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Sample records for stroke impact scale

  1. Psychometric comparisons of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0 and Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale.

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    Lin, Keh-Chung; Fu, Tiffany; Wu, Ching-Yi; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lee, Pei-Chin

    2010-04-01

    This study compared the responsiveness and criterion-related validity of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QOL) for patients after stroke rehabilitation. The SIS and SS-QOL, along with five criterion measures-the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Motor Activity Log, the Functional Independence Measure, the Frenchay Activities Index, and the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale-were administered to 74 patients with stroke before and after a 3-week intervention. Responsiveness was examined using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and standardized response mean (SRM). Criterion-related validity was investigated using the Spearman correlation coefficient (rho). Whereas the SS-QOL subscales were nonresponsive to changes, the SIS hand function showed medium responsiveness (SRM = .52, Wilcoxon Z = 4.24, P < .05). Responsiveness of the SIS total also was significantly larger than that of the SS-QOL total (SRM difference, .36; 95% confidence interval, .02-.71). Criterion validity of the SIS hand function was good (rho = .51-.68; P < .01), but that of the SS-QOL was only fair (rho = .25-.31; P < .05). Because the SIS had better overall responsiveness and the SIS hand function showed medium responsiveness and good criterion validity, the SIS appears to be more suited for assessing changes after stroke rehabilitation.

  2. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

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    Paanalahti, Markku; Berzina, Guna; Lundgren-Nilsson, Åsa; Arndt, Toni; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2018-03-05

    To examine if the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) core set for stoke contains problems that are relevant for the persons living with stroke as expressed in the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Cross-sectional study of 242 persons with previous stroke. The agreement between the perceived problems in the SIS items and problems in the categories of Comprehensive ICF Core Set for stroke were analyzed using percent of agreement and Kappa statistic. The analyses between 57 items of the SIS and 31 second-level categories of the ICF were conducted. The problems in domains of "Mobility", "Activities of daily living", "Hand function", "Strength" in the SIS had moderate agreement when compared to ICF categories. The SIS domains of "Emotion" and "Communication", as well as some aspects of the "Memory" had slight or fair agreement with corresponding ICF categories. The results of the study suggest that there is acceptable agreement between persons after stroke and health professionals in the physical aspects, but rather poor agreement in the cognitive and emotional aspects of functioning. Health professionals do not fully capture the magnitude of emotional or social problems experienced by persons after stroke when using the ICF Core Set as a framework for evaluation. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF Core Set for Stroke provides comprehensive list of possible health and health related outcomes for persons after stroke. Problems reported in condition-specific patient-reported outcome scales can be important in decision making in rehabilitation. Patients and health professionals tend to agree more on physical than cognitive problems. Examination of the relevance of the ICF cores set for stroke by comparing with the Stroke Impact Scale.

  3. The stroke impact scale: performance as a quality of life measure in a community-based stroke rehabilitation setting.

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    Richardson, Marina; Campbell, Nerissa; Allen, Laura; Meyer, Matthew; Teasell, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Data was derived from a study assessing a community-based stroke rehabilitation program. Patients were administered the SIS and Euroqol-5D (EQ-5D-5L) on admission to the study, and at six month and 12 month follow-up. The psychometric performance of each domain of the SIS was assessed at each time point. A total of 164 patients completed outcome measures at baseline, 108 patients at six months and 37 patients at 12 months. Correlation of the SIS domains with the EQ-5D-5L suggested that the dimensions of health contributing to a patient's perception of health-related quality of life changes over time. The SIS performed well in a sample of patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation in the community. Our findings suggest that the multidimensionality of the SIS may allow health professionals to track patient progress and tailor rehabilitation interventions to target the dimensions of health that are most important to a patient's overall health and perceived quality of life over time. Implications for Rehabilitation There is an increased need for valid and reliable measures to evaluate the outcomes of patients recovering from stroke in the community. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) measures multiple domains of health and is well-suited for use in patients recovering from stroke in the community. There is a high level of internal consistency in the eight SIS domains with no evidence of floor effects; ceiling effects were noted for several domains. Correlation of the SIS with the Euroqol-5D suggested that the dimensions of health contributing to a patient's perception of health related quality of life changes over time.

  4. Derivation and Validation of a Modified Short Form of the Stroke Impact Scale.

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    MacIsaac, Rachael; Ali, Myzoon; Peters, Michele; English, Coralie; Rodgers, Helen; Jenkinson, Crispin; Lees, Kennedy R; Quinn, Terence J

    2016-05-20

    The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) is a stroke-specific, quality of life measure recommended for research and clinical practice. Completion rates are suboptimal and could relate to test burden. We derived and validated a short form SIS (SF-SIS). We examined data from the Virtual International Stroke Trial Archive, generating derivation and validation populations. We derived an SF-SIS by selecting 1 item per domain of SIS, choosing items most highly correlated with total domain score. Our validation described agreement of SF-SIS with original SIS and the SIS-16 and correlation with Barthel Index, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and Euro-QoL 5 dimensions visual analog scales. We assessed discriminative validity (associations between SF-SIS and factors known to influence outcome [age, physiological parameters, and comorbidity]). We assessed face validity and acceptability by sharing the SF-SIS with a focus group of stroke survivors and multidisciplinary stroke healthcare staff. From 5549 acute study patients (mean age 68.5 [SD 13] years, mean SIS 64 [SD 32]) and 332 rehabilitation patients (mean age 65.7 [SD 11] years, mean SIS 61 [SD 11]), we derived an 8-item SF-SIS that demonstrated good agreement with original SIS and good correlation with our chosen functional and quality of life measures (all ρ>0.70, P<0.0001). Significant associations were seen with our chosen predictors of stroke outcome in the acute group (P<0.0001). The focus group agreed with the choice of items for SF-SIS across 7 of 8 domains. Using multiple, complementary methods, we have derived an SF-SIS and demonstrated content, convergent, and discriminant validity. This shortened SIS should allow collection of robust quality of life data with less associated test burden. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Stroke Impact Scale 3.0: Reliability and Validity Evaluation of the Korean Version.

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    Choi, Seong Uk; Lee, Hye Sun; Shin, Joon Ho; Ho, Seung Hee; Koo, Mi Jung; Park, Kyoung Hae; Yoon, Jeong Ah; Kim, Dong Min; Oh, Jung Eun; Yu, Se Hwa; Kim, Dong A

    2017-06-01

    To establish the reliability and validity the Korean version of the Stroke Impact Scale (K-SIS) 3.0. A total of 70 post-stroke patients were enrolled. All subjects were evaluated for general characteristics, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Modified Barthel Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The SF-36 and K-SIS 3.0 assessed their health-related quality of life. Statistical analysis after evaluation, determined the reliability and validity of the K-SIS 3.0. A total of 70 patients (mean age, 54.97 years) participated in this study. Internal consistency of the SIS 3.0 (Cronbach's alpha) was obtained, and all domains had good co-efficiency, with threshold above 0.70. Test-retest reliability of SIS 3.0 required correlation (Spearman's rho) of the same domain scores obtained on the first and second assessments. Results were above 0.5, with the exception of social participation and mobility. Concurrent validity of K-SIS 3.0 was assessed using the SF-36, and other scales with the same or similar domains. Each domain of K-SIS 3.0 had a positive correlation with corresponding similar domain of SF-36 and other scales (HADS, MMSE, and NIHSS). The newly developed K-SIS 3.0 showed high inter-intra reliability and test-retest reliabilities, together with high concurrent validity with the original and various other scales, for patients with stroke. K-SIS 3.0 can therefore be used for stroke patients, to assess their health-related quality of life and treatment efficacy.

  6. Challenging comparison of stroke scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke scales can be classified as clinicometric scales and functional impairment, handicap scales. All studies describing stroke scales were reviewed by internet searching engines with the final search performed on January 1, 2013. The following string of keywords was entered into search engines; stroke, scale, score and disability. Despite advantages of modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Scandinavian stroke scale comparing to the NIHSS, including their simplification and less inter-rater variability; most of the stroke neurologists around the world continue using the NIHSS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI are widely used functional impairment and disability scales. Distinction between grades of mRS is poorly defined. The Asian stroke disability scale is a simplified functional impairment, handicap scale which is as valid as mRS and BI. At the present time, the NIHSS, mRS and BI are routine stroke scales because physicians have used to work with these scales for more than two decades, although it could not be an acceptable reason. On the other side, results of previous stroke trials, which are the basis of stroke management guidelines are driven using these scales.

  7. Reliability and validity of the Nigerian (Hausa) version of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0 index.

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    Mohammad, Ashiru Hamza; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Siew Yim, Loh; Chinna, Karuthan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to test the translated Hausa version of the stroke impact scale SIS (3.0) and further evaluate its psychometric properties. The SIS 3.0 was translated from English into Hausa and was tested for its reliability and validity on a stratified random sample adult stroke survivors attending rehabilitation services at stroke referral hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Psychometric analysis of the Hausa-SIS 3.0 involved face, content, criterion, and construct validity tests as well as internal and test-retest reliability. In reliability analyses, the Cronbach's alpha values for the items in Strength, Hand function, Mobility, ADL/IADL, Memory and thinking, Communication, Emotion, and Social participation domains were 0.80, 0.92, 0.90, 0.78, 0.84, 0.89, 0.58, and 0.74, respectively. There are 8 domains in stroke impact scale 3.0 in confirmatory factory analysis; some of the items in the Hausa-SIS questionnaire have to be dropped due to lack of discriminate validity. In the final analysis, a parsimonious model was obtained with two items per construct for the 8 constructs (Chi-square/df 0.9, and RMSEA SIS seems to measure adequately the QOL outcomes in the 8 domains.

  8. Reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the Stroke Impact Scale 2.0 (SIS 2.0).

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    Gonçalves, Rui Soles; Gil, João Neves; Cavalheiro, Luís Manuel; Costa, Rui Dias; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2012-05-01

    To test the reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the Stroke Impact Scale 2.0 (SIS 2.0). Two samples (N = 448 and N = 50) of stroke patients attending physical therapy were evaluated. The Portuguese versions of the SIS 2.0 and Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), and a set of individual patient characteristics were the measures used. Reliability was good with Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranging from 0.83 to 0.96, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between 0.70 and 0.95 for the SIS 2.0 domains. Construct validity was supported by 6 predefined hypotheses involving expected correlations between SIS 2.0 domains, CMSA dimensions and age. An additional predefined hypothesis was also confirmed, with subjects without complications during hospitalization obtaining significantly higher scores in 7 of the 8 SIS 2.0 domains (P SIS 2.0 evidenced suitable psychometric characteristics in terms of reliability and validity.

  9. The Stroke Impact Scale: validation in a UK setting and development of a SIS short form and SIS index.

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    Jenkinson, Crispin; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Crocker, Helen; Peters, Michele

    2013-09-01

    The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) covers 8 dimensions and a composite disability score. This study evaluates the SIS in the UK context, and develops a single index and an 8-item short form. Patients with a diagnosis of stroke were recruited through general practices in London and the North-West of England. Patients completed the SIS and the EQ-5D. Internal consistency of the SIS dimensions and the disability score ranged from α 0.86 to 0.95. Complete data were available on 73 questionnaires (48.34%). Factor analysis suggested the 8 domains could be aggregated into a single index. A short-form SIS (SF-SIS) index was created by summing 1 item per dimension. Selected items were those that most highly correlated with their respective domain score (ρ ranged from 0.77-0.94, PSIS index scores were highly correlated with those gained from the parent form (ρ=0.98; PSIS index and SF-SIS index with the EQ-5D was identical (ρ=0.83; PSIS, or relevant items on the SF-SIS, were highly correlated (ρ=0.97; PSIS covers aspects of health, which are of importance to stroke patients, and the dimensions were found to have high levels of internal consistency in the UK context. The amount of incomplete data suggests that the length of the questionnaire may present a substantial patient burden. In comparison to the parent form the SF-SIS can accurately provide the disability score and overall index score with considerable brevity.

  10. Stroke scale score and early prediction of outcome after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Zuberi, F.Z.; Afsar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as a predictor of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Subjects and Methods: The study included 50 patients who presented to Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the study period with acute stroke and were evaluated with CT scan of brain. Only those patients were enrolled in the study that had acute ischemic stroke. The enrolled subjects were then evaluated for the neurological impairment using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The subjects were followed-up and their functional outcome was assessed using Barthel index (BI) on the 7th day of their admission. Results: Of the fifty patients enrolled in the study, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) were females, with age ranging from 45 years to 95 years and a mean age of 59.9 years. Neurological impairment at presentation was assessed by NIHSS. The score ranged between 2 and 28. The functional outcome was evaluated on the 7th day using Barthel index (BI), which ranged from 0 to 80. NIHSS score was found to be a good predictor of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke (p<0.001). Other factors like gender, hypertension and heart disease did not affect the functional recovery in such patients. Various factors were found to be significant for early prediction of stroke recovery. The NIHSS score was the strongest predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke. Age at the time of the event was also found to be an important predictor for stroke recovery. Conclusion: The NIHSS score is a good predictor of patient's recovery after stroke. Assessing the patient's neurological impairment at first presentation of ischemic stroke can guide the physician regarding the prognosis and management plan. (author)

  11. The Impact of Pre-Stroke Depressive Symptoms, Fatalism, and Social Support on Disability after Stroke.

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    Sharrief, Anjail Z; Sánchez, Brisa N; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Skolarus, Lesli E; Zahuranec, Darin B; Baek, Jonggyu; Garcia, Nelda; Case, Erin; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2017-11-01

    Psychological and social factors have been linked to stroke mortality; however, their impact on stroke disability is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-stroke fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support on 90-day neurologic, functional, and cognitive outcomes. Ischemic strokes (2008-2011) were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project. Validated scales were used to assess fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support during baseline interviews. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) scale, and Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (3MSE) were used to assess 90-day outcomes. The associations between the pre-stroke variables and 90-day outcomes were estimated from regression models adjusting for demographics, risk factors, tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment, and comorbidities. Among 364 stroke survivors, higher pre-stroke fatalism was associated with worse functional (.17 point higher ADL/IADL per interquartile range [IQR] higher fatalism; 95% confidence interval [CI]: .05, .30) and cognitive (2.81 point lower 3MSE per IQR higher fatalism; 95% CI: .95, 4.67) outcomes. Higher pre-stroke depressive symptoms were associated with worse functional (.16 point higher ADL/IADL per IQR higher Patient Health Questionnaire-9; 95% CI: .04, .28) and cognitive (2.28 point lower 3MSE per IQR higher Patient Health Questionnaire-9; 95% CI: .46, 4.10) outcomes. Participants in the middle tertile of social support had better cognitive outcomes (3.75 points higher 3MSE; 95% CI: .93, 6.56) compared with the highest tertile. The associations between pre-stroke fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support and 90-day outcomes suggest that psychosocial factors play an important role in stroke recovery. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Validating and comparing stroke prognosis scales.

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    Quinn, Terence J; Singh, Sarjit; Lees, Kennedy R; Bath, Philip M; Myint, Phyo K

    2017-09-05

    To compare the prognostic accuracy of various acute stroke prognostic scales using a large, independent, clinical trials dataset. We directly compared 8 stroke prognostic scales, chosen based on focused literature review (Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne [ASTRAL]; iSCORE; iSCORE-revised; preadmission comorbidities, level of consciousness, age, and neurologic deficit [PLAN]; stroke subtype, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project, age, and prestroke modified Rankin Scale [mRS] [SOAR]; modified SOAR; Stroke Prognosis Instrument 2 [SPI2]; and Totaled Health Risks in Vascular Events [THRIVE]) using individual patient-level data from a clinical trials archive (Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive [VISTA]). We calculated area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) for each scale against 90-day outcomes of mRS (dichotomized at mRS >2), Barthel Index (>85), and mortality. We performed 2 complementary analyses: the first limited to patients with complete data for all components of all scales (simultaneous) and the second using as many patients as possible for each individual scale (separate). We compared AUROCs and performed sensitivity analyses substituting extreme outcome values for missing data. In total, 10,777 patients contributed to the analyses. Our simultaneous analyses suggested that ASTRAL had greatest prognostic accuracy for mRS, AUROC 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-0.82), and SPI2 had poorest AUROC, 0.61 (95% CI 0.57-0.66). Our separate analyses confirmed these results: ASTRAL AUROC 0.79 (95% CI 0.78-0.80 and SPI2 AUROC 0.60 (95% CI 0.59-0.61). On formal comparative testing, there was a significant difference in modified Rankin Scale AUROC between ASTRAL and all other scales. Sensitivity analysis identified no evidence of systematic bias from missing data. Our comparative analyses confirm differences in the prognostic accuracy of stroke scales. However, even the best performing scale had prognostic accuracy that may not

  13. Outcome measurement in stroke: a scale selection strategy.

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    Baker, Karen; Cano, Stefan J; Playford, E Diane

    2011-06-01

    Evaluating the impact of new treatments requires the use of reliable, valid, and responsive outcome measures. However, given the wide range of instruments currently available, it is not always straightforward for healthcare professionals to select the most appropriate tool. In this review, we propose a potential approach to scale selection. In designing a new study of the impact of a robotic device in stroke rehabilitation, we developed a three-stage scale selection strategy. First, two guidance documents (Medical Outcome Trust and Food and Drug Administration PRO Guidance) were reviewed to identify key scale assessment criteria. Second, consideration was given at a theoretical level of the concepts and domains relevant to the goals our study. Third, a comprehensive literature search strategy and review were developed in conjunction with healthcare professionals and psychometricians. Identified scales were appraised regarding their psychometric properties and clinical content. Forty-five measures were initially identified and appraised. From a clinical content perspective, none of the measures were considered to be sufficient on their own to capture all the important outcome domains in this study. However, 3 measures were identified that best met our review criteria: Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement, Chedoke Arm and Hand Inventory, and ABILHAND. After the final stage of scale appraisal, two further upper limb scales (Fugl-Meyer and Action Research Arm Test) were included based on clinical content and study design issues. Our three-stage review process appears to be a potentially useful approach for evidence-based scale selection in stroke rehabilitation studies.

  14. Impact of social support on participation after stroke in Nigeria.

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    Vincent-Onabajo, Grace Oluwatitofunmi; Ihaza, Louis Oselene; Usman Ali, Muhammad; Ali Masta, Mamman; Majidadi, Rebecca; Modu, Ali; Umeonwuka, Chuka

    2016-10-01

    Participation which entails involvement in life situations and represents a higher level of functioning can be severely restricted after a stroke. This study investigated the impact of social support on participation of stroke survivors in Nigeria. Ninety-six community-residing stroke survivors were recruited from physiotherapy outpatient departments of two tertiary care hospitals in Northern Nigeria. Socio-demographic, clinical, participation (London Handicap Scale), and social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support) data were obtained. The impact of social support on global and domain-specific participation was examined using bivariate analyses and multiple regression analyses. Mean (SD) age of the stroke survivors was 56.6 (12.0) years. Social support was a significant (β = 0.41, p participation (p Social support, however, had no independent effect on overall participation and the other participation domains namely mobility, physical independence, occupation, social integration, and orientation. The impact of social support was significant only in the economic self-sufficiency domain of participation with higher availability of social support related to better economic self-sufficiency. This finding provides additional information on the importance of social support post-stroke.

  15. THE IMPACT OF COMORBIDITY ON COGNITIVE PARAMETERS AFTER ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirena Valkova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to examine the impact of comorbidity on cognitive parameters after the first ever ischemic stroke.Material and methods: We examined 112 patients (aged 46 to 84 (66.67± 5.96, 69 males and 43 females with first ever ischemic stroke. For cognitive assessment we used Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 10 word test (for short term memory and delayed recall, Isaack’s test for verbal fluency (VF, Geriatric depression scale (GDS, Hamilton depression scale (HDS, Blessed dementia information memory concentration test (revised, BDIMCT, Benton Visual Retention test (A,E; BVRT – number of corrects and number of errors and Wiskonsin Card Sorting Test (number of errors, WCST. The patients were examined on two step model. At acute stage, after collecting medical history, somatic and neurological examinations, MMSE, 10 words test and HDS were applied. At subacute stroke stage (90±5 days after first stroke symptoms, all cognitive tests were used. „STATGRAPHICS Plus 5.0 (free version” was used for statistical analysis.Results: Chronic ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most important additional risk factors for cognitive decline. Thyroid pathology, renal failure and anemia are independently associated with poststroke depression.Conclusions: On the basis of these data we can conclude that vascular risk factors are independently associated with cognitive and emotional changes after stroke and their effects should be assessed and taken into account for subsequent treatment of stroke survivors.

  16. Pilot assessment of a comfort scale in stroke patients.

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    Rogeau, Caroline; Beaucamp, Franck; Allart, Etienne; Daveluy, Walter; Rousseaux, Marc

    2014-04-15

    Comfort/discomfort (C/D) is an important factor of quality of life (QoL). Brain damage is a major source of discomfort. We developed a questionnaire for assessing C/D in daily living situations and for identifying the main causes of any discomfort and presented its pilot assessment in a population of stroke patients. The scale is a questionnaire of the patient or caregiver that addresses (i) comfort/discomfort in 15 situations of daily living (including getting dressed, washing, lying in bed and sitting in a chair) and (ii) the roles of physical difficulties, psychological problems and a poorly adapted environment. We analysed its metrological qualities in a group of 62 stroke patients. For the patients, the most uncomfortable activities were eating, dressing the lower body, urine and faeces elimination and walking, and the most significant factors of discomfort were motor impairments, fatigue, limb stiffness, joint pain, depression and anxiety. The reliability was fair for the overall score and for each C/D item and moderate for the impact of impairments on comfort/discomfort. We also found fair internal consistency and convergent validity against measures of functional status, QoL and burden of care. Sensitivity to change over a 6-week period was modest. The scale can help to define difficulties in daily living situations and identify opportunities for intervention in stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment scales in stroke: clinimetric and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison JK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer K Harrison,1 Katherine S McArthur,2 Terence J Quinn21Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: As stroke care has developed, there has been a need to robustly assess the efficacy of interventions both at the level of the individual stroke survivor and in the context of clinical trials. To describe stroke-survivor recovery meaningfully, more sophisticated measures are required than simple dichotomous end points, such as mortality or stroke recurrence. As stroke is an exemplar disabling long-term condition, measures of function are well suited as outcome assessment. In this review, we will describe functional assessment scales in stroke, concentrating on three of the more commonly used tools: the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index. We will discuss the strengths, limitations, and application of these scales and use the scales to highlight important properties that are relevant to all assessment tools. We will frame much of this discussion in the context of "clinimetric" analysis. As they are increasingly used to inform stroke-survivor assessments, we will also discuss some of the commonly used quality-of-life measures. A recurring theme when considering functional assessment is that no tool suits all situations. Clinicians and researchers should chose their assessment tool based on the question of interest and the evidence base around clinimetric properties.Keywords: Barthel Index, clinimetrics, clinical trial, disability, methodology, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes Health Stroke Scale, scales, stroke, outcomes

  18. Contribución de la adaptación y validación de la escala sis-16 (stroke impact scale) en el manejo de la rehabilitación de pacientes con ictus

    OpenAIRE

    Palomino Aguado, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio es, por una parte, disponer de una escala de valoración de discapacidad específica para el ictus, que sea sencilla de manejar en la práctica clínica y que a la vez nos permita medir la repercusión que tiene la enfermedad en el paciente en la esfera funcional. Para ello, se llevará a cabo la adaptación transcultural al español y su posterior validación de la escala SIS-16 (Stroke Impact Scale- Escala de Impacto del Ictus), que cuantifica el impacto de...

  19. Prospective study to assess national institutes of health stroke scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability and predicting functional outcome early at presentation would guide treatment and rehabilitation plans. The aim of this study was to assess baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as predictor of functional outcome. Methods: Ninety consecutive ...

  20. Quality of life after stroke. Impact of stroke type and lesion location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, R. J.; Limburg, M.; van der Meulen, J. H.; Jacobs, H. M.; Aaronson, N. K.

    1995-01-01

    Little attention has been focused on the relationship between neurological lesions and quality of life (QL) in stroke research. The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of stroke types and lesion locations on QL. The study sample was composed of 441 stroke patients. Lesion locations and

  1. Validation of international stroke scales for use by nurses in Greek settings.

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    Theofanidis, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Improving stroke outcomes by educating nurses in state-of-the-art stroke nursing skills is essential, but unfortunately, to date, there are limited validated stroke assessment scales for routine clinical and research use in Greece. The aim of this paper is to validate and culturally adapt three internationally recognised stroke scales for use in Greece. A critical appraisal of the international literature was undertaken to identify suitable scales to assess stroke impact: neurological, functional status and level of dependence. We identified: Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS), Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS). They were formally translated and culturally adapted from English to Greek. Their validity was tested using Cronbach's alpha and Median Discrimination Index, while construct validity was checked by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). These were used on 57 consecutively selected patients with stroke from a Greek hospital, mean age 67.7 (±6.7 SD) years, range 54-85 years, length of stay, 8.5 (±2.7 SD) days. All three scales show high internal consistency. The Cronbach's α on admission/ discharge for the SSS ranged from 0.86 to 0.88. The BI's reliability ranged from 0.95 to 0.93. The Median Discrimination Index was 0.70 (SSS) and 0.83 (BI). PCA showed that although a significant general factor (F1) explains most of the variance (57.0% on admission and 56.4% on discharge) a second factor (F2) of less significance was also highlighted. The convergent validity of the three scales was confirmed. The stroke tools selected showed high reliability and validity, thus making these suitable for use in Greek clinical/academic environments. All three scales used are almost routinely undertaken in stroke studies internationally and form a backdrop for bio-statistical, functional and social outcome post-stroke. The Greek version of the stroke tools show that both SSS and BI have high internal consistency and reliability and together with the mRS could be

  2. The post-stroke depression and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients of a rehabilitation unit.

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    Amaricai, Elena; Poenaru, Dan V

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and a major public health problem. To determine frequency and degree of post-stroke depression (PSD) and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit. The study included 72 stroke patients (aged 29-59 years) who were attending rehabilitation. The patients were assessed for depressive symptoms by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and their functioning by using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Forty-eight patients had different degrees of depression: borderline clinical depression (13.8%), moderate depression (34.7%), severe depression (15.2%) or extreme depression (2.9%). There were no significant differences of BDI scores in 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years groups. Statistically significant correlations were between BDI score and SIS score, between BDI score and ADL index, and between SIS score and ADL index in men, women and total study patients. More than half of the PSD patients had a moderate degree of depression. Significant correlations were noticed between depressive symptoms and functional status evaluated both by an instrument of assessing stroke impact upon general health and an instrument for assessing the everyday activities.

  3. Estimated Impact of Emergency Medical Service Triage of Stroke Patients on Comprehensive Stroke Centers: An Urban Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian S; Adeoye, Opeolu; Sucharew, Heidi; Broderick, Joseph P; McMullan, Jason; Khatri, Pooja; Widener, Michael; Alwell, Kathleen S; Moomaw, Charles J; Kissela, Brett M; Flaherty, Matthew L; Woo, Daniel; Ferioli, Simona; Mackey, Jason; Martini, Sharyl; De Los Rios la Rosa, Felipe; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-08-01

    The American Stroke Association recommends that Emergency Medical Service bypass acute stroke-ready hospital (ASRH)/primary stroke center (PSC) for comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) when transporting appropriate stroke patients, if the additional travel time is ≤15 minutes. However, data on additional transport time and the effect on hospital census remain unknown. Stroke patients ≥20 years old who were transported from home to an ASRH/PSC or CSC via Emergency Medical Service in 2010 were identified in the Greater Cincinnati area population of 1.3 million. Addresses of all patients' residences and hospitals were geocoded, and estimated travel times were calculated. We estimated the mean differences between the travel time for patients taken to an ASRH/PSC and the theoretical time had they been transported directly to the region's CSC. Of 929 patients with geocoded addresses, 806 were transported via Emergency Medical Service directly to an ASRH/PSC. Mean additional travel time of direct transport to the CSC, compared with transport to an ASRH/PSC, was 7.9±6.8 minutes; 85% would have ≤15 minutes added transport time. Triage of all stroke patients to the CSC would have added 727 patients to the CSC's census in 2010. Limiting triage to the CSC to patients with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≥10 within 6 hours of onset would have added 116 patients (2.2 per week) to the CSC's annual census. Emergency Medical Service triage to CSCs based on stroke severity and symptom duration may be feasible. The impact on stroke systems of care and patient outcomes remains to be determined and requires prospective evaluation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale Danish version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muus, Ingrid; Christensen, Doris; Petzold, Max

    2011-01-01

    To test responsiveness and sensitivity to change of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale Danish version (SSQOL-DK) scores in patients following stroke.......To test responsiveness and sensitivity to change of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale Danish version (SSQOL-DK) scores in patients following stroke....

  5. Association between nih stroke scale score and functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, S.; Fazal, N.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between baseline national institutes of health stroke scale score and functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical unit-IV, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, from May 2009 to October 2009. Patients and Methods: Patients who presented with stroke within 24 hours of onset of symptom and had a developing infarct on the CT- scan were further evaluated for neurological impairment using NIH stroke scale. The baseline NIHSS score was calculated using a proforma. Age of the patient, gender and time of presentation to the hospital was recorded. Follow-up was done on the 7th day of admission using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Results: Total number of subjects was 150. Good outcome (GOS=1-2) was noticed in those subjects who had a low baseline NIHSS score (0-6) while poor outcome (GOS=3-5) was noticed in those subjects who had a higher baseline NIHSS score (>16)( p value< 0.05). In cases who had a moderate score (7-15); the ratio of good outcome to bad outcome was almost 70:30. Likewise good outcome (GOS=1-2) was noticed in those subjects who were younger (less than 45 years) while poor outcome (GOS=3-5) was noticed in the elderly (more than 45 years)( p value< 0.05). Similarly patients who presented within 12 hrs of symptom onset had a good outcome compared to those who presented after 12 hrs( p value< 0.05). Conclusion: Baseline NIH Stroke Scale score is strongly associated with functional outcome after 1 week of acute ischemic stroke. (author)

  6. The impact of stroke aphasia on health and well-being and appropriate nursing interventions: an exploration using the Theory of Human Scale Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Juliana; McKeever, Margo

    2014-02-01

    This paper considers the impact of aphasia on health and well-being and provides suggestions for appropriate nursing interventions. Background.  Effective communication is essential to holistic care and positive outcomes for individuals affected by aphasia. When verbal communication is absent, nurses fail to adequately use alternative strategies so that the standard of nurse/patient communication is frequently poor. This is a discursive paper which reviews relevant literature and uses the Theory of Human Scale Development as a framework for discussion. The Theory of Human Scale Development is introduced. This theory emphasises that quality of life depends as much upon self-actualisation and relation building as on physical health. The theory is used within the discussion to highlight the significance of communication to quality of life and how its loss has profound psychological and social consequences. Aphasia results in 'loss of self'. The situation is exacerbated by inadequate healthcare communication strategies. Suggestions are offered regarding more appropriate strategies. Efficacy of family input is considered; nursing competence regarding language practice therapies is discussed, and the 'quest approach' is explored. Aphasia has a negative impact on relationships by denying access to support networks, which results in isolation. The individual's predicament is worsened by negative nursing responses. Positive nursing strategies, which alleviate effects of aphasia on individuals' social health, are investigated. Concept analysis and self-awareness exercises as methods of enhancing compassion skills are explored. The social model of disability is discussed to highlight the benefits to individuals of environmental adaptations. The social benefits of aphasia-group affiliation are discussed. The paper concludes by emphasising that fundamental human needs involve social and psychological as well as physical aspects. Nursing interventions must address all needs to

  7. Impact of the Swedish National Stroke Campaign on stroke awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanstig, A; Asplund, K; Norrving, B; Wahlgren, N; Wester, P; Rosengren, L

    2017-10-01

    Time delay from stroke onset to arrival in hospital is an important obstacle to widespread reperfusion therapy. To increase knowledge about stroke, and potentially decrease this delay, a 27-month national public information campaign was carried out in Sweden. To assess the effects of a national stroke campaign in Sweden. The variables used to measure campaign effects were knowledge of the AKUT test [a Swedish equivalent of the FAST (Face-Arm-Speech-Time)] test and intent to call 112 (emergency telephone number) . Telephone interviews were carried out with 1500 randomly selected people in Sweden at eight points in time: before, three times during, immediately after, and nine, 13 and 21 months after the campaign. Before the campaign, 4% could recall the meaning of some or all keywords in the AKUT test, compared with 23% during and directly after the campaign, and 14% 21 months later. Corresponding figures were 15%, 51%, and 50% for those remembering the term AKUT and 65%, 76%, and 73% for intent to call 112 when observing or experiencing stroke symptoms. During the course of the campaign, improvement of stroke knowledge was similar among men and women, but the absolute level of knowledge for both items was higher for women at all time points. The nationwide campaign substantially increased knowledge about the AKUT test and intention to call 112 when experiencing or observing stroke symptoms, but knowledge declined post-intervention. Repeated public information therefore appears essential to sustain knowledge gains. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Future costs of stroke in the Netherlands: the impact of stroke services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Jeroen N.; van Genugten, Marianne L. L.; Evers, Silvia M. A. A.; Ament, André J. H.; Baan, Caroline A.; van den Bos, Geertrudis A. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the next decades, the number of stroke patients is expected to increase. Furthermore, organizational changes, such as stroke services, are expected to be implemented on a large scale. The purpose of this study is to estimate the future healthcare costs by taking into account the

  9. Evaluation of the Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale in Chinese patients in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-lin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the performance of the Recognition Of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale in risk-stratifying Chinese patients with suspected stroke in Hong Kong. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study in an urban academic emergency department (ED over a 7-month period. Patients over 18 years of age with suspected stroke were recruited between June 2011 and December 2011. ROSIER scale assessment was performed in the ED triage area. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the impacts of diagnostic variables, including ROSIER scale, past history and ED characteristics. FINDINGS: 715 suspected stroke patients were recruited for assessment, of whom 371 (52% had acute cerebrovascular disease (302 ischaemic strokes, 24 transient ischaemic attacks (TIA, 45 intracerebral haemorrhages, and 344 (48% had other illnesses i.e. stroke mimics. Common stroke mimics were spinal neuropathy, dementia, labyrinthitis and sepsis. The suggested cut-off score of>0 for the ROSIER scale for stroke diagnosis gave a sensitivity of 87% (95%CI 83-90, a specificity of 41% (95%CI 36-47, a positive predictive value of 62% (95%CI 57-66, and a negative predictive value of 75% (95%CI 68-81, and the AUC was 0.723. The overall accuracy at cut off>0 was 65% i.e. (323+141/715. INTERPRETATION: The ROSIER scale was not as effective at differentiating acute stroke from stroke mimics in Chinese patients in Hong Kong as it was in the original studies, primarily due to a much lower specificity. If the ROSIER scale is to be clinically useful in Chinese suspected stroke patients, it requires further refinement.

  10. Earthquake impact scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.S.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of the USGS prompt assessment of global earthquakes for response (PAGER) system, which rapidly assesses earthquake impacts, U.S. and international earthquake responders are reconsidering their automatic alert and activation levels and response procedures. To help facilitate rapid and appropriate earthquake response, an Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS) is proposed on the basis of two complementary criteria. On the basis of the estimated cost of damage, one is most suitable for domestic events; the other, on the basis of estimated ranges of fatalities, is generally more appropriate for global events, particularly in developing countries. Simple thresholds, derived from the systematic analysis of past earthquake impact and associated response levels, are quite effective in communicating predicted impact and response needed after an event through alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1,000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered by estimated losses reaching $1M, $100M, and $1B, respectively. The rationale for a dual approach to earthquake alerting stems from the recognition that relatively high fatalities, injuries, and homelessness predominate in countries in which local building practices typically lend themselves to high collapse and casualty rates, and these impacts lend to prioritization for international response. In contrast, financial and overall societal impacts often trigger the level of response in regions or countries in which prevalent earthquake resistant construction practices greatly reduce building collapse and resulting fatalities. Any newly devised alert, whether economic- or casualty-based, should be intuitive and consistent with established lexicons and procedures. Useful alerts should

  11. Psychometric properties of the Caregiver Preparedness Scale in caregivers of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, Gianluca; Savini, Serenella; Byun, Eeeseung; Simeone, Silvio; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Vela, Raúl Juárez; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Caregiver Preparedness Scale (CPS) in caregivers of stroke survivors. Caregiver preparedness can have an important impact on both the caregiver and the stroke survivor. The validity and reliability of the CPS has not been tested for the stroke-caregiver population. We used a cross-sectional design to study a sample of 156 caregivers of stroke survivors. Construct validity of the CPS was evaluated by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were also evaluated. Caregivers were, on average, 54 year old (SD = 13.2) and most were women (64.7%). CFA supported the unidimensionality of the scale (comparative fit index = 0.98). Reliability was also supported: item-reliability index and item-total correlations above 0.30; composite reliability index = 0.93; Cronbach's alpha = 0.94; factor score determinacy = 0.97; and test-retest reliability = 0.92. The CPS is valid and reliable in caregivers of stroke survivors. Scores on this scale may assist health-care providers in identifying caregivers with less preparedness to provide specific interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ischemic Stroke and Cancer: Stroke Severely Impacts Cancer Patients, While Cancer Increases the Number of Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Seok, Jin Myoung; Kim, Seon Gyeong; Hong, Ji Man; Kim, Hahn Young; Lee, Jun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer and ischemic stroke are two of the most common causes of death among the elderly, and associations between them have been reported. However, the main pathomechanisms of stroke in cancer patients are not well known, and can only be established based on accurate knowledge of the characteristics of cancer-related strokes. We review herein recent studies concerning the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of patients with cancer-related stroke. Main Contents This revi...

  13. Post-stroke depression: Prevalence, associated factors and impact ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of post-stroke depression (PSD), its associated factors and impact on quality of life (QoL) among outpatients in a Nigerian hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 140 adults made up of 70 stroke survivors and matched controls with stable hypertension.

  14. 7. The Socio-Economic Impact of Stroke on

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Livingstone, Zambia, more than 30% of stroke victims indicate socio-economic problems. The study aimed at assessing the socio-economic impact of stroke in households in Livingstone district. A total of 50 households were conveniently selected from the Physiotherapy and Community Based. Rehabilitation registers of ...

  15. Are the hierarchical properties of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale the same in acute stroke and chronic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, J Lesley; Kwakkel, Gert; Bussmann, Johannes B J; Goos, Jos A G; Harmeling-van der Wel, Barbara C

    2014-07-01

    The motor function section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale (FM motor scale) is a robust scale of motor ability in people after stroke, with high predictive validity for outcome. However, the FM motor scale is time-consuming. The hierarchical properties of the upper extremity (UE) and lower extremity (LE) sections of the FM motor scale have been established in people with chronic stroke. These data support the use of a more concise method of administration and confirm scores can be legitimately summed. The aim of this study was to establish that a similar hierarchy exists in people within 72 hours after stroke onset. A prospective, cross-sectional design was used. Data were obtained from 75 eligible people in a nationwide prospective study (the Early Prediction of Functional Outcome After Stroke). The full version of both sections of the FM motor scale was administered within 72 hours after stroke onset. The hierarchy of item difficulty was investigated by applying Guttman scaling procedures within each stage and each subsection of the UE and LE sections of the scale. The scaling procedures then were applied to item difficulty between stages and subsections and finally across all scale items (stage divisions ignored) of the FM motor scale. For all analyses, the results exceeded acceptable levels for the coefficient of reproducibility and the coefficient of scalability. The sample was a population of people with stroke of moderate severity. The unidimensional hierarchy of the UE and LE sections of the FM motor scale (already established for chronic stroke) within 72 hours after stroke onset was confirmed. A legitimate total summed score can indicate a person's level of motor ability. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  16. Are the Hierarchical Properties of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale the Same in Acute Stroke and Chronic Stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crow, J.L.; Kwakkel, G.; Bussmann, J.B.J.; Goos, J.A.G.; Harmeling-van d Wel, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The motor function section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale (FM motor scale) is a robust scale of motor ability in people after stroke, with high predictive validity for outcome. However, the FM motor scale is time-consuming. The hierarchical properties of the upper extremity (UE) and

  17. Design and validation of a clinical scale for prehospital stroke recognition, severity grading and prediction of large vessel occlusion: the shortened NIH Stroke Scale for emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrucker, Jan Christoph; Härtig, Florian; Richter, Hardy; Engelbrecht, Andreas; Hartmann, Johannes; Auer, Jonas; Hametner, Christian; Popp, Erik; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Nagel, Simon; Poli, Sven

    2017-09-01

    To develop an NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS)-compatible, all-in-one scale for rapid and comprehensive prehospital stroke assessment including stroke recognition, severity grading and progression monitoring as well as prediction of large vessel occlusion (LVO). Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and stroke physicians (n=326) rated each item of the NIHSS regarding suitability for prehospital use; best rated items were included. Stroke recognition was evaluated retrospectively in 689 consecutive patients with acute stroke or stroke mimics, prediction of LVO in 741 consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke with acute vessel imaging independent of admission NIHSS score. Nine of the NIHSS items were rated as 'suitable for prehospital use.' After excluding two items in order to increase specificity, the final scale (termed shortened NIHSS for EMS, sNIHSS-EMS) consists of 'level of consciousness', 'facial palsy', 'motor arm/leg', 'sensory', 'language' and 'dysarthria'. Sensitivity for stroke recognition of the sNIHSS-EMS is 91% (95% CI 86 to 94), specificity 52% (95% CI 47 to 56). Receiver operating curve analysis revealed an optimal cut-off point for LVO prediction of ≥6 (sensitivity 70% (95% CI 65 to 76), specificity 81% (95% CI 76 to 84), positive predictive value 70 (95% CI 65 to 75), area under the curve 0.81 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.84)). Test characteristics were non-inferior to non-comprehensive scales. The sNIHSS-EMS may overcome the sequential use of multiple emergency stroke scales by permitting parallel stroke recognition, severity grading and LVO prediction. Full NIHSS-item compatibility allows for evaluation of stroke progression starting at the prehospital phase. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Correlation of perfusion- and diffusion-weighted MRI with Japan stroke scale in acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Naoki; Murakami, Masato; Mikami, Taishi; Kamoshita, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-imaging (PI) MRI are powerful new techniques for the assessment of early ischemic changes in acute stroke patients. We aimed to determine whether the results of these acute phase DWI and PI MRI are useful to predict their neurological outcomes. DWI, PI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging (FLAIR) MRI lesion volumes were compared with neurological deficit as determined by Japan Stroke Scale (JSS) and Barthel index in 12 patients with acute stroke at two time points. Patients were scanned and their clinical severity was measured first at their admission and two weeks after the initial scan. We could perform MRI within 5 days (mean: 2.6 days), and detect the latest ischemic lesions with initial DWI in all cases. Most patients showed decreased DWI lesion volumes, increased FLAIR volumes and decreased JSS scores reflecting their neurological improvements. Initial DWI volumes correlated with follow-up FLAIR volumes (p=0.0047, r 2 =0.976). The results seem to indicate that lesion volumes determined by DWI in the acute phase may be predictive of irreversible ischemic lesion, although the initial MRI study did not correlate with JSS, BI and patients' age. (author)

  19. Impact of Libido at 2 Weeks after Stroke on Risk of Stroke Recurrence at 1-Year in a Chinese Stroke Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Jing Li; Huai-Wu Yuan; Chun-Xue Wang; Ben-Yan Luo; Jie Ruan; Ning Zhang; Yu-Zhi Shi; Yong Zhou; Yi-Long Wang; Tong Zhang; Juan Zhou; Xing-Quan Zhao; Yong-Jun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: There were few studies on the relation between changes in libido and incidence of stroke recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between libido decrease at 2 weeks after stroke and recurrent stroke at 1-year. Methods: It is a multi-centered, prospective cohort study. The 14 th item of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 was used to evaluate changes of libido in poststroke patients at 2 weeks. Stroke recurrence was defined as an aggravation of ...

  20. Combined life satisfaction of persons with stroke and their caregivers: associations with caregiver burden and the impact of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Koch Lena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the life satisfaction of the person with stroke combined with their caregiver, i.e. the dyad, despite the fact that life satisfaction is an important rehabilitation outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the dyads combined life satisfaction and to understand this in relationship to the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life and caregiver burden. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the life satisfaction of persons and their informal caregivers was measured in 81 dyads one year post stroke. Their global life satisfaction, measured with LiSat-11, was combined to a dyad score and the dyads were then categorized as satisfied, dissatisfied or discordant. The groups were compared and analyzed regarding levels of caregiver burden, measured with the Caregiver Burden scale, and the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life, measured with the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS. Results The satisfied dyads comprised 40%, dissatisfied 26% and those that were discordant 34%. The satisfied dyads reported a significantly lower impact of the stroke in everyday life compared with the dyads that were not satisfied. As expected, dyads that were not satisfied reported a significantly greater caregiver burden compared with the satisfied dyads. The discordant group was further broken down into a group of dissatisfied and satisfied caregivers. The caregivers that were not satisfied in the discordant group perceived a significantly greater level of caregiver burden compared with the satisfied group. Even caregivers who were satisfied with life but whose care recipients were not satisfied reported caregiver burden. Conclusions Measuring combined life satisfaction provides a unique focus and appears to be a feasible way of attaining the dyads' perspective. The findings suggest that those dyads with a discordant life satisfaction could be vulnerable because of the caregivers' reported caregiver burden. These findings

  1. Combined life satisfaction of persons with stroke and their caregivers: associations with caregiver burden and the impact of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Aileen L; Eriksson, Gunilla; von Koch, Lena; Tham, Kerstin

    2011-01-11

    Little is known about the life satisfaction of the person with stroke combined with their caregiver, i.e. the dyad, despite the fact that life satisfaction is an important rehabilitation outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the dyads combined life satisfaction and to understand this in relationship to the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life and caregiver burden. In this cross-sectional study, the life satisfaction of persons and their informal caregivers was measured in 81 dyads one year post stroke. Their global life satisfaction, measured with LiSat-11, was combined to a dyad score and the dyads were then categorized as satisfied, dissatisfied or discordant. The groups were compared and analyzed regarding levels of caregiver burden, measured with the Caregiver Burden scale, and the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life, measured with the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). The satisfied dyads comprised 40%, dissatisfied 26% and those that were discordant 34%. The satisfied dyads reported a significantly lower impact of the stroke in everyday life compared with the dyads that were not satisfied. As expected, dyads that were not satisfied reported a significantly greater caregiver burden compared with the satisfied dyads. The discordant group was further broken down into a group of dissatisfied and satisfied caregivers. The caregivers that were not satisfied in the discordant group perceived a significantly greater level of caregiver burden compared with the satisfied group. Even caregivers who were satisfied with life but whose care recipients were not satisfied reported caregiver burden. Measuring combined life satisfaction provides a unique focus and appears to be a feasible way of attaining the dyads' perspective. The findings suggest that those dyads with a discordant life satisfaction could be vulnerable because of the caregivers' reported caregiver burden. These findings support the importance of a dyadic perspective and add to the

  2. Prehospital Acute Stroke Severity Scale to Predict Large Artery Occlusion: Design and Comparison With Other Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Sidsel; Damgaard, Dorte; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Andersen, Grethe

    2016-07-01

    We designed and validated a simple prehospital stroke scale to identify emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) in patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared the scale to other published scales for prediction of ELVO. A national historical test cohort of 3127 patients with information on intracranial vessel status (angiography) before reperfusion therapy was identified. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) items with the highest predictive value of occlusion of a large intracranial artery were identified, and the most optimal combination meeting predefined criteria to ensure usefulness in the prehospital phase was determined. The predictive performance of Prehospital Acute Stroke Severity (PASS) scale was compared with other published scales for ELVO. The PASS scale was composed of 3 NIHSS scores: level of consciousness (month/age), gaze palsy/deviation, and arm weakness. In derivation of PASS 2/3 of the test cohort was used and showed accuracy (area under the curve) of 0.76 for detecting large arterial occlusion. Optimal cut point ≥2 abnormal scores showed: sensitivity=0.66 (95% CI, 0.62-0.69), specificity=0.83 (0.81-0.85), and area under the curve=0.74 (0.72-0.76). Validation on 1/3 of the test cohort showed similar performance. Patients with a large artery occlusion on angiography with PASS ≥2 had a median NIHSS score of 17 (interquartile range=6) as opposed to PASS <2 with a median NIHSS score of 6 (interquartile range=5). The PASS scale showed equal performance although more simple when compared with other scales predicting ELVO. The PASS scale is simple and has promising accuracy for prediction of ELVO in the field. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Impact of emergency medical services stroke routing protocols on Primary Stroke Center certification in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberg, Sam; Song, Sarah; Saver, Jeffrey L; Mack, William J; Cen, Steven Y; Sanossian, Nerses

    2013-12-01

    Organized stroke systems of care include Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and preferential emergency medical services (EMS) routing of suspected patients with stroke to designated PSCs. Stroke EMS routing is not nationally governed; in California, routing is determined by county. EMS routing policies might provide an incentive for PSC accreditation. We evaluated the relationship between independent adoption of EMS routing protocols and PSC designation acquisition in California. Dates of PSC certification were obtained through The Joint Commissions Website and confirmatory calls to stroke coordinators. Starting date of county EMS PSC routing policies was obtained from county EMS agencies. We provide descriptive analysis of number of hospitals achieving PSC designation relative to implementation of EMS routing policies for all counties with PSCs. By June 2012, there were 131 California PSCs in 27 counties, and 22 of 58 counties had implemented EMS routing policies. The greatest number of PSCs was in Los Angeles (30) followed by San Diego (11), Orange (9), and Santa Clara (9) counties. Achievement of PSC designation occurred more frequently immediately before and after EMS routing: 51 PSCs (39%) within 1 year; 85 PSCs (65%) within 2 years. The yearly rate of eligible hospital conversion to PSC designation accelerated concurrent with EMS diversion policy adoption from 3.8% before to 16.2% during and decelerated afterward to 7.6%. Implementation of EMS routing policies may be an important factor driving PSC certification. National adoption of stroke routing policies may lead to more PSCs, positively impacting patient care.

  4. Use of the Barthel Index and Modified Rankin Scale in acute stroke trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, C; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    Background and Purpose-The Barthel Index (BI) and the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) are commonly used scales that: measure disability or dependence in activities of daily living in stroke victims. The objective of this study was to investigate how these scales were used and interpreted in acute stroke

  5. Correlation between upper limb function and oral health impact in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernanda C; da Silva, Daniela F T; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Bussadori, Sandra K

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between upper limb impairment and oral health impact in individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were conducted with a sample of 27 stroke survivors with complete or partial hemiparesis with brachial or crural predominance. The 14-item short version of the Oral Health Impact Profile was used to evaluate perceptions of oral health. The Brazilian version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale was used to evaluate perceptions regarding quality of life. [Results] A statistically significant association was found between the upper extremity function subscale of the SSQOL-Brazil and the impact of oral health evaluated using the OHIP-14, with a strong correlation found for the physical pain subscale, moderate correlations with the functional limitation, psychological discomfort, physical disability, social disability and social handicap subscales as well as a weak correlation with the psychological disability subscale. Analyzing the OHIP-14 scores with regard to the impact of oral health on quality of life, the most frequent classification was weak impact, with small rates of moderate and strong impact. [Conclusion] Compromised upper limb function and self-perceived poor oral health, whether due to cultural resignation or functional disability, exert a negative impact on the quality of life of individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke.

  6. Measuring stroke impact with SIS: construct validity of SIS telephone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooyeon; Duncan, Pamela; Studenski, Stephanie; Perera, Subashan; Lai, Sue Min; Reker, Dean

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) using telephone mode of administration. Stroke patients were identified using national VA administrative data and ICD-9 codes in 13 participating VA hospitals. Stroke was confirmed by reviewing electronic medical records. Patients were administered SIS by telephone at 12-weeks post-stroke, and administered the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and SF-36V at 16 weeks post-stroke. The instrument's convergent validity and its ability to differentiate between groups of stroke patients with different disability levels were examined using Pearson's correlations and Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA tests. All the relevant relationships yielded high correlation coefficients with statistical significance: 0.86 for FIM-motor vs. SIS-ADL, and 0.77 for PF in SF-36V vs. SIS-PHYSICAL. The SIS presented better score discrimination and distribution for different severity of stroke than FIM and SF-36V without severe ceiling and floor effects. Kruskal-Wallis tests showed the Physical Component Score of SF-36V did not discriminate any disability levels. Physical functioning (PF) in SF-36V, FIM-motor, SIS-PHYSICAL, SIS-16, and SIS-ADL showed better discrimination in person's functioning. The pairwise comparisons showed that SIS-PHYSICAL, SIS-16, and SIS-ADL discriminated more Rankin levels than FIM-motor and PF in SF-36V. SIS telephone survey had superior convergent validity and was better at differentiating between groups of stroke patients with different disability levels than the FIM and SF-36V with no evidence of ceiling and floor effects. Telephone administration of SIS would be a useful and cost-effective method to follow-up community dwelling veterans with stroke.

  7. Impact of central facial palsy and dysarthria on quality of life in patients with stroke: The KOSCO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Sohn, Min Kyun; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Deog Young; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Shin, Yong-Il; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lee, Yang-Soo; Joo, Min Cheol; Han, Eun Young; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-06-27

    There are a few reports on the impact of central facial palsy and dysarthria on quality of life (QOL) in stroke patients. To investigate the impact of central facial palsy on QOL compared with dysarthria during the chronic phase in patients with first-ever strokes. This study represents an interim analysis of the Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation study. We selected data from patients with functional independence of 0 or 1 by the modified Rankin Scale at 6 months after stroke onset, who showed an impairment only in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale items 4 (facial palsy) or 10 (dysarthria). Assessments included the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and the Geriatric depression scale-short form (GDS-SF). Data from 149 patients were selected for this analysis from 3,929 patients who were followed up at 6 months. Thirty-nine and 110 patients were classified into the facial palsy and dysarthria groups, respectively. The groups did not differ significantly in baseline characteristics or functional assessments. EQ-5D was significantly lower in the facial palsy group than in the dysarthria group at 6 months after stroke (p = 0.036). GDS-SF was significantly higher in the facial palsy group than in the dysarthria group (p = 0.005). The results of this study revealed that central facial palsy clearly has a more negative impact on QOL than dysarthria in chronic stroke patients with functional independence.

  8. The impact of stroke on emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Bronwyn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotional intelligence (EI is important for personal, social and career success and has been linked to the frontal anterior cingulate, insula and amygdala regions. Aim To ascertain which stroke lesion sites impair emotional intelligence and relation to current frontal assessment measurements. Methods One hundred consecutive, non aphasic, independently functioning patients post stroke were evaluated with the Bar-On emotional intelligence test, "known as the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i" and frontal tests that included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and Frontal Systems Behavioral Inventory (FRSBE for correlational validity. The results of a screening, bedside frontal network syndrome test (FNS and NIHSS to document neurological deficit were also recorded. Lesion location was determined by the Cerefy digital, coxial brain atlas. Results After exclusions (n = 8, patients tested (n = 92, mean age 50.1, CI: 52.9, 47.3 years revealed that EQ-i scores were correlated (negatively with all FRSBE T sub-scores (apathy, disinhibition, executive, total, with self-reported scores correlating better than family reported scores. Regression analysis revealed age and FRSBE total scores as the most influential variables. The WCST error percentage T score did not correlate with the EQ-i scores. Based on ANOVA, there were significant differences among the lesion sites with the lowest mean EQ-i scores associated with temporal (71.5 and frontal (87.3 lesions followed by subtentorial (91.7, subcortical gray (92.6 and white (95.2 matter, and the highest scores associated with parieto-occipital lesions (113.1. Conclusions 1 Stroke impairs EI and is associated with apathy, disinhibition and executive functioning. 2 EI is associated with frontal, temporal, subcortical and subtentorial stroke syndromes.

  9. The impact of stroke on emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael; Cases, Lourdes Benes; Hoffmann, Bronwyn; Chen, Ren

    2010-10-28

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for personal, social and career success and has been linked to the frontal anterior cingulate, insula and amygdala regions. To ascertain which stroke lesion sites impair emotional intelligence and relation to current frontal assessment measurements. One hundred consecutive, non aphasic, independently functioning patients post stroke were evaluated with the Bar-On emotional intelligence test, "known as the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i)" and frontal tests that included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Frontal Systems Behavioral Inventory (FRSBE) for correlational validity. The results of a screening, bedside frontal network syndrome test (FNS) and NIHSS to document neurological deficit were also recorded. Lesion location was determined by the Cerefy digital, coxial brain atlas. After exclusions (n = 8), patients tested (n = 92, mean age 50.1, CI: 52.9, 47.3 years) revealed that EQ-i scores were correlated (negatively) with all FRSBE T sub-scores (apathy, disinhibition, executive, total), with self-reported scores correlating better than family reported scores. Regression analysis revealed age and FRSBE total scores as the most influential variables. The WCST error percentage T score did not correlate with the EQ-i scores. Based on ANOVA, there were significant differences among the lesion sites with the lowest mean EQ-i scores associated with temporal (71.5) and frontal (87.3) lesions followed by subtentorial (91.7), subcortical gray (92.6) and white (95.2) matter, and the highest scores associated with parieto-occipital lesions (113.1). 1) Stroke impairs EI and is associated with apathy, disinhibition and executive functioning. 2) EI is associated with frontal, temporal, subcortical and subtentorial stroke syndromes.

  10. Stroke survivors' views and experiences on impact of visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J

    2017-09-01

    We sought to determine stroke survivors' views on impact of stroke-related visual impairment to quality of life. Stroke survivors with visual impairment, more than 1 year post stroke onset, were recruited. Semistructured biographical narrative interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic approach to analysis of the qualitative data was adopted. Transcripts were systematically coded using NVivo10 software. Thirty-five stroke survivors were interviewed across the UK: 16 females, 19 males; aged 20-75 years at stroke onset. Five qualitative themes emerged: "Formal care," "Symptoms and self," "Adaptations," "Daily life," and "Information." Where visual problems existed, they were often not immediately recognized as part of the stroke syndrome and attributed to other causes such as migraine. Many participants did not receive early vision assessment or treatment for their visual problems. Visual problems included visual field loss, double vision, and perceptual problems. Impact of visual problems included loss in confidence, being a burden to others, increased collisions/accidents, and fear of falling. They made many self-identified adaptations to compensate for visual problems: magnifiers, large print, increased lighting, use of white sticks. There was a consistent lack of support and provision of information about visual problems. Poststroke visual impairment causes considerable impact to daily life which could be substantially improved by simple measures including early formal visual assessment, management and advice on adaptive strategies and self-management options. Improved education about poststroke visual impairment for the public and clinicians could aid earlier diagnosis of visual impairments.

  11. Impact of language barriers on stroke care and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Baiju R; Khan, Nadia A; O'Donnell, Martin J; Kapral, Moira K

    2015-03-01

    Language barriers may lead to poor quality of care, particularly for conditions like acute stroke for which diagnosis and treatment decision making rely on taking an accurate patient history. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of patient language barriers on quality of stroke care and clinical outcomes. This retrospective cohort study used data from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network. All Ontario patients who were admitted with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack between July 2003 and March 2008 were selected. Mortality, stroke outcomes, in-hospital complications, quality of care, and disposition were compared between those without (n=12 787) and with (n=1506) language barriers, which was defined based on the patient's preferred language. Hierarchical multivariable regression models determined the effect of language barriers, independent of baseline covariates. Patients with language barriers had better 7-day mortality than those without (7.0% versus 9.2%; OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.82; Planguage barriers. Patients who had language barriers had reduced mortality and better performance on some quality of care measures. These differences existed despite adjustment for many potential confounders, including ethnicity, prognostic factors, and stroke characteristics. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A Scale of Mobbing Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Erkan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop the Mobbing Impacts Scale and to examine its validity and reliability analyses. The sample of study consisted of 509 teachers from Sakarya. In this study construct validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliabilities and item analysis of the scale were examined. As a result of factor analysis for…

  13. Coexistent Sickle Cell Disease Has No Impact on the Safety or Outcome of Lytic Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Findings From Get With The Guidelines-Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert J; Cox, Margueritte; Ozark, Shelly D; Kanter, Julie; Schulte, Phillip J; Xian, Ying; Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Schwamm, Lee H

    2017-03-01

    The recommended treatment for ischemic stroke is tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator). Although sickle cell disease (SCD) represents no known contraindication to tPA, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health recommended acute exchange transfusion for stroke in SCD, not tPA. Data on safety and outcomes of tPA in patients are needed to guide tPA use in SCD. We matched patients from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke registry with SCD to patients without SCD and compared usage, complications, and discharge outcomes after tPA. Multivariable logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to assess outcomes. From 2 016 652 stroke patients admitted to Get With The Guidelines-Stroke sites in the United States, 832 SCD and 3328 non-SCD controls with no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale or blood pressure were identified. Neither the fraction receiving thrombolytic therapy (8.2% for SCD versus 9.4% non-SCD) nor symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (4.9% of SCD versus 3.2% non-SCD; P =0.4502) was different. There was no difference in a prespecified set of outcome measures for those with SCD compared with controls. Coexistent SCD had no significant impact on the safety or outcome of thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. Although the sample size is relatively small, these data suggest that adults with SCD and acute ischemic stroke should be treated with thrombolysis, if they otherwise qualify. Addition studies, however, should track the intracranial hemorrhage rate and provide information on other SCD-related care such as transfusion. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on neurological recovery after ischemic stroke: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, D; Sukumaran, S; Varma, R; Radhakrishnan, A

    2017-11-01

    The presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been found to adversely affect the neurological recovery after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) in previous observational studies. However, in most of these studies, diagnosis of OSA was based on oximetry data alone, raising concern in the accuracy of diagnosis as well as estimation of severity. Purpose of our study was to determine the prevalence and severity of OSA (based on polysomnography and American Association of Sleep Medicine [AASM] criteria) in patients with AIS and to compare the post-stroke neurological and functional outcome, in those with and without OSA. A prospective single-centre study was conducted over a period of eighteen months from January 2013. The demographic and clinical data were collected, and the etiology of stroke was classified according to TOAST classification. Subsequently, all selected patients (N=99) underwent premorbid sleep status assessment by Epworth Sleepiness Scale followed by polysomnography using Resmed ApneaLink polysomnograph. Data were analyzed to find out the prevalence and severity of OSA as well as its impact on neurological recovery as assessed by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin scale (mRS) at different time points, starting from admission. There was a high prevalence of OSA (~60%) with a quarter of them having severe OSA. The OSA group had a significantly higher mean NIHSS score at discharge (P=.002) and significantly higher mRS score (irrespective of severity of OSA) at all points of evaluation. Ischemic stroke patients with OSA tend to have poor neurological and functional recovery, across all segments of stroke and OSA severity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A validation study using a modified version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients: Postural Stroke Study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsson Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS was created with some changes in the description of the items and clarifications in the manual (e.g. much help was defined as support from 2 persons. The aim of this validation study was to assess intrarater and interrater reliability using this modified version of PASS, at a stroke unit, for patients in the acute phase after their first event of stroke. Methods In the intrarater reliability study 114 patients and in the interrater reliability study 15 patients were examined twice with the test within one to 24 hours in the first week after stroke. Spearman's rank correlation, Kappa coefficients, Percentage Agreement and the newer rank-invariant methods; Relative Position, Relative Concentration and Relative rank Variance were used for the statistical analysis. Results For the intrarater reliability Spearman's rank correlations were 0.88-0.98 and k were 0.70-0.93 for the individual items. Small, statistically significant, differences were found for two items regarding Relative Position and for one item regarding Relative Concentration. There was no Relative rank Variance for any single item. For the interrater reliability, Spearman's rank correlations were 0.77-0.99 for individual items. For some items there was a possible, even if not proved, reliability problem regarding Relative Position and Relative Concentration. There was no Relative rank Variance for the single items, except for a small Relative rank Variance for one item. Conclusions The high intrarater and interrater reliability shown for the modified Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, the Swedish version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, with traditional and newer statistical analyses, particularly for assessments performed by the same rater, support the use of the Swedish version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, in the acute stage after stroke both

  16. The relationship between pneumonia and Glasgow coma scale assessment on acute stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritarwan, K.; Batubara, C. A.; Dhanu, R.

    2018-03-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most frequent medical complications of a stroke. Despite the well-documented association of a stroke associated infections with increased mortality and worse long-term outcome, on the other hand, the limited data available on independent predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke patients in an emergency unit. To determine the independentrelationship between pneumonia and Glasgow Coma Scale assessment on acute stroke patients. The cohort retrospective study observed 55 acute stroke patients who stayed in intensive care unit Adam Malik General Hospital from January until August 2017. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with Ischemic stroke (OR 5.40; 95% CI: 1.28 – 6.40, p=0.003), higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (p=0.014) and lower Glasgow Coma Scale (p=0.0001). Analysis multivariate logistic regression identified NIHSS as an independent of predictors of pneumonia (95% CI : 1.047 – 1.326, p=0.001). Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficits evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  17. Impact of libido at 2 weeks after stroke on risk of stroke recurrence at 1-year in a chinese stroke cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Huai-Wu; Wang, Chun-Xue; Luo, Ben-Yan; Ruan, Jie; Zhang, Ning; Shi, Yu-Zhi; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Yi-Long; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2015-05-20

    There were few studies on the relation between changes in libido and incidence of stroke recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between libido decrease at 2 weeks after stroke and recurrent stroke at 1-year. It is a multi-centered, prospective cohort study. The 14 th item of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 was used to evaluate changes of libido in poststroke patients at 2 weeks. Stroke recurrence was defined as an aggravation of former neurological functional deficit, new local or overall symptoms, or stroke diagnosed at re-admission. Among 2341 enrolled patients, 1757 patients had completed follow-up data, 533 (30.34%) patients had decreased libido at 2 weeks, and 166 (9.45%) patients had recurrent stroke at 1-year. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, compared with patients with normal libido, the odds ratio (OR) of recurrent stroke in patients with decreased libido was reduced by 41% (OR = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40-0.87). The correlation was more prominent among male patients (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.31-0.85) and patients of ≥60 years of age (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.35-0.93). One out of three stroke patients in mainland China has decreased libido at 2 weeks after stroke. Decreased libido is a protective factor for stroke recurrence at 1-year, which is more prominent among older male patients.

  18. A comparison of five stroke scales with measures of disability, handicap, and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, R.; Horn, J.; Limburg, M.; van der Meulen, J.; Bossuyt, P.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recently much debate has arisen on the appropriateness of assessing stroke outcomes with stroke impairment scales. Our purpose was to study the relationship between long-term impairments and functional outcomes in terms of disability, handicap, and quality of life. METHODS:

  19. Development and validation of a short version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Marcel W. M.; Boosman, Hileen; van Zandvoort, Martine M.; Passier, Patricia E. C. A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.

    Background and purpose The Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QoL) is a well validated measure of health related quality of life in patients with stroke, but with 49 items its length is a disadvantage. A short version of the SS-QoL was developed and tested here. Methods Secondary analyses of

  20. Aspects correlates with Scandinavian Stroke Scale for predicting early neurological impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gabriel, Maicon Gonçalves; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Fernandes, Thiago Dias; Resende, Luiz Antônio de Lima; Pontes Neto, Octávio Marques; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the correlation between the Alberta Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) for the evaluation of neurological impairment in patients with acute stroke. 59 patients with a first acute ischemic stroke were evaluated. The ASPECTS were evaluated by 2 neurologists at admission and by another neurologist after 48 hours. The NIHSS and SSS was applied to determinate stroke severity. Correlations and agreements were analysed statistically by Spearman and Kappa tests. ASPECTS was correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission (r = -0.52; p motor power, and speech (r = 0.51; p < 0.001). The SSS of 25.5 shows sensitivity (68%) and specificity (72%) when associated with ASPECTS ≤ 7. The SSS can predict worst neurological impairment when associated with lower values of ASPECTS.

  1. Quantifying Selection Bias in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Data Documented in an Acute Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael P; Luo, Zhehui; Gardiner, Joseph; Burke, James F; Nickles, Adrienne; Reeves, Mathew J

    2016-05-01

    As a measure of stroke severity, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is an important predictor of patient- and hospital-level outcomes, yet is often undocumented. The purpose of this study is to quantify and correct for potential selection bias in observed NIHSS data. Data were obtained from the Michigan Stroke Registry and included 10 262 patients with ischemic stroke aged ≥65 years discharged from 23 hospitals from 2009 to 2012, of which 74.6% of patients had documented NIHSS. We estimated models predicting NIHSS documentation and NIHSS score and used the Heckman selection model to estimate a correlation coefficient (ρ) between the 2 model error terms, which quantifies the degree of selection bias in the documentation of NIHSS. The Heckman model found modest, but significant, selection bias (ρ=0.19; 95% confidence interval: 0.09, 0.29; P2 points, which could significantly alter the risk profile of hospitals treating patients with ischemic stroke and subsequent hospital risk-adjusted outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Stroke Survivors Scoring Zero on the NIH Stroke Scale Score Still Exhibit Significant Motor Impairment and Functional Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brittany; Page, Stephen J; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale's (NIHSS's) association with upper extremity (UE) impairment and functional outcomes. Design. Secondary, retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial data. Setting. Not applicable. Participants. 146 subjects with stable, chronic stroke-induced hemiparesis. Intervention. The NIHSS, the UE Fugl-Meyer (FM), and the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT) were administered prior to their participation in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Main Outcome Measures. The NIHSS, FM, and AMAT. Results. The association between the NIHSS and UE impairment was statistically significant (P = -0.204; p = 0.014) but explained less than 4% of the variance among UE FM scores. The association between NIHSS total score and function as measured by the AMAT was not statistically significant (P = -0.141; p = 0.089). Subjects scoring a "zero" on the NIHSS exhibited discernible UE motor deficits and varied scores on the UE FM and AMAT. Conclusion. While being used in stroke trials, the NIHSS may have limited ability to discriminate between treatment responses, even when only a relatively narrow array of impairment levels exists among patients. Given these findings, NIHSS use should be restricted to acute stroke studies and clinical settings with the goal of reporting stroke severity.

  3. Functional outcome in young adult ischemic stroke: impact of lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, J; Strbian, D; Mustanoja, S; Haapaniemi, E; Kaste, M; Tatlisumak, T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the functional outcome in a cohort of young adults with ischemic stroke patients, focusing on components of lipid profile. In our registry including consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke aged 15-49 from 1994 to 2007, we analyzed predictors of 3-month functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale, mRS). Infarct size fell into small, medium, large posterior, or large anterior. Stroke severity was assessed with NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Serum lipids were measured within 72 h after admission. Binary, multinomial ordinal, and Poisson regressions allowed revealing factors associated with size of infarct, stroke severity, and unfavorable outcome or death (mRS, 2-6) or mRS as an ordinal measure. In the 968 patients included (mean age, 41.3 ± 7.6; 62.6% men; 49.5% with mRS 0-1), factors associated with unfavorable outcome after multivariable analysis were increasing age (odds ratio, 1.03 per year; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05), higher NIHSS score (1.23 per point, 1.17-1.29), large anterior (4.37, 2.26-8.42) or posterior (1.73, 1.05-2.85) infarcts, bilateral lesions (2.28, 1.30-3.98), internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) (3.65, 1.41-9.47), and inversely high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels (0.58 per unit increase, 0.38-0.86). Increasing HDL associated with smaller infarct size (0.71, 0.51-0.98). Both higher total and HDL cholesterol associated with lower NIHSS score (0.96, 0.93-0.98 for total cholesterol and 0.82, 0.75-0.88 for HDL) and lower 3-month mRS (0.87, 0.78-0.97 for total cholesterol and 0.65, 0.47-0.90 for HDL). In addition to known prognosticators, ICAD and lower HDL levels were independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes in our young adult stroke cohort. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Validation of the Scandinavian Stroke Scale in a Multicultural Population in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the consistency, coherence, and interobserver reliability of the Portuguese version of the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS in a multicultural population of stroke. Methods: The SSS was translated, culturally adapted, and applied by two independent investigators. This was a randomized transverse study involving two groups: group 1 included 20 patients in the acute phase and group 2 included 20 patients in the subacute phase after stroke was confirmed by computed tomography with a pre-stroke modified Rankin Scale score of 0. Each patient also underwent National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS evaluation at hospital entry and at the time of the SSS evaluation for correlation with our current standard hospital practice. Consistency and coherence were analyzed by Cronbach’s α and interobserver reliability by ĸ. Results: Forty patients were evaluated with 0.88 consistency and coherence in both stroke phases. Mean interobserver ĸ was 0.76, with reliability considered excellent and good for most scale items, and moderate for only the facial palsy item. Conclusion: The SSS is adequate and validated to study post-stroke patients in a multicultural Brazilian population and in the Portuguese language.

  5. Rasch analysis in the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Garde, B; Kreiner, S

    1995-01-01

    The study describes the development of a rating scale for assessment of mobility after stroke. It was based on 74 first-stroke patients, 40 men and 34 women, each assessed three times during rehabilitation. Their median age was 69 years, and they represented all degrees of severity of paresis....... Content, construct, criterion and convergent validity were examined, as well as the inter-rater reliability. The final rating scale has three special characteristics: 1) it reflects the regularity in the recovery of mobility after stroke; 2) the sum of item scores comprises the information contained...

  6. Automatic detection of ischemic stroke based on scaling exponent electroencephalogram using extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhi, H. A.; Wijaya, S. K.; Prawito; Badri, C.; Rezal, M.

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is one of cerebrovascular diseases caused by the obstruction of blood flow to the brain. Stroke becomes the leading cause of death in Indonesia and the second in the world. Stroke also causes of the disability. Ischemic stroke accounts for most of all stroke cases. Obstruction of blood flow can cause tissue damage which results the electrical changes in the brain that can be observed through the electroencephalogram (EEG). In this study, we presented the results of automatic detection of ischemic stroke and normal subjects based on the scaling exponent EEG obtained through detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) using extreme learning machine (ELM) as the classifier. The signal processing was performed with 18 channels of EEG in the range of 0-30 Hz. Scaling exponents of the subjects were used as the input for ELM to classify the ischemic stroke. The performance of detection was observed by the value of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The result showed, performance of the proposed method to classify the ischemic stroke was 84 % for accuracy, 82 % for sensitivity and 87 % for specificity with 120 hidden neurons and sine as the activation function of ELM.

  7. External Validation of the Prestroke Independence, Sex, Age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale Score for Predicting Pneumonia After Stroke Using Data From the China National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runhua; Ji, Ruijun; Pan, Yuesong; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-05-01

    Pneumonia is an important risk factor for mortality and morbidity after stroke. The Prestroke Independence, Sex, Age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (ISAN) score was shown to be a useful tool for predicting stroke-associated pneumonia based on UK multicenter cohort study. We aimed to externally validate the score using data from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR). Eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the CNSR from 2007 to 2008 were included. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curve was used to evaluate discrimination. The Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test and Pearson correlation coefficient were performed to assess calibration of the model. A total of 19,333 patients (AIS = 14400; ICH = 4933) were included and the overall pneumonia rate was 12.7%. The AUC was .76 (95% confidence interval [CI]: .75-.78) for the subgroup of AIS and .70 (95% CI: .68-.72) for the subgroup of ICH. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed the ISAN score with the good calibration for AIS and ICH (P = .177 and .405, respectively). The plot of observed versus predicted pneumonia rates suggested higher correlation for patients with AIS than with ICH (Pearson correlation coefficient = .99 and .83, respectively). The ISAN score was a useful tool for predicting in-hospital pneumonia after acute stroke, especially for patients with AIS. Further validations need to be done in different populations. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative interrater reliability of Asian Stroke Disability Scale, modified Rankin Scale and Barthel Index in patients with brain infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Kavian; Ghandehari, Kosar; Saffarian-Toosi, Ghazaleh; Masoudinezhad, Shahram; Yazdani, Siamak; Nooraddin, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed; Ahmadi, Fahimeh; Abrishamchi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study tried to develop an Asian Stroke Disability Scale (ASDS) and compared its interrater reliability with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI). Three items including self-care, mobility, and daily activities were selected as variables for development of the ASDS. The variables were provisionally graded on a 2- to 4-point scale based on the importance of each item. Each of the variables was categorized into 3 categories. Afterward, 125 rater-patient assessments for each scale (mRS, BI, and ASDS) were performed on 25 stroke patients by 5 raters. For categorization of functional impairment as minor or major, the scores of mRS, BI and ASDS were categorized as ≤ 2 and > 2, 0.05). The ASDS is easy to use, requires less than 1 minute to complete and is as valid as mRS and BI in assessment of functional impairment of patients with stroke.

  9. [Impact on quality of life in caregivers of stroke survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Espuela, Fidel; González-Gil, Teresa; Jiménez-Gracia, María Antonia; Bravo-Fernández, Sherezade; Amarilla-Donoso, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the first cause of disability in adults. Often, the care falls on the family and can affect their quality of life. To determine the health-related quality of life and the level of caregiver burden of a patient after a stroke. Descriptive and cross-sectional study. Caregivers, who had cared for a patient for more than six months and without pay, were included. This study had been approved by the Ethics Committee. Variables collected: sociodemographic, EuroQol-5D questionnaire, Zarit scale, mood and sleep problems. Forty-eight caregivers were included, with a mean age of 55.63 (SD: 13.48) and the majority were women (70.8%). The mean time of the care was 28.8 months (SD: 28.68), with 58% stated having a depressed mood, 31% had burden, and 89.6% had sleep problems. The dimensions that presented problems (moderate and severe) in the EQ-5D were pain-discomfort (66.7%) and anxiety-depression (68.8%). The score on the visual analog scale rating of quality of life was associated with a worse mood (75.5 vs. 32, p=0.0028), with the pain (81.94 vs. 38, p<0.001), and Zarit scale (r:<0.334, p=0.020). The role of caregivers of stroke patients often falls on women. To be a caregiver affects the quality of life, mainly in the pain-discomfort and anxiety-depression dimensions, regardless of the functional status of the patient. Nurses must identify the psychopathological needs and develop strategies on the prevention of the risk of burnout. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Urinary tract infection after acute stroke: Impact of indwelling urinary catheterization and assessment of catheter-use practices in French stroke centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net, P; Karnycheff, F; Vasse, M; Bourdain, F; Bonan, B; Lapergue, B

    2018-03-01

    Urinary catheterization and acute urinary retention increase the risk of urinary tract infection (UTI). Our study aimed to investigate the incidence of UTI following acute stroke at our stroke center (SC) and to assess urinary catheter-care practices among French SCs. Stroke patients hospitalized within 24h of stroke onset were prospectively enrolled between May and September 2013. Neurological deficit level was assessed on admission using the US National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Patients were followed-up until discharge. Indwelling urinary catheterization (IUC) was the only technique authorized during the study. An electronic survey was also conducted among French SCs to assess their practices regarding urinary catheterization in acute stroke patients. A total of 212 patients were included, with 45 (21.2%) receiving indwelling urinary catheters. The overall estimated incidence of UTI was 14.2%, and 18% among patients receiving IUC. On univariate analysis, IUC was significantly associated with older age, longer hospital stays and higher NIHSS scores. Of the 30 SCs that responded to our survey, 19 (63.3%) declared using IUC when urinary catheterization was needed. The main argument given to justify its use was that it was departmental policy to adopt this technique. Also, 27 participants (90%) stated that conducting a study to assess the impact of urinary catheterization techniques on UTI rates in acute stroke patients would be relevant. Our results are in accord with previously reported data and confirm the high burden of UTI among acute stroke subjects. However, no association was found between IUC and UTI on univariate analysis due to a lack of statistical power. Also, our survey showed high heterogeneity in catheter-use practices among French SCs, but offered no data to help determine the best urinary catheterization technique. Urinary catheterization is common after acute stroke and a well-known risk factor of UTI. However, as high

  11. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  12. The Reliability and Validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale with Japanese Patients After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    篠原, 純子; 児玉, 和紀; 迫田, 勝則; 金久, 重子; 百本, 文子

    2002-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale with Japanese patients after stroke was examined. Subjects were outpatients between 6 months and 3 years post stroke of cerebral infarction. Two kinds of Self-Esteem were examined. One was that of the present time. The other was that of the past time (Respondents recalled their Self-Esteem before having a stroke). The respondents were 38 people who consisted of 26 males and 12 females. Twenty-eight of thirty-eight respondents ans...

  13. Relationship between the Berg Balance Scale and Static Balance Test in Hemiplegic Patients with Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Makoto; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Machida, Yooichiro; Minakata, Shin

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between results of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Static Balance Test (SBT) in hemiplegic patients with stroke. [Subjects] The subjects were 39 hemiplegic patients (25 men, 14 women; mean age, 69.4 ? 11.0?years) with stroke that had occurred within the preceding 6 months and who had good understanding of verbal instructions. [Methods] The SBT consists of five posture-holding tasks (sitting, stride standing, close standing, ...

  14. Impact of spatial neglect on stroke rehabilitation: evidence from the setting of an inpatient rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peii; Hreha, Kimberly; Kong, Yekyung; Barrett, A M

    2015-08-01

    To examine the impact of spatial neglect on rehabilitation outcome, risk of falls, and discharge disposition in stroke survivors. Inception cohort. Inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF). Individuals with unilateral brain damage after their first stroke (N=108) were assessed at IRF admission and discharge. At admission, 74 of them (68.5%) demonstrated symptoms of spatial neglect as measured using the Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (KF-NAP). Usual and standard IRF care. The FIM, Conley Scale, number of falls, length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition. The greater the severity of spatial neglect (higher KF-NAP scores) at IRF admission and the lower the FIM scores at admission as well as at discharge. Higher KF-NAP scores also correlated with greater LOS and lower FIM improvement rate. The presence of spatial neglect (KF-NAP score>0), but not Conley Scale scores, predicted falls such that participants with spatial neglect fell 6.5 times more often than those without symptoms. More severe neglect, indicated by KF-NAP scores at IRF admission, reduced the likelihood of returning home at discharge. A model that took spatial neglect and other demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors into account predicted home discharge. Rapid FIM improvement during IRF stay and lower annual income level were significant predictors of home discharge. Spatial neglect after a stroke is a prevalent problem and may negatively affect rehabilitation outcome, risk of falls, and LOS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rasch analysis of the London Handicap Scale in stroke patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Yoo-Im

    2014-07-31

    Although activity and participation are the target domains in stroke rehabilitation interventions, there is insufficient evidence available regarding the validity of participation measurement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale in community-dwelling stroke patients, using Rasch analysis. Participants were 170 community-dwelling stroke survivors. The data were analyzed using Winsteps (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to determine the unidimensionality of item fit, the distribution of item difficulty, and the reliability and suitability of the rating process for the London Handicap Scale. Data of 16 participants did not fit the Rasch model and there were no misfitting items. The person separation value was 2.42, and the reliability was .85; furthermore, the rating process for the London Handicap Scale was found to be suitable for use with stroke patients. This was the first trial to investigate the psychometric properties of the London Handicap Scale using Rasch analysis; the results supported the suitability of this scale for use with stroke patients.

  16. Reliability and validity of a new post-stroke depression scale in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yingying; Liu, Rui; Lu, Jian; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Shining; Wu, Aiqin; Wang, Qiao; Yuan, Yonggui

    2015-03-15

    Nowadays there is still a lack of effective method to evaluate post-stroke depression. To distinguish patients with and without depression after stroke reliably, this study proposes a new Post-Stroke Depression Scale (PSDS). PSDS was developed based on various depression scales and clinician experiences. 158 stroke patients who were able to finish PSDS and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) were recruited. Cronbach α, Spearman rank coefficient and Kruskal-Wallis test were respectively used to examine reliability, internal consistency and discriminate validity. Then the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the ability of scale and categorized scales to the range of depression. Finally, the factors of the PSDS were classified by average clustering analysis. The Cronbach α of PSDS was 0.797 (95% CI) indicted a good reliability. The Spearman correlation coefficient between PSDS and HDRS was 0.822 (Psize maybe the main limitation, the larger sample used in different fields according sex, age and side-lesion was needed to verity the results. The cut off value calculated by ROC curve maybe react the severity of the disease to some extent, but it is not absolute. PSDS is a valid, reliable and specific tool for evaluating post-stroke depression patients and can be conveniently utilized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Prehospital Triage Scales to Detect Large Vessel Occlusion on Resource Utilization and Time to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemm, Ludwig; Ebinger, Martin; Nolte, Christian H; Endres, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Prehospital stroke severity scales may help to triage acute ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion (LVO) for direct transportation to a comprehensive stroke center. The impact on resource use and time to reperfusion treatment for patients with and without LVO is unknown. Based on empirical distributions of stroke symptom severity, prehospital delay times, and stroke symptom severity-dependent likelihood of LVO, we simulate prehospital incidents of stroke-like symptoms in abstract geographical environments to estimate the impact of prehospital triage strategies based on different cutoffs of the rapid arterial occlusion evaluation scale. Compared with transporting each patient to the nearest stroke center, implementation of a prehospital triage strategy based on a rapid arterial occlusion evaluation scale cutoff score ≥5 is associated with more patients with suspected acute stroke at comprehensive stroke centers and less patients at primary stroke centers (+11.7% [95% confidence interval: +8.1% to +15.3%] and -18.4% [-19.1% to -17.7%], respectively). Mean time to groin puncture is reduced by 29.6 minutes (-35.2 to -24.7 minutes) while mean time to thrombolysis does not change significantly (±0.0 minutes [-0.3 to +0.3 minutes]). The total number of secondary transfers is reduced by 60.9% (-62.8% to -59.0%); mean time of ambulance use per patient is unchanged. Results are robust with regards to variation in model parameters. Implementation of prehospital triage based on stroke severity scales would have strong impact on patient flow and distribution. The benefit of earlier thrombectomy for patients with LVO may outweigh the harm associated with delayed access to thrombolysis for some patients without LVO. Randomized trials using clinical stroke severity scales as a triage tool are needed to confirm our findings. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Measuring disability in stroke : relationship between the modified Rankin scale and the Barthel index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, M; Luijckx, G-J; Vroomen, P C A J; Stewart, R E; De Keyser, J

    The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in acute stroke trials is traditionally measured with the modified Rankin scale (mRs) and the Barthel index (BI). The mRs is a global disability scale divided into six steps from total independence to total dependence. The BI assesses ten basal

  19. Predictive impact of daily physical activity on new vascular events in patients with mild ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yuji; Kawajiri, Hiroyuki; Kamisaka, Kenta; Kamiya, Kuniyasu; Akao, Keigo; Asai, Chikako; Inuzuka, Kana; Yamada, Sumio

    2015-02-01

    Daily physical inactivity is associated with a substantially increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, the target level of daily physical activity remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the impact of physical activity on long-term vascular events in patients with mild ischemic stroke. We designed a single hospital-based prospective observational study and studied 166 ischemic stroke patients (mean age: 63.9 ± 9.2) who had a modified Rankin Scale 0-1. We measured the daily step count as a variable of the daily physical activity after three-months from the stroke onset. Other clinical characteristics including age, body mass index, blood pressure, blood laboratory tests, vascular function and medications were also assessed. The primary outcomes were hospitalization due to stroke recurrence, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris and peripheral artery disease. Survival curves were calculated by a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and the hazard ratios for recurrences were determined by univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. After a median follow-up periods of 1332 days, 34 vascular events (23 stroke recurrences, 11 coronary artery disease) and 7 drop-outs occurred, and the remaining patients were divided into two groups: the without recurrence group (n = 125) and the with recurrence group (n = 34). The daily step count was lower in the nonsurvivor group than in the survivor group. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses revealed that the daily step counts was independent predictors of new vascular events. A daily step count cutoff value of 6025 steps per day was determined by analyzing the receiver-operating characteristics that showed a sensitivity of 69.4% and a specificity of 79.4%. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves after a log-rank test showed a significantly lower event rate in the more than 6025 steps per day group compared with the less than 6025 steps per day group (P = 0.0002). The positive and

  20. Clinical utility of the modified trunk impairment scale for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, YunBok; An, SeungHeon; Lee, GyuChang

    2018-05-01

    The present study aimed to determine the discriminant power of the modified Trunk Impairment Scale (mTIS) in stroke survivors versus healthy adults. Cross-sectional. Inpatient rehabilitation center. Fifty-five subjects with stroke and 29 healthy adults. Subjects were examined using the mTIS, Berg Balance Scale, and Timed Up and Go test for balance; 5-m Walk Test and Functional Ambulation Category for gait; Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke-Trunk Control and Trunk Control Test for trunk control; and Modified Barthel Index for activities of daily living performance. The mTIS results differed significantly between stroke survivors and healthy adults (p Scale (r = 0.82), Timed Up and Go test (r = -0.70), 5-m Walk Test (r = 0.73), Functional Ambulation Category (r = 0.54), Fugl-Meyer Assessment (r = 0.37-0.80), Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke-Trunk Control and Trunk Control Test (r = 0.55-0.63), and Modified Barthel Index score (r = 0.56) results (p Scale, 49% on the Timed Up and Go test, 53% on the 5-m Walk Test, 28% on the Functional Ambulation Category, 12% on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-upper extremity, 64% on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-lower extremity, and 30% on the Modified Barthel Index. The cutoff value of the mTIS for the Modified Barthel Index classification was >10.5 points, while the area under the curve had a moderate accuracy of 73%. The mTIS can be used to examine the degree of trunk control or the level of trunk impairment, which is seen as a prerequisite for balance, gait, motor function, and activities of daily living performance in stroke survivors. Implications for Rehabilitation The modified Trunk Impairment Scale can be used as an assessment tool to classify the degree of trunk control or its level of impairment in stroke survivors. The modified Trunk Impairment Scale may have a favorable correlation with assessing physical functions such as balance, gait, motor

  1. Impact of stroke type on survival and functional health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A.; Reitsma, J. B.; Limburg, M.; van den Bos, G. A.; de Haan, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    In a cohort 760 consecutive stroke patients (23 hospitals in the Netherlands), we studied prognosis in relation to stroke type and focused on (a) short-term and long-term mortality, and (b) long-term functional health. Based on clinical and CT data, we distinguished infratentorial strokes from

  2. Large-Scale Phase Synchrony Reflects Clinical Status After Stroke: An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Teiji; Hattori, Noriaki; Uno, Yutaka; Kitajo, Keiichi; Hatakenaka, Megumi; Yagura, Hajime; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Tomomi; Nagasako, Michiko; Otomune, Hironori; Miyai, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Stroke-induced focal brain lesions often exert remote effects via residual neural network activity. Electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques can assess neural network modifications after brain damage. Recently, EEG phase synchrony analyses have shown associations between the level of large-scale phase synchrony of brain activity and clinical symptoms; however, few reports have assessed such associations in stroke patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of hemispheric phase synchrony in stroke patients by calculating its correlation with clinical status. This cross-sectional study included 19 patients with post-acute ischemic stroke admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Interhemispheric phase synchrony indices (IH-PSIs) were computed in 2 frequency bands (alpha [α], and beta [β]), and associations between indices and scores of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMA) were analyzed. For further assessments of IH-PSIs, ipsilesional intrahemispheric PSIs (IntraH-PSIs) as well as IH- and IntraH-phase lag indices (PLIs) were also evaluated. IH-PSIs correlated significantly with FIM scores and NIHSS scores. In contrast, IH-PSIs did not correlate with FMA scores. IntraH-PSIs correlate with FIM scores after removal of the outlier. The results of analysis with PLIs were consistent with IH-PSIs. The PSIs correlated with performance on the activities of daily living scale but not with scores on a pure motor impairment scale. These results suggest that large-scale phase synchrony represented by IH-PSIs provides a novel surrogate marker for clinical status after stroke.

  3. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu CS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Sheng Yu,1,* Chih-Ming Lin,2,3,* Chi-Kuang Liu,4 Henry Horng-Shing Lu1 1Institute of Statistics and Big Data Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 2Stroke Centre and Department of Neurology, Chunghua Christian Hospital, Chunghua, 3Graduate Institute of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 4Department of Medical Imaging, Chunghua Christian Hospital, Chunghua, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline m

  4. Validation of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale in a multicultural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiting Emily; Togher, Leanne; Power, Emma; Koh, Gerald C H

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and validity of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39 g) and its Mandarin adaptation SAQOL-CSg in Singaporean stroke patients. First-time stroke survivors were recruited at three months post-stroke and underwent a series of questionnaires in their dominant language (English/Mandarin). This included: SAQOL-39 g/CSg, National University Hospital System (NUHS) Aphasia Screening Test, Barthel Index, Modified Rankin Scale, Mini Mental State Examination, Frontal Assessment Battery, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Eurol-Qol Health Questionnaire (EQ-5D). The SAQOL-39 g/SAQOL-CSg was repeated within 1 week (± 6 days). Ninety-four participants (96.9%) were able to self-report and their results presented here. Both the SAQOL-39 g/SAQOL-CSg showed good internal consistency (α = 0.96/0.97), test-retest reliability (ICC= 0.99/0.98), convergent (rs  =0.64-0.81 and 0.66-0.88, respectively) and discriminant (rs = 0.35-0.53 and 0.48-0.62, respectively) validity. The correlation between the SAQOL-39 g and the EQ-5D Visual Analogue Scale was 0.27. Further inspection of the EQ-5DVAS scores revealed correlations in different directions for Malay versus Chinese participants. Both the SAQOL-39 g and SAQOL-CSg demonstrated good reliability and validity. Our results suggested some influence of ethnicity in self-rating of health status in relation to SAQOL-39 g scores. Further research is warranted to examine its use with stroke survivors with greater stroke severity and over time. Implications for Rehabilitation Validation of SAQOL in Singapore: Both the SAQOL-39g and the SAQOL-CSg may be used to measure the HRQoL of stroke survivors with and without aphasia in Singapore. Further investigation is required to examine use with stroke survivors with greater stroke severity and over time.

  5. Reliability of a new scale for measurement of spasticity in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Wu, Yuedi; Xiong, Li

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability of a new scale, the Triple Spasticity Scale (TSS), for assessing spasticity in stroke, through measurement of affected elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors of hemiplegic patients with stroke, and to compare the new scale with commonly used scales. Cross-sectional study. Inpatients at a rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-one inpatients with hemiplegic stroke. TSS, Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). Test-retest reliability for TSS total score was good (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.905~0.918). Inter- rater reliability for TSS total score was also good (ICC =  0.778~0.885). Spearman's correlation coefficient demonstrated significant correlation between the TSS and MAS, in both elbow flexors and plantar flexors (r = 0.840~0.946, p = 0.000), and between the TSS and MTS, in both elbow flexors and plantar flexors (r = 0.715~0.795, p = 0.000). There were small, but significant, correlations between the scores for increased resistance and dynamic muscle length in these 2 muscles (r = 0.307~0.564, p = 0.000~0.009). The TSS has good test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability in measurement of muscle tone. This new scale provides an alternative for measuring spasticity, which avoids some of the shortcomings of previous scales.

  6. Aspects correlates with Scandinavian Stroke Scale for predicting early neurological impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation between the Alberta Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS and the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS for the evaluation of neurological impairment in patients with acute stroke. Method 59 patients with a first acute ischemic stroke were evaluated. The ASPECTS were evaluated by 2 neurologists at admission and by another neurologist after 48 hours. The NIHSS and SSS was applied to determinate stroke severity. Correlations and agreements were analysed statistically by Spearman and Kappa tests. Results ASPECTS was correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS at admission (r = -0.52; p < 0.001 and SSS (r = 0.50; p < 0.001. The ASPECTS and SSS items were most correlated with arm (r = 0.52; p < 0.001 and hand (r = 0.49; p < 0.001 motor power, and speech (r = 0.51; p < 0.001. The SSS of 25.5 shows sensitivity (68% and specificity (72% when associated with ASPECTS ≤ 7. Conclusion The SSS can predict worst neurological impairment when associated with lower values of ASPECTS.

  7. Responsiveness of the Berg Balance Scale in patients early after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, Adam; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Gunnes, Mari; Askim, Torunn

    2016-05-01

    The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) has previously shown good measurement properties. However, its ability to detect important change in patients early after stroke is still unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the minimal important change (MIC) and its relation to the minimal detectable change (MDC) for BBS in patients early after stroke. This prospective follow-up study included patients within the first 2 weeks after onset of stroke. The BBS, Barthel Index, and Scandinavian Stroke Scale were obtained at inclusion and 1 month later. At the follow-up assessment, the Patient Global Impression of Change was obtained. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to calculate the cut-off value for the MIC. Fifty-two patients (mean age of 78.7, SD 8.5 years) were included. All measures showed a significant improvement from baseline to follow-up. The ROC analysis identified a MIC of ≥6 BBS points, while the MDC was 5.97 BBS points at the 80% confidence level. This study shows that a change of 6 BBS point or more can be considered an important change for patients in the sub-acute phase after stroke, which also represents an 80% probability of exceeding the measurement error. A total of 80% of unchanged patients would display random fluctuations within the bounds of MDC80, while 20% of unchanged patients would exceed MDC80.

  8. Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, Jacki

    2011-01-01

    Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

  9. Dose-response relationships using brain-computer interface technology impact stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brittany M; Nigogosyan, Zack; Walton, Léo M; Remsik, Alexander; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Tyler, Mitchell E; Edwards, Dorothy F; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A; Williams, Justin C; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are an emerging novel technology for stroke rehabilitation. Little is known about how dose-response relationships for BCI therapies affect brain and behavior changes. We report preliminary results on stroke patients (n = 16, 11 M) with persistent upper extremity motor impairment who received therapy using a BCI system with functional electrical stimulation of the hand and tongue stimulation. We collected MRI scans and behavioral data using the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) before, during, and after the therapy period. Using anatomical and functional MRI, we computed Laterality Index (LI) for brain activity in the motor network during impaired hand finger tapping. Changes from baseline LI and behavioral scores were assessed for relationships with dose, intensity, and frequency of BCI therapy. We found that gains in SIS Strength were directly responsive to BCI therapy: therapy dose and intensity correlated positively with increased SIS Strength (p ≤ 0.05), although no direct relationships were identified with ARAT or 9-HPT scores. We found behavioral measures that were not directly sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration but were associated with concurrent brain changes correlated with BCI therapy administration parameters: therapy dose and intensity showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) or trending (0.05 < p < 0.1) negative correlations with LI changes, while therapy frequency did not affect LI. Reductions in LI were then correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with increased SIS Activities of Daily Living scores and improved 9-HPT performance. Therefore, some behavioral changes may be reflected by brain changes sensitive to differences in BCI therapy administration, while others such as SIS Strength may be directly responsive to BCI therapy administration. Data preliminarily suggest that when using BCI in stroke rehabilitation, therapy frequency may be less important than dose and

  10. The Socio‑economic Impact of Stroke on Households in Livingstone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study has shown that stroke has considerable impact on victims and households socially and economically, which can deter the victim's development as well as the household and the nation at large. This implies that if stroke is unchecked, social relations could be affected making the society socially unfit for any kind of ...

  11. Impact of Generator Stroke Length on Energy Production for a Direct Drive Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Lysekil wave energy converter (WEC, developed by the wave energy research group of Uppsala University, has evolved through a variety of mechanical designs since the first prototype was installed in 2006. The hundreds of engineering decisions made throughout the design processes have been based on a combination of theory, know-how from previous experiments, and educated guesses. One key parameter in the design of the WECs linear generator is the stroke length. A long stroke requires a taller WEC with associated economical and mechanical challenges, but a short stroke limits the power production. The 2-m stroke of the current WECs has been an educated guess for the Swedish wave climate, though the consequences of this choice on energy absorption have not been studied. When the WEC technology is considered for international waters, with larger waves and challenges of energy absorption and survivability, the subject of stroke length becomes even more relevant. This paper studies the impact of generator stroke length on energy absorption for three sites off the coasts of Sweden, Chile and Scotland. 2-m, 4-m, and unlimited stroke are considered. Power matrices for the studied WEC prototype are presented for each of the studied stroke lengths. Presented results quantify the losses incurred by a limited stroke. The results indicate that a 2-m stroke length is likely to be a good choice for Sweden, but 4-m is likely to be necessary in more energetic international waters.

  12. Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale (NESIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — While the Fujita and Saffir-Simpson Scales characterize tornadoes and hurricanes respectively, there is no widely used scale to classify snowstorms. The Northeast...

  13. Psychometric properties of the sensory scale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jau-Hong; Hsueh, I-Ping; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2004-06-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the sensory scale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-S) in stroke patients with a broad range of neurological and functional impairment at times from 14 to 180 days after stroke. A total of 176 first stroke patients consecutively admitted to a university-based medical centre. This prospective, longitudinal investigation was based on data collected at 14, 30, 90 and 180 days after stroke. Reliability (inter-rater reliability and internal consistency), validity (convergent and predictive validity) and responsiveness of the FMA-S were examined. The inter-rater agreement of the total score of the FMA-S was excellent, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.93. The Cronbach's alphas of the FMA-S at four time points after stroke ranged from 0.94 to 0.98, indicating excellent internal consistency. However, the FMA-S showed a significant ceiling effect (more than 44.4% of the subjects achieving the highest score), poor to moderate inter-rater reliability for light touch items (weighted kappa ranging from 0.30 to 0.55), low to moderate validity (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.29 to 0.53), and low to moderate responsiveness (standardized response mean ranging from 0.27 to 0.67) at different post-stroke stages of recovery. The psychometric properties of the FMA-S in measuring sensory function do not support its clinical use in stroke patients. Further studies on methods to improve the psychometric properties of the FMA-S are needed.

  14. Impact of Bilingualism on Cognitive Outcome After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladi, Suvarna; Bak, Thomas H; Mekala, Shailaja; Rajan, Amulya; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Mioshi, Eneida; Krovvidi, Rajesh; Surampudi, Bapiraju; Duggirala, Vasanta; Kaul, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    Bilingualism has been associated with slower cognitive aging and a later onset of dementia. In this study, we aimed to determine whether bilingualism also influences cognitive outcome after stroke. We examined 608 patients with ischemic stroke from a large stroke registry and studied the role of bilingualism in predicting poststroke cognitive impairment in the absence of dementia. A larger proportion of bilinguals had normal cognition compared with monolinguals (40.5% versus 19.6%; Pbilinguals 49.0%; Pbilinguals 10.5%; P=0.354). Bilingualism was found to be an independent predictor of poststroke cognitive impairment. Our results suggest that bilingualism leads to a better cognitive outcome after stroke, possibly by enhancing cognitive reserve. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Validation of the Hindi version of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Dash, Deepa; Kumar, Amit

    2012-01-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) with the Hindi and Indian adaptation of items 9 and 10. NIHSS items 9 and 10 were modified and culturally adapted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) and the resulting version was termed as Hindi version (HV-NIHSS). HV-NIHSS was applied by two independent investigators on 107 patients with stroke. Inter-observer agreement and intra-class correlation coefficients were calculated. The predictive validity of the HV-NIHSS was calculated using functional outcome after three months in the form of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI). The study included 107 patients of stroke recruited from a tertiary referral hospital at Delhi between November 1, 2009, and October 1, 2010; the mean age of these patients was 56.26±13.84 years and 65.4% of them had suffered ischemic stroke. Inter-rater reliability was high between the two examiners, with Pearson's r ranging from 0.72 to 0.99 for the 15 items on the Scale. Intra-class correlation coefficient for the total score was 0.995 (95% CI-0.993-0.997). Concurrent construct validity was established between HV-NIHSS and baseline Glasgow Coma Scale, with a high correlation (Spearman coefficient = -0.863, P<.001). Predictive validity was also established with BI at three months (Spearman's rho: -0.829, P<.001) and with mRS at three months (Spearman's rho: 0.851, P<0.001). This study shows that a Hindi language version of the NIHSS developed at AIIMS appears reliable and valid when applied to a Hindi-speaking population.

  16. PROMIS GH (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health) Scale in Stroke: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzan, Irene L; Lapin, Brittany

    2018-01-01

    The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement recently included the 10-item PROMIS GH (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health) scale as part of their recommended Standard Set of Stroke Outcome Measures. Before collection of PROMIS GH is broadly implemented, it is necessary to assess its performance in the stroke population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of PROMIS GH in patients with ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage. PROMIS GH and 6 PROMIS domain scales measuring same/similar constructs were electronically collected on 1102 patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes at various stages of recovery from their stroke who were seen in a cerebrovascular clinic from October 12, 2015, through June 2, 2017. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to evaluate the adequacy of 2-factor structure of component scores. Test-retest reliability and convergent validity of PROMIS GH items and component scores were assessed. Discriminant validity and responsiveness were compared between PROMIS GH and PROMIS domain scales measuring the same or related constructs. Analyses were repeated stratified by stroke subtype and modified Rankin Scale score component scores (root mean square error of approximation, 0.11). Convergent validity was good with significant correlations between all PROMIS GH items and PROMIS domain scales ( P component scores across modified Rankin Scale levels. Good responsiveness (effect size, >0.5) was demonstrated for 8 of the 10 PROMIS GH items. Reliability and validity remained consistent across stroke subtype and disability level (modified Rankin Scale, <2 versus ≥2). PROMIS GH exhibits acceptable performance in patients with stroke. Our findings support International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement recommendation to use PROMIS GH as part of the standard set of outcome measures in stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. The Impact of Mild Stroke on Participation in Physical Fitness Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hildebrand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare participation in moderate to high intensity physical activities in persons before and after a mild stroke. Methods. We used data from the Cognitive Rehabilitation and Research Group to examine changes in moderate to high intensity physical activity participation in persons who had a mild stroke as defined by an NIH Stroke Scale score of less than 6 (N=127. Using the Activity Card Sort, we compared the participants' high-demand leisure activity (leisure activities that are moderate to high intensity physical activities participation at 6-months after stroke with their prestroke level. Results. We found a significant decrease in numbers of high-demand leisure activities in all participants and in each demographic group after mild stroke. Conclusion. These results suggest that persons after mild stroke are not retaining the high-demand leisure activities they were doing prior to their stroke. Health professionals must promote participation in high-demand leisure activities in patients with mild stroke as a tool to enhance health and fitness.

  18. Characterizing stroke lesions using digital templates and lesion quantification tools in a web-based imaging informatics system for a large-scale stroke rehabilitation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximing; Edwardson, Matthew; Dromerick, Alexander; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Jing; Liu, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we presented an Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) imaging informatics system that supports a large-scale phase III stroke rehabilitation trial. The ePR system is capable of displaying anonymized patient imaging studies and reports, and the system is accessible to multiple clinical trial sites and users across the United States via the web. However, the prior multicenter stroke rehabilitation trials lack any significant neuroimaging analysis infrastructure. In stroke related clinical trials, identification of the stroke lesion characteristics can be meaningful as recent research shows that lesion characteristics are related to stroke scale and functional recovery after stroke. To facilitate the stroke clinical trials, we hope to gain insight into specific lesion characteristics, such as vascular territory, for patients enrolled into large stroke rehabilitation trials. To enhance the system's capability for data analysis and data reporting, we have integrated new features with the system: a digital brain template display, a lesion quantification tool and a digital case report form. The digital brain templates are compiled from published vascular territory templates at each of 5 angles of incidence. These templates were updated to include territories in the brainstem using a vascular territory atlas and the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) tool. The digital templates are displayed for side-by-side comparisons and transparent template overlay onto patients' images in the image viewer. The lesion quantification tool quantifies planimetric lesion area from user-defined contour. The digital case report form stores user input into a database, then displays contents in the interface to allow for reviewing, editing, and new inputs. In sum, the newly integrated system features provide the user with readily-accessible web-based tools to identify the vascular territory involved, estimate lesion area

  19. Development of two Barthel Index-based Supplementary Scales for patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Chen; Chen, Sheng-Shiung; Koh, Chia-Lin; Hsueh, I-Ping; Yao, Kai-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The Barthel Index (BI) assesses actual performance of activities of daily living (ADL). However, comprehensive assessment of ADL functions should include two other constructs: self-perceived difficulty and ability. The aims of this study were to develop two BI-based Supplementary Scales (BI-SS), namely, the Self-perceived Difficulty Scale and the Ability Scale, and to examine the construct validity of the BI-SS in patients with stroke. The BI-SS was first developed by consultation with experts and then tested on patients to confirm the clarity and feasibility of administration. A total of 306 participants participated in the construct validity study. Construct validity was investigated using Mokken scale analysis and analyzing associations between scales. The agreement between each pair of the scales' scores was further examined. The Self-perceived Difficulty Scale consisted of 10 items, and the Ability Scale included 8 items (excluding both bladder and bowel control items). Items in each individual scale were unidimensional (H ≥ 0.5). The scores of the Self-perceived Difficulty and Ability Scales were highly correlated with those of the BI (rho = 0.78 and 0.90, respectively). The scores of the two BI-SS scales and BI were significantly different from each other (pscales assessed unique constructs. The BI-SS had overall good construct validity in patients with stroke. The BI-SS can be used as supplementary scales for the BI to comprehensively assess patients' ADL functions in order to identify patients' difficulties in performing ADL tasks, plan intervention strategies, and assess outcomes.

  20. Impact of pretreatment noncontrast CT Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on clinical outcome after intra-arterial stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Albert J; Zaidat, Osama O; Chaudhry, Zeshan A; Berkhemer, Olvert A; González, R Gilberto; Goyal, Mayank; Demchuk, Andrew M; Menon, Bijoy K; Mualem, Elan; Ueda, Dawn; Buell, Hope; Sit, Siu Po; Bose, Arani

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of intra-arterial treatment remains uncertain. Because most centers performing IAT use noncontrast CT (NCCT) imaging, it is critical to understand the impact of NCCT findings on treatment outcomes. This study aimed to compare functional independence and safety among patients undergoing intra-arterial treatment stratified by the extent of ischemic change on pretreatment NCCT. The study cohort was derived from multicenter trials of the Penumbra System. Inclusion criteria were anterior circulation proximal occlusion, evaluable pretreatment NCCT, and known time to reperfusion. Ischemic change was quantified using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and stratified into 3 prespecified groups for comparison: 0 to 4 (most ischemic change) versus 5 to 7 versus 8 to 10 (least ischemic change). A total of 249 patients were analyzed: 40 with ASPECTS 0 to 4, 83 with ASPECTS 5 to 7, and 126 with ASPECTS 8 to 10. For ASPECTS 0 to 4, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10, respectively, good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, 0-2) rates were 5%, 38.6%, and 46% (P<0.0001), and mortality rates were 55%, 28.9%, and 19% (P=0.0001). The only significant pairwise differences were between ASPECTS 0 to 4 and other groups. Symptomatic hemorrhage was more common with lower ASPECTS (P=0.02). Shorter time to reperfusion was significantly associated with better outcomes among patients with ASPECTS 8 to 10 (P=0.01). A similar relationship was seen for ASPECTS 5 to 7 but was not statistically significant. No such relationship was seen for ASPECTS 0 to 4. NCCT seems useful for excluding patients with the greatest burden of ischemic damage from futile intra-arterial treatment, which is unlikely to result in patient functional independence and increases the risk of hemorrhage.

  1. Comparison Between the Original and Shortened Versions of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in Ischemic Stroke Patients of Intermediate Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Fan; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Wong, K S Lawrence; Chen, Christopher L H

    2016-01-01

    The 15-item National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) has been critiqued for its complexity and variability, and shortened versions have been proposed. This study aimed to compare the measurement properties of the original version with 3 shortened versions with 11, 8, and 5 items, respectively. Analyses were performed using data from an international, double-blind randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of MLC601 on stroke recovery in patients with ischemic stroke of intermediate severity (Chinese Medicine Neuroaid Efficacy on Stroke recovery [CHIMES]). To compare discriminative ability and responsiveness to change, the effect sizes of the NIHSS scores in relation to modified Rankin Scale, mini-mental status examination, and Barthel index were estimated using regression analysis. For both discriminative ability and responsiveness to change, the original version exhibited a larger effect size (0.55 and 0.84) in relation to modified Rankin Scale than the other 3 shortened versions (0.35-0.46 and 0.74-0.78). The original 15-item NIHSS retained information that made it more discriminative and responsive to change than the shortened versions. We recommend future clinical researchers to use the full version NIHSS to evaluate patients' stroke severity. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00554723. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. The impact of stroke-related dysarthria on social participation and implications for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Marian C; Clark, Alexander M; Dickson, Sylvia; Paton, Gillian; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2011-01-01

    Each year an estimated 30,000-45,000 UK individuals experience stroke-related dysarthria (impairment of movements required to produce speech). Many will experience persistent dysarthria long after discharge from stroke services. Although we have some insight into the impact of other communication impairments, we have very limited information on the impact of dysarthria on social participation. To explore the impact of dysarthria on social participation following stroke. We report data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with 24 individuals with stroke-related dysarthria. Our findings suggest a complex association between the severity of an individual's dysarthria and the impact on their social participation. Participants' descriptions highlighted their experiences of social participation and isolation. We further suggest that, in some cases, the coping strategies adopted by the participants could be seen to further exacerbate this isolation. These results have important implications for the prioritisation, planning and delivery of therapeutic interventions for people with dysarthria. The impact of stroke-related dysarthria transcends the physiological impairment to impact upon individuals' social participation, which is key to the process of rehabilitation. The development and evaluation of the effectiveness of an intervention that addresses these impacts is the next challenge for therapists and researchers working in this area.

  3. Geographic Modeling to Quantify the Impact of Primary and Comprehensive Stroke Center Destination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Michael T; Pajerowski, William; Messé, Steven R; Mechem, C Crawford; Jia, Judy; Abboud, Michael; David, Guy; Carr, Brendan G; Band, Roger

    2018-02-28

    We evaluated the impact of a primary stroke center (PSC) destination policy in a major metropolitan city and used geographic modeling to evaluate expected changes for a comprehensive stroke center policy. We identified suspected stroke emergency medical services encounters from 1/1/2004 to 12/31/2013 in Philadelphia, PA. Transport times were compared before and after initiation of a PSC destination policy on 10/3/2011. Geographic modeling estimated the impact of bypassing the closest hospital for the closest PSC and for the closest comprehensive stroke center. There were 2 326 943 emergency medical services runs during the study period, of which 15 099 had a provider diagnosis of stroke. Bypassing the closest hospital for a PSC was common before the official policy and increased steadily over time. Geographic modeling suggested that bypassing the closest hospital in favor of the closest PSC adds a median of 3.1 minutes to transport time. Bypassing to the closest comprehensive stroke center would add a median of 8.3 minutes. Within a large metropolitan area, the time cost of routing patients preferentially to PSCs and comprehensive stroke centers is low. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Development of the Italian version of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale: It-NIHSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzella, Francesca Romana; Picconi, Orietta; De Luca, Assunta; Lyden, Patrick D; Fiorelli, Marco

    2009-07-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a basic component of the assessment of patients with acute stroke. To foster and standardize the use of the NIHSS among Italian health professionals, we translated the scale, dubbed into Italian the training and test videotapes devised by the National Institutes of Health researchers, and conducted a series of certification courses using the translated videos. Translation, text adaptation, video dubbing, and editing of the Italian NIHSS videotapes relied on a team of bilingual stroke neurologists. Three waves of training courses were organized for mixed classes of medical and nonmedical health professionals. The certification test was based on the usual set of 5 videotaped patients. Scoring rules were those provided by the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Reliability of the Italian NIHSS was assessed using kappa statistics and compared with that of the original NIHSS. During 3 years, 850 nurses, 460 nonneurologist physicians, and 246 neurologists were trained. Pass rates were respectively 44%, 75%, and 87%, respectively. Overall, 80% of scale items showed moderate to excellent reliability. Independent significant predictors of test failure at multivariate logistic regression were nurse profession (OR, 5.41; 95% CI, 4.07 to 7.20), older age (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.05), and first edition of the course (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 2.43 to 4.05). The agreement across all items between NIHSS and the Italian NIHSS was 80% (kappa=0.70+/-0.18, z<0.001). The Italian translation, supervised by experienced vascular neurologists, did not influence the clinimetric characteristics of the NIHSS. Our findings support the implementation of NIHSS video training in languages other than English.

  5. Developing a short form of the Berg Balance Scale for people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Yeh; Chien, Chi-Wen; Hsueh, I-Ping; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Wang, Chun-Hou; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2006-02-01

    To improve the utility of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the aim of this study was to develop a short form of the BBS (SFBBS) that was psychometrically similar (including test reliability, validity, and responsiveness) to the original BBS for people with stroke. A total of 226 subjects with stroke participated in this prospective study at 14 days after their stroke; 167 of these subjects also were examined at 90 days after their stroke. The BBS, Barthel Index, and Fugl-Meyer Motor Test were administered at these 2 time points. By reducing the number of tested items by more than half the number of items in the original BBS (ie, making 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-item tests) and simplifying the scoring system of the original BBS (ie, collapsing the 5-level scale into a 3-level scale [BBS-3P]), we generated a total of 8 SFBBSs. The distributions of scores for all 8 SFBBSs were acceptable but featured notable floor effects. The 4-item BBS, 5-item BBS, 5-item BBS-3P, and 7-item BBS-3P demonstrated good reliability. The subjects' scores on the 6-item BBS, 6-item BBS-3P, 7-item BBS, and 7-item BBS-3P showed excellent agreement with those on the original BBS. The 6-item BBS-3P and 7-item BBS-3P exhibited great responsiveness. Only the 7-item BBS-3P demonstrated both satisfactory and psychometric properties similar to those of the original BBS. The 7-item BBS-3P was found to be psychometrically similar to the original BBS. The 7-item BBS-3P, compared with the original BBS, is simpler and faster to complete in either a clinical or a research setting and is recommended.

  6. Dose-response relationship of robot-assisted stroke motor rehabilitation: the impact of initial motor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-wei; Wu, Ching-yi; Lin, Keh-chung; Yao, Grace; Wu, Kuen-yuh; Chang, Ya-ju

    2012-10-01

    The increasing availability of robot-assisted therapy (RT), which provides quantifiable, reproducible, interactive, and intensive practice, holds promise for stroke rehabilitation, but data on its dose-response relation are scanty. This study used 2 different intensities of RT to examine the treatment effects of RT and the effect on outcomes of the severity of initial motor deficits. Fifty-four patients with stroke were randomized to a 4-week intervention of higher-intensity RT, lower-intensity RT, or control treatment. The primary outcome, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, was administered at baseline, midterm, and posttreatment. Secondary outcomes included the Medical Research Council scale, the Motor Activity Log, and the physical domains of the Stroke Impact Scale. The higher-intensity RT group showed significantly greater improvements on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment than the lower-intensity RT and control treatment groups at midterm (P=0.003 and P=0.02) and at posttreatment (P=0.04 and P=0.02). Within-group gains on the secondary outcomes were significant, but the differences among the 3 groups did not reach significance. Recovery rates of the higher-intensity RT group were higher than those of the lower-intensity RT group, particularly on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. Scatterplots with curve fitting showed that patients with moderate motor deficits gained more improvements than those with severe or mild deficits after the higher-intensity RT. This study demonstrated the higher treatment intensity provided by RT was associated with better motor outcome for patients with stroke, which may shape further stroke rehabilitation. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00917605.

  7. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) as An Early Predictor of Poststroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaseelan, Rebecca D; Vargo, Mary M; Chae, John

    2015-06-01

    Despite the availability of multiple comprehensive screening methods to detect dysphagia during acute stroke care, consensus is lacking as to the best practice. Our previous study demonstrated favorable sensitivity of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) compared with a bedside 3-sip test. However, the FIM is challenging to administer during acute stroke care. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is administered routinely in the emergency department. To evaluate the utility of the NIHSS as a predictor of clinically relevant poststroke dysphagia compared with FIM data in the same cohort. Retrospective analysis. Academic medical center. Individuals with acute stroke who were admitted for acute care and later transferred to acute rehabilitation within the same institution. Clinically relevant dysphagia was defined as aspiration on modified barium swallow or laryngeal penetration on modified barium swallow requiring diet change, or aspiration pneumonia. NIHSS and FIM scores were compiled for all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for NIHSS and FIM. Sensitivity and specificity of different values of NIHSS and FIM were analyzed via receiver operator characteristic curves. Of 290 patients admitted to acute stroke rehabilitation, 88 (30%) manifested clinically relevant dysphagia during their rehabilitation stay. Sensitivity analyses suggested cut-off values for the NIHSS and the FIM of >9 and 9 and FIM dysphagia. Although the NIHSS clinical test characteristics are not as favorable as the FIM, NIHSS appears to be more sensitive than some other reported methods such as a 3-sip water test. Further study into development of paradigms that incorporate NIHSS into initial assessment of dysphagia risk may be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Libido at 2 Weeks after Stroke on Risk of Stroke Recurrence at 1-Year in a Chinese Stroke Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Jing Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: One out of three stroke patients in mainland China has decreased libido at 2 weeks after stroke. Decreased libido is a protective factor for stroke recurrence at 1-year, which is more prominent among older male patients.

  9. The correlation of nitrite concentration with lesion size in initial phase of stroke; It is not correlated with National Institute Health Stroke Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nematbakhsh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The role of Nitric Oxide (NO and its metabolites in stroke has been examined clinically and experimentally. The relationship between plasma NO level and Lesion Size (LS or clinical severity of stroke is still under investigation. In this clinical study, the serum level of Nitrite (NI; the last metabolite of NO was measured in first and fifth days of onset of the stroke, and its correlation with LS was determined.
    • METHOD: 37 Cerebrovascular Attack (CVA patients were considered. The National Institute Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was assessed to determined neurological impairment within 24 hours of onset. On the basis of NIHSS, the patients were divided into mild, moderate and severe groups. CT Scan for all patients were obtained in the first day, and based on CT Scan results, the patients were also divided into hemorrhagic, ischemic and normal groups. The serum level of NI and the LS were determined.
    • RESULTS: The mean serum levels of NI in 37 patients in the first and fifth days of stroke were 8.43± 1.23 and 7.46±0.72 7mole/liter with no significance difference. The analyses of data indicated no significant correlation between NI concentration and NIHSS, but in patients with abnormal CT Scan, statistical correlation was existed between NI concentration and LS (r=0.521, p=0.022.
    • CONCLUSION: The NI concentration is not correlated with NIHSS, but it is correlated with LS. The sources of NO metabolite sources are different; neuronal, endothelial or inducible. Therefore the concentration of NO or NI is not exactly the endothelial NO reprehensive which is beneficial in stroke, and it seems that the relationship between NO precursor subtypes and NIHSS or LS is needed to investigate.
    • KEYWORDS: Nitric Oxide, Stroke>

  10. The impact of patient's weight on post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Alperovitch-Najenson, Deborah; Treger, Iuly

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of patient's weight on rehabilitation outcomes in first-event stroke patients. Design Retrospective, observational comparative study. 102 first-time stroke male and female patients admitted to the 52-bed neurology rehabilitation department in a rehabilitation hospital were included in the study. Body mass index (BMI), Functional Independence Measure (FIM) on admission and at discharge, as well as the delta-FIM (FIM on admission - FIM at discharge) were evaluated. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the FIM and the NIHSS scores between BMI groups (normal, overweight, moderate and severe obesity). Results A statistically significant negative correlation (rho = -0.20, p = 0.049) was found between FIM change and BMI, that remained significant after adjustments for age, sex and hospitalisation days. No difference was found between groups in FIM or NIHSS change between BMI groups. Conclusions In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. Further investigations are needed to identify the functional parameters affected by the patients' BMI. Implications for Rehabilitation In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. New rehabilitation strategies should be designed to improve the functional outcomes of rehabilitation of obese patients.

  11. Psychometric evaluation of the appraisal of health scale in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth A; Bakas, Tamilyn; Williams, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive appraisal process influencing poststroke depressive symptoms. Based on a framework derived from Lazarus and Folkman (1984), psychometric properties of the Appraisal of Health Scale (AHS) were tested. Secondary analysis of data from 394 stroke survivors tested internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the AHS, consisting of 3 subscales (threat, benign, benefit). Cronbach's alphas were satisfactory (threat .92, benign .85, benefit .73). After principal axis factoring, two factors emerged (threat, benefit). Sequential multiple regression accounted for 43% of the variance in depressive symptoms (p < .001), partly explained by the threat and benefit subscales after controlling for depression history, disability, age, social support, self-esteem, and optimism. Threat and benefit AHS subscales demonstrated satisfactory evidence of internal consistency reliability and construct validity in stroke survivors.

  12. Preliminary Reliability and Validity of an Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention Scale in an African American Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Dawn M; Clark, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    African Americans are at heightened risk of first stroke, and regular exercise can reduce stroke risk. Benefits and barriers to exercise subscales from 2 instruments were combined to create the Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention (EBBSP) scale. Reliability and validity of the EBBSP scale were examined in a nonrandom sample of 66 African Americans who were primarily female, average age 43.3 ± 9.4 years, and high school graduates. Both subscales had adequate internal consistency reliability. Factor analysis revealed two factors for each subscale. More benefits and fewer perceived barriers were significantly related to current exercise and future intentions to exercise. The EBBSP scale may be useful in research focused on understanding, predicting, and promoting exercise for stroke prevention in adults.

  13. Factors influencing outcome in acute ischaemic stroke : outcome scales, the role of blood glucose and rtPA treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects that influence outcome in acute ischaemic strok. In the first part, two frequently used outcome scales - the Barthel index and modified Rankin scale - are studied and for both scales, optimal endpoints for stroke trials are proposed. In the second part, the

  14. Impact of stroke unit in a public hospital on length of hospitalization and rate of early mortality of ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sheila G. Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We ascertained whether a public health stroke unit reduces the length of hospitalization, the rate of inpatient fatality, and the mortality rate 30 days after the stroke. Methods We compared a cohort of stroke patients managed on a general neurology/medical ward with a similar cohort of stroke patients managed in a str oke unit. The in-patient fatality rates and 30-day mortality rates were analyzed. Results 729 patients were managed in the general ward and 344 were treated at a comprehensive stroke unit. The in-patient fatality rates were 14.7% for the general ward group and 6.9% for the stroke unit group (p<0.001. The overall mortality rate 30 days after stroke was 20.9% for general ward patients and 14.2% for stroke unit patients (p=0.005. Conclusions We observed reduced in-patient fatalities and 30-day mortality rates in patients managed in the stroke unit. There was no impact on the length of hospitalization.

  15. Impact of banning of two-stroke engines on airborne particulate matter concentrations in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Bilkis A; Biswas, Swapan K; Hopke, Philip K

    2006-01-01

    Vehicular air pollution is common in growing metropolitan areas throughout the world. Vehicular emissions of fine particles are particularly harmful because they occur near ground level, close to where people live and work. Two-stroke engines represented an important contribution to the motor vehicle emissions where they constitute approximately half of the total vehicle fleet in Dhaka city. Two-stroke engines have lower fuel efficiency than four-stroke engines, and they emit as much of an order of magnitude and more particulate matter (PM) than four-stroke engines of similar size. To eliminate their impact on air quality, the government of Bangladesh promulgated an order banning all two-stroke engines from the roads in Dhaka starting on December 31, 2002. The effect of the banning of two-stroke engines on airborne PM was studied at the Farm Gate air quality-monitoring station in Dhaka (capital of Bangladesh), a hot spot with very high-pollutant concentrations because of its proximity to major roadways. The samples were collected using a "Gent" stacked filter unit in two fractions of 0-2.2 microm and 2.2-10 microm sizes. Samples of fine and coarse fractions of airborne PM collected from 2000 to 2004 were studied. It has been found that the fine PM and black carbon concentrations decreased from the previous years because of the banning of two-stroke engine baby taxies.

  16. Impact of state Medicaid coverage on utilization of inpatient rehabilitation facilities among patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Burke, James F; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Meurer, William J; Adelman, Eric E; Kerber, Kevin A; Callaghan, Brian C; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2014-08-01

    Poststroke rehabilitation is associated with improved outcomes. Medicaid coverage of inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) admissions varies by state. We explored the role of state Medicaid IRF coverage on IRF utilization among patients with stroke. Working age ischemic stroke patients with Medicaid were identified from the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Medicaid coverage of IRFs (yes versus no) was ascertained. Primary outcome was discharge to IRF (versus other discharge destinations). We fit a logistic regression model that included patient demographics, Medicaid coverage, comorbidities, length of stay, tissue-type plasminogen activator use, state Medicaid IRF coverage, and the interaction between patient Medicaid status and state Medicaid IRF coverage while accounting for hospital clustering. Medicaid did not cover IRFs in 4 (TN, TX, SC, WV) of 42 states. The impact of State Medicaid IRF coverage was limited to Medicaid stroke patients (P for interaction stroke patients in states with Medicaid IRF coverage, Medicaid stroke patients hospitalized in states without Medicaid IRF coverage were less likely to be discharged to an IRF of 11.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.5%-14.7%) versus 19.5% (95% confidence interval, 18.3%-20.8%), Pstroke patients with Medicaid. Given the increasing stroke incidence among the working age and Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, careful attention to state Medicaid policy for poststroke rehabilitation and analysis of its effects on stroke outcome disparities are warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Impact of Spasticity on Balance Control during Quiet Standing in Persons after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, George; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Background Balance impairments, falls, and spasticity are common after stroke, but the effect of spasticity on balance control after stroke is not well understood. Methods In this cross-sectional study, twenty-seven participants with stroke were divided into two groups, based on ankle plantar flexor spasticity level. Fifteen individuals with high spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score of ≥2) and 12 individuals with low spasticity (MAS score spasticity group demonstrated greater ML COP velocity, trunk roll velocity, trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 3.7 Hz, and trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 4.9 Hz, particularly in the eyes closed condition (spasticity by vision interaction). ML COP MPF was greater in the high spasticity group. Conclusion Individuals with high spasticity after stroke demonstrated greater impairment of balance control in the frontal plane, which was exacerbated when vision was removed. PMID:29098109

  18. Stroke quality metrics: systematic reviews of the relationships to patient-centered outcomes and impact of public reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Carol; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J

    2012-01-01

    Stroke quality metrics play an increasingly important role in quality improvement and policies related to provider reimbursement, accreditation, and public reporting. We conducted 2 systematic reviews examining the relationships between compliance with stroke quality metrics and patient-centered outcomes, and public reporting of stroke metrics and quality improvement, quality of care, or outcomes. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies that evaluated the relationship between stroke quality metric compliance and patient-centered outcomes in acute hospital settings and public reporting of stroke quality metrics and quality improvement activities, quality of care, or patient outcomes. We specifically excluded studies that evaluated the effect of stroke units or hospital certification. Fourteen studies met eligibility criteria for the review of stroke quality metric compliance and patient-centered outcomes; 9 found mostly positive associations, whereas 5 found no or very limited associations. Only 2 eligible studies were found that directly addressed the public reporting of stroke quality metrics. Some studies have found positive associations between stroke metric compliance and improved patient-centered outcomes. However, high-quality studies are lacking and several methodological difficulties make the interpretation of the reported associations challenging. Information on the impact of public reporting of stroke quality metric data is extremely limited. Legitimate questions remain as to whether public reporting of stroke metrics is accurate, effective, or has the potential for unintended consequences. The generation of high-quality data examining quality metrics and stroke outcomes as well as the impact of public reporting should be given priority.

  19. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in Plain English Is Reliable for Novice Nurse Users with Minimal Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, Sandy; Brown, Allen J; Yanase, Lisa Rietz

    2017-05-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is commonly used in Comprehensive Stroke Centers, but it has not been easily implemented in smaller centers. The aim of this study was to assess whether nurse providers who were naive to stroke assessment scales could obtain accurate stroke severity scores using our previously validated NIH Stroke Scale in Plain English (NIHSS-PE) with minimal or no training. We randomly assigned 122 nursing students who were naive to stroke assessment scales to 1 of 4 groups: trained on the NIHSS, untrained on the NIHSS, trained on the NIHSS-PE, or untrained on the NIHSS-PE. The Trained/NIHSS and Trained/NIHSS-PE groups watched assessment scale-specific training DVDs. All 4 study groups scored the same 3 patients from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke certification DVD, in randomly assigned order. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare group scores with those obtained by a consensus panel of NIHSS-certified expert users, and with each other. NIHSS-PE users had scores significantly closer to the expert scores compared with NIHSS users (F (1,118) = 4.656, P = .033). Trained users had scores significantly closer to the expert scores than untrained users (F (1,118) = 6.607, P = .011). Scores from untrained users of the NIHSS-PE did not differ from those of trained users of the NIHSS (F (1,59) = 0.08, P = .780). With minimal or no training, novice nurse users of the NIHSS-PE can do as well as, if not better than, novice users of the NIHSS, making this tool useful for facilities pursuing Acute Stroke-Ready certification. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of two approaches to screen for dysphagia among acute ischemic stroke patients: nursing admission screening tool versus National Institutes of Health stroke scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravata, Dawn M; Daggett, Virginia S; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Damush, Teresa; Plue, Laurie; Russell, Scott; Allen, George; Williams, Linda S; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Chumbler, Neale R

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the positive and negative predictive values and the sensitivity and specificity of a nursing dysphagia screening tool and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) for the identification of dysphagia for veterans hospitalized with ischemic stroke.A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the speech-language pathology consult rate before and after the nursing admission dysphagia screening tool. This retrospective cohort study evaluated veterans admitted to one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center with ischemic stroke during the 6 months both before and after the implementation of a nursing dysphagia screening tool, which was part of the admission nursing template. Stroke severity was measured with the use of the retrospective NIHSS. Dysphagia diagnosis was based on speech-language pathology evaluations.Dysphagia was present in 38 of 101 patients (38%) with ischemic stroke. The nursing dysphagia screening tool had a positive predictive value of 50% and a negative predictive value of 68%, with a sensitivity of 29% and specificity of 84%. The use of the NIHSS to identify dysphagia risk had a positive predictive value of 60% and a negative predictive value of 84%.The NIHSS had better test characteristics in predicting dysphagia than the nursing dysphagia screening tool. Future research should evaluate the use of the NIHSS as a screening tool for dysphagia.

  1. Impact of early applied upper limb stimulation: The EXPLICIT-stroke programme design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindeman Eline

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Main claims of the literature are that functional recovery of the paretic upper limb is mainly defined within the first month post stroke and that rehabilitation services should preferably be applied intensively and in a task-oriented way within this particular time window. EXplaining PLastICITy after stroke (acronym EXPLICIT-stroke aims to explore the underlying mechanisms of post stroke upper limb recovery. Two randomized single blinded trials form the core of the programme, investigating the effects of early modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (modified CIMT and EMG-triggered Neuro-Muscular Stimulation (EMG-NMS in patients with respectively a favourable or poor probability for recovery of dexterity. Methods/design 180 participants suffering from an acute, first-ever ischemic stroke will be recruited. Functional prognosis at the end of the first week post stroke is used to stratify patient into a poor prognosis group for upper limb recovery (N = 120, A2 project and a group with a favourable prognosis (N = 60, A1 project. Both groups will be randomized to an experimental arm receiving respectively modified CIMT (favourable prognosis or EMG-NMS (poor prognosis for 3 weeks or to a control arm receiving usual care. Primary outcome variable will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT, assessed at 1,2,3,4,5, 8, 12 and 26 weeks post stroke. To study the impact of modified CIMT or EMG-NMS on stroke recovery mechanisms i.e. neuroplasticity, compensatory movements and upper limb neuromechanics, 60 patients randomly selected from projects A1 and A2 will undergo TMS, kinematical and haptic robotic measurements within a repeated measurement design. Additionally, 30 patients from the A1 project will undergo fMRI at baseline, 5 and 26 weeks post stroke. Conclusion EXPLICIT stroke is a 5 year translational research programme which main aim is to investigate the effects of early applied intensive intervention for regaining dexterity

  2. Impact of Cognitive Impairment on Functional Outcome in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Paker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cognitive impairment on functional status in patients with subacute stroke. Fifty-two patients with subacute stroke were included in the study. Mini mental state examination (MMSE test was used for the evaluation of cognitive status. Patients were separated into two groups according to their cognitive functions. Functional follow-up parameters were activities of daily living (ADL, global recovery and ambulation status. All patients were evaluated on admission to rehabilitation unit, at discharge and 6 months after discharge. Forty-four patients were completed the study. Mean age was 66 and 57 years; disease duration on admission was 4,8 and 3,5 months in the cognitively impaired and normal groups, respectively. Significant improvement was found in terms of functional follow-up parameters in both groups at discharge (<.05. Functional follow-up parameters did not show statistically significant difference between the groups. But community ambulation rate was higher in cognitively normal group at the sixth month visit. As a result of this study, inpatient rehabilitation was effective both cognitively normal and impaired subacute stroke patients.

  3. Assessment of test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Wisconsin Gait Scale in hemiparetic post-stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzik Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A proper assessment of gait pattern is a significant aspect in planning the process of teaching gait in hemiparetic post-stroke patients. The Wisconsin Gait Scale (WGS is an observational tool for assessing post-stroke patients’ gait. The aim of the study was to assess test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the WGS and examine correlations between gait assessment made with the WGS and gait speed, Brunnström scale, Ashworth’s scale and the Barthel Index.

  4. Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg-Morvay, Anne; Meisterernst, Julia; Schlager, Markus; Mono, Marie-Luise; El-Koussy, Marwan; Kägi, Georg; Jung, Simon; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke. Methods We studied 570 consecutive patients treated in a tertiary stroke center. Dysphagia was evaluated by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). We investigated the relationship of dysphagia with pneumonia, length of hospital stay and discharge destination and compared rates of favourable clinical outcome and mortality at 3 months between dysphagic patients and those without dysphagia. Results Dysphagia was diagnosed in 118 of 570 (20.7%) patients and persisted in 60 (50.9%) at hospital discharge. Thirty-six (30.5%) patients needed nasogastric tube because of severe dysphagia. Stroke severity rather than infarct location was associated with dysphagia. Dysphagic patients suffered more frequently from pneumonia (23.1% vs. 1.1%, pdysphagia. At 3 months, dysphagic patients less often had a favourable outcome (35.7% vs. 69.7%; pdysphagia to be an independent predictor of discharge destination and institutionalization at 3 months, while severe dysphagia requiring tube placement was strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion Dysphagia still affects a substantial portion of stroke patients and may have a large impact on clinical outcome, mortality and institutionalization. PMID:26863627

  5. Adaptation and validation of stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39 scale to Malayalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Raju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aphasia, an acquired inability to understand and/or speak language, is a common repercussion of stroke that denigrates the quality of life (QOL in the affected persons. Several languages in India experience the dearth of instruments to measure the QOL of persons with aphasia. Malayalam, the language spoken by more than 33 million people in Kerala, the southern state of India, is not an exception to this. Objective: This study aimed to adapt and validate the widely-used stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39 scale to Malayalam. Materials and Methods: We required seven Malayalam-speaking Speech Language Pathologists (SLPs, hailing from different regions of Kerala, to examine the socio-cultural suitability of the original items in SAQOL-39 and indicate modifications, wherever necessary. Subsequently, the linguistic adaptation was performed through a forward-backward translation scheme. The socio-culturally and linguistically adapted Malayalam version was then administered on a group of 48 Malayalam-speaking persons with aphasia to examine the test-retest reliability, acceptability, as well as the internal consistency of the instrument. Results: The Malayalam SAQOL-39 scale showed high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.91 as well as acceptability with minimal missing data (0.52%. Further, it yielded high internal consistency (Chronbach′s ∝ = 0.98 as well as item-to-total and inter-domain correlations. Conclusions: The Malayalam version of SAQOL-39 is the first socio-culturally and linguistically adapted tool to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia speaking this language. It may serve as a potential tool to measure the QOL of this population in both clinical practice and future research endeavors.

  6. Use of emergency medical transport and impact on time to care in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olascoaga Arrate, A; Freijo Guerrero, M M; Fernández Maiztegi, C; Azkune Calle, I; Silvariño Fernández, R; Fernández Rodríguez, M; Vazquez Naveira, P; Anievas Elena, A; Iturraspe González, I; Pérez Díez, Y; Ruiz Fernández, R

    2017-01-13

    According to numerous studies, using emergency medical services (EMS) to transport stroke patients to hospitals decreases diagnostic and treatment delays. To determine the frequency of use of EMS by stroke patients in Bizkaia (Spain), analyse the factors associated with using EMS, and study the impact of EMS on time to care. We gathered data from 545 patients hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke and recruited consecutively. Data were obtained from the patients' medical histories and interviews with the patients themselves or their companions. We studied the following variables: previous health status, stroke symptoms and severity (NIHSS), type of transport, and time to medical care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with use of EMS and care delays. Patients transported to hospital by the EMS accounted for 47.2% of the total. Greater stroke severity, arriving at the hospital at night, and poor functional status at baseline were found to be independently associated with use of EMS. Use of EMS was linked to earlier arrival at the hospital. Door-to-imaging times were shorter in the EMS group; however, this association disappeared after adjusting for stroke severity. Revascularisation was more frequent among patients transported by the EMS. EMS transport was associated with shorter prehospital delays. Effective health education programmes should be developed to promote EMS transport for patients with stroke symptoms. In-hospital stroke management should also be improved to reduce time to medical care. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Post-stroke motor and functional evaluations: a clinical correlation using Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Roberta de; Cacho,Enio Walker Azevedo; Borges,Guilherme

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. Objective: To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral strok...

  8. French validation of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QoL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Nicolas; Devilliers, Hervé; Daumas, Anaïs; Carnet, Didier; Charpy, Jean-Pierre; Bastable, Philip; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    To adapt the SS-QoL into French and test its psychometric properties. Seventy-seven patients from a population-based registry were enrolled 3 months after their stroke. SS-QoL, NIHSS score, Barthel index, HAD, FSS, SF-36 scales, and MMSE were administered at enrolment. SS-QoL was re-administered at 15 days and 2 months. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's α coefficients, factorial validity by an exploratory factor analysis and external validity by Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's correlations (ρ), comparing SS-QoL scores with those obtained from established scales. Reliability was assessed by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and responsiveness by standardized effect sizes (ES). Test-retest and inter-observer reliabilities were excellent (ICC> 0.88). Internal consistency was acceptable (α= 0.65-0.91), except for the Personality domain (α= 0.58). Factor analysis individualized eight homogenous axes. SS-QoL scores were different between groups opposed by their modified Rankin score at enrolment or their overall quality of life compared with pre-stroke status (p  0.35) to strongly (ρ> 0.5) with established measures. Nine domains were mildly to moderately responsive to change (ES> 0.3). The French version of the SS-QoL is a valid, reliable and moderately responsive instrument.

  9. Stroke Survivors Scoring Zero on the NIH Stroke Scale Score Still Exhibit Significant Motor Impairment and Functional Limitation

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    Brittany Hand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale’s (NIHSS’s association with upper extremity (UE impairment and functional outcomes. Design. Secondary, retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial data. Setting. Not applicable. Participants. 146 subjects with stable, chronic stroke-induced hemiparesis. Intervention. The NIHSS, the UE Fugl-Meyer (FM, and the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT were administered prior to their participation in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Main Outcome Measures. The NIHSS, FM, and AMAT. Results. The association between the NIHSS and UE impairment was statistically significant (P=-0.204;p=0.014 but explained less than 4% of the variance among UE FM scores. The association between NIHSS total score and function as measured by the AMAT was not statistically significant (P=-0.141;p=0.089. Subjects scoring a “zero” on the NIHSS exhibited discernible UE motor deficits and varied scores on the UE FM and AMAT. Conclusion. While being used in stroke trials, the NIHSS may have limited ability to discriminate between treatment responses, even when only a relatively narrow array of impairment levels exists among patients. Given these findings, NIHSS use should be restricted to acute stroke studies and clinical settings with the goal of reporting stroke severity.

  10. Relevance of the Updated Food and Drug Administration Alteplase Label for Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Estimated Impact and Current Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Harn J; Albright, Karen C; Sands, Kara A

    2018-04-01

    In 2015, the Food and Drug Administration updated the contraindications for the use of alteplase in acute ischemic stroke (AIS), potentially creating a greater impact on treatment. A history of intracranial hemorrhage and recent stroke within 3 months were removed as contraindications, increasing the number of patients eligible for alteplase. The aim of this commentary is to call attention to the updates and discuss them relative to current American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines. Additionally, we estimate the clinical impact of the updates by analyzing AIS admissions to a large-volume Comprehensive Stroke Center.

  11. Relevance of Post-Stroke Circulating BDNF Levels as a Prognostic Biomarker of Stroke Outcome. Impact of rt-PA Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Marion; Quirié, Aurore; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant form of tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only curative treatment for ischemic stroke. Recently, t-PA has been linked to the metabolism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a major neurotrophin involved in post-stroke neuroplasticity. Thus, the objective of our study was to investigate the impact of rt-PA treatment on post-stroke circulating BDNF levels in humans and in animals. Serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were measured at hospital admission and at up to 90 days in stroke patients receiving (n = 24) or not (n = 14) rt-PA perfusion. We investigated the relationships between serum BDNF with concurrent t-PA/plasmin activity, neurological outcomes and cardiovascular scores at admission. In parallel, serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were assessed before and after (1, 4 and 24h) the induction of ischemic stroke in rats. Our study revealed higher serum BDNF levels and better neurological outcome in rt-PA-treated than non-treated patients. However, serum BDNF levels did not predict stroke outcome when the whole cohort of stroke patients was analyzed. By contrast, serum BDNF levels when measured at admission and at day 90 correlated with cardiovascular scores, and those at day 1 correlated with serum t-PA/plasmin activity in the whole cohort of patients whereas no association could be found in the rt-PA-treated group. In rats devoid of cardiovascular risk, no difference in post-stroke serum BDNF levels was detected between rt-PA- and vehicle-treated animals and no correlation was found between serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity. Overall, the data suggest that serum BDNF levels may not be useful as a prognostic biomarker of stroke outcome and that endothelial dysfunction could be a confounding factor when serum BDNF levels after stroke are used to reflect of brain BDNF levels.

  12. Impacts of perinatal induced photothrombotic stroke on sensorimotor performance in adult rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brima, Tufikameni; Mikulecká, Anna; Otáhal, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2013), s. 85-94 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : photothrombosis * perinatal ischemic stroke * sensorimotor performance * immature rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  13. Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy in Large-Vessel Occlusion Ischemic Stroke Presenting with Low National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessenauer, Christoph J; Medin, Caroline; Maingard, Julian; Chandra, Ronil V; Ng, Wyatt; Brooks, Duncan Mark; Asadi, Hamed; Killer-Oberpfalzer, Monika; Schirmer, Clemens M; Moore, Justin M; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J; Phan, Kevin

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical thrombectomy has become the standard of care for management of most large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes. When patients with LVO present with minor stroke symptomatology, no consensus on the role of mechanical thrombectomy exists. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to identify studies that focused on mechanical thrombectomy, either as a standalone treatment or with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA), in patients with mild strokes with LVO, defined as a baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤5 at presentation. Data on methodology, quality criteria, and outcome measures were extracted, and outcomes were compared using odds ratio as a summary statistic. Five studies met the selection criteria and were included. When compared with medical therapy without IV tPA, mechanical thrombectomy and medical therapy with IV tPA were associated with improved 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Among medical patients who were not eligible for IV tPA, those who underwent mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to experience good 90-day mRS than those who were not. There was no significant difference in functional outcome between mechanical thrombectomy and medical therapy with IV tPA, and no treatment subgroup was associated with intracranial hemorrhage or death. In patients with mild strokes due to LVO, mechanical thrombectomy and medical therapy with IV tPA led to better 90-day functional outcome. Mechanical thrombectomy plays an important role in the management of these patients, particularly in those not eligible for IV tPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of sensory integration training on balance among stroke patients: sensory integration training on balance among stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang Hun; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to investigate the impact that the sensory integration training has on the recovery of balance among patients with stroke by examining the muscle activity and limit of stability (LOS). A total of 28 subjects participated. The subjects were randomly allocated by the computer program to one of two groups: control (CON) group (n=15), sensory integration training (SIT) group (n=13). The research subjects received intervention five days a week for a total of four weeks. The CON group additionally received 30-minute general balance training, while the SIT group additionally received 30-minute sensory integration training. In the muscle activity, the improvement of Erector spinae (ES) and Gluteus medius (GM) was more significant in the SIT group than in the CON group. In the LOS, the improvement of affected side and forward side was significantly higher in the SIT group compared to the CON group. Sensory integration training can improve balance ability of patients with stroke by increasing muscle activity of stance limb muscles such as GM and trunk extensor such as ES along with enhancement of the limit of stability.

  15. Impact of sensory integration training on balance among stroke patients: sensory integration training on balance among stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Sang Hun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to investigate the impact that the sensory integration training has on the recovery of balance among patients with stroke by examining the muscle activity and limit of stability (LOS. A total of 28 subjects participated. The subjects were randomly allocated by the computer program to one of two groups: control (CON group (n=15, sensory integration training (SIT group (n=13. The research subjects received intervention five days a week for a total of four weeks. The CON group additionally received 30-minute general balance training, while the SIT group additionally received 30-minute sensory integration training. In the muscle activity, the improvement of Erector spinae (ES and Gluteus medius (GM was more significant in the SIT group than in the CON group. In the LOS, the improvement of affected side and forward side was significantly higher in the SIT group compared to the CON group. Sensory integration training can improve balance ability of patients with stroke by increasing muscle activity of stance limb muscles such as GM and trunk extensor such as ES along with enhancement of the limit of stability.

  16. Development of an Earthquake Impact Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D. J.; Marano, K. D.; Jaiswal, K. S.

    2009-12-01

    With the advent of the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, domestic (U.S.) and international earthquake responders are reconsidering their automatic alert and activation levels as well as their response procedures. To help facilitate rapid and proportionate earthquake response, we propose and describe an Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS) founded on two alerting criteria. One, based on the estimated cost of damage, is most suitable for domestic events; the other, based on estimated ranges of fatalities, is more appropriate for most global events. Simple thresholds, derived from the systematic analysis of past earthquake impact and response levels, turn out to be quite effective in communicating predicted impact and response level of an event, characterized by alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (major disaster, necessitating international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered by estimated losses exceeding 1M, 10M, and $1B, respectively. The rationale for a dual approach to earthquake alerting stems from the recognition that relatively high fatalities, injuries, and homelessness dominate in countries where vernacular building practices typically lend themselves to high collapse and casualty rates, and it is these impacts that set prioritization for international response. In contrast, it is often financial and overall societal impacts that trigger the level of response in regions or countries where prevalent earthquake resistant construction practices greatly reduce building collapse and associated fatalities. Any newly devised alert protocols, whether financial or casualty based, must be intuitive and consistent with established lexicons and procedures. In this analysis, we make an attempt

  17. Assessing the impact of upper limb disability following stroke: a qualitative enquiry using internet-based personal accounts of stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltawski, Leon; Allison, Rhoda; Briscoe, Simon; Freeman, Jennifer; Kilbride, Cherry; Neal, Debbie; Turton, Ailie J.; Dean, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Upper limb disability following stroke may have multiple effects on the individual. Existing assessment instruments tend to focus on impairment and function and may miss other changes that are personally important. This study aimed to identify personally significant impacts of upper limb disability following stroke. Methods: Accounts by stroke survivors, in the form of web-based diaries (blogs) and stories, were sought using a blog search engine and in stroke-related web-sites. Thematic analysis using the World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) was used to identify personal impacts of upper limb disability following stroke. Results: Ninety-nine sources from at least four countries were analysed. Many impacts were classifiable using the ICF, but a number of additional themes emerged, including emotional, cognitive and behavioural changes. Blogs and other web-based accounts were easily accessible and rich sources of data, although using them raised several methodological issues, including potential sample bias. Conclusions: A range of impacts was identified, some of which (such as use of information technology and alienation from the upper limb) are not addressed in current assessment instruments. They should be considered in post-stroke assessments. Blogs may help in the development of more comprehensive assessments.Implications for RehabilitationA comprehensive assessment of the upper limb following stroke should include the impact of upper limb problems on social participation, as well as associated emotional, cognitive and behavioural changes.Using personalised assessment instruments alongside standardised measures may help ensure that these broader domains are considered in discussions between clinicians and patients.Rehabilitation researchers should investigate whether and how these domains could be addressed and operationalised in standard upper limb assessment instruments. PMID

  18. Reliability of measurements obtained with the modified Ashworth scale in the lower extremities of people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Marjan; van Vliet, Paulette; Mockett, Simon P

    2002-01-01

    Abnormal muscle tone is a common motor disorder following stroke, which may require rehabilitation. The Modified Ashworth Scale is a 6-point rating scale that is used to measure muscle tone. The interrater and intrarater reliability of measurements obtained with the scale remain equivocal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of measurements obtained with the scale in the lower limb of patients with stroke. Twenty patients were tested 2 weeks after their stroke, and 12 patients were tested 12 weeks after their stroke. Gastrocnemius, soleus, and quadriceps femoris muscles on the hemiplegic side were tested. Interrater reliability for 2 raters was poor, with a Kendall tau-b correlation for the combined muscle group of.062 (P=.461). For intrarater reliability, the Kendall tau-b correlation was.567 (PAshworth Scale yielded reliable measurements in the lower limb for a single examiner, and agreement was best on the grade of 0. The reliability between examiners was not good, which may bring into question the validity of measurements obtained with the scale.

  19. Evaluating motor recovery early after stroke: comparison of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and the Motor Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouin, F; Pichard, L; Bonneau, C; Durand, A; Corriveau, D

    1994-11-01

    This study compared the measurements of the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) to that of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), a reliable and valid test for motor function in stroke patients. Thirty-two patients (20 men, 12 women) with a mean age of 60 years, and a mean time since stroke of 64.5 days, were tested with the FMA and MAS on two consecutive days. The Spearman correlation coefficient for total FMA and total MAS scores was 0.96. For selected items, significant (p scale can better discriminate the level of motor recovery than the MAS in the early stage of recovery or in the more disabled subjects.

  20. Impact of Achieved Blood Pressure on First Stroke in Uncomplicated Grade 1 Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xianhui; Li, Youbao; Sun, Ningling; He, Mingli; Tang, Genfu; Yin, Delu; Wang, JiGuang; Liang, Min; Wang, Binyan; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Xu, Xiping; Hou, Fan Fan

    2017-03-08

    We aimed to test the impact of achieved blood pressure (BP) on first stroke among patients with grade 1 hypertension and without cardiovascular diseases in the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. A total of 3187 patients with uncomplicated grade 1 hypertension were included. The risk of outcomes was assessed according to: (1) the proportion of visits in which BP was reduced to hypertension subtypes (isolated systolic hypertension or systolic-diastolic hypertension). However, a time-averaged SBP hypertension. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Feasibility of the cognitive assessment scale for stroke patients (CASP) vs. MMSE and MoCA in aphasic left hemispheric stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay, J-L; Wauquiez, G; Bonnin-Koang, H Y; Anquetil, C; Pérennou, D; Piscicelli, C; Lucas-Pineau, B; Muja, L; le Stunff, E; de Boissezon, X; Terracol, C; Rousseaux, M; Bejot, Y; Binquet, C; Antoine, D; Devilliers, H; Benaim, C

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke aphasia makes it difficult to assess cognitive deficiencies. We thus developed the CASP, which can be administered without using language. Our objective was to compare the feasibility of the CASP, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in aphasic stroke patients. All aphasic patients consecutively admitted to seven French rehabilitation units during a 4-month period after a recent first left hemispheric stroke were assessed with CASP, MMSE and MoCA. We determined the proportion of patients in whom it was impossible to administer at least one item from these 3 scales, and compared their administration times. Forty-four patients were included (age 64±15, 26 males). The CASP was impossible to administer in eight of them (18%), compared with 16 for the MMSE (36%, P=0.05) and 13 for the MoCA (30%, P=0.21, NS). It was possible to administer the CASP in all of the patients with expressive aphasia, whereas the MMSE and the MoCA could not be administered. Administration times were longer for the CASP (13±4min) than for the MMSE (8±3min, P<10(-6)) and the MoCA (11±5min, P=0.23, NS). The CASP is more feasible than the MMSE and the MoCA in aphasic stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring disability in stroke: relationship between the modified Rankin scale and the Barthel index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenboogaart, M; Luijckx, G-J; Vroomen, P C A J; Stewart, R E; De Keyser, J

    2007-08-01

    The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in acute stroke trials is traditionally measured with the modified Rankin scale (mRs) and the Barthel index (BI). The mRs is a global disability scale divided into six steps from total independence to total dependence. The BI assesses ten basal activities of daily living, of which eight assess level of dependence (bathing, grooming, using stairs, dressing, feeding, toilet use, transfers and walking). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mRs and the total scores and item-scores of the BI. During a period of 3 months mRs and BI scores were collected from two multicentre randomised, placebo-controlled trials with lubeluzole (515 and 519 patients). In each patient we compared the mRs grades with the total BI score and the scores on the ten subitems. For both trials there was extensive overlap of BI scores between mRs grades and a wide range in BI scores among patients with mRs grades 3 and 4. We also found discrepancies between the BI item-scores and mRs grades. About 40% of patients with mRs grades 1 (able to carry out all usual activities) and 2 (able to look after own affairs without assistance) were not independent on at least one activity of the BI. In both studies, about 30% of the patients needed help or supervision for walking, although they were classified as mRs 3 (requiring some help but able to walk without assistance). Investigators in stroke trials use the mRs as a subjective global disability scale, and they do not strictly take into account limitations in performing specific basal activities of daily living, as assessed by the BI, to assign mRs grades.

  3. A First Step for the Automation of Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale for Stroke Subjects in Upper Limb Physical Neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villán-Villán, Mailin A; Pérez-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Gómez, Cristina; Opisso, Eloy; Tormos, Jose; Medina, Josep; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a first approach for the automation of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale used in physical neurorehabilitation. The main goal of this research is to automatically estimate an objective measurement for five Fugl-Meyer scale items related to the assessment of the upper limb motion. An objective score has been calculated for 7 patients. Obtained results indicate that the automation of the scale can be a useful tool for the objective assessment of upper limb motion of stroke survivors.

  4. Test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the Barthel Index-based Supplementary Scales in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Chen; Yu, Wan-Hui; Hsueh, I-Ping; Chen, Sheng-Shiung; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2017-10-01

    A lack of evidence on the test-retest reliability and responsiveness limits the utility of the BI-based Supplementary Scales (BI-SS) in both clinical and research settings. To examine the test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the BI-based Supplementary Scales (BI-SS) in patients with stroke. A repeated-assessments design (1 week apart) was used to examine the test-retest reliability of the BI-SS. For the responsiveness study, the participants were assessed with the BI-SS and BI (treated as an external criterion) at admission to and discharge from rehabilitation wards. Seven outpatient rehabilitation units and one inpatient rehabilitation unit. Outpatients with chronic stroke. Eighty-four outpatients with chronic stroke participated in the test-retest reliability study. Fifty-seven inpatients completed baseline and follow-up assessments in the responsiveness study. For the test-retest reliability study, the values of the intra-class correlation coefficient and the overall percentage of minimal detectable change for the Ability Scale and Self-perceived Difficulty Scale were 0.97, 12.8%, and 0.78, 35.8%, respectively. For the responsiveness study, the standardized effect size and standardized response mean (representing internal responsiveness) of the Ability Scale and Self-perceived Difficulty Scale were 1.17 and 1.56, and 0.78 and 0.89, respectively. Regarding external responsiveness, the change in score of the Ability Scale had significant and moderate association with that of the BI (r=0.61, Preliability and sufficient responsiveness for patients with stroke. However, the Self-perceived Difficulty Scale of the BI-SS has substantial random measurement error and insufficient external responsiveness, which may affect its utility in clinical settings. The findings of this study provide empirical evidence of psychometric properties of the BI-SS for assessing ability and self-perceived difficulty of ADL in patients with stroke.

  5. The impact of a toolkit on use of standardised measurement tools in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, S F; Burton, L; McGovern, A

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of a toolkit of psychometrically robust measurement tools, the Greater Manchester Assessment for Stroke Rehabilitation (G-MASTER) toolkit, on the use of measurement tools during stroke rehabilitation Mixed methods cohort design using non-participant observation of multi-disciplinary team meetings and semi-structured interviews with members of the team over three months before and three months after implementation of the assessment toolkit. Development and implementation of the toolkit are also described. Ten in-patient stroke services in a large UK city. Members of the participating multi-disciplinary stroke teams. Before implementation standardised measures were seldom used in team meetings. After implementation, use of all measurement tools significantly increased (36% to 81% of occasions, Ptoolkit and felt it enabled more accurate problem identification, effective progress monitoring, timely decision-making, communication and promoted inter-team relationships. A toolkit of standardised measurement tools can be feasibly and acceptably implemented into stroke rehabilitation. It increases the use of measurement tools by the multi-disciplinary team and improves the processes and quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Development and Assessment of a Computer Algorithm for Stroke Vascular Localization Using Components of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, David P; Tseng, Bertrand P; Goldstein, Larry B

    2016-02-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was not intended to be used to determine the stroke's vascular distribution. The aim of this study was to develop, assess the reliability, and validate a computer algorithm based on the NIHSS for this purpose. Two cohorts of patients with ischemic stroke having similar distributions of Oxfordshire localizations (total anterior, partial anterior, lacunar, and posterior circulation) based on neuroimaging were identified. The first cohort (n = 40) was used to develop a computer algorithm for vascular localization using a modified version of the NIHSS (NIHSS-Localization [NIHSS-Loc]) that included the laterality of selected deficits; the second (n = 20) was used to assess the reliability of algorithm-based localizations compared to those of 2 vascular neurologists. The validity of the algorithm-based localizations was assessed in comparison to neuroimaging. Agreement was assessed using the unweighted kappa (κ) statistic. Agreement between the 2 raters using the standard NIHSS was slight to moderate (κ = .36, 95% confidence interval [CI] .10-.61). Inter-rater agreement significantly improved to the substantial to almost perfect range using the NIHSS-Loc (κ = .88, 95% CI .73-1.00). Agreement was perfect when the 2 raters entered the data into the NIHSS-Loc computer algorithm (κ = 1.00, 95% CI 1.00-1.00). Agreement between the algorithm localization and neuroimaging results was fair to moderate (κ = .59, 95% CI .35-.84) and not significantly different from the localizations of either rater using the NIHSS-Loc. A computerized, modified version of the standard NIHSS can be used to reliably and validly assign the vascular distribution of an acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Validity of Modified Ashworth Scale as a Measure of Wrist Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are some controversies about the value of modified Ashworth Scale (MAS for assessing spasticity. The goal of this study was to investigate if there is any correlation between scores obtained from MAS for wrist spasticity and electrophysiological recordings as the objective measure of spasticity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 34 stroke patients were employed. Wrist spasticity was clinically measured by means of MAS. Also, an electromyogram (EMG machine was used to elicit Hmax and Mmax from the flexor carpi radialis muscle. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used to investigate potential correlation between clinically and electrophysiologically measures of spasticity. Results: The observed relation between MAS and EMG recordings was not statistically significant (rho=0.183, P>0.05. Discussion: Our findings suggest that MAS may be a useful tool for grading hypertonia, but it is not a valid measure of spasticity in selected patients.

  8. Relationship between Barthel Index (BI and the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS Score in Assessing Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated that stroke functional outcome can be predicted from the baseline BI and mRS scales. It is concluded thatBI and mRS Stroke scale can be used to prognosticate functional outcome at admission and at follow up.

  9. Leptomeningeal collateralization in acute ischemic stroke: Impact on prominent cortical veins in susceptibility-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Rajeev K.; Hsieh, Kety; Gratz, Pascal P.; Schankath, Adrian C.; Mordasini, Pasquale; Zubler, Christoph; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Jung, Simon; Schroth, Gerhard; Gralla, Jan; El-Koussy, Marwan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The extent of hypoperfusion is an important prognostic factor in acute ischemic stroke. Previous studies have postulated that the extent of prominent cortical veins (PCV) on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) reflects the extent of hypoperfusion. Our aim was to investigate, whether there is an association between PCV and the grade of leptomeningeal arterial collateralization in acute ischemic stroke. In addition, we analyzed the correlation between SWI and perfusion-MRI findings. Methods: 33 patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a thromboembolic M1-segment occlusion underwent MRI followed by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and were subdivided into two groups with very good to good and moderate to no leptomeningeal collaterals according to the DSA. The extent of PCV on SWI, diffusion restriction (DR) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and prolonged mean transit time (MTT) on perfusion-imaging were graded according to the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission and the time between symptom onset and MRI were documented. Results: 20 patients showed very good to good and 13 patients poor to no collateralization. PCV-ASPECTS was significantly higher for cases with good leptomeningeal collaterals versus those with poor leptomeningeal collaterals (mean 4.1 versus 2.69; p = 0.039). MTT-ASPECTS was significantly lower than PCV-ASPECTS in all 33 patients (mean 1.0 versus 3.5; p < 0.00). Conclusions: In our small study the grade of leptomeningeal collateralization correlates with the extent of PCV in SWI in acute ischemic stroke, due to the deoxyhemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin ratio. Consequently, extensive PCV correlate with poor leptomeningeal collateralization while less pronounced PCV correlate with good leptomeningeal collateralization. Further SWI is a very helpful tool in detecting tissue at risk but cannot replace PWI since MTT detects significantly more ill

  10. Optimizing cutoff scores for the Barthel Index and the modified Rankin Scale for defining outcome in acute stroke trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    Background and Purpose - There is little agreement on how to assess outcome in acute stroke trials. Cutoff scores for the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) are frequently arbitrarily chosen to dichotomize favorable and unfavorable outcome. We investigated sensitivity and specificity

  11. The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J H; Beckerman, H; Lankhorst, G J; Bouter, L M

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort

  12. The responsiveness of the action research arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J.H.; Beckerman, H.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bouter, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort

  13. The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lee, J. H.; Beckerman, H.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort

  14. Rasch Analysis of a New Hierarchical Scoring System for Evaluating Hand Function on the Motor Assessment Scale for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce S. Sabari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 To develop two independent measurement scales for use as items assessing hand movements and hand activities within the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS, an existing instrument used for clinical assessment of motor performance in stroke survivors; (2 To examine the psychometric properties of these new measurement scales. Design. Scale development, followed by a multicenter observational study. Setting. Inpatient and outpatient occupational therapy programs in eight hospital and rehabilitation facilities in the United States and Canada. Participants. Patients (N=332 receiving stroke rehabilitation following left (52% or right (48% cerebrovascular accident; mean age 64.2 years (sd 15; median 1 month since stroke onset. Intervention. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. Data were tested for unidimensionality and reliability, and behavioral criteria were ordered according to difficulty level with Rasch analysis. Results. The new scales assessing hand movements and hand activities met Rasch expectations of unidimensionality and reliability. Conclusion. Following a multistep process of test development, analysis, and refinement, we have redesigned the two scales that comprise the hand function items on the MAS. The hand movement scale contains an empirically validated 10-behavior hierarchy and the hand activities item contains an empirically validated 8-behavior hierarchy.

  15. The quality of prehospital ischemic stroke care: compliance with guidelines and impact on in-hospital stroke response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostema, John Adam; Nasiri, Mojdeh; Chassee, Todd; Reeves, Mathew J

    2014-01-01

    A number of emergency medical services (EMSs) performance measures for stroke have been proposed to promote early stroke recognition and rapid transportation to definitive care. This study examined performance measure compliance among EMS-transported stroke patients and the relationship between compliance and in-hospital stroke response. Eight quality indicators were derived from American Stroke Association guidelines. A prospective cohort of consecutive, EMS-transported patients discharged from 2 large Midwestern stroke centers with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke was identified. Data were abstracted from hospital and EMS records. Compliance with 8 prehospital quality indicators was calculated. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis were performed to measure the association between prehospital compliance and a binary outcome of door-to-computed tomography (CT) time less than or equal to 25 minutes. Over the 12 month study period, 186 EMS-transported ischemic stroke patients were identified. Compliance was highest for prehospital documentation of a glucose level (86.0%) and stroke screen (78.5%) and lowest for on-scene time less than or equal to 15 minutes (46.8%), hospital prenotification (56.5%), and transportation at highest priority (55.4%). After adjustment for age, time from symptom onset, and stroke severity, transportation at highest priority (odds ratio [OR], 13.45) and hospital prenotification (OR, 3.75) were both associated with significantly faster door-to-CT time. No prehospital quality metric was associated with tissue-plasminogen activator delivery. EMS transportation at highest priority and hospital prenotification were associated with faster in-hospital stroke response and represent logical targets for EMS quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of anger in adherence to treatment and beliefs about disease 1 year after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A Catarina; Ferro, José M

    2017-09-01

    Anger is a frequent neuropsychiatric symptom after stroke, which can disrupt treatment and recovery, in particular by affecting adherence behaviour to treatment and health care education. This study aimed to follow-up a cohort of stroke patients 12 months after their stroke to describe the presence of anger, compare levels and profile of acute and post-acute anger and analyse its impact on the adherence to treatment and beliefs about stroke. We followed (13.3 months mean follow-up) 91 stroke patients with a standardized protocol, using State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2) to assess the frequency and profile of anger and its components and one questionnaire to measure adherence to treatment and health education (meaning on the treatment) (Adh-T). We used as explanatory variables socio-demographic, clinical, stroke type and location information collected during the acute phase. Anger-state was detected in 15 (17%) patients, while anger-trait was present in 7 (8%) patients. The best regression model revealed that trait-anger, stroke location (posterior infarcts), and impact of stroke sequels were independent predictive factors for anger (R 2  = 43%). Patients with higher levels of anger expression had lower adherence rates, independently of the adherence dimension. In the chronic phase after stroke anger was related with posterior lesions, the impact of stroke consequences and anger as a personality trait. The detection and monitoring of anger could eventually prevent the negative impact of anger in care, especially in adherence to rehabilitation and secondary prevention.

  17. Impact of Spasticity on Balance Control during Quiet Standing in Persons after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh Khiabani, Reza; Mochizuki, George; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P; Gage, William H

    2017-01-01

    Balance impairments, falls, and spasticity are common after stroke, but the effect of spasticity on balance control after stroke is not well understood. In this cross-sectional study, twenty-seven participants with stroke were divided into two groups, based on ankle plantar flexor spasticity level. Fifteen individuals with high spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score of ≥2) and 12 individuals with low spasticity (MAS score Balance control measures included centre of pressure (COP) root mean square (RMS), COP velocity, and COP mean power frequency (MPF) in anterior-posterior and mediolateral (ML) directions. Trunk sway was estimated using a wearable inertial measurement unit to measure trunk angle, trunk velocity, and trunk velocity frequency amplitude in pitch and roll directions. The high spasticity group demonstrated greater ML COP velocity, trunk roll velocity, trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 3.7 Hz, and trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 4.9 Hz, particularly in the eyes closed condition ( spasticity by vision interaction). ML COP MPF was greater in the high spasticity group. Individuals with high spasticity after stroke demonstrated greater impairment of balance control in the frontal plane, which was exacerbated when vision was removed.

  18. Prognostic Impact of Mild Hypokalemia in Terms of Death and Stroke in the General Population-A Prospective Population Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Nick; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Johnson, Linda

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Potassium supplementation reduces the risk of cardiovascular mortality and stroke in population studies; however, the prognostic impact of mild hypokalemia in the general population has not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to investigate associations between mild hypokalemia and...

  19. The psychometric properties of the Turkish Stroke and Aphasia Quality Of Life Scale-39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamaz Calis, Funda; Celik, Serpil; Demir, Orcun; Aykanat, Dilek; Yagiz On, Arzu

    2016-06-01

    The Stroke and Aphasia Quality Of Life Scale (SAQOL-39) is a widely used instrument in assessing the quality of life in aphasic patients. Our purpose was to translate the SAQOL-39 into the Turkish language (SAQOL-39/TR) and assess its reliability and validity in patients who had aphasia. SAQOL-39/TR was obtained using the 'translation-backward translation' method and administered to 40 patients with aphasia. The reliability studies were performed by means of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The validation studies were carried out by means of construct validity using within-scale analyses and analyses against the external criteria. Correlation analysis was performed between scales and the Ege Aphasia Test, the Barthel index, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the Brunnstrom recovery stages (BRS) of the arm, hand, and lower extremity. In the results, the scores of the SAQOL-39 were not different between groups. Cronbach's α variables were good for all domains (0.80, 0.88, 0.89, 0.82, and 0.83). Test-retest reliability was also high (0.96, 0.97, 0.91, 0.70, and 0.96). There were significant correlations with coefficients ranging from 0.36 to 0.60 among the domains of scale and other measures. Moderate-high correlations were also seen with BRS-arm, BRS-hand, and BRS-lower extremity (r, 0.27-0.58). It was found that all domains were highly related with all domains of Ege aphasia test, except praxia (Pscale in patients with dysarthria suggest that the SAQOL-39 may not be specific to only aphasic patients.

  20. Impact of preventable risk factors on stroke in the EPICOR study: does gender matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkova, Slavica; d'Errico, Angelo; Ricceri, Fulvio; Fasanelli, Francesca; Pala, Valeria; Agnoli, Claudia; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Chiodini, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    The effect of modifiable stroke risk factors in terms of prevented cases remains unclear due to sex-specific disease rate and risk factors prevalence. Our aim was to estimate their impact on stroke by gender through population-attributable fraction (PAF), preventive fraction (PF) and their combination in EPIC-Italian cohort. 43,976 participants, age 34-75, and free of cardiovascular disease at baseline (1993-1998) were followed up for almost 11 years. Adjusted hazard ratios and PAF were estimated using Cox models. We identified 386 cases. In males, the burden for stroke was 17% (95% CI 4-28%) for smoking and 14% (95% CI 5-22%) for alcohol consumption. In females, hypertension was carrying the biggest burden with 18% (95% CI 9-26%) followed by smoking 15% (95% CI 7-22%). Their combination was 46% (95% CI 32-58%) in males and 48% (95% CI 35-59%) in females. PF for current smokers was gender unequal [males 21% (95% CI 15-27%) females 9% (95% CI 1-17%)]. Half of strokes are attributable to potentially modifiable factors. The proportion of prevented cases is gender unbalanced, encouraging sex-specific intervention.

  1. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scale evaluation of multimodal computed tomography in predicting clinical outcomes of stroke patients treated with aspiration thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychogios, Marios-Nikos; Schramm, Peter; Frölich, Andreas Maximilian; Kallenberg, Kai; Wasser, Katrin; Reinhardt, Lars; Kreusch, Andreas S; Jung, Klaus; Knauth, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Patient selection is crucial in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients. Baseline computed tomographic (CT) images, evaluated with the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scale (ASPECTS), are considered significant predictors of outcome. In this study, we evaluated CT images and perfusion parameters, analyzed with ASPECTS, as final outcome predictors after endovascular stroke treatment. We analyzed a cohort of patients with acute ischemic stroke and endovascular treatment. Patients with an occlusion of the M1 segment and multimodal CT imaging were included. CT perfusion data were reconstructed using commercial software. Two experienced neuroradiologists separately reviewed and scored CT and CT perfusion images with the ASPECTS score. Parameters were compared between patients with poor and with favorable follow-up outcome. Significantly different variables were further analyzed by forward stepwise logistic regression. Fifty-one patients were included in our study. Baseline characteristics did not differ between patients with favorable and poor outcomes. No significant difference in recanalization status, the various times, or CT ASPECTS was demonstrated between these 2 groups. Significant differences were demonstrated for age (P=0.0049), cerebral blood volume ASPECTS (P=0.0007), and between cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow ASPECTS (P=0.0045). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS>7 demonstrated the highest sensitivity and specificity for favorable outcome with 84% and 79%, respectively. CT perfusion parameters, evaluated with ASPECTS, are optimal predictors of outcome and are more sensitive and specific than CT ASPECTS in the prediction of favorable outcome. Use of these parameters in treatment decisions could reduce futile recanalizations.

  2. Impact of Stroke Center Certification on Mortality After Ischemic Stroke: The Medicare Cohort From 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Schold, Jesse D; Uchino, Ken

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of hospitals have been certified as primary stroke centers (PSCs). It remains unknown whether the action toward PSC certification has improved the outcome of stroke care. This study aimed to understand whether PSC certification reduced stroke mortality. We examined Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged ≥65 years who were hospitalized between 2009 and 2013 for ischemic stroke. Hospitals were classified into 3 groups: new PSCs, the hospitals that received initial PSC certification between 2009 and 2013 (n=634); existing PSCs, the PSCs certified before 2009 (n=785); and non-SCs, the hospitals that have never been certified as PSCs (n=2640). Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the mortality among the 3 groups. Existing PSCs were significantly larger than new PSCs as reflected by total number of beds and annual stroke admission ( P stroke certification may reduce stroke mortality and overcome the disadvantage of being smaller hospitals. Further study of other outcome measures will be useful to improve stroke system of care. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Post-stroke motor and functional evaluations: a clinical correlation using Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Roberta; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Borges, Guilherme

    2006-09-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Sequels deriving from this event may lead to motor disability and from mild to severe deficits. In order to better classify sensory-motor dysfunction, balance and ability to perform activities of daily living, quantitative and qualitative evaluation scales have been used. To correlate the scales Fugl-Meyer assessment scale, Berg balance scale and Barthel index. Twenty subjects with sequel after a single, unilateral stroke in chronic phase (>6 months post ictus) were evaluated for about one hour. Barthel scale was statistically related to the total motor score of Fugl-Meyer assessment (r=0.597, p=0.005). The lower limb section at Fugl-Meyer had positive correlation with Berg scale (r=0.653, p=0.002) and with the balance section of Fugl-Meyer own scale (r=0.449, p=0.047). Both balance scales were correlated one with other (r=0.555, p=0.011). Statistical divergence appeared when Barthel's Index was correlated with Berg's Scale (r=0.425, p=0.062), and it is not statistically significant. The use of both quantitative and qualitative scales was shown to be a good measuring instrument for the classification of the general clinical performance of the patient, especially when positively related joint evaluations are applied.

  4. Evaluating the impact of farm scale innovation at catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, Phelia; De Clercq, Willem; Vlok, Pieter; Querner, Erik

    2014-05-01

    responsibilities and inadequate procedures of implementing objectives. Planning for development in South Africa needs to take various factors into account. Economic and green economic growth is pursued, while social imbalances are addressed and the environment is protected against unreasonable exploitation. The term Sustainable Development is a neutral concept in the vision of many of the regulating authorities; however, the implementation of sustainability is difficult. This study considers an approach which aligns activities in a specified region to the vision and objectives of the applicable regulatory authorities, as an alternative to achieving objectives strictly through enforcing regulations. It was determined whether objectives of development planning were realistic in terms of water availability. It was established that the position of a farm in the landscape is a determining factor of the impact it has on the catchment area's water supply. For this purpose, hydrological modelling (SWAT and SIMGRO) was done for the Letaba catchment of the Limpopo Province, on two scales to also accommodate small-scale farming communities more accurately. Parallel to the modelling, the National Development Plan (NDP), the National Framework for Sustainable Development (NFSD), the Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Strategy (ISRDS) and the principles of Water Allocation Reform (WAR) were regarded. For regional categorisation, the relevant municipal Integrated Development Plan (IDP), Spatial Development Framework (SDF), Local Economic Development (LED) plan and the applicable Catchment Management Strategy (CMS) were considered. The developed Integrated Evaluation Model combined all the visions and objectives of the mentioned strategic documents to specifically assess the contribution a small-scale farm makes. The evaluation results provided insight into the alignment of activities to the ideals of a region and can be useful when formulating actions to reach a common vision. Small-scale

  5. Validation of the Caregivers' Satisfaction with Stroke Care Questionnaire: C-SASC hospital scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTo date, researchers have lacked a validated instrument to measure stroke caregivers' satisfaction with hospital care. We adjusted a validated patient version of satisfaction with hospital care for stroke caregivers and tested the 11-item caregivers' satisfaction with hospital care

  6. The Personal Impact of Epilepsy Scale (PIES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert S; Nune, George; Roberts, Sanford E; Cramer, Joyce A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of epilepsy is manifest by effects related to seizures and side effects of therapy and comorbidities such as depression. This report describes the development of a brief patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument, the Personal Impact of Epilepsy Scale (PIES), to measure the influence of epilepsy overall and in each of these domains. Instrument development followed standard procedures and an FDA Guidance. People with epilepsy were surveyed with open-ended questions to derive major themes of their concerns, resulting in 4 key areas: seizures, side effects, comorbidities, and overall quality of life (QOL). A preliminary set of 152 questions was based on these themes and completed by 50 patients, age 42.7 (range: 21-71) years, concurrent with comparator instruments, including the NH Seizure Severity Scale (NHSSS), the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP), the Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31) scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Epilepsy Foundation Depression: A Checklist. A multiple regression model indicated which PIES measures were associated with scores from the comparator instruments. Questions in each of the domains were selected for correlations and nonduplication. Test-retest consistency at a 3-day interval was completed by 38 subjects and a final set of questions constructed. The final question set comprised 25 items: 9 about characteristics of seizures, 7 about medication side effects, 8 about comorbidities, and 1 about overall quality of life. All items had 5 response choices (0-4), with higher scores reflecting more negative status. A total of 46 subjects completed the 25 questions. Cronbach's alpha was 0.87, indicating good internal consistency. Each of the three domains correlated well with the overall QOL item. The questions pertaining to seizures correlated with the NHSSS, the side effect questions with the LAEP, and the comorbidity questions with the QOLIE-31. The PIES provides a simple, brief PRO measure as a profile of

  7. Stroke knowledge in an Irish semi-rural community-dwelling cohort and impact of a brief education session.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, Geraldine

    2012-11-01

    Poor knowledge of stroke risk factors and failure to recognize and act on acute symptoms hinders efforts to prevent stroke and improve clinical outcomes. Levels of stroke knowledge are poorly established within Ireland. This study was conducted to establish levels of knowledge among men and women aged >40 years in an Irish community, and also to determine the impact of a single education session on stroke knowledge. Subjects from 2 separate geographical locations were allocated to an intervention group (n = 200), who received stroke information over a 90-minute session, or a control group (n = 200). Both groups completed a stroke knowledge questionnaire at baseline and at 4 weeks after the educational session. Overall, the initial response rate was 70% (280\\/400); 52% of the respondents knew that the brain is affected by stroke, 58% could list 2 or more risk factors but only 27% could list 2 or more warning signs, 50% would call 999 (emergency number in Ireland) in response to stroke, 17% had heard of thrombolytic therapy, but only 1% knew the time frame for receiving thrombolytics. The response rate to the resurvey following the educational session was 57%, with 47 of 117 subjects in the intervention group (40%) attending the session. Stroke knowledge scores improved by 50% in the intervention group (P < .001). Overall, the knowledge of stroke risk factors, warning signs, and thrombolytic therapy was poor in this Irish community-dwelling cohort. Our study demonstrates that a single educational session can improve short-term knowledge of stroke symptoms and thrombolytic therapy.

  8. Impact of heart rate on admission on mortality and morbidity in acute ischaemic stroke patients - results from VISTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, C H; Erdur, H; Grittner, U; Schneider, A; Piper, S K; Scheitz, J F; Wellwood, I; Bath, P M W; Diener, H-C; Lees, K R; Endres, M

    2016-12-01

    Elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with worse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its predictive value in acute stroke patients is less well established. We investigated the effects of HR on admission in acute ischaemic stroke patients. Using the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) database, the association between HR in acute stroke patients without atrial fibrillation and the pre-defined composite end-point of (recurrent) ischaemic stroke, transient ischaemic attack (TIA), myocardial infarction (MI) and vascular death within 90 days was analysed. Pre-defined secondary outcomes were the composite end-point components and any death, decompensated heart failure and degree of functional dependence according to the modified Rankin Scale after 90 days. HR was analysed as a categorical variable (quartiles). In all, 5606 patients were available for analysis (mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 13; mean age 67 years; mean HR 77 bpm; 44% female) amongst whom the composite end-point occurred in 620 patients (11.1%). Higher HR was not associated with the composite end-point. The frequencies of secondary outcomes were 3.2% recurrent stroke (n = 179), 0.6% TIA (n = 35), 1.8% MI (n = 100), 6.8% vascular death (n = 384), 15.0% any death (n = 841) and 2.2% decompensated heart failure (n = 124). Patients in the highest quartile (HR> 86 bpm) were at increased risk for any death [adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.40 (1.11-1.75)], decompensated heart failure [adjusted hazard ratio 2.20 (1.11-4.37)] and worse modified Rankin Scale [adjusted odds ratio 1.29 (1.14-1.52)]. In acute stroke patients, higher HR (>86 bpm) is linked to mortality, heart failure and higher degree of dependence after 90 days but not to recurrent stroke, TIA or MI. © 2016 EAN.

  9. Relationship between the modified Rankin Scale and the Barthel Index in the process of functional recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioncoloni, D; Piu, P; Tassi, R; Acampa, M; Guideri, F; Taddei, S; Bielli, S; Martini, G; Mazzocchio, R

    2012-01-01

    The modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and the Barthel Index (BI) are the most common clinimetrical instruments for measuring disability after stroke. This study investigated the relationship between the BI and the mRS at multiple time points after stroke. The BI, which is a widely used instrument for longitudinal follow-up post-stroke, was used as reference to determine the effect of time on the sensitivity of the mRS in differentiating functional recovery. Ninety-two patients with first stroke and hemispheric brain lesion were evaluated using the BI and mRS at 10 days, 3 and 6 months. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to examine median differences in BI among the mRS levels at 10 days, 3 and 6 months with Dunn's correction for multigroup comparison. The Mann and Whitney test was used to compare median differences in BI scores between two aggregations of mRS grades (mRS=0-2, mRS=3-5) at the same time periods after stroke. BI score distribution amongst mRS grades overlapped at 10 days, differentiating only between extreme grades (no disability vs severe disability). At 3 months, independent patients with slight disability could be distinguished from dependent patients with marked disability. At 6 months, grade 2 and 3 overlapped no more, differentiating independence (class 0-2) from dependence (class 3-5). The largest transition to an independent functional status occurred from grade 4, at 3 months. Maximum sensitivity of mRS in differentiating functional recovery is reached at six months post-stroke.

  10. Evaluation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in screening stroke patients for symptoms: Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayis, Salma A; Ayerbe, Luis; Ashworth, Mark; DA Wolfe, Charles

    2018-03-01

    Variations have been reported in the number of underlying constructs and choice of thresholds that determine caseness of anxiety and /or depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS). This study examined the properties of each item of HADS as perceived by stroke patients, and assessed the information these items convey about anxiety and depression between 3 months to 5 years after stroke. The study included 1443 stroke patients from the South London Stroke Register (SLSR). The dimensionality of HADS was examined using factor analysis methods, and items' properties up to 5 years after stroke were tested using Item Response Theory (IRT) methods, including graded response models (GRMs). The presence of two dimensions of HADS (anxiety and depression) for stroke patients was confirmed. Items that accurately inferred about the severity of anxiety and depression, and offered good discrimination of caseness were identified as "I can laugh and see the funny side of things" (Q4) and "I get sudden feelings of panic" (Q13), discrimination 2.44 (se = 0.26), and 3.34 (se = 0.35), respectively. Items that shared properties, hence replicate inference were: "I get a sort of frightened feeling as if something awful is about to happen" (Q3), "I get a sort of frightened feeling like butterflies in my stomach" (Q6), and "Worrying thoughts go through my mind" (Q9). Item properties were maintained over time. Approximately 20% of patients were lost to follow up. A more concise selection of items based on their properties, would provide a precise approach for screening patients and for an optimal allocation of patients into clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of early National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improvement with vessel recanalization and functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharitonova, Tatiana; Mikulik, Robert; Roine, Risto O; Soinne, Lauri; Ahmed, Niaz; Wahlgren, Nils

    2011-06-01

    Early neurological improvement (ENI) after thrombolytic therapy of acute stroke has been linked with recanalization and favorable outcome, although its definition shows considerable variation. We tested the ability of ENI, as defined in previous publications, to predict vessel recanalization and 3-month functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis recorded in an extensive patient cohort in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register (SITS-ISTR). Of 21,534 patients registered between December 2002 and December 2008, 798 patients (3.7%) had CT- or MR angiography-documented baseline vessel occlusion and also angiography data at 22 to 36 hours post-treatment. ENI definitions assessed at 2 hours and 24 hours post-treatment were (1) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score improvement ≥4 points from baseline; (2) NIHSS 0, 1, or improvement ≥8; (3) NIHSS ≤3 or improvement ≥10; (4) improvement by 20%; (5) 40% from baseline; or (6) NIHSS score 0 to 1. Receiver operating curve analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed to evaluate the association of ENI with vessel recanalization and favorable functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 3 months). ENI at 2 hours had fair accuracy to diagnose recanalization as derived from receiver operating curve analysis. Definitions of improvement based on percent of NIHSS score change from baseline demonstrate better accuracy to diagnose recanalization at 2 hours and 24 hours than the definitions based on NIHSS cutoffs (the best performance at 2 hours was area under the curve 0.633, sensitivity 58%, specificity 69%, positive predictive value 68%, and negative predictive value 59% for 20% improvement; and area under the curve 0.692, sensitivity 69%, specificity 70%, positive predictive value 70%, and negative predictive value 62% for 40% improvement at 24 hours). ENI-predicted functional outcome with OR 2.8 to 6.0 independently from

  12. Large-scale impacts of hydroelectric development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, D.M.; Bodaly, R.A.; Hecky, R.E.; Rudd, J.W.M.; Berkes, F.; Kelly, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted in which the cumulative environmental effects of mega-hydroelectric development projects such as the James Bay development in Canada, the Sardar Sarovar development in India and the Three Gorges development in China were examined. The extent of flooding as a result of these projects and of many others around the world was presented. The study showed that several factors are responsible for methyl mercury (MeHg) bioaccumulation in reservoirs. The study also revealed that reservoirs can be a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Boreal forests in particular, when flooded, become a strong source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. This results from the fact that after flooding a boreal forest changes from being a small carbon sink to a large source of carbon to the atmosphere, due to stimulated microbial production of CO 2 and CH 4 by decomposition of plant tissues and peat. This increased decomposition also results in an increase of another microbial activity, namely the methylation of inorganic mercury to the much more toxic MeHg. Selected examples of the downstream effects of altered flows caused by large-scale hydroelectric developments world-wide were summarized. A similar tabulation provided examples of social impacts of relocation of people necessitated by large-scale hydroelectric development. 209 refs., 10 tabs., 3 figs

  13. Functional Gain After Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation: Correlates and Impact on Long-Term Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Monitillo, Vincenzo; Guida, Pietro; Nardulli, Roberto; Multari, Vincenzo; Monitillo, Francesco; Calabrese, Gianluigi; Fiore, Pietro

    2015-10-01

    Prediction of functional outcome after stroke rehabilitation (SR) is a growing field of interest. The association between SR and survival still remains elusive. We sought to investigate the factors associated with functional outcome after SR and whether the magnitude of functional improvement achieved with rehabilitation is associated with long-term mortality risk. The study population consisted of 722 patients admitted for SR within 90 days of stroke onset, with an admission functional independence measure (FIM) score of stroke onset to rehabilitation admission (PStroke Scale score at rehabilitation admission (P<0.001), and aphasia (P=0.021) were independently associated with FIM gain. The R2 of the model was 0.275. During a median follow-up of 6.17 years, 36.9% of the patients died. At multivariable Cox analysis, age (P<0.0001), coronary heart disease (P=0.018), atrial fibrillation (P=0.042), total cholesterol (P=0.015), and total FIM gain (P<0.0001) were independently associated with mortality. The adjusted hazard ratio for death significantly decreased across tertiles of increasing FIM gain. Several factors are independently associated with functional gain after SR. Our findings strongly suggest that the magnitude of functional improvement is a powerful predictor of long-term mortality in patients admitted for SR. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Scaling of swim speed and stroke frequency in geometrically similar penguins: they swim optimally to minimize cost of transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Watanabe, Yuuki; Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been predicted that geometrically similar animals would swim at the same speed with stroke frequency scaling with mass−1/3. In the present study, morphological and behavioural data obtained from free-ranging penguins (seven species) were compared. Morphological measurements support the geometrical similarity. However, cruising speeds of 1.8–2.3 m s−1 were significantly related to mass0.08 and stroke frequencies were proportional to mass−0.29. These scaling relationships do not agree with the previous predictions for geometrically similar animals. We propose a theoretical model, considering metabolic cost, work against mechanical forces (drag and buoyancy), pitch angle and dive depth. This new model predicts that: (i) the optimal swim speed, which minimizes the energy cost of transport, is proportional to (basal metabolic rate/drag)1/3 independent of buoyancy, pitch angle and dive depth; (ii) the optimal speed is related to mass0.05; and (iii) stroke frequency is proportional to mass−0.28. The observed scaling relationships of penguins support these predictions, which suggest that breath-hold divers swam optimally to minimize the cost of transport, including mechanical and metabolic energy during dive. PMID:19906666

  15. Development of a computerized adaptive testing system of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Shih, Ching-Lin; Chou, Yeh-Tai; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Lin, Jau-Hong; Wu, Hung-Chia; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2012-06-01

    To develop a computerized adaptive testing system of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale (CAT-FM) to efficiently and reliably assess motor function in patients with stroke. First, a simulation study was used to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the CAT-FM. Second, a field study was employed to determine the administration efficiency of the CAT-FM. One medical center and 1 teaching hospital. Patients' responses (n=301) were used for the simulation study; 49 patients participated in the field study. Not applicable. The 2 CAT-FM item banks (upper extremity and lower extremity) include 37 items from the original Fugl-Meyer scale. The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the CAT-FM were determined by the simulation study. Two stopping rules (reliability ≥0.9 or an increase of reliability scale). The responsiveness was moderate (standardized response mean for the upper extremity=.67, lower extremity=.79, and motor=.77) for the 226 patients who completed both assessments at 14 and 90 days after stroke. The field study found that, on average, the time needed to administer the CAT-FM was 242 seconds with 4.7 items. The CAT-FM is an efficient, reliable, valid, and responsive clinical tool for assessing motor function in patients with stroke. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Evaluation of patient satisfaction after stroke rehabilitation program. Validation study for the Spanish version of the Satisfaction Pound Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirrezabal Juaristi, Aizpea; Ferrer Fores, Montse; Marco Navarro, Ester; Mojal García, Sergi; Vilagut Saiz, Gemma; Duarte Oller, Esther

    2016-11-18

    The Satisfaction Pound Scale is a specific questionnaire to evaluate satisfaction with the rehabilitation program after a stroke. The aim of this study was to adapt this scale to Spanish and to evaluate its metric characteristics. The adaptation included translation and back-translation methods. Metric characteristics were evaluated in 74 patients, all of whom were administered the Satisfaction Pound Scale and the Short Form 36 (SF-36). The statistical model was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Reliability was determined through Cronbach alpha coefficient and a test-retest procedure. Construct validity was assessed by means of correlations between the satisfaction scale and the SF-36. Adjustment indicators in the CFA were very good. Reproducibility test showed correlations higher than 0.85, and all correlations between SF-36 dimensions and the satisfaction scale were lower than 0.2, in accordance with the hypotheses raised. The Spanish version of the Satisfaction Pounds Scale is reliable and valid, therefore it is a useful tool to assess satisfaction with the post-stroke rehabilitation program in our area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of recovery of visuo-spatial neglect on motor recovery of the upper paretic limb after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja C W Nijboer

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to investigate the longitudinal relationship between improvements of synergism and strength of the upper paretic limb and severity of visuo-spatial neglect during the first 52 weeks post-stroke. The longitudinal association between severity of VSN and motor impairment using Fugl Meyer motor score and Motricity Index of the arm was measured in an intensive repeated measurement design including 18 measurement sessions for each subject. Neglect was assessed using the letter cancellation test applied in a prospective cohort of 101 ischemic, first-ever, hemispheric stroke patients. All time-dependent measures were taken weekly, starting within 14 days post-stroke. From week 10 to 20 biweekly measurements are obtained. The longitudinal relationship of (biweekly time on improvement of motor functions and severity of neglect was investigated using random coefficient analysis and trend analyses. Fifty-one of the 101 stroke patients showed neglect at stroke onset. Less improvement of synergism and strength of the upper paretic limb was associated with more severe neglect. This association was most pronounced in the first 10 weeks post-stroke. The seemingly suppressive effect of neglect on upper-limb motor recovery appears to take place mainly during spontaneous neurological recovery of first 10 weeks post-stroke. This finding suggests that damage to large-scale white matter tracts of especially the perceptual-attention networks suppress recovery of other networks at distance in the brain suggesting a common underlying mechanism.

  18. The disease impact, health care management and cost of stroke in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers SMAA; Struijs JN; Ament AJHA; Genugten MML van; Jager JC; Bos GAM van den; Universiteit Maastricht; CZO

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is a major chronic disease with a high morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands about 30,000 people a year suffer a stroke for the first time. One third of these stroke patients dies within the first year after stroke, and 41% of the survivors experience limitations in their daily

  19. Electromyography characterization of stretch responses in hemiparetic stroke patients and their relationship with the Modified Ashworth scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A; Musa, I M; van Deursen, R; Wiles, C M

    2005-10-01

    To determine the validity of the Modified Ashworth Scale as a measure of spasticity by determining its relationship to surface electromyography activity and contracture. A controlled study of hemiparetic stroke patients with spasticity. A physiotherapy department in a secondary care hospital. Thirty-one stroke patients and 20 healthy volunteers. The resistance to passive movement around the knee and ankle of the affected and unaffected legs was rated using the Modified Ashworth Scale. Passive range of movement was measured with a goniometer. Surface electromyography recordings of four lower limb muscles were taken during passive stretches of the knee and ankle. Hemiparetic patients produced surface electromyography responses to stretch that were of greater amplitude (unaffected limbs: mean = 25.82 mV (43.85), affected limbs: mean = 24.77 mV (35.46)) than those of healthy volunteers (mean = 15.85 (29.96)). The affected muscles of hemiparetic patients were more likely to produce surface electromyography responses to stretch of a sustained duration (45% of cases) compared with unaffected limbs (24% of cases) and those of healthy volunteers (16% of cases). The Modified Ashworth Scale showed a positive correlation with the magnitude (p Ashworth Scale were associated with contracture (p Ashworth Scale reflects spasticity in terms of surface electromyography stretch responses produced by passive movement, but the relationship of spasticity to contracture remains unclear.

  20. Differences in psychometric properties, cut-off scores, and outcomes between the Barthel Index and Modified Rankin Scale in pharmacotherapy-based stroke trials: systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Sanjeev

    2009-06-01

    Review published clinical trial studies on pharmacological treatment of stroke using both the Barthel Index (BI) and Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) as outcome measures, and to highlight the differences in psychometric properties and cut-off scores through a systematic review. A systematic literature search on stroke studies involving a pharmacological treatment was conducted between 1955-2008. Key words included Barthel index, Rankin, modified Rankin, pharmacotherapy, validity, reliability, responsiveness, sensitivity, specificity, outcomes, psychometrics, prediction, randomized clinical trials, analysis, and stroke. All search terms were limited to Medical Subjects Headings (MESH) terms, English-language abstracts, and human subjects. Overall, 44 studies were identified, six studies comparing the psychometric properties of the BI and the MRS, 24 studies on use of both the BI and the MRS in clinical stroke trials involving a pharmacological treatment, and 14 studies reviewed the cut-off scores and statistical issues related to scale selection. Most studies measured outcomes at 90 days after initiating therapy although differences were observed in this lag time. There was inconsistency in cut-off points used for both scales in the studies. There was no apparent relation between time to initiation of stroke therapy and outcomes measured by the BI and the MRS. The time window ranged from 3 hours to 72 hours although most of the studies reported outcomes after therapy initiation within 3-6 hours of stroke onset. BI may not be an appropriate scale to measure treatment effects due to the inherent ceiling and floor effects. Use of total distribution scores on the scales rather that dichotomizing or trichotomizing the scales has been favored recently. In mild to moderate stroke patients, the MRS seems to detect small and significant treatment effect changes as compared to the BI. Since most stroke studies try to exhibit the effects of treatment within 3 hours after symptom

  1. The impact of acute kidney injury on short-term survival in an Eastern European population with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covic, Adrian; Schiller, Adalbert; Mardare, Nicoleta-Genoveva; Petrica, Ligia; Petrica, Maxim; Mihaescu, Adelina; Posta, Norica

    2008-07-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and of serious disability with significant impact on patients' long-term survival. The short-term evolution following stroke can associate acute kidney injury (AKI) as a possible complication, frequently overlooked and underestimated in clinical trials. We aimed to describe in an East European cohort (i) the incidence of AKI and its risk factors; (ii) the 30-day mortality and its risk factors and (iii) the relationship between mortality, pre-existent renal function and subsequent AKI. A total of 1090 consecutive cases hospitalized-during a 12-month period-with a CT-confirmed diagnosis of stroke, from a distinct administrative region were included. Demographic details, comorbidities, laboratory and outcome data were retrieved from the electronic hospital database. All patients included in the study were followed for 30 days or until death. The mean age of this population was 66.1 +/- 11.5 years, 49.3% were males, mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 68.9 +/- 22.6 ml/min/1.73 m(2). The 30-day mortality rate was 17.2%. One hundred and fifty-eight patients presented with haemorrhagic stroke and 932 patients had ischaemic stroke. Stroke mortality was-14% for ischaemic stroke and almost twice as high for haemorrhagic stroke-36.3%. One hundred fifty-eight (14.5%) patients were classified as developing AKI. The AKI patients were older, had a higher baseline serum creatinine, lower GFR, higher serum glucose, higher prevalence of chronic heart failure and ischaemic heart disease, were more likely to have suffered a haemorrhagic stroke, and had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate (43.1 vs 12.8%) (P chronic heart failure) and type of stroke (Cox and Snell R(2) 0.244; Nagelkerke R(2) 0.431; P stroke patients. This is the first study to report the incidence of AKI in a distinct geographic population base, in patients with stroke. Baseline renal function emerged as both a significant independent marker for short-term survival

  2. Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the Modified Tardieu Scale and the Modified Ashworth Scale in hemiplegic patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2014-02-01

    The most commonly used tools for the assessment of spasticity are the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Tardieu Scale, but the results on the reliability of both scales keep equivocal. To evaluate the test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability of the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in hemiplegic patients with stroke. Cross-sectional study. Inpatients referred to a rehabilitation hospital. Fifty-one inpatients with hemiplegic stroke. MTS and MAS were collected from the affected elbow flexors and ankle plantar flexors by: 1) two raters who were blinded to the results of the other assessment. 2) one rater one day apart. In the MAS measurement, the inter-rater and intra-rater Kappa values were 0.66 and 0.69 for the elbow flexors, 0.48 and 0.48 for the plantar flexors, respectively. In the angle measurement of the MTS, the inter-rater and intra-rater ICCs were between 0.58-0.89 for the R1 and R2, and between 0.62-0.70 for the R1-R2. The MAS provided moderate to substantial test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability in the spasticity/tone measurement. The agreement of MAS elbow flexors scores was higher than that of plantar flexors scores. The reliability of angle measurement in the MTS was insufficient. Further work should avoid observing error when taking advantage of angle difference on measuring spasticity.

  3. Does English proficiency impact on health outcomes for inpatients undergoing stroke rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah E; Dodd, Karen J; Tu, April; Zucchi, Emiliano; Zen, Stefania; Hill, Keith D

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether English proficiency and/or the frequency of interpreter use impacts on health outcomes for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Retrospective case-control study. People admitted for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A high English proficiency group comprised people with native or near native English proficiency (n = 80), and a low English proficiency group comprised people who preferred a language other than English (n = 80). Length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The low English proficiency group showed a greater improvement in FIM from admission to discharge (p = 0.04). No significant differences were found between groups in LOS, discharge destination and number of encounters with allied health professionals. Increased interpreter usage improved FIM efficiency but did not significantly alter other outcomes. English proficiency does not appear to impact on health outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation with a primarily in-house professional interpreter service. However, there is a need for a larger powered study to confirm these findings. Implications for rehabilitation People with low English proficiency undergoing inpatient stroke rehabilitation in a setting with a primarily in-house professional interpreter service, achieved similar outcomes to those with high English proficiency irrespective of frequency of interpreter usage. A non-significant increase of 4 days length of stay was observed in the low English proficiency group compared to the high English proficiency group. For patients with low English proficiency, greater change in Functional Independence Measure efficiency scores was observed for those with higher levels of interpreter use relative to those with low interpreter use. Clinicians should optimise use of interpreters with patients with low English proficiency when possible.

  4. The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm test and the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, J H; Beckerman, H; Lankhorst, G J; Bouter, L M

    2001-03-01

    The responsiveness of the Action Research Arm (ARA) test and the upper extremity motor section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scale were compared in a cohort of 22 chronic stroke patients undergoing intensive forced use treatment aimed at improvement of upper extremity function. The cohort consisted of 13 men and 9 women, median age 58.5 years, median time since stroke 3.6 years. Responsiveness was defined as the sensitivity of an instrument to real change. Two baseline measurements were performed with a 2-week interval before the intervention, and a follow-up measurement after 2 weeks of intensive forced use treatment. The limits of agreement, according to the Bland-Altman method, were computed as a measure of the test-retest reliability. Two different measures of responsiveness were compared: (i) the number of patients who improved more than the upper limit of agreement during the intervention; (ii) the responsiveness ratio. The limits of agreement, designating the interval comprising 95% of the differences between two measurements in a stable individual, were -5.7 to 6.2 and -5.0 to 6.6 for the ARA test and the FMA scale, respectively. The possible sum scores range from 0 to 57 (ARA) and from 0 to 66 (FMA). The number of patients who improved more than the upper limit were 12 (54.5%) and 2 (9.1%); and the responsiveness ratios were 2.03 and 0.41 for the ARA test and the FMA scale, respectively. These results strongly suggest that the ARA test is more responsive to improvement in upper extremity function than the FMA scale in chronic stroke patients undergoing forced use treatment.

  5. Validity and reliability of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale among stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Hui-Lin; Fang, Liang; Bi, Rui-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Qun; Hu, Min

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Daily Living Self-Efficacy Scale (DLSES) in stroke patients. In total, 172 participants were recruited from a local hospital in China. The internal consistent reliability and convergent validity of the total scale and activities of daily living (ADL) and psychosocial functioning subscales were examined and factor analysis was carried out. Cronbach's αs for the Chinese version of the DLSES, ADL subscale, and psychosocial subscale were 0.96, 0.90, and 0.95, respectively. In the factor analysis, two factors (ADL and psychosocial functioning) were extracted, explaining 84.4% of the total variance in self-efficacy (χ/d.f.=2.19, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, normed fit index=0.95, comparative fit index=0.98, incremental fit index=0.98). Convergent validity was confirmed by positive relationships between the Chinese version of the DLSES and the Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (r=0.87). The ADL subscale was associated positively with the Barthel Index (r=0.74) and the psychosocial functioning subscale was associated negatively with the Functional Activities Questionnaire (r=-0.73) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (r=-0.44). The Chinese version of the DLSES was shown to be a reliable and valid measure of self-efficacy in stroke patients.

  6. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale in patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong XF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-fang Dong,1 Yan-jin Liu,2 Ai-xia Wang,1 Pei-hua Lv1 1Neurology Department, 2Nursing Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: It has been reported that stroke has a higher incidence and mortality rate in the People’s Republic of China compared to the global average. These conditions can be managed by proper medication use, but ensuring medication adherence is challenging.Objective: To translate the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale into Chinese and test its validity and reliability in patients with stroke.Methods: Instrument performances were measured from January 15, 2015 to April 28, 2015 on a convenience sample of 400 patients with stroke recruited at four neurology departments of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Questionnaires included the Chinese versions of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale (C-SEAMS and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (C-GSE. Construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency, and test–retest reliability were measured.Results: Item analysis showed that item-to-total correlations were in the range of 0.362–0.672. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors (which accounted for 60.862% of total variance, with factor loading ranging from 0.534 to 0.756. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to support the results, with an acceptable fit (χ2=73.716; df=64; P<0.01; goodness-of-fit index =0.902; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.897; comparative fit index =0.865; root-mean-square error of approximation =0.058. The convergent validity of the C-SEAMS correlated well with the validated measure of the C-GSE in measuring self-efficacy (r=0.531, P<0.01. Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.826 to 0.915 and test–retest reliability (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r=0.642, P<0.01 were found.Conclusion: The C-SEAMS is a brief and

  7. Adaptation and validation of stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39 scale to Hindi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita H Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a major detriment to the quality of life (QOL in its victims. Several functional limitations following stroke contribute to the denigrated QOL in this population. Aphasia, a disturbance in the comprehension, processing, and/or expression of language, is a common consequence of stroke. Yet, in most Indian languages, including the national language (Hindi, there are no published tools to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. Objective: The current study was carried out to adapt and validate a well-known tool to measure the QOL (i.e., Stroke-Aphasia Quality of Life-39; SAQOL-39 to Hindi. Materials and Methods: We presented the original (English version of the SAQOL-39 to a group of six Hindi-speaking Speech Language Pathologists hailing from the central and northern regions of India to examine the sociocultural suitability of items and indicate modifications, if any. The linguistic adaptation was performed through a forward-backward translation scheme. The socioculturally and linguistically adapted (to Hindi version was then administered on a group of 84 Hindi-speaking persons with aphasia to examine the acceptability, test-retest reliability as well as the internal consistency of the instrument. Results: The SAQOL-39 in Hindi exhibited high test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.9 as well as acceptability with minimal missing data. This instrument exhibited high internal consistency (Chronbach′s ∝ = 0.98 as well as the both item-to-total and inter-domain correlations. Conclusions: The socioculturally and linguistically adapted Hindi version of SAQOL-39 is a robust tool to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. It may serve as an essential tool to measure the QOL in this population for both clinical and research purposes.

  8. Activity Index - a complementary ADL scale to the Barthel Index in the acute stage in patients with severe stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, Louise; Eksborg, Staffan

    2006-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to compare the Barthel Index (BI) and the activities of daily living (ADL) component of the Activity Index [AI(ADL)] regarding floor and ceiling effects, responsiveness and the predictive value for survival during the first week until 3 months after stroke onset. Basic ADL were assessed in 75 patients with ischaemic stroke. There was a strong concordance between BI and AI(ADL) scores at all time points (Kendall's taub = 0.7878, p scales had a substantial ceiling effect at 3 months. At 1 week, the baseline BI score was significantly higher in patients being alive as compared with those who had died, while their AI(ADL) score did not differ significantly. At 3 months, baseline BI and AI(ADL) scores were significantly higher in patients being alive as compared with those who had died. The predictive value of being alive at 1 week and 3 months did not differ between BI and AI(ADL). AI(ADL) is recommended to be used in addition as a complement to BI in patients with severe stroke since the floor effect with BI in the acute stage is significantly more pronounced than with AI(ADL), thus hampering the responsiveness. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Neurophysiological examination of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) in patients with wrist flexor spasticity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, S; Ansari, N N; Mansouri, K; Asgari, A; Olyaei, G R; Kazemnejad, A

    2008-01-01

    The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) is a clinical test for the measurement of spasticity. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of the MMAS in patients with wrist flexor spasticity after stroke. 27 adult patients (14 women and 13 men) with first ever stroke resulting in hemiplegia with a mean (SD, range) age of 57.9 (11.6, 37-75) were included in the study. The outcome measures were the MMAS for the clinical assessment of spasticity, the Hslope/Mslope (Hslp/Mslp), and the H(max)/M(max) ratio for the neurophysiological evaluation. The mean of the Hslp/Mslp and the H(max)/M(max) were higher in patients with worse MMAS grades but the differences were not statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the MMAS scores and Hslp/Mslp ratio as the new index of alpha motoneurone excitability or traditional index of H(max)/M(max) ratio (r = 0.39, p = 0.04). It is concluded that the MMAS to be a valid measure of spasticity after stroke.

  10. Impact of Modified Transesophageal Echocardiography on Mortality and Stroke after Cardiac Surgery: A Large Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. Jansen Klomp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of perioperative screening with modified transesophageal echocardiography (A-View method. We compared, in consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2006 and 2014, 30-day mortality and in-hospital stroke incidence, operated either with perioperative modified TEE screening (intervention group or only with conventional TEE screening (control group. Of the 8,605 study patients, modified TEE was applied in 1,391 patients (16.2%. Patients in the intervention group were on average older (71 versus 68 years, p<0.001 and more often females (31.0% versus 28.0%, p<0.001 and had a higher predicted mortality (EuroSCORE I: 5.9% versus 4.0%, p<0.001. The observed 30-day mortality was 2.2% and 2.5% in both groups, respectively, with multivariable and propensity-score adjusted relative risks (RRs of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.50–1.00, p=0.05 and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.45–0.98, p=0.04. In-hospital stroke was 2.9% and 2.1% in both groups, respectively, with adjusted RRs of 1.03 (95% CI: 0.73–1.45 and 1.01 (95% CI: 0.71–1.43. In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, use of perioperative screening for aortic atherosclerosis with modified TEE was associated with lower postoperative mortality, but not stroke, as compared to patients operated on without such screening.

  11. Optimizing cutoff scores for the Barthel index and the modified Rankin scale for defining outcome in acute stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2005-09-01

    There is little agreement on how to assess outcome in acute stroke trials. Cutoff scores for the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) are frequently arbitrarily chosen to dichotomize favorable and unfavorable outcome. We investigated sensitivity and specificity of BI cutoff scores in relation to the mRS to obtain the optimal corresponding BI and mRS scores. BI and mRS scores were collected from 1034 ischemic stroke patients. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for BI cutoff scores from 45 to 100 in mRS score 1, 2, and 3 and were plotted in receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. The cutoff scores for the BI with the highest sum of sensitivity and specificity were 95 (sensitivity 85.6%; specificity 91.7%), 90 (sensitivity 90.7%; specificity 88.1%), and 75 (sensitivity 95.7%; specificity, 88.5%) for, respectively, mRS 1, 2, and 3. The area under the ROC curve was 0.933 in mRS 1, 0.960 in mRS 2, and 0.979 in mRS 3. The optimal cutoff scores for the BI were 95 for mRS 1, 90 for mRS 2, and 75 for mRS 3. For future acute stroke trials that assess stroke outcome with the BI and mRS, we recommend the use of these BI cutoff score(s) with the corresponding mRS cutoff score(s), to ensure the use of consistent and uniform end points.

  12. Impact of Stroke Risk Factors on Ethnic Stroke Disparities Among Midlife Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajiv C; Sánchez, Brisa N; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Li, Chengwei; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-10-01

    We examined the contribution of stroke risk factors to midlife (age 45-59 years) Mexican American and non-Hispanic White ischemic stroke (IS) rate disparities from 2000 to 2010. Incident IS cases (n=707) and risk factors were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project, Nueces County, TX (2000-2010). US Census data (2000-2010) were used to estimate the population at-risk for IS, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2000-2010) was used to estimate risk factor prevalence in the stroke-free population. Poisson regression models combined IS counts (numerator) and population at-risk counts (denominator) classified by ethnicity and risk factor status to estimate unadjusted and risk factor-adjusted associations between ethnicity and IS rates. Separate models were run for each risk factor and extended to include an interaction term between ethnicity and risk factor. The crude rate ratio (RR) for ethnicity (Mexican American versus non-Hispanic White) was 2.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-2.36) and was attenuated in models that adjusted for diabetes mellitus (RR: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26-1.78) and hypertension (RR: 1.84; 95% CI, 1.50-2.26). In addition, diabetes mellitus had a stronger association with IS rates among Mexican Americans (RR: 6.42; 95% CI, 5.31-7.76) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (RR: 4.07; 95% CI, 3.68-4.51). The higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and stronger association of diabetes mellitus with IS among midlife Mexican Americans likely contribute to persistent midlife ethnic stroke disparities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Validation of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin Scale and Barthel Index in Brazil: the role of cultural adaptation and structured interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincura, Carolina; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M; Neville, Iuri S; Mendes, Henrique F; Menezes, Daniela F; Mariano, Débora C; Pereira, Issana F; Teixeira, Larissa A; Jesus, Pedro A P; de Queiroz, Danilo C L; Pereira, Davidson F; Pinto, Elen; Leite, João P; Lopes, Antonio A; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to validate three widely used scales in stroke research in a multiethnic Brazilian population. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI) were translated, culturally adapted and applied by two independent investigators. The mRS was applied with or without a previously validated structured interview. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. 84 patients underwent mRS (56 with and 28 without a structured interview), 57 BI and 62 NIHSS scoring. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.902 for NIHSS and 0.967 for BI. For BI, interobserver agreement was good (kappa = 0.70). For mRS, the structured interview improved interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.34 without a structured interview; 0.75 with a structured interview). The NIHSS, BI and mRS show good validity when translated and culturally adapted. Using a structured interview for the mRS improves interobserver concordance rates. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Psychometric comparisons of 2 versions of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale and 2 versions of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Lee, Su; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong

    2008-01-01

    To provide empirical justification for selecting motor scales for stroke patients, the authors compared the psychometric properties (validity, responsiveness, test-retest reliability, and smallest real difference [SRD]) of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale (FM), the simplified FM (S-FM), the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement instrument (STREAM), and the simplified STREAM (S-STREAM). For the validity and responsiveness study, 50 inpatients were assessed with the FM and the STREAM at admission and discharge to a rehabilitation department. The scores of the S-FM and the S-STREAM were retrieved from their corresponding scales. For the test-retest reliability study, a therapist administered both scales on a different sample of 60 chronic patients on 2 occasions. Only the S-STREAM had no notable floor or ceiling effects at admission and discharge. The 4 motor scales had good concurrent validity (rho >or= .91) and satisfactory predictive validity (rho = .72-.77). The scales showed responsiveness (effect size d >or= 0.34; standardized response mean >or= 0.95; P scales were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients >or= .96). The SRD of the 4 scales was 10% of their corresponding highest score, indicating acceptable level of measurement error. The upper extremity and the lower extremity subscales of the 4 showed similar results. The 4 motor scales showed acceptable levels of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in stroke patients. The S-STREAM is recommended because it is short, responsive to change, and able to discriminate patients with severe or mild stroke.

  15. Replica scaling studies of hard missile impacts on reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, P.; Carter, P.G.; Howe, W.D.; Neilson, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Missile and target combinations at three different liners scales have been used in an experimental assessment of the applicability of replica scaling to the dynamic behaviour of reinforced concrete structures impacted by rigid missiles. Experimental results are presented for models with relative linear scales of 1, 0.37 and 0.12. (orig.) [de

  16. The impact of shoulder abduction loading on EMG-based intention detection of hand opening and closing after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yiyun; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Julius P A

    2011-01-01

    Many stroke patients are subject to limited hand functions in the paretic arm due to a significant loss of Corticospinal Tract (CST) fibers. A possible solution for this problem is to classify surface Electromyography (EMG) signals generated by hand movements and uses that to implement Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). However, EMG usually presents an abnormal muscle coactivation pattern shown as increased coupling between muscles within and/or across joints after stroke. The resulting Abnormal Muscle Synergies (AMS) could make the classification more difficult in individuals with stroke, especially when attempting to use the hand together with other joints in the paretic arm. Therefore, this study is aimed at identifying the impact of AMS following stroke on EMG pattern recognition between two hand movements. In an effort to achieve this goal, 7 chronic hemiparetic chronic stroke subjects were recruited and asked to perform hand opening and closing movements at their paretic arm while being either fully supported by a virtual table or loaded with 25% of subject's maximum shoulder abduction force. During the execution of motor tasks EMG signals from the wrist flexors and extensors were simultaneously acquired. Our results showed that increased synergy-induced activity at elbow flexors, induced by increasing shoulder abduction loading, deteriorated the performance of EMG pattern recognition for hand opening for those with a weak grasp strength and EMG activity. However, no such impact on hand closing has yet been observed possibly because finger/wrist flexion is facilitated by the shoulder abduction-induced flexion synergy.

  17. Development and validation of the first robotic scale for the clinical assessment of upper extremity motor impairments in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Omer; Geva, Diklah; Yoeli, Doron; Kerzhner, Marina; Mauritz, Karl-Heinz

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to develop and validate the first robotic-based instrument and procedure for assessing upper extremity motor impairments in patients with stroke and to test its discriminative power. The ReoGo robotic rehabilitation platform was used to design a novel, upper limb functionality assessment tool, the Reo Scale Assessment (RSA). We used the RSA to evaluate 100 patients with stroke. The RSA items were tested for internal consistency and submitted to factor analysis. The Fugl-Meyer (FM) motor test, the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to examine the validity of the RSA. RSA scores were compared and correlated with the scores of the 3 scales. The discriminative power of the RSA was tested against the FM impairment levels by analysis of variance. The total RSA score correlated closely with the upper extremity scores of the FM, WMFT, and ARAT (r = 0.95, 0.93, and 0.90, respectively). The RSA was able to discriminate between low, moderate, and high functioning patients (86% agreement with FM). Principal component analysis revealed that the RSA coefficients loaded on 3 tested components: proximal, distal, and force. Our results provide strong evidence that the validity of the RSA is comparable with that of the FM, WMFT, and ARAT. The objective measuring and scoring systems of the robotic RSA make it an efficient tool for assessing motor function of stroke patients in clinical and research settings. Additional studies are needed to test the reliability and sensitivity of the RSA.

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the Signs of Depression Scale with a revised scoring mechanism in stroke patients with communicative impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Mariska J; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-12-01

    To investigate (1) the diagnostic value of the Signs of Depression Scale (SODS) in a Likert scale format and (2) whether the Likert scale improves the diagnostic value compared with the original dichotomous scale. Cross-sectional multicentre study. One general and one university hospital in the Netherlands. A total of 116 consecutive hospitalized stroke patients, of whom 53 were patients with communicative impairment. Depression was diagnosed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) administered to the patients' relatives. The Barthel Index (BI) was used as an external validator. The correlation between the CIDI and the SODS-Likert or the SODS was small ( r b  = 0.18), and the correlation between the Barthel Index and the SODS-Likert ( r s  = -0.30) or the SODS ( r s  = -0.33) was moderate. For both instruments, the discriminatory power for diagnosing depression when compared with the CIDI was best at a cut-off score of ⩾2. The internal consistency of the SODS-Likert was acceptable (α = 0.69) and slightly higher than that of the SODS (α = 0.57). The inter-rater reliability of the SODS-Likert and the SODS was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.66 and ICC 0.80, respectively). The clinical utility was rated good. The diagnostic value of the SODS did not improve using a Likert scale format. However, the diagnostic value of the original dichotomous SODS is reasonable for the initial mood assessment of stroke patients with communicative impairment.

  19. Measuring Scaling Effects in Small Two-Stroke Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-20

    manufacturer. Being two-stroke engines, the crankcases are void of an oil sump, so needle roller bearings are used on both ends of the connecting...This energy is dispersed among several different paths including to the engine’s cooling medium, surface friction (piston- cylinder, bearings , etc...linked to the dynamometer driveshaft with a one-way bearing in order to start the engine and not dissipate power unnecessarily during testing. The

  20. Impact of naturalistic lighting on hospitalized stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Anders; Jennum, Poul; Simonsen, Sofie Amalie

    2017-01-01

    regulator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, is mainly controlled by natural daylight, and the blue spectrum is considered the most powerful. During stroke rehabilitation, patients typically are mostly indoors and therefore not exposed to the natural daytime variation in light intensity. Furthermore, several...... rehabilitation hospitals may be exposed to powerful light in the blue spectrum, but at a time that is adversely related to their endogenous circadian phase, for example in the late evening instead of the daytime. Hypothesis: Naturalistic light that mimics the natural daytime spectrum variation will have...... a positive impact on the health of poststroke patients admitted to rehabilitation. We test specifically for improved sleep and less fatigue (questionnaires, polysomnography, Actiwatch), improved well-being (questionnaires), lessen anxiety and depression (questionnaires), improved cognition (tests...

  1. Establishing research priorities relating to the long-term impact of TIA and minor stroke through stakeholder-centred consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Grace M; Backman, Ruth; McMullan, Christel; Mathers, Jonathan; Marshall, Tom; Calvert, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    What is the problem and why is this important? Mini-strokes are similar to full strokes, but symptoms last less than 24 h. Many people (up to 70%) have long-term problems after a mini-stroke, such as anxiety; depression; problems with brain functioning (like memory loss); and fatigue (feeling tired). However, the current healthcare pathway only focuses on preventing another stroke and care for other long-term problems is not routinely given. Without proper treatment, people with long-term problems after a mini-stroke could have worse quality of life and may find it difficult to return to work and their social activities. What is the aim of the research? We wanted to understand the research priorities of patients, health care professionals and key stakeholders relating to the long-term impact of mini-stroke. How did we address the problem? We invited patients, clinicians, researchers and other stakeholders to attend a meeting. At the meeting people discussed the issues relating to the long-term impact of mini-stroke and came to an agreement on their research priorities. There were three stages: (1) people wrote down their individual research suggestions; (2) in smaller groups people came to an agreement on what their top research questions were; and (3) the whole group agreed final research priorities. What did we find? Eleven people attended who were representatives for patients, GPs, stroke consultants, stroke nurses, psychologists, the Stroke Association (charity) and stroke researchers, The group agreed on eleven research questions which they felt were the most important to improve health and well-being for people who have had a mini-stroke.The eleven research questions encompass a range of categories, including: understanding the existing care patients receive (according to diagnosis and geographical location); exploring what optimal care post-TIA/minor stroke should comprise (identifying and treating impairments, information giving and support groups) and how

  2. The correlation between Modified Ashworth Scale scores and the new index of alpha motoneurones excitability in post-stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, S; Ansari, N N; Mansouri, K; Olyaei, G R; Asgari, A; Kazemnejad, A

    2008-03-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is currently a widely used clinical scale to evaluate muscle spasticity. However, it lacks reliability and the validity, of the MAS as a clinical measure of muscle spasticity has been challenged. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of the MAS in patients with wrist flexor spasticity after stroke by using the Hslope/Mslope (Hslp/Mslp) ratio as the new index of alpha motoneuron excitability. Twenty-seven adult patients (14 women and 13 men) with first ever stroke resulting in hemiplegia with a mean (SD, range) age of 57.9 (11.6, 37-75) were included in the study. The main outcome measures were the MAS for the clinical assessment of spasticity, and the Hslp/Mslp for the neurophysiological evaluation. There was not a significant correlation between the MAS scores and Hslp/Mslp ratio (r = 0.38, p > 0.05). The mean of the Hslp/Mslp did not show a hierarchical increase with the MAS scores. The findings indicate that the MAS is not a valid and ordinal level measure of muscle spasticity.

  3. Development and validation of a short form of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Hsueh, I-Ping; Chou, Yeh-Tai; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Kwakkel, Gert

    2007-11-01

    The 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale (FM) is commonly used in outcome studies. However, the lengthy administration time of the FM keeps it from being widely accepted for routine clinical use. We aimed to develop a short form of the FM (the S-FM) with sound psychometric properties for stroke patients. The FM was administered to 279 patients. It was then simplified based on expert opinions and the results of Rasch analysis. The psychometric properties (including Rasch reliability, concurrent validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness) of the S-FM were examined and were compared with those of the FM. The concurrent validity and responsiveness of the S-FM were further validated in a sample from the Netherlands. We selected 6 items for each subscale to construct a 12-item S-FM. The S-FM demonstrated high Rasch reliability, high concurrent validity with the original scale, moderate responsiveness, and moderate predictive validity with the comprehensive activities of daily living function. The S-FM also showed sufficient concurrent validity and responsiveness on the Dutch sample. Our results provide strong evidence that the psychometric properties of the S-FM are comparable with those of the FM. The S-FM contains only 12 items, making it a very efficient measure for assessing the motor function of stroke patients in both clinical and research settings.

  4. The Impact of Technology-Based Interventions on Informal Caregivers of Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehaim, Abdulkarim Yousef; Alotaibi, Faisal F; Uphold, Constance R; Dang, Stuti

    2016-03-01

    This article is a systematic review of the impact of technology-based intervention on outcomes related to care providers for those who survived a stroke. Literature was identified in the PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Cochrane databases for evidence on technology-based interventions for stroke survivors' caregivers. The search was restricted for all English-language articles from 1970 to February 2015 that implied technology-based interventions. This review included studies that measured the impact of these types of approaches on one or more of the following: depression and any of the following-problem-solving ability, burden, health status, social support, preparedness, and healthcare utilization by care recipient-as secondary outcomes. Telephone or face-to-face counseling sessions were not of interest for this review. The search strategy yielded five studies that met inclusion criteria: two randomized clinical trials and three pilot/preliminary studies, with diverse approaches and designs. Four studies have assessed the primary outcome, two of which reported significant decreases in caregivers' depressive symptoms. Two studies had measured each of the following outcomes-burden, problem-solving ability, health status, and social support-and they revealed no significant differences following the intervention. Only one study assessed caregivers' preparedness and showed improved posttest scores. Healthcare services use by the care recipient was assessed by one study, and the results indicated significant reduction in emergency department visits and hospital re-admissions. Despite various study designs and small sample sizes, available data suggest that an intervention that incorporates a theoretical-based model and is designed to target caregivers as early as possible is a promising strategy. Furthermore, there is a need to incorporate a cost-benefit analysis in future studies.

  5. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Rebecca; Grant, Ian; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age), we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage), determining the optimum codes for case identification. Methods We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2). To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV) and—where available—on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV). Results 37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6–97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes) consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources. Conclusions Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90%) for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should

  6. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Woodfield

    Full Text Available Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age, we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, determining the optimum codes for case identification.We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2. To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV and-where available-on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV.37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6-97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources.Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90% for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should improve accuracy in large

  7. Cross-education of strength has a positive impact on post-stroke rehabilitation: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrensberger, Monika; Simpson, Daniel; Broderick, Patrick; Monaghan, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Since its discovery in 1894 cross-education of strength - a bilateral adaptation after unilateral training - has been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation after one-sided orthopedic injuries. Limited knowledge exists on its application within the rehabilitation after stroke. This review examined the evidence regarding the implication of cross-education in the rehabilitation of the post-stroke hemiplegic patient and its role in motor function recovery. Electronic databases were searched by two independent assessors. Studies were included if they described interventions which examined the phenomenon of cross-education of strength from the less-affected to the more-affected side in stroke survivors. Study quality was assessed using the PEDro scale and the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Only two controlled trials met the eligibility criteria. The results of both studies show a clear trend towards cross-educational strength transfer in post-stroke hemiplegic patients with 31.4% and 45.5% strength increase in the untrained, more-affected dorsiflexor muscle. Results also suggest a possible translation of strength gains towards functional task improvements and motor recovery. Based on best evidence synthesis guidelines the combination of the results included in this review suggest at least a moderate level of evidence for the application of cross-education of strength in stroke rehabilitation. Following this review it is recommended that additional high quality randomized controlled trials are conducted to further support the findings.

  8. Nuclear Waste: Increasing Scale and Sociopolitical Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porte, Todd R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the impact of radioactive waste management system on social and political development. The article also presents (1) types of information necessary to estimate the costs and consequences of radioactive waste management; and (2) an index of radioactive hazards to improve the basis for policy decisions. (HM)

  9. The relationship between stroke survivors' perceived identity and mood, self-esteem and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapadatu, Irina; Morris, Reg

    2017-01-11

    To examine change in identity after stroke and to elucidate its relationship with mood and quality of life. To test Higgins' theory of the impact of identity (self-discrepancy) on anxiety and depression. To examine the role of self-esteem in mediating the relationship between identity and outcomes. Sixty-five community-living first-time stroke survivors, mean age 61.58 and time since stroke 5.60 years, were recruited from stroke charities. A cross-sectional study used the Head Injury Semantic Differential Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (adapted) and the Barthel Index. Identity was rated more negatively after stroke than before (t(64) = 6.46, p self-esteem (r = -.48, p self-esteem (β = .30, p self-esteem are associated with important outcomes for stroke survivors.

  10. Impact of transesophageal echocardiography on management in patients with suspected cardioembolic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khariton, Yevgeniy; House, John A; Comer, Lynn; Coggins, Tina R; Magalski, Anthony; Skolnick, David G; Good, Thomas H; Main, Michael L

    2014-12-15

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is frequently performed in patients with acute ischemic cerebrovascular events to exclude a cardioembolic source. We aimed to determine the clinical impact of TEE on management. This is a retrospective single-center study of 1,458 consecutive patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack who underwent TEE for evaluation of a suspected cardioembolic cause. Significant TEE findings were determined for each patient as recorded on the TEE report. The medical record was reviewed for baseline, clinical, and demographic variables and to determine whether significant management changes occurred as a result of the TEE findings. Potential significant changes in management included initiation of anticoagulation, placement of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure device, initiation of antibiotic therapy for endocarditis, surgical PFO closure, other cardiac surgery, and coil embolization of a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. A significant change in management occurred in 243 patients (16.7%); 173 (71%) underwent treatment for PFO with a percutaneous PFO closure device (n = 100), initiation of chronic systemic anticoagulation (n = 68), or surgical PFO closure (n = 5). Additional findings leading to a change in management included endocarditis (n = 20), aortic arch atheroma (n = 14), intracardiac thrombus (n = 13), pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (n = 2), aortic valve fibroelastoma (n = 2), other valve masses (n = 4), and miscellaneous causes (n = 15). In conclusion, in patients with suspected cardioembolic stroke, TEE findings led to a change in management in 16.7% of patients. Of these, most (71%) were directed at prevention of subsequent paradoxical emboli in patients with PFO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Disability measures in stroke: relationship among the Barthel Index, the Functional Independence Measure, and the Modified Rankin Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooyeon; Hartzema, Abraham G; Duncan, Pamela W; Min-Lai, Sue

    2004-04-01

    Residual disability after stroke presents a major economic and humanistic burden. To quantify disability in patients, activities of daily living (ADL; Barthel Index [BI], and motor component of Functional Independence Measure [M-FIM]) and categorical disability measures (Modified Rankin Scale [MRS]) are used. The purpose of this study is to examine the predicting ability of ADL measures to global disability scale. Kansas City Stroke Study data were used for the present study. Correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis test, and polytomous logistic regression analysis were applied to examine the relationship between the ADL measure and global disability scale. Model fit statistics were examined to verify logistic regression appropriateness. A categorization scheme, which minimized the false-positive response rate, was selected as the optimal categorizing system. The 3 measures were highly correlated. Both BI and M-FIM differentiated disability better in lower than higher disability. In logistic regression, BI differentiated 4 disability levels; M-FIM differentiated 3 levels in MRS. However, on the basis of results of the Kruskal-Wallis and multiple comparison tests, we suspect that M-FIM may have the potential to predict MRS categories better with a different model. The proposed categorization scheme can serve as a translation between measures. However, because of the ceiling effect of BI and M-FIM, the translation could not be completed for all 6 levels of MRS. No apparent variation over time in the categorization scheme was observed. Further research needs to be conducted to develop better prediction models explaining the relationship between M-FIM and MRS.

  12. Rehabilitation-triggered cortical plasticity after stroke: in vivo imaging at multiple scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Conti, Emilia; Lai, Stefano; Spalletti, Cristina; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Alia, Claudia; Panarese, Alessandro; Sacconi, Leonardo; Micera, Silvestro; Caleo, Matteo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2017-02-01

    Neurorehabilitation protocols based on the use of robotic devices provide a highly repeatable therapy and have recently shown promising clinical results. Little is known about how rehabilitation molds the brain to promote motor recovery of the affected limb. We used a custom-made robotic platform that provides quantitative assessment of forelimb function in a retraction test. Complementary imaging techniques allowed us to access to the multiple facets of robotic rehabilitation-induced cortical plasticity after unilateral photothrombotic stroke in mice Primary Motor Cortex (Caudal Forelimb Area - CFA). First, we analyzed structural features of vasculature and dendritic reshaping in the peri-infarct area with two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Longitudinal analysis of dendritic branches and spines of pyramidal neurons suggests that robotic rehabilitation promotes the stabilization of peri-infarct cortical excitatory circuits, which is not accompanied by consistent vascular reorganization towards pre-stroke conditions. To investigate if this structural stabilization was linked to functional remapping, we performed mesoscale wide-field imaging on GCaMP6 mice while performing the motor task on the robotic platform. We revealed temporal and spatial features of the motor-triggered cortical activation, shining new light on rehabilitation-induced functional remapping of the ipsilesional cortex. Finally, by using an all-optical approach that combines optogenetic activation of the contralesional hemisphere and wide-field functional imaging of peri-infarct area, we dissected the effect of robotic rehabilitation on inter-hemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity.

  13. Translation and cultural validation of clinical observational scales - the Fugl-Meyer assessment for post stroke sensorimotor function in Colombian Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Nubia E; Forero, Sandra M; Galeano, Claudia P; Hernández, Edgar D; Landinez, Nancy S; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Alt Murphy, Margit

    2018-04-24

    Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) is the most widely used and recommended clinical scale for evaluation of sensorimotor impairment post stroke, but an official Spanish version is not available today. This study aimed to establish methodological structure for translation and cultural adaptation process and perform a transcultural validation of the upper and lower extremity FMA to Colombian Spanish. Procedures included forward and backward translation, step-wise reviewing by bilingual and professional experts to ensure conceptual and semantic equivalence. Validation included a pilot evaluation of item-level agreement on 10 individuals with stroke at the Central Military Hospital of Colombia. Comprehensive step-wise procedure for transcultural validation was established. Low agreement (less than 70%) was detected for items assessing arm movements within synergies and for coordination/speed subscale. All points of disagreement were systematically reviewed and agreed upon when drafting the final version of the Spanish FMA. Use of FMA will allow unified description of stroke severity and motor recovery in Spanish speaking countries. This will open up possibility to compare stroke and rehabilitation outcomes with other countries and regions world-wide. Comprehensive methodological procedures provided can facilitate introduction of well-established clinical scales in other languages. Implications for Rehabilitation The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) of upper and lower extremity is the most used and recommended clinical scale for evaluation of sensorimotor impairment after stroke. The Spanish version of FMA, validated in this study, is now first time available for use in research and clinical practice. Use of FMA will allow unified description of stroke severity and motor recovery in Spanish speaking countries, which in turn opens up possibility to compare stroke and rehabilitation outcomes with other countries and regions world-wide.

  14. The reliability and sensitivity of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in an uncontrolled setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian V Specogna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS is commonly used to measure neurologic function and guide treatment after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH in routine stroke clinics. We evaluated its reliability and sensitivity to detect change with consecutive and unique rater combinations in a real-world setting. METHODS: Conservative measures of interrater reliability (unweighted Kappa (κ, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC1,1 and sensitivity to detect change (Minimal Detectable Difference (MDD were estimated. Sixty-one repeated ratings were completed within 1 week after ICH by physicians and nurses with no investigator intervention. RESULTS: Reliability (consistency of the NIHSS total score was good for both physicians vs. nurses and nurses vs. nurses (ICC=0.78, 95%CI: 0.58-0.89 and ICC=0.75, 95%CI: 0.55-0.87 respectively in this scenario. Reliability (agreement of items 1C and 9 were excellent (κ>=0.61 for both rater comparisons, however, reliability was poor to fair on most remaining items (κ:0.01-0.60, with item 11 being completely unreliable in this scenario (κ=10 points need to be observed for clinicians to be confident that real changes had occurred within 1 week after ICH.

  15. Assessment of the Effects of Rehabilitation on Balance Impairment in Patients After Ischemic Stroke According to Selected Tests and Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworska Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral stroke is one of the most important issues for modern medicine. Despite the fact that numerous activities have been undertaken for the purpose of raising awareness and significance of prevention, this condition still remains one of the main reasons behind disability. The objective of the work was to assess the effects of the type of therapy, age and period from the incident occurrence, on the progress of rehabilitation of imbalance and body stability observed in a group of researched patients, on the basis of results obtained according to the Berg Balance Scale, tandem balance test, Kwolek’s loading symmetry index and Timed Up and Go test. The test group comprised of 55 post-stroke patients. The group consisted of 29 women (52.73% and 26 men (47.27%. The average age of the subjects was 61.02 years (age range between 33-85 years. A number of the patients were subjected to rehabilitation with the use of classic kinesitherapy, whereas the remaining group underwent rehabilitation based on the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation method (PNF.

  16. Impact assessment of illegal small scale mining on construction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small-scale mining involves exploitation of mineral deposits using rudimentary implements and at low levels of production with minimal capital investment. South-Western Ghana has the largest concentration of mining operat-ions of both large companies and small scale miners. Illegal mining activities have impacted ...

  17. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  18. Prevalence and impact of disability and sexual dysfunction on Health-Related Quality of Life of Nigerian stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewole, Olufemi O; Ogunlana, Michael O; Gbiri, Caleb A O; Oritogun, Kolawole S

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the impact of disability and sexual dysfunction on Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among Nigerian stroke survivors (SSv) and to determine their association using sexual functioning (SF), Global Disability Measure and Function (GDMF), and demographic profiles. This study involved 121 consecutive SSv attending healthcare services in two tertiary health facilities in Nigeria. Demographic details were obtained through interview while HRQoL, SF, and Global Disability (GD) were assessed using Stroke-Specific Quality of Life (SS-QoL-12), Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ-14), and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS-2.0), respectively. Determinants of HRQoL were explored using the Poisson regression analysis. Most of the SSv had moderate/severe GD (95%) and low SF (86.8%). Their HRQoL decreased with increase in their age (p = 0.005) and with increase in GD (p = 0.001). This association remained unchanged even when adjusted for SF (p = 0.001). Those with low SF but with mild GD had relatively better HRQoL than those with moderate/severe GD even when they had higher SF. Their HRQoL was negatively impacted by their GD but not by their SF despite direct correlation between SF and HRQoL. With a unit increase in level of GD, there was 8% decrease in HRQoL scores in psychosocial and 17% decrease in physical domains. Although sexual dysfunction and global disability are prevalent among Nigerian SSv, their low HRQoL is determined by their disability and not by SF. Hence, effort at reducing global disability should be the focus of rehabilitation after stroke. Implication for Rehabilitation Global functional and sexual deficiencies abound in stroke survivors and they impact negatively on their overall quality of life. Sexual dysfunction correlates negatively on physical and psychosocial wellbeing of stroke survivors. Rehabilitation goal(s) should focus disability reduction and improvement of sexual

  19. The Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale as prognostic tools for long-term outcomes after stroke: a qualitative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Krista F; Caro, J Jaime

    2007-07-01

    Providing a quantitative prognosis after a stroke is important to clinicians and patients as well as to researchers interested in projecting the results of clinical trials and other studies. Thus, we critically reviewed the evidence supporting the prognostic value of two frequently-used measures, the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for long-term outcomes. A narrative review of the peer-reviewed medical literature obtained by searching Medline 1966 to January 2004--using the phrase '[stroke] AND [Barthel OR Rankin]'--was conducted to assess the strength of the evidence for these measures and answer three main questions: How good are the BI and mRS at predicting (1) the level of care required, (2) the time-course of recovery, and (3) mortality. Abstracts were screened for the presence of actual data on the prognostic impact of BI and mRS on these endpoints, and selected articles were fully reviewed and abstracted. Additional articles were identified from bibliographies of the retrieved papers. Of 753 abstracts screened, 89 articles were selected for detailed assessment. Early disability and global outcome (< or = 7 days) were shown in 21 studies to be strong predictors of care needs. This relation appears to be mainly biological, not country-specific. Recovery was shown in 18 studies to be strongly related to early BI. In contrast, the 11 studies examining mortality provided insufficient information to directly support the prognostic value of either measure. Key limitations of this review include heterogeneity of available studies (e.g., time-points, outcome, parameterization) and relative lack of information on the mRS. Despite the lack of uniformity in existing studies, the evidence overall is quite strong, supporting the use of BI and mRS as prognostic tools. External non-treatment modifiable factors which also determine long-term outcome (e.g., social support) have to be taken into account.

  20. Production and validation of Putonghua- and Cantonese-Chinese language National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale training and certification videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, R T F; Lyden, P D; Tsoi, T H; Huang, Y; Liu, M; Hon, S F K; Raman, R; Liu, L

    2010-04-01

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is an integral part of acute stroke assessment. We report our experience with new Putonghua- and Cantonese-Chinese language NIHSS (PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS) training and certification videos. A professional video production company was hired to create the training and certification videos for both PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS. Two training and certification workshops were held in Chengdu and Beijing, and two workshops in Hong Kong. The instruction, training and group A certification videos were presented to workshop attendees. Unweighted kappa statistics were used to measure the agreement among raters, and the inter-rater agreements for PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS videos were compared with those of original English language NIHSS (E-NIHSS) videos. The pass rates using PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS videos were 79% and 82%, respectively. All possible responses on individual scale items were included. Facial palsy and limb ataxia (13%) showed poor agreement, nine (60%) to 10 (67%) items showed moderate agreement (0.4videos, the agreements on best gaze, visual fields, facial weakness and aphasia were less for PC-NIHSS videos, and the agreements on commands for level of consciousness and visual fields were less for CC-NIHSS videos. Nevertheless, there was no difference between PC-NIHSS or CC-NIHSS and E-NIHSS videos in the agreement on total score. Compared with E-NIHSS videos, PC-NIHSS and CC-NIHSS videos show good content validity and inter-rater reliability. Availability of these videos may facilitate the proper use of NIHSS among physicians and nurses in Putonghua- or Cantonese-speaking communities.

  1. The socio-economic impact of stroke on households in Livingstone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines stroke as 'the neurological deficit of cerebral vascular cause that persists beyond twenty four hours or is interrupted by death within 24 hours'. In Livingstone, Zambia, more than 30% of stroke victims indicate socio-economic problems. The study aimed at assessing the ...

  2. Backup_of_23. THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT OF STROKE ON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines stroke as. 'the neurological deficit of cerebral vascular cause that persists beyond twenty four hours or is interrupted by death within 24 hours'. In Livingstone, Zambia, more than 30% of stroke victims indicate socio-economic problems. The study aimed at assessing the socio-.

  3. Behavioural Intervention Effects in Dysarthria Following Stroke: Communication Effectiveness, Intelligibility and Dysarthria Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a common post-stroke presentation. Its management falls within the remit of the speech and language therapy profession. Little controlled evaluation of the effects of intervention for dysarthria in stroke has been reported. Aims: The study aimed to determine the effects of a period of behavioural communication…

  4. Subsurface Morphology and Scaling of Lunar Impact Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, K.; Collins, G. S.; Wieczorek, M. A.; Johnson, B. C.; Soderblom, J. M.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Impact bombardment during the first billion years after the formation of the Moon produced at least several tens of basins. The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission mapped the gravity field of these impact structures at significantly higher spatial resolution than previous missions, allowing for detailed subsurface and morphological analyses to be made across the entire globe. GRAIL-derived crustal thickness maps were used to define the regions of crustal thinning observed in centers of lunar impact basins, which represents a less unambiguous measure of a basin size than those based on topographic features. The formation of lunar impact basins was modeled numerically by using the iSALE-2D hydrocode, with a large range of impact and target conditions typical for the first billion years of lunar evolution. In the investigated range of impactor and target conditions, the target temperature had the dominant effect on the basin subsurface morphology. Model results were also used to update current impact scaling relationships applicable to the lunar setting (based on assumed target temperature). Our new temperature-dependent impact-scaling relationships provide estimates of impact conditions and transient crater diameters for the majority of impact basins mapped by GRAIL. As the formation of lunar impact basins is associated with the first approximately 700 Myr of the solar system evolution when the impact flux was considerably larger than the present day, our revised impact scaling relationships can aid further analyses and understanding of the extent of impact bombardment on the Moon and terrestrial planets in the early solar system.

  5. Cross-diagnostic validity of the SF-36 physical functioning scale in patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study using Rasch analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; de Groot, Vincent; Roorda, Leo D.; Schepers, Vera P. M.; Lindeman, Eline; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Beelen, Anita; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate unidimensionality and differential item functioning of the SF-36 physical functioning scale (PF10) in patients with various neurological disorders. Patients: Patients post-stroke (n = 198), with multiple sclerosis (n = 151) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  6. Self-Reported Fatigue and Associated Factors Six Years after Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Elf

    Full Text Available Several studies have found that fatigue is one of the most commonly reported symptoms after stroke and the most difficult to cope with. The present study aimed to investigate the presence and severity of self-reported fatigue six years after stroke onset and associated factors. The cohort "Life After Stroke Phase I" (n = 349 persons was invited at six years to report fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale 7-item version, perceived impact of stroke and global recovery after stroke (Stroke Impact Scale, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Checklist and participation in everyday social activities (Frenchay Activities Index. At six years 37% of the 102 participants in this cross-sectional study reported fatigue. The results showed that in nearly all SIS domains the odds for post-stroke fatigue were higher in persons with a higher perceived impact. Furthermore, the odds for post-stroke fatigue were higher in those who had experienced a moderate/severe stroke and had signs of depression and anxiety. Fatigue is still present in one-third of persons as long as six years after stroke onset and is perceived to hinder many aspects of functioning in everyday life. There is an urgent need to develop and evaluate interventions to reduce fatigue.

  7. Impact of Age on the Importance of Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressures for Stroke Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram, Julie K K; Borglykke, Anders; Andreasen, Anne H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates age-related shifts in the relative importance of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures as predictors of stroke and whether these relations are influenced by other cardiovascular risk factors. Using 34 European cohorts from the MOnica, Risk, Genetics, Archiving......, and Monograph (MORGAM) Project with baseline between 1982 and 1997, 68 551 subjects aged 19 to 78 years, without cardiovascular disease and not receiving antihypertensive treatment, were included. During a mean of 13.2 years of follow-up, stroke incidence was 2.8%. Stroke risk was analyzed using hazard ratios...

  8. Systems pharmacology dissection of multi-scale mechanisms of action for herbal medicines in stroke treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    Full Text Available Annually, tens of millions of first-ever strokes occur in the world; however, currently there is lack of effective and widely applicable pharmacological treatments for stroke patients. Herbal medicines, characterized as multi-constituent, multi-target and multi-effect, have been acknowledged with conspicuous effects in treating stroke, and attract extensive interest of researchers although the mechanism of action is yet unclear. In this work, we introduce an innovative systems-pharmacology method that combines pharmacokinetic prescreening, target fishing and network analysis to decipher the mechanisms of action of 10 herbal medicines like Salvia miltiorrhizae, Ginkgo biloba and Ephedrae herba which are efficient in stroke treatment and prevention. Our systematic analysis results display that, in these anti-stroke herbal medicines, 168 out of 1285 constituents with the favorable pharmacokinetic profiles might be implicated in stroke therapy, and the systematic use of these compounds probably acts through multiple mechanisms to synergistically benefit patients with stroke, which can roughly be classified as preventing ischemic inflammatory response, scavenging free radicals and inhibiting neuronal apoptosis against ischemic cerebral damage, as well as exhibiting lipid-lowering, anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic and antiplatelet effects to decrease recurrent strokes. Relying on systems biology-based analysis, we speculate that herbal medicines, being characterized as the classical combination therapies, might be not only engaged in multiple mechanisms of action to synergistically improve the stroke outcomes, but also might be participated in reducing the risk factors for recurrent strokes.

  9. The Impact of Falls on Motor and Cognitive Recovery after Discharge from In-Patient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer S; Brooks, Dina; Inness, Elizabeth L; Mansfield, Avril

    2016-07-01

    Falls are common among community-dwelling stroke survivors. The aims of this study were (1) to compare motor and cognitive outcomes between individuals who fell in the 6 months' postdischarge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation and those who did not fall, and (2) to explore potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between falls and recovery of motor and cognitive function. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of individuals discharged home from in-patient rehabilitation was conducted. Participants were recruited at discharge and completed a 6-month falls monitoring period using postcards with follow-up. Nonfallers and fallers were compared at the 6-month follow-up assessment on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), gait speed, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Measures of balance confidence and physical activity were also assessed. Twenty-three fallers were matched to 23 nonfallers on age and functional balance scores at discharge. A total of 43 falls were reported during the study period (8 participants fell more than once). At follow-up, BBS scores (P = .0066) and CMSA foot scores (P = .0033) were significantly lower for fallers than for nonfallers. The 2 groups did not differ on CMSA leg scores (P = .049), gait speed (P = .47), or MoCA score (P = .23). There was no significant association between change in balance confidence scores and change in physical activity levels among all participants from the first and third questionnaire (r = .27, P = .08). Performance in balance and motor recovery of the foot were compromised in fallers when compared to nonfallers at 6 months post discharge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, S; Krishnan, Gopee

    2013-07-01

    Quality of life (QoL) dwells in a person's overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39) into Kannada, to measure test-retest reliability and internal consistency. The original English instrument was modified considering socio-cultural differences among native English and Kannada speakers. Cross-linguistic adaptation of SAQOL-39 into Kannada was carried out through forward-backward translation scheme. The scale was administered on 32 people from Karnataka (a state in India) having aphasia. For a direct understanding of the subject's QoL, scores were categorized into QoL severity levels. Item reliability of the Kannada version was examined by measuring Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was examined by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Kannada SAQOL-39 showed good acceptability with minimum missing data and excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.8). Value of Cronbach's α observed for four items modified in the original version was 0.9 each and the mean α of all Kannada items was 0.9, demonstrating high internal consistency. The present study offers a valid, reliable tool to measure QoL in Kannada-speaking individuals with aphasia. This tool is useful in a cross-center, cross-national comparison of QoL data from people with aphasia. This instrument also permits direct translation into other Indian languages as the items are culturally validated to the Indian population. This study promotes future research using the Kannada SAQOL-39.

  11. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of life (QoL dwells in a person′s overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39 into Kannada, to measure test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Materials and Methods: The original English instrument was modified considering socio-cultural differences among native English and Kannada speakers. Cross-linguistic adaptation of SAQOL-39 into Kannada was carried out through forward-backward translation scheme. The scale was administered on 32 people from Karnataka (a state in India having aphasia. For a direct understanding of the subject′s QoL, scores were categorized into QoL severity levels. Item reliability of the Kannada version was examined by measuring Cronbach′s alpha. Test-retest reliability was examined by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results: Kannada SAQOL-39 showed good acceptability with minimum missing data and excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.8. Value of Cronbach′s α observed for four items modified in the original version was 0.9 each and the mean α of all Kannada items was 0.9, demonstrating high internal consistency. Conclusions: The present study offers a valid, reliable tool to measure QoL in Kannada-speaking individuals with aphasia. This tool is useful in a cross-center, cross-national comparison of QoL data from people with aphasia. This instrument also permits direct translation into other Indian languages as the items are culturally validated to the Indian population. This study promotes future research using the Kannada SAQOL-39.

  12. Impact of Pretreatment Noncontrast CT Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on Clinical Outcome After Intra-Arterial Stroke Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, Albert J.; Zaidat, Osama O.; Chaudhry, Zeshan A.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; González, R. Gilberto; Goyal, Mayank; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Menon, Bijoy K.; Mualem, Elan; Ueda, Dawn; Buell, Hope; Sit, Siu Po; Bose, Arani

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of intra-arterial treatment remains uncertain. Because most centers performing IAT use noncontrast CT (NCCT) imaging, it is critical to understand the impact of NCCT findings on treatment outcomes. This study aimed to compare functional independence and safety among patients undergoing

  13. Systematic review of survival time in experimental mouse stroke with impact on reliability of infarct estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Carina Kirstine; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster; Hasseldam, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide. Only one treatment for acute ischemic stroke is currently available, thrombolysis with rt-PA, but it is limited in its use. Many efforts have been invested in order to find additive treatments, without success.A multitude of r...... of the investigated process. Our findings indicate a need for more research in this area, and establishment of common correction methodology....

  14. Impact of Expanding the Prehospital Stroke Bypass Time Window in a Large Geographic Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiell, Ian G; Clement, Catherine M; Campbell, Kristy; Sharma, Mukul; Socha, Doug; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Jin, Albert; Perry, Jeffrey J; Lumsden, Jim; Martin, Cally; Froats, Mark; Dionne, Richard; Trickett, John

    2017-03-01

    The Ontario Acute Stroke Medical Redirect Paramedic Protocol (ASMRPP) was revised to allow paramedics to bypass to designated stroke centers if total transport time would be stroke symptoms. A total of 1317 basic and advanced life support paramedics, of 9 land services in 10 rural counties and 5 cities, used the Revised ASMRPP to take appropriate patients directly to 6 designated stroke centers. We enrolled 1277 patients with 98.8% paramedic compliance in form completion. Of these, 755 (61.2%) met the redirect criteria and had these characteristics: mean age 72.1 (range 16-101), male 51.1%, mean time scene to hospital 16.7 minutes (range 0-92). Paramedics demonstrated excellent interobserver agreement (κ, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-0.96) and 97.9% accuracy in interpretation of the Revised ASMRPP. Prehospital adverse events occurred in 14.7% of patients, but few were life-threatening. Overall, 71.4% of 755 cases had a stroke code activated at the hospital and 23.2% received thrombolysis. For the 189 potential stroke patients picked up in 1 city, the ASMRPP classified thrombolysis administration with sensitivity 100% and specificity 37.3% and a final diagnosis of stroke, with sensitivity 86.1% and specificity 41.9%. In a large urban-rural area with 9 paramedic services, we demonstrated accurate, safe, and effective implementation of the Revised ASMRPP. These revisions will allow more patients with stroke to benefit from early treatment. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Discriminative and predictive validity of the short-form activities-specific balance confidence scale for predicting fall of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, SeungHeon; Lee, Yunbok; Lee, DongGeon; Cho, Ki-Hun; Lee, GyuChang; Park, Dong-Sik

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to investigate the discriminative validity of the short-form activities-specific balance confidence scale (ABC scale) in predicting falls, and its validity. [Subjects and Methods] 43 stroke survivors were identified as a group with a history of multiple falls (faller group) and a group without or with a history of one falls (non-faller group). The balance confidence was examined using the ABC scale and the short-form ABC scale. Functional abilities were examined with Fugl-Meyer assessment, sit-to-stand test, and Berg balance scale. [Results] The area under the curve of the ABC scale and the short-form ABC scale in predicting fall was>0.77. This result indicates that both examination tools have discriminative validity in predicting falls. Although both tools showed an identical predictable specificity of 72% in the non-faller and faller groups, the short-form ABC scale exhibited a predictable sensitivity of 86% in the faller group, which is higher than that of the ABC scale (71%). [Conclusion] Results of this study showed that the short-form ABC scale is an efficient clinical tool to evaluate and predict the balance confidence of stroke survivors.

  16. Impact of Insurance Precertification on Discharge of Stroke Patients to Acute Rehabilitation or Skilled Nursing Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew L; Kulhari, Ashish; Wolfram, Julie A; Furlan, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the common insurance practice of requiring precertification before a medically ready stroke patient can be discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) or inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) causes a delay in discharge. Eliminating delays in discharge of stroke patients is important given the increasing demands for health-care efficiency after the passage of the Affordable Health Care Act. A retrospective chart review of 1007 patients who were admitted to our comprehensive stroke center with the primary diagnosis of stroke over a 12-month period was performed. Out of the patient pool, 289 patients met the inclusion criterion of a primary diagnosis of stroke that required discharge to a SNF or IRF. All 289 patients were medically cleared for discharge to a SNF or IRF by a board-certified vascular neurologist. Of the 289 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 118 required insurance precertification and 171 did not require precertification before being discharged to a SNF or IRF. All 118 patients who required precertification had private health insurance. The patients who required insurance precertification had an average delay of discharge (DOD) of 1.5 days, and those patients who did not require precertification had an average DOD of .8 days (P value insurance precertification leads to delay in discharge, increased LOS, and increased hospital costs for stroke patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a foot impact scale for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Philip; Reay, Naomi; Gilworth, Gill; Redmond, Anthony; Slade, Anita; Tennant, Alan; Woodburn, James

    2005-06-15

    To develop a new foot impact scale to assess foot status in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using established qualitative methodology and the latest item response techniques (Rasch analysis). Foot problems in RA were explored by conducting qualitative interviews that were then used to generate items for a new foot impact scale. Further validation was undertaken following postal surveys and Rasch analysis. Analysis of the first postal survey (n = 192 responses) produced a 63-item binary response, 4-subscale instrument. The 4 subscales covered the domains impairment, activities, participation, and footwear. Following test-retest postal surveys and additional analysis, the instrument was reduced to a 2 subscale, 51-item questionnaire covering the domains of impairments/shoes and activities/participation. Initial results of these subscales indicate good psychometric properties, external validity, and test-retest reliability. A foot impact scale to assess the impact of RA and to measure the effect of interventions has been developed. The 2 scales comprising the instrument demonstrate good psychometric properties.

  19. Development of the Italian version of the trunk impairment scale in subjects with acute and chronic stroke. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, validity and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ambrosini, Emilia; Verheyden, Geert; Brivio, Flavia; Brunati, Roberto; Longoni, Luca; Mauri, Gaia; Molteni, Alessandro; Nava, Claudia; Rocca, Barbara; Ferrante, Simona

    2017-09-10

    To cross-culturally adapt and psychometrically analyse the Italian version of the Trunk Impairment Scale on acute (cohort 1) and chronic stroke patients (cohort 2). The Trunk Impairment Scale was culturally adapted in accordance with international standards. The psychometric testing included: internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), inter- and intra-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient; standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change), construct validity by comparing Trunk Impairment Scale score with Barthel Index, motor subscale of Functional Independence Measure, and Trunk Control Test (Pearson's correlation), and responsiveness (Effect Size, Effect Size with Guyatt approach, standardized response mean, and Receiver Operating Characteristics curves). The Trunk Impairment Scale was administered to 125 and 116 acute and chronic stroke patients, respectively. Internal consistency was acceptable (α > 0.7), inter- and intra-rater reliability (ICC > 0.9, Minimal Detectable Change for total score  0.4) with all scales but the motor Functional Independence Measure in cohort 2. Distribution-based methods showed large effects in cohort 1 and moderate to large effects in cohort 2. The Minimal Important Difference was 3.5 both from patient's and therapist's perspective in cohort 1 and 2.5 and 1.5 from patient's and therapist's perspective, respectively, in cohort 2. The Trunk Impairment Scale was successfully translated into Italian and proved to be reliable, valid, and responsive. Its use is recommended for clinical and research purposes. Implications for Rehabilitation Trunk control is an essential part of balance and postural control, constituting an important prerequisite for daily activities and function. The TIS administered in subjects with subacute and chronic stroke was reliable, valid and responsive. The TIS is expected to help clinicians and researchers by identifying key functional processes related to disability in people

  20. Evaluation of complete functional status of patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure scale on admission, discharge, and six months poststroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Alikhani, Ebrahim; Bayat, Masume; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, at the times of admission to hospital, discharge, and six-month poststroke, and to determine the level of improvement in patients after rehabilitative procedures. Methods: A total number of 108 patients with stroke entered the study who were admitted to neurology ward. They all received rehabilitation consultation, and occupational and physical therapies were prescribed for them. Finally, their functional status was evaluated by FIM scale. Results: The median (and range) of FIM scores were 86 (15-119), 102 (16-123) and 119 (17-126) at admission, discharge, and after six-month follow-up, respectively. Our observations showed a significant improvement in FIM scores (P < 0.001). About 13, 30, and 76 percent of the patients in individual functional tasks of motor domain and 61, 75, and 86 percent in cognitive domain got the score of 6 or 7 (complete or partial independence) on admission, discharge, and after six months, respectively. There was a reverse correlation between age and FIM improvement and also duration of hospitalization (P = 0.002). Conclusion: The study showed that the FIM is a valid tool for evaluation of patients with stroke, their follow-up and tracking the disease course. Moreover, we concluded that patients with stroke make a significant improvement in their functional status overtime. The exact effect of rehabilitative procedures and comparison with no treatment, must be assessed in separate studies. PMID:28435628

  1. Evaluation of complete functional status of patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure scale on admission, discharge, and six months poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Alikhani, Ebrahim; Bayat, Masume; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2016-10-07

    Background: To evaluate the patients with stroke by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, at the times of admission to hospital, discharge, and six-month poststroke, and to determine the level of improvement in patients after rehabilitative procedures. Methods: A total number of 108 patients with stroke entered the study who were admitted to neurology ward. They all received rehabilitation consultation, and occupational and physical therapies were prescribed for them. Finally, their functional status was evaluated by FIM scale. Results: The median (and range) of FIM scores were 86 (15-119), 102 (16-123) and 119 (17-126) at admission, discharge, and after six-month follow-up, respectively. Our observations showed a significant improvement in FIM scores (P < 0.001). About 13, 30, and 76 percent of the patients in individual functional tasks of motor domain and 61, 75, and 86 percent in cognitive domain got the score of 6 or 7 (complete or partial independence) on admission, discharge, and after six months, respectively. There was a reverse correlation between age and FIM improvement and also duration of hospitalization (P = 0.002). Conclusion: The study showed that the FIM is a valid tool for evaluation of patients with stroke, their follow-up and tracking the disease course. Moreover, we concluded that patients with stroke make a significant improvement in their functional status overtime. The exact effect of rehabilitative procedures and comparison with no treatment, must be assessed in separate studies.

  2. [Impact of rural or urban areas on disability after a stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Barrio, M Ángeles; Herce-Martínez, M Begoña; Valiñas-Sieiro, Florita; Mariscal-Pérez, Natividad; López-Cunquero, M Ángeles; Cubo-Delgado, Esther

    2013-01-01

    To assess the residual disability in a sample of patients after suffering a first episode of a stroke and to compare the disability of those patients who live in rural areas with those living in urban areas. An observational, longitudinal study of a cohort of 89 patients from a Neurology Unit, affected by cerebrovascular accident. The following factors were assessed: sociodemographic and environmental factors, co-morbidity, functional status, disability, depression and anxiety, and quality of life. The different clinical and demographic variables were compared after admission to the unit, at hospital discharge, and 3 months afterwards. Regression analyses were also carried out in order to study the association between the clinical and sociodemographic factors, and post-stroke disability. Compared to their previous clinical state, after suffering a stroke patients showed a higher rate of co-morbidity (P<.0001), disability (P<.0001), depression (P=.002), and a poorer quality of life (P=.013). The difference between patients coming from rural and urban areas was not statistically significant in terms of disability, quality of life, anxiety, depression, or co-morbidity. The level of disability, depression and co-morbidity that patients showed after suffering a stroke was similar to the results obtained in other studies. As a novel feature, there were no differences between patients living in rural areas after suffering a stroke and those living in urban areas, as regards disability, depression, or co-morbidity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of Smartphone Applications on Timing of Endovascular Therapy for Ischemic Stroke: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naif M; Sarzetto, Francesca; Guha, Daipayan; Lu, Michael; Bodo, Andre; Gupta, Shaurya; Dyer, Erin; Howard, Peter; da Costa, Leodante; Swartz, Richard H; Boyle, Karl; Nathens, Avery B; Yang, Victor X D

    2017-11-01

    The metrics of imaging-to-puncture and imaging-to-reperfusion were recently found to be associated with the clinical outcomes of endovascular thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. However, measures for improving workflow within hospitals to achieve better timing results are largely unexplored for endovascular therapy. The aim of this study was to examine our experience with a novel smartphone application developed in house to improve our timing metrics for endovascular treatment. We developed an encrypted smartphone application connecting all stroke team members to expedite conversations and to provide synchronized real-time updates on the time window from stroke onset to imaging and to puncture. The effects of the application on the timing of endovascular therapy were evaluated with a secondary analysis of our single-center cohort. Our primary outcome was imaging-to-puncture time. We assessed the outcomes with nonparametric tests of statistical significance. Forty-five patients met our criteria for analysis among 66 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who received endovascular therapy at our institution. After the implementation of the smartphone application, imaging-to-puncture time was significantly reduced (preapplication median time, 127 minutes; postapplication time, 69 minutes; P smartphone applications may reduce treatment times for endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Impact of acute-phase complications and interventions on 6-month survival after stroke. A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Antonio; Lamassa, Maria; Franceschini, Marco; Bovis, Francesca; Cecconi, Lorenzo; Pournajaf, Sanaz; Paravati, Stefano; Biggeri, Annibale; Inzitari, Domenico; Ferro, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    The outcome of stroke patients is complex and multidimensional. We evaluated the impact of acute-phase variables, including clinical state, complications, resource use and interventions, on 6-month survival after first-ever stroke, taking into account baseline conditions exerting a possible effect on outcome. As part of a National Research Program, we performed a prospective observational study of acute stroke patients in four Italian Regions. Consecutive patients admitted for a period of 3 months to the emergency rooms of participating hospitals were included. A total of 1030 patients were enrolled (median age 76.0 years, 52.1% males). At 6 months, 816 (79.2%) were alive, and 164 (15.9%) deceased. Survival status at the 6-month follow-up was missing for 50 (4.9%). Neurological state in the acute phase was significantly worse in patients deceased at 6 months, who showed also higher frequency of acute-phase complications. Cox regression analysis adjusted for demographics, pre-stroke function, baseline diseases and risk factors, indicated as significant predictors of 6-month death altered consciousness (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.14-2.53), total anterior circulation infarct (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.44-3.15), hyperthermia (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.18-2.45), pneumonia (HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.18-2.61), heart failure (HR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.34-6.13) and nasogastric feeding (HR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.53-3.60), while antiplatelet therapy during acute phase (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.39-0.79), and early mobilisation (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.36-0.84) significantly increased 6-month survival. In a prospective observational study, stroke severity and some acute-phase complications, potentially modifiable, significantly increased the risk of 6-month death, independently of baseline variables. Early mobilisation positively affected survival, highlighting the role of early rehabilitation after stroke.

  5. A new prognostic scale for the early prediction of ischemic stroke recovery mainly based on traditional Chinese medicine symptoms and NIHSS score: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ke-Gang; Fu, Cai-Hong; Li, Huan-Qin; Xin, Xi-Yan; Gao, Ying

    2015-11-16

    Ischemic stroke (IS) is a common disease, often resulting in death or disability. Previous studies on prognosis of stroke mainly focused on the baseline condition or modern expensive tests. However, the change of clinical symptoms during acute stage is considerably neglected. In our study, we aim to develop a new prognostic scale to predict the 90-day outcome of IS patients. In this retrospective cohort study, a secondary data analysis was performed on 489 patients extracted from 1046 patients of 4 hospitals. A new prognostic scale was constructed to predict the recovery of IS mainly based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) symptoms & signs and the changes during the first 3 days of patients in the 3 TCM hospitals. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cutoff point for prediction. In the end, the scale was used to test the outcome of IS patients in Xuanwu hospital. The new prognostic scale was composed of 8 items including age degree (OR = 3.32; 95 % CI: 1.72-6.42), history of diabetes mellitus (DM) (OR = 2.20; 95 % CI: 1.19-4.08), NIHSS score (OR = 3.08; 95 % CI: 2.16-4.40), anxiety (OR = 3.17; 95 % CI: 1.90-5.29) and irritability (OR = 4.61; 95 % CI: 1.36-15.63) on the 1st day of illness onset, change in NIHSS score (OR = 2.49; 95 % CI: 1.31-4.73), and circumrotating (OR = 7.80; 95 % CI: 1.98-30.64) and tinnitus (OR = 13.25; 95 % CI: 1.55-113.34) during the first 3 days of stroke onset. The total score of the scale was 16.5 and the cutoff point was 9.5, which means patients would have poor outcome at 90 days of stroke onset if the score was higher than 9.5. The new scale was validated on the data of Xuanwu hospital, and the value of its sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy were 69.6 %, 83.3 % and 75.0 % respectively. The 8-item scale, mainly based on TCM symptoms, NIHSS score and their changes during the first 3 days, can predict the 90-day outcome for IS

  6. The effects of core stability strength exercise on muscle activity and trunk impairment scale in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong-Hun; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of core stability-enhancing exercises on the lower trunk and muscle activity of stroke patients. The control group (n = 10) underwent standard exercise therapy, while the experiment group (n =10) underwent both the core stability-enhancing exercise and standard exercise therapy simultaneously. The standard exercise therapy applied to the two groups included weight bearing and weight shifts and joint movements to improve flexibility and the range of motion. The core stability-enhancing exercise was performed 5 times a week for 30 min over a period of 4 weeks in the room where the patients were treated. For all 20 subject, the items measured before the exercise were measured after the therapeutic intervention, and changes in muscle activity of the lower trunk were evaluated. The activity and stability of the core muscles were measured using surface electromyography and the trunk impairment scale (TIS). The mean TIS score and muscle activity of the lower trunk increased in the experiment group significantly after performing the core stability-enhancing exercise (Pcore stability-enhancing exercise is effective in improving muscle activity of the lower trunk, which is affected by hemiplegia.

  7. The impact of falls on motor and cognitive recovery after discharge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer S.; Brooks, Dina; Inness, Elizabeth L.; Mansfield, Avril

    2016-01-01

    Background Falls are common among community-dwelling stroke survivors. The aim of this study was to (1) compare motor and cognitive outcomes between individuals who fell in the six months post-discharge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation and those who did not fall, and (2) explore potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between falls and recovery of motor and cognitive function. Methods Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of individuals discharged home from in-patient rehabilitation was conducted. Participants were recruited at discharge and completed a six-month falls monitoring period using postcards with follow-up. Non-fallers and fallers were compared at the six-month follow-up assessment on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), gait speed, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Measures of balance confidence and physical activity were also assessed. Results 23 fallers were matched to 23 non-fallers on age and functional balance scores at discharge. A total of 43 falls were reported during the study period (8 participants fell more than once). At follow-up, BBS scores (p=0.0066) and CMSA foot scores (p=0.0033) were significantly lower for fallers than non-fallers. The two groups did not differ on CMSA leg scores (p=0.049), gait speed (p=0.47) or MoCA (p=0.23). There was no significant association between change in balance confidence scores and change in physical activity levels among all participants from the first and third questionnaire (r=0.27, p=0.08). Conclusions Performance in balance and motor recovery of the foot were compromised in fallers when compared to non-fallers at six months post-discharge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation. PMID:27062418

  8. The impact of World and European Football Cups on stroke in the population of Dijon, France: a longitudinal study from 1986 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboa-Eboulé, Corine; Béjot, Yannick; Cottenet, Jonathan; Khellaf, Mehni; Jacquin, Agnès; Durier, Jérôme; Rouaud, Olivier; Hervieu-Begue, Marie; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Giroud, Maurice; Quantin, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Acute stress may trigger vascular events. We aimed to investigate whether important football competitions involving the French football team increased the occurrence of stroke. We retrospectively retrieved data of fatal and nonfatal stroke during 4 World Football Cups (1986, 1998, 2002, and 2006) and 4 European Championships (1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004), based on data from the population-based Stroke Registry of Dijon, France. One period of exposure was analyzed: the period of competition extended to 15 days before and after the competitions. The number of strokes was compared between exposed and unexposed corresponding periods of preceding and following years using Poisson regression. A total of 175 strokes were observed during the exposed periods compared with 192 and 217 strokes in the unexposed preceding and following periods. Multivariate regression analyses showed an overall 30% significant decrease in stroke numbers between periods of competition and unexposed periods of following year (risk ratio (RR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.6; P = .029) but not with that of preceding year (RR = 1.1; 95% CI = .9-1.3; P = .367). This was mostly explained by a 40% decrease in stroke numbers during European Championships, compared with the unexposed following periods (RR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0-1.9; P = .044) in stratified analyses by football competitions. Watching European football competitions had a positive impact in the city of Dijon with a decrease of stroke numbers. European championship is possibly associated with higher television audience and long-lasting euphoria although other factors may be involved. Further studies using nationwide data are recommended to validate these findings. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of General Anesthesia on Safety and Outcomes in the Endovascular Arm of Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Chebl, Alex; Yeatts, Sharon D; Yan, Bernard; Cockroft, Kevin; Goyal, Mayank; Jovin, Tudor; Khatri, Pooja; Meyers, Phillip; Spilker, Judith; Sugg, Rebecca; Wartenberg, Katja E; Tomsick, Tom; Broderick, Joe; Hill, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    General anesthesia (GA) for endovascular therapy (EVT) of acute ischemic stroke may be associated with worse outcomes. The Interventional Management of Stroke III trial randomized patients within 3 hours of acute ischemic stroke onset to intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator±EVT. GA use within 7 hours of stroke onset was recorded per protocol. Good outcome was defined as 90-day modified Rankin Scale ≤2. A multivariable analysis adjusting for dichotomized National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS; 8-19 versus ≥20), age, and time from onset to groin puncture was performed. Four hundred thirty-four patients were randomized to EVT, 269 (62%) were treated under local anesthesia and 147 (33.9%) under GA; 18 (4%) were undetermined. The 2 groups were comparable except for median baseline NIHSS (16 local anesthesia versus 18 GA; P<0.0001). The GA group was less likely to achieve a good outcome (adjusted relative risk, 0.68; confidence interval, 0.52-0.90; P=0.0056) and had increased in-hospital mortality (adjusted relative risk, 2.84; confidence interval, 1.65-4.91; P=0.0002). Those with medically indicated GA had worse outcomes (adjusted relative risk, 0.49; confidence interval, 0.30-0.81; P=0.005) and increased mortality (relative risk, 3.93; confidence interval, 2.18-7.10; P<0.0001) with a trend for higher mortality with routine GA. There was no significant difference in the adjusted risks of subarachnoid hemorrhage (P=0.32) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (P=0.37). GA was associated with worse neurological outcomes and increased mortality in the EVT arm; this was primarily true among patients with medical indications for GA. Relative risk estimates, though not statistically significant, suggest reduced risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage under local anesthesia. Although the reasons for these associations are not clear, these data support the use of local anesthesia when possible during EVT. URL: http

  10. Large-scale impact cratering on the terrestrial planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieve, R.A.F.

    1982-01-01

    The crater densities on the earth and moon form the basis for a standard flux-time curve that can be used in dating unsampled planetary surfaces and constraining the temporal history of endogenic geologic processes. Abundant evidence is seen not only that impact cratering was an important surface process in planetary history but also that large imapact events produced effects that were crucial in scale. By way of example, it is noted that the formation of multiring basins on the early moon was as important in defining the planetary tectonic framework as plate tectonics is on the earth. Evidence from several planets suggests that the effects of very-large-scale impacts go beyond the simple formation of an impact structure and serve to localize increased endogenic activity over an extended period of geologic time. Even though no longer occurring with the frequency and magnitude of early solar system history, it is noted that large scale impact events continue to affect the local geology of the planets. 92 references

  11. The impact of early stroke on identity: A discourse analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jennifer; McKinlay, Andy; Widdicombe, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which sufferers talk about early stroke and the effects this chronic condition has on identity. Traditional research into chronic illness has largely used medical, psychiatric or cognitive models. We adopt a social constructionist perspective and use a discourse analytic methodology to study data collected via focus group interaction. Analysis of the data collected shows that participants displayed sensitivity about having acquired a potentially 'damaged' sense of self by mitigating negative features of their experiences. Participants also attended to the issue of whether their accounts were persuasive or believable. Some carers were present in these discussions. As a consequence, participants who had suffered a stroke displayed sensitivity to the way that carers might respond to mitigation of the negative aspects of stroke.

  12. The impact of positive, negative and neutral stimuli in a virtual reality cognitive-motor rehabilitation task: a pilot study with stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameirão, Mónica S; Faria, Ana Lúcia; Paulino, Teresa; Alves, Júlio; Bermúdez I Badia, Sergi

    2016-08-09

    Virtual Reality (VR) based methods for stroke rehabilitation have mainly focused on motor rehabilitation, but there is increasing interest in integrating motor and cognitive training to increase similarity to real-world settings. Unfortunately, more research is needed for the definition of which type of content should be used in the design of these tools. One possibility is the use of emotional stimuli, which are known to enhance attentional processes. According to the Socioemotional Selectivity Theory, as people age, the emotional salience arises for positive and neutral, but not for negative stimuli. For this study we developed a cognitive-motor VR task involving attention and short-term memory, and we investigated the impact of using emotional images of varying valence. The task consisted of finding a target image, shown for only two seconds, among fourteen neutral distractors, and selecting it through arm movements. After performing the VR task, a recall task took place and the patients had to identify the target images among a valence-matched number of distractors. Ten stroke patients participated in a within-subjects experiment with three conditions based on the valence of the images: positive, negative and neutral. Eye movements were recorded during VR task performance with an eye tracking system. Our results show decreased attention for negative stimuli in the VR task performance when compared to neutral stimuli. The recall task shows significantly more wrongly identified images (false memories) for negative stimuli than for neutral. Regression and correlation analyses with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Geriatric Depression Scale revealed differential effects of cognitive function and depressive symptomatology in the encoding and recall of positive, negative and neutral images. Further, eye movement data shows reduced search patterns for wrongly selected stimuli containing emotional content. The results of this study suggest that it is feasible

  13. THE IMPACT OF LEFT HEMISPHERE STROKE ON FORCE CONTROL WITH FAMILIAR AND NOVEL OBJECTS: NEUROANATOMIC SUBSTRATES AND RELATIONSHIP TO APRAXIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Amanda M.; Buxbaum, Laurel J.; Duff, Susan V.

    2010-01-01

    Fingertip force scaling for lifting objects frequently occurs in anticipation of finger contact. An ongoing question concerns the types of memories that are used to inform predictive control. Object-specific information such as weight may be stored and retrieved when previously encountered objects are lifted again. Alternatively, visual size and shape cues may provide estimates of object density each time objects are encountered. We reasoned that differences in performance with familiar versus novel objects would provide support for the former possibility. Anticipatory force production with both familiar and novel objects was assessed in 6 left hemisphere stroke patients, 2 of whom exhibited deficient actions with familiar objects (ideomotor apraxia; IMA), along with 5 control subjects. In contrast to healthy controls and stroke participants without IMA, participants with IMA displayed poor anticipatory scaling with familiar objects. However, like the other groups, IMA participants learned to differentiate fingertip forces with repeated lifts of both familiar and novel objects. Finally, there was a significant correlation between damage to the inferior parietal and superior and middle temporal lobes, and impaired anticipatory control for familiar objects. These data support the hypotheses that anticipatory control during lifts of familiar objects in IMA patients are based on object-specific memories, and that the ventro-dorsal stream is involved in the long-term storage of internal models used for anticipatory scaling during object manipulation. PMID:19945445

  14. Is the long form of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale more responsive than the short form in patients with stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chen, Cheng-Te; Chou, Yei-Tai; Shih, Ching-Lin; Koh, Chia-Lin; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-05-01

    To compare the responsiveness of the Rasch-calibrated 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor Scale with that of the 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale at both an individual and a group level. Repeated-measurements design. Medical center. Patients (N=301) 14 days after stroke. Not applicable. 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, and 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale. The patients were assessed with the original 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale 4 times, at 14, 30, 90, and 180 days after stroke onset. The patients' responses were used for estimating the Rasch scores of the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale and 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale. The effect size, standardized response mean, and paired t test were used to compare the group-based responsiveness of the 3 forms (50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale). Individual-level responsiveness was compared based on the significance of change between the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale and 12-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale. Because up to 13 items of the 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale did not meet the Rasch model's assumptions, the significance of change of the 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale was not calculated. At the group level, the FM-37 and FM-12 Fugl-Meyer motor scale had sufficient and similar responsiveness. At the individual level, the FM-37 Fugl-Meyer motor scale detected more patients with significant improvement than the FM-12 Fugl-Meyer motor scale. The SC values and category distribution of the FM-37 Fugl-Meyer motor scale were significantly better than those of the FM-12 Fugl-Meyer motor scale (PFugl-Meyer motor scale was sufficient and very similar to that of the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale, the 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale had better individual-level responsiveness. The 37-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale is suggested as an outcome measure for both clinicians and researchers. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by

  15. Woodrow Wilson's hidden stroke of 1919: the impact of patient-physician confidentiality on United States foreign policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Richard P; Storey, Christopher M; Guthikonda, Bharat; Missios, Symeon; Nanda, Anil; Cooper, John M

    2015-07-01

    World War I catapulted the United States from traditional isolationism to international involvement in a major European conflict. Woodrow Wilson envisaged a permanent American imprint on democracy in world affairs through participation in the League of Nations. Amid these defining events, Wilson suffered a major ischemic stroke on October 2, 1919, which left him incapacitated. What was probably his fourth and most devastating stroke was diagnosed and treated by his friend and personal physician, Admiral Cary Grayson. Grayson, who had tremendous personal and professional loyalty to Wilson, kept the severity of the stroke hidden from Congress, the American people, and even the president himself. During a cabinet briefing, Grayson formally refused to sign a document of disability and was reluctant to address the subject of presidential succession. Wilson was essentially incapacitated and hemiplegic, yet he remained an active president and all messages were relayed directly through his wife, Edith. Patient-physician confidentiality superseded national security amid the backdrop of friendship and political power on the eve of a pivotal juncture in the history of American foreign policy. It was in part because of the absence of Woodrow Wilson's vocal and unwavering support that the United States did not join the League of Nations and distanced itself from the international stage. The League of Nations would later prove powerless without American support and was unable to thwart the rise and advance of Adolf Hitler. Only after World War II did the United States assume its global leadership role and realize Wilson's visionary, yet contentious, groundwork for a Pax Americana. The authors describe Woodrow Wilson's stroke, the historical implications of his health decline, and its impact on United States foreign policy.

  16. Pain in stroke patients: characteristics and impact on the rehabilitation treatment. A multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, I; Briani, C; Pazzaglia, C; Cecchi, F; Negrini, S; Padua, L

    2015-12-01

    Post-stroke pain (PSP) is a common and disabling complication, difficult to treat, that often decreases patients' quality of life (QoL). The hypothesis is that PSP may negatively affect rehabilitation treatment. The aim of this paper was to quantify and characterize pain in a sample of post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation and to investigate the impact of pain in slowing down or discontinuing the rehabilitation program. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Inpatients and outpatients of rehabilitation department. One hundred and six subacute and chronic stroke patients. Pain intensity was measured with the NRS or the PAINAD (if cognitive/language impairment was present); pain characteristics were assessed with the DN4, and NPSI questionnaire. Qol was measured with the SF-36. A clinical assessment and a semi-structured questionnaire on pain occurrence, impact, and management was administered by the physiotherapist in charge of the patients and by the physician. Nearly 1/3 of the patients (32.9%) with normal cognitive functions and language reported pain occurrence after stroke; 81.8% of them had NRS≥3 and 31.8% DN4≥4 (meaning neuropathic origin of pain). In about 20% of the patients the PAINAD was used to measure pain; 17.4% of them presented a score ≥3. In 24.5% of our sample, pain influenced rehabilitation treatment. In 16% of the whole sample, pain influenced patients' attention during rehabilitation session. Patients with hypoesthesia presented significantly higher neuropathic pain scores than patients with normal sensory function. Regarding QoL, we found that patients with higher neuropathic pain showed more severe deterioration of mental aspects of QoL, where patients with higher nociceptive pain presented more severe deterioration of physical aspects of QoL. The results from this multicenter study showed that in about ¼ of the patients, pain negatively influenced the rehabilitation program delaying the recovery and likely increasing the cost of

  17. Impact of Spatial Scales on the Intercomparison of Climate Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wei; Steptoe, Michael; Chang, Zheng; Link, Robert; Clarke, Leon; Maciejewski, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Scenario analysis has been widely applied in climate science to understand the impact of climate change on the future human environment, but intercomparison and similarity analysis of different climate scenarios based on multiple simulation runs remain challenging. Although spatial heterogeneity plays a key role in modeling climate and human systems, little research has been performed to understand the impact of spatial variations and scales on similarity analysis of climate scenarios. To address this issue, the authors developed a geovisual analytics framework that lets users perform similarity analysis of climate scenarios from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) using a hierarchical clustering approach.

  18. A criterion for stability of the motor function of the lower extremity in stroke patients using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman; Vogelaar, T W; Lankhorst, G J; Verbeek, A L

    1996-03-01

    A test-retest reproducibility study was performed to define a criterion for stability as opposed to change of motor function of the lower extremity in stroke patients. Forty-nine patients with stroke were examined twice by the same physiotherapist, using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale. The interval between both measurements was three weeks. The mean differences between the first and the second measurement were small, with 0.04 points for the lower extremity scale and 0.92 points for the balance scale, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient for the lower extremity scale was 0.86, and 0.34 for the balance scale. The standard error of measurement for each scale was 1.76 and 1.17 points, respectively. The standard error of measurement can be transformed in an 'error threshold', which is a criterion to differentiate real changes from changes due to chance variation or measurement error. As the absence of real change is a parameter for stability, a change of less than 5 points for the lower extremity scale and of less than 4 points for balance confirms stability of motor function.

  19. Comparison of 2 extended activities of daily living scales with the Barthel Index and predictors of their outcomes: cohort study within the South London Stroke Register (SLSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Shah-Jalal; Rudd, Anthony G; Douiri, Abdel; Wolfe, Charles D A

    2012-05-01

    Basic activities of daily living measures are often supplemented by extended activities of daily living. We compared the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) with the Barthel Index (BI) in terms of distribution of scores, concurrent validity, reliability, and their agreement and investigated the predictors of scales outcomes. Two hundred thirty-eight patients from the population-based South London Stroke Register were assessed with the BI, FAI, and NEADL 3 months after a first-ever stroke. The pairwise relationship was studied using correlations, fractional polynomial regression, and Bland and Altman plot; the baseline predictors, for example, sociodemography, case severity: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and 7-day Abbreviated Memory Test, comorbidities, and acute treatments by negative binomial regression. The BI was highly affected by a ceiling effect (33% had the highest score), FAI was only affected by floor effect (19%), but NEADL was symmetrical with only 4% highest and lowest score. Despite high concurrent validity of the scales (r ≥0.80, PScale >13) had 28% lower BI (79% lower FAI and 62% lower NEADL) score than nonsevere patients (P≤0.001). Cognitively intact patients (Abbreviated Memory Test: 8-10) had 2.3 times greater FAI values (65% higher NEADL) compared with impaired patients (Pscale was symmetrical, concurrently valid with no floor and ceiling effects. It corresponded better with BI than FAI did confirming its basic activities of daily living properties, yet it is a more sensitive tool for extended activities of daily living without the floor and ceiling effects. Future functional status could be predicted by the acute stage National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, whereas only extended activities of daily living status could be predicted by the Abbreviated Memory Test score. Predicting future functional status at the acute stage may decrease unnecessary length of stay

  20. Testing of materials and scale models for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, A.K.; Satpathi, D.; Schryer, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum Honeycomb and Polyurethane foam specimens were tested to obtain experimental data on the material's behavior under different loading conditions. This paper reports the dynamic tests conducted on the materials and on the design and testing of scale models made out of these open-quotes Impact Limiters,close quotes as they are used in the design of transportation casks. Dynamic tests were conducted on a modified Charpy Impact machine with associated instrumentation, and compared with static test results. A scale model testing setup was designed and used for preliminary tests on models being used by current designers of transportation casks. The paper presents preliminary results of the program. Additional information will be available and reported at the time of presentation of the paper

  1. Proteinuria and clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumai, Y; Kamouchi, M; Hata, J; Ago, T; Kitayama, J; Nakane, H; Sugimori, H; Kitazono, T

    2012-06-12

    The impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke is still not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate how CKD and its components, proteinuria and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), affect the clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke. The study subjects consisted of 3,778 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours of onset from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry. CKD was defined as proteinuria or low eGFR (Stroke Scale during hospitalization), in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score at discharge of 2 to 6). The effects of CKD, proteinuria, and eGFR on these outcomes were evaluated using a multiple logistic regression analysis. CKD was diagnosed in 1,320 patients (34.9%). In the multivariate analyses after adjusting for confounding factors, patients with CKD had significantly higher risks of neurologic deterioration, in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome (p relationship between the eGFR level and each outcome was found. CKD is an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Proteinuria independently contributes to the increased risks of neurologic deterioration, mortality, and poor functional outcome, but the eGFR may not be relevant to these outcomes.

  2. Methodological Choices in Muscle Synergy Analysis Impact Differentiation of Physiological Characteristics Following Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L. Banks

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Muscle synergy analysis (MSA is a mathematical technique that reduces the dimensionality of electromyographic (EMG data. Used increasingly in biomechanics research, MSA requires methodological choices at each stage of the analysis. Differences in methodological steps affect the overall outcome, making it difficult to compare results across studies. We applied MSA to EMG data collected from individuals post-stroke identified as either responders (RES or non-responders (nRES on the basis of a critical post-treatment increase in walking speed. Importantly, no clinical or functional indicators identified differences between the cohort of RES and nRES at baseline. For this exploratory study, we selected the five highest RES and five lowest nRES available from a larger sample. Our goal was to assess how the methodological choices made before, during, and after MSA affect the ability to differentiate two groups with intrinsic physiologic differences based on MSA results. We investigated 30 variations in MSA methodology to determine which choices allowed differentiation of RES from nRES at baseline. Trial-to-trial variability in time-independent synergy vectors (SVs and time-varying neural commands (NCs were measured as a function of: (1 number of synergies computed; (2 EMG normalization method before MSA; (3 whether SVs were held constant across trials or allowed to vary during MSA; and (4 synergy analysis output normalization method after MSA. MSA methodology had a strong effect on our ability to differentiate RES from nRES at baseline. Across all 10 individuals and MSA variations, two synergies were needed to reach an average of 90% variance accounted for (VAF. Based on effect sizes, differences in SV and NC variability between groups were greatest using two synergies with SVs that varied from trial-to-trial. Differences in SV variability were clearest using unit magnitude per trial EMG normalization, while NC variability was less sensitive to EMG

  3. Impact of light rail transit on traffic-related pollution and stroke mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sug; Sener, Ipek Nese

    2017-09-01

    This paper evaluates the changes in vehicle exhaust and stroke mortality for the general public residing in the surrounding area of the light rail transit (LRT) in Houston, Texas, after its opening. The number of daily deaths due to stroke for 2002-2005 from the surrounding area of the original LRT line (exposure group) and the control groups was analyzed using an interrupted time-series analysis. Ambient concentrations of acetylene before and after the opening of LRT were also compared. A statistically significant reduction in the average concentration of acetylene was observed for the exposure sites whereas the reduction was negligible at the control site. Poisson regression models applied to the stroke mortality data indicated a significant reduction in daily stroke mortality after the opening of LRT for the exposure group, while there was either an increase or a considerably smaller reduction for the control groups. The findings support the idea that LRT systems provide health benefits for the general public and that the reduction in motor-vehicle-related air pollution may have contributed to these health benefits.

  4. Assessing Impacts of National Scale Droughts on Cereal Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udmale, P. D.; Ichikawa, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Till date, several drought indices have been developed and used to monitor local to regional scale droughts on various temporal scales. However, there are no generalized criteria to define a threshold to declare a national level drought using drought indices. EM-DAT (a global database on natural and technological disasters) lists disasters (including drought) from 1900 until the present confirming one of the following criteria: 10 or more people dead; 100 or more people affected; the declaration of a state of emergency; or a call for international assistance. This data is gathered from various organizations like United Nations Institutes, Governments, etc. and do not cover all disasters or have political limitations that could affect the numbers. These criteria are neither objective nor quantitative, and accordingly may cause uncertainties when the data is used for further investigation on disaster impacts. Here we present a methodology to define drought at a national scale and its impacts on national level crop production (mainly cereals). We define drought based on the percentage of cropland area affected by drought in a country during its seasonal rainfall. For this purpose meteorological definition of drought in combination with country's cropland area is proposed to prepare a drought inventory for major cereal producing countries (1902-2012). This drought inventory together with FAO's Crop data is used to identify the impacts of drought on a national level cereal production (and yield) using Superposed Epoch Analysis for the period 1961-2012.

  5. Ecohydrological modeling for large-scale environmental impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznicki, Sean A; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Abouali, Mohammad; Herman, Matthew R; Esfahanian, Elaheh; Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Ecohydrological models are frequently used to assess the biological integrity of unsampled streams. These models vary in complexity and scale, and their utility depends on their final application. Tradeoffs are usually made in model scale, where large-scale models are useful for determining broad impacts of human activities on biological conditions, and regional-scale (e.g. watershed or ecoregion) models provide stakeholders greater detail at the individual stream reach level. Given these tradeoffs, the objective of this study was to develop large-scale stream health models with reach level accuracy similar to regional-scale models thereby allowing for impacts assessments and improved decision-making capabilities. To accomplish this, four measures of biological integrity (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera taxa (EPT), Family Index of Biotic Integrity (FIBI), Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), and fish Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI)) were modeled based on four thermal classes (cold, cold-transitional, cool, and warm) of streams that broadly dictate the distribution of aquatic biota in Michigan. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to simulate streamflow and water quality in seven watersheds and the Hydrologic Index Tool was used to calculate 171 ecologically relevant flow regime variables. Unique variables were selected for each thermal class using a Bayesian variable selection method. The variables were then used in development of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) models of EPT, FIBI, HBI, and IBI. ANFIS model accuracy improved when accounting for stream thermal class rather than developing a global model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Large-scale coastal impact induced by a catastrophic storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter N

    Catastrophic storms and storm surges induce rapid and substantial changes along sandy barrier coasts, potentially causing severe environmental and economic damage. Coastal impacts of modern storms are associated with washover deposition, dune erosion, barrier breaching, and coastline and shoreface...... erosion. Little is however known about the impact of major storms and their post-storm coastal recovery on geologic and historic evolution of barrier systems. We apply high-resolution optically stimulated luminescence dating on a barrier system in the Wadden Sea (Denmark) and show that 5 to 8 meters...... of marine sand accumulated in an aggrading-prograding shoal and on a prograding shoreface during and within 3 to 4 decades (“healing phase”) after the most destructive storm documented for the Wadden Sea. Furthermore, we show that the impact of this storm caused large-scale shoreline erosion and barrier...

  7. Differential impact of white matter hyperintensities on long-term outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with large artery atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyoul Baik

    Full Text Available The presence of white matter hyperintensity (WMH is related to poor long-term outcomes in stroke patients. However, the long-term outcome is unknown in patients with both large artery atherosclerosis (LAA and WMH.We investigated the impact of WMH on long-term outcome in patients with LAA. Consecutive patients in a prospective stroke registry were included. Patients were followed for a median of 7.7 years (interquartile range, 5.6-9.7. The degree of WMH was assessed by Fazekas grade on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Total WMH burden was calculated by summation of Fazekas scores in periventricular and deep white matter. Severe WMH was defined as total burden score ≥ 3.Among 2529 patients, 639 patients (25.3% were classified with the LAA subtype. After applying exclusion criteria, the data from 538 patients were analyzed. The mean patient age was 65.7 ± 10.3 years. Severe WMHs were found in 243 patients (45.2%. During follow-up, 200 patients (37.2% died. Cox regression analysis showed that LAA patients with severe WMH had a 1.50-fold (95% CI, 1.12-2.00, p = 0.007 higher death rate compared to those without. In the older age group (≥65 years, Cox regression revealed that patients with severe WMH had a 1.75-fold (95% CI, 1.15-2.65, p = 0.008 higher 5-year death rate, whereas the younger age group did not have this association.The degree of WMH might be a surrogate marker for long-term outcome in patients with LAA. Atherosclerotic burdens in both small and large arteries might impact long-term prognosis in ischemic stroke patients.

  8. Unfulfilled rehabilitation needs and dissatisfaction with care 12 months after a stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tistad, Malin; Tham, Kerstin; von Koch, Lena

    2012-01-01

    a questionnaire. Stroke severity, domains of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC) and socio demographic factors were used as independent variables in four logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Unfulfilled needs for rehabilitation at 12 months were predicted by strength (SIS) (odds......BACKGROUND: People who have suffered a stroke commonly report unfulfilled need for rehabilitation. Using a model of patient satisfaction, we examined characteristics in individuals that at 3 months after stroke predicted, or at 12 months were associated with unmet need for rehabilitation...... or dissatisfaction with health care services at 12 months after stroke. METHODS: The participants (n = 175) received care at the stroke units at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden. The dependent variables "unfulfilled needs for rehabilitation" and "dissatisfaction with care" were collected using...

  9. Participation Changes in Sexual Functioning after Mild Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Lisa M.; Wolf, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which persons with mild stroke experience changes in participation in sexual activity post-stroke. A cross-sectional study was completed with adults 6-18 months post-mild stroke (n = 13); a brief case study was also completed with one of the participants. Participants completed an assessment battery over the phone that included the modified Quality of Sexual Function Scale (QSF), the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The sample reported mild problems with sexual dysfunction (M = 10.77, SD = 4.09). Sexual dysfunction post-stroke was highly correlated (r2 = −.372 to −.875) with all the domains on the SIS. Several of the participants in this study reported that they would have liked more information about sexual functioning following stroke. These findings suggest that individuals with mild stroke are experiencing decreased participation in sexual activities post-stroke and that they would like more information from the health care community on the potential sexual changes. PMID:24652075

  10. Patient-reported measures provide unique insights into motor function after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jill Campbell; Cramer, Steven C

    2013-04-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures have been found useful in many disciplines but have received limited evaluation after stroke. The current study investigated the relationship that patient-reported measures have with standard impairment and disability scales after stroke. Patients with motor deficits after stroke were scored on standard assessments including the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin Scale, and Fugl-Meyer motor scale, and on 2 patient-reported measures, the hand function domain of the Stroke Impact Scale, which documents difficulty of hand motor usage, and the amount of use portion of the Motor Activity Log, which records amount of arm motor usage. The 43 participants had mild disability (median modified Rankin Scale=2), moderate motor deficits (Fugl-Meyer motor scale=46 ± 22), and mild cognitive/language deficits. The 2 patient-reported outcome measures, Stroke Impact Scale and Motor Activity Log, were sensitive to the presence of arm motor deficits. Of 21 patients classified as having minimal or no impairment or disability by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale or modified Rankin Scale (score of 0-1), 15 (71%) reported difficulty with hand movements by the Stroke Impact Scale score or reduced arm use by the Motor Activity Log score. Furthermore, of 14 patients with a normal examination, 10 (71%) reported difficulty with hand movements or reduction in arm use. Patient-reported measures were a unique source of insight into clinical status in the current population. Motor deficits were revealed in a majority of patients classified by standard scales as having minimal or no disability, and in a majority of patients classified as having no deficits.

  11. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  12. [Workplace stress and its impact on the 16-year risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in an open female population aged 25-64 years in Russia/Siberia (WHO MONICA-psychosocial program)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafarov, V V; Panov, D O; Gromova, E A; Gagulin, I V; Gafarova, A V

    2015-01-01

    To determine the impact of workplace stress on the hazard ratio (HR) of myocardial infarction (M) and stroke in an open female population aged 25-64 years in Russia/Siberia (Novosibirsk) for 16 years. A random representative sample of 25-64-year-old women (n=870) residing in a Novosibirsk district was surveyed within the framework of the WHO program. Workplace stress was investigated using the Karasek scale; an attitude towards work and health prophylactic examinations was studied applying the Health Awareness and Attitude questionnaire of the WHO program. For 16 years (1994 to 2010), a cohort of all new cases of MI and stroke was examined employing the WHO program and all possible medical records. The Cox regression model was used to determine HR for MI and stroke in the open female population aged 25-64 years for 16 years. The prevalence of high-level stress in the open female population aged 25-64 years was 31.6%. The high level of job stress was associated with a high responsibility, impossibility to have a rest at the end of a working day, frequent professional dissatisfaction, and a reduced work capacity. During 16 years, the women having high-level job stress showed a 3.22- and 1.96-fold increases in the HR of MI (pstress as managers or manual laborers and having high and low educational attainment. The prevalence of high-level workplace stress was substantial in the open population of 25-64-year-old women in Russia/Siberia (Novosibirsk). The stress-related HR of Ml and stroke was 3-2 times higher than in those without high-level stress. The HR of MI and stroke is affected by a social gradient.

  13. Hierarchical properties of the motor function sections of the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for people after stroke: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, J Lesley; Harmeling-van der Wel, Barbara C

    2008-12-01

    The upper-extremity (UE) and lower-extremity (LE) sections (excluding balance) of the motor function domain of the Fugl-Meyer (FM) assessment scale (a construct referred to here as the FM motor scale) are recognized as a robust part of the scale for use with people after stroke. However, it is frequently criticized as a lengthy and time-consuming measurement tool. The aims of this study were to support a shortened method of administration for the FM motor scale and to provide arguments for the use of a summed score. In pursuit of these aims, the hierarchical properties of both the UE and LE sections of the FM motor scale were investigated. A retrospective analysis of data from 62 people with a previous stroke was performed. Guttman scale analysis considered the hierarchy of items within each subsection and each stage, between subsections and stages, and across all of the scale items (ignoring the stage divisions) of the FM motor scale. For the within-stage and subsection analyses and between-stage and subsection analyses, all of the results met or exceeded the acceptable levels for the coefficient of reproducibility and the coefficient of scalability. When stage divisions were ignored, the coefficient of reproducibility for both extremities was just below acceptable levels. The results support the use of the UE and LE sections of the FM motor scale as a stagewise and subsectionwise hierarchical assessment and outcome measure. This allows the use of a shortened method of administration, which can potentially reduce the time required for scale administration, and appropriate scores can be allocated for untested items, such that a legitimate total summed score can be used. A limitation of this study was that the study population consisted predominantly of older people with such severe disability that they were unable to function independently.

  14. Shrinking cities examined from a shrinking scale – the impact ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban populations continue to increase globally and cities have become the dominant human habitat. However, the growth of cities is not universal. Shrinking cities face decreased income, reduced property values, and decreased tax revenue. Fewer people per unit area creates inefficiencies and higher costs for infrastructure maintenance and the provision of public amenities. However, population losses and economic distress are not equal in all neighborhoods, and in fact are quite heterogeneously distributed across the landscape. Broader statements about the trajectory of a shrinking city may mask underlying differences in economic, cultural, and environmental impacts as well as the ability of some neighborhoods to be resilient and adaptive to economic changes as well as climate change and other environmental stressors. This paper examines the recent impact of population loss in neighborhoods in the Río Piedras watershed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on the provision of ecosystem services, material and energy flows, and ecological impacts, using public data and data collected previously in two household surveys. Using scenarios, we estimate future population changes and their potential positive and negative impacts on the environment and human well-being in these neighborhoods. This paper expands on prior research on shrinking cities by examining the impacts of population loss on urban social-ecological systems at the household and neighborhood scales. The purpose

  15. Excellent test-retest and inter-rater reliability for Tardieu Scale measurements with inertial sensors in elbow flexors of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Winifred D; Horemans, Herwin L D; Brouwer, Betty S; Stam, Henk J

    2011-02-01

    Spasticity is often clinically assessed with the Tardieu Scale, using goniometry to measure the range of motion and angle of catch. However, the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of these measurements have been questioned. Inertial sensors (IS) have been developed to measure orientation in space and are suggested to be a more appropriate tool than goniometry to measure angles in Tardieu Scale measurements. To compare the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of Tardieu Scale scores measured with IS and goniometry. Two physiotherapists performed Tardieu Scale measurements in two sessions, using both goniometry and IS, to quantify spasticity in elbow flexors of 13 stroke patients. For goniometry, test-retest and inter-rater reliability proved to be excellent (ICC 0.86) and fair to good (ICC 0.66), respectively. For IS, both test-retest (ICC 0.76) and inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.84) were excellent. Inertial sensors are reliable and accurate to use in Tardieu Scale measurements to quantify spasticity in the elbow flexors of hemiplegic stroke patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical impacts of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2004-01-01

    The progress of the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the cerebral stroke patients was remarkable, and it became possible to evaluate a brain perfusion or function. Here, we describe about the clinical application of the neuronal tracts and brain perfusion evaluation using 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. The subjects were patients with internal cerebral hemorrhage and major cerebral occlusive diseases. Three dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were accepted to estimate the damages of neurnal tracts. Perfusion weighted images with the contrast medium were performed for a quantitative evaluation. The pyramidal tracts were depicted well with 3DAC imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value generated from DTI can predict the outcome of the motor dysfunction in each patient at early stage. Cerebral blood volume calculated from perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) was correlated with and cerebral vascular reserve capacity. 3.0 Tesla MR imaging may develop in cerebral stroke patients in near future. (author)

  17. Proposal for a New Predictive Scale for Recurrent Risk of Fall in a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Patients with Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Elen Beatriz; Nascimento, Carla; Monteiro, Maiana; Castro, Mayra; Maso, Iara; Campos, Adriana; Marinho, Camila; Barreto-Neto, Nestor J; Lopes, Antônio A; Jesus, Pedro A P; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine risk factors related to the occurrence of falls in stroke patients and to propose a new predictive scale for falls. Demographic and clinical data were collected and the following scales were applied: Barthel Index, Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Subjects were followed prospectively for 2 years for the occurrence of recurrent (≥2) falls. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed and univariable associations were tested using log-rank test. Two separate multivariable models were then used: the first used Cox proportional hazards regression and the second used Poisson regression. In each model, significant associations were considered present with a P value less than .05. We evaluated 150 individuals and the final analysis included 131 patients; the average age of the patients was 55.8 ± 13 years, 52% were women, and the median NIHSS score was 2 (interquartile range = 1-5). Falls occurred in 17% of patients, with a median of 23 months of follow-up (interquartile range = 16-26 months). In the multivariable Cox regression model, only TUG quartile, female gender, and posterior circulation territory involvement remained significant predictors of recurrent falls. We used the predictors from the Cox regression model to propose a new recurrent fall risk scale. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 73%, 95% confidence interval = 62%-83%, P = .001, with 81.3% sensitivity and 41.8% specificity. The new predictive scale for recurrent risk (including TUG, posterior circulation territory involvement, and female gender) is presented as an instrument for monitoring the risk of recurrent falls. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of Rasch Analysis to Evaluate and Refine the Community Balance and Mobility Scale for Use in Ambulatory Community-Dwelling Adults Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Courtney L.; Brouwer, Brenda; Garland, S. Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Background The Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CB&M) is increasingly used to evaluate walking balance following stroke. Objective This study applied Rasch analysis to evaluate and refine the CB&M for use in ambulatory community-dwelling adults following stroke. Methods The CB&M content was linked to task demands and motor skill classifications. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate internal construct validity (structural validity) and refine the CB&M for use with ambulatory community-dwelling adults following stroke. The CB&M data were collected at 3 time points: at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation and at 6 and 12 months postdischarge (N=238). Rasch analysis evaluated scale dimensionality, item and person fit, item response bias, scoring hierarchy, and targeting. Disordered scoring hierarchy was resolved by collapsing scoring categories. Highly correlated and “misfitting” items were removed. Sensitivity to change was evaluated with standardized response means (SRMs) and one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The CB&M was primarily linked to closed body transport task demands. Significant item-trait interaction, disordered scoring hierarchies, and multidimensionality were found. Scoring categories were collapsed in 15/19 items, and 5 misfitting items were removed. The resulting stroke-specific 14-item unidimensional CB&M (CB&MStroke) fit Rasch model expectations, with no item response bias, acceptable targeting (13% floor effects and 0% ceiling effects), and moderate-to-strong sensitivity to change at 6 months postdischarge (SRM=0.63; 95% confidence interval=−1.523, −0.142) and 12 months postdischarge (SRM=0.73; 95% confidence interval=−2.318, −0.760). Limitations Findings are limited to a modest-sized sample of individuals with mild-to-moderate balance impairment following stroke. Conclusions The CB&MStroke shows promise as a clinical scale for measuring change in walking balance in ambulatory community-dwelling adults

  19. Impact of the ASPECT scores and distribution on outcome among patients undergoing thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Vargas, Jan; Hawk, Harris; Turner, Raymond; Chaudry, M Imran; Battenhouse, Holly; Turk, Aquilla S

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates whether the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) quantification is associated with outcome following mechanical thrombectomy. To determine whether preintervention non-perfect ASPECT scores involving cortical or subcortical regions and the side of the non-perfect ASPECT score affects outcomes. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of patients with acute ischemic stroke involving the anterior circulation who underwent thrombectomy between May 2008 and August 2012 at a single tertiary care center. The device for mechanical thrombectomy used was the penumbra aspiration system (Penumbra Inc, Alameda, California, USA) and the Solitaire stent retriever (ev3, Irvine, California, USA). A 'blinded' neuroradiologist obtained ASPECTS quantification and noted each region demonstrating early changes. 149 patients (51.7% female, mean age 66.1±15.1 years) were included with an average National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale of 16.2±6.7. Patients with non-perfect ASPECT scores on pretreatment imaging were more likely to have a hemorrhagic conversion (p=0.04) evident on post-procedure CT. However, functional outcomes were the same. Patients with both cortical and basal ganglia non-perfect ASPECT scores were more likely to be in a persistent vegetative state or expire. No differences were identified in outcome among patients with left- versus right-sided infarcts affecting the basal ganglia or cortical regions. These findings support a strategy of selecting candidacy for thrombectomy that does not exclude patients with non-perfect ASPECT scores involving either the basal ganglia or cortical regions. Outcomes were identical among patients with no non-perfect ASPECT scores and those with cortical or subcortical infarcts, despite a higher incidence of hemorrhagic conversion found among those with non-perfect ASPECT scores. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  20. Impact of Collateral Status Evaluated by Dynamic Computed Tomographic Angiography on Clinical Outcome in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaard, Ido R; Boiten, Jelis; Holswilder, Ghislaine; Algra, Ale; Dippel, Diederik W J; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Wermer, Marieke J H; van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2015-12-01

    Status of collateral circulation is a strong predictor of outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Our aim was to compare the predictive value of strategies for collateral blood flow assessment with dynamic computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and conventional single-phase CT angiography. Patients with a proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion underwent noncontrast CT, single-phase CTA and whole brain CT perfusion/dynamic CTA within 9 hours after stroke onset. We defined poor outcome as a score on the modified Rankin Scale score of ≥3. The association between collateral score and clinical outcome at 3 months was analyzed with Poisson regression. The prognostic value of collateral scoring with dynamic CTA and single-phase CTA in addition to age, stroke severity, and noncontrast CT was assessed with logistic regression and summarized with the area under the curve. Seventy patients were included, with a mean age of 68 years. We observed an increased risk of poor outcome in patients with poor collaterals on single-phase CTA (risk ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.1) and on dynamic CTA (risk ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.7). The prediction of poor clinical outcome by means of collateral adjustment was better with dynamic CTA (area under the curve, 0.84; likelihood ratio test PCollateral assessment with dynamic CTA better predicts clinical outcome at 3 months than single-phase conventional CTA. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg. Unique identifier: NTR1804. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00880113. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [Evaluation on efficacy of Jin's "Sanzhen" therapy combined with rehabilitation training for hemiplegia of stroke patients by Fugl-Meyer scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, De-Xiong; Zhuang, Li-Xing; Zhang, Ying

    2011-06-01

    To assess the therapeutic effect of Jin's "Sanzhen" therapy combined with rehabilitation training on limb-motor function of stroke patients by using Fugl-Meyer scale. A total of 254 hemiplegic stroke outpatients and inpatients from 7 hospitals were randomly divided into Jin's "Sanzhen" (JSZ) group (n = 83), rehabilitation group (n = 84) and combination group (n = 87). Acupuncture was applied to acupoints of Jin's "Sanzhen" including Quchi (LI 11), Waiguan (SJ 5) and Hegu (LI 4); Futu (ST 32). Zusanli (ST 36) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6); etc. The acupuncture needles were retained for 30 min after "Deqi". Rehabilitation training included passive joint movement, standing-sitting training, tapping-pressing stimulation, walking training, etc. The treatment was conducted once daily, 5 sessions a week and for 4 weeks. Fugl-Meyer scale composed of 100-point motor domain of the upper- and lower-extremity sections was used to assess the patients' motor function. On day 28 after the treatment, of the 83.84 and 87 hemiplegic stroke patients in the JSZ, rehabilitation and combination groups, 48 (57.8%), 31 (36.9%) and 50 (57.5%) experienced marked improvement in their clinical symptoms and signs, 26 (31.3%), 44 (52.4%) and 31(35.6%) had an improvement, and 9 (10.8%), 9 (10.7%) and 6 (6.9%) failed in the treatment, with the total effective rates being 89.2%, 89.3% and 93.1%, respectively. The neurological deficit score (NDS) of the combination group was significantly lower than that of the rehabilitation group (P Fugl-Meyer assessment score (FMAS) for extremity motor function of the combination group was apparently higher than those of the JSZ and rehabilitation groups (P 0.05). Jin's "Sanzhen" therapy combined with rehabilitation training can significantly improve the limb motor function of hemiplegic stroke patients, and has a good synergistic effect.

  2. The Impact of Process Scaling on Scratchpad Memory Energy Savings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennion Redd

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scratchpad memories have been shown to reduce power consumption, but the different characteristics of nanometer scale processes, such as increased leakage power, motivate an examination of how the benefits of these memories change with process scaling. Process and application characteristics affect the amount of energy saved by a scratchpad memory. Increases in leakage as a percentage of total power particularly impact applications that rarely access memory. This study examines how the benefits of scratchpad memories have changed in newer processes, based on the measured performance of the WIMS (Wireless Integrated MicroSystems microcontroller implemented in 180- and 65-nm processes and upon simulations of this microcontroller implemented in a 32-nm process. The results demonstrate that scratchpad memories will continue to improve the power dissipation of many applications, given the leakage anticipated in the foreseeable future.

  3. ACUTE STROKE: FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME PREDICTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha; Ramalingam; Vinodkumar; Vasumathi; Valarmathi; Anu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic strokes account for >80% of total stroke events. Biochemical modalities like serum uric acid, ESR, CRP, Serum Fibrinogen will be a low cost and useful way to predict functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The Barthel ADL index it is an ordinal scale helping us to measure performances in ADL-activities in daily living. The present study aims to study the Biochemical parameters Uric Acid, CRP, ESR and Fibrinogen in Ischemic Stroke patients and to assess fu...

  4. Horizontal impact testing of quarter scale flasks using masonry targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufton, E.P.S.

    1985-01-01

    The programme leading up to the Train Crash Demonstration included investigation of flask impacts, in horizontal motion, against masonry targets representing abutment structures. An outline is given of a series of eight tests, of which five are described in detail. All the tests used quarter-scale flasks, and the design and construction of the appropriate brick and stone masonry targets is described. A summary of results is given in terms of damage to the model flask compared with the more severe damage seen in regulatory drop tests. (author)

  5. Technology Scaling Impact on Embedded ADC Design for Telecom Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Andreani, Pietro; Malcovati, Piero

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the impact of technology scaling on the choice of A/D converters in telecom receivers. It is shown that the trend of diminishing feature size, together with better matching of passive components, allows the use of A/D topologies traditionally confined to low......-frequency, medium-resolution applications. The design of a 10 bit 20 MS/s ADC using the successive approximation algorithm is presented in order to validate the presented concepts. By using a deep-submicron technology, the speed of the chosen architecture is pushed to meet the desired output rate....

  6. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  7. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  8. Evaluation of the Family Impact Scale for use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís de Souza Barbosa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to assess the validity and reliability of the Family Impact Scale (FIS applied in Brazilian parents after translations and cultural adaptations to Brazilian Portuguese language and to evaluate the nature and extent to which the family functioning is compromised by the child oral conditions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Parents were recruited from general populations for pre-testing (n=20, validity (n=210 and test-retest reliability (n=20 studies. The children were examined for dental caries, gingivitis, fluorosis and malocclusion. RESULTS: The FIS discriminated among the categories of malocclusion and showed good construct validity. The Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.87 and 0.90, respectively. Almost 20% of the informants reported some family impact `sometimes' or `often/everyday' from the child's oral condition. Impact on FIS domains of this frequency ranged from 13.8% for financial difficulties to 24.4% for parental or family activities. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian Portuguese version of FIS is valid and reliable. The results suggest that child oral conditions have a negative impact on the family. Further research is required, as these findings were based on cross-sectional study and convenience samples.

  9. The combined impact of virtual reality neurorehabilitation and its interfaces on upper extremity functional recovery in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameirão, Mónica S; Badia, Sergi Bermúdez i; Duarte, Esther; Frisoli, Antonio; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2012-10-01

    Although there is strong evidence on the beneficial effects of virtual reality (VR)-based rehabilitation, it is not yet well understood how the different aspects of these systems affect recovery. Consequently, we do not exactly know what features of VR neurorehabilitation systems are decisive in conveying their beneficial effects. To specifically address this issue, we developed 3 different configurations of the same VR-based rehabilitation system, the Rehabilitation Gaming System, using 3 different interface technologies: vision-based tracking, haptics, and a passive exoskeleton. Forty-four patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated to one of the configurations and used the system for 35 minutes a day for 5 days a week during 4 weeks. Our results revealed significant within-subject improvements at most of the standard clinical evaluation scales for all groups. Specifically we observe that the beneficial effects of VR-based training are modulated by the use/nonuse of compensatory movement strategies and the specific sensorimotor contingencies presented to the user, that is, visual feedback versus combined visual haptic feedback. Our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of VR-based neurorehabilitation systems such as the Rehabilitation Gaming System for the treatment of chronic stroke depend on the specific interface systems used. These results have strong implications for the design of future VR rehabilitation strategies that aim at maximizing functional outcomes and their retention. Clinical Trial Registration- This trial was not registered because it is a small clinical study that evaluates the feasibility of prototype devices.

  10. The impact of health-related quality of life on the incidence of ischaemic heart disease and stroke; a cohort study in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjou, Yahya; Kermani-Alghoraishi, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Talaei, Mohammad; Yousefy, Alireza; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Rabiei, Katayoun; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of health-related quality of life (QoL) on the occurrence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke using a validated questionnaire. We followed the 3,283 subjects, aged ≥ 35 years and without history of cardiovascular events (CVE) over four years from 2007 to 2011 from the Isfahan cohort study. The World Health Organization QoL questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), which contains four separate domains, was used to assess QoL. Incidence rates of IHD and stroke were recorded during follow-up. Socioeconomic demographic data including marital state, educational level, occupation, income and place of living and metabolic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), dyslipidaemia, body mass index and smoking were also recorded. More IHD (42%) and stroke (57%) patients were illiterate; while the educational status was significantly different only in the IHD group (P = 0.000). Differences in income and occupation were notable in patients with stroke and IHD, respectively, compared to subjects without them (P stroke patients in comparison with subjects without CVE (P = 0.000). Two-way multivariate analyses of covariance test after age, educational status and metabolic risk factors adjustment showed that subjects with stroke had a significantly higher score in all QoL domains in comparison with individuals without stroke (P 0.050). This study indicates that there is no association between QoL and IHD incidence although there was a significant relationship between higher QoL and incidence of stroke.

  11. The impact of green tea and coffee consumption on the reduced risk of stroke incidence in Japanese population: the Japan public health center-based study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Saito, Isao; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Junko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-05-01

    Few prospective studies have examined the impact of both green tea and coffee consumption on strokes. We investigated the association of the combination of those consumption with stroke incidence in a general population. We studied 82 369 Japanese (aged 45-74 years; without cardiovascular disease [CVD] or cancer in 1995 and 1998 for Cohort I and II, respectively) who received 13 years of mean follow-up through the end of 2007. Green tea and coffee consumption was assessed by self-administered food frequency questionnaire at baseline. In the 1 066 718 person-years of follow-up, we documented the incidence of strokes (n=3425) and coronary heart disease (n=910). Compared with seldom drinking green tea, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all strokes were 0.86 (0.78-0.95) and 0.80 (0.73-0.89) in green tea 2 to 3 and ≥ 4 cups/d, respectively. Higher green tea consumption was associated with inverse risks of CVD and strokes subtypes. Compared with seldom drinking coffee, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all strokes were 0.89 (0.80-0.99), 0.80 (0.72-0.90), and 0.81 (0.72-0.91) for coffee 3 to 6 times/week and 1 and ≥ 2 times/day, respectively. Coffee consumption was associated with an inverse risk of CVD and cerebral infarction. Higher green tea or coffee consumption reduced the risks of CVD and stroke subtypes (especially in intracerebral hemorrhage, P for interaction between green tea and coffee=0.04). None of the significant association was observed in coronary heart disease. Higher green tea and coffee consumption were inversely associated with risk of CVD and stroke in general population.

  12. Modelling the potential impact of a sugar-sweetened beverage tax on stroke mortality, costs and health-adjusted life years in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Manyema

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke poses a growing human and economic burden in South Africa. Excess sugar consumption, especially from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs, has been associated with increased obesity and stroke risk. Research shows that price increases for SSBs can influence consumption and modelling evidence suggests that taxing SSBs has the potential to reduce obesity and related diseases. This study estimates the potential impact of an SSB tax on stroke-related mortality, costs and health-adjusted life years in South Africa. Methods A proportional multi-state life table-based model was constructed in Microsoft Excel (2010. We used consumption data from the 2012 South African National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, previously published own and cross price elasticities of SSBs and energy balance equations to estimate changes in daily energy intake and BMI arising from increased SSB prices. Stroke relative risk, and prevalent years lived with disability estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study and modelled disease epidemiology estimates from a previous study, were used to estimate the effect of the BMI changes on the burden of stroke. Results Our model predicts that an SSB tax may avert approximately 72 000 deaths, 550 000 stroke-related health-adjusted life years and over ZAR5 billion, (USD400 million in health care costs over 20 years (USD296-576 million. Over 20 years, the number of incident stroke cases may be reduced by approximately 85 000 and prevalent cases by about 13 000. Conclusions Fiscal policy has the potential, as part of a multi-faceted approach, to mitigate the growing burden of stroke in South Africa and contribute to the achievement of the target set by the Department of Health to reduce relative premature mortality (less than 60 years from non-communicable diseases by the year 2020.

  13. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  14. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency

    OpenAIRE

    S Kiran; Gopee Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) dwells in a person's overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39) into Kannada, to measure test?retest reliability and internal con...

  15. Predicting sickness impact profile at six months after stroke: further results from the European multi-center CERISE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stummer, C.A.; Verheyden, G.; Putman, K.; Jenni, W.; Schupp, W.; Wit, L. De

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop prognostic models and equations for predicting participation at six months after stroke. METHODS: This European prospective cohort study recruited 532 consecutive patients from four rehabilitation centers. Participation was assessed at six months after stroke with the Sickness

  16. Impact of Insurance Status on Outcomes and Use of Rehabilitation Services in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Findings From Get With The Guidelines-Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xu, Haolin; Smith, Eric E; Suter, Robert; Peterson, Eric D; Xian, Ying; Matsouaka, Roland A; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-11-14

    Insurance status affects access to care, which may affect health outcomes. The objective was to determine whether patients without insurance or with government-sponsored insurance had worse quality of care or in-hospital outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Multivariable logistic regressions with generalized estimating equations stratified by age under or at least 65 years were adjusted for patient demographics and comorbidities, presenting factors, and hospital characteristics to determine differences in in-hospital mortality and postdischarge destination. We included 589 320 ischemic stroke patients treated at 1604 US hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke program between 2012 and 2015. Uninsured patients with hypertension, high cholesterol, or diabetes mellitus were less likely to be taking appropriate control medications prior to stroke, to use an ambulance to arrive to the ED, or to arrive early after symptom onset. Even after adjustment, the uninsured were more likely than the privately insured to die in the hospital (rehab (stroke, time to presentation for acute treatment, access to rehabilitation, and in-hospital mortality differ by patient insurance status. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Minjoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS. They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large cerebral lesions, which are commonly accompanied by a secondary enlargement of the ventricles and atrophy. These structural alterations substantially change the conductivity distribution inside the head, which may have potentially important consequences for both brain stimulation methods. We therefore aimed to characterize the impact of these changes on the spatial distribution of the electric field generated by both TBS methods. In addition to confirming the safety of TBS in the presence of large stroke-related structural changes, our aim was to clarify whether targeted stimulation is still possible. Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative to the lesion were tested. For TDCS, the finite-element method was used to simulate a standard approach with two electrode pads, and the position of one electrode was systematically varied. For both TMS and TDCS, the lesion caused electric field “hot spots” in the cortex. However, these maxima were not substantially stronger than those seen in a healthy control. The electric field pattern induced by TMS was not substantially changed by the lesions. However, the average field strength generated by TDCS was substantially decreased. This effect occurred for both head models and even when both electrodes were distant to the lesion, caused by increased current shunting through the lesion and enlarged ventricles. Judging from the similar peak field strengths compared

  18. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjoli, Sena; Saturnino, Guilherme B; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Stagg, Charlotte J; Siebner, Hartwig R; Antunes, André; Thielscher, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS). They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large cerebral lesions, which are commonly accompanied by a secondary enlargement of the ventricles and atrophy. These structural alterations substantially change the conductivity distribution inside the head, which may have potentially important consequences for both brain stimulation methods. We therefore aimed to characterize the impact of these changes on the spatial distribution of the electric field generated by both TBS methods. In addition to confirming the safety of TBS in the presence of large stroke-related structural changes, our aim was to clarify whether targeted stimulation is still possible. Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative to the lesion were tested. For TDCS, the finite-element method was used to simulate a standard approach with two electrode pads, and the position of one electrode was systematically varied. For both TMS and TDCS, the lesion caused electric field "hot spots" in the cortex. However, these maxima were not substantially stronger than those seen in a healthy control. The electric field pattern induced by TMS was not substantially changed by the lesions. However, the average field strength generated by TDCS was substantially decreased. This effect occurred for both head models and even when both electrodes were distant to the lesion, caused by increased current shunting through the lesion and enlarged ventricles. Judging from the similar peak field strengths compared to the healthy

  19. Case Report: Impact of Botulinum Toxin Injection on Function of Affected Upper Extremity in A Patient, 16 Years after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Amini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Case report Impact of Botulinum Toxin injection on function of affected upper extremity in a patient after 16 years since stroke (CVA. Botulinum toxin injection is one the treatments in spasticity reduction and consequently in recovery of upper limb function in stroke patients. The purpose of this case study is to report the effect of Botulinum toxin injection on upper extremity function after 16 years of stroke. Materials & Methods: The patient was a 63-year-old man who has had a cerebrovascular accident that happened in the left hemisphere about 16 years ago, and as a result, a paresis in dominant hand and arm. Although the patient was able to perform simple movements but he was complaining about the slowness and stiffness in the movements. To treat spasticity the Botulinum toxin type A was used. Injection into selected muscles of hemiparetic upper limb was done by a specialist physician and was between 50-150IU based on specific volume of each muscle. After injection, the patient was monitored for 3 months and at the end of each month, the assessments were reevaluated. During this period, although research team suggested the patient to continue the rehabilitation but for personal reasons he didn’t participate in any treatment and didn`t receive any other antispasmodic medications. Results: An increase in range of motion was seen in all joints but this improvement was not significant. The greatest improvement in passive and active range of motion was seen in Metacarpophalengeal joints. At the end of each month, compared to the first month the recovery of function in upper extremity was significant. Maximum recovery of upper extremity function was related to the hand section of fugl-meyer assessment. At the end of the first month, spasticity significantly decreased so that the patient was able to extend all his joints more easily than before injection. Although spasticity never reached zero. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin injection

  20. Scaling Impacts in Life Support Architecture and Technology Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    For long-duration space missions outside of Earth orbit, reliability considerations will drive higher levels of redundancy and/or on-board spares for life support equipment. Component scaling will be a critical element in minimizing overall launch mass while maintaining an acceptable level of system reliability. Building on an earlier reliability study (AIAA 2012-3491), this paper considers the impact of alternative scaling approaches, including the design of technology assemblies and their individual components to maximum, nominal, survival, or other fractional requirements. The optimal level of life support system closure is evaluated for deep-space missions of varying duration using equivalent system mass (ESM) as the comparative basis. Reliability impacts are included in ESM by estimating the number of component spares required to meet a target system reliability. Common cause failures are included in the analysis. ISS and ISS-derived life support technologies are considered along with selected alternatives. This study focusses on minimizing launch mass, which may be enabling for deep-space missions.

  1. Impact of ankle-foot-orthosis on frontal plane behaviors post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Theresa Hayes; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2009-10-01

    Abnormal within and across-joint synergistic behaviors have been reported in the lower limb post stroke. It is unknown, however, whether these impairments limit adaptive movement strategies in response to imposed kinematic constraints. In this context, the goal of this pilot study was to examine changes to three-dimensional swing phase kinematics of the paretic hip, knee, and ankle joints and pelvis induced by AFO use in subjects with chronic stroke. Overground gait analysis was performed on 9 ambulating hemiplegic subjects with and without their AFOs. Both the toeoff and peak ankle dorsiflexion angles were significantly decreased in the no AFO condition. Likewise, the peak and toeoff swing phase pelvic obliquity angles significantly increased when the AFO was removed (6.47 degrees (2.0 SD) vs. 8.16 degrees (2.8 SD), paired t-tests, p=0.03 and 0.8 degrees (3.1 SD) vs. 2.9 degrees (1.1 SD), paired t-test, p=0.02, respectively). These behaviors were consistent across subjects (7 of 9 subjects). The hip frontal plane, and hip and knee sagittal plane kinematics were unaffected by removal of the AFO. Finally, the minimum toe clearance was not affected by the removal of the AFO (1.39 cm+/-0.62 SD vs. 1.27 cm+/-0.47 SD, p>0.05). Taken together, these findings suggest that pelvic obliquity is the primary compensatory degree of freedom utilized to achieve toe clearance in response to impaired dorsiflexion in the stroke population. We propose that this degree of freedom is exploited as it is not constrained by synergistic torque coupling of the lower limb.

  2. Impacts of Irrigation on Soil Moisture Scaling Properties and Downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, A.; Mascaro, G.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture (θ) exhibits high spatial variability due to the combined effect of natural and anthropogenic factors. Among the latter group, irrigation can introduce significant heterogeneity in the spatial variability of θ, thus modifying the statistical properties typically observed in natural landscapes. This, in turn, can affect the application of downscaling models of coarse satellite θ products based on the hypothesis of spatial homogeneity of θ distribution. In this study, the impact of irrigation on the scale invariance properties of θ and the application of a multifractal downscaling algorithm are analyzed using ground- and aircraft-based θ measurements from the National Airborne Field Experiments 2005 (NAFE05) and 2006 (NAFE06) campaigns conducted in two sites in Australia. After identifying irrigated areas through vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper scenes, we investigate the presence of scale invariance from 32 km to 1 km in three scenarios, including (1) the original θ fields and in cases where θ in irrigated pixels was (2) replaced with missing data or (3) interpolated from neighboring pixels. We found that irrigation has a larger impact on the scale invariance properties in a large and compact agricultural district in the NAFE06 region, while it has a negligible influence on the sparser districts of NAFE05. The θ fields of scenario 3 are then used to calibrate a downscaling model based on spatially-homogeneous multifractal cascades as a function of coarse predictors. The model capability to reproduce the θ variability across scales is assessed by comparing ensembles of disaggregated field with the small-scale θ airborne observations and, for the first time, with ground θ measurements. Model performances are adequate in most cases in both experiments, although some deficiencies are found in regions with a larger presence of irrigated fields, suggesting the need to further refine the technique for detection of

  3. Japanese Adaptation of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39): Comparative Study among Different Types of Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Akane; Kamiya, Kentaro; Tatsumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Makihiko; Horiguchi, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a Japanese version of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39), designated as SAQOL-39-J, and used psychometric methods to examine its acceptability and reliability. The acceptability and reliability of SAQOL-39-J, which was developed from the English version using a standard translation and back-translation method, were examined in 54 aphasia patients using standard psychometric methods. The acceptability and reliability of SAQOL-39-J were then compared among patients with different types of aphasia. SAQOL-39-J showed good acceptability, internal consistency (Cronbach's α score = .90), and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .97). Broca's aphasia patients showed the lowest total scores and communication scores on SAQOL-39-J. The Japanese version of SAQOL-39, SAQOL-39-J, provides acceptable and reliable data in Japanese stroke patients with aphasia. Among different types of aphasia, Broca's aphasia patients had the lowest total and communication SAQOL-39-J scores. Further studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of health care interventions on health-related quality of life in this population. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inter-rater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale as a clinical tool in measurements of post-stroke elbow flexor spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasson, Scott; Mousakhani, Atefeh; Nouriyan, Azam; Omidvar, Zeinab

    2009-01-01

    Patients with neurological conditions may be affected by spasticity. The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) is a clinical tool used to measure spasticity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of the MMAS during the assessment of elbow flexor spasticity in adult patients with post-stroke hemiplegia. Twenty-one adult patients with stroke (5 women, 16 men) with a median age of 60 years (interquartile range, 47-68) were tested. Elbow flexors on the affected side were examined. Inter-rater reliability for two inexperienced raters was very good. The weighted Kappa value was 0.81 (Standard Error = 0.097, 95% CI: 0.62-1.00, p = 0.0002). The weighted percentage agreement was 97.4%. The agreement between raters occurred mostly on score 1 (38.1%) followed by score 0 (23.8%). The MMAS yielded reliable measurements between raters when used on patients post-stroke with elbow flexor spasticity.

  5. Pharmacotherapy prior to and in acute ischaemic stroke. The use of pharmacotherapy and drug-associated outcomes in real world practice - findings from the Polish Hospital Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewada, Maciej; Sarzyńska-Długosz, Iwona Marta; Skowrońska, Marta; Kamiński, Bogumił; Kobayashi, Adam; Członkowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a preventable disease and acute ischaemic stroke can be effectively treated. Specific pharmacotherapy is recommended in either prevention or acute ischemic stroke treatment. We aimed to evaluate the use and the early and late outcomes impact of drugs administered before and in acute ischaemic stroke in a real world practice. Ischaemic stroke patients hospitalized between 1st March 2007 and 29th February 2008 and reported in Polish Hospital Stroke Registry were analysed. Fully anonymous data were collected with standardized, web-based questionnaire with authorized access. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for case-mix and evaluate the impact of drugs used prior to or in acute ischaemic stroke on outcomes. The early outcomes were defined as in-hospital mortality or poor outcome (death or dependency - modified Rankin Scale  3) at hospital discharge, while late outcomes covered one-year survival. A total number of 26 153 ischaemic stroke patients (mean age: 71.8 years; females: 51.6%) was reported. The ana-lysis of pharmacotherapy showed that preventive use of hypo-tensive agents, anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation, antiplatelets and statins is inadequate. Regression models confirmed some expected drug benefits and additionally revealed that antihypertensive drugs or aspirin used prior to stroke and oral anticoagulants or statins used in hospital were associated with better stroke outcome. The prevention of ischaemic stroke needs to be monitored and improved. Evidence-based treatment of acute ischaemic stroke requires further promotion. The benefits of acute ischaemic stroke treatment with statins require to be confirmed in randomized controlled settings.

  6. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, L

    2012-09-27

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  7. Environmental impacts of utility-scale solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R.R.; Easter, S.B.; Murphy-Mariscal, M. L.; Maestre, F.T.; Tavassoli, M.; Allen, E.B.; Barrows, C.W.; Belnap, J.; Ochoa-Hueso, R.; Ravi, S.; Allen, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy is a promising alternative to fossil fuel-based energy, but its development can require a complex set of environmental tradeoffs. A recent increase in solar energy systems, especially large, centralized installations, underscores the urgency of understanding their environmental interactions. Synthesizing literature across numerous disciplines, we review direct and indirect environmental impacts – both beneficial and adverse – of utility-scale solar energy (USSE) development, including impacts on biodiversity, land-use and land-cover change, soils, water resources, and human health. Additionally, we review feedbacks between USSE infrastructure and land-atmosphere interactions and the potential for USSE systems to mitigate climate change. Several characteristics and development strategies of USSE systems have low environmental impacts relative to other energy systems, including other renewables. We show opportunities to increase USSE environmental co-benefits, the permitting and regulatory constraints and opportunities of USSE, and highlight future research directions to better understand the nexus between USSE and the environment. Increasing the environmental compatibility of USSE systems will maximize the efficacy of this key renewable energy source in mitigating climatic and global environmental change.

  8. Renewable biomass energy: Understanding regional scale environmental impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.; Downing, M.

    1993-12-31

    If biomass energy is to become a significant component of the US energy sector, millions of acres of farmland must be converted to energy crops. The environmental implications of this change in land use must be quantitatively evaluated. The land use changes will be largely driven by economic considerations. Farmers will grow energy crops when it is profitable to do so. Thus, models which purport to predict environmental changes induced by energy crop production must take into account those economic features which will influence land use change. In this paper, we present an approach for projecting the probable environmental impacts of growing energy crops at the regional scale. The approach takes into account both economic and environmental factors. We demonstrate the approach by analyzing, at a county-level the probable impact of switchgrass production on erosion, evapotranspiration, nitrate in runoff, and phosphorous fertilizer use in multi-county subregions within the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region. Our results show that the adoption of switchgrass production will have different impacts in each subregion as a result of differences in the initial land use and soil conditions in the subregions. Erosion, evapotranspiration, and nitrate in runoff are projected to decrease in both subregions as switchgrass displaces the current crops. Phosphorous fertilizer applications are likely to increase in one subregion and decrease in the other due to initial differences in the types of conventional crops grown in each subregion. Overall these changes portend an improvement in water quality in the subregions with the increasing adoption of switchgrass.

  9. Impact of thrombophilia on risk of arterial ischemic stroke or cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in neonates and children: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenet, Gili; Lütkhoff, Lisa K.; Albisetti, Manuela; Bernard, Timothy; Bonduel, Mariana; Brandao, Leonardo; Chabrier, Stephane; Chan, Anthony; deVeber, Gabrielle; Fiedler, Barbara; Fullerton, Heather J.; Goldenberg, Neil A.; Grabowski, Eric; Günther, Gudrun; Heller, Christine; Holzhauer, Susanne; Iorio, Alfonso; Journeycake, Janna; Junker, Ralf; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Kurnik, Karin; Lynch, John K.; Male, Christoph; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Mesters, Rolf; Monagle, Paul; van Ommen, C. Heleen; Raffini, Leslie; Rostásy, Kevin; Simioni, Paolo; Sträter, Ronald D.; Young, Guy; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of thrombophilia on risk of first childhood stroke through a meta-analysis of published observational studies. A systematic search of electronic databases (Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library) for studies published

  10. Validation of the RRE-90 Scale to Predict Stroke Risk after Transient Symptoms with Infarction: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Song

    Full Text Available The risk of stroke after a transient ischemic attack (TIA for patients with a positive diffusion-weighted image (DWI, i.e., transient symptoms with infarction (TSI, is much higher than for those with a negative DWI. The aim of this study was to validate the predictive value of a web-based recurrence risk estimator (RRE; http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/RRE/ of TSI.Data from the prospective hospital-based TIA database of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University were analyzed. The RRE and ABCD2 scores were calculated within 7 days of symptom onset. The predictive outcome was ischemic stroke occurrence at 90 days. The receiver-operating characteristics curves were plotted, and the predictive value of the two models was assessed by computing the C statistics.A total of 221 eligible patients were prospectively enrolled, of whom 46 (20.81% experienced a stroke within 90 days. The 90-day stroke risk in high-risk TSI patients (RRE ≥4 was 3.406-fold greater than in those at low risk (P <0.001. The C statistic of RRE (0.681; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.592-0.771 was statistically higher than that of ABCD2 score (0.546; 95% CI, 0.454-0.638; Z = 2.115; P = 0.0344 at 90 days.The RRE score had a higher predictive value than the ABCD2 score for assessing the 90-day risk of stroke after TSI.

  11. Stroke awareness decreases prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed arrival at hospital is one of the major obstacles in enhancing the rate of thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Our study aimed to investigate factors associated with prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in Korea. Methods A prospective, multicenter study was conducted at 14 tertiary hospitals in Korea from March 2009 to July 2009. We interviewed 500 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 48 hours. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors influencing prehospital delay. Results Among the 500 patients (median 67 years, 62% men, the median time interval from symptom onset to arrival was 474 minutes (interquartile range, 170-1313. Early arrival within 3 hours of symptom onset was significantly associated with the following factors: high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, previous stroke, atrial fibrillation, use of ambulance, knowledge about thrombolysis and awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke (OR 4.438, 95% CI 2.669-7.381, knowledge about thrombolysis (OR 2.002, 95% CI 1.104-3.633 and use of ambulance (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.176-3.270 were significantly associated with early arrival. Conclusions In Korea, stroke awareness not only on the part of patients, but also of bystanders, had a great impact on early arrival at hospital. To increase the rate of thrombolysis therapy and the incidence of favorable outcomes, extensive general public education including how to recognize stroke symptoms would be important.

  12. Towards an objective assessment of motor function in sub-acute stroke patients: Relationship between clinical rating scales and instrumental gait stability indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, P; Mazzoli, D; Stagni, R

    2018-01-01

    The assessment of walking function alterations is a key issue to design effective rehabilitative interventions in sub-acute stroke patients. Nevertheless, the objective quantification of these alterations remains a challenge. Clinical rating scales are commonly used in clinical practice, but have been proven prone to errors associated to the evaluator subjective perception. On the other hand, instrumental measurement of trunk acceleration can be exploited for an objective quantitative characterization of gait function, but it is not applied in routine clinical practice, because the resulting quantitative indexes have not been related to the clinically information, conventionally provided by the rating scales. To overcome this limitation, the relationship between the indexes, in specific clinical conditions, and rating scale must be better investigated, to support their exploitability in the clinical practice as a fast and reliable screening tool. Thirty-one sub-acute stroke patients (17 with and 14 without cane) participated in the study. All were assessed with 6 rating scales (MI, TCT, MRI, FAC, WHS, CIRS) and 2 functional tests (2MWT and TUG). Sample Entropy (SEN) and Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) in AP, ML and V directions were calculated over 2MWT and walking section of TUG. The influence of assessment task and cane was analysed, as well as correlation of SEN and RQA indexes with clinical rating scales. SEN and RQA on the medio-lateral plane resulted influenced by the use of the cane, while the correlations between indexes and clinical scales showed that SEN and RQA for antero-posterior direction correlate positively with WHS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. EI Scale: an environmental impact assessment scale related to the construction materials used in the reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Morales

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to create EI Scal, an environmental impact assessment scal, related to construction materials used in the reinforced concrete structure production. The main reason for that was based on the need to classify the environmental impact levels through indicators to assess the damage level process. The scale allowed converting information to estimate the environmental impact caused. Indicators were defined trough the requirements and classification criteria of impact aspects considering the eco-design theory. Moreover, the scale allowed classifying the materials and processes environmental impact through four score categories which resulted in a single final impact score. It was concluded that the EI scale could be cheap, accessible, and relevant tool for environmental impact controlling and reduction, allowing the planning and material specification to minimize the construction negative effects caused in the environment.

  14. Violent breaking wave impacts. Part 3. Effects of scale and aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Bullock, G. N.; Hogg, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    . The Bagnold-Mitsuyasu scaling law for the compression of an air pocket by a piston of incompressible water is rederived and generalised to 3D air pockets of arbitrary shape. Numerical results for wall pressure, force and impulse are then presented for a flip-through impact, a low-aeration impact and a high......The effects of scale and aeration on violent breaking wave impacts with trapped and entrained air are investigated both analytically and numerically. By dimensional analysis we show that the impact pressures for Froude scaled conditions prior to the impact depend on the scale and aeration level......-aeration impact, for nine scales and five levels of initial aeration. Two of these impact types trap a pocket of air at the wall. Among the findings of the paper is that for fixed initial aeration, impact pressures from the flip-through impact broadly follow Froude scaling. This is also the case for the two...

  15. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  16. Small-scale wind power design, analysis, and environmental impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, John P

    2014-01-01

    In today's world, clean and robust energy sources are being sought to provide power to residences, commercial operations, and manufacturing enterprises. Among the most appealing energy sources is wind power-with its high reliability and low environmental impact. Wind power's rapid penetration into markets throughout the world has taken many forms, and this book discusses the types of wind power, as well as the appropriate decisions that need to be made regarding wind power design, testing, installation, and analysis. Inside, the authors detail the design of various small-wind systems including horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) and vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs). The design of wind turbines takes advantage of many avenues of investigation, all of which are included in the book. Analytical methods that have been developed over the past few decades are major methods used for design. Alternatively, experimentation (typically using scaled models in wind tunnels) and numerical simulation (using modern comp...

  17. Impact of Scattering Model on Disdrometer Derived Attenuation Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael; Luini, Lorenzo; Nessel, James; Riva, Carlo (Compiler)

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) are currently entering the third year of a joint propagation study in Milan, Italy utilizing the 20 and 40 GHz beacons of the Alphasat TDP5 Aldo Paraboni scientific payload. The Ka- and Q-band beacon receivers were installed at the POLIMI campus in June of 2014 and provide direct measurements of signal attenuation at each frequency. Collocated weather instrumentation provides concurrent measurement of atmospheric conditions at the receiver; included among these weather instruments is a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (optical disdrometer) which records droplet size distributions (DSD) and droplet velocity distributions (DVD) during precipitation events. This information can be used to derive the specific attenuation at frequencies of interest and thereby scale measured attenuation data from one frequency to another. Given the ability to both predict the 40 GHz attenuation from the disdrometer and the 20 GHz timeseries as well as to directly measure the 40 GHz attenuation with the beacon receiver, the Milan terminal is uniquely able to assess these scaling techniques and refine the methods used to infer attenuation from disdrometer data.In order to derive specific attenuation from the DSD, the forward scattering coefficient must be computed. In previous work, this has been done using the Mie scattering model, however, this assumes a spherical droplet shape. The primary goal of this analysis is to assess the impact of the scattering model and droplet shape on disdrometer derived attenuation predictions by comparing the use of the Mie scattering model to the use of the T-matrix method, which does not assume a spherical droplet. In particular, this paper will investigate the impact of these two scattering approaches on the error of the resulting predictions as well as on the relationship between prediction error and rain rate.

  18. Associations Between Collateral Status and Thrombus Characteristics and Their Impact in Anterior Circulation Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Heitor C; Treurniet, Kilian M; Dutra, Bruna G; Jansen, Ivo G H; Boers, Anna M M; Santos, Emilie M M; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Dippel, Diederik W J; van der Lugt, Aad; van Zwam, Wim H; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Lingsma, Hester F; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Yoo, Albert J; Marquering, Henk A; Majoie, Charles B L M

    2018-02-01

    Thrombus characteristics and collateral score are associated with functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. It has been suggested that they affect each other. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between clot burden score, thrombus perviousness, and collateral score and to determine whether collateral score influences the association of thrombus characteristics with functional outcome. Patients with baseline thin-slice noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography images from the MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands) were included (n=195). Collateral score and clot burden scores were determined on baseline computed tomographic angiography. Thrombus attenuation increase was determined by comparing thrombus density on noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography using a semiautomated method. The association of collateral score with clot burden score and thrombus attenuation increase was evaluated with linear regression. Mediation and effect modification analyses were used to assess the influence of collateral score on the association of clot burden score and thrombus attenuation increase with functional outcome. A higher clot burden score (B=0.063; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.118) and a higher thrombus attenuation increase (B=0.014; 95% confidence interval, 0.003-0.026) were associated with higher collateral score. Collateral score mediated the association of clot burden score with functional outcome. The association between thrombus attenuation increase and functional outcome was modified by the collateral score, and this association was stronger in patients with moderate and good collaterals. Patients with lower thrombus burden and higher thrombus perviousness scores had higher collateral score. The positive effect of thrombus perviousness on clinical outcome was only present in patients with

  19. ENSO impacts on flood risk at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Philip; Dettinger, Michael; Jongman, Brenden; Kummu, Matti; Winsemius, Hessel

    2014-05-01

    We present the impacts of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on society and the economy, via relationships between ENSO and the hydrological cycle. We also discuss ways in which this knowledge can be used in disaster risk management and risk reduction. This contribution provides the most recent results of an ongoing 4-year collaborative research initiative to assess and map the impacts of large scale interannual climate variability on flood hazard and risk at the global scale. We have examined anomalies in flood risk between ENSO phases, whereby flood risk is expressed in terms of indicators such as: annual expected damage; annual expected affected population; annual expected affected Gross Domestic Product (GDP). We show that large anomalies in flood risk occur during El Niño or La Niña years in basins covering large parts of the Earth's surface. These anomalies reach statistical significance river basins covering almost two-thirds of the Earth's surface. Particularly strong anomalies exist in southern Africa, parts of western Africa, Australia, parts of Central Eurasia (especially for El Niño), the western USA (especially La Niña anomalies), and parts of South America. We relate these anomalies to possible causal relationships between ENSO and flood hazard, using both modelled and observed data on flood occurrence and extremity. The implications for flood risk management are many-fold. In those regions where disaster risk is strongly influenced by ENSO, the potential predictably of ENSO could be used to develop probabilistic flood risk projections with lead times up to several seasons. Such data could be used by the insurance industry in managing risk portfolios and by multinational companies for assessing the robustness of their supply chains to potential flood-related interruptions. Seasonal forecasts of ENSO influence of peak flows could also allow for improved flood early warning and regulation by dam operators, which could also reduce overall risks

  20. Determinants of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Wang

    Full Text Available Fatigue after stroke is common and has a negative impact on rehabilitation and survival. However, its pathogenesis and contributing factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the occurrence of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke in acute phase.We examined 265 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase (within 2 weeks in two tertiary stroke care hospitals in Henan, China. We documented patients' demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires and reviews of medical records. Post-stroke fatigue was defined as a score of ≥4 using the Fatigue Severity Scale. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine post-stroke fatigue in relation to socio-demographic, lifestyle, clinical characteristics and family function.About 40% first-ever ischemic stroke patients experienced post-stroke fatigue in acute phase. Post-stroke fatigue was associated with lack of exercise before stroke (adjusted odds ratio 4.01, 95% CI 1.95-8.24, family dysfunction (2.63, 1.20-5.80, depression (2.39, 1.02-5.58, the presence of pre-stroke fatigue (4.89, 2.13-11.21, use of sedative medications (4.14, 1.58-10.88, coronary heart disease (3.38, 1.46-7.79 and more severe Modified Rankin Scale (2.55, 1.65-3.95.The causes of post-stroke fatigue are multifaceted. More physical exercise, improving family function, reducing depression and appropriate use of sedative medications may be helpful in preventing post-stroke fatigue.

  1. The relation between Ashworth scale scores and the excitability of the alpha motor neurones in patients with post-stroke muscle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, A M O; Maynard, V A; Curnow, J; Hudson, N; Kodapala, S

    2003-05-01

    The modified Ashworth scale (MAS) is the most widely used method for assessing muscle spasticity in clinical practice and research. However, the validity of this scale has been challenged. To compare the MAS with objective neurophysiological tests of spasticity. The MAS was recorded in patients with post-stroke lower limb muscle spasticity and correlated with the excitability of the alpha motor neurones. The latter was evaluated by measuring the latency of the Hoffmann reflex (H reflex) and the ratio of the amplitude of the maximum H reflex (H(max)) to that of the compound action motor potential of the soleus muscle (M(max)). Data on 24 randomly recruited patients were analysed. Patients were divided into two groups according to their MAS score: 14 had a MAS score of 1 (group A) and 10 scored 2 (group B). The two groups were comparable with respect to age and sex, but in group A there was a longer period since the stroke. The H reflex latency was reduced and the H(max):M(max) ratio was increased in both groups. The H(max):M(max) ratio values were higher for group B but the differences were not statistically significant. There is a relation between the MAS scores and alpha motor neurone excitability, although it is not linear. This suggests that the MAS measures muscle hypertonia rather than spasticity.

  2. EI Scale: an environmental impact assessment scale related to the construction materials used in the reinforced concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Gilson Morales; Antonio Edésio Jungles; Sheila Elisa Scheidemantel Klein; Juliana Guarda

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to create EI Scal, an environmental impact assessment scal, related to construction materials used in the reinforced concrete structure production. The main reason for that was based on the need to classify the environmental impact levels through indicators to assess the damage level process. The scale allowed converting information to estimate the environmental impact caused. Indicators were defined trough the requirements and classification criteria of impact aspects consid...

  3. Environmental Impacts of Large Scale Biochar Application Through Spatial Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, I.; Archontoulis, S.

    2017-12-01

    In an effort to study the environmental (emissions, soil quality) and production (yield) impacts of biochar application at regional scales we coupled the APSIM-Biochar model with the pSIMS parallel platform. So far the majority of biochar research has been concentrated on lab to field studies to advance scientific knowledge. Regional scale assessments are highly needed to assist decision making. The overall objective of this simulation study was to identify areas in the USA that have the most gain environmentally from biochar's application, as well as areas which our model predicts a notable yield increase due to the addition of biochar. We present the modifications in both APSIM biochar and pSIMS components that were necessary to facilitate these large scale model runs across several regions in the United States at a resolution of 5 arcminutes. This study uses the AgMERRA global climate data set (1980-2010) and the Global Soil Dataset for Earth Systems modeling as a basis for creating its simulations, as well as local management operations for maize and soybean cropping systems and different biochar application rates. The regional scale simulation analysis is in progress. Preliminary results showed that the model predicts that high quality soils (particularly those common to Iowa cropping systems) do not receive much, if any, production benefit from biochar. However, soils with low soil organic matter ( 0.5%) do get a noteworthy yield increase of around 5-10% in the best cases. We also found N2O emissions to be spatial and temporal specific; increase in some areas and decrease in some other areas due to biochar application. In contrast, we found increases in soil organic carbon and plant available water in all soils (top 30 cm) due to biochar application. The magnitude of these increases (% change from the control) were larger in soil with low organic matter (below 1.5%) and smaller in soils with high organic matter (above 3%) and also dependent on biochar

  4. Post-stroke Fatigue is an Independent Predictor of Post-stroke Disability and Burden of Care: A Path analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandliya, Alok; Das, Abhijit; Unnikrishnan, J P; Amal, M G; Sarma, P Sankara; Sylaja, P N

    2016-02-01

    Post-stroke fatigue (PSF) is a common and one of the most distressing symptoms in stroke survivors. However, little is known about the relationship between severity of fatigue and the overall impact it has on post-stroke disability and burden of care. We aimed to examine the role of PSF in post-stroke disability and burden of care among stroke survivors after their first-ever stroke. We prospectively recruited 163 subjects (35 females) from patients examined consecutively in a tertiary stroke care center in India, after their first-ever ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (>3 months after event). In addition to demographic and clinical characteristics, the following assessments were done - SF-36 vitality domain (fatigue), Modified Rankin Scale (functional recovery), Hospital anxiety and depression scale (depression), Functional independence measure (disability and burden of care). We used path analysis to identify a model that will capture the interactions of fatigue, depression, and degree of functional recovery in stroke survivors. The severity of PSF positively correlated with the severity of disability and PSF had significant contribution to disability over and above functional recovery and depression, with all three factors accounting for 43% of the variance. Among the four models that were proposed to explore these relationships, the best fitting model showed that the effect of PSF is mediated through both the direct effect of fatigue on disability and through its interaction with depression, which remained a separate contributor to post-stroke disability and burden of care. PSF, therefore, is an important determinant of post-stroke disability and should be evaluated for successful post-stroke rehabilitation.

  5. Watershed scale impacts of bioenergy, landscape changes, and ecosystem response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, Indrajeet; Cibin, Raj; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2013-04-01

    loading at watershed outlet were reduced with bioenergy scenarios except for stover removal scenarios with reduction ranging between 2.4% to 30.5%. Based on the simulation results for different bioenergy crop production scenario, we have also developed a multi-level spatial optimization framework (MLSOPT) to optimize production of food and energy crops under various sustainability objective functions. The method works in two levels, first level divides large watershed into small subareas and optimum solutions for individually for these subareas are identified. The second level uses these optimum solutions from the first level to identify watershed scale optimum solutions. The framework is tested with a complex spatial optimization case study designed to maximize crop residue (corn stover) harvest with minimum environmental impacts in a 2000 km2 watershed, located in Indiana, USA. In this presentation, results related to optimize sustainability of bioenergy crops will also be discussed.

  6. Validity and reliability of a Nigerian-Yoruba version of the stroke-specific quality of life scale 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetunde, Marufat Oluyemisi; Akinpelu, Aderonke Omobonike; Odole, Adesola Christiana

    2017-10-19

    Psychometric evidence is necessary to establish scientific integrity and clinical usefulness of translations and cultural adaptations of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life (SS-QoL) scale. However, the limited evidence on psychometrics of Yoruba version of SS-QoL 2.0 (SS-QoL(Y)) is a significant shortcoming. This study assessed the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, convergent, divergent, discriminant and known-group validity of the SS-QoL(Y). Yoruba version of the WHOQoL-BREF was used to test the convergent and divergent validity of the SS-QoL(Y) among 100 consenting stroke survivors. The WHOQoL-BREF and SS-QoL(Y) was administered randomly in order to eliminate bias. The test-retest reliability of the SS-QoL(Y) was carried out among 68 of the respondents within an interval of 7 days. All respondents were purposively recruited from selected secondary and tertiary health facilities in South-west Nigeria. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics of mean and standard deviation, and inferential statistics of Spearman correlation, Cronbach's alpha, Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC), Independent t-test and One-way ANOVA. Alpha level was set at p validity of SS-QoL(Y) showed that items' r value ranged from 0.711 to 0.920 with their hypothesized domains. The scale demonstrated moderate to strong test-retest reliability with Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for the domains and overall scores (r = 0.47 to 0.81) and moderate to high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha =0.61 to 0.82) for domains scores. These correlations were also significant for the domains and overall scores (p validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Yoruba version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life 2.0 are adequate while the convergent and divergent validity are low but acceptable. The SS-QoL(Y) is recommended for assessing health-related quality of life among Yoruba stroke survivors.

  7. Impact of the New American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Definition of Stroke on the Results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kasab, Sami; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. We also compared the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in both treatment groups. By considering CITS as equivalent to stroke, the number of primary end points increased from 34 to 43 in the medical group and from 52 to 66 in the stenting group of SAMMPRIS. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary end points in the 2 groups were significantly different (P = .009). The percentage of patients with reported TIAs who underwent brain MRI was 69% in the medical group and 61% in the stenting group (P = .40). Using the AHA/ASA definition of stroke resulted in a substantially higher primary end point rate in both treatment groups and an even higher benefit from medical therapy over stenting than originally shown in SAMMPRIS. The higher rate of CITS in the stenting group was not due to ascertainment bias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A Comparison of Crater-Size Scaling and Ejection-Speed Scaling During Experimental Impacts in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Cintala, M. J.; Johnson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Non-dimensional scaling relationships are used to understand various cratering processes including final crater sizes and the excavation of material from a growing crater. The principal assumption behind these scaling relationships is that these processes depend on a combination of the projectile's characteristics, namely its diameter, density, and impact speed. This simplifies the impact event into a single point-source. So long as the process of interest is beyond a few projectile radii from the impact point, the point-source assumption holds. These assumptions can be tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are controlled and resulting processes measured directly. In this contribution, we continue our exploration of the congruence between crater-size scaling and ejection-speed scaling relationships. In particular, we examine a series of experimental suites in which the projectile diameter and average grain size of the target are varied.

  9. Postural alignment is altered in people with chronic stroke and related to motor and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Geert; Ruesen, Carolien; Gorissen, Monique; Brumby, Victoria; Moran, Rachel; Burnett, Malcolm; Ashburn, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Trunk control is impaired after stroke but little is known about how changes in posture relate to other deficits. We examined spinal postural alignment in people with chronic stroke and explored the relationship between postural alignment and clinical measures. Twenty-one subjects with stroke and 22 age-matched healthy comparison subjects participated in this observational, cross-sectional study. Data collection included measurements of thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and overall postural alignment in the sagittal plane in both sitting and standing. Measurements were made in different postures, including: upright, flexed forward, and extended backward. Clinical outcome measures included the Trunk Impairment Scale and its subscales, Fugl-Meyer Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Barthel Index, and Stroke Impact Scale. Significant deviations in postural alignment for participants with stroke compared with comparison subjects were apparent in sacral alignment (P Scale (r = -0.61) and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.64). Participants with greater anterior pelvic tilt when flexed forward and more overall inclination when flexed forward and extended backward scored better on the Trunk Impairment Scale, its subscales, and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.6-0.7). People with chronic stroke have altered postural alignment in standing compared with subjects without neurological deficits. Investigating interventions focusing on increasing anterior and posterior pelvic tilt seem warranted.Video Abstract available. See video (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A76) for more insights from the authors.

  10. The Socio‑economic Impact of Stroke on Households in Livingstone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The social impacts on the victim were depression, difficult to get along with, resentfulness, apathy, needy, separation, divorce, general marital problems, neglect on the part of the victim and fear. The economic impacts were loss of employment, reduced business activity and loss of business on the part of the victim.

  11. Psychometric evaluation of the Signs of Depression Scale with a revised scoring mechanism in stroke patients with communicative impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Mariska J; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M.; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate (1) the diagnostic value of the Signs of Depression Scale (SODS) in a Likert scale format and (2) whether the Likert scale improves the diagnostic value compared with the original dichotomous scale. Design: Cross-sectional multicentre study. Setting: One general and one

  12. From catchment scale hydrologic processes to numerical models and robust predictions of climate change impacts at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, T.

    2017-12-01

    Current societal problems and questions demand that we increasingly build hydrologic models for regional or even continental scale assessment of global change impacts. Such models offer new opportunities for scientific advancement, for example by enabling comparative hydrology or connectivity studies, and for improved support of water management decision, since we might better understand regional impacts on water resources from large scale phenomena such as droughts. On the other hand, we are faced with epistemic uncertainties when we move up in scale. The term epistemic uncertainty describes those uncertainties that are not well determined by historical observations. This lack of determination can be because the future is not like the past (e.g. due to climate change), because the historical data is unreliable (e.g. because it is imperfectly recorded from proxies or missing), or because it is scarce (either because measurements are not available at the right scale or there is no observation network available at all). In this talk I will explore: (1) how we might build a bridge between what we have learned about catchment scale processes and hydrologic model development and evaluation at larger scales. (2) How we can understand the impact of epistemic uncertainty in large scale hydrologic models. And (3) how we might utilize large scale hydrologic predictions to understand climate change impacts, e.g. on infectious disease risk.

  13. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  14. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  15. Participation in everyday life and life satisfaction in persons with stroke and their caregivers 3-6 months after onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Aileen L; von Koch, Lena; Andersson, Magnus; Tham, Kerstin; Eriksson, Gunilla

    2015-06-01

    To explore and describe persons with stroke and their caregivers' restrictions in participation in everyday occupations, i.e. occupational gaps, 3-6 months post-stroke, in relation to life satisfaction, combined life satisfaction, care-giver burden, perceived impact of stroke, and activities of daily living. Cross-sectional study. Persons with stroke and their caregivers (105 dyads). The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, Caregiver Burden Scale, Stroke Impact Scale and Barthel Index were used. Correlations were analysed with Spearman's rank, and regression analyses used life satisfaction as the dependent variable. At least one person in 86% of the dyads perceived restrictions in participation, with the most common gap in travelling for pleasure. Correlations were low between the numbers of occupational gaps and life satisfaction (R = -0.33, R = -0.31); however, life satisfaction accounted for occupational gaps both for persons with stroke and for caregivers. A greater number of occupational gaps were perceived in the dyads with combined low levels of life satisfaction compared with those with combined high levels of life satisfaction. Participation in everyday occupations is related to life satisfaction even for caregivers of persons with stroke. The results of this study add to our knowledge about the stroke-caregiver dyad and will help to inform family-centred approaches within stroke rehabilitation.

  16. Etiologic Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Şule Özer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke in people aged less than 45 years is less frequent than in older patients, but has major impacts on both the individual and society. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic subtypes of acute ischemic stroke in the young. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 619 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and November 2014. Acute ischemic stroke in the young was defined as patients aged 45 years and under. Demographic data, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at admission and detailed investigations aimed at determining etiologic cause were recorded. Etiologic stroke subtypes were determined using the automated Causative Classification System. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores were recorded in the follow-up. Results: There were 32 (5.2% young patients with acute ischemic stroke. The rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and coronary artery disease were significantly lower in young patients compared with patients aged more than 45 years (p<0.05. The mean NIHSS score at admission and hospital mortality was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p=0.006, p=0.043. Cardioaortic embolism was the most common etiologic stroke subtype in both groups. Other causes were significantly more frequent in the young acute ischemic stroke group compared with the older patients. The median follow-up mRS was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p<0.001. Conclusion: Young patients with ischemic stroke have different risk factors, stroke etiology, stroke severity and prognosis compared with patients older than 45 years with the same condition

  17. The impact of low hemoglobin levels and transfusion on critical care patients with severe ischemic stroke: STroke: RelevAnt Impact of HemoGlobin, Hematocrit and Transfusion (STRAIGHT)--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellert, L; Schrader, F; Ringleb, P; Steiner, T; Bösel, J

    2014-04-01

    Optimal management of hemoglobin (Hb) and red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) in neurologic intensive care unit (NICU) patients has not been determined yet. Here we aimed to investigate the impact of anemia and transfusion activity in patients who had acute ischemic stroke. A retrospective analysis of clinical, laboratory, and outcome data of patients with severe acute ischemic stroke treated on our NICU between 2004 and 2011 was performed. Of 109 patients, 97.2% developed anemia and 33% received RBCT. Significant correlations were found between NICU length of stay (NICU LOS) and lowest (nadir) Hb (correlation coefficient, -0.42, P hematocrit (Hct; -0.43, P < .001), and Hct decrease (0.51, P < .001). Duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) was strongly associated with both nadir Hb (-0.41, P < .001) and decrease (0.42, P < .001) and nadir Hct (-0.43, P < .001) and decrease (0.40, P < .001). Red blood cell transfusion correlated with NICU LOS (0.33, P < .001) and with duration of MV (0.40, P < .001). None of these hematologic parameters correlated with in-hospital mortality or 90-day outcome. The linear regression model showed number of RBCT (0.29, P = .008), nadir Hb (-0.18, P = .049), Hb decrease (0.33, P < .001), nadir Hct (-0.18, P = .03), and Hct decrease (0.29, P < .001) to be independent predictors of NICU LOS. Duration of MV was also independently predicted by number of RBC transfusions (0.29, P < .001), nadir Hb (-0.20, P = .02), Hb decrease (0.25, P = .002), nadir Hct (-0.21, P = .015), and Hct decrease (0.26, P < .001). Low and further decreasing Hb and Hct levels as well as RBCT activity are associated with prolonged NICU stay and duration of MV but not with mortality or long-term outcome. Our findings do not justify using a more aggressive transfusion practice at present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of metabolic syndrome on the prognosis of ischemic stroke secondary to symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in Chinese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghua Mi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze the effect of metabolic syndrome (MetS on prognosis of ischemic stroke secondary to intracranial stenosis in Chinese patients. METHODS: A prospective cohort of 701 patients with ischemic stroke, caused by intracranial stenosis, were followed at 3-month intervals for 1 year to monitor development of recurrent stroke or death. Imaging was performed using magnetic resonance angiography. MetS was defined using International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. RESULTS: MetS was identified in 26.0% of the cohort of stroke patients. Patients with MetS were more likely to be female, nonsmokers, and more likely to have a prior history of diabetes mellitus, high blood glucose and a family history of stroke than patients without MetS. During 1-year follow-up, patients with MetS had a non-significantly higher rate of stroke recurrence (7.1% than patients without MetS (3.9%; P = 0.07. There was no difference in mortality (3.3% versus 3.5%, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis (adjusting for gender, BMI, smoking, diabetes, and LDL-C identified an association between that 1-year stroke recurrence and the presence of MetS (hazard ratio 2.30; 95% CI: 1.01-5.22 and large waist circumference (hazard ratio: 2.39; 95% CI: 1.05-5.42. However, multivariable analysis adjusting for the individual components of MetS found no significant associations between MetS and stroke recurrence. There were no associations between these parameters and mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis who have MetS, are at higher risk of recurrent stroke than those without MetS. However, MetS was not predictive of stroke recurrence beyond its individual components and one-year mortality.

  19. Cerebral oxygen transport failure?: decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels after ischemic stroke predict poor outcome and mortality: STroke: RelevAnt Impact of hemoGlobin, Hematocrit and Transfusion (STRAIGHT)--an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellert, Lars; Martin, Evgenia; Sykora, Marek; Bauer, Harald; Gussmann, Philipp; Diedler, Jennifer; Herweh, Christian; Ringleb, Peter A; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten; Bösel, Julian

    2011-10-01

    Although conceivably relevant for penumbra oxygenation, the optimal levels of hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) in patients with acute ischemic stroke are unknown. We identified patients from our prospective local stroke database who received intravenous thrombolysis based on multimodal magnet resonance imaging during the years 1998 to 2009. A favorable outcome at 3 months was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score≤2 and a poor outcome as a modified Rankin Scale score≥3. The dynamics of Hemoglobin (Hb), Hematocrit (Hct), and other relevant laboratory parameters as well as cardiovascular risk factors were retrospectively assessed and analyzed between these 2 groups. Of 217 patients, 114 had a favorable and 103 a poor outcome. In a multivariable regression model, anemia until day 5 after admission (odds ratio [OR]=2.61; 95% CI, 1.33 to 5.11; P=0.005), Hb nadir (OR=0.81; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.99; P=0.038), and Hct nadir (OR=0.93; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.99; P=0.038) remained independent predictors for poor outcome at 3 months. Mortality after 3 months was independently associated with Hb nadir (OR=0.80; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98; P=0.028) and Hb decrease (OR=1.34; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.76; P=0.04) as well as Hct decrease (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.23; P=0.027). Poor outcome and mortality after ischemic stroke are strongly associated with low and further decreasing Hb and Hct levels. This decrease of Hb and Hct levels after admission might be more relevant and accessible to treatment than are baseline levels.

  20. Maintenance of Normoglycemia May Improve Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sruthi S; Sylaja, P N; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Sarma, Sankara

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have shown that high admission glucose is associated with poor outcomes after stroke, but the impact of maintenance of normoglycemia on functional outcome during hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke is less well established. The aim of this study was to examine the independent association of postadmission glycemic status in the 1 st week with 3-month functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 48 h of symptom onset with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) of ≥4 were selected from a prospectively maintained database by chart review. Demographic data, risk factors, NIHSS, and blood glucose values in the 1 st week were collected. The primary outcome was Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months (good outcome-mRS ≤2). Over 3 years, 342 patients were enrolled with 220 (64.32%) males. Mean age was 60.5 ± 13.4 years, and median admission score on NIHSS was 10 (interquartile range: 6-16). Blood glucose values persistently <140 mg/dl in the 1 st week were associated with a good 3-month functional outcome in univariate analysis ( P = 0.036). Hypoglycemic episodes occurred only in 11 (3.22%) patients. Blood glucose values persistently below 140 mg/dl in the 1 st week after acute ischemic stroke were associated with a favorable outcome in our study. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Player Experience in the Design of a Serious Game for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos; Cargnin, Diego João; Cervi Prado, Ana Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Video games have become a major entertainment industry and one of the most popular leisure forms, ranging from laboratory experiments to a mainstream cultural medium. Indeed, current games are multimodal and multidimensional products, relying on sophisticated features including not only a narrative-driven story but also impressive graphics and detailed settings. All of these elements helped to create a seamless and appealing product that have resulted in a growing number of players and in the number of game genres. Although video games have been used in education, simulation, and training, another application that exploits serious gaming is the exploration of player experience in the context of game research. Recent advances in the natural user interfaces and player experience have brought new perspectives on the in-game assessment of serious games. This paper evaluates the impact of player experience in the design of a serious game for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. The game combines biofeedback and mirror neurons both in single and multiplayer mode. Results have shown that the game is a feasible solution to integrate serious games into the physical therapy routine.

  2. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  3. The Impact of Micro-Finance on the Performance of Small-Scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature on the impact of micro-finance institutions (MFIs) on small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) is still fraught with inconsistent results, with some concluding on positive impacts while others reporting negative impacts. This paper therefore sets out to assess the impact that the study-MFIs are making on their ...

  4. Secondary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder following perinatal and childhood stroke: impact on cognitive and academic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tricia S; Roberts, Samantha D; Coppens, Andrea M; Crosbie, Jennifer; Dlamini, Nomazulu; Westmacott, Robyn

    2017-05-30

    This cross-sectional retrospective clinical research study examines a large group of children followed within a pediatric stroke program and a developmental attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children, between May 2004 and June 2016. All children with a history of stroke who participated in a neuropsychological assessment between the ages of 4 and 18 years were considered for inclusion. From a sample of 275 participants with a history of stroke, 36 children (13.1%) received a diagnosis of secondary ADHD. Children with secondary ADHD were younger at the time of stroke and more likely to be identified as having a presumed perinatal stroke and persistent seizures than children without secondary ADHD diagnoses. There were no differences in pattern of lesion, size, or laterality between children who developed secondary ADHD and those who did not. Children with secondary ADHD had the lowest scores across all cognitive and academic measures compared to children with stroke-only and developmental ADHD. Findings highlight the added risk of receiving a diagnosis of secondary ADHD following pediatric stroke. Implications for future research and directed intervention are discussed.

  5. Clinically important differences for the upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Scale in people with minimal to moderate impairment due to chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephen J; Fulk, George D; Boyne, Pierce

    2012-06-01

    The upper-extremity portion of the Fugl-Meyer Scale (UE-FM) is one of the most established and commonly used outcome measures in stroke rehabilitative trials. Empirical work is needed to determine the amount of change in UE-FM scores that can be regarded as important and clinically meaningful for health professionals, patients, and other stakeholders. This study used anchor-based methods to estimate the clinically important difference (CID) for the UE-FM in people with minimal to moderate impairment due to chronic stroke. One hundred forty-six individuals with stable, mild to moderate upper-extremity (UE) hemiparesis were administered the UE-FM before and after an intervention targeting their affected UEs. The treating therapists rated each participant's perceived amount of UE motor recovery on a global rating of change (GROC) scale evaluating several facets of UE movement (grasp, release, move the affected UE, perform 5 important functional tasks with the affected UE, overall UE function). Estimated CID of the UE-FM scores was calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with the GROC scores as the anchor. The ROC curve analysis revealed that change in UE-FM scores during the intervention period distinguished participants who experienced clinically important improvement from those that did not based on the therapists' GROC scores. The area under the curve ranged from 0.61 to 0.70 for the different facets of UE movement. The estimated CID of the UE-FM scores ranged from 4.25 to 7.25 points, depending on the different facets of UE movement.

  6. The impact of a neuro-intensivist on patients with stroke admitted to a neurosciences intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelas, Panayiotis N; Schultz, Lonni; Conti, Mary; Spanaki, Marianna; Genarrelli, Thomas; Hacein-Bey, Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    Stroke Units improve the outcome in patients with mild to moderate severity strokes. We sought to examine the role that a full-time neurointensivist (NI) might play on the outcomes of patients with more severe strokes admitted to a Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Data regarding 433 stroke patients admitted to a 10-bed university hospital NICU were prospectively collected in two 19-month periods, before and after the appointment of a NI. Outcomes and disposition of patients with ischemic stroke (IS), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were compared between the two periods, using univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and seventy-four patients with strokes were admitted in the period before and 259 in the period after the NI. Observed mortality did not differ between the two periods. More patients were discharged home in the after period (75% vs. 54% in the before period (P = 0.003). After adjusting for covariates, the NICU and hospital LOS were shorter for each type of stroke in the after period (Cox proportional hazard ratios, 95% CI were 2.37, 1.4-4.1 and 1.8, 1.04-3 for IS, 1.98, 1.3-3 and 1.2, 0.8-1.9 for ICH, and 1.6, 1.1-2.3 and 1.4, 1.01-2 for SAH, respectively) or for all strokes (1.92, 1.52-2.43 and 1.7, 1.28-2.25 for the first 12 days of hospital admission). The direct patient care offered and the organizational changes implemented by a NI shortened the NICU and hospital LOS and improved the disposition of patients with strokes admitted to a NICU.

  7. The impact of education and training interventions for nurses and other health care staff involved in the delivery of stroke care: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie P; Miller, Colette; Gibson, Josephine M E; Cook, Julie; Price, Chris; Watkins, Caroline L

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to explore the impact of stroke education and training of nurses and other health care staff involved in the delivery of stroke care. We performed an integrative review, following PRISMA guidance where possible. We searched MEDLINE, ERIC, PubMed, AMED, EMBASE, HMIC, CINAHL, Google Scholar, IBSS, Web of Knowledge, and the British Nursing Index from 1980 to 2016. Any intervention studies were included if they focused on the education or training of nurses and other health care staff in relation to stroke care. Articles that appeared to meet the inclusion criteria were read in full. Data were extracted from the articles, and the study quality assessed by two researchers. We assessed risk of bias of included studies using a pre-specified tool based on Cochrane guidance. Our initial search identified 2850 studies of which 21 met the inclusion criteria. Six studies were randomised controlled trials, and one was an interrupted time series. Fourteen studies were quasi-experimental: eight were pretest-posttest; five were non-equivalent groups; one study had a single assessment. Thirteen studies used quality of care outcomes and eight used a patient outcome measure. None of the studies was identified as having a low risk of bias. Only nine studies used a multi-disciplinary approach to education and training and nurses were often taught alone. Interactive education and training delivered to multi-disciplinary stroke teams, and the use of protocols or guidelines tended to be associated with a positive impact on patient and quality of care outcomes. Practice educators should consider the delivery of interactive education and training delivered to multi-disciplinary groups, and the use of protocols or guidelines, which tend to be associated with a positive impact on both patient and quality of care outcomes. Future research should incorporate a robust design. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Impact of scaling on the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is considering using glycolic acid as a replacement for formic acid in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Catalytic decomposition of formic acid is responsible for the generation of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas, during processing. To prevent the formation of a flammable mixture in the offgas, an air purge is used to dilute the hydrogen concentration below the 60% of the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL). The offgas is continuously monitored for hydrogen using Gas Chromatographs (GCs). Since formic acid is much more volatile and toxic than glycolic acid, a formic acid spill would lead to the release of much larger quantities to the environment. Switching from formic acid to glycolic acid is expected to eliminate the hydrogen flammability hazard leading to lower air purges, thus downgrading of Safety Significant GCs to Process Support GCs, and minimizing the consequence of a glycolic acid tank leak in DWPF. Overall this leads to a reduction in process operation costs and an increase in safety margin. Experiments were completed at three different scales to demonstrate that the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet scales from the 4-L lab scale to the 22-L bench scale and 220-L engineering scale. Ten process demonstrations of the sludge-only flowsheet for SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed using Sludge Batch 8 (SB8)-Tank 40 simulant. No Actinide Removal Process (ARP) product or strip effluent was added during the runs. Six experiments were completed at the 4-L scale, two experiments were completed at the 22-L scale, and two experiments were completed at the 220-L scale. Experiments completed at the 4-L scale (100 and 110% acid stoichiometry) were repeated at the 22-L and 220-L scale for scale comparisons.

  9. New Resolution Strategy for Multi-scale Reaction Waves using Time Operator Splitting and Space Adaptive Multiresolution: Application to Human Ischemic Stroke*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louvet Violaine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling multi-scale reaction waves. This type of problems induces peculiar difficulties and potentially large stiffness which stem from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of large spatial gradients in the reactive fronts, spatially very localized. A new resolution strategy was recently introduced ? that combines a performing time operator splitting with high oder dedicated time integration methods and space adaptive multiresolution. Based on recent theoretical studies of numerical analysis, such a strategy leads to a splitting time step which is not restricted neither by the fastest scales in the source term nor by stability limits related to the diffusion problem, but only by the physics of the phenomenon. In this paper, the efficiency of the method is evaluated through 2D and 3D numerical simulations of a human ischemic stroke model, conducted on a simplified brain geometry, for which a simple parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures was implemented, in order to reduce computing costs related to “detailed chemistry” features of the model.

  10. Scaling up: Expanding the impact of food security and nutrition ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    Together with partners, IDRC is scaling up proven food security and nutrition solutions to benefit ... of complementary approaches to achieve large-scale positive change in food security and nutrition: ... Precooked beans are an affordable and fast-cooking new product that is boosting the consumption of nutritious pulses.

  11. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of State Self-Esteem Scale: an analysis of data from a cross-sectional survey of patients in the first four months after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Janita P C; Thompson, David R; Chang, Anne M; Woo, Jean

    2012-11-01

    To establish the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the State Self-Esteem Scale in stroke patients. Self-esteem is seen to enhance peoples' ability to cope with disease: low self-esteem may inhibit participation in rehabilitation and thus result in poor health and social outcomes. Although the Chinese version of the State Self-Esteem Scale has been used as an outcome measure for stroke rehabilitation, no study has examined its factor structure in this patient group. A cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of 265 Chinese stroke patients (mean age 71·4, SD 10·3 years), with a minimum score of 18 out of a possible 30 for the Mini Mental State Exam recruited from two regional rehabilitation hospitals in Hong Kong. An exploratory factor analysis and an internal consistency analysis of the State Self-Esteem Scale were conducted. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between the State Self-Esteem Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale to determine convergent validity. The final factor solution comprised a three-factor model with correlated constructs and accounted for 49·5% of the total variance. Significant negative correlations were found between the Geriatric Depression Scale and the State Self-Esteem Scale subscale scores (r-0·31 to -0·55, p State Self-Esteem Scale had acceptable convergent validity. The new three-factor structure had higher Cronbach's alphas when compared with the original three-factor structure. The State Self-Esteem Scale appears to be a useful measure for assessing state self-esteem in stroke patients. To establish the concurrent, discriminative and construct validities, the factor structure of the SSES could be further developed and tested. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunyoung; Song, Wonkyong; Lee, Dongkun

    2013-01-01

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should

  13. Study protocol of the YOU CALL - WE CALL TRIAL: impact of a multimodal support intervention after a "mild" stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Gina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 60% of new strokes each year are "mild" in severity and this proportion is expected to rise in the years to come. Within our current health care system those with "mild" stroke are typically discharged home within days, without further referral to health or rehabilitation services other than advice to see their family physician. Those with mild stroke often have limited access to support from health professionals with stroke-specific knowledge who would typically provide critical information on topics such as secondary stroke prevention, community reintegration, medication counselling and problem solving with regard to specific concerns that arise. Isolation and lack of knowledge may lead to a worsening of health problems including stroke recurrence and unnecessary and costly health care utilization. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness, for individuals who experience a first "mild" stroke, of a sustainable, low cost, multimodal support intervention (comprising information, education and telephone support - "WE CALL" compared to a passive intervention (providing the name and phone number of a resource person available if they feel the need to - "YOU CALL", on two primary outcomes: unplanned-use of health services for negative events and quality of life. Method/Design We will recruit 384 adults who meet inclusion criteria for a first mild stroke across six Canadian sites. Baseline measures will be taken within the first month after stroke onset. Participants will be stratified according to comorbidity level and randomised to one of two groups: YOU CALL or WE CALL. Both interventions will be offered over a six months period. Primary outcomes include unplanned use of heath services for negative event (frequency calendar and quality of life (EQ-5D and Quality of Life Index. Secondary outcomes include participation level (LIFE-H, depression (Beck Depression Inventory II and use of health services for

  14. Estimating landscape-scale impacts of agricultural management on soil carbon using measurements and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agriculture covers 40% of Earth’s ice-free land area and has broad impacts on global biogeochemical cycles. While some agricultural management changes are small in scale or impact, others have the potential to shift biogeochemical cycles at landscape and larger scales if widely adopted. Understandin...

  15. Change in pulse pressure/stroke index in response to sustained blood pressure reduction and its impact on left ventricular mass and geometry changes: the life study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmieri, V.; Bella, J.N.; Gerdts, E.

    2008-01-01

    in hypertension (LIFE) study, we evaluated the impact of antihypertensive treatment on change of PP/SVi as raw indicator of systemic arterial stiffness, and further explored the impact of the change in PP/SVi on the change in LV mass and RWT. RESULTS: Compared to baseline, mean PP/SVi reduction was -13% at year 1......BACKGROUND: In cross-sectional data in hypertensive subjects, brachial pulse pressure (PP)/Doppler stroke index (SVi), (PP/SVi) correlates weakly but significantly with left ventricular (LV) mass and relative wall thickness (RWT). METHODS: In the Losartan Intervention For End-point reduction...

  16. The impact of `admit no bed` and long boarding times in the emergency department on stroke outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khathaami, Ali M; Abulaban, Ahmad A; Mohamed, Gamal E; Alamry, Ahmed M; Kojan, Suleiman M; Aljumah, Mohammed A

    2014-09-01

    To examine and test the possible association between boarding time and stroke patients` outcome. This study is a retrospective review of stroke patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from 2007-2010. We excluded thrombolysis cases and those deemed critically ill. We collected time of stroke onset, ED arrival, decision to admit, and arrival to ward. Boarding time (BT) was defined as time of arrival to ward minus time of decision to admit. Primary outcome (PO) was defined as a composite of mortality, and/or any of post-stroke complications. We included 300 patients with a mean age +/- standard deviation of 69 +/- 12 years, and 66.3% were men. The PO occurred in 37.7%. There was no association between BT and PO (odds ratio [OR]=0.9, p=0.3), or any of the secondary outcomes, such as, death (OR=0.97, p=0.5), severe disability (OR=0.97, p=0.3), pneumonia (OR=1, p=0.9), urinary tract infection (OR=1, p=0.9), or neurological deterioration (OR=0.8, p=0.1). Multivariate analysis included gender, age, stroke severity, subtype, hypertension, diabetes, coronary disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure (HF), onset to ED, BT and ED wait time; only moderate to severe stroke, HF, and previous stroke predicted poor outcome. Although `admit no bed` was not associated with adverse effects, the results should be interpreted with caution, and early admission to the stroke unit should be encouraged.

  17. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and validity in stroke trials. Objectives: The aim of the work was to evaluate the FOUR score predictability for outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS ...

  18. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  19. Differential melt scaling for oblique impacts on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Oleg; Wong, Stephanie M. Wong; Kring, David A. Kring

    2012-01-01

    Analytical estimates of melt volumes produced by a given projectile and contained in a given impact crater are derived as a function of impact velocity, impact angle, planetary gravity, target and projectile densities, and specific internal energy of melting. Applications to impact events and impact craters on the Earth, Moon, and Mars are demonstrated and discussed. The most probable oblique impact (45°) produces ∼1.6 times less melt volume than a vertical impact, and ∼1.6 and 3.7 times more melt volume than impacts with 30° and 15° trajectories, respectively. The melt volume for a particular crater diameter increases with planetary gravity, so a crater on Earth should have more melt than similar-size craters on Mars and the Moon. The melt volume for a particular projectile diameter does not depend on gravity, but has a strong dependence on impact velocity, so the melt generated by a given projectile on the Moon is significantly larger than on Mars. Higher surface temperatures and geothermal gradients increase melt production, as do lower energies of melting. Collectively, the results imply thinner central melt sheets and a smaller proportion of melt particles in impact breccias on the Moon and Mars than on Earth. These effects are illustrated in a comparison of the Chicxulub crater on Earth, linked to the Cretaceous–Tertiary mass extinction, Gusev crater on Mars, where the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit landed, and Tsiolkovsky crater on the Moon. The results are comparable to those obtained from field and spacecraft observations, other analytical expressions, and hydrocode simulations.

  20. The Impact of 200 Meter Breast Stroke Swimming Activity on Blood Glucose Level of The Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahrastani, S.; Badri, H.; Argantos, A.; Yuniarti, E.

    2018-04-01

    Blood sugar in the human body is very important, as it is a source of energy for humans. Fasting blood sugar needs to be recognized, because it is an indicator of a person’s health. The research that has been done aims to determine the effect of physical activity on fasting blood sugar. This research is a quasi-experimental research. The research was conducted on 15 students of FIK UNP Padang, who have passed the swimming course. Blood was taken before and after doing physical exercise activity of 200 meter breaststroke swimming. Data collection was conducted with tests and measurements. The data analysis technique used inference statistics with t test formula, with α = 0.05. From the results it is obtained that there is a very significant impact on blood sugar levels after 200 meters breaststroke swimming activity with p <0.05

  1. The System Effect: Scaling High-Impact Practices across Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Jonathan S.; Martin, Rebecca R.; Wise, Kathleen; Blaich, Charles

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the role of systems and consortia in scaling and implementing undergraduate research through a study of the efforts of six systems and consortia working together with the Council on Undergraduate Research.

  2. Land use change impacts on floods at the catchment scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogger, M.; Agnoletti, M.; Alaoui, A.; Bathurst, J.C.; Bodner, G.; Borga, M.; Chaplot, Vincent; Gallart, F.; Glatzel, G.; Hall, J.; Holden, J.; Holko, L.; Horn, R.; Kiss, A.; Kohnová, S.; Leitinger, G.; Lennartz, B.; Parajka, J.; Perdigão, R.; Peth, S.; Plavcová, L.; Quinton, John N.; Robinson, Matthew R.; Salinas, J.L.; Santoro, A.; Szolgay, J.; Tron, S.; Akker, van den J.J.H.; Viglione, A.; Blöschl, G.

    2017-01-01

    Research gaps in understanding flood changes at the catchment scale caused by changes in forest management, agricultural practices, artificial drainage, and terracing are identified. Potential strategies in addressing these gaps are proposed, such as complex systems approaches to link processes

  3. Budget impact analysis of apixaban versus other NOACs for the prevention of stroke in Italian atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pradelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to perform a budget impact analysis of the use of three available novel oral anticoagulant agents (NOACs for preventing thromboembolic events in Italian patients with non‑valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF.METHODS: Estimated Italian population of patients was run through a previously published lifetime decision tree/Markov model simulating their treatment with the available therapeutic options: dabigatran at two dose levels (110 mg/bid for the over 80 years old, 150 mg/bid for younger NVAF patients, rivaroxaban (20 mg/uid, and apixaban (5 mg/bid. Effectiveness and safety estimates derive from an adjusted indirect treatment comparison using warfarin as link. The main clinical events considered in the model are ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, systemic thromboembolism, bleeds (both major and clinically relevant minor and cardiovascular hospitalizations, besides treatment discontinuations. Epidemiological data and unit costs, actualized to 2013, are collected from Italian published sources. The budget impact analysis evaluates the financial impact of apixaban introduction by comparing expected 1,2, and 3 years costs in hypothetical scenarios: with and without apixaban. Italian NVAF patient population estimation is based on official apixaban reimbursement criteria, applying the characteristics of the trial population to national epidemiologic data. Numbers of patients for each regimen are estimated by projecting share evolution. Sensitivity analysis is performed on an alternative non‑experimental population of NVAF patients.RESULTS: Among available NOACs, apixaban was expected to be the least expensive in an estimated patient population of 364,000 Italian patients, allowing for savings of € 1,180,549, € 3,841,429 and € 5,368,918 at 1,2, and 3 years, respectively. Results of the simulation run on an alternative non‑experimental population of NVAF patients yields comparable estimates.CONCLUSIONS: The different

  4. The impacts of small scale artisanal diamond mining on the environment

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    M.A. This mini-dissertation establishes the extent to which small scale artisanal diamond mining impacts on the environment. There has, in the past, been research undertaken specifically on the water related impacts of small scale artisanal diamond mining. This study however, looks at the environment holistically, and gauges the total degradation to the receiving environment. Small scale artisanal diamond mining is considered to be a major contributor to the local economy and improved qual...

  5. Molecular basis of young ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Borellini, Linda; Motto, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Pezzini, Alessandro; Basilico, Paola; Micieli, Giuseppe; Padovani, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio; Candelise, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and family studies have provided evidence on the role of genetic factors in stroke, particularly in stroke occurring at young age. However, despite its impact, young stroke continues to be understudied. This article reviews the existing literature on the most investigated monogenic disorders (CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, RVCL, COL4A1, Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes) causing stroke in young and a number of candidate genes associated with stroke occurring in patients younger than 50 years. Although our study failed in identifying strong and reliable associations between specific genes and young stroke, our detailed literature revision on the field allowed us to compile a panel of genes possibly generating a susceptibility to stroke, which could be a starting point for future research. Since stroke is a potentially preventable disease, the identification of genes associated with young stroke may promote novel prevention strategies and allow the identification of therapeutic disease targets.

  6. Infections and Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Grabska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Członkowska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Infections increase the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and may worsen IS prognosis. Adverse effects of in-hospital infections on stroke outcome were also reported. We aimed to study the prevalence of pre- and poststroke infections and their impact on IS outcome. Methods. We analysed clinical data of 2066 IS patients to assess the effect of pre-stroke and post-stroke infections on IS severity, as well as short-term (up to 30 days) and long-term (90 days) outcome. The independent i...

  7. Apixaban for treatment of embolic stroke of undetermined source (ATTICUS randomized trial): Rationale and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Tobias; Poli, Sven; Meisner, Christoph; Schreieck, Juergen; Zuern, Christine S; Nägele, Thomas; Brachmann, Johannes; Jung, Werner; Gahn, Georg; Schmid, Elisabeth; Bäezner, Hansjörg; Keller, Timea; Petzold, Gabor C; Schrickel, Jan-Wilko; Liman, Jan; Wachter, Rolf; Schön, Frauke; Schabet, Martin; Lindner, Alfred; Ludolph, Albert C; Kimmig, Hubert; Jander, Sebastian; Schlegel, Uwe; Gawaz, Meinrad; Ziemann, Ulf

    2017-12-01

    Rationale Optimal secondary prevention of embolic stroke of undetermined source is not established. The current standard in these patients is acetylsalicylic acid, despite high prevalence of yet undetected paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Aim The ATTICUS randomized trial is designed to determine whether the factor Xa inhibitor apixaban administered within 7 days after embolic stroke of undetermined source, is superior to acetylsalicylic acid for prevention of new ischemic lesions documented by brain magnetic resonance imaging within 12 months after index stroke. Design Prospective, randomized, blinded, parallel-group, open-label, German multicenter phase III trial in approximately 500 patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source. A key inclusion criterion is the presence or the planned implantation of an insertable cardiac monitor. Patients are 1:1 randomized to apixaban or acetylsalicylic acid and treated for a 12-month period. It is an event-driven trial aiming for core-lab adjudicated primary outcome events. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the occurrence of at least one new ischemic lesion identified by axial T2-weighted FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging and/or axial DWI magnetic resonance imaging at 12 months when compared with the baseline magnetic resonance imaging. Key secondary outcomes are the combination of recurrent ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes, systemic embolism; combination of MACE including recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular death and combination of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding defined according to ISTH, and change of cognitive function and quality of life (EQ-5D, Stroke Impact Scale). Discussion Embolic stroke of undetermined source is caused by embolic disease and associated with a high risk of recurrent ischemic strokes and clinically silent cerebral ischemic lesions. ATTICUS will investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation detected by insertable cardiac monitor and the effects of

  8. Different impact of aspirin on renal progression in patients with predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease with or without previous stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Huang, Jing-Yang; Lee, Chun-Te; Hung, Tung-Wei; Liaw, Yung-Po; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The benefit of reducing the risk of stroke against increasing the risk of renal progression associated with antiplatelet therapy in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. We enrolled 1301 adult patients with advanced CKD treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents from January 1, 2002 to June 30, 2009 from the 2005 Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. All of the patients were followed until the development of the primary or secondary endpoints, or the end of the study (December 31, 2011). The primary endpoint was the development of ischemic stroke, and the secondary endpoints included hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and renal failure. The adjusted cumulative probability of events was calculated using multivariate Cox proportional regression analysis. Adjusted survival curves showed that the usage of aspirin was not associated with ischemic stroke, hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality, however, it was significantly associated with renal failure. In subgroup analysis, aspirin use was associated with renal failure in the patients with no history of stroke (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.73), and there was a borderline interaction between previous stroke and the use of aspirin on renal failure (interaction p=0.0565). There was no significant benefit in preventing ischemic stroke in the patients with advanced CKD who received aspirin therapy. Furthermore, the use of aspirin was associated with the risk of renal failure in the patients with advanced CKD without previous stroke. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acceptability, reliability, and validity of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39) across languages: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Akram; Tohidast, Seyed Abolfazl; Mansuri, Banafshe; Kamali, Mohammad; Krishnan, Gopee

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review aimed to explore the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life-39 (SAQOL-39) scale across languages. We employed a systematic search of the online databases including MEDLINE (Pubmed), Science direct, Web of science, Psychinfo, Scopus, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and Cochrane library published between 2003 and 2016. We used PRISMA guidelines for conducting and reporting this review. Subsequently, screening of the titles and abstracts, extraction of data as well as the appraisal of the quality of relevant studies were carried out. The initial search returned 8185 studies. Subsequent screening and study selection processes narrowed them to 20, needing detailed review. Forward-backward translation scheme was the preferred method for translation of the SAQOL-39 from English to other languages. Mainly, the socio-cultural and linguistic adaptations were performed in the translated versions. Most versions of the SAQOL-39 showed high test-retest reliability and internal consistency. However, several psychometric properties including the validity and responsiveness were seldom reported in these versions. The SAQOL-39 scale showed high acceptability, and reliability across the languages reviewed in this study. Future translations may additionally focus on reporting the validity and responsiveness of the instrument.

  10. CO2-impacts of a small-scale consumers levy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    Because of a number of developments (altered budgets of Dutch ministries and implementation of environmental policy plans of energy distribution companies in the Netherlands) the 1993 analyses of the effects of a small-scale consumer levy on the emission of CO 2 are updated. First, attention is paid to the conservation impetus as a result of an increase of the energy price for small-scale consumers. Next, the effects that can occur as a consequence of the presently suggested form of the levy (in particular, the exemption of renewable energy and waste heat) are discussed. Subsequently, the alterations of other policy tools, that are necessary in case a higher effectiveness of conservation measures is realized, are dealt with. The direct effect of a higher energy price on the saving behavior of the small-scale consumers is calculated by means of the CENECA-model. 4 tabs., 1 appendix, 8 refs

  11. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  12. Hydrological impacts of urbanization at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Ludovic; Salavati, Bahar; Furusho-Percot, Carina; Ribstein, Pierre; Saadi, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The impacts of urbanization on floods, droughts and the overall river regime have been largely investigated in the past few decades, but the quantification and the prediction of such impacts still remain a challenge in hydrology. We gathered a sample of 142 catchments that have a documented increase in urban areas over the hydrometeorological record period in the United States. The changes in river flow regimes due to urban spread were differentiated from climate variability using the GR4J conceptual hydrological model. High, low and mean flows were impacted at a threshold of a 10% total impervious area. Moreover, the historical evolution of urban landscape spatial patterns was used to further detail the urbanization process in terms of extent and fragmentation of urban areas throughout the catchment and to help interpret the divergent impacts observed in streamflow behaviors. Regression analysis pointed out the importance of major wastewater treatment facilities that might overpass the effects of imperviousness, and therefore further research should either take them explicitly into account or select a wastewater facility-free catchment sample to clearly evaluate the impacts of urban landscape on low flows.

  13. Regional Scale Analyses of Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, D. W.; Hayhoe, K.

    2006-12-01

    New statistically downscaled climate modeling techniques provide an opportunity for improved regional analysis of climate change impacts on agriculture. Climate modeling outputs can often simultaneously meet the needs of those studying impacts on natural as well as managed ecosystems. Climate outputs can be used to drive existing forest or crop models, or livestock models (e.g., temperature-humidity index model predicting dairy milk production) for improved information on regional impact. High spatial resolution climate forecasts, combined with knowledge of seasonal temperatures or rainfall constraining species ranges, can be used to predict shifts in suitable habitat for invasive weeds, insects, and pathogens, as well as cash crops. Examples of climate thresholds affecting species range and species composition include: minimum winter temperature, duration of winter chilling (vernalization) hours (e.g., hours below 7.2 C), frost-free period, and frequency of high temperature stress days in summer. High resolution climate outputs can also be used to drive existing integrated pest management models predicting crop insect and disease pressure. Collectively, these analyses can be used to test hypotheses or provide insight into the impact of future climate change scenarios on species range shifts and threat from invasives, shifts in crop production zones, and timing and regional variation in economic impacts.

  14. Invertebrates or iron: does large-scale opencast mining impact ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results were, however, confounded by the fact that the resting eggs of pan inhabitants could remain dormant in the sediment for decades; suggesting that ... Similarly, the preservation of conservation areas and a landscape wide management system were proposed to ensure that large-scale ecological process are not ...

  15. Wind power impacts and electricity storage - a time scale perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Meibom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    technologies – batteries, flow batteries, compressed air energy storage, electrolysis combined with fuel cells, and electric vehicles – are moreover categorised with respect to the time scales at which they are suited to support wind power integration. While all of these technologies are assessed suitable...

  16. Achieving Impact at Scale through ICT-Enabled Extension Services ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Government of Ghana is looking for alternatives to conventional extension services to ensure better outreach to poor farmers and rural women. The expansion of mobile technology will connect farmers to extension resources and link them to profitable markets. The research team will scale up an ICT-based agricultural ...

  17. Translation and psychometric evaluation of Persian versions of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale and Impact of Event Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezeljeh, Tahereh Najafi; Ardebili, Fatimah Mohades; Rafii, Forough; Hagani, Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Burn as a traumatic life incident manifests severe pain and psychological problems. Specific instruments are needed to evaluate burn patients' psychological issues related to the injury. The aim of this study was to translate and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Persian versions of Impact of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety scale (BSPAS) and Impact of Event Scale (IES). In this cross-sectional study, convenience sampling method was utilized to select 55 Iranian hospitalized burn patients. Combined translation was utilized for translating scales. Alpha cronbach, item-total correlation, convergent and discriminative validity were evaluated. The Cronbach's α for both BSPAS- and IES-Persian version was 0.96. Item-total correlation coefficients ranged from 0.70 to 0.90. Convergent construct validity was confirmed by indicating high correlation between the scales designed to measure the same concepts. The mean score of BSPAS- and IES-Persian version was lower for individuals with a lower TBSA burn percentage which assessed discriminative construct validity of scales. BSPAS- and IES-Persian version showed high internal consistency and good validity for the assessment of burn psychological outcome in hospitalized burn patients. Future studies are needed to determine repeatability, factor structure, sensitivity and specificity of the scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Item reduction and psychometric validation of the Oily Skin Self Assessment Scale (OSSAS) and the Oily Skin Impact Scale (OSIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Robert; Clark, Marci; Harness, Jane; Bonner, Nicola; Scott, Jane; Draelos, Zoe; Rizer, Ronald; Yeh, Yating; Copley-Merriman, Kati

    2009-01-01

    Developed using focus groups, the Oily Skin Self Assessment Scale (OSSAS) and Oily Skin Impact Scale (OSIS) are patient-reported outcome measures of oily facial skin. The aim of this study was to finalize the item-scale structure of the instruments and perform psychometric validation in adults with self-reported oily facial skin. The OSSAS and OSIS were administered to 202 adult subjects with oily facial skin in the United States. A subgroup of 152 subjects returned, 4 to 10 days later, for test–retest reliability evaluation. Of the 202 participants, 72.8% were female; 64.4% had self-reported nonsevere acne. Item reduction resulted in a 14-item OSSAS with Sensation (five items), Tactile (four items) and Visual (four items) domains, a single blotting item, and an overall oiliness item. The OSIS was reduced to two three-item domains assessing Annoyance and Self-Image. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the construct validity of the final item-scale structures. The OSSAS and OSIS scales had acceptable item convergent validity (item-scale correlations >0.40) and floor and ceiling effects (skin severity (P skin (P skin), as assessments of self-reported oily facial skin severity and its emotional impact, respectively.

  19. Impacts of Large Scale Wind Penetration on Energy Supply Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kabouris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Large penetration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES impacts Energy Supply Industry (ESI in many aspects leading to a fundamental change in electric power systems. It raises a number of technical challenges to the Transmission System Operators (TSOs, Distribution System Operators (DSOs and Wind Turbine Generators (WTG constructors. This paper aims to present in a thorough and coherent way the redrawn picture for Energy Systems under these conditions. Topics related to emergent technical challenges, technical solutions required and finally the impact on ESI due to large wind power penetration, are analyzed. Finally, general conclusions are extracted about the ESI current and future state and general directions are recommended.

  20. Development and validation of a short form of the Fugl-Meyer motor scale in patients with stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsieh, Y.W.; Hsueh, I.P.; Chou, Y.T.; Sheu, C.F.; Hsieh, C.L.; Kwakkel, G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 50-item Fugl-Meyer motor scale (FM) is commonly used in outcome studies. However, the lengthy administration time of the FM keeps it from being widely accepted for routine clinical use. We aimed to develop a short form of the FM (the S-FM) with sound psychometric

  1. Experimental studies of dynamic impact response with scale models of lead shielded radioactive material shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.; Hadden, J.A.; Basham, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary experimental studies of dynamic impact response of scale models of lead-shielded radioactive material shipping containers are presented. The objective of these studies is to provide DOE/ECT with a data base to allow the prediction of a rational margin of confidence in overviewing and assessing the adequacy of the safety and environmental control provided by these shipping containers. Replica scale modeling techniques were employed to predict full scale response with 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models of shipping containers that are used in the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high level wastes. Free fall impact experiments are described for scale models of plain cylindrical stainless steel shells, stainless steel shells filled with lead, and replica scale models of radioactive material shipping containers. Dynamic induced strain and acceleration measurements were obtained at several critical locations on the models. The models were dropped from various heights, attitudes to the impact surface, with and without impact limiters and at uniform temperatures between -40 and 175 0 C. In addition, thermal expansion and thermal gradient induced strains were measured at -40 and 175 0 C. The frequency content of the strain signals and the effect of different drop pad compositions and stiffness were examined. Appropriate scale modeling laws were developed and scaling techniques were substantiated for predicting full scale response by comparison of dynamic strain data for 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models with stainless steel shells and lead shielding

  2. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minjoli, Sena; Saturnino, Guilherme B.; Blicher, Jakob Udby

    2017-01-01

    . Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative...... to the lesion were tested. For TDCS, the finite-element method was used to simulate a standard approach with two electrode pads, and the position of one electrode was systematically varied. For both TMS and TDCS, the lesion caused electric field " hot spots" in the cortex. However, these maxima were......Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS). They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large...

  3. Assessing local scale impacts of Opuntia stricta (Cactaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... assemblages were significantly different from uninvaded control sites. This study suggests that the current density of O. stricta does not significantly affect spider species richness, density or assemblages but that beetle assemblages are significantly affected. Key words: Araneae, arthropods, Coleoptera, invasion impacts, ...

  4. Scaling up impact assessment results through statistics and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M. van; Jonkers, E.; Haak, W.P. van den; Ouboter, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    For a successful introduction of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) it is important to determine (socio-economic) impacts and societal costs and benefits of these systems beforehand, and to develop business models. Governments usually make investment decisions based on these aspects. In the field

  5. Understanding ocean acidification impacts on organismal to ecological scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Andreas J; Kline, David I; Edmunds, Peter J; Archer, Stephen D; Bednaršek, Nina; Carpenter, Robert C; Chadsey, Meg; Goldstein, Philip; Grottoli, Andrea G.; Hurst, Thomas P; King, Andrew L; Kübler, Janet E.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Mackey, Katherine R M; Menge, Bruce A.; Paytan, Adina; Riebesell, Ulf; Schnetzer, Astrid; Warner, Mark E; Zimmerman, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) research seeks to understand how marine ecosystems and global elemental cycles will respond to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry in combination with other environmental perturbations such as warming, eutrophication, and deoxygenation. Here, we discuss the effectiveness and limitations of current research approaches used to address this goal. A diverse combination of approaches is essential to decipher the consequences of OA to marine organisms, communities, and ecosystems. Consequently, the benefits and limitations of each approach must be considered carefully. Major research challenges involve experimentally addressing the effects of OA in the context of large natural variability in seawater carbonate system parameters and other interactive variables, integrating the results from different research approaches, and scaling results across different temporal and spatial scales.

  6. Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.

  7. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q 25 , 75 ) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men ( P stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. The Impact of Conscious Sedation versus General Anesthesia for Stroke Thrombectomy on the Predictive Value of Collateral Status: A Post Hoc Analysis of the SIESTA Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenberger, S; Pfaff, J; Uhlmann, L; Klose, C; Nagel, S; Ringleb, P A; Hacke, W; Kieser, M; Bendszus, M; Möhlenbruch, M A; Bösel, J

    2017-08-01

    Radiologic selection criteria to identify patients likely to benefit from endovascular stroke treatment are still controversial. In this post hoc analysis of the recent randomized Sedation versus Intubation for Endovascular Stroke TreAtment (SIESTA) trial, we aimed to investigate the impact of sedation mode (conscious sedation versus general anesthesia) on the predictive value of collateral status. Using imaging data from SIESTA, we assessed collateral status with the collateral score of Tan et al and graded it from absent to good collaterals (0-3). We examined the association of collateral status with 24-hour improvement of the NIHSS score, infarct volume, and mRS at 3 months according to the sedation regimen. In a cohort of 104 patients, the NIHSS score improved significantly in patients with moderate or good collaterals (2-3) compared with patients with no or poor collaterals (0-1) ( P = .011; mean, -5.8 ± 7.6 versus -1.1 ± 10.7). Tan 2-3 was also associated with significantly higher ASPECTS before endovascular stroke treatment (median, 9 versus 7; P collateral status (0.1 versus 2.3), the sedation modes conscious sedation and general anesthesia were not associated with significant differences in the predictive value of collateral status regarding infarction size or functional outcome. The sedation mode, conscious sedation or general anesthesia, did not influence the predictive value of collaterals in patients with large-vessel occlusion anterior circulation stroke undergoing thrombectomy in the SIESTA trial. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  10. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  11. Time configuration of combined neuromodulation and motor training after stroke: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Elizabeth S; Carrico, Cheryl; Westgate, Philip M; Chelette, Kenneth C; Nichols, Laurie; Reddy, Lakshmi; Salyers, Emily; Ward, Andrea; Sawaki, Lumy

    2016-07-15

    Intensive motor training is a therapeutic intervention that supports recovery of movement function after stroke by capitalizing on the brain's capacity for neuroplastic change. Peripheral nerve stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation are neuromodulation techniques that can upregulate neuroplasticity and, in turn, enhance outcomes of motor training after stroke. Few studies have investigated possible adjuvant effects between peripheral nerve stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and intensive motor training. This proof-of-concept study investigated whether timing variations in neuromodulation paired with robot-assisted motor training effect differential outcomes for subjects with chronic, moderate-to-severe upper extremity impairment after stroke. Ten subjects in the chronic phase (>12 months after stroke) of recovery completed the study. Subjects received 10 daily sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation either at the start (n = 4) or at the end (n = 6) of peripheral nerve stimulation preceding intensive motor training. Pre-post changes in motor function (Fugl-Meyer Assessment; Stroke Impact Scale) and neuroplasticity (transcranial magnetic stimulation) were assessed by condition. Significant improvement in Stroke Impact Scale (p = 0.02) and no change in Fugl-Meyer Assessment were associated with the start condition. No changes in Stroke Impact Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment were associated with the end condition. Only 1 subject in the start group had measurable neuroplastic responses and demonstrated an increase in ipsilesional cortical map volume. Only 1 subject in the end group had measurable neuroplastic responses and demonstrated a decrease in ipsilesional cortical map volume. Opposite shifts in ipsilesional cortical centers of gravity occurred relative to condition. In cases of moderate-to-severe impairment after stroke, transcranial direct current stimulation at the start, rather than the end, of

  12. Full-scale aircraft impact test for evaluation of impact force-Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, K.; Sugano, T.; Tsubata, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Suzuki, M.; Ohrui, S.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parrish, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper analyzes measurements used to evaluate the impact force of a rigid barrier against head on impacting aircraft. The authors uses the results to evaluate existing analytical methods for prediction of the impact force

  13. Full-scale tornado-missile impact tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.

    1976-04-01

    Seven completed initial tests are described with 4 types of hypothetical tornado-borne missiles (impacting reinforced concrete panels that are typical of walls in nuclear power facilities). The missiles were rocket propelled to velocities currently postulated as being attainable by debris in tornadoes. (1500-pound 35-foot long utility pole; 8-pound 1-inch Grade 60 reinforcing bar; 78-pound 3-inch Schedule 40 pipe; and 743-pound 12-inch Schedule 40 pipe;) The results show that a minimum thickness of 24 inches is sufficient to prevent backface scabbing from normal impacts of currently postulated tornado missiles and that existing power plant walls are adequate for the most severe conditions currently postulated by regulatory agencies. This report gives selected detailed data on the tests completed thus far, including strain, panel velocity, and reaction histories

  14. Modeling watershed-scale impacts of stormwater management with traditional versus low impact development design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkman, Stephanie A.; Hogan, Dianna; Hopkins, Kristina G.; Loperfido, J. V.

    2017-01-01

    Stormwater runoff and associated pollutants from urban areas in the greater Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW) impair local streams and downstream ecosystems, despite urbanized land comprising only 7% of the CBW area. More recently, stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented in a low impact development (LID) manner to treat stormwater runoff closer to its source. This approach included the development of a novel BMP model to compare traditional and LID design, pioneering the use of comprehensively digitized storm sewer infrastructure and BMP design connectivity with spatial patterns in a geographic information system at the watershed scale. The goal was to compare total watershed pollutant removal efficiency in two study watersheds with differing spatial patterns of BMP design (traditional and LID), by quantifying the improved water quality benefit of LID BMP design. An estimate of uncertainty was included in the modeling framework by using ranges for BMP pollutant removal efficiencies that were based on the literature. Our model, using Monte Carlo analysis, predicted that the LID watershed removed approximately 78 kg more nitrogen, 3 kg more phosphorus, and 1,592 kg more sediment per square kilometer as compared with the traditional watershed on an annual basis. Our research provides planners a valuable model to prioritize watersheds for BMP design based on model results or in optimizing BMP selection.

  15. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  16. Quality of Life and Loneliness in Stroke Survivors Living in Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeke, Laurie; Horstman, Patricia; Mallow, Jennifer; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Culp, Stacey; Domico, Jennifer; Barr, Taura

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Negative outcomes of stroke are associated with poorer quality of life (QoL) and impact stroke recovery. The purpose of this study was to characterize QoL and loneliness in a sample of rural Appalachian stroke survivors within 1 year of stroke. Methods Using mail survey methodology, survey data were collected from 121 ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke survivors living in West Virginia using 13 subscales from the Neuro-QOL survey and the three-item UCLA Loneliness Scale. Statistical Package for Social Sciences v. 20 was used to conduct descriptive, comparative, and predictive analyses. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess explanatory value of loneliness for QoL domains while controlling for comorbidities. Results: Participants who were discharged to a nursing home had poorer QoL when compared with those who were discharged to home. Stroke survivors who continued to smoke were less satisfied with social roles and reported higher mean loneliness and depression scores. History of psychological problems negatively correlated with all QoL domains and loneliness scores. Loneliness predicted poorer QoL even when controlling for age, gender, and significant comorbidities. Conclusion Nurses need to assess for loneliness, include loneliness in care planning, and implement smoking cessation and cognitive behavioral interventions. Interventions that target loneliness for stroke survivors could potentially diminish psychological sequelae after stroke and enhance QoL. PMID:25365057

  17. Health Impact Assessment for Second-Hand Smoke Exposure in Germany—Quantifying Estimates for Ischaemic Heart Diseases, COPD, and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Fischer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of the adverse health effects attributable to second-hand smoke (SHS exposure is available. This study aims to quantify the impact of SHS exposure on ischaemic heart diseases (IHD, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD, and stroke in Germany. Therefore, this study estimated and forecasted the morbidity for the three outcomes in the German population. Furthermore, a health impact assessment was performed using DYNAMO-HIA, which is a generic software tool applying a Markov model. Overall 687,254 IHD cases, 231,973 COPD cases, and 288,015 stroke cases were estimated to be attributable to SHS exposure in Germany for 2014. Under the assumption that the population prevalence of these diseases and the prevalence of SHS exposure remain constant, the total number of cases will increase due to demographic aging. Assuming a total eradication of SHS exposure beginning in 2014 leads to an estimated reduction of 50% in cases, compared to the reference scenario in 2040 for all three diseases. The results highlight the relevance of SHS exposure because it affects several chronic disease conditions and has a major impact on the population’s health. Therefore, public health campaigns to protect non-smokers are urgently needed.

  18. Exploratory study of plasma total homocysteine and its relationship to short-term outcome in acute ischaemic stroke in Nigerians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awosanya Gbolahan O

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperhomocysteinemia is a potentially modifiable risk factor for stroke, and may have a negative impact on the course of ischaemic stroke. The role of hyperhomocysteinemia as it relates to stroke in Africans is still uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and short-term impact of hyperhomocysteinemia in Nigerians with acute ischaemic stroke. We hypothesized that Hcy levels are significantly higher than in normal controls, worsen stroke severity, and increase short-term case fatality rates following acute ischaemic stroke. Methods The study employed both a case-control and prospective follow-up design to study hospitalized adults with first – ever acute ischaemic stroke presenting within 48 hours of onset. Clinical histories, neurological evaluation (including National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores on admission were documented. Total plasma Hcy was determined on fasting samples drawn from controls and stroke cases (within 24 hours of hospitalization. Outcome at 4 weeks was assessed in stroke patients using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. Results We evaluated 155 persons (69 acute ischaemic stroke and 86 healthy controls. The mean age ± SD of the cases was 58.8 ± 9.8 years, comparable to that of controls which was 58.3 ± 9.9 years (T = 0.32; P = 0.75. The mean duration of stroke (SD prior to hospitalization was 43.5 ± 38.8 hours, and mean admission NIHSS score was 10.1 ± 7.7. Total fasting Hcy in stroke patients was 10.2 ± 4.6 umol/L and did not differ significantly from controls (10.1 ± 3.6 umol/L; P = 0.88. Hyperhomocysteinemia, defined by plasma Hcy levels > 90th percentile of controls (>14.2 umol/L in women and >14.6 umol/L in men, was present in 7 (10.1% stroke cases and 11 (12.8% controls (odds ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.31 – 2.39; P > 0.05. In multiple regression analysis admission NIHSS score (but not plasma Hcy was a significant determinant of 4

  19. Impact of Scaled Technology on Radiation Testing and Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of some of the radiation challenges facing emerging scaled digital technologies with implications on using consumer grade electronics and next generation hardening schemes. Commercial semiconductor manufacturers are recognizing some of these issues as issues for terrestrial performance. Looking at means of dealing with soft errors. The thinned oxide has indicated improved TID tolerance of commercial products hardened by "serendipity" which does not guarantee hardness or say if the trend will continue. This presentation also focuses one reliability implications of thinned oxides.

  20. The Desirable Scale", impact of scale on group mix and social quality in assisted living facilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dort Spierings

    2012-01-01

    In order to be able to age in place, Dutch elderly are being housed in Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) for over 25 years. Here they can live independently and rely on care and services. The physical scale of ALFs ranges from 30 up to 300 residents. This paper presents the findings of a multiple

  1. Auditing the frequency and the clinical and economic impact of testing for Fabry disease in patients under the age of 70 with a stroke admitted to Saint Vincent's University Hospital over a 6-month period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, J; Noone, I; Lonergan, R; Tubridy, N

    2018-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder that provokes multi-organ morbidity, including early-onset stroke. Worldwide prevalence may be greater than previously estimated, with many experiencing first stroke prior to diagnosis of Fabry disease. The aim of this study is to screen a cohort of stroke patients under 70 years of age, evaluating the clinical and economic efficacy of such a broad screening programme for Fabry disease. All stroke patients under 70 years of age who were entered into the Saint Vincent's University Hospital stroke database over a 6-month period underwent enzyme analysis and/or genetic testing as appropriate for Fabry disease. Patients' past medical histories were analysed for clinical signs suggestive of Fabry disease. Cost-effectiveness analysis of testing was performed and compared to overall economic impact of young stroke in Ireland. Of 22 patients tested for Fabry disease, no new cases were detected. Few clinical indicators of Fabry disease were identified at the time of testing. Broad screening programmes for Fabry disease are highly unlikely to offset the cost of testing. The efficacy of future screening programmes will depend on careful selection of an appropriate patient cohort of young stroke patients with multi-organ morbidity and a positive family history.

  2. Cost optimization of biofuel production – The impact of scale, integration, transport and supply chain configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S.A.; Hoefnagels, E.T.A.; Wetterlund, Elisabeth; Pettersson, Karin; Faaij, André; Junginger, H.M.

    2017-01-01

    This study uses a geographically-explicit cost optimization model to analyze the impact of and interrelation between four cost reduction strategies for biofuel production: economies of scale, intermodal transport, integration with existing industries, and distributed supply chain configurations

  3. Small scale agriculture, marginal conditions and market access: impacts on natural resources and farmers' welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavatassi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: small-scale farmers, food security, impact evaluation, Ecuador, Ethiopia, crop choice, social capital, crop genetic diversity, pesticides. Numerous are the obstacles and difficulties smallholder farmers from developing countries have to face to achieve food security or improve their

  4. Minimal detectable changes of the Berg Balance Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale, Timed "Up & Go" Test, gait speeds, and 2-minute walk test in individuals with chronic stroke with different degrees of ankle plantarflexor tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiengkaew, Vimonwan; Jitaree, Khanitha; Chaiyawat, Pakaratee

    2012-07-01

    To determine test-retest reliability and absolute and relative minimal detectable changes at the 95% confidence level (MDC(95)) of measures to detect postural balance and lower limb movements in individuals with chronic stroke who were able to walk and had differences in ankle plantarflexor tone. Test-retest study. Data were collected on 2 occasions, about 6 days apart. Outpatient physical therapy clinics. Volunteers (N=61) with chronic stroke who were able to walk and had differences in ankle plantarflexor tone: no increase in ankle plantarflexor tone (n=12), a slight increase in ankle plantarflexor tone (n=32), and a marked increase in ankle plantarflexor tone (n=17). Not applicable. Reliability and absolute and relative MDC(95) of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the lower limb subscale of Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-LE), the Timed "Up & Go" test (TUG), the comfortable gait speed (CGS), the fast gait speed (FGS), and the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). Excellent reliability of the BBS, FMA-LE, TUG, CGS, FGS, and 2MWT for all the participants combined and for the subgroups was shown. All the participants combined showed the absolute and relative MDC(95) in the BBS of 5 points and 10%, FMA-LE of 4 points and 16%, TUG of 8 seconds and 28%, CGS of 0.2m/s and 34%, FGS of 0.1m/s and 21%, and 2MWT of 13m and 23%. The absolute and relative MDC(95) of the subgroups were varied based on ankle plantarflexor tone. The BBS, FMA-LE, TUG, CGS, FGS, and 2MWT are reliable measures to detect postural balance and lower limb movements in individuals with chronic stroke who have differences in ankle plantarflexor tone. The absolute and relative MDC(95) of each measure are dissimilar in those with differences in ankle plantarflexor tone. The relative MDC(95) seems more useful than the absolute MDC(95) because the relative value can be used for a single individual. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of diabetes on coronary heart disease differs from that on ischaemic stroke with regard to the gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderberg Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the diabetes related CVD risk between men and women of different ages. Methods Hazards ratios (HRs (95%CI for acute CHD and ischaemic stroke events were estimated based on data of Finnish and Swedish cohorts of 5111 women and 4167 men. Results 182 (3.6% women and 348 (8.4% men had CHD and 129 (2.5% women and 137 (3.3% men ischaemic stroke events. The multivariate adjusted HRs for acute CHD at age groups of 40–49, 50–59 and 60–69 years were 1.00 (1.94, 1.78 (4.23, 3.75 (8.40 in women (men without diabetes and 4.35 (5.40, 5.49 (9.54 and 8.84 (13.76 in women (men with diabetes. The corresponding HRs for ischaemic stroke were 1.00 (1.26, 2.48 (2.83 and 5.17 (5.11 in women (men without diabetes and 4.14 (4.91, 3.32 (6.75 and 13.91 (18.06 in women (men with diabetes, respectively. Conclusion CHD risk was higher in men than in women but difference reduced in diabetic population. Diabetes, however, increased stroke risk more in men than in women.

  6. Impact of Collateral Status Evaluated by Dynamic Computed Tomographic Angiography on Clinical Outcome in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, Ido R.; Boiten, Jelis; Holswilder, Ghislaine; Algra, Ale; Dippel, Diederik W J; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Wermer, Marieke J H; van Walderveen, Marianne A A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE—: Status of collateral circulation is a strong predictor of outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Our aim was to compare the predictive value of strategies for collateral blood flow assessment with dynamic computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and conventional single-phase CT

  7. Impact of internal capsule lesions on outcome of motor hand function at one year post-stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiemanck, Sven K.; Kwakkel, Gert; Post, Marcel W. M.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Prevo, Arie J. H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between damage to different levels of the corticofugal tract and long-term hand motor recovery. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: Seventy-five first-ever middle cerebral artery stroke survivors. METHODS: Hand motor function was assessed with the

  8. Relationship between the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale and the Biomechanical Measure in Assessing Knee Extensor Muscle Spasticity in Patients with Post-Stroke Hemiparesia:A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nakhostin Ansari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS is a clinical meas-ure that has been recently developed for the assessment of muscle spasticity. There is a dearth of research on the validity of the MMAS. The aim of the present study was to investi-gate the relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope in assessing knee extensor muscle spasticity in patients with hemiparesia. Materials & Methods: Fourteen patients with post-stroke hemiparesia were included in this cross sectional study. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed with MMAS. An isokinetic dy-namometer was used to impose knee passive flexion with the angular velocity of 10, 30, 60, and 90 °/Sec to measure Torque-angle data. Work (Joule was calculated at each velocity to determine the slope of the work-velocity curves as the biomechanical measure of muscle spasticity. Results: The mean work decreased as the velocity increased but was not statistically signifi-cant (P = 0.07. The mean slope was – 0.35 [J /(°/Sec]. There was no significant correlation between the MMAS and the work-velocity slope (r =0.31, P = 0.28. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope. Further studies with larger sample size are suggested. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2: 131-136

  9. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  10. European Academy of Neurology and European Stroke Organization consensus statement and practical guidance for pre-hospital management of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, A; Czlonkowska, A; Ford, G A; Fonseca, A C; Luijckx, G J; Korv, J; de la Ossa, N Pérez; Price, C; Russell, D; Tsiskaridze, A; Messmer-Wullen, M; De Keyser, J

    2018-03-01

    The reduction of delay between onset and hospital arrival and adequate pre-hospital care of persons with acute stroke are important for improving the chances of a favourable outcome. The objective is to recommend evidence-based practices for the management of patients with suspected stroke in the pre-hospital setting. The GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology was used to define the key clinical questions. An expert panel then reviewed the literature, established the quality of the evidence, and made recommendations. Despite very low quality of evidence educational campaigns to increase the awareness of immediately calling emergency medical services are strongly recommended. Moderate quality evidence was found to support strong recommendations for the training of emergency medical personnel in recognizing the symptoms of a stroke and in implementation of a pre-hospital 'code stroke' including highest priority dispatch, pre-hospital notification and rapid transfer to the closest 'stroke-ready' centre. Insufficient evidence was found to recommend a pre-hospital stroke scale to predict large vessel occlusion. Despite the very low quality of evidence, restoring normoxia in patients with hypoxia is recommended, and blood pressure lowering drugs and treating hyperglycaemia with insulin should be avoided. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of mobile stroke units delivering intravenous thrombolysis at the scene. Because only feasibility studies have been reported, no recommendations can be provided for pre-hospital telemedicine during ambulance transport. These guidelines inform on the contemporary approach to patients with suspected stroke in the pre-hospital setting. Further studies, preferably randomized controlled trials, are required to examine the impact of particular interventions on quality parameters and outcome. © 2017 EAN.

  11. A systematic review of the impact of stroke on social support and social networks: associated factors and patterns of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Sarah; Moss, Becky; Harrison, Kirsty; Hilari, Katerina

    2016-08-01

    Identify what factors are associated with functional social support and social network post stroke; explore stroke survivors' perspectives on what changes occur and how they are perceived. The following electronic databases were systematically searched up to May 2015: Academic Search Complete; CINAHL Plus; E-journals; Health Policy Reference Centre; MEDLINE; PsycARTICLES; PsycINFO; and SocINDEX. PRISMA guidelines were followed in the conduct and reporting of this review. All included studies were critically appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program tools. Meta-ethnographic techniques were used to integrate findings from the qualitative studies. Given the heterogeneous nature of the quantitative studies, data synthesis was narrative. Seventy research reports met the eligibility criteria: 22 qualitative and 48 quantitative reporting on 4,816 stroke survivors. The qualitative studies described a contraction of the social network, with non-kin contact being vulnerable. Although family were more robust network members, significant strain was observed within the family unit. In the quantitative studies, poor functional social support was associated with depression (13/14 studies), reduced quality of life (6/6 studies) and worse physical recovery (2/2 studies). Reduced social network was associated with depression (7/8 studies), severity of disability (2/2 studies) and aphasia (2/2 studies). Although most indicators of social network reduced post stroke (for example, contact with friends, 5/5 studies), the perception of feeling supported remained relatively stable (4/4 studies). Following a stroke non-kin contact is vulnerable, strain is observed within the family unit, and poor social support is associated with depressive symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Impact of anxiety on verbal and visuospatial working memory in patients with acute stroke without severe cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosdemange, Antoine; Monfort, Vincent; Richard, Sébastien; Toniolo, Anne-Marie; Ducrocq, Xavier; Bolmont, Benoît

    2015-05-01

    Working memory is the most impaired cognitive domain in the acute phase of stroke. In a context where anxiety is highly prevalent, close attention must be paid to anxiety which could mimic mild to moderate working memory impairments. This is the first study to assess the contribution of state anxiety (the currently experienced level of anxiety) to the working memory (verbal, visuospatial) in patients with first-ever acute stroke without severe cognitive impairment. 28 patients with first-ever acute stroke and 41 matched control subjects were exposed to a neutral condition and an anxiogenic condition in which verbal (VWM) and visuospatial working memory (VSWM) performance and state anxiety were assessed. State anxiety was assessed before the beginning of the experiment (baseline), after the neutral condition and after the anxiogenic condition. The mean state anxiety score was higher in patients than in controls in the neutral (z = 1.9, p<0.05) and anxiogenic (z = 2, p<0.05) conditions despite a similar level at baseline. Multiple regression analyses with a dummy variable 'group' (patients vs controls) showed that increased state anxiety in patients contributed significantly more to both reduced VWM (β = -0.93, p<0.05) and VSWM (β = -1, p<0.05) performance between the neutral and anxiogenic conditions compared to controls. In a stressful context, the contribution of state anxiety to reduced working memory performance is more pronounced in patients with acute stroke than in controls. These results are of particular relevance for clinicians assessing patients in the acute phase of stroke in which anxiety is highly prevalent. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Functional Recovery of the Paretic Upper Limb After Stroke: Who Regains Hand Capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Participants: Patients with stroke (N=299)

  14. Functional recovery of the paretic upper limb after stroke: who regains hand capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Nijland, R.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Kwakkel, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe recovery of upper limb capacity after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation based on the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Inpatient department of a rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with stroke (N=299)

  15. How Does Scale of Implementation Impact the Environmental Sustainability of Wastewater Treatment Integrated with Resource Recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo, Pablo K; Zhang, Qiong; Mihelcic, James R

    2016-07-05

    Energy and resource consumptions required to treat and transport wastewater have led to efforts to improve the environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Resource recovery can reduce the environmental impact of these systems; however, limited research has considered how the scale of implementation impacts the sustainability of WWTPs integrated with resource recovery. Accordingly, this research uses life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate how the scale of implementation impacts the environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment integrated with water reuse, energy recovery, and nutrient recycling. Three systems were selected: a septic tank with aerobic treatment at the household scale, an advanced water reclamation facility at the community scale, and an advanced water reclamation facility at the city scale. Three sustainability indicators were considered: embodied energy, carbon footprint, and eutrophication potential. This study determined that as with economies of scale, there are benefits to centralization of WWTPs with resource recovery in terms of embodied energy and carbon footprint; however, the community scale was shown to have the lowest eutrophication potential. Additionally, technology selection, nutrient control practices, system layout, and topographical conditions may have a larger impact on environmental sustainability than the implementation scale in some cases.

  16. Multi-scale modeling of composites subjected to high speed impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhyung; Cha, Myung S.; Kim, Nam H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, multi-scale modeling methodology has been applied to simulate the relatively thick composite panels subjected to high speed local impact loading. Instead of massive parallel processing, we propose to use surrogate modeling to bridge micro-scale and macro-scale. Multi-scale modeling of fracture phenomena of composite materials will consist of (1) micro-scale modeling of fiber-matrix structure using the unit-volume-element technique, which can incorporate the boundary effect, and the level set method for crack modeling, which can model the crack propagation independent of finite element mesh; (2) macro-scale simulation of composite panels under high strain-rate impact using material response calculated from micro-scale modeling; and (3) surrogate modeling to integrate the two scales. In order to validate the predictions, first we did the material level lab experiment such as tensile test. We also did the field test of bullet impact into composite panels made of 4 plies fiber. The impact velocity ranges from 300 ˜ 600 m/s.

  17. Unconvergence of very-large-scale giant impact simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Natsuki; Iwasawa, Masaki; Tanikawa, Ataru; Nitadori, Keigo; Muranushi, Takayuki; Makino, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    The giant impact (GI) hypothesis is one of the most important hypotheses both in planetary science and in geoscience, since it is related to the origin of the Moon and also the initial condition of the Earth. A number of numerical simulations have been done using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. However, GI hypothesis is currently in a crisis. The “canonical” GI scenario failed to explain the identical isotope ratio between the Earth and the Moon. On the other hand, little has been known about the reliability of the result of GI simulations. In this paper, we discuss the effect of the resolution on the results of the GI simulations by varying the number of particles from 3 × 103 to 108. We found that the results does not converge, but show oscillatory behaviour. We discuss the origin of this oscillatory behaviour.

  18. Small Reservoir Impact on Simulated Watershed-Scale Nutrient Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane J. Prochnow

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The soil and water assessment tool (SWAT is used to assess the influence of small upland reservoirs (PL566 on watershed nutrient yield. SWAT simulates the impact of collectively increasing and decreasing PL566 magnitudes (size parameters on the watershed. Totally removing PL566 reservoirs results in a 100% increase in total phosphorus and an 82% increase in total nitrogen, while a total maximum daily load (TMDL calling for a 50% reduction in total phosphorus can be achieved with a 500% increase in the magnitude of PL566s in the watershed. PL566 reservoirs capture agriculture pollution in surface flow, providing long-term storage of these constituents when they settle to the reservoir beds. A potential strategy to reduce future downstream nutrient loading is to enhance or construct new PL566 reservoirs in the upper basin to better capture agricultural runoff.

  19. Acoustic fluidization and the scale dependence of impact crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.; Gaffney, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological Bingham plastic model has previously been shown to provide an adequate description of the collapse of impact craters. This paper demonstrates that the Bingham parameters may be derived from a model in which acoustic energy generated during excavation fluidizes the rock debris surrounding the crater. Experimental support for the theoretical flow law is presented. Although the Bingham yield stress cannot be computed without detailed knowledge of the initial acoustic field, the Bingham viscosity is derived from a simple argument which shows that it increases as the 3/2 power of crater diameter, consistent with observation. Crater collapse may occur in material with internal dissipation Q as low as 100, comparable to laboratory observations of dissipation in granular materials. Crater collapse thus does not require that the acoustic field be regenerated during flow.

  20. Utility of the impact of event scale in screening for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Anke B.; Bramsen, Inge; Hovens, Johannes E.; van der Ploeg, Henk M.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses the optimal cut-off point for the Impact of Event Scale and compares its screening properties with those of the Self-rating Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among war-related trauma victims. 74 patients with war-related trauma were administered the Impact of Event

  1. Design and construction of a full-scale lateral impact testing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this work is to design and construct a full scale lateral impact testing facility that is capable of recreating the damage that would be created by an overheight vehicle collision. This was accomplished by impacting a test specimen with 8...

  2. The Evaluation Scale: Exploring Decisions About Societal Impact in Peer Review Panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Gemma E; Samuel, Gabrielle N

    Realising the societal gains from publicly funded health and medical research requires a model for a reflexive evaluation precedent for the societal impact of research. This research explores UK Research Excellence Framework evaluators' values and opinions and assessing societal impact, prior to the assessment taking place. Specifically, we discuss the characteristics of two different impact assessment extremes - the "quality-focused" evaluation and "societal impact-focused" evaluation. We show the wide range of evaluator views about impact, and that these views could be conceptually reflected in a range of different positions along a conceptual evaluation scale. We describe the characteristics of these extremes in detail, and discuss the different beliefs evaluators had which could influence where they positioned themselves along the scale. These decisions, we argue, when considered together, form a dominant definition of societal impact that influences the direction of its evaluation by the panel.

  3. Impact of achieved blood pressure on renal function decline and first stroke in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youbao; Liang, Min; Jiang, Chongfei; Wang, Guobao; Li, Jianping; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Fangfang; Sun, Ningling; Cui, Yiming; He, Mingli; Tang, Genfu; Yin, Delu; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Wang, Binyan; Huo, Yong; Xu, Xin; Hou, Fan Fan; Xu, Xiping; Qin, Xianhui

    2018-03-01

    The effect of achieved blood pressure (BP) on first stroke and renal function decline among hypertensive patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still uncertain. In total, 3230 hypertensive patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or proteinuria were included in the present analyses. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to a daily treatment of a combined enalapril 10 mg and folic acid 0.8 mg tablet or an enalapril 10 mg tablet alone. Participants were followed up every 3 months. The study outcomes included first stroke and the progression of CKD. The median antihypertensive treatment duration was 4.7 years. Compared with participants with a time-averaged on-treatment systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 135 to ≤140 mmHg, the incidence of total first stroke [1.7% versus 3.3%; hazard ratio (HR), 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.26-0.99] and ischemic stroke (1.3% versus 2.8%; HR, 0.46; 95% CI: 0.22-0.98) decreased significantly in those with a time-averaged SBP of ≤135 mmHg. Furthermore, a time-averaged diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of ≤80 mmHg, compared with a time-averaged DBP level of 80 to ≤90 mmHg, was significantly related to a decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (0.2% versus 0.9%; HR, 0.18; 95% CI: 0.04-0.80). However, compared with participants with a time-averaged SBP of 135 to ≤140 mmHg, a lower but non-significant trend of CKD progression was found in those with a time-averaged SBP of ≤130 mmHg. A BP treatment level of ≤135/80 mmHg, compared with a BP treatment level of 135-140/80-90 mmHg, could lead to a decreased risk of first stroke in hypertensive patients with mild-to-moderate CKD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Endovascular stroke treatment in a small-volume stroke center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Gry N; Fjetland, Lars; Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Martin W; Kurz, Kathinka D

    2017-04-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) of stroke caused by large vessel occlusions (LVO) performed by general interventional radiologists in cooperation with stroke neurologists and neuroradiologists at a center with a limited annual number of procedures. We aimed to compare our results with those previously reported from larger stroke centers. A total of 108 patients with acute stroke due to LVO treated with EVT were included. Outcome was measured using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days. Efficacy was classified according to the modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (mTICI) scoring system. Safety was evaluated according to the incidence of procedural complications and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Mean age of the patients was 67.5 years. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on hospital admission was 17. Successful revascularization was achieved in 76%. 39.4% experienced a good clinical outcome (mRS<3). Intraprocedural complications were seen in 7.4%. 7.4% suffered a sICH. 21.3% died within 3 months after EVT. The use of general interventional radiologists in EVT of LVO may be a possible approach for improving EVT coverage where availability of specialized neurointerventionalists is challenging. EVT for LVO stroke performed by general interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists can be safe and efficacious despite the low number of annual procedures.

  5. Recent Trends in Local-Scale Marine Biodiversity Reflect Community Structure and Human Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Robin; O'Connor, Mary I; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Dunic, Jillian; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Hensel, Marc J S; Kearns, Patrick J

    2015-07-20

    The modern biodiversity crisis reflects global extinctions and local introductions. Human activities have dramatically altered rates and scales of processes that regulate biodiversity at local scales. Reconciling the threat of global biodiversity loss with recent evidence of stability at fine spatial scales is a major challenge and requires a nuanced approach to biodiversity change that integrates ecological understanding. With a new dataset of 471 diversity time series spanning from 1962 to 2015 from marine coastal ecosystems, we tested (1) whether biodiversity changed at local scales in recent decades, and (2) whether we can ignore ecological context (e.g., proximate human impacts, trophic level, spatial scale) and still make informative inferences regarding local change. We detected a predominant signal of increasing species richness in coastal systems since 1962 in our dataset, though net species loss was associated with localized effects of anthropogenic impacts. Our geographically extensive dataset is unlikely to be a random sample of marine coastal habitats; impacted sites (3% of our time series) were underrepresented relative to their global presence. These local-scale patterns do not contradict the prospect of accelerating global extinctions but are consistent with local species loss in areas with direct human impacts and increases in diversity due to invasions and range expansions in lower impact areas. Attempts to detect and understand local biodiversity trends are incomplete without information on local human activities and ecological context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying Catchment-Scale Predictors of Coal Mining Impacts on New Zealand Stream Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapcott, Joanne E.; Goodwin, Eric O.; Harding, Jon S.

    2016-03-01

    Coal mining activities can have severe and long-term impacts on freshwater ecosystems. At the individual stream scale, these impacts have been well studied; however, few attempts have been made to determine the predictors of mine impacts at a regional scale. We investigated whether catchment-scale measures of mining impacts could be used to predict biological responses. We collated data from multiple studies and analyzed algae, benthic invertebrate, and fish community data from 186 stream sites, including un-mined streams, and those associated with 620 mines on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand. Algal, invertebrate, and fish richness responded to mine impacts and were significantly higher in un-mined compared to mine-impacted streams. Changes in community composition toward more acid- and metal-tolerant species were evident for algae and invertebrates, whereas changes in fish communities were significant and driven by a loss of nonmigratory native species. Consistent catchment-scale predictors of mining activities affecting biota included the time post mining (years), mining density (the number of mines upstream per catchment area), and mining intensity (tons of coal production per catchment area). Mining was associated with a decline in stream biodiversity irrespective of catchment size, and recovery was not evident until at least 30 years after mining activities have ceased. These catchment-scale predictors can provide managers and regulators with practical metrics to focus on management and remediation decisions.

  7. Identifying Catchment-Scale Predictors of Coal Mining Impacts on New Zealand Stream Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapcott, Joanne E; Goodwin, Eric O; Harding, Jon S

    2016-03-01

    Coal mining activities can have severe and long-term impacts on freshwater ecosystems. At the individual stream scale, these impacts have been well studied; however, few attempts have been made to determine the predictors of mine impacts at a regional scale. We investigated whether catchment-scale measures of mining impacts could be used to predict biological responses. We collated data from multiple studies and analyzed algae, benthic invertebrate, and fish community data from 186 stream sites, including un-mined streams, and those associated with 620 mines on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand. Algal, invertebrate, and fish richness responded to mine impacts and were significantly higher in un-mined compared to mine-impacted streams. Changes in community composition toward more acid- and metal-tolerant species were evident for algae and invertebrates, whereas changes in fish communities were significant and driven by a loss of nonmigratory native species. Consistent catchment-scale predictors of mining activities affecting biota included the time post mining (years), mining density (the number of mines upstream per catchment area), and mining intensity (tons of coal production per catchment area). Mining was associated with a decline in stream biodiversity irrespective of catchment size, and recovery was not evident until at least 30 years after mining activities have ceased. These catchment-scale predictors can provide managers and regulators with practical metrics to focus on management and remediation decisions.

  8. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  9. The impact of a physician-staffed helicopter on outcome in patients admitted to a stroke unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Rasmussen, Lars S.; Lohse, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transportation by helicopter may reduce time to hospital admission and improve outcome. We aimed to investigate the effect of transport mode on mortality, disability, and labour market affiliation in patients admitted to the stroke unit. Methods: Prospective, observational study with 5...... labour market affiliation compared to patients transported by a ground unit. Trial registration: The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02576379)....

  10. Post-stroke depression: mechanisms, translation and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Kronenberg, Golo; Endres, Matthias; Schumann-Bard, Pascale; Freret, Thomas; Filipkowski, Robert K; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between depression and stroke is highly complex. Post-stroke depression (PSD) is among the most frequent neuropsychiatric consequences of stroke. Depression also negatively impacts stroke outcome with increased morbidity, mortality and poorer functional recovery. Antidepressants such as the commonly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors improve stroke outcome, an effect that may extend far beyond depression, e.g., to motor recovery. The main biological theory of P...

  11. A comparison of the Barthel Index and the Functional Independence Measure as outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation: patterns of disability scale usage in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Harpreet; Lipson, David; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Bhogal, Sanjit; Pohani, Gina; Teasell, Robert W

    2005-06-01

    In order to compare the frequency and patterns of use of the Barthel Index (BI) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) in stroke rehabilitation trials, all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of stroke rehabilitation published between 1968 and 2002 were identified and reviewed to determine the frequency with which the BI and FIM measures were used relative to other measures of disability. The date and location of each study citing either the FIM or the BI were also recorded. Studies were assigned ratings of methodological quality based on the physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scoring system. Comparisons of the age, frequency and continents of origin and methodological quality of the studies were explored. Results indicate that the BI and FIM were the most common measures of disability used in RCTs examining stroke rehabilitation. However, the BI was used more often than the FIM (n=86, Pscale use in stroke rehabilitation research.

  12. A "client-centred activities of daily living" intervention for persons with stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidetti, Susanne; Ranner, Maria; Tham, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    diagnosed with dementia, and were able to understand instructions. Data collection was performed by blinded assessors. The primary outcome, perceived participation, was assessed with the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0, domain 8. The secondary outcomes, participation, independence in ADL, and life satisfaction...

  13. Hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics as primary stroke prevention make better functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Mo; Lin, Wei Chun; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Thiazides have been used for the control of blood pressure and primary prevention of ischemic stroke. No previous studies have assessed the influence of thiazides on functional prognosis after ischemic stroke. Demographics, prestroke conditions, poststroke National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and clinical and laboratory parameters were prospectively registered in 216 Taiwanese patients. One hundred forty patients who completed follow-up 3 months after experiencing ischemic stroke were assessed with the modified Rankin scale as functional prognoses. Twenty-one patients used thiazide to control hypertension before experiencing ischemic stroke. No differences of stroke subtypes and comorbidities before stroke were observed between the 2 groups. The emergency department National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was lesser among thiazide users (4 [2-7] versus 6 [4-16], P = .02). Among 140 patients who completed follow-up in 90 days, thiazide users had more favorable functional status (modified Rankin scale ≤2: 42.4% versus 26.9%, P = .02, odds ratio 3.34, 95%, confidence interval .130-.862). Hypertensive patients treated with thiazides long term had a lesser severity of stroke and better functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Determinants of Length of Stay in Stroke Patients: A Geriatric Rehabilitation Unit Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to identify the predictors of length of stay--the impact of age, comorbidity, and stroke subtype--on the outcome of geriatric stroke patients. One hundred and seventy stroke patients (129 first-ever ischemic, 25 hemorrhagic, and 16 ischemic second strokes) were included in the study. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project…

  15. Evaluación del impacto de una trayectoria clínica sobre el ictus isquémico Impact of a clinical pathway for stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Esteve

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar el impacto de la introducción de una trayectoria clínica sobre la atención a los pacientes con un ictus isquémico. Métodos: Se diseñó un estudio de intervención, controlado, sin asignación aleatoria, de seguimiento de 2 cohortes de pacientes, no coincidentes en el tiempo, correspondiente a los períodos inmediatamente anterior (grupo PRE o control y posterior (grupo POST o intervención a la introducción de la trayectoria clínica. Las principales medidas del resultado fueron: a indicadores de calidad asistencial; b mejora en la capacidad funcional (índice de Barthel y la función neurológica (escala Canadiense; c complicaciones intrahospitalarias; d satisfacción, y e estancia media. Resultados: Se reclutó a 139 pacientes, 69 correspondientes al período PRE y 70 al período POST, sin que se observaran diferencias significativas al ingreso entre ambos grupos. Se constató una reducción del 36,5% en el tiempo transcurrido desde el ingreso hasta el inicio de la movilización, aunque no se observaron diferencias significativas en los otros indicadores de calidad ni en el incremento de la función neurológica o la capacidad funcional. El porcentaje de individuos con alguna complicación durante el ingreso fue del 44,6% en el período PRE y del 28,6% en el período POST (p = 0,039. No se observaron diferencias significativas en la valoración global del cuestionario de satisfacción, pero los pacientes del período POST presentaron una mayor satisfacción en las dimensiones «información recibida» y «profesionalidad y confianza». La estancia media se redujo de 11 a 10 días. Conclusiones: La introducción de la trayectoria clínica del ictus isquémico puede contribuir a reducir el número de complicaciones y los días de estancia, así como mejorar la calidad de la atención y la satisfacción de los pacientes.Objective: To assess the impact of the implementation of a clinical pathway for stroke patients

  16. Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess the Impact of Cyberbullying: The Cybervictimization Emotional Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipe, Paz; Mora-Merchán, Joaquín A; Nacimiento, Lydia

    2017-08-01

    Cyberbullying is a phenomenon with important adverse consequences on victims. The emotional impact of this phenomenon has been well established. However, there is to date no instrument with good psychometric properties tested to assess such impact. The objective of this study was developing and testing the psychometric properties of an instrument to assess the emotional impact of cyberbullying: the "Cybervictimization Emotional Impact Scale, CVEIS." The sample included 1,016 Compulsory Secondary Education students (52.9 percent female) aged between 12 and 18 (M = 13.86, DT = 1.33) from three schools in southern Spain. The study used Confirmatory Factor Analyses to test the structure of the questionnaire and robustness of the scale. Internal consistency was also tested. The results supported the suitability of a three-factor model: active, depressed, and annoyed. This model showed an optimal adjustment, which was better than its competing models. It also demonstrated strong invariance among cybervictims and non-cybervictims and also among gender. The internal consistency of each factor, and the total scale, was also appropriate. The article concludes by discussing research and practical implications of the scale.

  17. mStroke: "Mobile Stroke"-Improving Acute Stroke Care with Smartphone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Benjamin Y; Stack, Colleen M; Yang, Julian P; Dodds, Jodi A

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of method and time of system activation on clinical metrics in cases utilizing the Stop Stroke (Pulsara, Inc.) mobile acute stroke care coordination application. A retrospective cohort analysis of stroke codes at 12 medical centers using Stop Stroke from March 2013 to May 2016 was performed. Comparison of metrics (door-to-needle time [DTN] and door-to-CT time [DTC], and rate of DTN ≤ 60 minutes [goal DTN]) was performed between subgroups based on method (emergency medical service [EMS] versus emergency department [ED]) and time of activation. Effects were adjusted for confounders (age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) using multiple linear and logistic regression. The final dataset included 2589 cases. Cases activated by EMS were more severe (median NIHSS score 8 versus 4, P smartphone technology provides unique insight into acute stroke codes. Activation of mobile electronic stroke coordination in the field appears to promote a more expedited and successful care process. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  19. The Prognostic Value of a Four-Dimensional CT Angiography-Based Collateral Grading Scale for Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Weili; Tang, Huan; Han, Quan; Yan, Shenqiang; Zhang, Xiaocheng; Chen, Qingmeng; Parsons, Mark; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal collaterals, which affects tissue fate, are still challenging to assess. Four-dimensional CT angiography (4D CTA) originated from CT perfusion (CTP) provides the possibility of non-invasive and time-resolved assessment of leptomeningeal collateral flow. We sought to develop a comprehensive rating system to integrate the speed and extent of collateral flow on 4D CTA, and investigate its prognostic value for reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. We retrospectively studied 80 patients with M1 ± internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion who had baseline CTP before intravenous thrombolysis. The velocity and extent of collaterals were evaluated by regional leptomeningeal collateral score on peak phase (rLMC-P) and temporally fused intensity projections (tMIP) (rLMC-M) on 4D CTA, respectively. The cutoffs of rLMC-P and rLMC-M score for predicting good outcome (mRS score ≤ 2) were integrated to develop the collateral grading scale (CGS) (rating from 0-2). The CGS score was correlated with 3-months mRS score (non-recanalizers: ρ = -0.495, p = 0.01; recanalizers: ρ = -0.671, p < 0.001). Patients with intermediate or good collaterals (CGS score of 1 and 2) who recanalized were more likely to have good outcome than those without recanalization (p = 0.038, p = 0.018), while there was no significant difference in outcome in patients with poor collaterals (CGS score of 0) stratified by recanalization (p = 0.227). Identification of collaterals based on CGS may help to select good responders to reperfusion therapy in patients with large artery occlusion.

  20. Problem Gambling Family Impacts: Development of the Problem Gambling Family Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, N A; Suomi, A; Jackson, A C; Lavis, T

    2016-09-01

    Although family members of problem gamblers frequently present to treatment services, problem gambling family impacts are under-researched. The most commonly endorsed items on a new measure of gambling-related family impacts [Problem Gambling Family Impact Measure (PG-FIM: Problem Gambler version)] by 212 treatment-seeking problem gamblers included trust (62.5 %), anger (61.8 %), depression or sadness (58.7 %), anxiety (57.7 %), distress due to gambling-related absences (56.1 %), reduced quality time (52.4 %), and communication breakdowns (52.4 %). The PG-FIM (Problem Gambler version) was comprised of three factors: (1) financial impacts, (2) increased responsibility impacts, and (3) psychosocial impacts with good psychometric properties. Younger, more impulsive, non-electronic gaming machine (EGM) gamblers who had more severe gambling problems reported more financial impacts; non-EGM gamblers with poorer general health reported more increased responsibility impacts; and more impulsive non-EGM gamblers with more psychological distress and higher gambling severity reported more psychosocial impacts. The findings have implications for the development of interventions for the family members of problem gamblers.

  1. Spatial scale and movement behaviour traits control the impacts of habitat fragmentation on individual fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattarino, Lorenzo; McAlpine, Clive A; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation, that is the breaking apart of habitat, can occur at multiple spatial scales at the same time, as a result of different land uses. Individuals of most species spend different amounts of times moving in different modes, during which they cover different distances and experience different fitness impacts. The scale at which fragmentation occurs interacts with the distance that individuals move in a particular mode to affect an individual's ability to find habitat. However, there is little knowledge of the fitness consequences of different scales of fragmentation for individuals with different traits of movement behaviour. This is critical to understand the mechanisms of persistence of different species in fragmented landscapes. The aim of this study was to quantify the impacts of habitat fragmentation at different scales on the fitness components (reproduction and survival) of individuals with different traits of movement behaviour. We developed a demographic model of individuals that adopt short and tortuous movements within foraging areas (foraging mode) and long and straight movements between foraging areas (searching mode). We considered individuals that adopt different movement modes with varying frequencies, inherently move different searching distances and experience different risks of mortality during searching. We then applied the model within a spatially explicit simulation framework where we varied simultaneously the degree of fragmentation within (fine scale) and between foraging areas (coarse scale). Fine-scale fragmentation had a greater impact on reproduction and survival than coarse-scale fragmentation, for those individuals with a low searching propensity. The impact of fine-scale fragmentation on reproduction and survival interacted with the impact of coarse-scale fragmentation on reproduction and survival, to affect the fitness of individuals with a high searching propensity, large inherent searching distances and high

  2. The translational research impact scale: development, construct validity, and reliability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembe, Allard E; Lynch, Michele S; Gugiu, P Cristian; Jackson, Rebecca D

    2014-03-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed on measuring return on research investment and determining the true impacts of biomedical research for medical practice and population health. This article describes initial progress on development of a new standardized tool for identifying and measuring impacts across research sites. The Translational Research Impact Scale (TRIS) is intended to provide a systematic approach to assessing impact levels using a set of 72 impact indicators organized into three broad research impact domains and nine subdomains. A validation process was conducted with input from a panel of 31 experts in translational research, who met to define and standardize the measurement of research impacts using the TRIS. Testing was performed to estimate the reliability of the experts' ratings. The reliability was found to be high (ranging from .75 to .94) in all of the domains and most of the subdomains. A weighting process was performed assigning item weights to the individual indicators, so that composite scores can be derived.

  3. Mismatch between observed and perceived upper limb function: an eye-catching phenomenon after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essers, Bea; Meyer, Sarah; De Bruyn, Nele; Van Gils, Annick; Boccuni, Leonardo; Tedesco Triccas, Lisa; Peeters, André; Thijs, Vincent; Feys, Hilde; Verheyden, Geert

    2018-03-22

    To investigate the relation between observed and perceived upper limb motor function in patients with chronic stroke. We investigated 32 patients at six months after stroke with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (observed function) and hand subscale of the Stroke Impact Scale (perceived function). Spearman correlation was calculated to relate observed and perceived function. Through cut-off scores, we divided our sample in low (Fugl-Meyer Assessment low (hand subscale of Stroke Impact Scale low match group" of patients with low observed and low perceived function (n = 11, 34%), a "good match group" containing patients with good observed and good perceived function (n = 15, 47%), and a "mismatch group" comprising patients with good observed but low perceived function (n = 6, 19%). In our chronic sample, one in five patients showed good upper limb observed but low perceived function. Measuring both observed and perceived arm and hand function seems warranted together with considering a differential therapy approach for the distinct groups. Implications for rehabilitation A considerable group of patients in the chronic phase post-stroke have good motor function in their affected upper limb, but nevertheless perceive a restricted ability. In order to identify a mismatch in people with chronic stroke, both observed and perceived upper limb motor function should be assessed. Besides common measurement tools for observed function like the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, perceived function can be evaluated by means of the hand function section of the Stroke Impact Scale. For patients with good observed but low perceived function, an additional rehabilitation strategy should be considered, potentially including awareness of ability and a self-efficacy approach.

  4. Impacts of Sensation, Perception, and Motor Abilities of the Ipsilesional Upper Limb on Hand Functions in Unilateral Stroke: Quantifications From Biomechanical and Functional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Ke, Chia-Wen; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Yang, Hsiu-Ching; Tsai, Ching-Liang; Kuo, Li-Chieh

    2018-02-01

    The presence of subtle losses in hand dexterity after stroke affects the regaining of independence with regard to activities of daily living. Therefore, awareness of ipsilesional upper extremity (UE) function may be of importance when developing a comprehensive rehabilitation program. However, current hand function tests seem to be unable to identify asymptomatic UE impairments. To assess the motor coordination as well as the sensory perception of an ipsilesional UE using biomechanical analysis of performance-oriented tasks and conducting a Manual Tactile Test (MTT). Case-controlled study. A university hospital. A total of 21 patients with unilateral stroke, along with 21 matched healthy control subjects, were recruited. Each participant was requested to perform a pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test, object-transport task, and reach-to-grasp task via motion capture, as well as the MTT. The kinetic data of the PHUA test, kinematics analysis of functional movements, and time requirement of MTT were analyzed. Patients with ipsilesional UE had an inferior ability to scale and produce pinch force precisely when conducting the PHUA test compared to the healthy controls (P perception (P sensation-perception-motor system in the ipsilesional UE. Integration of sensorimotor training programs for ipsilesional UE in future neuro-rehabilitation strategies may provide more beneficial effects to regain patients' motor recovery and to promote daily living activity independence than focusing on paretic arm motor training alone. III. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sleep Duration, Sedentary Behavior, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life after Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeugwu, Victor E; Manns, Patricia J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe accelerometer-derived sleep duration, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and quality of life and their association with demographic and clinical factors within the first month after inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Thirty people with stroke (mean ± standard deviation, age: 63.8 ± 12.3 years, time since stroke: 3.6 ± 1.1 months) wore an activPAL3 Micro accelerometer (PAL Technologies, Glasgow, Scotland) continuously for 7 days to measure whole-day activity behavior. The Stroke Impact Scale and the Functional Independence Measure were used to assess quality of life and function, respectively. Sleep duration ranged from 6.6 to 11.6 hours/day. Fifteen participants engaged in long sleep greater than 9 hours/day. Participants spent 74.8% of waking hours in sedentary behavior, 17.9% standing, and 7.3% stepping. Of stepping time, only a median of 1.1 (interquartile range: .3-5.8) minutes were spent walking at a moderate-to-vigorous intensity (≥100 steps/minute). The time spent sedentary, the stepping time, and the number of steps differed significantly by the hemiparetic side (P stroke. There were moderate to strong correlations between the stepping time and the number of steps with gait speed (Spearman r = .49 and .61 respectively, P stroke, and cognition were not significant. People with stroke sleep for longer than the normal duration, spend about three quarters of their waking hours in sedentary behaviors, and engage in minimal walking following stroke rehabilitation. Our findings provide a rationale for the development of behavior change strategies after stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    higher mortality risk (HR, 1.564; 95% CI, 1.441-1.696). The increased risk was, however, time-dependent; initially, risk was 4-fold, after 1 week it was 2.5-fold, and after 3 weeks it was 1.5-fold. After 3 months stroke type did not correlate to mortality. Conclusion-Strokes are generally more severe......Background and Purpose-Stroke patients with hemorrhagic (HS) and ischemic strokes were compared with regard to stroke severity, mortality, and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods-A registry started in 2001, with the aim of registering all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds...... information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  7. Hydrodynamic interactions in metachronal paddling: effects of varying stroke kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaee, Milad; Kasoju, Vishwa; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2017-11-01

    Crustaceans such as shrimp and krill use a drag-based technique for propulsion, in which multiple pairs of limbs are paddled rhythmically from the tail to the head. Each limb is phase-shifted in time relative to its neighbor. Most studies of this type of metachronal swimming have focused on the jet formed in the animal's wake. However, synergistic hydrodynamic interactions between adjacent limbs in metachrony have received minimal attention. We used a dynamically scaled robotic model to experimentally investigate how variations in stroke kinematics impact inter-paddle hydrodynamic interactions and thrust generation. Physical models of limbs were fitted to the robot and paddled with two different motion profiles (MPs)-1) MP1: metachronal power stroke (PS) and metachronal recovery stroke (RS); and 2) MP2: metachronal PS and synchronous RS. Stroke frequency and amplitude were maintained constant across both MPs. Our results show that MP2 produced faster jets in the thrust-generating direction as compared to MP1. The necessity for a pause in MP2 after completion of PS by the paddles leading the motion, prior to executing the synchronous RS, aided in further downstream flow propagation. The effect of using asymmetric stroke kinematics on thrust generated will be discussed.

  8. Moving with music for stroke rehabilitation: a sonification feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Daniel S; Rhode, Sönke; Großbach, Michael; Rollnik, Jens; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-03-01

    Gross-motor impairments are common after stroke, but efficacious and motivating therapies for these impairments are scarce. We present a novel musical sonification therapy especially designed to retrain gross-motor functions. Four stroke patients were included in a clinical pre-post feasibility study and were trained with our sonification training. Patients' upper-extremity functions and their psychological states were assessed before and after training. The four patients were subdivided into two groups, with both groups receiving 9 days of musical sonification therapy (music group, MG) or a sham sonification training (control group, CG). The only difference between these training protocols was that, in the CG, no sound was played back. During the training the patients initially explored the acoustic effects of their arm movements, and at the end of the training the patients played simple melodies by moving their arms. The two patients in the MG improved in nearly all motor function tests after the training. They also reported in the stroke impact scale, which assesses well-being, memory, thinking, and social participation, to be less impaired by the stroke. The two patients in the CG did benefit less from the movement training. Taken together, musical sonification may be a promising therapy for impairments after stroke. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Stroke Location Is an Independent Predictor of Cognitive Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Fanny; Sagnier, Sharmila; Asselineau, Julien; Bigourdan, Antoine; Guttmann, Charles R; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Poli, Mathilde; Renou, Pauline; Perez, Paul; Dousset, Vincent; Sibon, Igor; Tourdias, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    On top of functional outcome, accurate prediction of cognitive outcome for stroke patients is an unmet need with major implications for clinical management. We investigated whether stroke location may contribute independent prognostic value to multifactorial predictive models of functional and cognitive outcomes. Four hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were prospectively assessed with magnetic resonance imaging at 24 to 72 hours and at 3 months for functional outcome using the modified Rankin Scale and cognitive outcome using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Statistical maps of functional and cognitive eloquent regions were derived from the first 215 patients (development sample) using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. We used multivariate logistic regression models to study the influence of stroke location (number of eloquent voxels from voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping maps), age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and stroke volume on modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. The second part of our cohort was used as an independent replication sample. In univariate analyses, stroke location, age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume were all predictive of poor modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. In multivariable analyses, stroke location remained the strongest independent predictor of MoCA and significantly improved the prediction compared with using only age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume (area under the curve increased from 0.697-0.771; difference=0.073; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.155). In contrast, stroke location did not persist as independent predictor of modified Rankin Scale that was mainly driven by initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (area under the curve going from 0.840 to 0.835). Similar results were obtained in the replication sample. Stroke location is an independent predictor of cognitive outcome (MoCA) at 3

  10. Community Stroke Rehabilitation: How Do Rural Residents Fare Compared With Their Urban Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Laura; McIntyre, Amanda; Janzen, Shannon; Richardson, Marina; Meyer, Matthew; Ure, David; Teasell, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rural living has been demonstrated to have an effect on a person's overall health status, and rural residing individuals often have decreased access to health and specialized rehabilitation services. The aim of this study was to determine if there are differences in recovery from stroke between urban and rural-dwelling stroke survivors accessing an in-home, community-based, interdisciplinary, stroke rehabilitation program. Data from a cohort of 1222 stroke survivors receiving care from the Community Stroke Rehabilitation Teams between January 2009 and June 2013 was analyzed. This program delivers stroke rehabilitation care directly in a person's home and community. Functional and psychosocial outcomes were evaluated at baseline, discharge, and six -month follow-up. A series of multiple linear regression analyses was performed to determine if rural versus urban status was a significant predictor of discharge and 6-month health outcomes. The mean age of the rural cohort was 68.8 (±13.1) years (53.6% male), and the urban cohort was 68.4 (±13.0) years (44.8% male). A total of 278 (35.4%) individuals were classified as living in a rural area using the Rurality Index for Ontario. In multivariate linear regression analysis, no significant differences on the Functional Independence Measure, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, or the Reintegration to Normal Living Index were found between urban and rural cohorts. When provided with access to a home-based, specialized stroke rehabilitation program, rural dwelling stroke survivors make and maintain functional gains comparable to their urban-living counterparts.

  11. Impacts of different characterizations of large-scale background on simulated regional-scale ozone over the continental United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hogrefe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes simulated regional-scale ozone burdens both near the surface and aloft, estimates process contributions to these burdens, and calculates the sensitivity of the simulated regional-scale ozone burden to several key model inputs with a particular emphasis on boundary conditions derived from hemispheric or global-scale models. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model simulations supporting this analysis were performed over the continental US for the year 2010 within the context of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII and Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF-HTAP activities. CMAQ process analysis (PA results highlight the dominant role of horizontal and vertical advection on the ozone burden in the mid-to-upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Vertical mixing, including mixing by convective clouds, couples fluctuations in free-tropospheric ozone to ozone in lower layers. Hypothetical bounding scenarios were performed to quantify the effects of emissions, boundary conditions, and ozone dry deposition on the simulated ozone burden. Analysis of these simulations confirms that the characterization of ozone outside the regional-scale modeling domain can have a profound impact on simulated regional-scale ozone. This was further investigated by using data from four hemispheric or global modeling systems (Chemistry – Integrated Forecasting Model (C-IFS, CMAQ extended for hemispheric applications (H-CMAQ, the Goddard Earth Observing System model coupled to chemistry (GEOS-Chem, and AM3 to derive alternate boundary conditions for the regional-scale CMAQ simulations. The regional-scale CMAQ simulations using these four different boundary conditions showed that the largest ozone abundance in the upper layers was simulated when using boundary conditions from GEOS-Chem, followed by the simulations using C-IFS, AM3, and H-CMAQ boundary conditions, consistent with the analysis of the

  12. Impacts of different characterizations of large-scale background on simulated regional-scale ozone over the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogrefe, Christian; Liu, Peng; Pouliot, George; Mathur, Rohit; Roselle, Shawn; Flemming, Johannes; Lin, Meiyun; Park, Rokjin J.

    2018-03-01

    This study analyzes simulated regional-scale ozone burdens both near the surface and aloft, estimates process contributions to these burdens, and calculates the sensitivity of the simulated regional-scale ozone burden to several key model inputs with a particular emphasis on boundary conditions derived from hemispheric or global-scale models. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations supporting this analysis were performed over the continental US for the year 2010 within the context of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) and Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF-HTAP) activities. CMAQ process analysis (PA) results highlight the dominant role of horizontal and vertical advection on the ozone burden in the mid-to-upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Vertical mixing, including mixing by convective clouds, couples fluctuations in free-tropospheric ozone to ozone in lower layers. Hypothetical bounding scenarios were performed to quantify the effects of emissions, boundary conditions, and ozone dry deposition on the simulated ozone burden. Analysis of these simulations confirms that the characterization of ozone outside the regional-scale modeling domain can have a profound impact on simulated regional-scale ozone. This was further investigated by using data from four hemispheric or global modeling systems (Chemistry - Integrated Forecasting Model (C-IFS), CMAQ extended for hemispheric applications (H-CMAQ), the Goddard Earth Observing System model coupled to chemistry (GEOS-Chem), and AM3) to derive alternate boundary conditions for the regional-scale CMAQ simulations. The regional-scale CMAQ simulations using these four different boundary conditions showed that the largest ozone abundance in the upper layers was simulated when using boundary conditions from GEOS-Chem, followed by the simulations using C-IFS, AM3, and H-CMAQ boundary conditions, consistent with the analysis of the ozone fields

  13. Ranking of small scale proposals for water system repair using the Rapid Impact Assessment Matrix (RIAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakib-Manesh, T.E.; Hirvonen, K.O.; Jalava, K.J.; Ålander, T.; Kuitunen, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental impacts of small scale projects are often assessed poorly, or not assessed at all. This paper examines the usability of the Rapid Impact Assessment Matrix (RIAM) as a tool to prioritize project proposals for small scale water restoration projects in relation to proposals' potential to improve the environment. The RIAM scoring system was used to assess and rank the proposals based on their environmental impacts, the costs of the projects to repair the harmful impacts, and the size of human population living around the sites. A four-member assessment group (The expert panel) gave the RIAM-scores to the proposals. The assumed impacts of the studied projects at the Eastern Finland water systems were divided into the ecological and social impacts. The more detailed assessment categories of the ecological impacts in this study were impacts on landscape, natural state, and limnology. The social impact categories were impacts to recreational use of the area, fishing, industry, population, and economy. These impacts were scored according to their geographical and social significance, their magnitude of change, their character, permanence, reversibility, and cumulativeness. The RIAM method proved to be an appropriate and recommendable method for the small-scale assessment and prioritizing of project proposals. If the assessments are well documented, the RIAM can be a method for easy assessing and comparison of the various kinds of projects. In the studied project proposals there were no big surprises in the results: the best ranks were received by the projects, which were assumed to return watersheds toward their original state

  14. National Trends in Patients Hospitalized for Stroke and Stroke Mortality in France, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoffre, Camille; de Peretti, Christine; Gabet, Amélie; Grimaud, Olivier; Woimant, France; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Olié, Valérie

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men in France. In young adults (ie, stroke was observed at a local scale between 1985 and 2011. After the implementation of the 2010 to 2014 National Stroke Action Plan, this study investigates national trends in patients hospitalized by stroke subtypes, in-hospital mortality, and stroke mortality between 2008 and 2014. Hospitalization data were extracted from the French national hospital discharge databases and mortality data from the French national medical causes of death database. Time trends were tested using a Poisson regression model. From 2008 to 2014, the age-standardized rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke increased by 14.3% in patients stroke was stable (+2.0%), irrespective of age and sex. The proportion of patients hospitalized in stroke units substantially increased. In-hospital mortality decreased by 17.1% in patients with ischemic stroke. From 2008 to 2013, stroke mortality decreased, except for women between 45 and 64 years old and for people aged ≥85 years. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors and improved stroke management may explain the increase in the rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke. The decrease observed for in-hospital stroke mortality may be because of recent improvements in acute-phase management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The long-term effects of pitavastatin on blood lipids and platelet activation markers in stroke patients: impact of the homocysteine level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Sugimoto

    Full Text Available To examine the impact of the plasma homocysteine level on the anti-atherosclerotic effects of pitavastatin treatment, we retrospectively examined 59 patients who had a history of stroke and had been prescribed pitavastatin for the treatment of dyslipidemia at the Neurology department of Toho University Ohashi Medical Center Hospital. The patients were classified into two groups according to their homocysteine levels. Carotid artery plaque progression was determined before and after pitavastatin treatment. Plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, platelet molecular markers, and von Willebrand factor were measured. Pitavastatin treatment had beneficial effects on the lipid profiles of these patients and slowed atherosclerosis progression. These effects were observed in both the high and low homocysteine groups. Proactive lipid intervention using pitavastatin may inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis and contribute to secondary prevention of stroke in high-risk patients. We conclude that this statin could inhibit progression at any stage of disease and should therefore be proactively administered to these patient groups, regardless of disease severity.

  16. Comparing the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in the assessment of wrist flexor spasticity in patients with stroke: protocol for a neurophysiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Hamid; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mansouri, Korosh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Hasson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reliable and valid tools must be used to assess spasticity in clinical practise and research settings. There is a paucity of literature regarding the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). No study, to date, has been performed to compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS. This neurophysiological study protocol will compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS in the assessment of poststroke wrist flexor spasticity. Methods and analysis Thirty-two patients with stroke from the University Rehabilitation clinics will be recruited to participate in this cross-sectional, non-interventional study. All measurements will be taken in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Shafa University Hospital in Tehran, Iran. First, wrist flexor spasticity will be assessed clinically using the MMAS and MTS. The tests will be applied randomly. For the MTS, the components of R1, R2, R2−R1 and quality of muscle reaction will be measured. Second, neurophysiological measures of H-reflex latency, Hmax/Mmax ratio, Hslp and Hslp/Mslp ratio will be collected from the affected side. The results will be analysed using Spearman's ρ test or Pearson's correlation test to determine the validity of the MMAS and the MTS as well as to compare the validity between the MMAS and the MTS. Ethics and dissemination The Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) approved the study protocol.  The study results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at international congresses. PMID:23166123

  17. Comparing the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in the assessment of wrist flexor spasticity in patients with stroke: protocol for a neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Hamid; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mansouri, Korosh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Hasson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and valid tools must be used to assess spasticity in clinical practise and research settings. There is a paucity of literature regarding the validity of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS). No study, to date, has been performed to compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS. This neurophysiological study protocol will compare the validity of the MMAS and the MTS in the assessment of poststroke wrist flexor spasticity. Thirty-two patients with stroke from the University Rehabilitation clinics will be recruited to participate in this cross-sectional, non-interventional study. All measurements will be taken in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of Shafa University Hospital in Tehran, Iran. First, wrist flexor spasticity will be assessed clinically using the MMAS and MTS. The tests will be applied randomly. For the MTS, the components of R1, R2, R2-R1 and quality of muscle reaction will be measured. Second, neurophysiological measures of H-reflex latency, H(max)/M(max) ratio, H(slp) and H(slp)/M(slp) ratio will be collected from the affected side. The results will be analysed using Spearman's ρ test or Pearson's correlation test to determine the validity of the MMAS and the MTS as well as to compare the validity between the MMAS and the MTS. The Research Council, School of Rehabilitation and the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) approved the study protocol.  The study results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at international congresses.

  18. Assessing climate change impacts on river flows and environmental flow requirements at catchment scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gül, G.O.; Rosbjerg, Dan; Gül, A.

    2010-01-01

    The fourth assessment report of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggests studies that increase the spatial resolution to solve the scale mismatch between large-scale climatic models and the catchment scale while addressing climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Impacts occur....... In this Study, the regional impacts of climate change on river flow and environmental flow requirement. which is a negotiated trade-off between water uses, are analysed for a lowland catchment in Denmark through MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 coupling. The Coupled model possesses an important capacity for simulating stream...... flows and groundwater head levels in a dynamic system. Although the simulation results from different global circulation models (GCMs) indicate different responses in flows to the climate change, there are obvious deviations of the river flows and environmental flow potentials computed for all...

  19. Mercury use in small scale gold mining in Ghana: an assessment of its impact on miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagya, Robert Yakubu

    2002-12-01

    Small scale gold mining is responsible for about 5% of Ghana’s annual gold production. It is estimated that between 80,000 and 100,000 people are engaged in small scale gold mining either on part-time or permanent basis. Amalgamation is the preferred method used by small scale gold miners for extracting free gold from its ores. The rate at which mercury, an important input in this method, is discharged into the atmosphere and water bodies is alarming. This research describes the various mining and processing methods in small scale gold mining and the extent of mercury use and releases to the environment. It discusses mercury and its human and environmental effects. It defines the various forms of mercury, routes of exposure, toxic effects. The levels of exposure to mercury by all groups of small scale gold miners are determined, and the impacts on the miners and the environment are assessed. It concludes that: • Mercury is mainly released into the environment as a result of small scale gold mining through spillage of elemental mercury and evaporation of mercury from the amalgam and sponge gold when they are heated on open fire. • Mercury in environmental samples from small scale gold mining areas is well above standard limit values. • Mercury released into the environment through small scale gold mining impacts negatively on the miners themselves and the general environment. Finally, it recommends the need for the adoption of mercury emission reduction strategies for dealing with the mercury problem. (