution diagnosed with cryptococcosis from 1996 through 2010. Data included demographics, clinical features, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. We identified 302 individuals: 108 (36%) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, 84 (28%) organ transplant recipients (OTRs), and 110 (36%) non-HIV, non-transplant (NHNT) patients including 39 with no identifiable immunodeficiency. Mean age was 49 years, 203 (67%) were male and 170 (56%) were white. All-cause mortality at 90 days was 21%. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, cryptococcemia (OR 5.09, 95% CI 2.54-10.22) and baseline opening pressure >25 cmH2O (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.25-6.88) were associated with increased odds of mortality; HIV-positive patients (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.19-1.16) and OTRs (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.21-1.05) had lower odds of death compared to NHNT patients. Predictors of mortality from cryptococcosis in the modern period include cryptococcemia, high intracranial pressure, and NHNT status while drug(s) used for induction and historical prognostic factors including organ failure syndromes and hematologic malignancy were not associated with mortality.

  6. The sigmoid volvulus: surgical timing and mortality for different clinical types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spizzirri Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In western countries intestinal obstruction caused by sigmoid volvulus is rare and its mortality remains significant in patients with late diagnosis. The aim of this work is to assess what is the correct surgical timing and how the prognosis changes for the different clinical types. Methods We realized a retrospective clinical study including all the patients treated for sigmoid volvulus in the Department of General Surgery, St Maria Hospital, Terni, from January 1996 till January 2009. We selected 23 patients and divided them in 2 groups on the basis of the clinical onset: patients with clear clinical signs of obstruction and patients with subocclusive symptoms. We focused on 30-day postoperative mortality in relation to the surgical timing and procedure performed for each group. Results In the obstruction group mortality rate was 44% and it concerned only the patients who had clinical signs and symptoms of peritonitis and that were treated with a sigmoid resection (57%. Conversely none of the patients treated with intestinal derotation and colopexy died. In the subocclusive group mortality was 35% and it increased up to 50% in those patients with a late diagnosis who underwent a sigmoid resection. Conclusions The mortality of patients affected by sigmoid volvulus is related to the disease stage, prompt surgical timing, functional status of the patient and his collaboration with the clinicians in the pre-operative decision making process. Mortality is higher in both obstructed patients with generalized peritonitis and patients affected by subocclusion with late diagnosis and surgical treatment; in both scenarios a Hartmann's procedure is the proper operation to be considered.

  7. Stroke and methamphetamine use in young adults: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Julia M; Darke, Shane; Farrell, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Methamphetamine use and stroke are significant public health problems. Strokes among people aged below 45 years are much less common than in older age groups but have significant mortality and morbidity. Methamphetamine is a putative cause of strokes among younger people. A review of methamphetamine-related strokes was conducted. Bibliographic databases were searched until February 2017 for articles related to methamphetamine and stroke. Both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes were considered. Of 370 articles screened, 77 were selected for inclusion. There were 81 haemorrhagic and 17 ischaemic strokes reported in case reports and series. Both types were approximately twice as common in males. Route of administration associated with haemorrhagic stroke was typically oral or injecting, but for ischaemic stroke inhalation was most common. Haemorrhagic stroke was associated with vascular abnormalities in a third of cases. One quarter of individuals completely recovered, and a third died following haemorrhagic stroke. One-fifth completely recovered, and one-fifth died following ischaemic stroke. There is a preponderance of haemorrhagic strokes associated with methamphetamine use in young people, and methamphetamine-related stroke is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Mechanisms of methamphetamine-associated stroke include hypertension, vasculitis, direct vascular toxicity and vasospasm. In a period of rising worldwide methamphetamine use, the incidence of methamphetamine-related stroke will increase, with a consequent increase in the burden of disease contributed by such events. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. The role of chronic kidney disease and atrial fibrillation on outcomes of ischaemic stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahsan A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    and diabetes mellitus lead to impairment of renal function and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, CKD is increasingly prevalent in the elderly population and is an independent predictor of stroke recurrence, mortality and poor clinical outcomes after acute ischaemic stroke (1). This article...

  9. Efficacy of keishibukuryogan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, in treating cold sensation and numbness after stroke: clinical improvement and skin temperature normalization in 22 stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Keishi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Cold sensation and numbness have been reported as post-stroke sensory sequelae attributable to distal axonopathy, which is caused by chronic ischemia of diseased limbs resulting from dysfunction of vasomotor regulatory systems. Keishibukuryogan is a traditional herbal medicine used to treat symptoms of peripheral ischemia such as cold extremities. This study investigated clinical improvement and skin temperature in peripheral ischemia patients to determine the efficacy of keishibukuryogan in alleviating post-stroke cold sensation and numbness. Twenty-two stroke patients with cold sensation and/or numbness were enrolled in this study. Subjective cold sensation and numbness, evaluated using the visual analogue scale, were found in 21 and 31 limbs, respectively. The skin temperature of diseased and healthy limbs was recorded. We observed all patients for 4 weeks and 17 patients for 8 weeks after administration of keishibukuryogan. The skin temperature of diseased limbs was significantly higher than baseline at 4 weeks and 8 weeks, whereas that of healthy limbs did not change significantly. Cold sensation and numbness were significantly improved at 4 weeks and 8 weeks compared to baseline. Keishibukuryogan administration resulted in warming of diseased limbs and improved cold sensation and numbness, probably by increasing peripheral blood flow.

  10. A knowledge translation intervention to enhance clinical application of a virtual reality system in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Glegg, Stephanie M N; Sveistrup, Heidi; Colquhoun, Heather; Miller, Patricia A; Finestone, Hillel; DePaul, Vincent; Harris, Jocelyn E; Velikonja, Diana

    2016-10-06

    Despite increasing evidence for the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR)-based therapy in stroke rehabilitation, few knowledge translation (KT) resources exist to support clinical integration. KT interventions addressing known barriers and facilitators to VR use are required. When environmental barriers to VR integration are less amenable to change, KT interventions can target modifiable barriers related to therapist knowledge and skills. A multi-faceted KT intervention was designed and implemented to support physical and occupational therapists in two stroke rehabilitation units in acquiring proficiency with use of the Interactive Exercise Rehabilitation System (IREX; GestureTek). The KT intervention consisted of interactive e-learning modules, hands-on workshops and experiential practice. Evaluation included the Assessing Determinants of Prospective Take Up of Virtual Reality (ADOPT-VR) Instrument and self-report confidence ratings of knowledge and skills pre- and post-study. Usability of the IREX was measured with the System Usability Scale (SUS). A focus group gathered therapist experiences. Frequency of IREX use was recorded for 6 months post-study. Eleven therapists delivered a total of 107 sessions of VR-based therapy to 34 clients with stroke. On the ADOPT-VR, significant pre-post improvements in therapist perceived behavioral control (p = 0.003), self-efficacy (p = 0.005) and facilitating conditions (p =0.019) related to VR use were observed. Therapist intention to use VR did not change. Knowledge and skills improved significantly following e-learning completion (p = 0.001) and was sustained 6 months post-study. Below average perceived usability of the IREX (19 th percentile) was reported. Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to VR use. A decrease in frequency of perceived barriers to VR use was not significant (p = 0.159). Two therapists used the IREX sparingly in the 6 months following the study. Therapists reported

  11. Selecting relevant and feasible measurement instruments for the revised Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, Nicoline; Veerbeek, Janne; Schiemanck, Sven; van der Wees, Philip; Nollet, Frans; Kwakkel, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To select relevant and feasible instruments for the revision of the Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients with stroke. Methods: In this implementation study a comprehensive proposal for ICF categories and matching instruments was developed, based on reliability

  12. Selecting relevant and feasible measurement instruments for the revised Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, N.; Veerbeek, J.; Schiemanck, S.; Wees, P.J. van der; Nollet, F.; Kwakkel, G.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To select relevant and feasible instruments for the revision of the Dutch clinical practice guideline for physical therapy in patients with stroke. METHODS: In this implementation study a comprehensive proposal for ICF categories and matching instruments was developed, based on reliability

  13. A clinical study on cognitive impairment in post-ischemic stroke patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relation between metabolic syndrome (MetS and cognitive impairment after ischemic stroke. Methods Ninety-four cases of first ischemic stroke patients were divided into stroke without MetS group (n = 54 and stroke with MetS group (n = 40 according to the diagnostic criteria for MetS defined by Metabolic Syndrome Researching Group of Chinese Diabetes Society. All patients underwent Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, animal Verbal Fluency Test (aVFT, Trial Making Test-A (TMT-A at 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke to evaluate mental state such as verbal learning memory, and executive, attentional and visuospatial abilities. The incidence and development of cognitive impairment were also assessed. Results At 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke, the incidence of cognitive impairment were 24.47% (23/94 and 22.34% (21/94, respectively, and in the cognitive impairment patients the incidence of non-dementia were 21.28% (20/94 and 19.15% (18/94, while the incidence of dementia were 3.19% (3/94 and 3.19% (3/94, respectively. The incidence of cognitive impairment was higher in the stroke patients with MetS than the stroke patients without MetS, 37.50% (15/40 vs 14.81% (8/54 (Z = 2.500, P = 0.012 at 2 weeks after stroke and 35.00% (14/40 vs 12.96% (7/54 (Z = 2.513, P = 0.012 at 3 months after stroke. In the scores of MMSE, delay recall and CDT of the stroke patients with MetS were all lower than those without MetS at 2 weeks after stroke and at 3 months after stroke (P < 0.05, for all. The stroke patients with MetS had more cognition deterioration than the stroke patients without MetS at 3 months after stroke, the difference was significant (Z = 2.134, P = 0.033. Conclusion MetS can increase the incidence of cognitive impairment, especially non-dementia cognitive impairment in post ischemic stroke. Executive dysfunction and hypomnesis are often seen. The development of cognitive impairment in stroke patients

  14. Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality is associated with improved clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, C Barry; Retegan, Claudia; Maddern, Guy J

    2015-11-01

    Improved outcomes are desirable results of clinical audit. The aim of this study was to use data from the Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality (VASM) and the Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED) to highlight specific areas of clinical improvement and reduction in mortality over the duration of the audit process. This study used retrospective, observational data from VASM and VAED. VASM data were reported by participating public and private health services, the Coroner and self-reporting surgeons across Victoria. Aggregated VAED data were supplied by the Victorian Department of Health. Assessment of outcomes was performed using chi-squared trend analysis over successive annual audit periods. Because initial collection of data was incomplete in the recruitment phase, statistical analysis was confined to the last 3-year period, 2010-2013. A 20% reduction in surgical mortality over the past 5 years has been identified from the VAED data. Progressive increase in both surgeon and hospital participation, significant reduction in both errors in management as perceived by assessors and increased direct consultant involvement in cases returned to theatre have been documented. The benefits of VASM are reflected in the association with a reduction of mortality and adverse clinical outcomes, which have clinical and financial benefits. It is a purely educational exercise and continued participation in this audit will ensure the highest standards of surgical care in Australia. This also highlights the valuable collaboration between the Victorian Department of Health and the RACS. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Clinical librarian attendance at general surgery quality of care rounds (Morbidity and Mortality Conference).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Elisa; Englesakis, Marina; Faulkner, Amy; Trojan, Boguslawa; Rotstein, Lorne E; Urbach, David R

    2009-09-01

    Quality of Care rounds, also known as Mortality and Morbidity conferences, are an important and time-honored forum for quality audit in clinical surgery services. The authors created a modification to their hospital's Quality of Care rounds by incorporating a clinical librarian, who assisted residents in conducting literature reviews related to clinical topics discussed during the rounds. The objective of this article is to describe the authors' experience with this intervention. The clinical librarian program has greatly improved the Quality of Care rounds by aiding in literature searches and quality of up-to-date, evidence-based presentations.

  16. Clinical Characteristics of Influenza-Associated Pneumonia of Adults: Clinical Features and Factors Contributing to Severity and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Kagiyama, Naho; Uozumi, Ryuji; Odashima, Kyuto; Takaku, Yotaro; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Takayanagi, Noboru

    2017-06-01

    Background : Pneumonia is a major complication of influenza that contributes to mortality. Clinical characteristics and factors of influenza virus contributing to the severity and mortality of pneumonia have not been fully elucidated. Objective : The objective was to clarify clinical characteristics and factors contributing to the severity and mortality of influenza-associated pneumonia ( flu-p ). Methods : We retrospectively analyzed patients with flu-p . Results : From December 1999 to March 2016, 210 patients with a median age of 69 (range, 17 to 92) years with flu-p based on positive rapid antigen tests, increased antibody titers of paired sera, or positive results of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were admitted to our institution. A multivariate analysis found that advanced age (≥ 65 years), pneumonia subtypes (unclassified), diabetes mellitus, and acute kidney injury complicated with flu-p were independent factors associated with disease severity, whereas pneumonia subtypes (mixed viral and bacterial pneumonia and unclassified), healthcare-associated pneumonia, acute kidney injury complicated with flu-p , and severity on admission (severe) were independent factors associated with non-survival. Conclusion : The clinical characteristics of flu-p are varied, and the contribution of several factors to the severity and mortality of flu-p suggest their importance in either preventing flu-p or managing flu-p after it develops.

  17. Collateral vessels on magnetic resonance angiography in endovascular-treated acute ischemic stroke patients associated with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Su, Hao-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Zhou, Jun-Shan; Geng, Wen; Chen, Huiyou; Xu, Quan; Yin, Xindao; Chen, Yu-Chen

    2017-10-06

    Collateral vessels were considered to be related with outcome in endovascular-treated acute ischemic stroke patients. This study aimed to evaluate whether the collateral vessels on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) could predict the clinical outcome. Acute stroke patients with internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusion within 6 hours of symptom onset were included. All patients underwent MRI and received endovascular treatment. The collateral circulations at the Sylvian fissure and the leptomeningeal convexity were evaluated. The preoperative and postoperative infarct volume was measured. The clinical outcome was evaluated by mRS score at 3 months after stroke. Of 55 patients, Cases with insufficient collateral circulation at the Sylvian fissure and leptomeningeal convexity showed that the NIHSS score at arrival and preoperative infarct volume were significantly lower in mRS score of 0-2 (both P collateral status at the leptomeningeal convexity were independent of the clinical outcome at 3 months after stroke (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.094 (1.025-1.168); 9.542 (1.812-50.245) respectively). The change of infarct volume in the group with mRS score of 0-2 was smaller than that with mRS score of 3-6. While multivariate logistic models showed that postoperative infarct volume was non-significant in predicting the clinical outcome after stroke. The extent of collateral circulation at the leptomeningeal convexity may be useful for predicting the functional recovery while the relationship between postoperative infarct volume and clinical outcome still requires for further study.

  18. Clinical validation of the nursing outcome falls prevention behavior in people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Costa, Alice G; de Araujo, Thelma Leite; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Oliveira Lopes, Marcos V; Oliveira-Kumakura, Ana R de Souza; Chaves Costa, Francisca B

    2017-02-01

    To review the nursing outcome, Fall Prevention Behavior, and clinically validate its indicators in people with stroke. A methodological study performed with 106 patients in two outpatient clinics, from July to September of 2013. Two pairs of trained nurses applied the NOC scale, one with and one without the use of operational definitions. The internal consistency, stability and difference between the medians obtained by nurses were compared within and between pairs. Most participants were men, elderly, with low education and income. Statistically significant differences were noted in twelve indicators. Five indicators had different means that were greater than the least significant difference. The indicators were statistically significant; the internal consistency was similar between the pairs and the intraclass correlation coefficient was more satisfactory in the pair that used the definitions. Thus, the construction of empirical referents and the clinical validation process makes the nursing indicators and outcomes more adequate for specific populations and provides an effective means to better evaluate the nursing actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thrombus length discrepancy on dual-phase CT can predict clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mina; Kim, Kyung-eun; Lee, Seung-Koo; Shin, Na-Young; Lim, Soo Mee; Song, Dongbeom; Heo, Ji Hoe; Kim, Jin Woo; Oh, Se Won

    2016-01-01

    The thrombus length may be overestimated on early arterial computed tomography angiography (CTA) depending on the collateral status. We evaluated the value of a grading system based on the thrombus length discrepancy on dual-phase CT in outcome prediction. Forty-eight acute ischemic stroke patients with M1 occlusion were included. Dual-phase CT protocol encompassed non-contrast enhanced CT, CTA with a bolus tracking technique, and delayed contrast enhanced CT (CECT) performed 40s after contrast injection. The thrombus length discrepancy between CTA and CECT was graded by using a three-point scale: G0 = no difference; G1 = no difference in thrombus length, but in attenuation distal to thrombus; G2 = difference in thrombus length. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to define independent predictors of poor clinical outcome at 3 months. The thrombus discrepancy grade showed significant linear relationships with both the collateral status (P = 0.008) and the presence of antegrade flow on DSA (P = 0.010) with good interobserver agreement (κ = 0.868). In a multivariate model, the presence of thrombus length discrepancy (G2) was an independent predictor of poor clinical outcome [odds ratio = 11.474 (1.350-97.547); P =0.025]. The presence of thrombus length discrepancy on dual-phase CT may be a useful predictor of unfavourable clinical outcome in acute M1 occlusion patients. (orig.)

  20. Post-stroke motor and functional evaluations: a clinical correlation using Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Roberta; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Borges, Guilherme

    2006-09-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral stroke in chronic phase (>6 months post ictus) were evaluated for about one hour. Barthel scale was statistically related to the total motor score of Fugl-Meyer assessment (r=0.597, p=0.005). The lower limb section at Fugl-Meyer had positive correlation with Berg scale (r=0.653, p=0.002) and with the balance section of Fugl-Meyer own scale (r=0.449, p=0.047). Both balance scales were correlated one with other (r=0.555, p=0.011). Statistical divergence appeared when Barthel's Index was correlated with Berg's Scale (r=0.425, p=0.062), and it is not statistically significant. The use of both quantitative and qualitative scales was shown to be a good measuring instrument for the classification of the general clinical performance of the patient, especially when positively related joint evaluations are applied.

  1. Clinical and Imaging Features Associated with an Increased Risk of Late Stroke in Patients with Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, A R; Schroeder, T V; Sillesen, H

    2014-01-01

    /CAS. METHODS: Review of clinical and/or imaging based scoring systems, predictive algorithms and imaging parameters that may be associated with an increased (or decreased) risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid disease. RESULTS: Parameters associated with an increased risk of late stroke include...... intracranial disease. CONCLUSIONS: A number of imaging parameters have been shown to be predictive of an increased risk of late stroke in previously asymptomatic patients. None have been independently validated, but many could easily be evaluated in natural history studies or randomized trials in order......BACKGROUND: The 2011 American Heart Association Guidelines on the management of asymptomatic carotid disease recommends that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) (with carotid artery stenting (CAS) as an alternative) may be considered in highly selected patients with 70-99% stenoses. However, no guidance...

  2. Dead reckoning: can we trust estimates of mortality rates in clinical databases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan, Steve; Stark, Jaroslav; Pagel, Christina; Williams, Gail; Williams, William G

    2008-03-01

    Databases almost invariably contain some errors and improvements to the quality of recorded data are costly. We sought to assess the extent to which given levels of error in a clinical database can lead to misleading mortality rates being derived. We deliberately seeded a large database concerning congenital heart surgery involving over 17,600 operations, which we assumed to be error free, with errors at known rates of 0-20%. The effects of three different types of random error were explored: data omission, outcome miscoding (alive or dead) and the miscoding of procedures. For each error type, we compared the mortality rates calculated from the 'seeded' database to those calculated from the pristine database. Outcome miscoding typically results in overestimated mortality rates which for low-risk procedures may well give estimates over double the true value. Random data omission has relatively little effect. If procedure types are miscoded, procedure-specific mortality estimates for high-risk operations tend to be underestimates and those for low-risk operations overestimates. A mathematical model developed to examine these effects accurately forecasted the results of such error-seeding experiments. Software to implement this model is available free of charge on the Internet. Even small levels of data error can substantially affect the accuracy of mortality rate estimates, especially for low-risk operations. Such inaccuracy could lead to misleading analysis of institutional and individual surgeons' results. Our results suggest that caution is warranted in interpreting the mortality estimates derived from clinical databases. Our analysis goes beyond the realms of surgical mortality and concerns all adverse events whose frequency is rare.

  3. [The clinical characteristics of stroke in young patients with cardiac myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, G F; Bi, Q; Cao, L; Wang, C

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics of stroke in young patients with cardiac myxoma. Methods: Medical records of young patients (aged between 18-44 years) diagnosed with cardiac myxoma in Beijing Anzhen Hospital affiliated to Capital Medical University from January 2005 to March 2016 were retrospective reviewed. Results: A total of 117 cases were included (85 female and 32 male)with the average age (36±7)years old. Most myxomas (83.8%) were located in the left atrium, 7.7% were in the right atrium, 3.5% were in the both atriums, 2.6% were in the left ventricle, and a few were in the left atrium plus left ventricle and in the right ventricle. Of all the patients, 24 (20.5%) (16 women and 8 men) were complicated with cerebral infarction. Among them, 3 patients were with lower extremity arterial embolisms. Two patients were with cerebral hemorrhage. The cerebral infarction mainly involved in the distribution area of the internal carotid artery. Infarctions involving 2 or more cerebral vessels were found in 4 cases. Most subjects (58.3%) manifested with hemiplegia, and some (18.2%) with syncope. The proportion of the left atrial myxoma in patients with cerebral infarction (100.0%) was significantly higher than those in patients without cerebral infarction (85.1%, P =0.044). Subjects with tumor diameter less than 3 cm were more frequently complicated with cerebral infarction (37.5% vs 13.8%, P = 0.009). A logistic analysis showed that the odds ratio of myxoma with tumor diameter less than 3 cm for cerebral infarction was 3.750(95% CI 1.343-10.470). Conclusions: Cardiac myxoma is more common in young women, and often complicated with cerebral infarction. The infarctions are mainly distributed in internal carotid artery system, and some are involved in multiple vascular systems. The incidence of stroke is associated with the position of the myxoma. Smail-size myxoma cannot be ignored for its risk of stroke.

  4. Optimizing the Definitions of Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, and Infarction for Research and Application in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L. Abbott

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeUntil now, stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA have been clinically based terms which describe the presence and duration of characteristic neurological deficits attributable to intrinsic disorders of particular arteries supplying the brain, retina, or (sometimes the spinal cord. Further, infarction has been pathologically defined as death of neural tissue due to reduced blood supply. Recently, it has been proposed we shift to definitions of stroke and TIA determined by neuroimaging results alone and that neuroimaging findings be equated with infarction.MethodsWe examined the scientific validity and clinical implications of these proposals using the existing published literature and our own experience in research and clinical practice.ResultsWe found that the proposals to change to imaging-dominant definitions, as published, are ambiguous and inconsistent. Therefore, they cannot provide the standardization required in research or its application in clinical practice. Further, we found that the proposals are scientifically incorrect because neuroimaging findings do not always correlate with the clinical status or the presence of infarction. In addition, we found that attempts to use the proposals are disrupting research, are otherwise clinically unhelpful and do not solve the problems they were proposed to solve.ConclusionWe advise that the proposals must not be accepted. In particular, we explain why the clinical focus of the definitions of stroke and TIA should be retained with continued sub-classification of these syndromes depending neuroimaging results (with or without other information and that infarction should remain a pathological term. We outline ways the established clinically based definitions of stroke and TIA, and use of them, may be improved to encourage better patient outcomes in the modern era.

  5. The hospital mortality project: a tool for using administrative data for continuous clinical quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S Aqif; Hoffman, Neville E; MacQuillan, Gerry; Semmens, James B

    The increasing demand for greater clinical accountability requires development of convenient tools to measure healthcare safety and quality, which are able to provide information contemporaneously. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of the Hospital Mortality Project, a quality assurance initiative designed to encourage and facilitate clinical accountability for hospital mortality by all clinical departments and clinicians. The project was carried out in two stages. Part 1: After registration of in-hospital patient deaths ( May 1, 2004 to December 31, 2007), the consultant in charge of patient care was notified and requested to assign the death to a predefined category. This categorisation leads to further investigation as appropriate. Part 2: Hospital administrative data from April 1, 1997 to December 31, 2007 were used to assess a defined index, the Hospital Mortality Index (HMI), which was the expressed in the form of an Attribute Control Chart (p-CHART ) and then used as a performance indicator for hospital departments and clinicians. Summary data are reported to the clinical departments and to the hospital executive via the Quality Improvement Committee on quarterly basis. The clinical review was complete for 2,990 of 3,132 (95%) inpatient deaths till December 31, 2007, while a further 142 (5%) deaths are still in the process of being reviewed as of April 7, 2008. The median age of all the cases was 78 years (IQR 67-86) of which 1,657 (53%) were male. The Poisson regression analysis showed that since 1997 departments with a minimum of 100 deaths in total showed no clinically significant change in HMI over time. The Hospital Mortality Project provides a simple and efficient tool to analyse data for clinical managers to facilitate accountability.

  6. Ischemic Stroke Profile, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in India: The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylaja, P N; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Kaul, Subhash; Srivastava, M V Padma; Khurana, Dheeraj; Schwamm, Lee H; Kesav, Praveen; Arora, Deepti; Pannu, Aman; Thankachan, Tijy K; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2018-01-01

    The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project was designed to characterize ischemic stroke across 5 high-volume academic tertiary hospitals in India. From January 2012 to August 2014, research coordinators and physician coinvestigators prospectively collected data on 2066 patients with ischemic stroke admitted Stroke Scale score was 10 (interquartile range, 5-15) and 24.5% had National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16. Hypertension (60.8%), diabetes mellitus (35.7%), and tobacco use (32.2%, including bidi/smokeless tobacco) were common risk factors. Only 4% had atrial fibrillation. All patients underwent computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; 81% had cerebrovascular imaging. Stroke etiologic subtypes were large artery (29.9%), cardiac (24.9%), small artery (14.2%), other definite (3.4%), and undetermined (27.6%, including 6.7% with incomplete evaluation). Intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was administered in 13%. In-hospital mortality was 7.9%, and 48% achieved modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 90 days. On multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus predicted poor 3-month outcome and younger age, lower admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and small-artery etiology predicted excellent 3-month outcome. These comprehensive and novel clinical imaging data will prove useful in refining stroke guidelines and advancing stroke care in India. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Decompensated liver disease complicated by acute stroke caused by multiple factors: a clinical analysis of 15 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOU Chunyan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical features of patients with decompensated liver disease complicated by acute stroke. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 15 patients who were hospitalized in Beijing You'an Hospital, Capital Medical University and diagnosed with decompensated liver disease complicated by acute stroke from January 2011 to December 2015, including medical history, neurological manifestations, treatment, and prognostic features. Results Among the 15 patients, 11 had acute hemorrhagic stroke (AHS, and 4 had acute ischemic stroke (AIS; among the 11 patients with AHS, 4 (36.36% had hemorrhage caused by brain metastatic tumor of liver cancer (tumor-associated stroke, and 3 (27.27% were complicated by liver failure. Among the 15 patients, 12 (80% had disturbance of consciousness as the early neurological manifestation, and the confirmed diagnosis was made based on head CT findings; the treatment mainly included symptomatic support and rehabilitation training. The patients with AHS had poor prognosis. Four (26.67% of the 15 AHS patients died, among these patients, 2 had liver failure complicated by AHS, 1 had liver cirrhosis complicated by AHS, and 1 had brain metastases complicated by AHS. Conclusion Patients with decompensated liver disease complicated by acute stroke tend to develop the manifestations of AHS, which may be related to a poor clotting mechanism and brain metastasis of liver cancer, and have poor prognosis. Head CT scan should be performed for patients with decompensated liver disease accompanied by neuropsychiatric abnormalities as early as possible to help with early diagnosis and timely treatment.

  8. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  9. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  10. Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment and clinical outcome among patients hospitalized with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2014-01-01

    Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been linked with less severe stroke and a better outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the existing studies have methodological limitations and have, with one exception, not included hemorrhagic strokes. We performed a nationwide...... historic follow-up study using data from population-based healthcare registries to assess the effect of preadmission OAT on stroke outcomes further....

  11. Long-term physical activity in leisure time and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory diseases, and cancer. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Lange, Peter; Scharling, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between different levels of long-term physical activity in leisure time and subsequent causes of deaths. DESIGN: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study of 19 329 men and women aged 20-...... was in both sexes associated with significantly lower mortality from coronary heart disease, cancer and all-causes. The same tendency was found for stroke and respiratory diseases, but the associations did not reach statistical significance......., total-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, body mass index, education, income, and forced expiratory volume in 10.78 (% predicted). RESULTS: Adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease were...

  12. Post-stroke urinary incontinence with impaired awareness of the need to void: clinical and urodynamic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Renate; Stien, Ragnar; Wyller, Torgeir B

    2007-05-01

    To describe a clinical subtype of urinary incontinence (UI) after a stroke, i.e. with impaired awareness of the need to void (IA-UI), and to compare it to urge UI after a stroke for the risk factors and medium-term outcome. In a consecutive sample of 315 hospitalized stroke patients who were clinically stable and able to communicate, 65 with UI were identified (27 urge UI, 38 IA-UI). All had a comprehensive clinical assessment and cerebral computed tomography (CT). Cysto-urethrometry was performed in seven patients with IA-UI. Of the 38 patients with IA-UI, 16 were partially aware of leakage, but not of bladder fullness; the remaining 22 denied leakage. Patients with IA-UI were more functionally impaired (P=0.001), had more visible new CT lesions (24 of 38 vs 10 of 27, P=0.04) and less frontal lobe involvement (seven of 24 vs seven of 10, P=0.05) than those with urge UI. Ten of 12 patients with parietal lobe involvement denied leakage; no particular lesion pattern was found in those with partial awareness. Two patients had normal cysto-urethrometry, four showed terminal detrusor overactivity, and one had an incompetent urethral closure mechanism. In all, bladder sensation was reduced or absent. Only two of the surviving patients had regained continence after 1 year, whereas half of those with urge UI had become continent. IA-UI after a stroke differs from urge UI in clinical and prognostic respects, and probably reflects greater brain damage. It might explain the prognostic importance of stroke-related UI. There are various urodynamic patterns. Patients with better preserved insight might benefit from early awareness training and even from additional medical treatment if bladder overactivity is present; this needs further investigation.

  13. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  14. Excess mortality in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm Brandt Kristensen, Frans; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Christensen, Kaare

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with severe comorbidity, such as stroke, and seems to confer increased mortality. However, it is unknown whether this increased mortality is explained by hyperthyroidism per se, comorbidity, and/or genetic confounding.......Hyperthyroidism is associated with severe comorbidity, such as stroke, and seems to confer increased mortality. However, it is unknown whether this increased mortality is explained by hyperthyroidism per se, comorbidity, and/or genetic confounding....

  15. Patent foramen ovale closure with GORE HELEX or CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder vs. antiplatelet therapy for reduction of recurrent stroke or new brain infarct in patients with prior cryptogenic stroke: Design of the randomized Gore REDUCE Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasner, Scott E; Thomassen, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars; Rhodes, John F; Larsen, Coby C; Jacobson, Joth

    2017-12-01

    Rationale The utility of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure for secondary prevention in patients with prior cryptogenic stroke is uncertain despite multiple randomized trials completed to date. Aims The Gore REDUCE Clinical Study (REDUCE) aims to establish superiority of patent foramen ovale closure in conjunction with antiplatelet therapy over antiplatelet therapy alone in reducing the risk of recurrent clinical ischemic stroke or new silent brain infarct in patients who have had a cryptogenic stroke. Methods and design This controlled, open-label trial randomized 664 subjects with cryptogenic stroke at 63 multinational sites in a 2:1 ratio to either antiplatelet therapy plus patent foramen ovale closure (with GORE® HELEX® Septal Occluder or GORE® CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder) or antiplatelet therapy alone. Subjects will be prospectively followed for up to five years. Neuroimaging is required for all subjects at baseline and at two years or study exit. Study outcomes The two co-primary endpoints for the study are freedom from recurrent clinical ischemic stroke through at least 24 months post-randomization and incidence of new brain infarct (defined as clinical ischemic stroke or silent brain infarct) through 24 months. The primary analyses are an unadjusted log-rank test and a binomial test of subject-based proportions, respectively, both on the intent-to-treat population, with adjustment for testing multiplicity. Discussion The REDUCE trial aims to target a patient population with truly cryptogenic strokes. Medical therapy is limited to antiplatelet agents in both arms thereby reducing confounding. The trial should determine whether patent foramen ovale closure with the Gore septal occluders is safe and more effective than medical therapy alone for the prevention of recurrent clinical ischemic stroke or new silent brain infarct; the neuroimaging data will provide an opportunity to further support the proof of concept. The main results are anticipated in 2017

  16. Time to Angiographic Reperfusion and Clinical Outcome after Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Interventional Management of Stroke Phase III (IMS III) Trial: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pooja; Yeatts, Sharon D.; Mazighi, Mikael; Broderick, Joseph P.; Liebeskind, David S.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Amarenco, Pierre; Carrozzella, Janice; Spilker, Judith; Foster, Lydia D.; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Jauch, Edward C.; Haley, E. Clarke; Vagal, Achala; Tomsick, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The IMS III Trial did not demonstrate clinical benefit of the endovascular approach compared to IV rt-PA alone for moderate or severe ischemic strokes (NIHSS≥8) enrolled within three hours of stroke onset. Late reperfusion of tissue that is no longer salvageable may be one explanation, as suggested by prior exploratory studies showing an association between time to reperfusion and good clinical outcome. We sought to validate this relationship in the large-scale IMS III trial, and consider its implications for future endovascular trials. METHODS The analysis consisted of the endovascular cohort with proximal arterial occlusions in the anterior circulation that achieved angiographic reperfusion (TICI 2–3) during the endovascular procedure (within 7 hours from the onset of symptoms). Logistic regression was used to model good clinical outcome (90-day modified Rankin 0–2) as a function of the time to reperfusion, and prespecified variables were considered for adjustment. FINDINGS Among 240 proximal vessel occlusions, angiographic reperfusion (TICI 2–3) was achieved in 182 (76%). Mean time to reperfusion was 325 minutes (range 180–418 minutes). Longer time for reperfusion was associated with a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome (RR [95% CI] for every 30 minute delay: unadjusted 0·85 [0·77–0·94]; adjusted 0·88 [0·80–0·98]). INTERPRETATION We confirm that delay in time to angiographic reperfusion leads to a decreased likelihood of good clinical outcome. Achieving rapid reperfusion may be critical for the successes of future acute endovascular trials. FUNDING: NIH/NINDS (study sponsor), Genentech Inc. (study drug - intra-arterial t-PA), EKOS Corp. (device), Concentric Inc. (device), Cordis Neurovascular, Inc. (device), and Boehringer Ingelheim (European Investigator Meeting support). PMID:24784550

  17. Healthy lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in treatment-resistant hypertension: the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Keith M; Booth, John N; Calhoun, David A; Irvin, Marguerite R; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-09-01

    Few data exist on whether healthy lifestyle factors are associated with better prognosis among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension, a high-risk phenotype of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of healthy lifestyle factors with cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular mortality among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. We studied participants (n=2043) from the population-based Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg despite the use of 3 antihypertensive medication classes or the use of ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication regardless of blood pressure control). Six healthy lifestyle factors adapted from guidelines for the management of hypertension (normal waist circumference, physical activity ≥4 times/week, nonsmoking, moderate alcohol consumption, high Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet score, and low sodium-to-potassium intake ratio) were examined. A greater number of healthy lifestyle factors were associated with lower risk for cardiovascular events (n=360) during a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios [HR (95% confidence interval)] for cardiovascular events comparing individuals with 2, 3, and 4 to 6 versus 0 to 1 healthy lifestyle factors were 0.91 (0.68-1.21), 0.80 (0.57-1.14), and 0.63 (0.41-0.95), respectively (P-trend=0.020). Physical activity and nonsmoking were individual healthy lifestyle factors significantly associated with lower risk for cardiovascular events. Similar associations were observed between healthy lifestyle factors and risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, healthy lifestyle factors, particularly physical activity and nonsmoking, are associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular events and mortality among individuals with apparent treatment

  18. Design of a clinically relevant upper-limb exoskeleton robot for stroke patients with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Bae, Sung Jin; Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Pyung Hun

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to propose a design of a clinically relevant upper-limb (hand, wrist, and elbow) exoskeleton that meets the clinical requirements. At first, the proposed robot was designed to have sufficient torque for passive exercise therapy and spasticity measurement of post-stroke patients with spasticity (grade 3 or lower in Modified Ashworth Scale). Because the therapy of patients with high level spasticity could be laborious for therapists by increased muscle tone, and the patients tend not to get enough rehabilitation treatment. Secondly, this robot was designed to have user friendly features like as modularity, so that users have easy approach to assemble and disassemble for practical use. Thirdly, this robot system was designed to guarantee the safety for robot-aided passive training of patients with spasticity. As a result, we were able to see the usability of the robot system, even though it was a pilot test. This shows the possibility of measuring and classifying the spasticity.

  19. Botulinum toxin in post-stroke patients: stiffness modifications and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miscio, Giacinta; Del Conte, Carmen; Pianca, Danilo; Colombo, Roberto; Panizza, Marcela; Schieppati, Marco; Pisano, Fabrizio

    2004-02-01

    To objectively quantify stiffness and clinical changes in the upper limb of poststroke patients following botulinum toxin (BT) injection. Eighteen consecutive chronic post-stroke spastic patients were injected Botulinum toxin A in the forearm flexor spastic muscles. Spasticity was clinically evaluated with the Ashworth scale. Stiffness was measured with indices (passive stiffness index (ISI) and total stiffness index (TSI) obtained by mechanical wrist displacements induced by a torque motor,which could also provide the stretch reflex threshold speed (SRTS) from flexor muscles. Functional status was measured with the Barthel index and a specific hand ability scale, pain with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The ranges of voluntary wrist extension (EROM) and flexion (FROM) and wrist isometric extension and flexion (IE-IF) strength were also calculated. IE and EROM significantly increased, being respectively p < 0.01 and p < 0.05; also SRTS was augmented (p < 0.001),while TSI showed lower values (p < 0.001); the Ashworth score decreased at least one point. Hand function for selected tasks improved in 50% of patients, the Barthel index only in 4 (22 %), forearm pain was completely relieved in 3 patients (17 %). BT can be considered a valid therapeutic tool in all spastic patients, because of immediate advantages: reduction of muscle hypertonia, pain relief, improvement in selected motor performances.

  20. Safety and effectiveness of stem cell therapies in early-phase clinical trials in stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Anjali; Choy, Fong Chan; Howell, Stuart; Hillier, Susan; Chan, Fiona; Hamilton-Bruce, Monica A; Koblar, Simon A

    2017-08-30

    Stem cells have demonstrated encouraging potential as reparative therapy for patients suffering from post-stroke disability. Reperfusion interventions in the acute phase of stroke have shown significant benefit but are limited by a narrow window of opportunity in which they are beneficial. Thereafter, rehabilitation is the only intervention available. The current review summarises the current evidence for use of stem cell therapies in stroke from early-phase clinical trials. The safety and feasibility of administering different types of stem cell therapies in stroke seem to be reasonably proven. However, the effectiveness needs still to be established through bigger clinical trials with more pragmatic clinical trial designs that address the challenges raised by the heterogeneous nature of stroke per se, as well those due to unique characteristics of stem cells as therapeutic agents.

  1. Clinically useful predictors for premature mortality among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Buus, Niels; Wernlund, Andreas Glahn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine changes in the distribution of causes of death and mortality rates among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room (PER), to determine clinically useful predictors for avoiding premature mortality among these patients and to discuss...... linked to the Cause of Death Register and the Central Psychiatric Research Register, and logistic predictor analyses for premature death were performed. RESULTS: The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) of all visitors compared to the general Danish population was approximately 5. Overall, patients...... was the strongest predictor of premature death among visitors to a PER (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5, 2.2). CONCLUSION: Persons visiting the PER had an increased SMR and substance use disorders were the strongest predictor of premature death within 3 years. However, death caused...

  2. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure for Secondary Prevention of Cryptogenic Stroke: Updated Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Qamar, Arman; Gupta, Ankur; Bajaj, Navkaranbir; Golwala, Harsh B; Pandey, Ambarish; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-12-08

    Patent foramen ovale closure represents a potential secondary prevention strategy for cryptogenic stroke, but available trials have varied by size, device studied, and follow-up. We conducted a systematic search of published randomized clinical trials evaluating patent foramen ovale closure versus medical therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack using PubMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane through September 2017. Weighting was by random effects models. Of 480 studies screened, we included 5 randomized clinical trials in the meta-analysis in which 3440 patients were randomized to patent foramen ovale closure (n = 1829) or medical therapy (n = 1611) and followed for an average of 2.0 to 5.9 years. Index stroke/transient ischemic attack occurred within 6 to 9 months of randomization. The primary end point was composite stroke/transient ischemic attack and death (in 3 trials) or stroke alone (in 2 trials). Patent foramen ovale closure reduced the primary end point (0.70 vs 1.48 events per 100 patient-years; risk ratio [RR], 0.52 [0.29-0.91]; I 2  = 55.0%) and stroke/transient ischemic attack (1.04 vs 2.00 events per 100 patient-years; RR, 0.55 [0.37-0.82]; I 2  = 42.2%) with modest heterogeneity compared with medical therapy. Procedural bleeding was not different between study arms (1.8% vs 1.8%; RR, 0.94 [0.49-1.83]; I 2  = 29.2%), but new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter was increased with patent foramen ovale closure (6.6% vs 0.7%; RR, 4.69 [2.17-10.12]; I 2  = 29.3%). In patients with recent cryptogenic stroke, patent foramen ovale closure reduces recurrent stroke/transient ischemic attack compared with medical therapy, but is associated with a higher risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation/flutter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Concise Arm and Hand Rehabilitation Approach in Stroke (CARAS: A practical and evidence-based framework for clinical rehabilitation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan A. Franck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The volume of information on new treatment techniques supporting the restoration of arm-hand function (AHF and arm-hand skill performance (ASHP in stroke survivors overwhelms therapists in everyday clinical practice when choosing the appropriate therapy. The Concise Arm and Hand Rehabilitation Approach in Stroke (CARAS is designed for paramedical staff to structure and implement training of AHF and AHSP in stroke survivors. The CARAS is based on four constructs: (a stratification according to the severity of arm–hand impairment (using the Utrecht Arm/Hand -Test [UAT], (b the individual’s rehabilitation goals and concomitant potential rehabilitation outcomes, (c principles of self-efficacy, and (d possibilities to systematically incorporate (new technology and new evidence-based training elements swiftly. The framework encompasses three programs aimed at treating either the severely (UAT 0-1, moderately (UAT 2-3, or mildly (UAT 4-7 impaired arm-hand. Program themes are: taking care of the limb and prevention of complications (Program 1, task-oriented gross motor grip performance (Program 2, and functional AHSP training (Program 3. Each program is preceded and followed by an assessment. Training modularity facilitates rapid interchange/adaptation of sub-elements. Proof-of-principle in clinical rehabilitation has been established. The CARAS facilitates rapid structured design and provision of state-of-the-art AHF and ASHP treatment in stroke patients.

  4. Added value of CT perfusion compared to CT angiography in predicting clinical outcomes of stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsogkas, Ioannis; Knauth, Michael; Schregel, Katharina; Behme, Daniel; Psychogios, Marios Nikos [University Medicine Goettingen, Department of Neuroradiology, Goettingen (Germany); Wasser, Katrin; Maier, Ilko; Liman, Jan [University Medicine Goettingen, Department of Neurology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    CTP images analyzed with the Alberta stroke program early CT scale (ASPECTS) have been shown to be optimal predictors of clinical outcome. In this study we compared two biomarkers, the cerebral blood volume (CBV)-ASPECTS and the CTA-ASPECTS as predictors of clinical outcome after thrombectomy. Stroke patients with thrombosis of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery were included in our study. All patients underwent initial multimodal CT with CTP and CTA on a modern CT scanner. Treatment consisted of full dose intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, when applicable, and mechanical thrombectomy. Three neuroradiologists separately scored CTP and CTA images with the ASPECTS score. Sixty-five patients were included. Median baseline CBV-ASPECTS and CTA-ASPECTS for patients with favourable clinical outcome at follow-up were 8 [interquartile range (IQR) 8-9 and 7-9 respectively]. Patients with poor clinical outcome showed a median baseline CBV-ASPECTS of 6 (IQR 5-8, P < 0.0001) and a median baseline CTA-ASPECTS of 7 (IQR 7-8, P = 0.18). Using CBV-ASPECTS and CTA-ASPECTS raters predicted futile reperfusions in 96 % and 56 % of the cases, respectively. CBV-ASPECTS is a significant predictor of clinical outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy. (orig.)

  5. Predictors of mortality and differences in clinical features among patients with Cryptococcosis according to immune status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Brizendine

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is an invasive fungal infection causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Prognostic factors are largely derived from trials conducted prior to the modern era of antifungal and potent combination antiretroviral therapies, immunosuppression, and transplantation. Data describing the clinical features and predictors of mortality in a modern cohort are needed.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients at our institution diagnosed with cryptococcosis from 1996 through 2010. Data included demographics, clinical features, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes.We identified 302 individuals: 108 (36% human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive, 84 (28% organ transplant recipients (OTRs, and 110 (36% non-HIV, non-transplant (NHNT patients including 39 with no identifiable immunodeficiency. Mean age was 49 years, 203 (67% were male and 170 (56% were white. All-cause mortality at 90 days was 21%. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, cryptococcemia (OR 5.09, 95% CI 2.54-10.22 and baseline opening pressure >25 cmH2O (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.25-6.88 were associated with increased odds of mortality; HIV-positive patients (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.19-1.16 and OTRs (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.21-1.05 had lower odds of death compared to NHNT patients.Predictors of mortality from cryptococcosis in the modern period include cryptococcemia, high intracranial pressure, and NHNT status while drug(s used for induction and historical prognostic factors including organ failure syndromes and hematologic malignancy were not associated with mortality.

  6. Intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke: from randomised clinical trials to daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Dirks (Maaike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, as in most Western countries, stroke is a major contributor to the total burden of disease, with an estimated 39,600 hospital admissions, 9,000 deaths, and approximately 241,600 people living with the consequences of a stroke in 2009.1 Fortunately, improvements are

  7. Early post-acute stroke seizures: Clinical profile and outcome in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early and late seizures after cryptogenic ischemic stroke in young adults. Neurology 2003;60:400-4. 10. Bladin CF, Alexandrov AV, Bellavance A, Bornstein N,. Chambers B, Coté R, et al. Seizures after stroke: A prospective multicenter study. Arch Neurol 2000;57: 1617-22. 11. De Reuck J, De Groote L, Van Maele G. Single ...

  8. Ultrasonographic and clinical study of post-stroke painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania E. Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an essential method in evaluation of post-stroke PHS. However, the U/S grades were not correlated with the stages of motor recovery. Avoiding overuse of the unaffected shoulder will be helpful for prevention of shoulder injuries following hemiplegic stroke.

  9. Efficacy of strategy training in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia : A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M; Dekker, J; Stehmann-Saris, FC; Deelman, B. G.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine in a controlled study the efficacy of strategy training in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. A total of 113 left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia were randomly assigned to two treatment groups; (1) strategy training integrated

  10. Novel nonpharmacologic approaches for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: results from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Riccardo; Joza, Jacqueline; Arensi, Andrea; Levi, Michael; Russo, Vincenzo; Tzikas, Apostolos; Danna, Paolo; Sagone, Antonio; Viecca, Maurizio; Essebag, Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, confers a 5-fold risk of stroke that increases to 17-fold when associated with mitral stenosis. At this time, the most effective long-term solution to protect patients from stroke and thromboembolism is oral anticoagulation, either with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC). Despite the significant benefits they confer, both VKAs and NOACs are underused because of their increased potential for bleeding, and VKAs are underused because of their narrow therapeutic range, need for regular international normalized ratio checks, and interactions with food or medications. In patients with nonvalvular AF, approximately 90% of strokes originate from the left atrial appendage (LAA); in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease, many patients (60%) have strokes that originate from the left atrium itself. Surgical LAA amputation or closure, although widely used to reduce stroke risk in association with cardiac surgery, is not currently performed as a stand-alone operation for stroke risk reduction because of its invasiveness. Percutaneous LAA closure, as an alternative to anticoagulation, has been increasingly used during the last decade in an effort to reduce stroke risk in nonvalvular AF. Several devices have been introduced during this time, of which one has demonstrated noninferiority compared with warfarin in a randomized controlled trial. This review describes the available technologies for percutaneous LAA closure, as well as a summary of the published trials concerning their safety and efficacy in reducing stroke risk in AF.

  11. Trends for coronary heart disease and stroke mortality among migrants in England and Wales, 1979–2003: slow declines notable for some groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, S; Rosato, M; Teyhan, A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine trends in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in migrants to England and Wales. Design: Cross-sectional. Outcome measures: Age-standardised and sex-specific death rates and rate ratios 1979–83, 1989–93 and 1999–2003. Results: Coronary mortality fell among migrants, more so in the second decade than the first. Rate ratios for coronary mortality remained higher for men and women from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and South Asia, and lower for men from Jamaica, other Caribbean countries, West Africa, Italy and Spain. Rate ratios increased for men from Jamaica (1979–83: 0.45, 0.40 to 0.50; 1999–2003: 0.81, 0.73 to 0.90), Pakistan (1979–83: 1.14, 1.04 to 1.25; 1999–2003: 1.93, 1.81 to 2.06), Bangladesh (1979–83: 1.36, 1.15 to 1.60; 1999–2003: 2.11, 1.90 to 2.34), Republic of Ireland (1979–1983: 1.18, 1.15 to 1.21; 1999–2003: 1.45, 1.39 to 1.52) and Poland (1979–83: 1.17, 1.09 to 1.25; 1999–2003: 1.97, 1.57 to 2.47), and for women from Jamaica (1979–83: 0.63, 0.52 to 0.77; 1999–2003: 1.23, 1.06 to 1.42) and Pakistan (1979–83: 1.14, 0.88 to 1.47; 1999–2003: 2.45, 2.19 to 2.74), owing to smaller declines in death rates than those born in England and Wales. Rate ratios for stroke mortality remained higher for migrants. As a result of smaller declines, rate ratios increased for men from Pakistan (1979–1983: 0.99, 0.76 to 1.29; 1999–2003: 1.58, 1.35 to 1.85), Scotland (1979–1983: 1.11, 1.04 to 1.19; 1999–2003: 1.30, 1.19 to 1.42) and Republic of Ireland (1979–1983: 1.27, 1.19 to 1.36; 1999–2003: 1.67, 1.52 to 1.84). Conclusion: For groups with higher mortality than people born in England and Wales, mortality remained higher. Smaller declines led to increasing disparities for some groups and to excess coronary mortality for women from Jamaica. Maximising the coverage of prevention and treatment programmes is critical. PMID:17690159

  12. Utilisation of diagnostic computerised tomography imaging and immediate clinical outcomes in older people with stroke before and after introduction of the National Service Framework for older people. A comparative study of hospital-based stroke registry data (1997-2003): Norfolk experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2006-07-01

    how the National Service Framework (NSF) for older people in England might be associated with changes in clinically relevant stroke outcome has not been investigated. We looked for changes in computerised tomography (CT) scan rate, inpatient case-fatality rate (CFR), length of acute hospital stay and discharge destination for older people with stroke, compared with their younger counterparts, for a period before, and after, the introduction of the NSF. two periods, 4 years before and 2 years after the publication of the NSF, were selected to compare the above outcomes between three age categories: or = 85 years of age. Annual summary data for these periods were compared for the magnitude of changes in all age categories for all outcomes measured between pre- and post-NSF periods. n = 5,219. Utilisation of CT imaging had increased in all age groups post-NSF, with the most significant improvement in the oldest group. This change was associated with a greater proportion of people who had CT in this age group being discharged home in the post-NSF period. There was no change in the mortality from stroke in any age group during the study. Although the length of acute hospital stay increased, this was associated with a higher percentage of home discharges particularly in > 65-year olds, suggesting better clinical outcome in those who survived. in this single-centre analysis, the post-NSF period appeared to be associated with improvement in outcome in older people with stroke. Continual monitoring using stroke registry data may help to assess whether these effects are sustained in the longer term.

  13. Systematic Review of Parameters of Stimulation: Clinical Trial Design Characteristics and Motor Outcomes in Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele Oyebamiji Adeyemo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation are two powerful non-invasive neuromodulatory therapies that have the potential to alter and evaluate the integrity of the corticospinal tract. Moreover, recent evidence has shown that brain stimulation might be beneficial in stroke recovery. Therefore, investigating and investing in innovative therapies that may improve neurorehabilitative stroke recovery are next steps in research and development.Methods: This article presents an up-to-date systematic review of the treatment effects of rTMS and tDCS on motor function. A literary search was conducted, utilizing search terms stroke and transcranial stimulation. Items were excluded if they failed to: (1 include stroke patients, (2 study motor outcomes, or (3 include rTMS/tDCS as treatments. Other exclusions included: (1 reviews, editorials, and letters, (2 animal or pediatric populations, (3 case reports or sample sizes < or = 2 patients, and (4 primary outcomes of dysphagia, dysarthria, neglect, or swallowing.Results: Investigation of PubMed English Database prior to 01/01/2012 produced 695 applicable results. Studies were excluded based on the aforementioned criteria, resulting in 50 remaining studies. They included 1314 participants (1282 stroke patients and 32 healthy subjects evaluated by motor function pre- and post- tDCS or rTMS. Heterogeneity among studies’ motor assessments was high and could not be accounted for by individual comparison. Pooled effect sizes for the impact of post-treatment improvement revealed consistently demonstrable improvements after tDCS and rTMS therapeutic stimulation. Most studies provided limited follow-up for long-term effects.Conclusions: It is apparent from the available studies that noninvasive stimulation may enhance motor recovery and may lead to clinically-meaningful functional improvements in the stroke population.

  14. Acinetobacter baumannii in critically ill patients: Molecular epidemiology, clinical features and predictors of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnacho-Montero, José; Gutiérrez-Pizarraya, Antonio; Díaz-Martín, Ana; Cisneros-Herreros, José Miguel; Cano, María Eugenia; Gato, Eva; Ruiz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Tomás-Carmona, M Del Mar; Pascual, Álvaro; Bou, Germán; Pachón-Diaz, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess changes in the epidemiology and clinical presentation of Acinetobacter baumannii over a 10-year period, as well as risk factors of mortality in infected patients. Prospective, multicentre, hospital-based cohort studies including critically ill patients with A. baumannii isolated from any clinical sample were included. These were divided into a first period ("2000 study") (one month), and a second period ("2010 study") (two months). Molecular typing was performed by REP-PCR, PFGE and MSLT. The primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. In 2000 and 2010, 103 and 108 patients were included, and the incidence of A. baumannii colonization/infection in the ICU decreased in 2010 (1.23 vs. 4.35 cases/1000 patient-days; pbaumannii infection, the multivariate analysis identified appropriate antimicrobial therapy and ST79 clonal group as protective factors for mortality. At 10 years of the first analysis, some variations have been observed in the epidemiology of A. baumannii in the ICU, with no changes in mortality. Epidemic ST79 clone seems to be associated with a better prognosis and adequate treatment is crucial in terms of survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. General cognition predicts post-stroke recovery defined through minimal clinically important difference (MCID): a cohort study in an Italian rehabilitation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginex, V; Vanacore, N; Lacorte, E; Sozzi, M; Pisani, L; Corbo, M; Clerici, F

    2015-10-01

    In the field of rehabilitation it is crucial to define if changes in functional scores correspond to relevant clinical improvements. To assess whether cognition affects motor recovery in post-stroke patients using a clinical meaningful criterion: the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Retrospective cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation clinic Two hundred nine first-ever stroke patients undergoing a post-acute inpatient rehabilitation. Cognitive status was assessed with the cognitive FIM and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The response to the rehabilitation was defined as the achievement of the MCID between admission and discharge in the motor FIM (responder) and both in the motor and in the cognitive FIM (best-responder). Subjects with a baseline higher MMSE>24.9 had a near four-fold higher probability of being responder (OR 3.91; 95% CI 1.72-8.89) and a two-fold higher probability of being best-responder (OR 2.69; 95% CI 1.24-5.84) on motor FIM as compared to those with a MMSE≤24.9. A duration of the rehabilitation of 55-61 days implies a three-fold higher probability (OR 3.17; 95% CI 1.15-8.72) to be responder as compared to shorter period of treatment; a treatment >61 days does not involve a greater probability of response. This is the first st