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Sample records for stroke heart disease

  1. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  2. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  3. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mortality statistics found in the Heart Disease & Stroke Statistics Update . Because mortality is considered "hard" data, it's possible to do time-trend analysis and compute percent changes over time. What are ...

  4. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 22,2017 Heart disease is the ... a marathon.” Learn more: Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke Make the Effort to Prevent Heart Disease with ...

  5. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  6. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Census Bureau. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  7. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 16, ... be life-threatening. It’s a condition known as sleep apnea, in which the person may experience pauses ...

  8. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  9. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  10. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  11. Pandora's Box: mitochondrial defects in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Sasan; Divani, Afshin A; Michel, Tanja M; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-04-05

    Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are vascular events with serious health consequences worldwide. Recent genetic and epigenetic techniques have revealed many genetic determinants of these vascular events and simplified the approaches to research focused on ischaemic heart disease and stroke. The pathogenetic mechanisms of ischaemic heart disease and stroke are complex, with mitochondrial involvement (partially or entirely) recently gaining substantial support. Not only can mitochondrial reactive oxygen species give rise to ischaemic heart disease and stroke by production of oxidised low-density lipoprotein and induction of apoptosis, but the impact on pericytes contributes directly to the pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, publications implicate the causative role of nuclear genes in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, in contrast to the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathophysiology of the disorders, which is much less understood, although recent studies do demonstrate that the involvement of mitochondria and mtDNA in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke is likely to be larger than originally thought, with the novel discovery of links among mitochondria, mtDNA and vascular events. Here we explore the molecular events and mtDNA alterations in relation to the role of mitochondria in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

  12. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  13. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease includes but is not limited to coronary artery disease [heart attack or myocardial infarction, acute coronary ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  14. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  15. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The FINRISK Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Puska, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The FINRISK risk calculator predicts 10-year risk for coronary heart disease, stroke incidence, and their combination. The model is based on 10-year cohort follow-up from 3 different cohorts in 1982, 1987, and 1992 from a random population sample in 3 areas in Finland. Coronary heart disease, stroke, and their combination are predicted by smoking, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diabetes, and family history. The Internet-based calculator is commonly used in Finland in health services to assess the need for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia treatment and is used also in patients' counseling. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Denial and Self-Image in Stroke, Lung Cancer, and Heart Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jacob; Zigler, Edward

    1975-01-01

    Stroke, lung cancer, and heart disease patients were found to employ denial, as indicated by the relatively small difference between their real and ideal selves before and after the onset of illness. The greatest amount of denial was found for stroke patients. Cancer patients displayed more denial than did heart patients. (Author)

  17. Factors associated with coronary artery disease and stroke in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokma, Jouke P.; Zegstroo, Ineke; Kuijpers, Joey M.; Konings, Thelma C.; van Kimmenade, Roland R. J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Kiès, Philippine; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2017-01-01

    To determine factors associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and ischaemic stroke in ageing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients. We performed a multicentre case-control study, using data from the national CONgenital CORvitia (CONCOR) registry to identify ACHD patients within five

  18. Snoring as a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and stroke in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Koskenvuo, M; Kaprio, J; Telakivi, T; Partinen, M; Heikkilä, K; Sarna, S

    1987-01-01

    The association of snoring with ischaemic heart disease and stroke was studied prospectively in 4388 men aged 40-69. The men were asked, in a questionnaire sent to them, whether they snored habitually, frequently, occasionally, or never. Hospital records and death certificates were checked for the next three years to establish how many of the men developed ischaemic heart disease or stroke: the numbers were 149 and 42, respectively. Three categories of snoring were used for analysis: habitual...

  19. Prediction of Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Eric J.; Chen, Yan; Hudson, Melissa M.; Feijen, Elizabeth A. M.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Border, William L.; Green, Daniel M.; Meacham, Lillian R.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Sklar, Charles A.; Stovall, Marilyn; van der Pal, Helena J.; van Dijk, Irma W. E. M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Weathers, Rita E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Yasui, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to predict individual risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke in 5-year survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS; n = 13,060) were observed through age 50 years for the development of ischemic heart disease and

  20. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. From 2.5 million children (aged hemorrhagic strokes and randomly selected age- and facility-matched stroke-free controls (3 per case). We determined exposure to CHD (diagnosed before stroke) and used conditional logistic regression to analyze stroke risk factors. CHD was identified in 15 of 412 cases (4%) versus 7 of 1236 controls (0.6%). Cases of childhood stroke (occurring between ages 29 days to 20 years) with CHD had 19-fold (odds ratio, 19; 95% confidence interval 4.2-83) increased stroke risk compared to controls. History of CHD surgery was associated with >30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding perioperative strokes, the history of CHD surgery still increased the childhood stroke risk (odds ratio, 13; confidence interval 1.5-114). The majority of children with stroke and CHD were outpatients at the time of stroke, and almost half the cases who underwent cardiac surgery had their stroke >5 years after the most recent procedure. An estimated 7% of ischemic and 2% of hemorrhagic childhood strokes in the population were attributable to CHD. CHD is an important childhood stroke risk factor. Children who undergo CHD surgery remain at elevated risk outside the perioperative period and would benefit from optimized long-term stroke prevention strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  2. Unrealistic pessimism about risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimakopoulou, Koula G.; Skinner, T. Chas; Spimpolo, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We examined the accuracy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients' risk estimates of developing coronary heart disease (CHD)/having a stroke as a consequence of diabetes and their mood about these risks. Methods: Patients reported their perceived risks of developing CHD/having a stroke...... disease risk and mood was also seen where higher risk of actual and perceived CHD/stroke was related to worse mood. A positive relationship between mood and extent of perceptual error was further observed; the more inaccurate patients' perceptions of CHD/stroke risk were, the better their mood. Mood...... and rated their mood about these risks using a self-report measure. Using an objective risk calculator, they were then told their actual risk of CHD and stroke and their mood was re-assessed. Results: Patients' estimates of their risk of CHD/stroke were grossly inflated. A negative relationship between...

  3. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jukema, J Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P; Sabayan, Behnam; de Craen, Anton J M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association of performance in cognitive domains executive function and memory with incident coronary heart disease and stroke in older participants without dementia. We included 3,926 participants (mean age 75 years, 44% male) at risk for cardiovascular diseases from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite executive function score. Likewise, scores of the Picture Learning Test (immediate and delayed memory) were transformed into a composite memory score. Associations of executive function and memory were longitudinally assessed with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke using multivariable Cox regression models. During 3.2 years of follow-up, incidence rates of coronary heart disease and stroke were 30.5 and 12.4 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In multivariable models, participants in the lowest third of executive function, as compared to participants in the highest third, had 1.85-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-2.45) higher risk of coronary heart disease and 1.51-fold (95% CI 0.99-2.30) higher risk of stroke. Participants in the lowest third of memory had no increased risk of coronary heart disease (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0.74-1.32) or stroke (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.57-1.32). Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Homocysteine and risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homocysteine Studies Collab, .

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT: It has been suggested that total blood homocysteine concentrations are associated with the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of homocysteine concentrations with vascular disease risk. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for articles

  5. Trends in Mortality from Ischemic Heart Disease, Stroke, and Stomach Cancer: from past to future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Amiri (Masoud)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe common occurrence of chronic diseases – such as ischemic heart diseases (IHD, stroke, and stomach cancer in most populations and the attendant mortality, loss of independence, impaired quality of life, and social and economic costs are compelling reasons for public health

  6. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  7. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-03-01

    Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We investigated the association between atopy as assessed by IgE sensitization, a well-accepted biomarker of allergy, and incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in five Danish population-based cohorts. A total of 14,849 participants were included in the study. Atopy was defined as serum-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were analyzed by Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and adjusted for study cohort, gender, education, body mass index, alcohol intake, smoking habits, physical activity during leisure time, serum lipids, and blood pressure. The prevalence of atopy was 26.9 % (n = 3,994). There were 1,170, 817, and 1,063 incident cases of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, respectively (median follow-up 11.2 years). The hazard ratios, HRs (95 % confidence intervals, CIs) for atopics versus non-atopics: for ischemic heart disease (HR 1.00, 95 % CI 0.86, 1.16), stroke (HR 1.18, 95 % CI 0.99, 1.41), and diabetes (HR 1.06, 95 % CI 0.91, 1.23). Our results did not support the hypothesis that atopy is associated with higher risk of ischemic heart disease, stroke, or diabetes. However, a small-moderately increased risk cannot be excluded from our data.

  8. Risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Line; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Skjøth, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relation to ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, major bleeding, and all-cause death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational cohort...

  9. Rehabilitation of Older Persons Disabled by Cancer, Stroke, and Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty-Fried, Pamela; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Rehabilitation of older persons disabled by cancer, stroke, or heart disease is discussed. Aspects of each disability are described, and the importance of timely and appropriate intervention with older persons is emphasized. Barriers generally faced by older disabled persons are briefly outlined. (Author)

  10. Polyphenols and Oxidative Stress in Atherosclerosis-Related Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Hu, Wen Long; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Good nutrition could maintain health and life. Polyphenols are common nutrient mainly derived from fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, cocoa, mushrooms, beverages, and traditional medicinal herbs. They are potential substances against oxidative-related diseases, for example, cardiovascular disease, specifically, atherosclerosis-related ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are health and economic problems recognized worldwide. In this study, we reviewed the risk factors for atherosclerosis, i...

  11. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... searches of reference lists, and discussion with collaborators. DATA EXTRACTION: Individual records were provided for each of 126,634 participants in 36 prospective studies. During 1.3 million person-years of follow-up, 22,076 first-ever fatal or nonfatal vascular disease outcomes or nonvascular deaths...... were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta...

  12. Preexisting Heart Disease Underlies Newly Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizos, Timolaos; Horstmann, Solveig; Dittgen, Felix; Täger, Tobias; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Heuschmann, Peter; Veltkamp, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Whether newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation (nAF) after stroke reflects underlying heart disease and represents an increased risk of cardioembolic stroke, or whether it is triggered by neurogenic mechanisms remains uncertain. We investigated, whether cardiovascular risk factors and echocardiographic parameters in patients with nAF are similar to patients with known AF (kAF) and differ from patients without AF. Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients were enrolled into a prospective stroke database. All patients with echocardiography were included and univariable and multivariable testing was applied to compare clinical characteristics and echocardiographic findings among patients with nAF, kAF, and no AF. A total of 1397 patients were included (male, 62.3%; median age, 71 years). AF was present in 320 (22.9%) patients. Of those, nAF was present in 36.2% (116/320) and kAF in 63.8% (204/320). No clinical or echocardiographic factor was independently associated with detection of nAF compared with kAF but a trend toward larger left atrial diameters in patients with kAF was observed (P=0.070). In contrast, patients with nAF were more often female (Pstroke severity in patients with nAF and kAF was similar, patients without AF had less severe strokes. Stroke patients with nAF and with kAF share common cardiovascular risk factors, have similar echocardiographic findings and suffer equally severe strokes. We conclude that preexisting heart disease is the major cause of AF that is first diagnosed after stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Early menopause predicts future coronary heart disease and stroke: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank P = 0.008 and P = 0.0158). In models adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, Multi-ethnic Study Atherosclerosis site, and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, this risk for coronary heart disease and stroke remained (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.17-3.70; and hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.11-4.32, respectively). Early menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  14. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

    2015-01-01

    Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We...... investigated the association between atopy as assessed by IgE sensitization, a well-accepted biomarker of allergy, and incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in five Danish population-based cohorts. A total of 14,849 participants were included in the study. Atopy was defined as serum......-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were...

  15. Ischemic Stroke in Children and Young Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalenakis, Zacharias; Rosengren, Annika; Lappas, Georgios; Eriksson, Peter; Hansson, Per-Olof; Dellborg, Mikael

    2016-02-23

    Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) may be at increased risk of ischemic stroke due to residual shunts, arrhythmias, and other cardiovascular abnormalities. We studied the relative risk and potential factors for developing ischemic stroke in children and young adults with CHD in Sweden. All patients in the Swedish Patient Register with a diagnosis of CHD, born between 1970 and 1993, were identified and compared with 10 controls for each patient, matched for age, sex, and county and randomly selected from the general population. Follow-up data through 2011 were collected for both groups. Of 25 985 children and young adults with CHD (51.5% male, 48.5% female), 140 (0.5%) developed ischemic stroke. The hazard ratio for CHD patients developing ischemic stroke was 10.8 (95% CI, 8.5-13.6) versus controls. All major Marelli groups had significantly increased risk, but because of small CHD-group sizes, only atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale, double-inlet ventricle, and aortic coarctation displayed significantly increased risk. In multivariate analysis of CHD patients, congestive heart failure carried the highest risk for developing ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 6.9 [95% CI, 4.7-10.3]), followed by hypertension and atrial fibrillation, which were also significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. The risk of developing ischemic stroke was almost 11 times higher in young patients with CHD than in the general population, although absolute risk is low. Cardiovascular comorbidities were strongly associated with the development of ischemic stroke in young CHD patients. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta-analysis...... broadly continuous in shape. In the 24 cohort studies, the rates of CHD in the top and bottom thirds of baseline Lp(a) distributions, respectively, were 5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-5.9) per 1000 person-years and 4.4 (95% CI, 4.2-4.6) per 1000 person-years. The risk ratio for CHD, adjusted...

  17. Plasma d-Dimer and Incident Ischemic Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Appiah, Duke; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have documented that plasma d-dimer, a fibrin degradation product, is a risk marker for coronary heart disease, but there is limited prospective evidence for stroke. Given that thrombosis is a key mechanism for many strokes, we studied whether d-dimer is a risk marker for ischemic stroke incidence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. We measured d-dimer in 11 415 ARIC participants free of stroke and coronary heart disease in 1992 to 1995. We followed them for stroke, stroke subtype, and coronary heart disease events through 2012. Over a median of 18 years of follow-up, 719 participants had incident strokes (628 ischemic and 91 hemorrhagic). d-dimer was associated positively with risk of total, ischemic, and cardioembolic strokes, with risk elevated primarily for the highest quintile of d-dimer. After adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratio for the highest versus lowest quintile of d-dimer was 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.67) for total stroke, 1.33 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.73) for ischemic stroke, and 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.95) for cardioembolic stroke. There was no association with hemorrhagic, lacunar, or nonlacunar stroke categories. d-dimer was positively but weakly associated with coronary heart disease incidence. A higher basal plasma d-dimer concentration in the general population is a risk marker for ischemic stroke, especially cardioembolic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. PCOS, coronary heart disease, stroke and the influence of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P. C. M.; Dekkers, O. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Dieben, S. W. M.; Helmerhorst, F. M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at risk of arterial disease. We examined the risk of (non) fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke in patients with PCOS and ovulatory women without PCOS, and assessed whether obesity might explain a higher risk of CHD or stroke.

  19. Kidney stones may increase the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian-Ping; Zheng, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to quantitatively assess the potential relationship between kidney stones and coronary heart disease or stroke. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted on eligibly studies published before 31 May 2016 in PubMed or Embase. The data were pooled, and the relationship was assessed by the random-effect model with inverse variance-weighted procedure. The results were expressed as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Results: Eight studies of 11 cohorts (n = 11) were included in our analysis with 3,658,360 participants and 157,037 cases. We found that a history of kidney stones was associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) (RR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.14–1.36; I2 = 79.0%, n = 11); similar effect on myocardial infarction, a serious condition of CHD, was observed (RR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.10–1.40; I2 = 80.4%, n = 8). We also found that a history of kidney stones may increase the risk of stroke (RR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.06–1.38; I2 = 54.7%, n = 4). In subgroup analysis, the risk of coronary heart disease was higher in men (RR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.02–1.49) while the risk for stroke was higher in women (RR = 1.12; 95%CI: 1.03–1.21). No obvious publications bias was detected (Egger test: P = .47). Conclusion: Kidney stones are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke, and the effect may differ by sex. PMID:28834909

  20. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  1. Risk factors for heart disease and stroke among diabetic persons, by disability status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Catherine A; Denny, Clark H; Greenlund, Kurt J; Benjamin, Stephanie M; Strine, Tara W; Balluz, Lina S; Mokdad, Ali H

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether disabled diabetic persons have a higher prevalence of risk factors for heart disease and stroke than do diabetic persons without disability. RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND METHODS: Data were analyzed for noninstitutionalized adults in 27 states and the District of Columbia that participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 2001 and/or 2003. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the adjusted prevalence and odds ratios of disabled diabetic persons, by sociodemographic characteristics. The logit form of each model was used to estimate conditional marginal probabilities of risk factors for heart disease and stroke among diabetic persons, by disability status. Diabetic persons with disability were more likely than those without disability to have more risk factors for heart disease and stroke, including insufficient leisure-time physical activity or inactivity (adjusted prevalence: 75.2% vs. 63.3%; Pvs. 43.3%; Pvs. 48.4%; P=.038), and hypertension (63.9% vs. 56.6%; Ptwo or more, three or more, and four or more risk factors (97.2% vs. 95.6%, 83.5% vs. 74.0%, 56.5% vs. 41.1%, and 22.2% vs. 13.6%, respectively; Pstroke. Health care guidelines specifically targeting diabetic patients with disability may be needed to aid health care providers in addressing these risk factors.

  2. Assessment of stroke and concomitant cerebrovascular disease with heart disease requires invasive treatment: analysis of 249 consecutive patients with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Song, Hyun; Oh, Se-Yang; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Bum-Soo; Kang, Joonkyu; Shin, Yong Sam

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships of cerebrovascular disease (CVD), heart problems, and stroke in patients who required an invasive cardiac procedure. We enrolled 249 consecutive patients who required to or underwent invasive cardiac treatment and divided into a non-CVD group (n = 116) and a CVD group (n = 133). The latter group was divided into a coronary artery disease (CAD) group (n = 118) and a non-CAD group such as cardiac structural lesions (n = 15). No significant relationship with significant cerebrovascular stenosis was observed in either the CADs or non-CADs. The incidence of past stroke was significantly higher in the CVD group than that in the non-CVD group (12.8 vs. 3.4%; p = 0.017). Previous stroke event had increased odds of having significant cerebrovascular stenosis (odds ratio, 3.919, p = 0.006). In patients with both cardiac disease and the CVD, perioperative stroke was only one case (0.9%). The main source of stroke was cardiogenic in the immediate results and cerebrovascular lesions in the delayed results (1-12 months). The risk of perioperative stroke was very low in combined cardiac disease and the CVD. However, for preventing ischemic stroke due to the predetected cerebrovascular lesions, precautionary efforts could be needed for patients undergoing an invasive cardiac procedure, and concomitant cerebrovascular lesions should be considered as main source of delayed ischemic stroke. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Brain imaging and cognitive predictors of stroke and Alzheimer disease in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Galit; Beiser, Alexa S; Decarli, Charles; Au, Rhoda; Wolf, Philip A; Seshadri, Sudha

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to vascular risk factors has a gradual deleterious effect on brain MRI and cognitive measures. We explored whether a pattern of these measures exists that predicts stroke and Alzheimer disease (AD) risk. A cognitive battery was administered to 1679 dementia and stroke-free Framingham offspring (age, >55 years; mean, 65.7±7.0) between 1999 and 2004; participants were also free of other neurological conditions that could affect cognition and >90% also had brain MRI examination. We related cognitive and MRI measures to risks of incident stroke and AD ≤10 years of follow-up. As a secondary analysis, we explored these associations in The Framingham Heart Study original cohort (mean age, 67.5±7.3 and 84.8±3.3 years at the cognitive assessment and MRI examination, respectively). A total of 55 Offspring participants sustained strokes and 31 developed AD. Offspring who scored stroke (hazard ratio [HR], 2.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-4.85) and AD (HR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.52-8.52); additional cognitive tests also predicted AD. Participants with low (20 percentile) white matter hyperintensity volume had a higher risk of stroke (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03-3.77 and HR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.51-5.00, respectively) but not AD. Hippocampal volume at the bottom quintile predicted AD in the offspring and original cohorts (HR, 4.41; 95% CI, 2.00-9.72 and HR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.12-5.00, respectively). A stepwise increase in stroke risk was apparent with increasing numbers of these cognitive and imaging markers. Specific patterns of cognitive and brain structural measures observed even in early aging predict stroke risk and may serve as biomarkers for risk prediction.

  4. Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Adults Born Preterm - The Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Eriksson, Johan G

    2015-11-01

    Adults born preterm have increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We studied the cumulative incidence of manifest coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in adults born preterm. We studied 19 015 people born in Helsinki, Finland, during 1924-44. Of them, 137 (0.7%) were born early (preterm (34 to preterm. For stroke, they were 0.84 (0.50, 1.39) and 0.86 (0.71, 1.06). HRs were little changed when adjusted for childhood and adult socio-economic position and birthweight for gestation standard deviation score. They were similar for first-ever events before or after 65 years, for haemorrhagic and thrombotic stroke, and for men and women, except that the HR for CHD for women born early preterm was 1.98 (1.18, 3.30). We found no increased risk of CHD or stroke up to old age in people born preterm, although women born early preterm had a higher rate of CHD. There is a discrepancy between increased risk factors in younger generations born preterm and little or no increase in manifest disease in older age. Uncovering reasons underlying this discrepancy may give important insights into the prevention of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Behavioral Risk Factor Data: Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011 to present. BRFSS is a continuous, state-based surveillance system that collects information about modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases and other...

  6. Early Menopause Predicts Future Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if a self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank p=menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22692332

  7. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-10-18

    Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose-response relation. We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01-1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12-1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06-1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17-1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate ( 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93-1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19-1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98-1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93-1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94-1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12-1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39-1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies concerning general populations, resting heart rate was not associated with sudden death. © 2016 Canadian Medical

  8. The independent effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus on ischemic heart disease, stroke, and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas; Scharling, Henrik; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have reported that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular diseases, independent of other risk factors. However, most of these studies have been performed in selected patient groups. The purpose...... of the present study was prospectively to assess the impact of type 2 DM on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in an unselected population. METHODS: A total of 13,105 subjects from the Copenhagen City Heart Study were followed up prospectively for 20 years. Adjusted relative risks of first, incident......, admission for, or death from ischemic heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, or stroke, as well as total mortality in persons with type 2 DM compared with healthy controls, were estimated. RESULTS: The relative risk of first, incident, and admission for myocardial infarction was increased 1.5- to 4...

  9. Meta-analysis of Egg Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dominik D; Miller, Paula E; Vargas, Ashley J; Weed, Douglas L; Cohen, Sarah S

    2016-01-01

    The possible relationship between dietary cholesterol and cardiac outcomes has been scrutinized for decades. However, recent reviews of the literature have suggested that dietary cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of egg intake (a significant contributor to dietary cholesterol) and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. A comprehensive literature search was conducted through August 2015 to identify prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for egg consumption in association with CHD or stroke. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate summary relative risk estimates (SRREs) for high vs low intake and stratified intake dose-response analyses. Heterogeneity was examined in subgroups where sensitivity and meta regression analyses were conducted based on increasing egg intake. A 12% decreased risk (SRRE = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-0.97) of stroke was observed in the meta-analysis of 7 studies of egg intake (high vs low; generally 1/d vs egg consumption and CHD. No clear dose-response trends were apparent in the stratified intake meta-analyses or the meta regression analyses. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, consumption of up to one egg daily may contribute to a decreased risk of total stroke, and daily egg intake does not appear to be associated with risk of CHD. Key Teaching Points: • The role of egg consumption in the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease has come under scrutiny over many years. • A comprehensive meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for egg consumption in association with CHD or stroke was performed on the peer-reviewed epidemiologic literature through August 2015. • Overall, summary associations indicate that intake of up to 1 egg daily may be associated with reduced risk of total stroke. • Overall, summary associations show no clear association between egg intake and increased or decreased risk of CHD

  10. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite.......57-1.32). CONCLUSION: Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies....

  11. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Erqou, Sebhat; Kaptoge, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...... and nonvascular outcomes. STUDY SELECTION: Long-term prospective studies that recorded Lp(a) concentration and subsequent major vascular morbidity and/or cause-specific mortality published between January 1970 and March 2009 were identified through electronic searches of MEDLINE and other databases, manual...

  12. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rezvani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD and Ischemic Stroke (IS was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Results: Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000 respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020. Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Conclusion: Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occur r ence of IS and IHD.

  13. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Ghandehari, Kavian

    2012-10-01

    The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Ischemic Stroke (IS) was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males) with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000) respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020). Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occurrence of IS and IHD.

  14. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    -response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p=0·002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (ptrendEmployees who work......, Economic and Social Research Council, European Union New and Emerging Risks in Occupational Safety and Health research programme, Finnish Work Environment Fund, Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Research, German Social Accident Insurance, Danish National Research Centre for the Working......BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We...

  15. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease in the adult health study sample, 1958 - 78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Sawada, Hisao; Kato, Hiroo.

    1986-04-01

    Approximately 16,000 study subjects in the Adult Health Study sample who had received examination at least once during the 20 years (1958 - 78) in Hiroshima or Nagasaki and were found to have neither stroke nor coronary heart disease (CHD) at the initial examination were studied for the incidence of stroke and CHD and the relationship of these to atomic bomb radiation exposure. Their secular trends were also studied. Findings suggestive of a relationship between stroke and radiation exposure among Hiroshima females were first discovered for the years 1969 - 73, that is, 24 - 28 years after A-bomb exposure. In general, this association is supported by the present analysis. Stroke incidence continued to decrease during the present report's period of observation. Analysis by type showed that cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhage both decreased, but the decrease of the latter is especially remarkable. The trend to decrease is observed in both sexes and in both cities. A relationship between CHD and radiation exposure was, as noted for stroke, first observed only in Hiroshima females for the years 1969 - 73, but from this analysis it appears that the trend began earlier and the association is getting stronger with the passage of time. Analysis by type showed myocardial infarction (MI), but not angina pectoris, to be related to radiation exposure. The incidence rate for CHD, especially for MI, was almost constant during the observation period, it being 1.2/1,000 person-years on the average. Comparing by sex, the incidence rate was constant in males. In females, the pattern varied with time. There appear to be no between-city differences in secular trends - essentially constant. (author)

  17. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid...... management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients....

  18. Relationship Between Dietary Vitamin D and Deaths From Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerah, Haytham A; Eshak, Ehab S; Cui, Renzhe; Imano, Hironori; Iso, Hiroyasu; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2018-02-01

    There is growing evidence about the importance of vitamin D for cardiovascular health. Therefore, we examined the relationship between dietary vitamin D intake and risk of mortality from stroke and coronary heart disease in Japanese population. A prospective study encompassing 58 646 healthy Japanese adults (23 099 men and 35  547 women) aged of 40 to 79 years in whom dietary vitamin D intake was determined via a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. The median follow-up period was 19.3 years (1989-2009). The hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of mortality were calculated using categories of vitamin D intake. During 965 970 person-years of follow-up, 1514 stroke and 702 coronary heart disease deaths were documented. Vitamin D intake was inversely associated with risk of mortality from total stroke especially intraparenchymal hemorrhage but not from coronary heart disease; the multivariable hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest (≥440 IU/d) versus lowest (stroke and 0.66 (0.46-0.96; P for trend=0.04) for intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Dietary vitamin D intake seems to be inversely associated with mortality from stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Long-term physical activity in leisure time and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory diseases, and cancer. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Lange, Peter; Scharling, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between different levels of long-term physical activity in leisure time and subsequent causes of deaths. DESIGN: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study of 19 329 men and women aged 20-...... was in both sexes associated with significantly lower mortality from coronary heart disease, cancer and all-causes. The same tendency was found for stroke and respiratory diseases, but the associations did not reach statistical significance......., total-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, body mass index, education, income, and forced expiratory volume in 10.78 (% predicted). RESULTS: Adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease were...

  20. Depressive disorder, coronary heart disease, and stroke: dose-response and reverse causation effects in the Whitehall II cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Eric J; Shipley, Martin J; Britton, Annie R; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Heuschmann, Peter U; Rudd, Anthony G; Wolfe, Charles D A; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

    2014-03-01

    Systematic reviews examining associations of depressive disorder with coronary heart disease and stroke produce mixed results. Failure to consider reverse causation and dose-response patterns may have caused inconsistencies in evidence. This prospective cohort study on depressive disorder, coronary heart disease, and stroke analysed reverse causation and dose-response effects using four 5-year and three 10-year observation cycles (total follow up 24 years) based on multiple repeat measures of exposure. Participants in the Whitehall II study (n = 10,036, 31,395 person-observations, age at start 44.4 years) provided up to six repeat measures of depressive symptoms via the 30-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) and one measure via Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The cohort was followed up for major coronary events (coronary death/nonfatal myocardial infarction) and stroke (stroke death/morbidity) through the national mortality register Hospital Episode Statistics, ECG-screening, medical records, and self-report questionnaires. GHQ-30 caseness predicted stroke over 0-5 years (age-, sex- and ethnicity-adjusted HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.1-2.3) but not over 5-10 years (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.6-1.4). Using the last 5-year observation cycle, cumulative GHQ-30 caseness was associated with incident coronary heart disease in a dose-response manner (1-2 times a case: HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.7-1.7; 3-4 times: HR 2.06, 95% CI 1.2-3.7), and CES-D caseness predicted coronary heart disease (HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). There was evidence of a dose-response effect of depressive symptoms on risk of coronary heart disease. In contrast, prospective associations of depressive symptoms with stroke appeared to arise wholly or partly through reverse causation.

  1. Heart healthy and stroke free: successful business strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson Koffman, Dyann M; Goetzel, Ron Z; Anwuri, Victoria V; Shore, Karen K; Orenstein, Diane; LaPier, Timothy

    2005-12-01

    Heart disease and stroke, the principal components of cardiovascular disease (CVD), are the first and third leading causes of death in the United States. In 2002, employers representing 88 companies in the United States paid an average of 18,618 dollars per employee for health and productivity-related costs. A sizable portion of these costs are related to CVD. Employers can yield a 3 dollar to 6 dollar return on investment for each dollar invested over a 2 to 5 year period and improve employee cardiovascular health by investing in comprehensive worksite health-promotion programs, and by choosing health plans that provide adequate coverage and support for essential preventive services. The most effective interventions in worksites are those that provide sustained individual follow-up risk factor education and counseling and other interventions within the context of a comprehensive health-promotion program: (1) screening, health risk assessments, and referrals; (2) environmental supports for behavior change (e.g., access to healthy food choices); (3) financial and other incentives; and (4) corporate policies that support healthy lifestyles (e.g., tobacco-free policies). The most effective practices in healthcare settings include systems that use (1) standardized treatment and prevention protocols consistent with national guidelines, (2) multidisciplinary clinical care teams to deliver quality patient care, (3) clinics that specialize in treating/preventing risk factors, (4) physician and patient reminders, and (5) electronic medical records. Comprehensive worksite health-promotion programs, health plans that cover preventive benefits, and effective healthcare systems will have the greatest impact on heart disease and stroke and are likely to reduce employers' health and productivity-related costs.

  2. Association of Breakfast Intake With Incident Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-02-01

    The association between breakfast intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke, among Asian people remains unknown. We sought to prospectively investigate whether the omission of breakfast is related to increased risks of stroke and coronary heart disease in general Japanese populations. A total of 82,772 participants (38,676 men and 44,096 women) aged 45 to 74 years without histories of cardiovascular disease or cancer were followed up from 1995 to 2010. Participants were classified as having breakfast 0 to 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 6, or 7 times/wk. The hazard ratios of cardiovascular disease were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During the 1 050 030 person-years of follow-up, we documented a total of 4642 incident cases, 3772 strokes (1051 cerebral hemorrhages, 417 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 2286 cerebral infarctions), and 870 coronary heart disease. Multivariable analysis showed that those consuming no breakfast per week compared with those consuming breakfast everyday had hazard ratios (95% confidence interval; P for trend) of 1.14 (1.01-1.27; 0.013) for total cardiovascular disease, 1.18 (1.04-1.34; 0.007) for total stroke, and 1.36 (1.10-1.70; 0.004) for cerebral hemorrhage. Similar results were observed even after exclusion of early cardiovascular events. No significant association between the frequency of breakfast intake and the risk of coronary heart disease was observed. The frequency of breakfast intake was inversely associated with the risk of stroke, especially cerebral hemorrhage in Japanese, suggesting that eating breakfast everyday may be beneficial for the prevention of stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Dairy Intake and Coronary Heart Disease or Stroke – a population-based cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmeijer, G.W.; Struijk, E.A.; Schouw, van der Y.T.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between total dairy intake and dairy subtypes (high-fat dairy, low-fat dairy, milk and milk products, cheese and fermented dairy) with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. METHODS: EPIC-NL is a prospective cohort study among 33,625

  4. Prevalence of electrocardiographic ST-T changes during acute ischemic stroke in patients without known ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Bak, Søren; Flemming Høilund-Carlsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated characteristics and prevalence of ST-segment depression and/or T-wave inversion in the resting electrocardiogram of 244 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, but without ischemic heart disease. The prevalence of ST-T changes ranged from 13% to 16% and this is what to expect...

  5. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  6. Dietary choline and betaine; associations with subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk and incidence of CVD, coronary heart disease and stroke: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Heather R; Musani, Solomon K; Dibaba, Daniel T; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Taylor, Herman A; Tucker, Katherine L; Bidulescu, Aurelian

    2018-02-01

    Several mechanisms have been described through which dietary intake of choline and its derivative betaine may be associated in both directions with subclinical atherosclerosis. We assessed the association of dietary intake of choline and betaine with cardiovascular risk and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Data from 3924 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) African-American participants with complete food frequency questionnaire at baseline and follow-up measurements of heart disease measures were used. Multivariable linear regression models were employed to assess associations between choline and betaine intake with carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcium, abdominal aortic calcium and left ventricular mass. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate associations with time to incident coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). During an average nine years of follow-up, 124 incident CHD events, 75 incident stroke events and 153 incident CVD events were documented. In women, greater choline intake was associated with lower left ventricular mass (p = 0.0006 for trend across choline quartiles) and with abdominal aortic calcium score. Among all JHS participants, there was a statistically significant inverse association between dietary choline intake and incident stroke, β = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Betaine intake was associated with greater risk of incident CHD when comparing the third quartile of intake with the lowest quartile of intake (HR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.14, 3.15). Among our African-American participants, higher dietary choline intake was associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, and thus putative dietary benefits. Higher dietary betaine intake was associated with a nonlinear higher risk of incident CHD.

  7. D-dimer and the Risk of Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease. The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Neil A; McClure, Leslie A; Judd, Suzanne E; Kissela, Brett; Howard, George; Safford, Monika; Cushman, Mary

    2017-02-28

    D-dimer, a biomarker of coagulation, is higher in blacks than in whites and has been associated with stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD). It was our objective to assess the association of higher D-dimer with stroke and CHD in blacks and whites. REGARDS recruited 30,239 black and white participants across the contiguous US and measured baseline D-dimer in stroke (n=646) and CHD (n=654) cases and a cohort random sample (n=1,104). Cox models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors determined the hazard ratio (HR) for increasing D-dimer for cardiovascular disease with bootstrapping to assess the difference in HR for CHD versus stroke by race. D-dimer was higher with increasing age, female sex, diabetes, hypertension, pre-baseline cardiovascular disease and higher C-reactive protein (CRP). Accounting for cardiovascular risk factors, each doubling of D-dimer was associated with increased stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.15; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.31) and CHD (HR 1.27; 95 % CI 1.11, 1.45) risk. The difference in the HR between CHD and stroke was 0.20 (95 % CI >0.00, 0.58) for blacks and 0.02 (95 % CI -0.30, 0.27) for whites. CRP mediated 22 % (95 % CI 5 %, 41 %) of the association between D-dimer and CHD and none of the association with stroke. Higher D-dimer increased the risk of stroke and CHD independent of cardiovascular risk factors and CRP, with perhaps a stronger association for CHD versus stroke in blacks than whites. These findings highlight potential different pathophysiology of vascular disease by disease site and race suggesting potential further studies targeting haemostasis in primary prevention of vascular disease.

  8. Polyphenols and Oxidative Stress in Atherosclerosis-Related Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Hu, Wen Long; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2017-01-01

    Good nutrition could maintain health and life. Polyphenols are common nutrient mainly derived from fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, cocoa, mushrooms, beverages, and traditional medicinal herbs. They are potential substances against oxidative-related diseases, for example, cardiovascular disease, specifically, atherosclerosis-related ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are health and economic problems recognized worldwide. In this study, we reviewed the risk factors for atherosclerosis, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cigarette smoking as well as the antioxidative activity of polyphenols, which could prevent the pathology of atherosclerosis, including endothelial dysfunction, low-density lipoprotein oxidation, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, inflammatory process by monocytes, macrophages or T lymphocytes, and platelet aggregation. The strong radical-scavenging properties of polyphenols would exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammation effects. Polyphenols reduce ROS production by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting OxLDL formation, suppressing VSMC proliferation and migration, reducing platelet aggregation, and improving mitochondrial oxidative stress. Polyphenol consumption also inhibits the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Despite the numerous in vivo and in vitro studies, more advanced clinical trials are necessary to confirm the efficacy of polyphenols in the treatment of atherosclerosis-related vascular diseases.

  9. Polyphenols and Oxidative Stress in Atherosclerosis-Related Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Good nutrition could maintain health and life. Polyphenols are common nutrient mainly derived from fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, cocoa, mushrooms, beverages, and traditional medicinal herbs. They are potential substances against oxidative-related diseases, for example, cardiovascular disease, specifically, atherosclerosis-related ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are health and economic problems recognized worldwide. In this study, we reviewed the risk factors for atherosclerosis, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cigarette smoking as well as the antioxidative activity of polyphenols, which could prevent the pathology of atherosclerosis, including endothelial dysfunction, low-density lipoprotein oxidation, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, inflammatory process by monocytes, macrophages or T lymphocytes, and platelet aggregation. The strong radical-scavenging properties of polyphenols would exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammation effects. Polyphenols reduce ROS production by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting OxLDL formation, suppressing VSMC proliferation and migration, reducing platelet aggregation, and improving mitochondrial oxidative stress. Polyphenol consumption also inhibits the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Despite the numerous in vivo and in vitro studies, more advanced clinical trials are necessary to confirm the efficacy of polyphenols in the treatment of atherosclerosis-related vascular diseases.

  10. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Benavente, Oscar; Zweifler, Richard M; Callahan, Alfred; Hennerici, Michael G; Zivin, Justin A; Welch, K Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients. A total of 4731 patients (mean age, 63 years) was randomized to 80 mg/day atorvastatin placebo. The rates of major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure were evaluated. After 4.9 years of follow-up, the risks of a major coronary event and of any CHD end point in the placebo group were 5.1% and 8.6%, respectively. The rate of outcome of stroke decreased over time, whereas the major coronary event rate was stable. Relative to those having a large vessel-related stroke at baseline, those having a transient ischemic attack, hemorrhagic stroke, small vessel stroke, or a stroke of unknown cause had similar absolute rates for a first major coronary event and for any CHD event; transient ischemic attack, small vessel, and unknown cause groups had lower absolute revascularization procedure rates. Major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure rates were similarly reduced in all baseline stroke subtypes in the atorvastatin arm compared with placebo with no heterogeneity between groups. CHD risk can be substantially reduced by atorvastatin therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack regardless of stroke subtype.

  11. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  12. Sex Differences in the Association Between Insulin Resistance and Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Blacks Without Diabetes Mellitus: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effoe, Valery S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Echouffo Tcheugui, Justin B; Chen, Haiying; Joseph, Joshua J; Kalyani, Rita R; Bell, Ronny A; Wu, Wen-Chih H; Casanova, Ramon; Bertoni, Alain G

    2017-02-02

    Studies exploring the association between insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease in blacks have not been conclusive, especially for coronary heart disease (CHD). The McAuley index and homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) perform differently in predicting cardiovascular disease. We investigated this association in the Jackson Heart Study, a large longitudinal cohort of blacks. IR was estimated for 3565 participants without diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline using the McAuley index and HOMA-IR, and their associations with incident CHD and stroke (composite outcome) were compared. A lower McAuley index and higher HOMA-IR are indicative of IR. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for incident CHD and/or stroke. There were 158 events (89 CHD-only, 58 stroke-only, and 11 CHD/stroke) over a median follow-up of 8.4 years. After adjustment for demographic factors, the risk of the composite outcome decreased with each SD increase in the McAuley index (hazard ratio 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.96), with no attenuation after further accounting for CHD and stroke risk factors. When considered individually, McAuley index and HOMA-IR were associated with CHD (hazard ratio 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.92 and hazard ratio 1.33, 95% CI: 1.03-1.72, respectively), but not stroke risk. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women (P interaction =0.01). Both HOMA-IR and the McAuley index demonstrate strong associations with CHD but not stroke risk in blacks. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  13. The performance of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors as screening tests for ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M R; Wald, N J; Morris, J K

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarises the main evidence and conclusions relating to using blood pressure measurement as a screening test to identify people who will develop ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke, as recently published in a Health Technology Assessment report. While blood pressure is recognised as an important cause of stroke and IHD, and lowering blood pressure can substantially lower the risk of these diseases, the measurement of blood pressure is a poor screening test. It is not good in distinguishing those who will and will not develop these diseases. The poor screening performance is illustrated by the findings that in the largest cohort study, persons in the top 10% of the distribution of systolic blood pressure experienced only 21% of all IHD events and 28% of all strokes at a given age. Using several cardiovascular risk factors in combination does not add materially to the poor screening performance of blood pressure alone. Among persons in a specified age group, the 5% at highest risk experience 17% of all heart disease deaths with risk computation based on blood pressure alone, 22% when based on blood pressure and apolipoprotein B (or LDL cholesterol) in combination, and only 28% using these two, smoking and three other cardiovascular risk factors all in combination. Identifying patients at the time of hospital discharge following myocardial infarction or stroke is the most effective screening test to identify those who will die of cardiovascular disease. In patients with a history of myocardial infarction or stroke the cardiovascular death rate in the absence of treatment is about 5% per year, a risk that persists for at least 15 years. In the absence of treatment, about half of all deaths from heart disease in a population occur after hospital discharge following the first infarct. Among persons with no history of cardiovascular disease, age is a better screening test than the reversible risk factors, and the best policy is to offer treatment to all

  14. Increasing Area Deprivation and Socioeconomic Inequalities in Heart Disease, Stroke, and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Working Age Populations, United States, 1969-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal K. Singh, PhD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We examined the extent to which area- and individual-level socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular-disease (CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality among United States men and women aged 25-64 years changed between 1969 and 2011. Methods: National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate area- and individual-level socioeconomic gradients in mortality over time. Rate ratios and log-linear and Cox regression were used to model mortality trends and differentials. Results: Area socioeconomic gradients in mortality from CVD, heart disease, and stroke increased substantially during the study period. Compared to those in the most affluent group, individuals in the most deprived area group had, respectively 35%, 29%, and 73% higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality in 1969, but 120-121% higher mortality in 2007-2011. Gradients were steeper for women than for men. Education, income, and occupation were inversely associated with CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality, with individual-level socioeconomic gradients being steeper during 1990-2002 than in 1979-1989. Individuals with low education and incomes had 2.7 to 3.7 times higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality risks than their counterparts with high education and income levels. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Although mortality declined for all US groups during 1969-2011, socioeconomic disparities in mortality from CVD, heart disease and stroke remained marked and increased over time because of faster declines in mortality among higher socioeconomic groups. Widening disparities in mortality may reflect increasing temporal areal inequalities in living conditions, behavioral risk factors such as smoking, obesity and physical inactivity, and access to and use of health services. With social inequalities and prevalence of smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity on the rise, most segments of the working

  15. Increasing Area Deprivation and Socioeconomic Inequalities in Heart Disease, Stroke, and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Working Age Populations, United States, 1969-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gopal K; Siahpush, Mohammad; Azuine, Romuladus E; Williams, Shanita D

    2015-01-01

    We examined the extent to which area- and individual-level socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular-disease (CVD), heart disease, and stroke mortality among United States men and women aged 25-64 years changed between 1969 and 2011. National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate area- and individual-level socioeconomic gradients in mortality over time. Rate ratios and log-linear and Cox regression were used to model mortality trends and differentials. Area socioeconomic gradients in mortality from CVD, heart disease, and stroke increased substantially during the study period. Compared to those in the most affluent group, individuals in the most deprived area group had, respectively 35%, 29%, and 73% higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality in 1969, but 120-121% higher mortality in 2007-2011. Gradients were steeper for women than for men. Education, income, and occupation were inversely associated with CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality, with individual-level socioeconomic gradients being steeper during 1990-2002 than in 1979-1989. Individuals with low education and incomes had 2.7 to 3.7 times higher CVD, heart disease, and stroke mortality risks than their counterparts with high education and income levels. Although mortality declined for all US groups during 1969-2011, socioeconomic disparities in mortality from CVD, heart disease and stroke remained marked and increased over time because of faster declines in mortality among higher socioeconomic groups. Widening disparities in mortality may reflect increasing temporal areal inequalities in living conditions, behavioral risk factors such as smoking, obesity and physical inactivity, and access to and use of health services. With social inequalities and prevalence of smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity on the rise, most segments of the working-age population in low- and middle-income countries will likely experience increased cardiovascular-disease

  16. Associations of estimated Δ-5-desaturase and Δ-6-desaturase activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Roya; Kurl, Sudhir; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The role of PUFA in reducing the risk of stroke is uncertain. The concentrations of PUFA in the human body are determined both by dietary intake and by activities of desaturase enzymes. Desaturase enzymes have been associated with chronic diseases, but little is known about their association with stroke risk. We investigated the associations of Δ-6-desaturase (D6D) and Δ-5-desaturase (D5D) activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke among 1842 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989. ANCOVA and Cox regression models were used for the analyses. Whole serum desaturase activities were estimated as product:precursor ratios - γ-linolenic acid:linoleic acid for D6D and arachidonic acid:dihomo-γ-linolenic acid for D5D. Higher D6D activity was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin and TAG concentrations and worse homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA) indices. In contrast, higher D5D activity was associated with lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin, LDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein concentrations, higher HDL-cholesterol concentration, and better HOMA indices. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred. Neither D6D activity (multivariable-adjusted extreme-quartile hazard ratios (HR) 1·18; 95 % CI 0·80, 1·74) nor D5D activity (HR 1·06; 95 % CI 0·70, 1·60) were associated with stroke risk. In conclusion, higher D5D activity was favourably associated and higher D6D activity unfavourably associated with several stroke risk factors, but not with the risk of incident stroke.

  17. The difference between acute coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke risk with regard to gender and age in Finnish and Swedish populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Marjukka; Qiao, Qing; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Söderberg, Stefan; Eliasson, Mats; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2010-06-01

    We studied the age and gender difference between acute coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke risk and examined the extent to which such a difference may be explained by known risk factors. Data from Finnish and Swedish population-based cohorts including 9278 individuals were collaboratively analysed. Hazards ratios (95% confidence intervals) for coronary heart disease and stroke incidence were estimated using the Cox-proportional hazards model. The incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke was higher in all age groups in men than in women, and the gender difference was more marked for coronary heart disease than for ischaemic stroke. There was a 10-year lag in the development of coronary heart disease and stroke in women compared with men. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for the incidence of coronary heart disease in men and women were 3.87 (2.49-6.02) and 1.71 (1.07-2.74) at age 50-59 years, and 7.22 (4.59-11.36) and 3.49 (2.18-5.57) at age 60-69 years compared with women aged 40-49 years. For ischaemic stroke, they were 2.64 (1.45-4.82) and 2.17 (1.18-3.97) at age 50-59 years, and 5.19 (2.81-9.58) and 4.89 (2.67-8.97) at age 60-69 years, respectively. Acute coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke events appeared approximately 10 years earlier in men than in women, and these rates remained higher in men than in women in all age groups. The gender difference was more marked for coronary heart disease than for ischaemic stroke. This may be taken into account when developing interventions and treatment strategies.

  18. C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortality: an individual participant meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Lowe, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    .18-1.49) for ischaemic stroke; 1.34 (1.18-1.52) for vascular mortality; and 1.34 (1.20-1.50) for non-vascular mortality. INTERPRETATION: CRP concentration has continuous associations with the risk of coronary heart disease, ischaemic stroke, vascular mortality, and death from several cancers and lung disease......-person variation in risk factor levels. RESULTS: Log(e) CRP concentration was linearly associated with several conventional risk factors and inflammatory markers, and nearly log-linearly with the risk of ischaemic vascular disease and non-vascular mortality. Risk ratios (RRs) for coronary heart disease per 1-SD...... higher log(e) CRP concentration (three-fold higher) were 1.63 (95% CI 1.51-1.76) when initially adjusted for age and sex only, and 1.37 (1.27-1.48) when adjusted further for conventional risk factors; 1.44 (1.32-1.57) and 1.27 (1.15-1.40) for ischaemic stroke; 1.71 (1.53-1.91) and 1.55 (1...

  19. Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque Characteristics on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Relate With History of Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwaness, Mariana; Bos, Daniel; van den Bouwhuijsen, Quirijn; Portegies, Marileen L P; Ikram, M Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; van der Lugt, Aad; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Vernooij, Meike W

    2016-06-01

    Because atherosclerosis is a systemic disease, presence and composition on 1 location may relate to ischemic events in distant locations. We examined whether carotid atherosclerotic wall thickness, stenosis, and plaque composition are related to history of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD). From the population-based Rotterdam Study, 1731 asymptomatic participants (mean age, 72.4±9.1 years; 55% males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging of both carotid arteries. We assessed carotid wall thickness, stenosis and plaque composition, that is presence of intraplaque hemorrhage, lipid, and calcification. History of ischemic stroke and CHD was assessed until date of magnetic resonance imaging. The study was approved by the institutional review board, and all participants gave informed consent. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for age and traditional cardiovascular risk factors were used to study sex-specific associations between plaque characteristics and clinical events. We found that both carotid stenosis and intraplaque hemorrhage were associated with ischemic stroke in men but not in women (men: odds ratio [OR] for stenosis [per 10% increase]: 1.17 [95% CI, 1.06-1.30] and for intraplaque hemorrhage 2.39 [95% CI, 1.32-4.35]). In both men and women, carotid stenosis was associated with CHD (men: OR per 10% increase 1.12 [95% CI, 1.04-1.21] and women: OR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.03-1.34]) and carotid wall thickness was associated with CHD (men: OR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.03-1.39] and women: OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 0.88-1.65]). None of the plaque components was associated with CHD. Whereas carotid plaque thickness and stenosis are associated with the history of ischemic stroke and CHD, carotid intraplaque hemorrhage is associated with ischemic stroke, but not with CHD, providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Childhood intelligence in relation to adult coronary heart disease and stroke risk: evidence from a Danish birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G. David; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2005-01-01

    While recent studies have reported an inverse relation between childhood intelligence test scores and all-cause mortality in later life, the link with disease-specific outcomes has been rarely examined. Furthermore, the potential confounding effect of birthweight and childhood social circumstances...... is unknown. We investigated the relation of childhood intelligence with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk in a cohort of 6910 men born in 1953 in the Copenhagen area of Denmark. Events were ascertained from 1978 to 2000 using a cause-of-death register and hospital discharge records. There were 150...... CHD (19 fatal; 131 non-fatal) and 93 stroke (4 fatal; 89 non-fatal) events during follow-up into mid-life. Childhood intelligence was inversely related to CHD with the highest rate apparent in adults with low childhood test scores (HR(lowest vs. highest quartile), 2.70; 95% confidence interval: 1...

  1. Comparing the decline in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in neighbouring countries with different healthcare systems.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, K

    2013-06-04

    OBJECTIVE: To examine age and gender specific trends in coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke mortality in two neighbouring countries, the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI). DESIGN: Epidemiological study of time trends in CHD and stroke mortality. SETTING\\/PATIENTS: The populations of the ROI and NI, 1985-2010. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Directly age standardised CHD and stroke mortality rates were calculated and analysed using joinpoint regression to identify years where the slope of the linear trend changed significantly. This was performed separately for specific age groups (25-54, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-84 years) and by gender. Annual percentage change (APC) and 95% CIs are presented. RESULTS: There was a striking similarity between the two countries, with percentage change between 1985 and 1989 and between 2006 and 2010 of 67% and 69% in CHD mortality, and 64% and 62% in stroke mortality for the ROI and NI, respectively. However, joinpoint analysis identified differences in the pace of change between the two countries. There was an accelerated pace of decline (negative APC) in mortality for both CHD and stroke in both countries from the mid-1990s (APC ROI -8% (95% CI -9.5 to 6.5) and NI -6.6% (-6.9 to -6.3)), but the accelerated decrease started later for CHD mortality in the ROI. In recent years, a levelling off in CHD mortality was observed in the 25-54 year age group in NI and in stroke mortality for men and women in the ROI. CONCLUSIONS: While differences in the pace of change in mortality were observed at different time points, similar, substantial decreases in CHD and stroke mortality were achieved between 1985 and 1989 and between 2006 and 2010 in the ROI and NI despite important differences in health service structures. There is evidence of a levelling in mortality rates in some groups in recent years.

  2. Quantifying the risk of heart disease following acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of over 50 000 participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Trishna; Hasan, Nazeeha; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Slark, Julia; Bentley, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective Following an acute stroke, there is a high risk of recurrence. However, the leading cause of mortality following a stroke is due to coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) but that risk has not been robustly quantified. We sought to reliably quantify the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) in the absence of a known cardiac history. Setting A meta-analysis study. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Google Scholar were searched for potential studies up to October 2015. Included studies reported an acute cerebral ischaemic event and followed for CAD or MI within 1 year in patients without known IHD. Using arcsine transformed proportions for meta-analysis, studies were combined using a generic inverse variance random-effects model to calculate the pooled standardised mean difference and 95% CIs. These were interpreted as the percentage prevalence of CAD or incidence of MI following AIS. Results 17 studies with 4869 patients with AIS demonstrated a mean average of asymptomatic CAD in 52%. Anatomical methods of CAD detection revealed a prevalence of asymptomatic ≥50% coronary stenosis in 32% (95% CI 19% to 47%; pischaemic stroke revealed an overall risk of MI in the year following stroke of 3% (95% CI 1% to 5%; pischaemic stroke with no cardiac history have more than 50% coronary stenosis and 3% are at risk of developing MI within a year. Our findings provide a reliable quantitative measure of the risk of IHD following AIS in patients with no cardiac history. PMID:26792217

  3. Quantifying the risk of heart disease following acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of over 50,000 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Trishna; Hasan, Nazeeha; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Slark, Julia; Bentley, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-20

    Following an acute stroke, there is a high risk of recurrence. However, the leading cause of mortality following a stroke is due to coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) but that risk has not been robustly quantified. We sought to reliably quantify the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) in the absence of a known cardiac history. A meta-analysis study. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Google Scholar were searched for potential studies up to October 2015. Included studies reported an acute cerebral ischaemic event and followed for CAD or MI within 1 year in patients without known IHD. Using arcsine transformed proportions for meta-analysis, studies were combined using a generic inverse variance random-effects model to calculate the pooled standardised mean difference and 95% CIs. These were interpreted as the percentage prevalence of CAD or incidence of MI following AIS. 17 studies with 4869 patients with AIS demonstrated a mean average of asymptomatic CAD in 52%. Anatomical methods of CAD detection revealed a prevalence of asymptomatic ≥ 50% coronary stenosis in 32% (95% CI 19% to 47%; pischaemic stroke revealed an overall risk of MI in the year following stroke of 3% (95% CI 1% to 5%; pischaemic stroke with no cardiac history have more than 50% coronary stenosis and 3% are at risk of developing MI within a year. Our findings provide a reliable quantitative measure of the risk of IHD following AIS in patients with no cardiac history. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Homocysteine, Ischemic Stroke, and Coronary Heart Disease in Hypertensive Patients: A Population-Based, Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liyuan; Wu, Qunhong; Wang, Changyi; Hao, Yanhua; Zhao, Jinshun; Zhang, Lina; Fan, Rui; Liu, Yanfen; Li, Runhua; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Sihan; Ma, Jianping; Liu, Shengyuan; Peng, Xiaolin; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-07-01

    Total homocysteine level (tHcy) is a risk factor of ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary heart disease. However, the results are conflicting and mainly focused on healthy individuals in developed countries. A prospective, population-based cohort study was conducted among 5935 participants from 60 communities in the city of Shenzhen, China. A Cox regression analysis was applied to evaluate the contribution of tHcy to the risk of IS and coronary heart disease. The effect of folic acid supplementation on tHcy levels was also evaluated among 501 patients with essential hypertension, who received an average of 2.5 years of folic acid supplementation. After adjustment for confounding factors, the hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of IS caused by hyperhomocysteinemia were 2.18 (1.65-2.89), 2.40 (1.56-3.67), and 2.73 (1.83-4.08) in the total, male, and female participants, respectively. Compared with normal levels of tHcy (disease. The 2.5 years of folic acid supplementation reduced tHcy levels by 6.7 μmol/L (27.92%) in patients with essential hypertension. Hyperhomocysteinemia in Chinese hypertensive patients is significantly associated with IS risk but not coronary heart disease susceptibility, and folic acid supplementation can efficiently reduce tHcy levels. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Effects of early age at natural menopause on coronary heart disease and stroke in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijun; Song, Lulu; Liu, Bingqing; Li, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Lina; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2017-08-15

    Menopause is identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease because of the change of estrogen. The objective of the study was to explore the associations between early age at natural menopause (menopause at an age≤45years) and the presence of CHD and stroke. The study subjects were from the first follow-up survey of the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study. A total of 16,515 postmenopausal women were included for the analysis. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between age at natural menopause (≤45, 45-52, >52years) and the presence of CHD and stroke adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, reproductive history and metabolic factors. In the fully adjusted model, for each 1-year delay in menopausal age, the prevalence of CHD and stroke was reduced by 3% (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.98) and 5% (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), respectively. Women with early menopause (≤45years) had a higher prevalence of CHD (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Similarly, women with early menopause (≤45years) was associated with higher prevalence of stroke (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.25-2.30) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Early age at natural menopause is significantly associated with the presence of CHD and stroke among Chinese women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Alpha-Linolenic Acid Intake and 10-Year Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in 20,000 Middle-Aged Men and Women in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, de J.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Kromhout, D.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in the Netherlands.

  7. Chocolate Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Li, Xia; Jin, Yalei; Lu, Jinping

    2017-07-02

    Although epidemiological studies have examined the role of chocolate in preventing cardiometabolic disease, the results remain inconsistent. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to determine the association between chocolate intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and diabetes. A systematical search in PubMed and Embase through March 2017, together with reference scrutiny of relevant literatures, was performed to identify eligible studies. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effect models. Fourteen prospective studies of primary prevention with 508,705 participants were finally included, with follow-up durations ranging from 5 to 16 years. The summary RRs for the highest versus lowest chocolate consumption were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82-0.97; n = 6) for CHD, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78-0.90; n = 7) for stroke, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70-0.96; n = 5) for diabetes. Dose-response meta-analysis suggested a nonlinear association of chocolate consumption with all outcomes. For both CHD and stroke, there was little additional risk reduction when consuming chocolate ≥3 servings/week (one serving was defined as 30 g of chocolate). For diabetes, the peak protective effect of chocolate emerged at 2 servings/week (RR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.63-0.89), with no benefit observed when increasing consumption above 6 servings/week. In conclusion, chocolate intake is associated with decreased risks of CHD, stroke, and diabetes. Consuming chocolate in moderation (≤6 servings/week) may be optimal for preventing these disorders.

  8. Outdoor Air Pollution, Heart Attack and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated outdoor ambient air particle pollution triggers heart attacks, strokes, and abnormal heart rhythms and worsens heart failure in individuals at high risk due to underlying medical conditions. Emergency Medical Services in communities are the first responders to these eme...

  9. Snoring and risk of stroke and ischaemic heart disease in a 70 year old population. A 6-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Schultz-Larsen, K; Davidsen, Michael

    1994-01-01

    heart disease (IHD) and stroke while controlling for the potential influence of major cardio- and cerebrovascular risk factors. METHODS. In all, 804 70 year old males and females were classified according to snoring habits. Alcohol and tobacco consumption, blood pressure, body mass index, social group......, plasma lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein), fasting blood glucose, plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine were determined at baseline. RESULTS. Over a 6-year period (1984-1990) 88 suffered an IHD episode, 60 had a stroke and 180 died. A slightly higher stroke incidence was found...

  10. Social media for health promotion: What messages are women receiving about cardiovascular disease risk by the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Christine A; McGannon, Kerry R; Schinke, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the meanings of women's cardiovascular disease constructed within the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation Facebook page. Posts from Heart and Stroke Foundation and public user comments surrounding the launch of the Heart and Stroke Foundation re-branding were of interest. Ethnographic content analysis was employed to analyse text ( n = 40), images ( n = 32), videos ( n = 6), user comments and replies ( n = 42) from November 2016 to March 2017. Constructions (re)presented on Facebook of 'typical' women at risk and risk reduction were problematic as women most at risk were excluded through the use of consumerist, medicalized identities which also excluded promotion of healthy behaviour changes.

  11. Adherence to a DASH-style diet and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Teresa T; Chiuve, Stephanie E; McCullough, Marjorie L; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Hu, Frank B

    2008-04-14

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet has been shown to lower blood pressure, but little is known about its long-term effect on cardiovascular end points. Our objective was to assess the association between a DASH-style diet adherence score and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in women. In this prospective cohort study, diet was assessed 7 times during 24 years of follow-up (1980-2004) with validated food frequency questionnaires. A DASH score based on 8 food and nutrient components (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy, red and processed meats, sweetened beverages, and sodium) was calculated. Lifestyle and medical information was collected biennially with a questionnaire. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for potential confounders. The study population comprised 88,517 female nurses aged 34 to 59 years without a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes in 1980. The main outcome measures were the numbers of confirmed incident cases of nonfatal myocardial infarction, CHD death, and stroke. We documented 2129 cases of incident nonfatal myocardial infarction, 976 CHD deaths, and 2317 [corrected] cases of stroke. After adjustment for age, smoking, and other cardiovascular risk factors, the relative risks of CHD across quintiles of the DASH score were 1.0, 0.99, 0.86, 0.87, and 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.85) (PDASH score was also significantly associated with lower risk of stroke (multivariate relative risks across quintiles of the DASH score were 1.0, 0.92, 0.91, 0.89, and 0.82) (P=.002 for trend). Cross-sectional analysis in a subgroup of women with blood samples showed that the DASH score was significantly associated with lower plasma levels of C-reactive protein (P=.008 for trend) and interleukin 6 (P=.04 for trend). Adherence to the DASH-style diet is associated with a lower risk of CHD and stroke among middle-aged women during 24 years of follow-up.

  12. Relationship between tap water hardness, magnesium, and calcium concentration and mortality due to ischemic heart disease or stroke in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Schouten, L.J.; Mons, M.N.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting results on the relationship between the hardness of drinking water and mortality related to ischemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke have been reported. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the possible association between tap water calcium or magnesium concentration and total hardness

  13. Proteomic risk markers for coronary heart disease and stroke: validation and mediation of randomized trial hormone therapy effects on these diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Ross L; Zhao, Shanshan; Johnson, Melissa; Aragaki, Aaron; Hsia, Judith; Jackson, Rebecca D; Rossouw, Jacques E; Manson, JoAnn E; Hanash, Samir M

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported mass spectrometry-based proteomic discovery research to identify novel plasma proteins related to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, and to identify proteins with concentrations affected by the use of postmenopausal hormone therapy. Here we report CHD and stroke risk validation studies for highly ranked proteins, and consider the extent to which protein concentration changes relate to disease risk or provide an explanation for hormone therapy effects on these outcomes. Five proteins potentially associated with CHD (beta-2 microglobulin (B2M), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1 (ORM1), thrombospondin-1(THBS1), complement factor D pre-protein (CFD), and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1)) and five potentially associated with stroke (B2M, IGFBP2, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and hemopexin (HPX)) had high discovery phase significance level ranking and an available ELISA assay, and were included in case-control validation studies within the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) hormone therapy trials. Protein concentrations, at baseline and 1 year following randomization, were assessed for 358 CHD cases and 362 stroke cases, along with corresponding disease-free controls. Disease association, and mediation of estrogen-alone and estrogen plus progestin effects on CHD and stroke risk, were assessed using logistic regression. B2M, THBS1, and CFD were confirmed (P markers, and B2M, IGFBP2, and IGFBP4 were confirmed as novel stroke disease risk markers, while the assay for HPX proved to be unreliable. The change from baseline to 1 year in B2M was associated (P marker for both CHD and stroke. The B2M increase experienced by women during the first year of hormone therapy trial participation conveys cardiovascular disease risk. The increase in IGFBP1 similarly conveys CHD risk, and the magnitude of the IGFBP1 increase following hormone therapy may be a mediator of hormone therapy effects. Plasma THBS1 and CFD are confirmed as CHD risk markers

  14. Bowel Movement Frequency, Laxative Use, and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-05-05

    The associations of bowel movement frequency and laxative use with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are unclear. A total of 72 014 subjects (29 668 men and 42 346 women) aged 40 to 79 years, without a history of CVD or cancer, completed a lifestyle questionnaire at baseline between 1988 and 1990 that included information on bowel movement frequency (daily, every 2-3 days, or once every 4 or more days) and laxative use (yes or no), and were followed-up until 2009. During the subjects' 1 165 569 person-years of follow-up, we documented 977 deaths from coronary heart disease (561 men and 416 women), 2024 from total stroke (1028 men and 996 women), 1127 from ischemic stroke (606 men and 521 women), and 828 from hemorrhagic stroke (388 men and 440 women). The prevalence of CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, stress, depression, and physical inactivity, was higher in laxative users and in those with a lower frequency of bowel movements. The multivariable HRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of laxative users were as follows: 1.56 (95% CI, 1.21-2.03) for coronary heart disease and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.07-1.76) for ischemic stroke in men, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for total stroke, and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.17-1.79) for ischemic stroke in women. Similar results were observed even after the exclusion of deaths that occurred early in the follow-up period. A significant association between bowel movement frequency and mortality from CVD was not observed. Constipation could be a marker of exposure to CVD risk factors, and laxative use could be a risk factor for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

  15. Bowel Movement Frequency, Laxative Use, and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Kubota

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The associations of bowel movement frequency and laxative use with cardiovascular disease (CVD are unclear. Methods: A total of 72 014 subjects (29 668 men and 42 346 women aged 40 to 79 years, without a history of CVD or cancer, completed a lifestyle questionnaire at baseline between 1988 and 1990 that included information on bowel movement frequency (daily, every 2–3 days, or once every 4 or more days and laxative use (yes or no, and were followed-up until 2009. Results: During the subjects’ 1 165 569 person-years of follow-up, we documented 977 deaths from coronary heart disease (561 men and 416 women, 2024 from total stroke (1028 men and 996 women, 1127 from ischemic stroke (606 men and 521 women, and 828 from hemorrhagic stroke (388 men and 440 women. The prevalence of CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, stress, depression, and physical inactivity, was higher in laxative users and in those with a lower frequency of bowel movements. The multivariable HRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs] of laxative users were as follows: 1.56 (95% CI, 1.21–2.03 for coronary heart disease and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.07–1.76 for ischemic stroke in men, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08–1.49 for total stroke, and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.17–1.79 for ischemic stroke in women. Similar results were observed even after the exclusion of deaths that occurred early in the follow-up period. A significant association between bowel movement frequency and mortality from CVD was not observed. Conclusions: Constipation could be a marker of exposure to CVD risk factors, and laxative use could be a risk factor for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

  16. All-Cause Mortality up to and After Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Events in European Middle-Aged Men: The PRIME Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majed, Bilal; Montaye, Michèle; Wagner, Aline; Arveiler, Dominique; Ducimetiere, Pierre; Tafflet, Muriel; Ferrieres, Jean; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Kee, Frank; Evans, Alun; Amouyel, Philippe; Prugger, Christof; Empana, Jean-Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to investigate prospectively the all-cause mortality risk up to and after coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke events in European middle-aged men. The study population comprised 10 424 men 50 to 59 years of age recruited between 1991 and 1994 in France (N=7855) and Northern Ireland (N=2747) within the Prospective Epidemiological Study of Myocardial Infarction. Incident CHD and stroke events and deaths from all causes were prospectively registered during the 10-year follow-up. In Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis, CHD and stroke events during follow-up were used as time-dependent covariates. A total of 769 CHD and 132 stroke events were adjudicated, and 569 deaths up to and 66 after CHD or stroke occurred during follow-up. After adjustment for study country and cardiovascular risk factors, the hazard ratios of all-cause mortality were 1.58 (95% confidence interval 1.18-2.12) after CHD and 3.13 (95% confidence interval 1.98-4.92) after stroke. These findings support continuous efforts to promote both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Long term risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke: influence of duration of follow-up over four decades of mortality surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G David; Shipley, Martin; Smith, George Davey; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-09-01

    While cohort studies have revealed a range of risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke, the extent to which the strength of these associations varies according to duration of follow-up in studies with extended disease surveillance is unclear. This was the aim of the present study. Initiated in 1967/70, the original Whitehall study is an on-going cohort study of 15,402 male UK government workers free of coronary heart disease when they took part in a baseline medical examination during which a range of standard risk factors was measured. In analyses in which we stratified by duration of follow-up, there was evidence of time-dependency for most risk factor-disease relationships. Thus, the associations of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and cigarette smoking with coronary heart disease and stroke diminished in strength with increasing duration of follow-up, whereas the magnitude of the body mass index-coronary heart disease relation was unchanged. For example, the age-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for cigarette smoking (versus never smoked) in relation to coronary heart disease were: 2.49 (1.80, 3.44), 1.65 (1.34, 2.03), 1.36 (1.15, 1.61) and 1.32 (1.10, 1.58) for follow-up periods 0-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30+ years, respectively. Despite a general diminution in the strength of effect over time, even in the fourth decade of follow-up, classic risk factors retained some predictive capacity for coronary heart disease and, to a lesser degree, stroke. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  18. Similarities and differences between coronary heart disease and stroke in the associations with cardiovascular risk factors: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masaaki; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Kentaro; Li, Yuanying; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Tanabe, Naohito; Wada, Yasuhiko; Wang, Chaochen; Ota, Atsuhiko; Tamakoshi, Koji; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2017-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke have common risk factors, but some of these differ in the magnitude or direction of associations between CHD and stroke. We assessed whether the impact of each risk factor differed between CHD and stroke mortality in Asians. In total, 104 910 subjects aged 40-79 years without histories of cancer, CHD and stroke at baseline were followed between 1988 and 2009. Competing-risks analysis was used to test for differences in the associations of each risk factor with two endpoints (CHD and stroke). Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were also calculated for these endpoints to estimate the population impact of each risk factor. During a median 19.1-year follow-up, 1554 died from CHD and 3163 from stroke. The association of hypertension with CHD was similar to that with stroke in terms of the magnitude and direction (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for CHD: 1.63 vs. stroke: 1.73 in men and 1.70 vs. 1.66 in women). Conversely, the magnitude of these associations differed for smoking (CHD: 1.95 vs. stroke: 1.23 in men and 2.45 vs. 1.35 in women) and diabetes (1.49 vs. 1.09 in men and 2.08 vs. 1.39 in women). The highest PAF for CHD was caused by smoking in men and by hypertension in women; that for stroke was caused by hypertension in both sexes. Hypertension associations and PAFs were consistent between CHD and stroke, but not for other risk factors. These findings may be useful to optimize public health intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  20. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603,838 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Fransson, Eleonor I; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A; Hamer, Mark; Hooftman, Wendela E; Houtman, Irene L; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Lunau, Thorsten; Madsen, Ida E H; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Shipley, Martin J; Siegrist, Johannes; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; O'Reilly, Dermot; Kumari, Meena; Batty, G David; Ferrie, Jane E; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-10-31

    Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603,838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease at baseline; the meta-analysis of stroke comprised data for 528,908 men and women who were free from stroke at baseline. Follow-up for coronary heart disease was 5·1 million person-years (mean 8·5 years), in which 4768 events were recorded, and for stroke was 3·8 million person-years (mean 7·2 years), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (≥55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1·13, 95% CI 1·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p

  1. Gender Differences in Risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Their Association with Metabolic Syndrome in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fang Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We aimed to explore the differences in the risks of CHD and stroke between Chinese women and men with T2DM and their association with metabolic syndrome (MS. This study included 1514 patients with T2DM. The Asian Guidelines of ATPIII (2005 were used for MS diagnosis, and the UKPDS risk engine was used to evaluate the 10-year CHD and stroke risks. Women had lower CHD risk (15.3% versus 26.3%, fatal CHD risk (11.8% versus 19.0%, stroke risk (8.4% versus 10.3%, and fatal stroke risk (1.4% versus 1.6% compared with men with T2DM (p<0.05–0.001. The CHD risk (28.4% versus 22.6%, p<0.001 was significantly higher in men with MS than in those without MS. The CHD (16.2% versus 11.0%, p<0.001 and stroke risks (8.9% versus 5.8%, p<0.001 were higher in women with MS than in those without MS. In conclusion, our findings indicated that Chinese women with T2DM are less susceptible to CHD and stroke than men. Further, MS increases the risk of both these events, highlighting the need for comprehensive metabolic control in T2DM.

  2. Preventable risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke amongst ethnic groups in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemic-Stojcevic, N; Dundas, R; Jenkins, S; Rudd, A; Wolfe, C

    2001-05-01

    People of African Caribbean descent have higher mortality rates from stroke than other ethnic groups. However, little is known about the prevalence of stroke risk factors in UK ethnic minority groups. We investigated the prevalence of these risk factors amongst African Caribbeans, black Africans and whites. A random sample of patients aged 45-74 registered with 16 general practices in south London was surveyed in 1995. Main outcome measures were: prevalence of hypertension, mean serum cholesterol, serum fibrinogen and glycosylated haemoglobin AIC. Logistic and linear regressions were used to determine ethnic differences in these measures. Hypertension was more prevalent in black Caribbeans (79.4%) and black Africans (71.6%) than in whites (54.3%) (p Africans had similar rates to black Caribbeans for these risk factors apart from lower triglvceride levels. These differences in risk factors may partially explain the high stroke mortality rates in black Caribbeans and black Africans compared to whites. There was little difference in prevalence of these risk factors between black Caribbean and black African groups. Specific strategies targeted to each ethnic group need to be developed to reduce risk factors.

  3. The validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for the prediction of the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke, and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Pankow, James; Lindström, Jaana; Jousilahti, Pekka; Hu, Gang; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2005-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease shares several risk factors with type 2 diabetes. We tested whether the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), recently developed in a Finnish population to estimate the future risk of diabetes, would also identify individuals at high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, and total mortality in this same population. Independent risk factor surveys were conducted in 1987, 1992, and 1997 in Finland, comprising 8268 men and 9457 women aged 25-64 years and free of CHD and stroke at baseline. During the follow-up until the end of 2001, 699 incident acute CHD events, 324 acute stroke events, and 765 deaths occurred. The data were analysed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the Cox-regression model. The areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were 71% for CHD, 73% for stroke, and 68% for total mortality in men and 78, 68, and 72% in women, respectively. The addition of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking increased the AUC values modestly (the change of the absolute values from 2.6 to 6.5%), but the additional use of plasma glucose had only a slight effect on the AUC values for CHD and stroke. The FINDRISC is a reasonably good predictor of CHD, stroke and total mortality.

  4. The effects of pay for performance on disparities in stroke, hypertension, and coronary heart disease management: interrupted time series study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tayu Lee

    Full Text Available The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, a major pay-for-performance programme, was introduced into United Kingdom primary care in April 2004. The impact of this programme on disparities in health care remains unclear. This study examines the following questions: has this pay for performance programme improved the quality of care for coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension in white, black and south Asian patients? Has this programme reduced disparities in the quality of care between these ethnic groups? Did general practices with different baseline performance respond differently to this programme?Retrospective cohort study of patients registered with family practices in Wandsworth, London during 2007. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was used to take into account the previous time trend. Primary outcome measures were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Our findings suggest that the implementation of QOF resulted in significant short term improvements in blood pressure control. The magnitude of benefit varied between ethnic groups with a statistically significant short term reduction in systolic BP in white and black but not in south Asian patients with hypertension. Disparities in risk factor control were attenuated only on few measures and largely remained intact at the end of the study period.Pay for performance programmes such as the QOF in the UK should set challenging but achievable targets. Specific targets aimed at reducing ethnic disparities in health care may also be needed.

  5. The effects of pay for performance on disparities in stroke, hypertension, and coronary heart disease management: interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a major pay-for-performance programme, was introduced into United Kingdom primary care in April 2004. The impact of this programme on disparities in health care remains unclear. This study examines the following questions: has this pay for performance programme improved the quality of care for coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension in white, black and south Asian patients? Has this programme reduced disparities in the quality of care between these ethnic groups? Did general practices with different baseline performance respond differently to this programme? Retrospective cohort study of patients registered with family practices in Wandsworth, London during 2007. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was used to take into account the previous time trend. Primary outcome measures were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Our findings suggest that the implementation of QOF resulted in significant short term improvements in blood pressure control. The magnitude of benefit varied between ethnic groups with a statistically significant short term reduction in systolic BP in white and black but not in south Asian patients with hypertension. Disparities in risk factor control were attenuated only on few measures and largely remained intact at the end of the study period. Pay for performance programmes such as the QOF in the UK should set challenging but achievable targets. Specific targets aimed at reducing ethnic disparities in health care may also be needed.

  6. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease : A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to

  7. Vascular disease and stroke risk in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease (including myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease) has been proposed as a less well-validated risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. We investigated whether vascular disease is an independent risk factor of stroke/thromboembolism in atrial...... fibrillation and whether adding vascular disease improves Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age 75 years, Diabetes, previous Stroke (CHADS(2)) risk stratification....

  8. Snoring and risk of stroke and ischaemic heart disease in a 70 year old population. A 6-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Schultz-Larsen, K; Davidsen, Michael

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. A number of studies have demonstrated an association between habitual snoring and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Control for the influence of potential confounders has been inadequate. To clarify the issue we examined the association between snoring and future risk of ischaemic...... heart disease (IHD) and stroke while controlling for the potential influence of major cardio- and cerebrovascular risk factors. METHODS. In all, 804 70 year old males and females were classified according to snoring habits. Alcohol and tobacco consumption, blood pressure, body mass index, social group......, plasma lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein), fasting blood glucose, plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine were determined at baseline. RESULTS. Over a 6-year period (1984-1990) 88 suffered an IHD episode, 60 had a stroke and 180 died. A slightly higher stroke incidence was found...

  9. Increased Serum Alkaline Phosphatase as a Predictor of Symptomatic Hemorrhagic Transformation in Ischemic Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and/or Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Wang, Deren; Li, Jie; Xiong, Yao; Liu, Bian; Wei, Chenchen; Wu, Simiao; Lin, Jing; Liu, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is considered as a marker of liver function in clinical practice. Furthermore, it has been identified that liver function can contribute to hemorrhagic transformation (HT). However, whether ALP levels play a role in HT after stroke remains an open question, especially in cardioembolic stroke patients. We prospectively and consecutively enrolled ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation and/or rheumatic heart disease. Baseline data including ALP levels within 48 hours after admission were collected. ALP levels were divided into tertiles. The presence of HT, hemorrhagic infarction (HI), parenchymal hematoma (PH), and symptomatic HT was evaluated according to brain magnetic resonance imaging and European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study III definitions. We used logistic regression to examine the associations between ALP levels and risk of HT, HI, PH, and symptomatic HT. Of the 130 patients (56 male; mean age: 63 years) included finally, 50 (38.5%) developed HT and 13 (10.0%) developed symptomatic HT. ALP levels were not associated with risk of HT, HI, and PH. However, compared with the first ALP tertile, patients in the third tertile were 8.96 times more likely to have symptomatic HT (95% confidence interval: 1.33-60.21; P = .02) after adjusting for age, gender, alanine aminotransferase levels, aspartate aminotransferase levels, antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation therapy, and thrombolysis therapy. Elevated ALP levels may help identify high-risk symptomatic HT in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation and/or rheumatic heart disease. However, further studies with larger cohorts are needed to identify our results. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Apixaban in Comparison With Warfarin in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease: Findings From the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avezum, Alvaro; Lopes, Renato D; Schulte, Phillip J; Lanas, Fernando; Gersh, Bernard J; Hanna, Michael; Pais, Prem; Erol, Cetin; Diaz, Rafael; Bahit, M Cecilia; Bartunek, Jozef; De Caterina, Raffaele; Goto, Shinya; Ruzyllo, Witold; Zhu, Jun; Granger, Christopher B; Alexander, John H

    2015-08-25

    Apixaban is approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial included a substantial number of patients with valvular heart disease and only excluded patients with clinically significant mitral stenosis or mechanical prosthetic heart valves. We compared the effect of apixaban and warfarin on rates of stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, and death in patients with and without moderate or severe valvular heart disease using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of the 18 201 patients enrolled in ARISTOTLE, 4808 (26.4%) had a history of moderate or severe valvular heart disease or previous valve surgery. Patients with valvular heart disease had higher rates of stroke or systemic embolism and bleeding than patients without valvular heart disease. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin in patients with and without valvular heart disease in reducing stroke and systemic embolism (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51-0.97 and HR, 0.84; 95%, CI 0.67-1.04; interaction P=0.38), causing less major bleeding (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.04 and HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.55-0.77; interaction P=0.23), and reducing mortality (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.84-1.22 and HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.96; interaction P=0.10). More than a quarter of the patients in ARISTOTLE with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation had moderate or severe valvular heart disease. There was no evidence of a differential effect of apixaban over warfarin in reducing stroke or systemic embolism, causing less bleeding, and reducing death in patients with and without valvular heart disease. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00412984. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Sodium intake and prevalence of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and stroke in Korean adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyung Park

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In order to control the effect of sodium on diseases, attention must also be paid to the influence of potassium on diseases as a covariate, and it is considered that additional research should be made regarding the role of potassium in studying the impact of sodium on health in the future.

  12. The impact of health-related quality of life on the incidence of ischaemic heart disease and stroke; a cohort study in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjou, Yahya; Kermani-Alghoraishi, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Talaei, Mohammad; Yousefy, Alireza; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Rabiei, Katayoun; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of health-related quality of life (QoL) on the occurrence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke using a validated questionnaire. We followed the 3,283 subjects, aged ≥ 35 years and without history of cardiovascular events (CVE) over four years from 2007 to 2011 from the Isfahan cohort study. The World Health Organization QoL questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF), which contains four separate domains, was used to assess QoL. Incidence rates of IHD and stroke were recorded during follow-up. Socioeconomic demographic data including marital state, educational level, occupation, income and place of living and metabolic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), dyslipidaemia, body mass index and smoking were also recorded. More IHD (42%) and stroke (57%) patients were illiterate; while the educational status was significantly different only in the IHD group (P = 0.000). Differences in income and occupation were notable in patients with stroke and IHD, respectively, compared to subjects without them (P stroke patients in comparison with subjects without CVE (P = 0.000). Two-way multivariate analyses of covariance test after age, educational status and metabolic risk factors adjustment showed that subjects with stroke had a significantly higher score in all QoL domains in comparison with individuals without stroke (P 0.050). This study indicates that there is no association between QoL and IHD incidence although there was a significant relationship between higher QoL and incidence of stroke.

  13. Long-term physical activity in leisure time and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory diseases, and cancer. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Lange, Peter; Scharling, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between different levels of long-term physical activity in leisure time and subsequent causes of deaths. DESIGN: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study of 19 329 men and women aged 20......-93 in 1976. Physical activity in leisure time was estimated at the examinations in 1976-78 and 1981-83. This analysis consists of 2136 healthy men and 2758 women aged 20-79 years, with unchanged physical activity at the two examinations, and with all covariates included in the multivariate analyses: smoking......, total-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, body mass index, education, income, and forced expiratory volume in 10.78 (% predicted). RESULTS: Adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease were...

  14. Influence of the β-fibrinogen-455G/A polymorphism on development of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lian; Liu, Wenhui; Yan, Yan; Su, Li; Wu, Guangliang; Liang, Baoyun; Tan, Jinjing; Huang, Guihua

    2014-06-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) are two vascular disorders that are a common cause of death worldwide. Several studies have assessed the association of the β-fibrinogen-455G/A (FGB-455G/A) polymorphism and risk of IS and CHD, but the results are still inconsistent. Our study aimed to investigate whether the FGB-455G/A polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to IS and CHD by using meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified from PubMed, Embase and four Chinese database up to July 2013.Data were analyzed and processed by Stata 11.2. A pooled OR with 95% CI was calculated to estimate the strength of the genetic association. Cumulative meta-analysis was performed to assess the tendency of pooled OR over time. 45 studies based on a total of 7238 cases and 7395 controls were included in our meta-analysis. The results indicated that the FGB-455G/A polymorphism is associated with the risk of IS when compared with the dominant model (OR=1.518, 95%CI=1.279-1.802 for AA+GA vs. GG). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significantly elevated risks were associated with the A allele in Asians (OR=1.700, 95%CI=1.417-2.040), but not in Caucasians (OR=0.942, 95%CI=0.813-1.091). Both the hypertension and non-hypertension subgroups reached significant results, but no significance was found when stratified according to sex or subtype of IS. Results indicate that the FGB-455G/A polymorphism is associated with CHD (OR=1.802, 95%CI=1.445-2.246). Our meta-analysis suggests that the FGB-455G/A polymorphism contributes to susceptibility to IS and CHD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased risk of stroke with darbepoetin alfa in anaemic heart failure patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello, Natalie A.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Desai, Akshay S.; Anand, Inder S.; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.; Olson, Kurt; Solomon, Scott D.; Swedberg, Karl; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Young, James B.; Pfeffer, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The use of an erythropoesis-stimulating agent, darbepoetin alfa (DA), to treat anaemia in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease was associated with a heightened risk of stroke and neutral efficacy in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Therapy (TREAT),

  16. Muertes por enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares prevenibles - (Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de septiembre del 2013 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Más de 800,000 personas en los Estados Unidos mueren cada año a causa de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares. Aprenda cómo controlar todos los principales factores de riesgo.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  17. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities in health outcomes persist. Moreover, the continuous improvement in cardiovascular mortality typical of the last four decades has ended motivating new and innovative approaches to improve population health and wellbeing. Apart from continued focus on traditional risk factor modification such as identification and treatment of high blood pressure and cholesterol, cessation of smoking, and appropriate use of evidence-based pharmacological prevention measures and disease management, other factors should be considered such as increasing physical activity, dietary sodium reduction and modification of social and environmental determinants known to cause heart attacks and stroke and exacerbate vascular disease. Such an approach will require greater cooperation among public health, environmental health, the broader public and private healthcare delivery and payment systems, and federal agencies. To introduce this concept the U.S. EPA held a workshop in September 2016 bringing together representatives of local and state public health officials, the healthcare system, educators, data analytics, and federal partners (CMS, CDC, Dept. of State and EPA) for the purpose of exploring the idea of prom

  18. Risks for cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes mellitus associated with the metabolic syndrome using the new harmonised definition: findings from nationally representative longitudinal data from an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Young-Ho; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Hye-Ryun

    2010-12-01

    We examined the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes with the metabolic syndrome according to the new harmonised definition and its components using a national longitudinal data set from an Asian population. Data of 9791 men and women aged 20+ from 1998 and 2001 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were individually linked to national hospitalisation and mortality data using unique personal identification numbers. During a 5.8-year follow-up through 2005, 288 incident cardiovascular events (184 strokes and 122 cases of ischaemic heart disease) and 85 new diabetes cases have been detected. Men and women with the metabolic syndrome had 48%, 39%, 64%, and 127% greater risks of cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes, respectively, than those without the metabolic syndrome. The increased risks of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes remained significant after adjusting for health behaviours, bio-clinical factors, family history, and socio-demographic factors. Analysis results on population attributable risks showed that about a quarter of total diabetes occurrence and more than 10% of cardiovascular disease was attributable to the metabolic syndrome. The number of metabolic syndrome components was linearly associated with risks of outcomes. High blood pressure was significantly associated with all four outcomes while hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia were also important for ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, respectively. Reduction of metabolic risk factors is necessary in South Korea to lower the burden of associated diseases, especially ever-increasing ischaemic heart disease and diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. REDUCTION DEGREE OF LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS CHOLESTEROL LEVELS ACCORDING TO DIFFERENT DOSES OF STATINS; ITS EFFECT ON THE RISK OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE ACUTE EPISODES DEPENDING ON TREATMENT DURATION; AND RISK OF ISCHEMIC AND THROMBOEMBOLIC STROKE. COMMENT ON THE PAPER OF LAW M.R., WALD N.J., RUDNICKA A.R. QUANTIFYING EFFECT OF STATINS ON LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL, ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE, AND STROKE: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. BMJ 2003; 326:1423-1427

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Perova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative dose-dependent ability of different statins to lower serum low-density lipoproteins (LDL cholesterol was determined in three large meta-analysis. Besides, it was found that standardized decrease in LDL cholesterol levels on 1.0 or 1.8 mmol/l leads to rate reduction in ischemic heart disease acute episodes as well as stroke depending on treatment duration. Effect of LDL cholesterol reduction on stroke occurrence was more significant in studies, which included a major share of patients with vascular disease, because these patients have a higher risk of thromboembolic stroke (rather than haemorrhagic stroke in comparison with the general population.

  20. Permanent work disability before and after ischaemic heart disease or stroke event: a nationwide population-based cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Jenni; Virtanen, Marianna; Lallukka, Tea; Friberg, Emilie; Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor; Lundström, Erik; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2017-09-29

    We examined the risk of disability pension before and after ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke event, the burden of stroke compared with IHD and which factors predicted disability pension after either event. A population-based cohort study with follow-up 5 years before and after the event. Register data were analysed with general linear modelling with binary and Poisson distributions including interaction tests for event type (IHD/stroke). All people living in Sweden, aged 25‒60 years at the first event year, who had been living in Sweden for 5 years before the event and had no indication of IHD or stroke prior to the index event in 2006‒2008 were included, except for cases in which death occurred within 30 days of the event. People with both IHD and stroke were excluded, resulting in 18 480 cases of IHD (65%) and 9750 stroke cases (35%). Disability pension. Of those going to suffer IHD or stroke event, 25% were already on disability pension a year before the event. The adjusted OR for disability pension at first postevent year was 2.64-fold (95% CI 2.25 to 3.11) for people with stroke compared with IHD. Economic inactivity predicted disability pension regardless of event type (OR=3.40; 95% CI 2.85 to 4.04). Comorbid mental disorder was associated with the greatest risk (OR=3.60; 95% CI 2.69 to 4.83) after an IHD event. Regarding stroke, medical procedure, a proxy for event severity, was the largest contributor (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.43 to 3.60). While IHD event was more common, stroke involved more permanent work disability. Demographic, socioeconomic and comorbidity-related factors were associated with disability pension both before and after the event. The results help occupational and other healthcare professionals to identify vulnerable groups at risk for permanent labour market exclusion after such an event. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial

  1. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  2. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  3. Snoring and risk of stroke and ischaemic heart disease in a 70 year old population. A 6-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Schultz-Larsen, K; Davidsen, Michael

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. A number of studies have demonstrated an association between habitual snoring and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Control for the influence of potential confounders has been inadequate. To clarify the issue we examined the association between snoring and future risk of ischaemic...... heart disease (IHD) and stroke while controlling for the potential influence of major cardio- and cerebrovascular risk factors. METHODS. In all, 804 70 year old males and females were classified according to snoring habits. Alcohol and tobacco consumption, blood pressure, body mass index, social group...... among snorers (relative risk [RR] = 1.8; (95% confidence interval: 1.1-3.6). When adjustments were made for the above confounders, no associations could be found between snoring and IHD, stroke or all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS. In a 70 year old population, snoring is not associated with an increased...

  4. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk and stress in a person's life, their health behaviors and socioeconomic status. These factors may affect established ... Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) • Consumer Healthcare • Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & ...

  5. Chronic inflammatory disorders and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, and stroke: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; Charlton, Judith; Chowienczyk, Phil; Gulliford, Martin C

    2014-09-02

    This study sought to evaluate whether risks of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease are elevated across a range of organ-specific and multisystem chronic inflammatory disorders. A matched cohort study was implemented in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink including participants with severe psoriasis (5648), mild psoriasis (85 232), bullous skin diseases (4284), ulcerative colitis (12 203), Crohn's disease (7628), inflammatory arthritis (27 358), systemic autoimmune disorders (7472), and systemic vasculitis (6283) and in 373 851 matched controls. The main outcome measures were new diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke, or coronary heart disease. The outcomes were evaluated for each condition in a multiple outcomes model, with adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Estimates for different inflammatory conditions were pooled in a random-effects meta-analysis. There were 4695 new diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 3266 of coronary heart disease, and 1715 of stroke. The hazard ratio for pooled multiple failure estimate was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-1.26). The highest relative hazards were observed in systemic autoimmune disorders (1.32; 95% CI, 1.16-1.50) and systemic vasculitis (1.29; 95% CI, 1.16-1.44). Hazards were increased in organ-specific disorders, including severe psoriasis (1.29; 95% CI, 1.12-1.47) and ulcerative colitis (1.26; 95% CI, 1.14-1.40). Participants in the highest tertile of C-reactive protein had greater risk of multiple outcomes (1.52; 95% CI, 1.37-1.68). The risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus is increased across a range of organ-specific and multisystem chronic inflammatory disorders with evidence that risk is associated with severity of inflammation. Clinical management of patients with chronic inflammatory disorders should seek to reduce cardiovascular risk. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  7. Association of childhood intelligence with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: findings from the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Batty, G David; Clark, Heather; McIntyre, Sally; Leon, David A

    2008-01-01

    Associations of cognitive function assessed in adulthood with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke might reflect a causal effect or could be explained by residual confounding or a common underlying pathology (atherosclerosis) that links both declines in cognitive function and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (i.e. reverse causality). Our objective was to examine the association of childhood intelligence (assessed at an age when generalised atherosclerosis would be extremely unlikely) with risk of CHD and stroke in later life in a cohort of females and males on whom information on a wide range of potential confounding factors is available. Cohort study of 11,125 individuals born in Aberdeen, Scotland, between 1950 and 1956, who had childhood intelligence measured at ages 7, 9, 11 and who have been followed up by linkage to hospital admissions and mortality data. The cohort contributed 264,672 person years of follow-up and over this time 93 females experienced CHD and 56 experienced a stroke; 264 males experienced CHD and 67 a stroke. There were inverse associations of childhood intelligence measured at all 3 ages (7, 9, 11 years) with both CHD and stroke, with some evidence that the association with intelligence assessed at age 11 was stronger than at younger ages. The magnitude of associations were similar for CHD and stroke. Adjustment for a range of potential confounding factors did not markedly attenuate the associations and there was evidence that the association was stronger in females than in males. For example, the age adjusted hazard ratio of a combined outcome of CHD and stroke per 1 standard deviation (SD; 1SD=15 points) difference in intelligence score at age 11 in females was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42, 0.64) and in males was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.90), with adjustment for all potential confounding factors these became 0.60 (95% CI: 0.48, 0.76) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.98) respectively; P-value for interaction with gender in both models=0

  8. Causal Associations of Adiposity and Body Fat Distribution With Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke Subtypes, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Caroline E; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Palmer, Tom M; White, Jon; Prieto-Merino, David; Zabaneh, Delilah; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Wong, Andrew; Warren, Helen R; McLachlan, Stela; Trompet, Stella; Moldovan, Max; Morris, Richard W; Sofat, Reecha; Kumari, Meena; Hyppönen, Elina; Jefferis, Barbara J; Gaunt, Tom R; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Zhou, Ang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Mutsert, Renée de; Noordam, Raymond; Caulfield, Mark J; Jukema, J Wouter; Worrall, Bradford B; Munroe, Patricia B; Menon, Usha; Power, Chris; Kuh, Diana; Lawlor, Debbie A; Humphries, Steve E; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Sattar, Naveed; Kivimaki, Mika; Price, Jacqueline F; Davey Smith, George; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon D; Holmes, Michael V; Casas, Juan P

    2017-06-13

    The implications of different adiposity measures on cardiovascular disease etiology remain unclear. In this article, we quantify and contrast causal associations of central adiposity (waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index [WHRadjBMI]) and general adiposity (body mass index [BMI]) with cardiometabolic disease. Ninety-seven independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms for BMI and 49 single-nucleotide polymorphisms for WHRadjBMI were used to conduct Mendelian randomization analyses in 14 prospective studies supplemented with coronary heart disease (CHD) data from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D (Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis [CARDIoGRAM] plus The Coronary Artery Disease [C4D] Genetics; combined total 66 842 cases), stroke from METASTROKE (12 389 ischemic stroke cases), type 2 diabetes mellitus from DIAGRAM (Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis; 34 840 cases), and lipids from GLGC (Global Lipids Genetic Consortium; 213 500 participants) consortia. Primary outcomes were CHD, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and major stroke subtypes; secondary analyses included 18 cardiometabolic traits. Each one standard deviation (SD) higher WHRadjBMI (1 SD≈0.08 U) associated with a 48% excess risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] for CHD, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-1.71), similar to findings for BMI (1 SD≈4.6 kg/m 2 ; OR for CHD, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.22-1.52). Only WHRadjBMI increased risk of ischemic stroke (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03-1.70). For type 2 diabetes mellitus, both measures had large effects: OR, 1.82 (95% CI, 1.38-2.42) and OR, 1.98 (95% CI, 1.41-2.78) per 1 SD higher WHRadjBMI and BMI, respectively. Both WHRadjBMI and BMI were associated with higher left ventricular hypertrophy, glycemic traits, interleukin 6, and circulating lipids. WHRadjBMI was also associated with higher carotid intima-media thickness (39%; 95% CI, 9%-77% per 1 SD). Both general and central adiposity have causal effects on CHD and type 2 diabetes mellitus

  9. Alpha-linolenic acid intake and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,000 middle-aged men and women in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette de Goede

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke in the Netherlands. METHODS: Data were collected from a general population of 20,069 generally healthy men and women, aged 20 to 65 years. Habitual diet was assessed at baseline (1993-1997 with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidences of CHD and stroke were assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Hazard ratios (HR were calculated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, lifestyle, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During 8-13 years of follow-up, we observed 280 incident CHD events (19% fatal and 221 strokes (4% fatal. Intakes of energy-adjusted ALA in quintiles ranged from less than 1.0 g/d in the bottom quintile (Q1 to more than 1.9 g/d in the top quintile (Q5. ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD, with HRs varying between 0.89 and 1.01 (all p>0.05 in Q2-Q5 compared with the bottom quintile of ALA intake. For incident stroke, however, participants in Q2-Q5 had a 35-50% lower risk compared with the reference group. HRs were 0.65 (0.43-0.97, 0.49 (0.31-0.76, 0.53 (0.34-0.83, and 0.65 (0.41-1.04 for Q2-Q5 respectively. CONCLUSION: In this general Dutch population, ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD. The data suggested that a low intake of ALA may be a risk factor for incident stroke. These results warrant confirmation in other population-based studies and in trials.

  10. Alpha-linolenic acid intake and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,000 middle-aged men and women in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Janette; Verschuren, W M Monique; Boer, Jolanda M A; Kromhout, Daan; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    2011-03-25

    Whether intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), could prevent cardiovascular diseases is not yet clear. We examined the associations of ALA intake with 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in the Netherlands. Data were collected from a general population of 20,069 generally healthy men and women, aged 20 to 65 years. Habitual diet was assessed at baseline (1993-1997) with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidences of CHD and stroke were assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, lifestyle, and dietary factors. During 8-13 years of follow-up, we observed 280 incident CHD events (19% fatal) and 221 strokes (4% fatal). Intakes of energy-adjusted ALA in quintiles ranged from less than 1.0 g/d in the bottom quintile (Q1) to more than 1.9 g/d in the top quintile (Q5). ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD, with HRs varying between 0.89 and 1.01 (all p>0.05) in Q2-Q5 compared with the bottom quintile of ALA intake. For incident stroke, however, participants in Q2-Q5 had a 35-50% lower risk compared with the reference group. HRs were 0.65 (0.43-0.97), 0.49 (0.31-0.76), 0.53 (0.34-0.83), and 0.65 (0.41-1.04) for Q2-Q5 respectively. In this general Dutch population, ALA intake was not associated with incident CHD. The data suggested that a low intake of ALA may be a risk factor for incident stroke. These results warrant confirmation in other population-based studies and in trials.

  11. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summary Coverdell Program 2012-2015 State Summaries Data & Statistics Fact Sheets Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheets ... Roadmap for State Planning Other Data Resources Other Statistic Resources Grantee Information Cross-Program Information Online Tools ...

  12. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  13. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aorta Ebstein anomaly Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Transposition of the ... through the middle Cardiac catheterization Heart, front view Tetralogy of Fallot Clubbing Cyanotic heart disease References Bernstein D. Cyanotic ...

  14. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  15. Health Impact Assessment for Second-Hand Smoke Exposure in Germany—Quantifying Estimates for Ischaemic Heart Diseases, COPD, and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Fischer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of the adverse health effects attributable to second-hand smoke (SHS exposure is available. This study aims to quantify the impact of SHS exposure on ischaemic heart diseases (IHD, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD, and stroke in Germany. Therefore, this study estimated and forecasted the morbidity for the three outcomes in the German population. Furthermore, a health impact assessment was performed using DYNAMO-HIA, which is a generic software tool applying a Markov model. Overall 687,254 IHD cases, 231,973 COPD cases, and 288,015 stroke cases were estimated to be attributable to SHS exposure in Germany for 2014. Under the assumption that the population prevalence of these diseases and the prevalence of SHS exposure remain constant, the total number of cases will increase due to demographic aging. Assuming a total eradication of SHS exposure beginning in 2014 leads to an estimated reduction of 50% in cases, compared to the reference scenario in 2040 for all three diseases. The results highlight the relevance of SHS exposure because it affects several chronic disease conditions and has a major impact on the population’s health. Therefore, public health campaigns to protect non-smokers are urgently needed.

  16. Loneliness and social isolation as risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtorta, Nicole K; Kanaan, Mona; Gilbody, Simon; Ronzi, Sara; Hanratty, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The influence of social relationships on morbidity is widely accepted, but the size of the risk to cardiovascular health is unclear. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between loneliness or social isolation and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. Sixteen electronic databases were systematically searched for longitudinal studies set in high-income countries and published up until May 2015. Two independent reviewers screened studies for inclusion and extracted data. We assessed quality using a component approach and pooled data for analysis using random effects models. Of the 35 925 records retrieved, 23 papers met inclusion criteria for the narrative review. They reported data from 16 longitudinal datasets, for a total of 4628 CHD and 3002 stroke events recorded over follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 21 years. Reports of 11 CHD studies and 8 stroke studies provided data suitable for meta-analysis. Poor social relationships were associated with a 29% increase in risk of incident CHD (pooled relative risk: 1.29, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.59) and a 32% increase in risk of stroke (pooled relative risk: 1.32, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.68). Subgroup analyses did not identify any differences by gender. Our findings suggest that deficiencies in social relationships are associated with an increased risk of developing CHD and stroke. Future studies are needed to investigate whether interventions targeting loneliness and social isolation can help to prevent two of the leading causes of death and disability in high-income countries. CRD42014010225. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of cardiovascular disease. Poor diet. A diet that's high in fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol can contribute to the development ... other health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and ... low in salt and saturated fat Maintain a healthy weight Reduce ...

  18. Dietary glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in Dutch men and women: the EPIC-MORGEN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert N J Burger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations of glycemic load (GL and glycemic index (GI with the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD are not well-established, particularly in men, and may be modified by gender. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether high dietary GL and GI increase the risk of CVD in men and women. METHODS: A large prospective cohort study (EPIC-MORGEN was conducted within the general Dutch population among 8,855 men and 10,753 women, aged 21-64 years at baseline (1993-1997 and free of diabetes and CVD. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire and GI and GL were calculated using Foster-Powell's international table of GI. Information on morbidity and mortality was obtained through linkage with national registries. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs for incident coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke, while adjusting for age, CVD risk factors, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 11.9 years, 581 CHD cases and 120 stroke cases occurred among men, and 300 CHD cases and 109 stroke cases occurred among women. In men, GL was associated with an increased CHD risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.02-1.35], while no significant association was found in women (1.09 [0.89-1.33]. GI was not associated with CHD risk in both genders, while it was associated with increased stroke risk in men (1.27 [1.02-1.58] but not in women (0.96 [0.75-1.22]. Similarly, total carbohydrate intake and starch intake were associated with a higher CHD risk in men (1.23 [1.04-1.46]; and 1.24 [1.07-1.45], but not in women. CONCLUSION: Among men, high GL and GI, and high carbohydrate and starch intake, were associated with increased risk of CVD.

  19. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  20. Metabolic mediators of the effects of body-mass index, overweight, and obesity on coronary heart disease and stroke: a pooled analysis of 97 prospective cohorts with 1.8 million participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Hollander, de E.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Body-mass index (BMI) and diabetes have increased worldwide, whereas global average blood pressure and cholesterol have decreased or remained unchanged in the past three decades. We quantified how much of the effects of BMI on coronary heart disease and stroke are mediated through blood

  1. Differences in coronary heart disease, stroke and cancer mortality rates between England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland: the role of diet and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Peter; Morgan, Robert David; Webster, Premila; Rayner, Mike

    2011-11-03

    Introduction It is unclear how much of the geographical variation in coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and cancer mortality rates within the UK is associated with diet. The aim of this study is to estimate how many deaths from CHD, stroke and cancer would be delayed or averted if Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland adopted a diet equivalent in nutritional quality to the English diet. Methods Mortality data for CHD, stroke and 10 diet-related cancers for 2007-2009 were used to calculate the mortality gap (the difference between actual mortality and English mortality rates) for Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Estimates of mean national consumption of 10 dietary factors were used as baseline and counterfactual inputs in a macrosimulation model (DIETRON). An uncertainty analysis was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation with 5000 iterations. Results The mortality gap in the modelled scenario (achieving the English diet) was reduced by 81% (95% credible intervals: 62% to 108%) for Wales, 40% (33% to 51%) for Scotland and 81% (67% to 99%) for Northern Ireland, equating to approximately 3700 deaths delayed or averted annually. For CHD only, the mortality gap was reduced by 88% (69% to 118%) for Wales, 58% (47% to 72%) for Scotland, and 88% (70% to 111%) for Northern Ireland. Conclusion Improving the average diet in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland to a level already achieved in England could have a substantial impact on reducing geographical variations in chronic disease mortality rates in the UK. Much of the mortality gap between Scotland and England is explained by non-dietary risk factors.

  2. Self-Care for the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K; Buck, Harleah G; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Dunbar, Sandra B; Lee, Christopher S; Lennie, Terry A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Mitchell, Judith E; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Webber, David E

    2017-08-31

    Self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process addressing both the prevention and management of chronic illness, with core elements of self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, and self-care management. In this scientific statement, we describe the importance of self-care in the American Heart Association mission and vision of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The evidence supporting specific self-care behaviors such as diet and exercise, barriers to self-care, and the effectiveness of self-care in improving outcomes is reviewed, as is the evidence supporting various individual, family-based, and community-based approaches to improving self-care. Although there are many nuances to the relationships between self-care and outcomes, there is strong evidence that self-care is effective in achieving the goals of the treatment plan and cannot be ignored. As such, greater emphasis should be placed on self-care in evidence-based guidelines. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  3. Power of Peer Support to Change Health Behavior to Reduce Risks for Heart Disease and Stroke for African American Men in a Faith-Based Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohye; Schorr, Erica; Hadidi, Niloufar Niakosari; Kelley, Robin; Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Lindquist, Ruth

    2018-02-01

    Peer support has powerful potential to improve outcomes in a program of health behavior change; yet, how peer support is perceived by participants, its role, and how it contributes to intervention efficacy is not known, especially among African Americans. The purpose of this study was to identify the subjectively perceived experience and potential contributions of peer support to the outcomes of a peer group behavioral intervention designed to change health behavior to reduce risks for heart disease and stroke in African American men in a faith-based community. A peer support group intervention was implemented to increase health knowledge and to improve health behaviors in line with the American Heart Association's Life Simple 7 domains (get active, control cholesterol, eat better, manage blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, and stop smoking). Fourteen peer group sessions and eight follow-up interviews with program participants were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Seven key themes emerged, including (1) enhancing access to health behavior information and resources, (2) practicing and applying problem-solving skills with group feedback and support, (3) discussing health behavior challenges and barriers, (4) sharing health behavior changes, (5) sharing perceived health outcome improvements and benefits, (6) feelings of belonging and being cared for, and (7) addressing health of family and community. Qualitative findings revealed a positive perception of peer support and greater understanding of potential reasons why it may be an effective strategy for African American men.

  4. The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary heart disease and stroke events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki A; Laatikainen, Tiina; Philpot, Benjamin; Janus, Edward D; Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie; Dunbar, James A

    2011-01-03

    To model the impact of both population and high-risk strategies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. A CVD risk-factor survey was carried out in rural south-eastern Australia from 2004 to 2006. Using a stratified random sample, data for 1116 participants aged 35-74 years were analysed. Applying the Framingham risk equations to risk-factor data, 5-year probabilities of a coronary heart disease event, stroke and cardiovascular event were calculated. The effect of different changes in risk factors were modelled to assess the extent to which cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by changing the risk factors at a population level (population strategy), among the high-risk individuals (high-risk strategy) or both. Among men, a population strategy could reduce cardiovascular events by 19.3% (193 per 1000 per 5 years), the high-risk strategy by 12.6% (126 per 1000) and a combined strategy by 24.1% (241 per 1000); and among women, by 21.9% (219 per 1000), 19.0% (190 per 1000) and 28.7% (287 per 1000), respectively. For prevention of CVD in Australia, it is important both to treat high-risk individuals and to reduce the mean risk-factor levels in the population. We show how risk-factor survey data can be used to set targets for prevention and to monitor progress in line with the recommendations of the National Preventative Health Taskforce.

  5. Evaluating the Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Statin Use Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David J; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Pletcher, Mark J; Goldman, Lee; Odden, Michelle C; Kazi, Dhruv S; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2017-09-19

    Statins are effective in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline expands recommended statin use, but its cost-effectiveness has not been compared with other guidelines. We used the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the ACC/AHA guideline relative to current use, Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, and universal statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age over a 10-year horizon from 2016 to 2025. Sensitivity analyses varied costs, risks, and benefits. Main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and numbers needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Each approach produces substantial benefits and net cost savings relative to the status quo. Full adherence to the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline would result in 8.8 million more statin users than the status quo, at a number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 35. The ACC/AHA guideline would potentially result in up to 12.3 million more statin users than the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 68. Moderate-intensity statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age would result in 28.9 million more statin users than the ACC/AHA guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 108. In all cases, benefits would be greater in men than women. Results vary moderately with different risk thresholds for instituting statins and statin toxicity estimates but depend greatly on the disutility caused by daily medication use (pill burden). At a population level, the ACC/AHA guideline for expanded statin use for primary prevention is projected to treat more people, to save more lives, and to cost less

  6. Practice size, caseload, deprivation and quality of care of patients with coronary heart disease, hypertension and stroke in primary care: national cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soljak Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of higher quality care by higher-volume secondary care providers have fuelled a shift of services from smaller provider units to larger hospitals and units. In the United Kingdom, most patients are managed in primary care. Hence if larger practices provide better quality of care; this would have important implications for the future organization of primary care services. We examined the association between quality of primary care for cardiovascular disease achieved by general practices in England and Scotland by general practice caseload, practice size and area based deprivation measures, using data from the New General Practitioner (GP Contract. Methods We analyzed data from 8,970 general practices with a total registered population of 55,522,778 patients in England and Scotland. We measured practice performance against 26 cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, left ventricular disease, and stroke Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF indicators for patients on cardiovascular disease registers and linked this with data on practice characteristics and census data. Results Despite wide variations in practice list sizes and deprivation, the prevalence of was remarkably consistent, (coronary heart disease, left ventricular dysfunction, hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was 3.7%; 0.45%; 11.4% and 1.5% respectively. Achievement in quality of care for cardiovascular disease, as measured by QOF, was consistently high regardless of caseload or size with a few notable exceptions: practices with larger list sizes, higher cardiovascular disease caseloads and those in affluent areas had higher achievement of indicators requiring referral for further investigation. For example, small practices achieved lower scores 71.4% than large practices 88.6% (P Conclusion The volume-outcome relationship found in hospital settings is not seen between practices in the UK in management of cardiovascular disorders in primary care

  7. Practice size, caseload, deprivation and quality of care of patients with coronary heart disease, hypertension and stroke in primary care: national cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sonia; Car, Josip; Eldred, Darren; Soljak, Michael; Majeed, Azeem

    2007-06-27

    Reports of higher quality care by higher-volume secondary care providers have fuelled a shift of services from smaller provider units to larger hospitals and units. In the United Kingdom, most patients are managed in primary care. Hence if larger practices provide better quality of care; this would have important implications for the future organization of primary care services. We examined the association between quality of primary care for cardiovascular disease achieved by general practices in England and Scotland by general practice caseload, practice size and area based deprivation measures, using data from the New General Practitioner (GP) Contract. We analyzed data from 8,970 general practices with a total registered population of 55,522,778 patients in England and Scotland. We measured practice performance against 26 cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, left ventricular disease, and stroke) Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) indicators for patients on cardiovascular disease registers and linked this with data on practice characteristics and census data. Despite wide variations in practice list sizes and deprivation, the prevalence of was remarkably consistent, (coronary heart disease, left ventricular dysfunction, hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was 3.7%; 0.45%; 11.4% and 1.5% respectively). Achievement in quality of care for cardiovascular disease, as measured by QOF, was consistently high regardless of caseload or size with a few notable exceptions: practices with larger list sizes, higher cardiovascular disease caseloads and those in affluent areas had higher achievement of indicators requiring referral for further investigation. For example, small practices achieved lower scores 71.4% than large practices 88.6% (P < 0.0001) for referral for exercise testing and specialist assessment of patients with newly diagnosed angina. The volume-outcome relationship found in hospital settings is not seen between practices in the UK in

  8. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  10. Long-term heart disease and stroke mortality among former American prisoners of war of World War II and the Korean Conflict: results of a 50-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, W F; Brass, L M

    2001-09-01

    For the first 30 years after repatriation, former American prisoners of war (POWs) of World War II and the Korean Conflict had lower death rates for heart disease and stroke than non-POW veteran controls and the U.S. population, but subsequent morbidity data suggested that this survival advantage may have disappeared. We used U.S. federal records to obtain death data through 1996 and used proportional hazards analysis to compare the mortality experience of POWs and controls. POWs aged 75 years and older showed a significantly higher risk of heart disease deaths than controls (hazard ratio = 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.56), and their stroke mortality was also increased, although not significantly (hazard ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.91). These results suggest that circulatory disease sequelae of serious, acute malnutrition and the stresses associated with imprisonment may not appear until after many decades.

  11. The impact of diabetes on coronary heart disease differs from that on ischaemic stroke with regard to the gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderberg Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the diabetes related CVD risk between men and women of different ages. Methods Hazards ratios (HRs (95%CI for acute CHD and ischaemic stroke events were estimated based on data of Finnish and Swedish cohorts of 5111 women and 4167 men. Results 182 (3.6% women and 348 (8.4% men had CHD and 129 (2.5% women and 137 (3.3% men ischaemic stroke events. The multivariate adjusted HRs for acute CHD at age groups of 40–49, 50–59 and 60–69 years were 1.00 (1.94, 1.78 (4.23, 3.75 (8.40 in women (men without diabetes and 4.35 (5.40, 5.49 (9.54 and 8.84 (13.76 in women (men with diabetes. The corresponding HRs for ischaemic stroke were 1.00 (1.26, 2.48 (2.83 and 5.17 (5.11 in women (men without diabetes and 4.14 (4.91, 3.32 (6.75 and 13.91 (18.06 in women (men with diabetes, respectively. Conclusion CHD risk was higher in men than in women but difference reduced in diabetic population. Diabetes, however, increased stroke risk more in men than in women.

  12. Poor sleep linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    Insomnia is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study in China. Researchers carried out a meta-analysis of 15 cohort studies to assess the association between insomnia symptoms and incidence or death from cardiovascular disease and stroke.

  13. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  14. Brain-Heart Interaction: Cardiac Complications After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhili; Venkat, Poornima; Seyfried, Don; Chopp, Michael; Yan, Tao; Chen, Jieli

    2017-08-04

    Neurocardiology is an emerging specialty that addresses the interaction between the brain and the heart, that is, the effects of cardiac injury on the brain and the effects of brain injury on the heart. This review article focuses on cardiac dysfunction in the setting of stroke such as ischemic stroke, brain hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The majority of post-stroke deaths are attributed to neurological damage, and cardiovascular complications are the second leading cause of post-stroke mortality. Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence suggests a causal relationship between brain damage and heart dysfunction. Thus, it is important to determine whether cardiac dysfunction is triggered by stroke, is an unrelated complication, or is the underlying cause of stroke. Stroke-induced cardiac damage may lead to fatality or potentially lifelong cardiac problems (such as heart failure), or to mild and recoverable damage such as neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The role of location and lateralization of brain lesions after stroke in brain-heart interaction; clinical biomarkers and manifestations of cardiac complications; and underlying mechanisms of brain-heart interaction after stroke, such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; catecholamine surge; sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation; microvesicles; microRNAs; gut microbiome, immunoresponse, and systemic inflammation, are discussed. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Southern Dietary Pattern is Associated With Hazard of Acute Coronary Heart Disease in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M; Safford, Monika M; Newby, P K; Durant, Raegan W; Brown, Todd M; Judd, Suzanne E

    2015-09-01

    The association of overall diet, as characterized by dietary patterns, with risk of incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) has not been studied extensively in samples including sociodemographic and regional diversity. We used data from 17 418 participants in Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS), a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥45 years, enrolled from 2003 to 2007. We derived dietary patterns with factor analysis and used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine hazard of incident acute CHD events - nonfatal myocardial infarction and acute CHD death - associated with quartiles of consumption of each pattern, adjusted for various levels of covariates. Five primary dietary patterns emerged: Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad. A total of 536 acute CHD events occurred over a median (interquartile range) 5.8 (2.1) years of follow-up. After adjustment for sociodemographics, lifestyle factors, and energy intake, highest consumers of the Southern pattern (characterized by added fats, fried food, eggs, organ and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages) experienced a 56% higher hazard of acute CHD (comparing quartile 4 with quartile 1: hazard ratio, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.08; P for trend across quartiles=0.003). Adding anthropometric and medical history variables to the model attenuated the association somewhat (hazard ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.85; P=0.036). A dietary pattern characteristic of the southern United States was associated with greater hazard of CHD in this sample of white and black adults in diverse regions of the United States. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  17. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine to treat high blood pressure). A high fasting blood sugar level (or you're on medicine ... find out whether routine testing for DHD will benefit people who have diabetes but no heart disease ...

  18. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body ... Get Well" card and paying a visit. Can Kids Get Heart Disease? Kids usually don't have ...

  19. Associations of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA and hair mercury with the risk of incident stroke in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Roya; Kurl, Sudhir; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K

    2016-05-28

    PUFA have been associated with lower risk of CVD, but less is known about their association with stroke risk. Fish, a major source of n-3 PUFA, may also contain methylmercury, which has been associated with higher risk of CVD and attenuation of the benefits of long-chain n-3 PUFA. We investigated the associations of serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA and hair Hg with risk of stroke in men. A total of 1828 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989 were studied. Cox regression models were used for the analyses. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred, of which 153 were ischaemic strokes. After adjustment for age and examination year, the only statistically significant association among the n-3 and n-6 PUFA was observed between the n-3 PUFA α-linolenic acid and risk of haemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio in the highest v. the lowest quartile 0·33; 95 % CI 0·13, 0·86; P trend=0·03). However, further adjustments attenuated the association to statistically non-significant. Hair Hg was not associated with stroke risk, but among those with hair Hg above the median level, higher serum long-chain n-3 PUFA concentrations were associated with a higher risk of ischaemic stroke. In our cohort of men, serum n-3 or n-6 PUFA or hair Hg were not associated with stroke risk; however, the interaction between Hg and long-chain n-3 PUFA with regard to ischaemic stroke risk warrants further investigation.

  20. Trends for coronary heart disease and stroke mortality among migrants in England and Wales, 1979-2003: slow declines notable for some groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, S; Rosato, M; Teyhan, A

    2008-04-01

    To examine trends in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in migrants to England and Wales. Cross-sectional. Age-standardised and sex-specific death rates and rate ratios 1979-83, 1989-93 and 1999-2003. Coronary mortality fell among migrants, more so in the second decade than the first. Rate ratios for coronary mortality remained higher for men and women from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and South Asia, and lower for men from Jamaica, other Caribbean countries, West Africa, Italy and Spain. Rate ratios increased for men from Jamaica (1979-83: 0.45, 0.40 to 0.50; 1999-2003: 0.81, 0.73 to 0.90), Pakistan (1979-83: 1.14, 1.04 to 1.25; 1999-2003: 1.93, 1.81 to 2.06), Bangladesh (1979-83: 1.36, 1.15 to 1.60; 1999-2003: 2.11, 1.90 to 2.34), Republic of Ireland (1979-1983: 1.18, 1.15 to 1.21; 1999-2003: 1.45, 1.39 to 1.52) and Poland (1979-83: 1.17, 1.09 to 1.25; 1999-2003: 1.97, 1.57 to 2.47), and for women from Jamaica (1979-83: 0.63, 0.52 to 0.77; 1999-2003: 1.23, 1.06 to 1.42) and Pakistan (1979-83: 1.14, 0.88 to 1.47; 1999-2003: 2.45, 2.19 to 2.74), owing to smaller declines in death rates than those born in England and Wales. Rate ratios for stroke mortality remained higher for migrants. As a result of smaller declines, rate ratios increased for men from Pakistan (1979-1983: 0.99, 0.76 to 1.29; 1999-2003: 1.58, 1.35 to 1.85), Scotland (1979-1983: 1.11, 1.04 to 1.19; 1999-2003: 1.30, 1.19 to 1.42) and Republic of Ireland (1979-1983: 1.27, 1.19 to 1.36; 1999-2003: 1.67, 1.52 to 1.84). For groups with higher mortality than people born in England and Wales, mortality remained higher. Smaller declines led to increasing disparities for some groups and to excess coronary mortality for women from Jamaica. Maximising the coverage of prevention and treatment programmes is critical.

  1. Southern Dietary Pattern is Associated with Hazard of Acute Coronary Heart Disease in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M.; Safford, Monika M.; Newby, P. K.; Durant, Raegan W.; Brown, Todd M.; Judd, Suzanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of overall diet, as characterized by dietary patterns, with risk of incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) has not been studied extensively in samples including sociodemographic and regional diversity. Methods and Results We used data from 17,418 participants in Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS), a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥45 years, enrolled from 2003-2007. We derived dietary patterns with factor analysis, and used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine hazard of incident acute CHD events – nonfatal myocardial infarction and acute CHD death – associated with quartiles of consumption of each pattern, adjusted for various levels of covariates. Five primary dietary patterns emerged: Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad. A total of 536 acute CHD events occurred over a median (IQR) 5.8 (2.1) years of follow-up. After adjustment for sociodemographics, lifestyle factors, and energy intake, highest consumers of the Southern pattern (characterized by added fats, fried food, eggs, organ and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages) experienced a 56% higher hazard of acute CHD (comparing quartile 4 to quartile 1: HR = 1.56; 95% CI: 1.17, 2.08; P for trend across quartiles = 0.003). Adding anthropometric and medical history variables to the model attenuated the association somewhat (HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.85; P = 0.036). Conclusions A dietary pattern characteristic of the southern US was associated with greater hazard of CHD in this sample of white and black adults in diverse regions of the US. PMID:26260732

  2. CHA2DS2-VASc Score (Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 [Doubled], Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack [Doubled], Vascular Disease, Age 65-74, Female) for Stroke in Asian Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Korean Nationwide Sample Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yang, Pil-Sung; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jong-Youn; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Joung, Boyoung; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-06-01

    The CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc stroke score (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 (doubled), diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (doubled), vascular disease, age 65-74, female) is used in most guidelines for risk stratification in atrial fibrillation (AF), but most data for this score have been derived in Western populations. Ethnic differences in stroke risk may be present. Our objective was to investigate risk factors for stroke in AF and application of the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score in an Asian AF population from Korea. A total of 5855 oral anticoagulant-naive nonvalvular AF patients aged ≥20 years were enrolled from Korea National Health Insurance Service Sample cohort from 2002 to 2008 and were followed up until December 2013. The incidence rates (per 100 person-years) of ischemic stroke were 3.32 in the total population, being 0.23 in low-risk (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score 0 [male] or 1 [female]) and 4.59 in high-risk patients (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc ≥2). Incidence rates of ischemic stroke or the composite thromboembolism end point showed a clear increase with increasing CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score. On multivariable analysis, significant associations between CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc risk factors and ischemic stroke were observed; however, the significance of vascular disease or diabetes mellitus was attenuated after multivariate adjustment, and female sex (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.84) had a lower risk of ischemic stroke than males. Patients who were categorized as low risk consistently had an event rate Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  4. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  5. Dietary patterns derived from principal component- and k-means cluster analysis: long-term association with coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, M D; Onland-Moret, N C; Boer, J M A; van der Schouw, Y T; Verschuren, W M M; May, A M; Peeters, P H M; Beulens, J W J

    2013-03-01

    Studies comparing dietary patterns derived from different a posteriori methods in view of predicting disease risk are scarce. We aimed to explore differences between dietary patterns derived from principal component- (PCA) and k-means cluster analysis (KCA) in relation to their food group composition and ability to predict CHD and stroke risk. The study was conducted in the EPIC-NL cohort that consists of 40,011 men and women. Baseline dietary intake was measured using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Food items were consolidated into 31 food groups. Occurrence of CHD and stroke was assessed through linkage with registries. After 13 years of follow-up, 1,843 CHD and 588 stroke cases were documented. Both PCA and KCA extracted a prudent pattern (high intakes of fish, high-fiber products, raw vegetables, wine) and a western pattern (high consumption of French fries, fast food, low-fiber products, other alcoholic drinks, soft drinks with sugar) with small variation between components and clusters. The prudent component was associated with a reduced risk of CHD (HR for extreme quartiles: 0.87; 95%-CI: 0.75-1.00) and stroke (0.68; 0.53-0.88). The western component was not related to any outcome. The prudent cluster was related with a lower risk of CHD (0.91; 0.82-1.00) and stroke (0.79; 0.67-0.94) compared to the western cluster. PCA and KCA found similar underlying patterns with comparable associations with CHD and stroke risk. A prudent pattern reduced the risk of CHD and stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Moss, Kevin; Morelli, Thiago; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ 2 trend P stroke/1000-person years was 1.29 for PPC-A (health), 2.82 for PPC-B, 4.80 for PPC-C, 3.81 for PPC-D, 3.50 for PPC-E, 4.78 for PPC-F, and 5.03 for PPC-G (severe periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  8. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  9. Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Luiza; Cury, Patricia; Demarchi, Lea M.F.; Coelho, Verônica; Abel, Lúcia; Lopez, Ana P.; Oshiro, Sandra Emiko; Aliotti, Selma; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M.A.; Tanaka, Ana C.; Kalil, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Heart lesions of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients contain T-cell clones that recognize heart proteins and streptococcal M peptides. To functionally characterize heart-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we evaluated their cytokine profile, both directly in situ and in T-cell lines derived from the heart (HIL). Interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 expressions were characterized in 20 heart tissue infiltrates from 14 RHD patients by immunohistochemistry. IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, and IL-10-positive cells were consistently predominant, whereas IL-4 was scarce in the valves. In agreement with these data, the in vitro experiments, in which 13 HILs derived from heart samples of eight patients were stimulated with M5 protein and the immunodominant M5 (81-96) peptide, IL-4 was detected in HIL derived from the atrium (three of six) but not from the valve (zero of seven). IFN-γ and IL-10 production were detected in culture supernatants in 11 of 13 and 6 of 12 HILs, respectively. The predominant IFN-γ and TNF-α expression in the heart suggests that Th1-type cytokines could mediate RHD. Unlike in reversible myocardium inflammation, the significantly lower IL-4 expression in the valvular tissue (P = 0.02) may contribute to the progression of the RHD leading to permanent valvular damage (relative risk, 4.3; odds ratio, 15.8). The lack of IL-4 in vitro production by valve-derived HIL also emphasizes the more severe tissue destruction in valves observed in RHD. PMID:15509528

  10. Comparison of Expert Adjudicated Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality With the National Death Index: Results From the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olubowale, Olusola Tope; Safford, Monika M; Brown, Todd M; Durant, Raegan W; Howard, Virginia J; Gamboa, Christopher; Glasser, Stephen P; Rhodes, J David; Levitan, Emily B

    2017-05-03

    The National Death Index (NDI) is widely used to detect coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths, but its reliability has not been examined recently. We compared CHD and CVD deaths detected by NDI with expert adjudication of 4010 deaths that occurred between 2003 and 2013 among participants in the REGARDS (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke) cohort of black and white adults in the United States. NDI derived CHD mortality had sensitivity 53.6%, specificity 90.3%, positive predictive value 54.2%, and negative predictive value 90.1%. NDI-derived CVD mortality had sensitivity 73.4%, specificity 84.5%, positive predictive value 70.6%, and negative predictive value 86.2%. Among NDI-derived CHD and CVD deaths, older age (odds ratios, 1.06 and 1.04 per 1-year increase) was associated with a higher probability of disagreement with the adjudicated cause of death, whereas among REGARDS adjudicated CHD and CVD deaths a history of CHD or CVD was associated with a lower probability of disagreement with the NDI-derived causes of death (odds ratios, 0.59 and 0.67, respectively). The modest accuracy and differential performance of NDI-derived cause of death may impact CHD and CVD mortality statistics. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  11. Trends for coronary heart disease and stroke mortality among migrants in England and Wales, 1979–2003: slow declines notable for some groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, S; Rosato, M; Teyhan, A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine trends in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in migrants to England and Wales. Design: Cross-sectional. Outcome measures: Age-standardised and sex-specific death rates and rate ratios 1979–83, 1989–93 and 1999–2003. Results: Coronary mortality fell among migrants, more so in the second decade than the first. Rate ratios for coronary mortality remained higher for men and women from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and South Asia, and lower for men from Jamaica, other Caribbean countries, West Africa, Italy and Spain. Rate ratios increased for men from Jamaica (1979–83: 0.45, 0.40 to 0.50; 1999–2003: 0.81, 0.73 to 0.90), Pakistan (1979–83: 1.14, 1.04 to 1.25; 1999–2003: 1.93, 1.81 to 2.06), Bangladesh (1979–83: 1.36, 1.15 to 1.60; 1999–2003: 2.11, 1.90 to 2.34), Republic of Ireland (1979–1983: 1.18, 1.15 to 1.21; 1999–2003: 1.45, 1.39 to 1.52) and Poland (1979–83: 1.17, 1.09 to 1.25; 1999–2003: 1.97, 1.57 to 2.47), and for women from Jamaica (1979–83: 0.63, 0.52 to 0.77; 1999–2003: 1.23, 1.06 to 1.42) and Pakistan (1979–83: 1.14, 0.88 to 1.47; 1999–2003: 2.45, 2.19 to 2.74), owing to smaller declines in death rates than those born in England and Wales. Rate ratios for stroke mortality remained higher for migrants. As a result of smaller declines, rate ratios increased for men from Pakistan (1979–1983: 0.99, 0.76 to 1.29; 1999–2003: 1.58, 1.35 to 1.85), Scotland (1979–1983: 1.11, 1.04 to 1.19; 1999–2003: 1.30, 1.19 to 1.42) and Republic of Ireland (1979–1983: 1.27, 1.19 to 1.36; 1999–2003: 1.67, 1.52 to 1.84). Conclusion: For groups with higher mortality than people born in England and Wales, mortality remained higher. Smaller declines led to increasing disparities for some groups and to excess coronary mortality for women from Jamaica. Maximising the coverage of prevention and treatment programmes is critical. PMID:17690159

  12. Anxiety and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Kokalj; Brigita Novak Šarotar

    2018-01-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease anxiety is often overlooked. Symptoms of anxiety are often similar to coronary heart disease symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety in general population and coronary heart disease patients is very high. While the underlying pathophysiology of the connection remains unclear, anxiety lowers the quality of life and is a factor for a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  13. Impact of cigarette smoking on the relationship between body mass index and coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 3264 stroke and 2706 CHD events in 378579 individuals in the Asia Pacific region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated levels of body mass index (BMI and smoking are well established lifestyle risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke. If these two risk factors have a synergistic relationship, rigorous lifestyle modification may contribute to greater reduction in cardiovascular burden than previously expected. Methods A pooled analysis of individual participant data from 38 cohorts, involving 378,579 participants. Hazards ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for BMI by cigarette smoking status were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. Results During a mean follow-up of 3.8 years, 2706 CHD and 3264 strokes were recorded. There was a log-linear, positive relationship of BMI with CHD and stroke in both smokers and non-smokers with evidence of a synergistic effect of smoking on the association between BMI and CHD only: HRs (95% CIs associated with a 2 kg/m2 higher BMI were 1.13 (1.10 – 1.17 in current smokers and 1.09 (1.06 – 1.11 in non-smokers (p-value for interaction = 0.04. Conclusion Smoking amplifies the positive association between BMI and CHD but not stroke. If confirmed, these results suggest that effective strategies that target smoking cessation and weight loss are likely to have a greater impact than anticipated on reducing the burden of CHD.

  14. Symptom recognition of heart attack and stroke in nine European countries: a representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Jutta; Frank, Ronald; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death and a source of chronic disability. To assess recognition of and reaction to symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and how recognition is related to the frequency of consulting physicians and other information sources. Face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews. Representative sample of 10,228 persons in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Spain and UK, aged 14-98. Recognition of heart attack and stroke symptoms and proper reaction to symptoms. Chest pain was the only heart attack symptom recognized by more than 50% of participants. Eight percent knew no symptoms. Of 14 stroke symptoms, none was recognized by more than 50% of participants; 19% could not identify any symptom. For both heart attack and stroke, Germans and Austrians recognized the largest number of symptoms. Persons in Italy, Poland, Russia and Spain knew only about half as many symptoms as in Germany or Austria. Only 51% of Europeans would call an ambulance when someone suffers a stroke, the fewest (33 and 34%) in Germany and Austria. In most countries, people who consulted their physician more frequently had no better recognition of heart attack or stroke symptoms. The majority of persons in nine European countries recognize few heart attack and stroke symptoms; many do not know how to react. This low level of knowledge constitutes a major health risk and likely leads to delay in treatment, contributing to the high mortality and morbidity from these diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Physical activity and risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke events: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyu, Hmwe H; Bachman, Victoria F; Alexander, Lily T; Mumford, John Everett; Afshin, Ashkan; Estep, Kara; Veerman, J Lennert; Delwiche, Kristen; Iannarone, Marissa L; Moyer, Madeline L; Cercy, Kelly; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J L; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H

    2016-08-09

     To quantify the dose-response associations between total physical activity and risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke events.  Systematic review and Bayesian dose-response meta-analysis.  PubMed and Embase from 1980 to 27 February 2016, and references from relevant systematic reviews. Data from the Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health conducted in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa from 2007 to 2010 and the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1999 to 2011 were used to map domain specific physical activity (reported in included studies) to total activity.  Prospective cohort studies examining the associations between physical activity (any domain) and at least one of the five diseases studied.  174 articles were identified: 35 for breast cancer, 19 for colon cancer, 55 for diabetes, 43 for ischemic heart disease, and 26 for ischemic stroke (some articles included multiple outcomes). Although higher levels of total physical activity were significantly associated with lower risk for all outcomes, major gains occurred at lower levels of activity (up to 3000-4000 metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes/week). For example, individuals with a total activity level of 600 MET minutes/week (the minimum recommended level) had a 2% lower risk of diabetes compared with those reporting no physical activity. An increase from 600 to 3600 MET minutes/week reduced the risk by an additional 19%. The same amount of increase yielded much smaller returns at higher levels of activity: an increase of total activity from 9000 to 12 000 MET minutes/week reduced the risk of diabetes by only 0.6%. Compared with insufficiently active individuals (total activity active category (≥8000 MET minutes/week) was 14% (relative risk 0.863, 95% uncertainty interval 0.829 to 0.900) for breast cancer; 21% (0.789, 0.735 to 0.850) for colon cancer; 28% (0.722, 0.678 to 0.768) for diabetes; 25% (0.754, 0

  16. Association of body mass index and obesity measured in early childhood with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in middle age: findings from the aberdeen children of the 1950s prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Leon, David A

    2005-04-19

    There is concern that the childhood epidemic of obesity will result in increases in the risk of cardiovascular disease in the future; however, there is currently little direct evidence on this issue. We assessed the association of body mass index, measured when subjects were a mean age of 4.9 years old, with the future risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in a large Scottish birth cohort (born in the 1950s) who have been linked to hospital admissions and mortality data. At the start of the follow-up period (1981), there were 11,106 (91%) members of the cohort alive and believed to be resident in Scotland. Over the follow-up period, they contributed 245,000 person-years of risk. Among these subjects, there were 302 (53 fatal) cases of CHD, 109 (4 fatal) cases of stroke, and 397 (57 fatal) cases of either a CHD or stroke. There was no association between childhood body mass index and CHD risk. There was no linear association between childhood body mass index and stroke risk, but those who were obese in childhood (top 2.5% of the body mass index distribution) compared with all others had an increased risk of stroke; the adjusted (for gender, father's occupational social class at birth, number of siblings, and birth weight) hazards ratio was 2.41 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.86). Body mass index in early childhood does not appear to be associated with increased CHD risk in later life.

  17. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  18. Tachyarrhythmias in structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiès, Philippine

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the major cause of sudden unexpected cardiac arrest, occur specifically in patients with structural heart disease. In general, all types of structural heart disease may lead to chronic heart failure, a severe condition with an additional high risk of atrial- and

  19. Genetically reduced soluble epoxide hydrolase activity and risk of stroke and other cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Julie; Dahl, Morten; Grande, Peer

    2010-01-01

    epoxide hydrolase activity is associated with risk of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and ischemic heart disease. METHODS: We genotyped participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (n=10 352), the Copenhagen General Population Study (n=26 042), the Copenhagen Carotid Stroke Study (n=398 cases......+796 control subjects), and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study (n=4901 cases+9798 control subjects) for the R103C, R287Q, and Arg(402-403ins) variants in the EPHX2 gene and recorded hospital admissions due to ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and ischemic heart disease. RESULTS......=0.08 to 1.00). Similar results were obtained for myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease in the 3 studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show with significant power that genetically reduced soluble epoxide hydrolase activity is not a major risk factor for ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction...

  20. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease, Angina Basic Facts & Information What ... and oxygen supply; this is what causes a heart attack. If the damaged area is small, however, your ...

  1. Acute Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Varun; Barr, Brian; Srivastava, Mukta

    2018-02-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is a common clinical entity. Recognition of decompensated VHD is crucial to instituting appropriate workup and management. Initial evaluation focuses on hemodynamics, peripheral perfusion, volume overload, and active myocardial ischemia. Initial therapy is targeted at improving hemodynamics, fluid status, and decreasing myocardial ischemia before intervention. Echocardiography can rapidly identify VHD etiology and severity along with physical examination findings. Owing to improved survival with cardiac surgery over the past several decades, prosthetic valve dysfunction should be recognized and initial treatment understood. Mechanical circulatory support is increasingly part of clinical practice in stabilizing patients with decompensated VHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluids and diuretics Heart failure - home monitoring Heart failure - what to ask your ... of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  3. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Print this issue Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment ... When it comes to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke, every minute counts. Get to know ...

  5. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  6. Elevated troponin in patients with acute stroke - Is it a true heart attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dous, George V; Grigos, Angela C; Grodman, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Although the prognostic value of a positive troponin in an acute stroke patient is still uncertain, it is a commonly encountered clinical situation given that Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) frequently co-exist in the same patient and share similar risk factors. Our objectives in this review are to (1) identify the biologic relationship between acute cerebrovascular stroke and elevated troponin levels, (2) determine the pathophysiologic differences between positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke versus acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and (3) examine whether positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke has prognostic significance. We also will provide an insight analysis of some of the available studies and will provide guidance for a management approach based on the available data according to the current guidelines.

  7. The heart: Congenital disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The most important diagnostic requirement in congenital heart disease (CHD) is definition of cardiovascular pathoanatomy. The considerable success in operative correction of even the most complex anomalies in recent years compels ever increasing precision in preoperative demonstration of these anomalies. Early experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at several institutions indicated that this modality is an effective noninvasive technique for evaluation of CHD. Indeed, MRI seems to have some advantage over other techniques, including angiography, for definitive diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the heart and great arteries and veins. The absence of ionizing radiation and contrast medium in MRI is an additional advantage; the former is particularly important for children, who, up to this time, have frequently been subjected to enormous radiation burdens from multiple cineangiograms during initial diagnosis and follow-up. This chapter describes the MRI appearance of cardiovascular anatomy im the segmental fashion proposed for analysis of complex CHD. Likewise, MRI demonstration of congenital cardiovascular lesions is organized into abnormalities situated at the four segmental cardiovascular levels: great vessels, atria, ventricles, and visceroatrial relationship. The role of MRI in evaluation of complex ventricular anomalies such as single ventricle and thoracic aortic abnormalities is specifically described

  8. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of High Cholesterol Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital ... chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too. It is best to call EMS for rapid transport to the emergency room. Learn more about ... More about stroke Immediately ...

  9. Combined effects of family history of CVD and heart rate on ischemic stroke incidence among Inner Mongolians in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Tian, Yunfan; Zhong, Chongke; Batu, Buren; Xu, Tian; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Aili; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the combined effects of family history of cardiovascular diseases (FHCVD) and heart rate on ischemic stroke incidence among Inner Mongolians in China. A prospective cohort study was conducted among 2589 participants aged 20 years and older from Inner Mongolia, China. The participants were divided into four groups according to status of FHCVD and heart rate and followed up from June 2002 to July 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the combined effects of FHCVD and heart rate on the incidence of ischemic stroke. A total of 76 ischemic stroke occurred during the follow-up period. The observed ischemic stroke cases tended to be older and male, and had higher prevalence of smoking, drinking, hypertension and FHCVD as well as higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures at baseline compared with those who did not experience ischemic stroke. Age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of ischemic stroke in the participants with both FHCVD and heart rate ≥ 80 were 2.89 (1.51-5.53), compared with those without FHCVD and heart rate < 80. After multiple adjustment, the association between ischemic stroke risk and both FHCVD and heart rate ≥ 80 remained statistically significant (hazard ratio, 2.47; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-5.01). Our main finding that participants with both FHCVD and faster heart rate have the highest risk of ischemic stroke suggests that faster heart rate may increase the risk of ischemic stroke among people with FHCVD.

  10. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  11. Epidemiologic studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California: demographic, physical, dietary, and biochemical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, A.; Harris, B.R.; Winkelstein, W. Jr.; Johnson, K.G.; Kato, H.; Syme, S.L.; Rhoads, G.G.; Gay, M.L.; Nichaman, M.Z.; Hamilton, H.B.; Tillotson, J.

    1973-01-01

    These summary descriptive data of ethnically similar cohorts of indigenous and migrant Japanese males have shown similarities or slight differences in characteristics wholly or largely genetically determined, such as blood groups, stature, and skeletal size. Differences have been noted in characteristics largely environmental or behavioral, such as diet and cigarette smoking habit, as well as in characteristics determined by a varying mixture of genetic and environmental influences, such as weight, blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and serum lipid and uric acid levels. Detailed analyses of the distributions of laboratory variables, of dietary data obtained by different methods, and of correlations among laboratory, dietary, physical, and demographic variables are currently in progress. Also part of the study plan are determinations of disease prevalence from evaluation of examination, laboratory, and electrocardiographic findings, of disease incidence from repeat examinations and from surveillance of hospital records, and of cause-specific mortality from hospital records, and from death certificates. In addition, at Hiroshima and Honolulu a uniform autopsy protocol is in use. All of these disease findings will be correlated with characteristics determined by questionnaire, interview, examination, and laboratory analyses in order to determine the relations between the measured variables and the occurrence of CHD and stroke. (U.S.)

  12. Valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carabello, B.; Crawford, F.

    1998-01-01

    The predicts of the patients with valvular heart disease it has improved substantially in the last 15 years.A better understanding of the appropriate programming of the surgery it is one of the key reasons .In general the surgery for the illness valvular stenosis it can take a long time until the appearance of the symptoms. Probably that in the future it progresses toward a conservation of the native valves in the patient.It will be beneficial because the valves modern prosthetic even have inherent risks .The aortic stenosis acquired it will follow requiring a valve prosthetic substitution .But the valvular disease it will be treated every time but by means of procedures that keep the native valves.They include the lung autograft for the aortic stenosis ,The balloonla commissurectomy with ball for the mitral stenosis ,the aortic valvular repair for aortic inadequacy .This procedures will make that the surgery is but attractive eliminating the risks associated with the prosthetics.The continuous advances in the valuation non invasive of the aortic and mitral valves, the of the appropriate selection moment for the derivation for surgical treatment, the improves of the surgical techniques for the valvular substitution and reconstruction and the very recent advances in less aggressive surgical focuses they should combine to improve the patients' perspectives with cardiopatia valvular [es

  13. Discharge Disposition After Stroke in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neal S; Merkler, Alexander E; Schneider, Yecheskel; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    Liver disease is associated with both hemorrhagic and thrombotic processes, including an elevated risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to assess the relationship between liver disease and outcomes after stroke, as measured by discharge disposition. Using administrative claims data, we identified a cohort of patients hospitalized with stroke in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. The predictor variable was liver disease. All diagnoses were defined using validated diagnosis codes. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and worsening discharge disposition: home, nursing/rehabilitation facility, or death. Secondarily, multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and in-hospital mortality. Models were adjusted for demographics, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities. We identified 121 428 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 703 918 with ischemic stroke. Liver disease was documented in 13 584 patients (1.7%). Liver disease was associated with worse discharge disposition after both intracerebral hemorrhage (global odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.38) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.29). Similarly, liver disease was associated with in-hospital death after both intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.44) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.71). Liver disease was associated with worse hospital discharge disposition and in-hospital mortality after stroke, suggesting worse functional outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Disparities in adult African American women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology: an analysis of 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Cumba, Marites T; McCullough, Joel Emery; Barlow, Erika Laverne; Lipsky, Martin S

    2008-06-01

    Heart disease and stroke are the first and third leading causes of death of American women, respectively. African American women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women and are also more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. As knowledge is a first step in seeking care, this study examined the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among African American women. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data. A composite heart attack and stroke knowledge score was computed for each respondent from the 13 heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge questions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using low scores on the heart attack and stroke knowledge questions as the dependent variable. Twenty percent of the respondents were low scorers, and 23.8% were high scorers. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult African American women who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to be aged 18-34 (OR = 1.36, CI 1.35, 1.37), be uninsured (OR = 1.32, CI 1.31, 1.33), have an annual household income heart attack and stroke symptoms varied significantly among African American women, depending on socioeconomic variables. Targeting interventions to African American women, particularly those in lower socioeconomic groups, may increase knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms, subsequently improving preventive action taken in response to these conditions.

  15. The relationship between knowledge and risk for heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cameron; Vinson, Seth; Shofer, Frances; Brice, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) represent 2 of the leading causes of death in the United States. The early recognition of risk factors and event symptoms allows for the mitigation of disability or death. We sought to compare subject knowledge of stroke and MI, assess subject risk for cardiovascular disease, and determine if an association exists between knowledge and risk. In this cross-sectional survey, adult, non-health care professionals were presented with a written knowledge test and risk assessment tool. Subjects were classified into 3 categories of cardiovascular risk. Associations were then calculated between knowledge, risk, and population demographics. Of 500 subjects approached, 364 were enrolled. The subjects were mostly white, middle-aged, and high school educated. Gender and income were evenly distributed. Forty-eight (14%) subjects were identified as ideal risk, 130 (38%) as low risk, and 168 (49%) as moderate/high risk. MI and stroke knowledge scores decreased as cardiovascular risk increased (85%, 79%, and 73% for ideal, low, and moderate/high risk groups, respectively; P heart attack knowledge scores. Knowledge about stroke and MI was modest, with knowledge of MI exceeding that of stroke at every level of risk. Subjects with higher risk were less knowledgeable about the stroke signs, symptoms, and risk factors than those of MI. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferit Onur Mutluer; Alpay Çeliker

    2018-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This m...

  17. Decreased nighttime heart rate variability is associated with increased stroke risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binici, Zeynep; Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Køber, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of stroke in healthy individuals is challenging and there is a diurnal variation of stroke onset. We hypothesized that heart rate variability with a focus on nighttime heart rate variability will predict the risk of stroke in apparently healthy middle-age and elderly subjects....

  18. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin

  19. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon

    1979-01-01

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin of great

  20. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). Eur Heart J . ... A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, ...

  1. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transporting smaller loads and making more trips. The engine — or in this case, your heart — has to ... to go to Johannesburg and go to a game park for the day,” Gandy said. Plane Precautions ...

  2. Anticoagulation in ischaemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Cristofaro, R

    2006-01-01

    Although treatments with oral anti‐vitamin K agents have become more refined and safer over the years, physicians are reluctant to prescribe these agents for fear they will cause bleeding, particular in patients with ischaemic heart disease

  3. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  4. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  5. Metabolomics and ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmiena, Aliki A; Ng, Theodore W; Meikle, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Ischaemic heart disease accounts for nearly half of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Aetiologies relating to heart disease are complex, but dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress and inflammation are cardinal features. Despite preventative measures and advancements in treatment regimens with lipid-lowering agents, the high prevalence of heart disease and the residual risk of recurrent events continue to be a significant burden to the health sector and to the affected individuals and their families. The development of improved risk models for the early detection and prevention of cardiovascular events in addition to new therapeutic strategies to address this residual risk are required if we are to continue to make inroads into this most prevalent of diseases. Metabolomics and lipidomics are modern disciplines that characterize the metabolite and lipid complement respectively, of a given system. Their application to ischaemic heart disease has demonstrated utilities in population profiling, identification of multivariate biomarkers and in monitoring of therapeutic response, as well as in basic mechanistic studies. Although advances in magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry technologies have given rise to the fields of metabolomics and lipidomics, the plethora of data generated presents challenges requiring specific statistical and bioinformatics applications, together with appropriate study designs. Nonetheless, the predictive and re-classification capacity of individuals with various degrees of risk by the plasma lipidome has recently been demonstrated. In the present review, we summarize evidence derived exclusively by metabolomic and lipidomic studies in the context of ischaemic heart disease. We consider the potential role of plasma lipid profiling in assessing heart disease risk and therapeutic responses, and explore the potential mechanisms. Finally, we highlight where metabolomic studies together with complementary -omic disciplines may make further

  6. Relevance of genetics and genomics for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, the Stroke Council, and the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Donna K; Baird, Alison E; Barkley, Ruth A; Basson, Craig T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ganesh, Santhi K; Herrington, David M; Hong, Yuling; Jaquish, Cashell; McDermott, Deborah A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2007-06-05

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem in the United States and around the world. Evidence accumulated over decades convincingly demonstrates that family history in a parent or a sibling is associated with atherosclerotic CVD, manifested as coronary heart disease, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial disease. Although there are several mendelian disorders that contribute to CVD, most common forms of CVD are believed to be multifactorial and to result from many genes, each with a relatively small effect working alone or in combination with modifier genes and/or environmental factors. The identification and the characterization of these genes and their modifiers would enhance prediction of CVD risk and improve prevention, treatment, and quality of care. This scientific statement describes the approaches researchers are using to advance understanding of the genetic basis of CVD and details the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic CVD, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Current areas of interest and investigation--including gene-environment interaction, pharmacogenetics, and genetic counseling--are also discussed. The statement concludes with a list of specific recommendations intended to help incorporate usable knowledge into current clinical and public health practice, foster and guide future research, and prepare both researchers and practitioners for the changes likely to occur as molecular genetics moves from the laboratory to clinic.

  7. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Stress management in heart diseases, obesity, nicotine and alcohol use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterbauer, E; Anders, I; Ladurner, G; Huemer, M; Wranek, U

    2001-12-17

    Heart diseases, obesity, nicotine and alcohol abuse are all relevant stroke risk factors. Some studies refer to stress stimuli and coping strategies as modulators for stroke risk factors. This study investigated differences between stroke prevention patients with heart complaints, obesity, nicotine or alcohol abuse and stroke prevention patients without these risk factors. 5993 stroke prevention patients participated in a medical-psychological stroke risk investigation at the Christian Doppler Clinic in Salzburg. The differences in coping strategies between groups of patients with risk factors and groups without were investigated by means of multivariate analysis of covariance. Significant differences in stress coping were found for every risk factor (split by sex). Men suffering from heart diseases showed higher values in the coping strategy tendency to flee. Women with heart complaints demonstrated significantly lower values in minimising by comparison. Obese/adipose patients performed significantly higher values in the coping strategies vicarious satisfaction and aggression (men). Nicotine abusing prevention patients showed significantly higher values in drug intake and lower scores in continued thoughts. Non-smoking men furthermore reached higher values in vicarious satisfaction and non-smoking women in minimising. Persons not consuming alcohol demonstrated higher drug intake and aggression (men). Wine drinkers showed lower scores of self-pity and increased situation control attempts (women). Prevention patients with risk factors demonstrated significant differences in coping strategies in comparison to those without risk factors. Persons with heart diseases demonstrate a more defensive behaviour. The risk factors obesity, nicotine and alcohol consumption are associated with a risk factor supporting stress coping behaviour. The modification of the coping strategies drug intake and vicarious satisfaction towards a more active confrontation could probably

  9. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutluer, Ferit Onur; Çeliker, Alpay

    2018-01-20

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face.

  10. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit Onur Mutluer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face

  11. Impact of heart rate on admission on mortality and morbidity in acute ischaemic stroke patients - results from VISTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, C H; Erdur, H; Grittner, U; Schneider, A; Piper, S K; Scheitz, J F; Wellwood, I; Bath, P M W; Diener, H-C; Lees, K R; Endres, M

    2016-12-01

    Elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with worse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its predictive value in acute stroke patients is less well established. We investigated the effects of HR on admission in acute ischaemic stroke patients. Using the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) database, the association between HR in acute stroke patients without atrial fibrillation and the pre-defined composite end-point of (recurrent) ischaemic stroke, transient ischaemic attack (TIA), myocardial infarction (MI) and vascular death within 90 days was analysed. Pre-defined secondary outcomes were the composite end-point components and any death, decompensated heart failure and degree of functional dependence according to the modified Rankin Scale after 90 days. HR was analysed as a categorical variable (quartiles). In all, 5606 patients were available for analysis (mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 13; mean age 67 years; mean HR 77 bpm; 44% female) amongst whom the composite end-point occurred in 620 patients (11.1%). Higher HR was not associated with the composite end-point. The frequencies of secondary outcomes were 3.2% recurrent stroke (n = 179), 0.6% TIA (n = 35), 1.8% MI (n = 100), 6.8% vascular death (n = 384), 15.0% any death (n = 841) and 2.2% decompensated heart failure (n = 124). Patients in the highest quartile (HR> 86 bpm) were at increased risk for any death [adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.40 (1.11-1.75)], decompensated heart failure [adjusted hazard ratio 2.20 (1.11-4.37)] and worse modified Rankin Scale [adjusted odds ratio 1.29 (1.14-1.52)]. In acute stroke patients, higher HR (>86 bpm) is linked to mortality, heart failure and higher degree of dependence after 90 days but not to recurrent stroke, TIA or MI. © 2016 EAN.

  12. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    to four times over a five year period. All participants with an unhealthy lifestyle had individually tailored lifestyle counselling at all visits (at baseline and after one and three years); those at high risk of ischaemic heart disease, according to predefined criteria, were furthermore offered six....... MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was incidence of ischaemic heart disease in the intervention group compared with the control group. Secondary outcome measures were stroke, combined events (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, or both), and mortality. RESULTS: 6091 (52.4%) people...... disease. Among 58,940 without a history of stroke at baseline, 1726 developed stroke. No significant difference was seen between the intervention and control groups in the primary end point (hazard ratio for ischaemic heart disease 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.13) or in the secondary endpoints...

  13. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  14. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  15. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk factors ... do smoke, quit. Controlling your cholesterol through diet, exercise, and medicines . Controlling high blood pressure through diet, ...

  16. Status of cardiovascular disease and stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L; Isasi, Carmen R; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L; Ramirez, Sarah M; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2014-08-12

    This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA's 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Writing group members were nominated by the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before consideration and approval by the

  17. The magnitude and course of exercise-induced stroke volume changes determine the exercise tolerance in heart transplant recipients with heart failure and normal ejection fraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meluzín, J.; Hude, P.; Leinveber, P.; Jurák, Pavel; Soukup, L.; Viščor, Ivo; Špinarová, L.; Štěpánová, R.; Podroužková, H.; Vondra, Vlastimil; Langer, P.; Němec, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2014), s. 674-687 ISSN 1205-6626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Keywords : heart failure * stroke volume index * exercise tolerance * bioimpedance Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2013

  18. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  19. [Congenital Heart Diseases and Sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippermann, Friederike; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Daily activity is essential for children's development. Especially children with congenital heart disease do not burden adequate, even physical activity is beneficial for them. They should get used to activity and individual athletic performance. Once risks are defined or excluded in a cardiological examination, a detailed sports medical examination is recommended to give advice on individual intensity for leisure and school sports activities. By participation in sporting activities with their peers, they will benefit both physically as well as psychologically. Furthermore, children with congenital heart disease are able to experience their performance limitations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Age, gender, insulin and blood glucose control status alter the risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke among elderly diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hattori Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the effects of insulin therapy, age and gender on the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD and cerebrovascular accident (CVA according to glycemic control. Methods and Results We performed a prospective cohort study (Japan Cholesterol and Diabetes Mellitus Study of type 2 diabetes patients (n = 4014 for 2 years. The primary endpoint was the onset of fatal/non-fatal IHD and/or CVA, which occurred at rates of 7.9 and 7.2 per 1000 person-years, respectively. We divided diabetic patients into four groups based on age (≤ 70 and > 70 and hemoglobin A1C levels (≤ 7.0 and > 7.0%. Multiple regression analysis revealed that IHD was associated with high systolic blood pressure and low HDL-C in patients under 70 years of age with fair glycemic control and was associated with low diastolic blood pressure in the older/fair group. Interestingly, insulin use was associated with IHD in the older/poor group (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.11-5.89; p = 0.026 and was associated with CVA in the older/fair group (OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.06-4.25; p = 0.028. CVA was associated with lower HDL-C and longer duration of diabetes in younger/poor glycemic control group. Results by stepwise analysis were similar. Next, patients were divided into four groups based on gender and diabetic control(hemoglobinA1C 7.0%. Multiple regression analysis revealed that IHD was associated with high systolic blood pressure in male/fair glycemic control group, age in male/poor control group, and short duration of diabetic history in females in both glycemic control groups. Interestingly, insulin use was associated with IHD in the male/poor group(OR = 4.11, 95% CI = 1.22-8.12; p = 0.018 and with CVA in the female/poor group(OR = 3.26, 95% CI = 1.12-6.24; p = 0.02. CVA was associated with short duration of diabetes in both female groups. Conclusions IHD and CVA risks are affected by specific factors in diabetics, such as treatment, gender and age. Specifically, insulin

  1. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  2. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology: a cross-sectional comparison of rural and non-rural US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanoski, Michael T; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Amaro, Maria L; Akers, Michael F; Huot, Krista L

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, attained education, health insurance status, having a health care provider (HCP), timing of last routine medical check-up, medical care deferment because of cost, self-defined health status and geographic locale. The weighted n for this study overall was 103,262,115 U.S. adults  > =18 years of age. Approximately 22.0% of these respondents were U.S. adults living in rural locales. Logistic regression analysis revealed that those U.S. adults who had low composite heart attack and stroke knowledge scores were more likely to be rural (OR=1.218 95%CI 1.216-1.219) rather than non-rural residents. Furthermore, those with low scores were more likely to be: male (OR=1.353 95%CI 1.352-1.354), >65 years of age (OR=1.369 95%CI 1.368-1.371), African American (OR=1.892 95%CI 1.889-1.894), not educated beyond high school (OR=1.400 955CI 1.399-1.402), uninsured (OR=1.308 95%CI 1.3-6-1.310), without a HCP (OR=1.216 95%CI 1.215-1.218), and living in a household with an

  3. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology: a cross-sectional comparison of rural and non-rural US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanoski Michael T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Methods Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, attained education, health insurance status, having a health care provider (HCP, timing of last routine medical check-up, medical care deferment because of cost, self-defined health status and geographic locale. Results The weighted n for this study overall was 103,262,115 U.S. adults > =18 years of age. Approximately 22.0% of these respondents were U.S. adults living in rural locales. Logistic regression analysis revealed that those U.S. adults who had low composite heart attack and stroke knowledge scores were more likely to be rural (OR = 1.218 95%CI 1.216-1.219 rather than non-rural residents. Furthermore, those with low scores were more likely to be: male (OR = 1.353 95%CI 1.352-1.354, >65 years of age (OR = 1.369 95%CI 1.368-1.371, African American (OR = 1.892 95%CI 1.889-1.894, not educated beyond high school (OR = 1.400 955CI 1.399-1.402, uninsured (OR = 1.308 95%CI 1

  4. Increased Vascular Disease Mortality Risk in Prediabetic Korean Adults Is Mainly Attributable to Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hoon; Kwon, Tae Yeon; Yu, Sungwook; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Yousung; Kim, Sin Gon

    2017-04-01

    Prediabetes is a known risk factor for vascular diseases; however, its differential contribution to mortality risk from various vascular disease subtypes is not known. The subjects of the National Health Insurance Service in Korea (2002-2013) nationwide cohort were stratified into normal glucose tolerance (fasting glucose disease and its subtypes-ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke. When adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index, IFG stage 2, but not stage 1, was associated with significantly higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-1.34) and vascular disease mortality (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.08-1.49) compared with normal glucose tolerance. Among the vascular disease subtypes, mortality from ischemic stroke was significantly higher (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.18-2.18) in subjects with IFG stage 2 but not from ischemic heart disease and hemorrhagic stroke. The ischemic stroke mortality associated with IFG stage 2 remained significantly high when adjusted other modifiable vascular disease risk factors (HR, 1.51; 95% CI: 1.10-2.09) and medical treatments (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.19-2.57). Higher IFG degree (fasting glucose, 110-125 mg/dL) was associated with increased all-cause and vascular disease mortality. The increased vascular disease mortality in IFG stage 2 was attributable to ischemic stroke, but not ischemic heart disease or hemorrhagic stroke in Korean adults. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The polypill and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes by Caroline Telfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David S

    2013-07-01

    David S Wald speaks to Caroline Telfer, Assistant Commissioning Editor. David S Wald is a Consultant Cardiologist and Reader in Preventive Cardiology. He trained at Oxford University (UK) and Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (UK). His work combines interventional and preventive approaches to cardiovascular disease. He is currently leading a multicenter randomized trial assessing the value of preventive angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and a UK trial of a polypill for people over the age of 50 years for the prevention of ischemic heart disease and stroke.

  6. Heart rate variability and baroreceptor sensitivity in acute stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yperzeele, Laetitia; van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; Nagels, Guy; De Smedt, Ann; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is common after acute stroke and is associated with elevated risk of cardiac arrhythmia and mortality. Heart rate variability and baroreceptor sensitivity have been investigated as parameters of autonomic nervous system dysfunction for the prediction of stroke outcome. We performed a systematic literature review on heart rate variability and baroreceptor sensitivity as parameters for autonomic nervous function in acute stroke. Twenty-two studies were included. Associations between heart rate variability or baroreceptor sensitivity and stroke severity, early and late complications, dependency and mortality were reported. However, interpretability of most studies and extrapolation to general stroke population are limited due to many confounding factors such as varying methodology, small sample sizes, survival selection, and exclusion of patients with frequently occurring comorbidities in stroke. Key issues, such as the effect of thrombolytic therapy on autonomic function, autonomic nervous system dysfunction in the hyperacute phase of stroke, and correlation with the risk of recurrent stroke have not been investigated. Also, nonlinear techniques have remained largely unexplored in this domain, in spite of their advantage to provide more solid evaluation in the occurrence of arrhythmia. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction, represented by reduced heart rate variability or impaired baroreceptor sensitivity, is associated with stroke severity, early and late complications, dependency, and mortality. Large-scale prospective studies applying internationally accepted standards of measures for analysis of heart rate variability and baroreceptor sensitivity are needed in patients with acute stroke. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  7. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAD - women; Coronary artery disease - women ... NOT smoke or use tobacco. Get plenty of exercise. Women who need to lose or keep off ... least 60 to 90 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days. To maintain your health, get ...

  8. Coronary Heart Disease and Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga SAKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is a chronic process, of which the progression can rapidly change the functional capacity of patients. In CAD patients, the quality of life can be improved with an appropriate exercise prescription. This article explains how a safe exercise program for CAD patients can be prescribed.

  9. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conventional medicine , such as treating lead poisoning or iron overload. When used as a complementary treatment for heart disease, a health care provider typically administers a solution of disodium EDTA, a man-made amino acid, in a series of infusions ...

  10. Monocytes in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The link between the immune system and ischemic heart disease has been recognized for years and great improvements have been made in understanding the role of immune cells in the context of infarct healing, atherosclerosis and arteriogenesis, using experimental and in vitro models. However, the role

  11. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does have a bit of a penchant for racial bias where Hispanic and Latina women are concerned. And the statistics above are proof. Why? “Hispanic women think [heart disease] is something that is ‘my’ problem and they don’t want to share it ...

  12. Congenital Heart Disease and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for inattention, hyperactivity and impaired school performance were examined in 109 children, 5 to 10 years of age, who had undergone newborn cardiac surgery for complex congenital heart disease (CHD at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA.

  13. Limitations and pitfalls in measurements of right ventricular stroke volume in an animal model of right heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vildbrad, Mads Dam; Andersen, Asger; Andersen, Thomas Krarup; Axelgaard, Sofie; Holmboe, Sarah; Andersen, Stine; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Right heart failure occurs in various heart and pulmonary vascular diseases and may be fatal. We aimed to identify limitations in non-invasive measurements of right ventricular stroke volume in an animal model of right ventricular failure. Data from previous studies randomising rats to pulmonary trunk banding (PTB, n = 33) causing pressure-overload right ventricular failure or sham operation (n = 16) was evaluated retrospectively. We measured right ventricular stroke volume by high frequency echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We found correlation between right ventricular stroke volume measured by echocardiography and MRI in the sham animals (r = 0.677, p = 0.004) but not in the PTB group. Echocardiography overestimated the stroke volume compared to MRI in both groups. Intra- and inter-observer variation did not explain the difference. Technical, physiological and anatomical issues in the pulmonary artery might explain why echocardiography over-estimates stroke volume. Flow acceleration close to the pulmonary artery banding can cause uncertainties in the PTB model and might explain the lack of correlation. In conclusion, we found a correlation in right ventricular stroke volume measured by echocardiography versus MRI in the sham group but not the PTB group. Echocardiography overestimated right ventricular stroke volume compared to MRI. (paper)

  14. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    of Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 59 616 people aged 30-60 years randomised with different age and sex randomisation ratios to an intervention group (n=11 629) and a control group (n=47 987). INTERVENTION: The intervention group was invited for screening, risk assessment, and lifestyle counselling up to four...... OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was incidence of ischaemic heart disease in the intervention group compared with the control group. Secondary outcome measures were stroke, combined events (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, or both), and mortality. RESULTS: 6091 (52.4%) people...... disease. Among 58 940 without a history of stroke at baseline, 1726 developed stroke. No significant difference was seen between the intervention and control groups in the primary end point (hazard ratio for ischaemic heart disease 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.13) or in the secondary endpoints...

  15. Test Your Stroke Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9-1-1. Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? High blood pressure Heart disease Smoking High cholesterol Diabetes Show Answer All of these are risk factors for stroke. If you smoke - quit. If you have high ...

  16. An updated definition of stroke for the 21st century: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Ralph L; Kasner, Scott E; Broderick, Joseph P; Caplan, Louis R; Connors, J J Buddy; Culebras, Antonio; Elkind, Mitchell S V; George, Mary G; Hamdan, Allen D; Higashida, Randall T; Hoh, Brian L; Janis, L Scott; Kase, Carlos S; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Lee, Jin-Moo; Moseley, Michael E; Peterson, Eric D; Turan, Tanya N; Valderrama, Amy L; Vinters, Harry V

    2013-07-01

    Despite the global impact and advances in understanding the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases, the term "stroke" is not consistently defined in clinical practice, in clinical research, or in assessments of the public health. The classic definition is mainly clinical and does not account for advances in science and technology. The Stroke Council of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association convened a writing group to develop an expert consensus document for an updated definition of stroke for the 21st century. Central nervous system infarction is defined as brain, spinal cord, or retinal cell death attributable to ischemia, based on neuropathological, neuroimaging, and/or clinical evidence of permanent injury. Central nervous system infarction occurs over a clinical spectrum: Ischemic stroke specifically refers to central nervous system infarction accompanied by overt symptoms, while silent infarction by definition causes no known symptoms. Stroke also broadly includes intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The updated definition of stroke incorporates clinical and tissue criteria and can be incorporated into practice, research, and assessments of the public health.

  17. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Combined effect of educational status and cardiovascular risk factors on the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in European cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Ferrario, Marco M

    2017-01-01

    Background The combined effect of social status and risk factors on the absolute risk of cardiovascular disease has been insufficiently investigated, but results provide guidance on who could benefit most through prevention. Methods We followed 77,918 cardiovascular disease-free individuals aged ...

  19. Heart rate as a predictor of stroke in high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Berge, Eivind; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Julius, Stevo; Holzhauer, Björn; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Hua, Tsushung A

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for first stroke are well established, but less is known about risk factors for recurrent stroke. In the present analysis, we aimed to assess the effect of heart rate and other possible predictors of stroke in a hypertensive population with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-Term Use Evaluation trial was a multicentre, double-masked, randomized controlled, parallel group trial comparing the effects of an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan) and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) in patients with hypertension and high cardiovascular risk. We used Cox proportional hazard models to investigate the effect of baseline variables on the risk of stroke. Quadratic terms of the continuous variables were entered in the models to test for linearity. Of 15,245 patients included in the trial, 3014 had a previous stroke or TIA at baseline and were included in the present analysis. Stroke recurrence occurred in 239 patients (7.9%) during a median of 4.5 years of follow-up. Resting heart rate (per 10 beats per minute; hazard ratio [HR], 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-6.58) and diabetes mellitus at baseline (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.03-2.10) were significantly associated with an increased risk of stroke recurrence in the multivariable analysis. In high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or TIA, resting heart rate was the strongest predictor of recurrent stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stroke and cerebrovascular diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2014-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined as a reduced glomerular filtration rate or increased urinary albumin excretion, is recognised as a rapidly growing global health burden, and increasing evidence suggests that it contributes to the risk and severity of cerebrovascular diseases. In particular, chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for stroke and is also strongly associated with subclinical cerebrovascular abnormalities and cognitive impairment, partly because it shares several traditional and non-traditional risk factors, and sometimes uraemia-related and dialysis-related factors, with cerebrovascular diseases. The effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke differs among regions and races and is greater in Asian than in non-Asian people. Chronic kidney disease seems to be predictive of severe neurological deficits and poor vital and functional outcomes after both ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes, which is partly due to the limitations of pharmacotherapies, including limited use and effects of novel oral anticoagulants, other antithrombotic treatments, and reperfusion treatment for hyperacute ischaemic stroke. In view of the strong two-way association between stroke and kidney disease, the pathophysiological interactions between the brain and kidney should be the subject of intensive study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called a valve-in-valve procedure. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes to Treat Other Related Heart Conditions To ... your doctor may advise you to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes, such as: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for ...

  2. Bradyarrhythmias in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven K; Patel, Akash R; Chang, Philip M

    2017-06-01

    Bradyarrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) comprise a complex group of arrhythmia disorders with congenital and acquired origins, highly variable long-term sequelae, and complicated treatment options. They can develop across the spectrum of CHD defects and can be encountered at all ages. Although permanent pacing is effective in treating bradyarrhythmias, it is associated with many complications and morbidity, where it is often used early in life. This section discusses the incidence and prevalence of bradyarrhythmias in the CHD population, their timing of occurrence with respect to specific disease entities and interventions, and their short- and long-term clinical sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stroke volume of the heart and thoracic fluid content during head-up and head-down tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lieshout, J J; Harms, M P M; Pott, F

    2005-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) of the heart depends on the diastolic volume but, for the intact organism, central pressures are applied widely to express the filling of the heart.......The stroke volume (SV) of the heart depends on the diastolic volume but, for the intact organism, central pressures are applied widely to express the filling of the heart....

  4. Sickle Cell Disease with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease: Long-Term Outcomes in 5 Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Glen J; Adisa, Olufolake A; Oster, Matthew E; McConnell, Michael; Mahle, William T

    2016-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents in the pediatric population. This risk is compounded by hypoxemia. Cyanotic congenital heart disease can expose patients to prolonged hypoxemia. To our knowledge, the long-term outcome of patients who have combined sickle cell and cyanotic congenital heart disease has not been reported. We retrospectively reviewed patient records at our institution and identified 5 patients (3 girls and 2 boys) who had both conditions. Their outcomes were uniformly poor: 4 died (age range, 12 mo-17 yr); 3 had documented cerebrovascular accidents; and 3 developed ventricular dysfunction. The surviving patient had developmental delays. On the basis of this series, we suggest mitigating hypoxemia, and thus the risk of stroke, in patients who have sickle cell disease and cyanotic congenital heart disease. Potential therapies include chronic blood transfusions, hydroxyurea, earlier surgical correction to reduce the duration of hypoxemia, and heart or bone marrow transplantation.

  5. Successful Heart Transplantation Following Decompressive Craniectomy in a Patient with Restrictive Cardiomyopathy and Extensive Stroke in the Region of the Right Middle Cerebral Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Gulsen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM in children is associated with a greater risk of embolic stroke than are other congenital heart diseases. After diagnosis, 50% of children with RCM die within 2 years without heart transplantation. As such, all RCM patients are placed on the heart transplantation list and must wait for an appropriate heart for transplantation. Every type of embolic stroke can occur while waiting for a donor heart; therefore, the cardiovascular team must initiate antithrombotic therapy at time RCM is diagnosed. Some pediatric RCM patients experience embolic stroke (50% are the cerebral type despite antithrombotic therapy, including acetylsalicylic acid, warfarin, and heparine. Neurosurgeons working in hospitals that perform organ transplantation expect to see RCM cases with restrictive large cerebral infarct. We think that decompressive craniectomy should be performed as soon as possible after determining the clinical condition of any patient with RCM and a large right middle cerebral artery (MCA infarct.

  6. Employment after heart transplantation among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Chou, Helen; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark; McConnell, Patrick I

    2017-12-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease may require heart transplantation for end-stage heart failure. Whereas heart transplantation potentially allows adults with congenital heart disease to resume their usual activities, employment outcomes in this population are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and predictors of work participation after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease. Retrospective review of a prospective registry. United Network for Organ Sharing registry of transplant recipients in the United States. Adult recipients of first-time heart transplantation with a primary diagnosis of congenital heart disease, performed between 2004 and 2015. None. Employment status reported by transplant centers at required follow-up intervals up to 5 y posttransplant. Among 470 patients included in the analysis (mean follow-up: 5 ± 3 y), 127 (27%) worked after transplant, 69 (15%) died before beginning or returning to work, and 274 (58%) survived until censoring, but did not participate in paid work. Multivariable competing-risks regression analysis examined characteristics associated with posttransplant employment, accounting for mortality as a competing outcome. In descriptive and multivariable analysis, pretransplant work participation was associated with a greater likelihood of posttransplant employment, while the use of Medicaid insurance at the time of transplant was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of working after transplant (subhazard ratio compared to private insurance: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.95; P = .032). Employment was rare after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease, and was significantly less common than in the broader population of adults with congenital heart disease. Differences in return to work were primarily related to pretransplant employment and the use of public insurance, rather than clinical characteristics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... times more likely to have a stroke. Heart disease and a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation ... if you smoke Or have diabetes, sickle cell disease, high cholesterol, or a family history of stroke. ...

  8. Misery perfusion, blood pressure control, and 5-year stroke risk in symptomatic major cerebral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shinya; Kishibe, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of strict blood pressure (BP) control in high-risk patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease and misery perfusion (MP) is controversial. Our purposes were (1) to determine whether MP is a predictor of a 5-year risk of subsequent stroke and (2) to investigate the relationships among BP during follow-up, MP, and the stroke risk. We studied 130 nondisabled patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease. Baseline hemodynamic measurements were obtained from (15)O-gas positron emission tomography, and patients received medical treatment and they were followed for 5 years or until stroke recurrence or death. During 5 years, strokes occurred in 6 of 16 patients with MP and in 15 of 114 without MP (log-rank test; Pstrokes in patients with MP and 4 in those without MP (Pstroke declined markedly after 2 years, and there was only 1 ipsilateral ischemic stroke in a patient without MP. Normal systolic BP (strokes in patients with impaired perfusion (including MP), whereas systolic BP outside the 130 to 149 mm Hg range was associated with an increased risk of all strokes in patients without MP. Patients with MP showed a high-5-year stroke recurrence, but a large part of the 5-year stroke risk disappeared after 2 years. Aggressive BP control may be hazardous in patients with impaired perfusion, including MP. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Comorbid Psychiatric Disease Is Associated With Lower Rates of Thrombolysis in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, Diana M; Daumit, Gail L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Faigle, Roland

    2018-03-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) improves outcomes after acute ischemic stroke but is underused in certain patient populations. Mental illness is pervasive in the United States, and patients with comorbid psychiatric disease experience inequities in treatment for a range of conditions. We aimed to determine whether comorbid psychiatric disease is associated with differences in IVT use in acute ischemic stroke. Acute ischemic stroke admissions between 2007 and 2011 were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Psychiatric disease was defined by International Classification of Diseases , Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes for secondary diagnoses of schizophrenia or other psychoses, bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety. Using logistic regression, we tested the association between IVT and psychiatric disease, controlling for demographic, clinical, and hospital factors. Of the 325 009 ischemic stroke cases meeting inclusion criteria, 12.8% had any of the specified psychiatric comorbidities. IVT was used in 3.6% of those with, and 4.4% of those without, psychiatric disease ( P disease was associated with lower odds of receiving IVT (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.85). When psychiatric diagnoses were analyzed separately individuals with schizophrenia or other psychoses, anxiety, or depression each had significantly lower odds of IVT compared to individuals without psychiatric disease. Acute ischemic stroke patients with comorbid psychiatric disease have significantly lower odds of IVT. Understanding barriers to IVT use in such patients may help in developing interventions to increase access to evidence-based stroke care. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Problems and Causes Heart Murmurs and Valve Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral ...

  11. Rationale and design of a randomized, double-blind, event-driven, multicentre study comparing the efficacy and safety of oral rivaroxaban with placebo for reducing the risk of death, myocardial infarction or stroke in subjects with heart failure and significant coronary artery disease following an exacerbation of heart failure: the COMMANDER HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannad, Faiez; Greenberg, Barry; Cleland, John G F; Gheorghiade, Mihai; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Mehra, Mandeep R; Anker, Stefan D; Byra, William M; Fu, Min; Mills, Roger M

    2015-07-01

    Thrombin is a critical element of crosstalk between pathways contributing to worsening of established heart failure (HF). The aim of this study is to explore the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban 2.5 mg bid compared with placebo (with standard care) after an exacerbation of HF in patients with reduced ejection fraction (HF-rEF) and documented coronary artery disease. This is an international prospective, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, event-driven study of approximately 5000 patients for a targeted 984 events. Patients must have a recent symptomatic exacerbation of HF, increased plasma concentrations of natriuretic peptides (B-type natriuretic peptide ≥200 pg/mL or N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide ≥800 pg/mL), with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40% and coronary artery disease. Patients requiring anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation or other conditions will be excluded. After an index event (overnight hospitalization, emergency department or observation unit admission, or unscheduled outpatient parenteral treatment for worsening HF), patients will be randomized 1:1 to rivaroxaban or placebo (with standard of care). The primary efficacy outcome event is a composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke. The principal safety outcome events are the composite of fatal bleeding or bleeding into a critical space with potential permanent disability, bleeding events requiring hospitalization and major bleeding events according to International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis bleeding criteria. COMMANDER HF is the first prospective study of a target-specific oral antithrombotic agent in HF. It will provide important information regarding rivaroxaban use following an HF event in an HF-rEF patient population with coronary artery disease. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Profiles in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, M.D.; Keane, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pediatric cardiology has made great strides in the diagnosis, management, and correction of complex congenital malformations in the past two decades. The foundation of these advances is a more precise understanding of the physiology and anatomy of complex lesions that has been obtained from cardiac catheterization and angiography. The techniques for catheterization of infants and children have been discussed in another paper. This chapter focuses on brief profiles of some of the more important congenital abnormalities. The incidence cited in the discussion of each abnormality pertains to a population comprises of children and adults referred to The Children's Hospital Medical Center and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, respectively, for evaluation of congenital heart disease

  13. The global burden of paediatric heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Ndidiamaka L; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Zheleva, Bistra

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 15 million children die or are crippled annually by treatable or preventable heart disease in low- and middle-income countries. Global efforts to reduce under-5 mortality have focused on reducing death from communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries with little...... to no attention focusing on paediatric CHD and acquired heart disease. Lack of awareness of CHD and acquired heart disease, access to care, poor healthcare infrastructure, competing health priorities, and a critical shortage of specialists are important reasons why paediatric heart disease has not been addressed...... in low resourced settings. Non-governmental organisations have taken the lead to address these challenges. This review describes the global burden of paediatric heart disease and strategies to improve the quality of care for paediatric heart disease. These strategies would improve outcomes for children...

  14. Reflux of Anterior Spinal Artery Predicts Recurrent Posterior Circulation Stroke in Bilateral Vertebral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Kosuke; Handa, Akira; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Lo, Benjamin; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-11-01

    Predictive value of reflux of anterior spinal artery for recurrent posterior circulation ischemia in bilateral vertebral arteries steno-occlusive disease was evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients with symptomatic posterior circulation stroke caused by bilateral stenotic (>70%) lesions of the vertebral artery. We investigated any correlation of clinical and angiographic characteristics including collateral flow patterns, with recurrent stroke. Risk factors for poor 3-month functional outcome were also evaluated. Recurrent posterior circulation stroke was observed in 15 (27.3%) patients. Multivariable analysis using Cox proportional hazards model showed anterior spinal artery reflux as a significant risk factor for stroke recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 19.3 [95% confidence interval, 5.35-69.9]; Pdisease, anterior spinal artery reflux predicted recurrent posterior circulation stroke and poor functional outcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  16. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  17. Genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan J; Gelb, Bruce D

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this review is to highlight recent discoveries in the field of genetics as it relates to congenital heart disease (CHD). Recent advancements in next generation sequencing technology and tools to interpret this growing body of data have allowed us to refine our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that result in CHD. From multiple different study designs, the genetic lesions that cause CHD are increasingly being elucidated. Of the more novel findings, a forward genetic screen in mice has implicated recessive inheritance and the ciliome broadly in CHD pathogenesis. The developmental delays frequently observed in patients with CHD appear to result from mutations affecting genes that overlap heart and brain developmental regulation. A meta-analysis has provided clarity, discriminating pathologic from incidental copy number variations and defining a critical region or gene. Recent technological advances have rapidly expanded our understanding of CHD genetics, and support the applicability to the clinical domain in both sporadic and inherited disease. Though significant gaps remain, genetic lesions remain the primary explanation for CHD pathogenesis, although the precise mechanism is likely multifactorial.

  18. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.S.; Billoo, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  19. Stroke prevalence amongst sickle cell disease patients in Nigeria: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a life-changing, debilitating complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). Previous studies had recorded high stroke prevalence amongst this group of patients. Nigeria has a large population of people affected by this condition and this study aims to assess the stroke prevalence in this large population.

  20. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Vilar-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator or tempol (SOD-mimetic. Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  1. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  2. Knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke among Singapore residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Joy Li Juan; Yap, Susan; Cheah, Si Oon; Ng, Yih Yng; Goh, E Shaun; Doctor, Nausheen; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tiah, Ling; Chia, Michael Yih Chong; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore resident population, in comparison to the global community. A population based, random sample of 7,840 household addresses was selected from a validated national sampling frame. Each participant was asked eight questions on signs and symptoms of heart attack and 10 questions on stroke. The response rate was 65.2% with 4,192 respondents. The level of knowledge for preselected, common signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke was 57.8% and 57.1%, respectively. The respondents scored a mean of 5.0 (SD 2.4) out of 8 for heart attack, while they scored a mean of 6.8 (SD 2.9) out of 10 for stroke. Respondents who were ≥ 50 years, with lower educational level, and unemployed/retired had the least knowledge about both conditions. The level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore is comparable to USA and Canada. We found a comparable knowledge of stroke and heart attack signs and symptoms in the community to countries within the same economic, educational, and healthcare strata. However older persons, those with lower educational level and those who are unemployed/retired, require more public health education efforts.

  3. Knowledge of Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack and Stroke among Singapore Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Li Juan Quah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore resident population, in comparison to the global community. Methods. A population based, random sample of 7,840 household addresses was selected from a validated national sampling frame. Each participant was asked eight questions on signs and symptoms of heart attack and 10 questions on stroke. Results. The response rate was 65.2% with 4,192 respondents. The level of knowledge for preselected, common signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke was 57.8% and 57.1%, respectively. The respondents scored a mean of 5.0 (SD 2.4 out of 8 for heart attack, while they scored a mean of 6.8 (SD 2.9 out of 10 for stroke. Respondents who were ≥50 years, with lower educational level, and unemployed/retired had the least knowledge about both conditions. The level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore is comparable to USA and Canada. Conclusion. We found a comparable knowledge of stroke and heart attack signs and symptoms in the community to countries within the same economic, educational, and healthcare strata. However older persons, those with lower educational level and those who are unemployed/retired, require more public health education efforts.

  4. Heart valve disease among patients with hyperprolactinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  5. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 7. Recommendations on stress management. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J D; Barnett, P A; Linden, W; Ramsden, V; Taenzer, P

    1999-05-04

    . Individualized cognitive behavioural interventions are more likely to be effective than single-component interventions. These recommendations were reviewed by all of the sponsoring organizations and by participants in a satellite symposium of the fourth International Conference on Preventive Cardiology. They have not been clinically tested. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

  6. Sickle Cell Disease and Stroke: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Courtney; Webb, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Both adult and pediatric patients with sickle cell disease face a higher risk of stroke than the general population. Given the different underlying pathophysiology predisposing these patients to stroke, providers should be aware of differences in guidelines for stroke management. This paper reviews diagnostic considerations and recommendations during the evaluation and acute management of patients with sickle cell disease presenting with stroke, focusing on recent updates in the literature. Given the high recurrence rate of stroke in these patients, secondary prevention and curative measures will also be reviewed.

  7. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may ... exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you would like to do is safe for you. This is especially important if: You recently had a heart attack. You ...

  8. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  9. Clinical Pregenetic Screening for Stroke Monogenic Diseases: Results From Lombardia GENS Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Markus, Hugh Stephen; Quaglini, Silvana; Arbustini, Eloisa; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Micieli, Giuseppe; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Taroni, Franco; Gellera, Cinzia; Baratta, Silvia; Penco, Silvana; Mosca, Lorena; Grasso, Maurizia; Carrera, Paola; Ferrari, Maurizio; Cereda, Cristina; Grieco, Gaetano; Corti, Stefania; Ronchi, Dario; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Obici, Laura; Parati, Eugenio A; Pezzini, Alessando; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Verrengia, Elena P; Bono, Giorgio; Mazucchelli, Francesca; Zarcone, Davide; Calloni, Maria Vittoria; Perrone, Patrizia; Bordo, Bianca Maria; Colombo, Antonio; Padovani, Alessandro; Cavallini, Anna; Beretta, Simone; Ferrarese, Carlo; Motto, Cristina; Agostoni, Elio; Molini, Graziella; Sasanelli, Francesco; Corato, Manuel; Marcheselli, Simona; Sessa, Maria; Comi, Giancarlo; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Guidotti, Mario; Uccellini, Davide; Capitani, Erminio; Tancredi, Lucia; Arnaboldi, Marco; Incorvaia, Barbara; Tadeo, Carlo Sebastiano; Fusi, Laura; Grampa, Giampiero; Merlini, Giampaolo; Trobia, Nadia; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Braga, Massimiliano; Vitali, Paolo; Baron, Pierluigi; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Candelise, Livia

    2016-07-01

    Lombardia GENS is a multicentre prospective study aimed at diagnosing 5 single-gene disorders associated with stroke (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, Fabry disease, MELAS [mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes], hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and Marfan syndrome) by applying diagnostic algorithms specific for each clinically suspected disease We enrolled a consecutive series of patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted in stroke units in the Lombardia region participating in the project. Patients were defined as probable when presenting with stroke or transient ischemic attack of unknown etiopathogenic causes, or in the presence of young age at onset, or positive familial history or of specific clinical features. Patients fulfilling diagnostic algorithms specific for each monogenic disease (suspected) were referred for genetic analysis. In 209 patients (57.4±14.7 years), the application of the disease-specific algorithm identified 227 patients with possible monogenic disease. Genetic testing identified pathogenic mutations in 7% of these cases. Familial history of stroke was the only significant specific feature that distinguished mutated patients from nonmutated ones. The presence of cerebrovascular risk factors did not exclude a genetic disease. In patients prescreened using a clinical algorithm for monogenic disorders, we identified monogenic causes of events in 7% of patients in comparison to the 1% to 5% prevalence reported in previous series. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Proteinuria, but Not eGFR, Predicts Stroke Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsmark, Danielle K; Messé, Steven R; Zhang, Xiaoming; Roy, Jason; Nessel, Lisa; Lee Hamm, Lotuce; He, Jiang; Horwitz, Edward J; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Kusek, John W; Mohler, Emile R; Porter, Anna; Seliger, Stephen L; Sozio, Stephen M; Townsend, Raymond R; Feldman, Harold I; Kasner, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, the impact of chronic kidney disease on cerebrovascular disease is less well understood. We hypothesized that renal function severity would be predictive of stroke risk, independent of other vascular risk factors. The study population included 3939 subjects enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a prospective observational cohort. Stroke events were reported by participants and adjudicated by 2 vascular neurologists. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare measures of baseline renal function with stroke events. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for key covariates. In 3939 subjects, 143 new stroke events (0.62 events per 100 person-years) occurred over a mean follow-up of 6.4 years. Stroke risk was increased in subjects who had worse baseline measurements of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate and total proteinuria or albuminuria). When adjusted for variables known to influence stroke risk, total proteinuria or albuminuria, but not estimated glomerular filtration rate, were associated with an increased risk of stroke. Treatment with blockers of the renin-angiotensin system did not decrease stroke risk in individuals with albuminuria. Proteinuria and albuminuria are better predictors of stroke risk in patients with chronic kidney disease than estimated glomerular filtration rate. The impact of therapies targeting proteinuria/albuminuria in individuals with chronic kidney disease on stroke prevention warrants further investigation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Ischemic heart disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Kellan E; Geraci, Stephen A

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Although overall mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) has decreased, there are subsets of patients, particularly young women, in whom the mortality rate has increased. Underlying sex differences in CHD may be an explanation. Women have more frequent symptoms, more ischemia, and higher mortality than men, but less obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Despite this, traditional risk factor assessment has been ineffective in risk stratifying women, prompting the emergence of novel markers and prediction scores to identify a population at risk. Sex differences in manifestations and the pathophysiology of CHD also have led to differences in the selection of diagnostic testing and treatment options for women, having profound effects on outcomes. The frequent finding of nonobstructive CAD in women with ischemia suggests microvascular dysfunction as an underlying cause; therefore, coronary reactivity and endothelial function testing may add to diagnostic accuracy in female patients. In spite of evidence that women benefit from the same therapies as men, they continue to receive less-aggressive therapy, which is reflected in higher healthcare resource utilization and adverse outcomes. More sex-specific research is needed in the area of symptomatic nonobstructive CAD to define the optimal therapeutic approach.

  12. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Radioisotope heart examination during exercise to diagnose ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotope exercise test is discussed and its benefits characterized for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, namely the use of 99m Tc in scintiscanning heart ventricles and of 201 Tl in scintiscanning myocardial perfusion. The exercise ventricular function and perfusion scintigraphies are compared with the common exercise ECG examination, and their superior sensitivity and specificity emphasized. Considering the constraints of scintigraphic imaging, indications are outlined for patients including those with suspect serious ischemic heart disease in whom the exercise ECG test has been negative or inconclusive, patients with the so-called nondiagnostic ECG, patients with atypical symptoms, and healthy individuals for whom the exercise ECG test indicated with respect to their occupation has been positive. Both radionuclide imaging techniques are complementary and are shown to be valuable not only in improving the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease but also in identifying the high-risk patients in whom cardiac surgery is to be considered. (L.O.)

  14. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t be repaired and must be replaced. This surgery involves removing the faulty valve and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made ...

  15. Major stroke in a 19-year-old patient with a univentricular heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemann, Mads; Idorn, Lars; Wagner, Aase

    2013-01-01

    Patients with univentricular heart malformations are at increased risk of suffering from thromboembolic events. We present a case of a 19-year-old woman born with a univentricular heart who suffered a major stroke while being treated with only salicylic acid. At least 20% of patients...

  16. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CARCINOID HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Ravnik

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carcinoid heart disease is a rare heart disease which affects endocard and heart valves on the right side of heart. It affects only patients with manifested carcinoid syndrome, which is thought to be the consequence of secretory active metastases of carcinoid tumour. The carcinoid endocardial plaques cause structural changes of tricuspid and pulmonic valve and later on their stenosis and/or insufficiency.Patients and methods. In this article we introduce a carcinoid valve heart disease (CVHD scoring system for easier end exact echocardiographic diagnostics. Four echocardiographic parameters are beeing estimated: structural changes of tricuspid valve, tricuspid valve regurgitation, stenosis of pulmonic valve and pulmonic valve regurgitation.Conclusions. The scoring system allows us to make an early diagnosis and evaluation of progression of carcinoid heart disease, which is very important for planning the treatment process. Our experiences confirm the usefulness of this scoring system in echocardiographic follow–up of patients with carcinoid syndrome.

  17. Imaging of Heart Disease in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Tina D; Kicska, Gregory A; Jacobs, Jill E; Pampaloni, Miguel H; Litmanovich, Diana E; Reddy, Gautham P

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the number one cause of death of women in the United States, accounting for over a quarter of a million annual female deaths. Evidence within the last several decades supports sex-specific differences in the prevalence, symptoms, and prognosis of ischemic heart disease between men and women. Despite women having a lower burden of obstructive coronary artery disease compared with men, the prevalence of angina and mortality from ischemic heart disease is higher for women than men. In addition to ischemic heart disease, certain nonischemic conditions may also have sex-specific differences in clinical presentation and occurrence. With the rising utilization of noninvasive modalities for the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the unique considerations for imaging women with heart disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss challenges for detection of heart disease in women, examine performance of noninvasive modalities in the detection of ischemic heart disease, and discuss nonischemic cardiomyopathies unique to or prevalent in women. Considerations for cardiac imaging in pregnancy are also discussed. © RSNA, 2017.

  18. Space Radiation Heart Disease Risk Estimates for Lunar and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Program performs research on the risks of late effects from space radiation for cancer, neurological disorders, cataracts, and heart disease. For mortality risks, an aggregate over all risks should be considered as well as projection of the life loss per radiation induced death. We report on a triple detriment life-table approach to combine cancer and heart disease risks. Epidemiology results show extensive heterogeneity between populations for distinct components of the overall heart disease risks including hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular diseases. We report on an update to our previous heart disease estimates for Heart disease (ICD9 390-429) and Stroke (ICD9 430-438), and other sub-groups using recent meta-analysis results for various exposed radiation cohorts to low LET radiation. Results for multiplicative and additive risk transfer models are considered using baseline rates for US males and female. Uncertainty analysis indicated heart mortality risks as low as zero, assuming a threshold dose for deterministic effects, and projections approaching one-third of the overall cancer risk. Medan life-loss per death estimates were significantly less than that of solid cancer and leukemias. Critical research questions to improve risks estimates for heart disease are distinctions in mechanisms at high doses (>2 Gy) and low to moderate doses (<2 Gy), and data and basic understanding of radiation doserate and quality effects, and individual sensitivity.

  19. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  20. Focus on the Heart: Alcohol Consumption, HIV Infection, and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freiberg, Matthew S.; Kraemer, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy, people infected with HIV have a longer life expectancy and, consequently, are likely to develop other chronic conditions also found in noninfected people, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Alcohol consumption, which is common among HIV-infected people, may influence the risk of CVD. In noninfected adults, moderate alcohol consumption can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), heart attacks, and the most common type of stroke...

  1. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  2. Valvular Disorders in Carcinoid Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Abstract Carcinoid heart disease is a rare but important cause of intrinsic right heart valve disorders leading to right heart failure. Occasionally, left-sided heart valves may also be involved. The characteristic cardiac pathological findings of carcinoid heart disease are endocardial thickening as a result of fibrous deposits on the endocardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterization are very useful for the diagnosis of the lesion. If more cardiac valves are affected, multiple valve replacement should be considered. The management of the pulmonary valve lesion depends on the extent of the diseased valve, either by valvulotomy, valvectomy, or valve replacement. Percutaneous valve implantations in the pulmonary and in the inferior vena cava positions have been advocated for high-risk patients.

  3. Preattentive processing of heart cues and the perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was aimed at clarifying whether preattentive processing of heart cues results in biased perception of heart sensations in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD) who are also highly trait anxious. Twenty-six patients with ConHD and 22 healthy participants categorized

  4. Indigenous drugs in ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh

    2009-11-01

    India is currently facing the silent epidemic of ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and stroke. Both diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear in Indian people a decade earlier compared to whites. The recent evidence that certain medicinal plants possess hypoglycemic, lipid-lowering, and immunomodulating properties on account of their rich flavonoid and/or other glucose-lowering active constituents merits scientific scrutiny in this regard. The present communication aims to give a brief review of those plants that could be useful in T2DM associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and/or dyslipidemia. Aegle marmelos (bael), Allium sativum (garlic), Curcuma domestica (turmeric), Eugenia jambolana (jamun), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek), and Terminalia arjuna (arjun) have been found to be useful in diabetes associated with ischemic heart disease. Their active biomolecules have been identified. They have also been demonstrated to be safe in long-term use. Further clinical research regarding their potency and efficacy vis-à-vis oral hypoglycemics needs to done.

  5. Awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms among Hispanic male adults living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Bardales, Ricardo; Bales, Robert; Aguero, Carlos; Brady, Shelly; Tobar, Adriana; McGrath, Cynthia; Zaiser, Julia; Lipsky, Martin S

    2010-10-01

    There is evidence that Hispanic men are a high risk group for treatment delay for both heart attack and stroke. More targeted research is needed to elucidate this specific population's knowledge of warning signs for these acute events. This study sought to describe within-group disparities in Hispanic men's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology. Multivariate techniques were used to analyze a multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Heart and Stroke module database. The data were cross-sectional and focused on health risk factors and behaviors. The research participants were U.S. male Hispanic adults aged 18-99. The main outcome measure for the study was heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis yielded that Hispanic men aged >or=18 years who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to: have less than a high school education, have deferred medical care because of cost, not have an identified health care provider, and be uninsured. There were significant within-group differences. Targeting educational efforts toward older (>or=55 years) Hispanic men with less than high school education, those who do not have an identified health care provider or health insurance, and who defer health care because of cost could be ways to improve the outcome of acute vascular events among the U.S. Hispanic adult male population.

  6. Coexistent Sickle Cell Disease Has No Impact on the Safety or Outcome of Lytic Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Findings From Get With The Guidelines-Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert J; Cox, Margueritte; Ozark, Shelly D; Kanter, Julie; Schulte, Phillip J; Xian, Ying; Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Schwamm, Lee H

    2017-03-01

    The recommended treatment for ischemic stroke is tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator). Although sickle cell disease (SCD) represents no known contraindication to tPA, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health recommended acute exchange transfusion for stroke in SCD, not tPA. Data on safety and outcomes of tPA in patients are needed to guide tPA use in SCD. We matched patients from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke registry with SCD to patients without SCD and compared usage, complications, and discharge outcomes after tPA. Multivariable logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to assess outcomes. From 2 016 652 stroke patients admitted to Get With The Guidelines-Stroke sites in the United States, 832 SCD and 3328 non-SCD controls with no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale or blood pressure were identified. Neither the fraction receiving thrombolytic therapy (8.2% for SCD versus 9.4% non-SCD) nor symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (4.9% of SCD versus 3.2% non-SCD; P =0.4502) was different. There was no difference in a prespecified set of outcome measures for those with SCD compared with controls. Coexistent SCD had no significant impact on the safety or outcome of thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. Although the sample size is relatively small, these data suggest that adults with SCD and acute ischemic stroke should be treated with thrombolysis, if they otherwise qualify. Addition studies, however, should track the intracranial hemorrhage rate and provide information on other SCD-related care such as transfusion. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  8. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A cause of heart disease? Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including ...

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  10. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF). This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I–III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index. A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were −52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = −0.318, P lower extremities (r = −0.288, P lower extremities (r = −0.311, P limbs. FVC was more strongly associated with MIP and MEP than predicted FVC%. FEV1/FVC may be used as a reference for the pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:27749577

  11. Attributing heart attack and stroke to "Old Age": Implications for subsequent health outcomes among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tara L; Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P; Hamm, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which older adults attribute a recent heart attack/stroke to "old age," and examined consequences for subsequent lifestyle behavior and health-care service utilization. Community-dwelling adults (N = 57, ages 73-98 years) were interviewed about their heart attack/stroke, and an objective health registry provided data on health-care utilization over a 3-year period. Endorsement of "old age" as a cause of heart attack/stroke negatively predicted lifestyle behavior change, and positively predicted frequency of physician visits and likelihood of hospitalization over the subsequent 3 years. Findings suggest the importance of considering "old age" attributions in the context of cardiovascular health events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A. Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart

  13. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MW, Willems PJ. Genetic factors in non-syndromic congenital heart malformations. Clin Genet. 2010 Aug;78(2):103-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2010.01435.x. Epub 2010 May 17. Review. Citation on ... genes in congenital heart disease. Nature. 2013 Jun 13;498(7453): ...

  14. Racial-ethnic disparities in stroke care: the American experience: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Biller, Jose; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Griffith, Patrick; Gorelick, Philip B; Howard, George; Leira, Enrique C; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Peterson, Eric; Rosamond, Wayne; Trimble, Brian; Valderrama, Amy L

    2011-07-01

    Our goal is to describe the effect of race and ethnicity on stroke epidemiology, personal beliefs, access to care, response to treatment, and participation in clinical research. In addition, we seek to determine the state of knowledge on the main factors that may explain disparities in stroke care, with the goal of identifying gaps in knowledge to guide future research. The intended audience includes physicians, nurses, other healthcare professionals, and policy makers. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and represent different areas of expertise in relation to racial-ethnic disparities in stroke care. The writing group reviewed the relevant literature, with an emphasis on reports published since 1972. The statement was approved by the writing group; the statement underwent peer review, then was approved by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. There are limitations in the definitions of racial and ethnic categories currently in use. For the purpose of this statement, we used the racial categories defined by the US federal government: white, black or African American, Asian, American Indian/Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander. There are 2 ethnic categories: people of Hispanic/Latino origin or not of Hispanic/Latino origin. There are differences in the distribution of the burden of risk factors, stroke incidence and prevalence, and stroke mortality among different racial and ethnic groups. In addition, there are disparities in stroke care between minority groups compared with whites. These disparities include lack of awareness of stroke symptoms and signs and lack of knowledge about the need for urgent treatment and the causal role of risk factors. There are also differences in attitudes, beliefs, and compliance among minorities compared with whites. Differences in socioeconomic status and insurance coverage

  15. Antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Hart, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    Cardioembolic strokes account for one-sixth of all strokes and are an important potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K antagonists (e.g., warfarin) are effective for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and in those with mechanical heart valves but because of their inherent limitations are underutilized and often suboptimally managed. Antiplatelet therapies have been the only alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in AF but although they are safer and more convenient they are much less efficacious. The advent of new oral anticoagulant drugs offers the potential to reduce the burden of cardioembolic stroke by providing access to effective, safe, and more convenient therapies. New oral anticoagulants have begun to replace warfarin for stroke prevention in some patients with AF, based on the favorable results of recently completed phase III randomized controlled trials, and provide for the first time an alternative to antiplatelet therapy for patients deemed unsuitable for warfarin. The promise of the new oral anticoagulants in patients with mechanical heart valves is currently being tested in a phase II trial. If efficacy and safety are demonstrated, the new oral anticoagulants will provide an alternative to warfarin for patients with mechanical heart valves and may also lead to increased use of mechanical valves for patients who would not have received them in the past because of the requirement for long term warfarin therapy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Trends in stroke incidence. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, T; Prescott, E; Grønbaek, M

    1997-01-01

    in men, whose annual rate ratio was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99), but not in women, whose annual rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00). Throughout four observed periods the stroke incidence among men remained significantly higher than that for women. CONCLUSIONS: During the period from 1976 to 1993......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke incidence has increased in some countries and decreased in others. After 20 years of intensive antihypertensive treatment the latter could be expected, and we have evaluated the sex-specific temporal trends in stroke incidence using 17 years of follow...... at least one of the two first examinations as well as the total cohort including nonresponders. Subjects between 45 and 84 years of age were followed from March 1, 1976 until March 1, 1993. Changes in age-specific stroke incidence were calculated by means of Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS...

  17. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented...... by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling...

  18. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; AlHabib, Khalid F; Cowie, Martin R; Force, Thomas L; Hu, Shengshou; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krum, Henry; Rastogi, Vishal; Rohde, Luis E; Samal, Umesh C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Budi Siswanto, Bambang; Sliwa, Karen; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease and addressing it should be considered a global health priority. At present, approximately 26 million people worldwide are living with heart failure. The outlook for such patients is poor, with survival rates worse than those for bowel, breast or prostate cancer. Furthermore, heart failure places great stresses on patients, caregivers and healthcare systems. Demands on healthcare services, in particular, are predicted to increase dramatically over the next decade as patient numbers rise owing to ageing populations, detrimental lifestyle changes and improved survival of those who go on to develop heart failure as the final stage of another disease. It is time to ease the strain on healthcare systems through clear policy initiatives that prioritize heart failure prevention and champion equity of care for all. Despite the burdens that heart failure imposes on society, awareness of the disease is poor. As a result, many premature deaths occur. This is in spite of the fact that most types of heart failure are preventable and that a healthy lifestyle can reduce risk. Even after heart failure has developed, premature deaths could be prevented if people were taught to recognize the symptoms and seek immediate medical attention. Public awareness campaigns focusing on these messages have great potential to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure and ultimately to save lives. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines is also associated with improved outcomes for patients with heart failure. However, in many countries, there is considerable variation in how closely physicians follow guideline recommendations. To promote equity of care, improvements should be encouraged through the use of hospital performance measures and incentives appropriate to the locality. To this end, policies should promote the research required to establish an evidence base for performance measures that reflect improved outcomes for patients

  19. Interactive Whole-Heart Segmentation in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Danielle F; Dalca, Adrian V; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J; Moghari, Mehdi H; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    We present an interactive algorithm to segment the heart chambers and epicardial surfaces, including the great vessel walls, in pediatric cardiac MRI of congenital heart disease. Accurate whole-heart segmentation is necessary to create patient-specific 3D heart models for surgical planning in the presence of complex heart defects. Anatomical variability due to congenital defects precludes fully automatic atlas-based segmentation. Our interactive segmentation method exploits expert segmentations of a small set of short-axis slice regions to automatically delineate the remaining volume using patch-based segmentation. We also investigate the potential of active learning to automatically solicit user input in areas where segmentation error is likely to be high. Validation is performed on four subjects with double outlet right ventricle, a severe congenital heart defect. We show that strategies asking the user to manually segment regions of interest within short-axis slices yield higher accuracy with less user input than those querying entire short-axis slices.

  20. Autonomic Nervous System and Stress to Predict Secondary Ischemic Events after Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Stroke: Possible Implications of Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Mazowita, Garey; Claydon, Victoria E

    2018-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke have high risks of recurrence and deterioration into severe ischemic strokes. Risk stratification of TIA and minor stroke is essential for early effective treatment. Traditional tools have only moderate predictive value, likely due to their inclusion of the limited number of stroke risk factors. Our review follows Hans Selye's fundamental work on stress theory and the progressive shift of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) from adaptation to disease when stress becomes chronic. We will first show that traditional risk factors and acute triggers of ischemic stroke are chronic and acute stress factors or "stressors," respectively. Our first review shows solid evidence of the relationship between chronic stress and stroke occurrence. The stress response is tightly regulated by the ANS whose function can be assessed with heart rate variability (HRV). Our second review demonstrates that stress-related risk factors of ischemic stroke are correlated with ANS dysfunction and impaired HRV. Our conclusions support the idea that HRV parameters may represent the combined effects of all body stressors that are risk factors for ischemic stroke and, thus, may be of important predictive value for the risk of subsequent ischemic events after TIA or minor stroke.

  1. Autonomic Nervous System and Stress to Predict Secondary Ischemic Events after Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Stroke: Possible Implications of Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Mazowita, Garey; Claydon, Victoria E.

    2018-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke have high risks of recurrence and deterioration into severe ischemic strokes. Risk stratification of TIA and minor stroke is essential for early effective treatment. Traditional tools have only moderate predictive value, likely due to their inclusion of the limited number of stroke risk factors. Our review follows Hans Selye’s fundamental work on stress theory and the progressive shift of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) from adaptation to disease when stress becomes chronic. We will first show that traditional risk factors and acute triggers of ischemic stroke are chronic and acute stress factors or “stressors,” respectively. Our first review shows solid evidence of the relationship between chronic stress and stroke occurrence. The stress response is tightly regulated by the ANS whose function can be assessed with heart rate variability (HRV). Our second review demonstrates that stress-related risk factors of ischemic stroke are correlated with ANS dysfunction and impaired HRV. Our conclusions support the idea that HRV parameters may represent the combined effects of all body stressors that are risk factors for ischemic stroke and, thus, may be of important predictive value for the risk of subsequent ischemic events after TIA or minor stroke. PMID:29556209

  2. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  4. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Khairy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy.

  5. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  6. A Mediterranean diet and risk of myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tektonidis, Thanasis G; Åkesson, Agneta; Gigante, Bruna; Wolk, Alicja; Larsson, Susanna C

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean diet, which is palatable and easily achievable, has been associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and mortality. Data on heart failure (HF) and stroke types are lacking. The aim was to examine a Mediterranean diet in relation to incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), HF and stroke types in a Swedish prospective cohort. In a population-based cohort of 32,921 women, diet was assessed through a self-administered questionnaire. The modified Mediterranean diet (mMED) score was created based on high consumption of vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish and monounsaturated fat, moderate intakes of alcohol and low consumption of red meat, on a 0-8 scale. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression models. During 10 y of follow-up (1998-2008), 1109 MIs, 1648 HFs, 1270 ischemic strokes and 262 total hemorrhagic strokes were ascertained. A high adherence to the mMED score (6-8), compared to low, was associated with a lower risk of MI (RR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.61-0.90, p = 0.003), HF (RR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.68-0.93, p = 0.004) and ischemic stroke (RR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.93, p = 0.007), but not hemorrhagic stroke (RR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.61-1.29, p = 0.53). Better adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with lower risk of MI, HF and ischemic stroke. The Mediterranean diet is most likely to be beneficial in primary prevention of all major types of atherosclerosis-related CVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of Atrial Fibrillation Among Patients With Stroke Due to Large or Small Vessel Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeestere, Jelle; Fieuws, Steffen; Lansberg, Maarten G; Lemmens, Robin

    2016-09-26

    Recent trials have demonstrated that extended cardiac monitoring increases the yield of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in patients with cryptogenic stroke. The utility of extended cardiac monitoring is uncertain among patients with stroke caused by small and large vessel disease. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the yield of AF detection in this population. We searched PubMed, Cochrane, and SCOPUS databases for studies on AF detection in stroke patients and excluded studies restricted to patients with cryptogenic stroke or transient ischemic attack. We abstracted AF detection rates for 3 populations grouped by stroke etiology: large vessel stroke, small vessel stroke, and stroke of undefined etiology (a mixture of cryptogenic, small vessel, large vessel, and other stroke etiologies). Our search yielded 30 studies (n=5687). AF detection rates were similar in patients with large vessel (2.2%, 95% CI 0.3-5.5; n=830) and small vessel stroke (2.4%, 95% CI 0.4-6.1; n=520). No studies had a monitoring duration longer than 7 days. The yield of AF detection in the undefined stroke population was higher (9.2%; 95% CI 7.1-11.5) compared to small vessel stroke (P=0.02) and large vessel stroke (P=0.02) populations. AF detection rate is similar in patients with small and large vessel strokes (2.2-2.4%). Because no studies reported on extended monitoring (>7 days) in these stroke populations, we could not estimate the yield of AF detection with long-term cardiac monitoring. Randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the utility of AF detection with long-term cardiac monitoring (>7 days) in this patient population. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Dolichoectasia and Small Vessel Disease in Young Patients With Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Fazekas, Franz; McCabe, Dominick J H; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt; Enzinger, Christian

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated whether basilar dolichoectasia is associated with markers of cerebral small vessel disease in younger transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients. We used data from the SIFAP1 study (Stroke in Young Fabry Patients), a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young (ischemic attack/stroke patients in whom detailed clinical data and brain MRI were obtained, and stroke subtyping with TOAST classification (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) was performed. Dolichoectasia was found in 508 of 3850 (13.2%) of patients. Dolichoectasia was associated with older age (odds ratio per decade, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.44), male sex (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.42), and hypertension (odds ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.70). Dolichoectasia was more common in patients with small infarctions (33.9% versus 29.8% for acute lesions, P =0.065; 29.1% versus 16.5% for old lesions, P ischemic attack and ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. [Hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Jan

    Hypothyroidism is frequently found in patients with heart disease. It is a risk factor for atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease and has a direct negative effect on both the left and right ventricular functions (hypothyroidism-induced cardiomyopathy). The confirmed manifest hypothyroidism is always a reason for replacement therapy with levothyroxine; regarding patients with heart disease, we always begin treatment with a small dose and increase it gradually. The treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is disputable and its benefits probably depend on age. At a higher age, the therapy-related risks often outweigh its benefits, so we make do with the target levels of the thyroid stimulating hormone being within the upper band of the normal range, or even slightly above it, rather than overdosing the patient. To summarize in a simplified way, the treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is the most effective in younger individuals, mainly those aged below 65, while at a higher age > 80 years the risk usually outweighs the benefit.Key words: cardiovascular risk - hypothyroidism - ischemic heart disease - left ventricular dysfunction - right ventricular dysfunction - subclinical hypothyroidism - thyroid peroxidase antibodies.

  10. Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease Is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Stroke: A Thailand National Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Adrian D; Mannu, Gurdeep S; Clark, Allan B; Tiamkao, Somsak; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Barlas, Raphae S; Mamas, Mamas; Myint, Phyo Kyaw

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatic valvular heart disease is associated with the increased risk of cerebrovascular events, although there are limited data on the prognosis of patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (RMVD) after stroke. We examined the association between RMVD and both serious and common cardiovascular and noncardiovascular (respiratory and infective) complications in a cohort of hospitalized stroke patients based in Thailand. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were also explored. Data were obtained from a National Insurance Database. All hospitalized strokes between October 1, 2004, and January 31, 2013, were included in the current study. Characteristics and outcomes were compared for RMVD and non-RMVD patients. Logistic regression, propensity score matching, and multivariate models were used to assess study outcomes. In total, 594 681 patients (mean [SD] age=64 [14.5] years) with a diagnosis of stroke (ischemic=306 154; hemorrhagic=195 392; undetermined=93 135) were included in this study, of whom 5461 had RMVD. Results from primary analyses showed that after ischemic stroke, and controlling for potential confounding covariates, RMVD was associated (Pstroke patients, RMVD was associated with increased odds (fully adjusted model) for respiratory failure (1.26 [1.01-1.57]), and in patients with undetermined stroke, RMVD was associated with increased odds (fully adjusted analyses) for shock (3.00 [1.46-6.14]), respiratory failure (2.70 [1.91-3.79]), and pneumonia (2.42 [1.88-3.11]). RMVD is associated with the development of cardiac arrest, shock, arrhythmias, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and sepsis after acute stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. How to Prevent Heart Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease - At Any Age (American Heart Association) Red Wine and Resveratrol: Good for Your Heart? (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Time to Talk: Five Things to Know about Omega-3s for Heart Disease (National Center for ...

  12. External Counterpulsation Increases Beat-to-Beat Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Tian, Ge; Wang, Li; Lin, Wenhua; Chen, Xiangyan; Leung, Thomas Wai Hong; Soo, Yannie Oi Yan; Wong, Lawrence Ka Sing

    2017-07-01

    External counterpulsation (ECP) is a noninvasive method used to augment cerebral perfusion in ischemic stroke. However, the response of beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with ischemic stroke during ECP remains unknown. Forty-eight patients with unilateral ischemic stroke at the subacute stage and 14 healthy controls were recruited. Beat-to-beat heart rate before, during, and after ECP was monitored. The frequency components of HRV were calculated using power spectral analysis. Very low frequency (VLF; <.04 Hz), low frequency (LF; .04-.15 Hz), high frequency (HF; .15-.40 Hz), total power spectral density (TP; <.40 Hz), and LF/HF ratio were calculated. In stroke patients, although there were no statistical differences in all of the HRV components, the HRV at VLF showed a trend of increase during ECP compared with baseline in the left-sided stroke patients (P = .083). After ECP, the HRV at LF and TP remained higher than baseline in the right-sided stroke patients (LF, 209.4 versus 117.9, P = .050; TP, 1275.6 versus 390.2, P = .017, respectively). Besides, the HRV at TP also increased after ECP compared with baseline in the left-sided stroke patients (563.0 versus 298.3, P = .029). Irrespective of the side of the ischemia, patients showed an increased beat-to-beat HRV after ECP. Additionally, sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac modulations were increased after ECP in patients after right-sided subacute stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Valvular aspects of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Boglarka; ElGuindy, Ahmed; Smith, Sidney C; Yacoub, Magdi; Holmes, David R

    2016-03-26

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain major global health problems. Although strategies for primary and secondary prevention are well established, their worldwide implementation is suboptimum. In patients with advanced valvular heart disease, mechanical approaches (both percutaneous and surgical) are well described and can, for selected patients, greatly improve outcomes; however, access to centres with experienced staff is very restricted in regions that have the highest prevalence of disease. Development of diagnostic strategies that can be locally and regionally provided and improve access to expert centres for more advanced disease are urgent and, as yet, unmet clinical needs. We outline current management strategies for valvular rheumatic heart disease on the basis of either strong evidence or expert consensus, and highlight areas needing future research and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Racial disparities in knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Rafferty, Ann P; Reeves, Mathew J; Zackery, Shannon; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Anderson, Beth

    2009-01-01

    To describe the level of knowledge regarding risk factors and warning signs for stroke and heart attack among White and African American adults in Michigan and to quantify racial disparities. Knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs was assessed by using data from the 2004 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Prevalence estimates of knowledge were generated, and statistical differences in knowledge between Whites and African Americans were assessed. Adequate knowledge was defined as knowing 3 correct warning signs or risk factors. Logistic regression models were used to quantify the racial disparity in knowledge while controlling for potential confounding. Whites had substantially higher levels of adequate knowledge of risk factors (stroke: 31.6% vs 13.8%; heart attack: 52.6% vs 24.3%) and warning signs (stroke: 30.0% vs 17.2%; heart attack: 29.3% vs 13.8%) compared with African Americans (all observed differences were significant at P heart attack: AOR 3.4) and warning signs (stroke: AOR 2.0; heart attack: AOR 2.4) were significantly higher for Whites than for African Americans. A strong racial disparity in the knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs exists among Michigan adults. Communitywide public education programs in conjunction with targeted interventions for at-risk populations are necessary to produce meaningful improvements in the awareness of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

  15. Mortality, stroke, and heart failure in atrial fibrillation cohorts after ablation versus propensity-matched cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Julian We; Hunter, Tina D; Hussain, Wajid; March, Jamie L; Wong, Tom; Markides, Vias

    2017-01-01

    We sought to determine from key clinical outcomes whether catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased survival. Using routinely collected hospital data, ablation patients were matched to two control cohorts using direct and propensity score methodology. Four thousand nine hundred ninety-one ablation patients were matched 1:1 with general AF controls without ablation. Five thousand four hundred seven ablation patients were similarly matched to controls who underwent cardioversion. We examined the rates of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (stroke/TIA), heart failure hospitalization, and death. Matched populations had very similar comorbidity profiles, including nearly identical CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc risk distribution ( p =0.6948 and p =0.8152 vs general AF and cardioversion cohorts). Kaplan-Meier models showed increased survival after ablation for all outcomes compared with both control cohorts ( p vs general AF, p =0.0087 for stroke/TIA, p vs cardioversion). Cox regression models also showed improved survival after ablation for all outcomes compared with the general AF cohort (hazard ratio [HR]=0.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.3-0.6, p stroke/TIA; HR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.6, p stroke/TIA; HR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.3-0.6, p stroke/TIA, and heart failure compared with a matched general AF population and a matched population who underwent cardioversion. Potential confounding of outcomes was minimized by very tight cohort matching.

  16. Addition of 24 hour heart rate variability parameters to the cardiovascular health study stroke risk score and prediction of incident stroke : The cardiovascular health study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodapati, R.K.; Kizer, J.R.; Kop, W.J.; Stein, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) characterizes cardiac autonomic functioning. The association of HRV with stroke is uncertain. We examined whether 24‐hour HRV added predictive value to the Cardiovascular Health Study clinical stroke risk score (CHS‐SCORE), previously developed at the baseline

  17. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  18. Changes of deceleration and acceleration capacity of heart rate in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu YH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Hong Xu,1 Xing-De Wang,2 Jia-Jun Yang,1 Li Zhou,2 Yong-Chao Pan1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: Autonomic dysfunction is common after stroke, which is correlated with unfavorable outcome. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a newly developed technique for assessing cardiac autonomic function, by detecting sympathetic and vagal nerve activity separately through calculating acceleration capacity (AC and deceleration capacity (DC of heart rate. In this study, we used this technique for the first time to investigate the cardiac autonomic function of patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke. Methods: A 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed in 63 patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke in hemisphere and sinus rhythm, as well as in 50 controls with high risk of stroke. DC, AC, heart rate variability parameters, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN, and square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD were calculated. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to assess the severity of stroke. We analyzed the changes of DC, AC, SDNN, and RMSSD and also studied the correlations between these parameters and NIHSS scores. Results: The R–R (R wave to R wave on electrocardiogram intervals, DC, AC, and SDNN in the cerebral infarction group were lower than those in controls (P=0.003, P=0.002, P=0.006, and P=0.043, but the difference of RMSSD and the D-value and ratio between absolute value of AC (|AC| and DC were not statistically significant compared with those in controls. The DC of the infarction group was significantly correlated with |AC|, SDNN, and RMSSD (r=0.857, r=0.619, and r=0.358; P=0.000, P=0.000, and P=0.004. Correlation analysis also showed that DC, |AC|, and SDNN

  19. Natriuretic peptides in common valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Christopher D; Ray, Simon; Ng, Leong L; McCann, Gerry P

    2010-05-11

    Valvular heart disease, particularly aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, accounts for a large proportion of cardiology practice, and their prevalence is predicted to increase. Management of the asymptomatic patient remains controversial. Biomarkers have been shown to have utility in the management of cardiovascular disease such as heart failure and acute coronary syndromes. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence relating to natriuretic peptides as potential biomarkers in aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The natriuretic peptides correlate with measures of disease severity and symptomatic status and also can be used to predict outcome. This review shows that natriuretic peptides have much promise as biomarkers in common valvular heart disease, but the impact of their measurement on clinical practice and outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anesthesia in pregnancy with heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Luthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pregnant women with heart disease remains challenging due to the advancement of innovations in cardiac surgery and correction of complex cardiac anomalies, and more recently, with the successful performance of heart transplants, cardiac diseases are not only likely to coexist with pregnancy, but will also increase in frequency over the years to come. In developing countries with a higher prevalence of rheumatic fever, cardiac disease may complicate as many as 5.9% of pregnancies with a high incidence of maternal death. Since many of these deaths occur during or immediately following parturition, heart disease is of special importance to the anesthesiologist. This importance arises from the fact that drugs used for preventing or relieving pain during labor and delivery exert a major influence – for better or for worse – on the prognosis of the mother and newborn. Properly administered anesthesia and analgesia can contribute to the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  1. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...

  2. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madrid, Alexander Scheller; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... (telomerase RNA component), which code for proteins and RNA involved in telomere maintenance. We studied 105 055 individuals from Copenhagen; 17 235 of these individuals were diagnosed with ischemic heart disease between 1977 and 2013, and 66 618 had telomere length measured. For genetic studies, we further...

  5. Adult congenital heart disease: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Amy; Pearson, Disty; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2006-11-01

    This article presents the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patient "voice" by high-lighting issues and challenges commonly identified in peer support forums but rarely addressed in the existing literature. Representative patient quotations are provided, and relevant research on patient education and psychosocial function is referenced. Issues discussed include the provision of overly pessimistic and overly optimistic prognoses, common patient misperceptions and knowledge gaps, frustrations and dangerous encounters in the medical system, and living with invisible disabilities. Patient self-perception of congenital heart disease, the gifts of congenital heart disease, and the role of patient associations are also discussed. For each issue identified, implications for the ACHD health professional are outlined and recommendations for best practices are made.

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbach, Ghazal; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-12

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) related to left heart disease (LHD) is the most common form of PH, accounting for more than two third of all PH cases. The hemodynamic abnormalities seen in PH-LHD are complex, and there are currently minimal evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. While it is accepted that PH in the context of left heart disease is a marker of worse prognosis, it remains unclear whether its primary treatment is beneficial or harmful. In this article, we discuss the prevalence and significance of PH in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) as well as HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and those with valvular heart disease and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interrelationship in individuals with PH due to left heart disease. Furthermore, we provide a framework for diagnostic testing and an approach to optimal management of these complex patients based on current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdester Cavalcante Pinto Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction:Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007.Objective:To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes.Methods:The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables.Results:The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498; atrial septal defect (4,693; persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490; pulmonary stenosis (1,431; tetralogy of Fallot (973; coarctation of the aorta (973; transposition of the great arteries (887; and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults.Conclusion:In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration.

  8. Relationship between stress and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurd, Bushra Jawaid; Dar, Mudassir Iqbal; Shoaib, Maria; Malik, Laraib; Aijaz, Zobia; Asif, Iqra

    2014-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for 13.7% of deaths in countries like Pakistan. Its association with stress has not been well considered in our setup. Patients with coronary artery disease admitted for coronary artery bypass grafting may have a high prevalence of stress that might increase the risk of adverse outcomes. 60 patients with coronary artery disease admitted to the Civil Hospital Karachi for coronary artery bypass graft surgery from January 1 to March 31, 2012, were evaluated using a stress evaluation scale. Stress of varying degrees was found to be a significant independent risk factor in patients with coronary heart disease. Analysis of our collected sample of patients with stress showed 60% with high stress (p = 0.025) and 36.7% moderate stress (p = 0.0025). An appreciable relationship was found between stress and patient age, sex, body mass index, blood group, and the incidence of myocardial infarction. Our study found evidence of an independent causative association between psychological stress and coronary heart disease, of a similar order to the more conventional coronary heart disease risk factors.

  9. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  10. [Dizziness in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuesen, Leif; May, Ole; Brorholt-Petersen, Jens Uffe; Christensen, Per Dahl

    2013-11-04

    In patients with heart disease, dizziness is primarily associated with syncope or pre-syncope and mandates further investigation to obtain a specific diagnosis, estimation of risk of sudden death and treatment options. After a focused history and physical examination, the cause of the problem may be determined in more than half of the patients. The reflex syncope is by far the most common form and may usually be handled by reassurance of the benign nature of the problem. Patients with syncope caused by brachy- or tachy-arrhythmia or structural or ischaemic heart disease should be referred to a cardiological department for specific diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (ARTICO study will increase the knowledge of patient outcome after ischemic stroke and may help to improve our ability to detect patients at high risk of stroke recurrence or major cardiovascular events. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stine Andersen, Stine Andersen; Andersen, Asger; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent a rapidly growing patient group. Dysfunction of the right ventricle is often present, and right heart failure constitutes the main cause of death. Heart failure therapies used in acquired left heart failure are often initiated in adults with right heart failure due to congenital heart disease, but the right ventricle differs substantially from the left ventricle, and the clinical evidence for this treatment strategy is lacking. In this review,...

  13. De novo Diagnosis of Fabry Disease among Italian Adults with Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Ilaria; Borsini, Walter; Nencini, Patrizia; Morrone, Amelia; Ferri, Lorenzo; Frusconi, Sabrina; Donadio, Vincenzo Angelo; Liguori, Rocco; Donati, Maria Alice; Falconi, Serena; Pracucci, Giovanni; Inzitari, Domenico

    2015-11-01

    Cerebrovascular complications are often the first cause of hospitalization in patients with Fabry disease (FD). Screenings for FD among stroke patients have yielded discrepant results, likely as a result of heterogeneous or incomplete assessment. We designed a study to identify FD among adults 60 years of age or younger who were consecutively admitted for acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) to a stroke neurology service in Italy. Patients with first-ever or recurrent events were included, irrespective of gender, risk factors, or stroke type. We screened male patients using α-galactosidase A enzyme assay, and female patients using DNA sequencing. FD was eventually established after a broad multidisciplinary discussion. We screened 108 patients (61% males, median age: 48 years); 84% of these patients had stroke. De novo FD diagnosis was established in 3 patients (2.8%; 95% confidence interval, .57-8.18): a 59-year-old man with recurrent lacunar-like strokes and multiple risk factors; a 42-year-old woman with recurrent cryptogenic minor strokes; and a 32-year-old woman with recurrent strokes previously attributed to Behçet's disease. Screened patients were systematically asked for typical FD symptoms; each of the de novo patients reported one or more of the following: episodes of hand/foot pain during fever, angiokeratoma, and family history of heart disease. In all of the patients events were recurrent, and lacunar-like infarcts characterized their brain imaging. Prevalence of FD among nonselected adults 60 years of age or younger with acute ischemic stroke or TIA is not negligible. A systematic search for FD in a stroke setting, using a comprehensive clinical, biochemical, and genetic screening protocol, may be worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke. High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke four to six times. Heart disease, especially a condition ... leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability. Four million Americans are living with the effects of stroke. The length of time to recover from a ...

  15. Echocardiographic evaluation of right ventricular stroke work index in advanced heart failure: a new index?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frea, Simone; Bovolo, Virginia; Bergerone, Serena; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Antolini, Marina; Capriolo, Michele; Canavosio, Federico Giovanni; Morello, Mara; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function plays a pivotal role in advanced heart failure patients, especially for screening those who may benefit from left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. We introduce RV contraction pressure index (RVCPI) as a new echo-Doppler parameter of RV function. The accuracy of RVCPI in detecting RV failure was compared with the criterion standard, the RV stroke work index (RVSWI) obtained through right heart catheterization in advanced heart failure patients referred for heart transplantation or LVAD implantation. Right heart catheterization and echo-Doppler were simultaneously performed in 94 consecutive patients referred to our center for advanced heart failure (ejection fraction (EF) 24 ± 8.8%, 40% NYHA functional class IV). RV stroke volume and invasive pulmonary pressures were used to obtain RVSWI. Simplified RVCPI (sRVCPI) was derived as TAPSE × (RV - right atrial pressure gradient). Close positive correlation between sRVCPI and RVSWI was found (r = 0.68; P rights reserved.

  16. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  17. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether...... patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis....... However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk...

  18. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Launch Programs and Activities National Wear Red Day ® Road Show Stories from the Road Road Show Photographs Lower Heart Disease Risk What is ... physical activity that's best for you. Eat less salt and sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. ...

  19. HEART SIZE IN PRIMARY MYOCARDIAL DISEASE*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-10

    Jul 10, 1971 ... Heart volllme and cardia-Thoracic raTio were compared. STaTiSTically wiTh rhe haemodynamic and angiocardio- graphic paramerers measured aT cardiac caThererizaTion in. ]8 paTienis wiTh primary myocardial disease. Three paTients had mild cardiomyopaThy, 17 had classical cardiomyo- parhy, in 6 ...

  20. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Mascha; Vogels, Ton; Ottenkamp, Jaap; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. Pauline; Vliegen, Hubert W.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate job participation, career-related problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Cross-sectional study. Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the Department of Pediatric

  1. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Vogels, T.; Ottenkamp, J.; Wall, E.E. van der; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Vliegen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate job participation, careerrelated problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the

  2. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  3. The right side in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased dramatically during the past years, due to the successes of cardiac surgery. At present, nearly all of these children with CHD can be operated at young age and more than 90% reach adulthood. At adult age, however, many

  4. cholesterol, coronary heart disease and oestrogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-03

    Apr 3, 1971 ... Present concepts of the interrelationship between oestro- gens, endogenous and exogenous, and the development of atheromatosis and coronalY heart disease in the human female are reviewed. Aspects of research conducted by me at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, are incorporated.

  5. Berlin Heart EXCOR use in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David L S; Zafar, Farhan; Almond, Christopher S; Canter, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Conway, Jennifer; Adachi, Iki; Lorts, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Management of mechanical circulatory support in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging due to physiologic variations and anatomic limitations to device placement. In this study we examine the use of Berlin Heart EXCOR in CHD patients. CHD patients were identified from the EXCOR Pediatric Study data set (2007 to 2010). Mortality and serious adverse events were compared between CHD and non-CHD cohorts, and predictors of poor outcomes in the CHD cohort were identified. CHD was present in 29% (n = 59, 18 with 1-ventricle physiology) of all EXCOR patients (N = 204). Successful bridge (transplant or wean) was less likely in CHD patients compared with non-CHD patients (48% vs 80%; p 1 year) were successfully bridged. Pre-implant congenital heart surgery (CHS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the same admission occurred in 60% of children ≤1 year of age (83% of neonates, 50% of infants), with 8% survival. Regardless of age, patients who did not have CHS and ECMO had 61% survival. Smaller pump, pre-implant bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and renal dysfunction were independently associated with mortality. End-organ function at implant reliably predicts adverse outcomes and should be considered when making implant decisions. EXCOR use in neonates and infants with CHD should be approached cautiously. If patients have undergone pre-implant CHS and ECMO, EXCOR support may not provide any survival benefit. EXCOR support in non-infants with CHD is challenging but can be consistently successful with appropriate patient selection. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Classification of stroke disease using convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbun, J. T.; Seniman; Andayani, U.

    2018-03-01

    Stroke is a condition that occurs when the blood supply stop flowing to the brain because of a blockage or a broken blood vessel. A symptoms that happen when experiencing stroke, some of them is a dropped consciousness, disrupted vision and paralyzed body. The general examination is being done to get a picture of the brain part that have stroke using Computerized Tomography (CT) Scan. The image produced from CT will be manually checked and need a proper lighting by doctor to get a type of stroke. That is why it needs a method to classify stroke from CT image automatically. A method proposed in this research is Convolutional Neural Network. CT image of the brain is used as the input for image processing. The stage before classification are image processing (Grayscaling, Scaling, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization, then the image being classified with Convolutional Neural Network. The result then showed that the method significantly conducted was able to be used as a tool to classify stroke disease in order to distinguish the type of stroke from CT image.

  7. Electrocardiography in Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio A.C. Garzon

    Full Text Available Conventional ECG still plays an important role in the overall knowledge of Chagas' cardiopathy, because of its importance in longitudinal and epidemiological studies, its diagnostic value, and its utility in prognostic evaluation. The authors discuss these aspects, as well as the use of ECG in the acute phase and the significance of a normal ECG in Chagas' disease. Correlations were made between ECG and hemodynamic/angiographic variables among 1010 patients with positive laboratory tests for Chagas' disease: a in the group with normal ECG there were no significant differences between symptomatic and non-symptomatic patients with regard to ejection fraction and angiographic abnormalities; b slight abnormalities on the ECG corresponded to an intermediate level of severity of the disease, that is, between normal ECG and ECG with significant abnormalities; c fibrosis on the ECG was not predictive of akinesia in the related area on the angiography; d combined ECG abnormalities generally correlated with greater myocardial compromise compared to isolated abnormalities; e under multiple regression analysis the ECG abnormalities that independently correlated with depressed ejection fraction were: premature ventricular beats, ventricular tachycardia, left bundle branch block, atrial fibrillation, complete AV block, and anterior and inferior fibrosis. Male sex, cardiac insufficiency and cardiomegaly on the thorax radiography were also significantly related.

  8. Self-reported stress and risk of stroke: the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Nielsen, Naja; Boysen, Gudrun

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Lay people often mention stress as one of the most important risk factors for stroke. Stress might trigger a cerebrovascular event directly or could be associated with higher levels of blood pressure or an unfavorable lifestyle. To examine these possibilities, we analyzed...... the association between self-reported stress frequency and intensity and risk of stroke. METHODS: Data from the second examination, 1981 to 1983, of participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study were analyzed with Cox regression after a mean of 13 years of follow-up. A total of 5604 men and 6970 women were...... included, and 929 first-ever strokes occurred, of which 207 (22%) were fatal within 28 days after onset of symptoms. The stress frequency categories were never/hardly ever, monthly, weekly, or daily. The stress intensity categories were never/hardly ever, light, moderate, or high. RESULTS: Subjects...

  9. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  10. Physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinger, Sandra A; Arena, Ross; Bernhardt, Julie; Eng, Janice J; Franklin, Barry A; Johnson, Cheryl Mortag; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Macko, Richard F; Mead, Gillian E; Roth, Elliot J; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Tang, Ada

    2014-08-01

    This scientific statement provides an overview of the evidence on physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors. Evidence suggests that stroke survivors experience physical deconditioning and lead sedentary lifestyles. Therefore, this updated scientific statement serves as an overall guide for practitioners to gain a better understanding of the benefits of physical activity and recommendations for prescribing exercise for stroke survivors across all stages of recovery. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, morbidity and mortality reports, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence and indicate gaps in current knowledge. Physical inactivity after stroke is highly prevalent. The assessed body of evidence clearly supports the use of exercise training (both aerobic and strength training) for stroke survivors. Exercise training improves functional capacity, the ability to perform activities of daily living, and quality of life, and it reduces the risk for subsequent cardiovascular events. Physical activity goals and exercise prescription for stroke survivors need to be customized for the individual to maximize long-term adherence. The recommendation from this writing group is that physical activity and exercise prescription should be incorporated into the management of stroke survivors. The promotion of physical activity in stroke survivors should emphasize low- to moderate-intensity aerobic activity, muscle-strengthening activity, reduction of sedentary behavior, and risk management for secondary prevention of stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement...

  12. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  13. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  14. Defining Optimal Brain Health in Adults: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B; Furie, Karen L; Iadecola, Costantino; Smith, Eric E; Waddy, Salina P; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Bae, Hee-Joon; Bauman, Mary Ann; Dichgans, Martin; Duncan, Pamela W; Girgus, Meighan; Howard, Virginia J; Lazar, Ronald M; Seshadri, Sudha; Testai, Fernando D; van Gaal, Stephen; Yaffe, Kristine; Wasiak, Hank; Zerna, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive function is an important component of aging and predicts quality of life, functional independence, and risk of institutionalization. Advances in our understanding of the role of cardiovascular risks have shown them to be closely associated with cognitive impairment and dementia. Because many cardiovascular risks are modifiable, it may be possible to maintain brain health and to prevent dementia in later life. The purpose of this American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association presidential advisory is to provide an initial definition of optimal brain health in adults and guidance on how to maintain brain health. We identify metrics to define optimal brain health in adults based on inclusion of factors that could be measured, monitored, and modified. From these practical considerations, we identified 7 metrics to define optimal brain health in adults that originated from AHA's Life's Simple 7: 4 ideal health behaviors (nonsmoking, physical activity at goal levels, healthy diet consistent with current guideline levels, and body mass index brain health but recognize that the truly ideal circumstance may be uncommon because there is a continuum of brain health as demonstrated by AHA's Life's Simple 7. Therefore, there is opportunity to improve brain health through primordial prevention and other interventions. Furthermore, although cardiovascular risks align well with brain health, we acknowledge that other factors differing from those related to cardiovascular health may drive cognitive health. Defining optimal brain health in adults and its maintenance is consistent with the AHA's Strategic Impact Goal to improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20% and to reduce deaths resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20% by the year 2020. This work in defining optimal brain health in adults serves to provide the AHA/American Stroke Association with a foundation for a new strategic direction going forward in cardiovascular health

  15. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario (HSFO) high blood pressure strategy's hypertension management initiative study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Lum-Kwong, Margaret Moy; Perkins, Nancy; Von Sychowski, Shirley; Sebaldt, Rolf J; Kiss, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Achieving control of hypertension prevents target organ damage at both the micro and macrovascular level and is a highly cost effective means of lowering the risk for heart attack and stroke particularly in people with diabetes. Clinical trials demonstrate that blood pressure control can be achieved in a large proportion of people. Translating this knowledge into widespread practice is the focus of the Hypertension Management Initiative, which began in 2004 with the goal o...

  17. Ischemic Stroke among the Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Who Were Undergoing Maintenance Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, San; Kwon, Seok-Beom; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Noh, Jung Woo; Lee, Young-Ki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In spite of higher incidence of stroke in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients compared to general population, the risk factor for stroke which is specific to ESRD is not fully understood. The ESRD patients who develop stroke may have certain additional risk factors compared to ESRD patients without stroke. We used registered data of Hallym Stroke Registry to elucidate the factors which affect development of ischemic stroke among the dialysis patients. Materials and Methods We recr...

  18. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  20. [Coronary heart disease: epidemiologic-genetic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, F H

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and the risk factors which predispose to it aggregate in families. How much of this clustering of disease is "explained" by the familial resemblance in predisposing factors? The published reports which bear on this question fall into six distinct study designs: prospective studies, persons at high or low risk or persons with and without a positive family history as points of departure, case-control studies, studies of patients who had a coronary angiogram and studies in different ethnic groups. The findings of the 16 investigations reviewed suggest that there are as yet unidentified factors - genetic, environmental or both - which are responsible for familial clustering of coronary heart disease, apart from the three main risk factors (serum lipids, blood pressure, smoking) and diabetes. Future research must put greater emphasis on studies of families rather than individuals and on closer collaboration between epidemiologists and geneticists, in order to fill these gaps in knowledge. It is likely that the individual predisposition to coronary heart disease is due in part to genetic influences which remain to be discovered in the course of such studies. They would help in identifying susceptible person in the population with greater precision than is now possible. The "high-risk strategy" of coronary heart disease prevention will become more efficient as more specific and sensitive tests of disease prediction are developed. In the meantime, preventive programmes must be put into action on the basis of what is already known, on the level of both the high-risk and the community-wide mass strategy.

  1. Coronary heart disease after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Zhanat A.; Land, Charles E.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Weinstock, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Griem, Melvin L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease after radiotherapy (RT) for peptic ulcer disease. Methods and materials: Peptic ulcer disease patients treated with RT (n = 1859) or by other means (n = 1860) at the University of Chicago Medical Center between 1936 and 1965, were followed through 1997. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with the expected numbers from the general population rates. During RT, 5% of the heart was in the treatment field and the remainder of the heart mostly received scattered radiation. A volume-weighted cardiac dose was computed to describe the average tissue dose to the entire organ. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to analyze the CHD and cerebrovascular disease risk associated with RT, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: Greater than expected CHD mortality was observed among the irradiated patients. The irradiated patients received volume-weighted cardiac doses ranging from 1.6 to 3.9 Gy and the portion of the heart directly in the field received doses of 7.6-18.4 Gy. The CHD risk increased with the cardiac dose (p trend = 0.01). The cerebrovascular disease risk was not associated with the surrogate carotid dose. Conclusion: The excess CHD risk in patients undergoing RT for peptic ulcer disease decades previously indicates the need for long-term follow-up for cardiovascular disease after chest RT

  2. Microbleeds, Mortality, and Stroke in Alzheimer Disease: The MISTRAL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedictus, Marije R; Prins, Niels D; Goos, Jeroen D C; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2015-05-01

    Microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared with the general elderly population. In addition, microbleeds have been found to predict mortality in AD. To investigate whether microbleeds in AD increase the risk for mortality, stroke (including intracerebral hemorrhage), and cardiovascular events. The MISTRAL (do MIcrobleeds predict STRoke in ALzheimer's disease) Study is a longitudinal cohort study within the memory clinic-based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. We selected all patients with AD with a baseline visit between January 2, 2002, and December 16, 2009, and microbleeds (n = 111) and matched those (1:2) for age, sex, and magnetic resonance imaging scanner to 222 patients with AD without microbleeds. After a minimal follow-up of 3 years, information on all-cause mortality, stroke-related mortality, and cardiovascular mortality was obtained between November 1, 2012, and May 1, 2014. In addition, we obtained information on the occurrence of incident stroke or transient ischemic attack, cardiovascular events, and nursing home admittance. Stroke-related mortality, incident stroke, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients had a mean (SD) age of 71.2 (7.8) years and 127 (42%) were female. Compared with having no microbleeds, microbleeds in lobar locations were associated with an increased risk for stroke-related mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 33.9; 95% CI, 2.5-461.7), whereas nonlobar microbleeds were associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR, 12.0; 95% CI, 3.2-44.7). In addition, lobar microbleeds were associated with an increased risk for incident stroke (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5-10.1) and nonlobar microbleeds with an increased risk for cardiovascular events (HR, 6.2; 95% CI, 1.5-25.0). Even higher risks for incident stroke and cardiovascular events were found in patients using antithrombotic medication. All 5 patients with an intracerebral hemorrhage had lobar microbleeds at baseline; 4 of them used antithrombotics

  3. Aroma and taste perceptions with Alzheimer disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliani, Michel; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Girgih, Abraham T; Pownall, Trisha L; Bugera, Jacqeline L; Eskin, Michael N A

    2013-01-01

    Chemosensory disorders of smell or taste in humans have been attributed to various physiological and environmental factors including aging and disease conditions. Aroma and taste greatly condition our food preference, selection and, consumption; the decreased appetite in patients with known neurodegenerative diseases may lead to dietary restrictions that could negatively impact nutritional and health status. The decline in olfactory and gustatory systems in patients with Alzheimer disease and various types of stroke are described.

  4. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela O.W. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. Methods: Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal, haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA, using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS® version 14.0. Results: Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p = 0.001 and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p = 0.044. The presence of α-thal (p = 0.196, the CAR haplotype (p = 0.543, and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD.

  5. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela O W; Ribeiro, Luiz C; Sudário, Lysla C; Teixeira, Maria T B; Martins, Marina L; Pittella, Anuska M O L; Junior, Irtis de O Fernandes

    To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal), haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS ® version 14.0. Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR) was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p=0.001) and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p=0.044). The presence of α-thal (p=0.196), the CAR haplotype (p=0.543), and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al......., Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 5:536–539, 2006; Sorensen et al., Pediatr Radiol 38:1314–1322, 2008). This chapter serves as an introduction to virtual surgery for patient-specific preoperative planning and teaching of cardiovascular anatomy and interventions for clinicians. The chapter is mainly based...

  7. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  8. False Heart Rate Feedback and the Perception of Heart Symptoms in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose It was

  9. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  10. Cardiac diseases as a risk factor for stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah; Ahmed, A.; Kentab, Amal Y.; A-Jarallah, Abdullah S.; Al-Saadi, Muslim M.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective was to ascertain the role of cardiac diseases as a risk factor for stroke in a cohort of Saudi children who were evaluated in a retrospective and prospective study. Children with cardiac diseases were identified from within a cohort of 104 Saudi children who presented with stroke. They were seen as inpatients in the Pediatric Wards or evaluated at the Outpatient Clinics of the Division of Pediatric Neurology (DPN), and the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). A comprehensive form for clinical, neuroimaging, neurophysiological and laboratory data retrieval was designed and completed for each patient. Cardiac evaluation included 12-lead ECG and serial echocardiograms. Cardiac catheterization and 24-hour ambulatory ECG (Holter) were conducted on clinical discretion. Cardiac diseases were the underlying risk factor for stroke in 6 (5.8%) of the 104 children (aged one month to 12 years). The patients (4males and 2 females) were evaluated at the DPN at a mean age of 5.3 years (range=1-8 years; median 6.5 years). Onset of stroke was at a mean age of 34 months (range= 4 months - 8 years; median = 30 months). Five patients had stroke in association with congenital heart disease (CHD), whereas the sixth had restrictive cardiomyopathy. The identified CHD consisted of membranous ventricular septal defect in a 5-year-old boy who had moyamoya syndrome and sickle cell b-thalassemia, asymptomatic patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in a 17-months-old girl, atrioventricular canal defect and PDA in an 8-year-old boy who also had Down syndrome, partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage in a one-year-old boy. The latter patient developed hemiparesis secondary to a septic embolus, which evolved into brain abscess involving the right fronto-preital region. This was successfully managed surgically

  11. Clinical and Imaging Features Associated with an Increased Risk of Late Stroke in Patients with Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, A R; Schroeder, T V; Sillesen, H

    2014-01-01

    /CAS. METHODS: Review of clinical and/or imaging based scoring systems, predictive algorithms and imaging parameters that may be associated with an increased (or decreased) risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid disease. RESULTS: Parameters associated with an increased risk of late stroke include...... intracranial disease. CONCLUSIONS: A number of imaging parameters have been shown to be predictive of an increased risk of late stroke in previously asymptomatic patients. None have been independently validated, but many could easily be evaluated in natural history studies or randomized trials in order......BACKGROUND: The 2011 American Heart Association Guidelines on the management of asymptomatic carotid disease recommends that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) (with carotid artery stenting (CAS) as an alternative) may be considered in highly selected patients with 70-99% stenoses. However, no guidance...

  12. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes.

  13. [Stress echo and valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, J L

    2005-06-01

    Stress echo has already been validated in some forms of valvular heart disease, especially in calcific aortic stenosis with low cardiac output and dynamic mitral regurgitation (MR) of valvular heart disease. Stress Doppler haemodynamics is a term used to differentiate these new indications from that of segmental wall analysis of the left atrium in ischaemic heart disease. In calcific aortic stenosis with low output, the haemodynamics with low dose dobutamine allows assessment of the real severity of the aortic stenosis and identification of the rare cases with mild stenosis: the principal indication remains the assessment of operative risk and long-term prognosis by the study of left ventricular contractile reserve. In cases of ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the presence of mild mitral regurgitation (regurgitant surface area >20 mm2 at rest) is a poor prognostic factor. The dynamic character of mitral regurgitation is related to left ventricular remodelling which leads to deformation of the valvular apparatus (mitral tenting). Dynamic mitral regurgitation (regurgitant orifice area >13 mm2 on exercise) is a powerful prognostic factor, the role of which has recently been demonstrated in the genesis of acute pulmonary oedema. the other indications of stress haemodynamics are under validation, mainly the assessment of exercise capacity and valvular compliance in mitral stenosis or asymptomatic aortic stenosis.

  14. [Sports in children with congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosser, Gilles; Moulin-Zinsch, Anne; Fischer-Atalla, Reem

    2017-05-01

    The practice of physical activity is one of the essential elements for health in general but also for the well-being and the quality of life. It is highly desirable to encourage physical activities in children with congenital heart diseases, taking into account all the benefits associated with this practice (quality of life, life expectancy) and this especially since these children often have limited capacity (due to their heart disease but also often by relative deconditioning). While there is a transient increase in risk of cardiac complications during intense activity, it would nevertheless be inappropriate to contra-indicate physical activities considering the well-known benefits in the medium and long term. The risks associated with the practice of physical activity must be assessed, on one hand, in terms of the severity of the heart disease, and on the other hand, on the nature and intensity of the activity. The stress test is here an essential tool because it helps to assess the physical capacity and cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise. The international recommendations for competitive sports generally give an appropriate advice for a specific situation but the practice of moderate activity or leisure sports which are highly desirable should not be neglected and be strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethnicity and Onset of Cardiovascular Disease: A CALIBER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease; Sudden Cardiac Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest

  16. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  17. The disease impact, health care management and cost of stroke in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers SMAA; Struijs JN; Ament AJHA; Genugten MML van; Jager JC; Bos GAM van den; Universiteit Maastricht; CZO

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is a major chronic disease with a high morbidity and mortality. In the Netherlands about 30,000 people a year suffer a stroke for the first time. One third of these stroke patients dies within the first year after stroke, and 41% of the survivors experience limitations in their daily

  18. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, AFib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Aug ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  19. Microbleeds, Mortality, and Stroke in Alzheimer Disease The MISTRAL Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedictus, M.R.; Prins, N.D.; Goos, J.D.C.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared with the general elderly population. In addition, microbleeds have been found to predict mortality in AD. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether microbleeds in AD increase the risk for mortality, stroke (including

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker for heart failure in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Matthew A; Puttgen, H Adrian; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Reich, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D

    2007-09-01

    To determine whether serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (N-BNP), a biomarker of myocardial wall stress, is specific to acute heart failure (HF) in patients hospitalized with stroke. Case-control study. Tertiary hospital, Neurosciences Critical Care Unit and Stroke Unit. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who were evaluated for HF. None. Cases and controls were classified, respectively, as patients with or without HF, defined according to modified Framingham criteria. Seventy-two patients were evaluated, 39 with ischemic stroke, 22 with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and 11 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Thirty-four patients (47%) met criteria for HF, and 47 patients (65%) had systolic or diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction on echocardiogram. Serum N-BNP was measured a median of 48 h following the onset of stroke and was increased (> 900 pg/ml) in 56 patients (78%), with higher levels in non-survivors (11898 +/- 12741 vs 4073 +/-5691; p = 0.001). In a multiple regression model, N-BNP elevation was not independently associated with HF (OR 5.4, 95% CI 0.8-36.0, p = 0.084). At a cut-off of 900 pg/ml, the sensitivity of N-BNP for HF was 94%, specificity 37%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 88%. For systolic or diastolic LV dysfunction, the sensitivity of N-BNP was 89%, specificity 44%, PPV 75%, and NPV 69%. These results demonstrate that N-BNP elevation is not specific to HF or LV dysfunction in patients with acute ischemic stroke, SAH, and ICH.

  1. Duration of ovarian hormone exposure and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Korean women: the Korean Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keum Ji; Kim, Mee-Ran; Yun, Young Duk; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Jee, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Although reproductive and hormonal factors, such as menarche and menopause, have been reported as independent risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), few studies have examined these factors in East Asian populations. In the Korean Heart Study, ASCVD risk related to duration of ovarian hormone exposure was examined in a cohort of 66,104 Korean women. Study members were recruited from participants of routine health examinations at health promotion centers across South Korea in 1996-2004. Ovarian hormone exposure was defined as duration between menarche and menopause. Incidence rates for ASCVD, stroke, and ischemic heart disease were examined in relation to ovarian hormone exposure. The mean duration of ovarian hormone exposure at study baseline was 33.7 years, and risk for ASCVD was negatively associated with duration. Women with shorter ovarian hormone exposure (hormone exposure (35-35 y). In similar comparison groups, women with ovarian hormone exposure shorter than 30 years were at increased risk for developing total stroke (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.00-1.38), thrombotic stroke (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.61), ischemic heart disease (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.19-1.63), and acute myocardial infarction (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.08-2.47). Our study provides further confirmation of increased cardiovascular risk with shorter reproductive years. Therefore, women with reduced lifetime ovarian hormone exposure should focus on minimizing ASCVD risk by lifestyle modifications such as smoking avoidance or increased physical activities.

  2. 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Ackerson, Teri; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Becker, Kyra; Biller, José; Brown, Michael; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Hoh, Brian; Jauch, Edward C; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Scott, Phillip A; Sheth, Kevin N; Southerland, Andrew M; Summers, Deborah V; Tirschwell, David L

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an up-to-date comprehensive set of recommendations for clinicians caring for adult patients with acute arterial ischemic stroke in a single document. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators. These guidelines supersede the 2013 guidelines and subsequent updates. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained. Members were not allowed to participate in discussions or to vote on topics relevant to their relations with industry. The members of the writing group unanimously approved all recommendations except when relations with industry precluded members voting. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 4 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. These guidelines use the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2015 Class of Recommendations and Levels of Evidence and the new American Heart Association guidelines format. These guidelines detail prehospital care, urgent and emergency evaluation and treatment with intravenous and intra-arterial therapies, and in-hospital management, including secondary prevention measures that are appropriately instituted within the first 2 weeks. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care in both the prehospital and hospital settings. These guidelines are based on the best evidence currently available. In many instances, however, only limited data exist demonstrating the urgent need for continued research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults with Moyamoya Disease: Prognostic Factors for Stroke Recurrence and Functional Outcome after Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Deng, Xiaofeng; Gao, Faliang; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Jizong

    2017-07-01

    Stroke in young adults is uncommon and rarely described. Moyamoya disease is one of the leading causes of stroke in young adults. We aimed to study the prognostic factors for stroke recurrences and functional outcomes in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease after revascularization. We reviewed 696 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease admitted to our hospital from 2009-2015 and identified patients aged 18-45 years with first-ever stroke. Follow-up was conducted via face-to-face or structured telephone interviews. Outcome measures were recurrent stroke events and unfavorable functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale >2). We included 121 young patients with moyamoya disease suffering from stroke (initial presentation age, 35.4 ± 7.5 years). All patients underwent revascularization after the acute phase of initial stroke events as the secondary prevention for recurrences. During follow-up (median, 40 months), 9 patients (7.4%) experienced recurrent strokes and 8 of them (6.6%) suffered unfavorable functional outcomes. In the multivariate analysis, diabetes was an independent predictor for stroke recurrences (hazard ratio 6.76; 95% confidence interval 1.30-35.11; P = 0.02) and was significantly associated with unfavorable functional outcomes (odds ratio 7.87; 95% confidence interval 1.42-38.74; P = 0.01). We identified diabetes as an independent risk factor for recurrent strokes and unfavorable functional outcomes after revascularization in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. THE ROLE OF GENE IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiya Begum1 , Syeda Zeba Hyder Zaidi2 , Nuha Rasheed3 and Abdul Saleem Mohammad 4

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 plays a key role in atherosclerosis and its complications. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels. Cardiovascular disease includes coronary artery diseases (CAD) such as angina and myocardial infarction (commonly known as a heart attack). Other CVDs include stroke, heart failure, hypertensive heart disease, rheumatic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, heart arrhythmia, congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, cardit...

  5. Stroke in Latin America: Burden of Disease and Opportunities for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avezum, Álvaro; Costa-Filho, Francisco F; Pieri, Alexandre; Martins, Sheila O; Marin-Neto, José A

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiological transition in Latin America toward older urban dwelling adults has led to the rise in cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in morbidity and mortality rates related to both stroke and myocardial infarction. As a result, there is an immediate need for effective actions resulting in better detection and control of cardiovascular risk factors that will ultimately reduce cardiovascular disease burden. Data from case-control studies have identified the following risk factors associated with stroke: hypertension; smoking; abdominal obesity; diet; physical activity; diabetes; alcohol intake; psychosocial factors; cardiac causes; and dyslipidemia. In addition to its high mortality, patients who survive after a stroke present quite frequently with marked physical and functional disability. Because stroke is the leading cause of death in most Latin American countries and also because it is a clearly preventable cause of death and disability, simple, affordable, and efficient strategies must be urgently implemented in Latin America. Copyright © 2015 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Occupational risk factors for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, J; Heinonen, O P

    1992-01-01

    To investigate possible associations between cardiovascular malformations and maternal occupational exposure to various factors during the first trimester of pregnancy, 406 cases and 756 controls were studied retrospectively. The cases were taken from all infants diagnosed with cardiovascular malformations born in Finland during 1982 and 1983. The controls were randomly selected from all normal births in the country during the same period. All mothers were interviewed approximately 3 months after delivery by a midwife, using a structured questionnaire. Maternal overall exposure to chemicals at work was more prevalent among the case group (35.8%) than the control group (26.2%, P less than 0.01). Among the specific chemical groups, maternal exposure to dyes, lacquers, or paints was significantly associated with the risk of congenital heart disease. Exposure to organic solvents during the first trimester seemed to increase to risk of ventricular septal defect (P less than 0.05). Work at video display terminals was slightly more prevalent among the case group (6.3%) than among the control group (5.0%). The mothers' education level, regular exposure to passive smoking at work, or temperature at the workplace were not risk factors for congenital heart disease in the offspring, neither was maternal exposure to microwave ovens, disinfectants, pesticides, or anesthetic gases. It is concluded that many maternal exposures at work seem not to have a teratogenic effect on the fetal heart, although the limited power of this investigation needs to be borne in mind.

  8. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years.

  9. Understanding the Role of Autoimmune Disorders on the Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-20

    Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Stroke; Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Venous Thrombosis; Transient Ischemic Attack; Stable Angina Pectoris; Unstable Angina; Heart Failure; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

  10. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  11. Genetics of Dyslipidemia and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Baliga, Ragavendra R

    2017-05-01

    Genetic dyslipidemias contribute to the prevalence of ischemic heart disease. The field of genetic dyslipidemias and their influence on atherosclerotic heart disease is rapidly developing and accumulating increasing evidence. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of knowledge in regard to inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias. The disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and elevated lipoprotein(a) will be detailed. Genetic technology has made rapid advancements, leading to new discoveries in inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias, which will be explored in this review, as well as a description of possible future developments. Increasing attention has come upon the genetic disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia and elevated lipoprotein(a). This review includes new knowledge of these disorders including description of these disorders, their method of diagnosis, their prevalence, their genetic underpinnings, and their effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. In addition, it discusses major advances in genetic technology, including the completion of the human genome sequence, next-generation sequencing, and genome-wide association studies. Also discussed are rare variant studies with specific genetic mechanisms involved in inherited dyslipidemias, such as in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) enzyme. The field of genetics of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease is rapidly growing, which will result in a bright future of novel mechanisms of action and new therapeutics.

  12. Large Mammalian Animal Models of Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Camacho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the biological complexity of the cardiovascular system, the animal model is an urgent pre-clinical need to advance our knowledge of cardiovascular disease and to explore new drugs to repair the damaged heart. Ideally, a model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, a biological representative of human disease, and ethically sound. Although a larger animal model is more expensive and difficult to manipulate, its genetic, structural, functional, and even disease similarities to humans make it an ideal model to first consider. This review presents the commonly-used large animals—dog, sheep, pig, and non-human primates—while the less-used other large animals—cows, horses—are excluded. The review attempts to introduce unique points for each species regarding its biological property, degrees of susceptibility to develop certain types of heart diseases, and methodology of induced conditions. For example, dogs barely develop myocardial infarction, while dilated cardiomyopathy is developed quite often. Based on the similarities of each species to the human, the model selection may first consider non-human primates—pig, sheep, then dog—but it also depends on other factors, for example, purposes, funding, ethics, and policy. We hope this review can serve as a basic outline of large animal models for cardiovascular researchers and clinicians.

  13. Chronic kidney disease in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Yuuko; Takahashi, Wakoh; Takizawa, Shunya; Kawada, Shiaki; Takagi, Shigeharu

    2012-10-01

    To examine the significance of renal dysfunction in patients who have sustained ischemic stroke, we examined the relationship between the renal function evaluated in terms of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the subtype of brain infarction (BI) in patients with ischemic stroke. A total of 639 patients with BI were enrolled in this study, with 314 subjects without stroke or transient ischemic attack registered as age-matched controls. eGFR was calculated according to the equation 194 × Cr(-1.094) × Age(-0.287) (-0.739 if female), where Cr is serum creatinine concentration, and was classified into four stages: stage I, eGFR ≥ 90 mL/min/1.73 m(2); stage II, eGFR 60 ~ 89 mL/min/1.73 m(2); stage III, eGFR 30 ~ 59 mL/min/1.73 m(2); and stage IV, eGFR stroke is frequently associated with renal dysfunction. Chronic kidney disease might be independent risk factor for infarction, especially for cardiogenic and atherosclerotic types. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Associations of coeliac disease with coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, K; Koskinen, O A; Agarwal, A; Tikkinen, K A O; Mäki, M; Kaukinen, K

    2015-09-01

    Clinical experience suggests that atherosclerotic disease is common in individuals with coeliac disease, but epidemiological studies have had contradicting findings. To summarise the currently available evidence, we systematically reviewed and analysed observational studies of the association of coeliac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis with coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke. We searched for studies comparing CHD or stroke outcomes with individuals with and without coeliac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis. Three investigators independently searched electronic databases, identified relevant studies and extracted data. Study-specific results were combined in random-effects meta-analyses, and heterogeneity was quantified using the I(2) statistic and meta-regression. Twenty-one studies were included in our systematic review and 18 in the meta-analyses. For CHD, the pooled hazard ratio for incident disease was 1.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.19) and the overall standardised mortality ratio was 1.21 (0.99, 1.49). For stroke and brain haemorrhage, the corresponding estimates were 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.21) and 1.43 (0.97, 2.10), respectively. There was moderate to considerable heterogeneity among the study-specific estimates. In addition, many estimates were based on small numbers of outcomes and they had limitations in terms of adjustment for potential confounders. Our meta-analyses lend some support to an association between coeliac disease and CHD or cerebrovascular disease, but the evidence base was heterogeneous and had limitations. Our systematic review highlighted a need in this area for adequately powered prospective studies with appropriate adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Major stroke in a 19-year-old patient with a univentricular heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riemann M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mads Riemann,1,2 Lars Idorn,3 Aase Wagner,4 Lars Søndergaard,3 Jørgen K Kanters1,21Department of Internal Medicine, Elsinore Hospital, Elsinore, Denmark; 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Section 2014, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Section 3023, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Patients with univentricular heart malformations are at increased risk of suffering from thromboembolic events. We present a case of a 19-year-old woman born with a univentricular heart who suffered a major stroke while being treated with only salicylic acid. At least 20% of patients with univentricular hearts have been reported to experience thromboembolic events, of which 25% are fatal. Despite the high incidence of thromboembolic events, no consensus has been reached regarding the role of long-term anti-thrombotic treatment in this group of patients. This lack of consensus warrants future studies that compare the different therapeutic strategies.Keywords: univentricle, stroke, antithrombotic treatment

  16. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  17. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD

  18. Echocardiographic patterns of juvenile rheumatic heart disease at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic heart disease seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital Heart Unit. Subjects: Patients aged 20 years and less with echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease.

  19. Cooperative Strategies to Develop Effective Stroke and Heart Attack Awareness Messages in Rural American Indian Communities, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C.; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S.; Harwell, Todd S.; Helgerson, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. Methods During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Results Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Conclusion Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities. PMID:23680509

  20. Cooperative strategies to develop effective stroke and heart attack awareness messages in rural american Indian communities, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie S; Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S; Harwell, Todd S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2013-05-16

    National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities.

  1. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars

    2015-01-01

    .62-1.80, respectively), and composite of death, MI, and ischaemic stroke, 95% CI HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.36-1.42; and HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.61-1.75, respectively). The greater long-term risks of PAD were seen for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Both women and men with incident PAD have greater long-term risks of total......AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Danish...

  2. Tea consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Si, Jiahui; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Ren, Xiaolan; Jiang, Ge; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Lv, Jun; Li, Liming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine the association between tea consumption and the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Methods Prospective study using the China Kadoorie Biobank; participants from 10 areas across China were enrolled during 2004–2008 and followed up until 31 December 2013. After excluding participants with cancer, heart disease and stroke at baseline, the present study included 199 293 men and 288 082 women aged 30–79 years at baseline. Information on IHD incidence was collected through disease registries and the new national health insurance databases. Results During a median follow-up of 7.2 years, we documented 24 665 (7.19 cases/1000 person-years) incident IHD cases and 3959 (1.13 cases/1000 person-years) major coronary events (MCEs). Tea consumption was associated with reduced risk of IHD and MCE. In the whole cohort, compared with participants who never consumed tea during the past 12 months, the multivariable-adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for less than daily and daily tea consumers were 0.97 (0.94 to 1.00) and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.95) for IHD, 0.92 (0.85 to 1.00) and 0.90 (0.82 to 0.99) for MCE. No linear trends in the HRs across the amount of tea were observed in daily consumers for IHD and MCE (PLinear >0.05). The inverse association between tea consumption and IHD was stronger in rural (PInteraction 0.006 for IHD, tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of IHD. PMID:28077466

  3. ESRD After Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, or Stroke in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charytan, David M; Solomon, Scott D; Ivanovich, Peter; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Cooper, Mark E; McGill, Janet B; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Parfrey, Patrick; Singh, Ajay K; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Levey, Andrew S; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; McMurray, John J V; Claggett, Brian; Lewis, Eldrin F; Pfeffer, Marc A

    2017-10-01

    How cardiovascular (CV) events affect progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), particularly in the setting of type 2 diabetes, remains uncertain. Observational study. 4,022 patients with type 2 diabetes, anemia, and chronic kidney disease from the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). Postrandomization CV events. ESRD (defined as initiation of dialysis for >30 days, kidney transplantation, or refusal or nonavailability of renal replacement therapy) and post-ESRD mortality within 30 days and during overall follow-up after an intercurrent CV event. Population limited to clinical trial participants with diabetes and anemia. 155 of 652 (23.8%) ESRD cases occurred after an intercurrent CV event; 110 (16.9%) cases followed heart failure, 28 (4.3%) followed myocardial infarction, 12 (1.84%) followed stroke, and 5 (0.77%) followed multiple CV events. ESRD rate was higher within 30 days in individuals with an intercurrent CV event compared with those without an intercurrent event (HR, 22.2; 95% CI, 17.0-29.0). Compared to no intercurrent CV events, relative risks for ESRD were higher after the occurrence of heart failure overall (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.7-4.2) and at 30 days (HR, 20.1; 95% CI, 14.5-27.9) than after myocardial infarction or stroke (Pfailure, are strongly associated with risk for ESRD. These findings underscore the need for kidney-specific therapies in addition to treatment of CV risk factors to lower ESRD incidence in diabetes. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate VLDL and their remnants, and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development; but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population, and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease. PMID:21527746

  5. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  6. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  7. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yavagal, S.T.; Deshpande, Niteen; Admane, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress a...

  8. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  9. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  10. Ventricular tachycardia in ischemic heart disease substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olujimi A. Ajijola

    2014-01-01

    This review will discuss the central role of the ischemic heart disease substrate in the development MMVT. Electrophysiologic characterization of the post-infarct myocardium using bipolar electrogram amplitudes to delineate scar border zones will be reviewed. Functional electrogram determinants of reentrant circuits such as isolated late potentials will be discussed. Strategies for catheter ablation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, including structural and functional targets will also be examined, as will the role of the epicardial mapping and ablation in the management of recurrent MMVT.

  11. RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND USE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To review risk factors for stroke and the use of echocardiography in its diagnosis. ... therapy. Several risk factors are shared between ischaemic heart disease and ischaemic stroke and these have been well documented. Stroke has .... history, physical examination, electrocardiography or chest.

  12. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  13. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: the PRECORIS score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, David; Song, Dongbeom; Yoo, Joonsang; Turc, Guillaume; Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Choi, Byoung Wook; Heo, Ji Hoe; Mas, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Identifying occult coronary artery stenosis may improve secondary prevention of stroke patients. The aim of this study was to derive and validate a simple score to predict severe occult coronary artery stenosis in stroke patients. We derived a score from a French hospital-based cohort of consecutive patients (n=300) who had an ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack and no previous history of coronary heart disease (Predicting Asymptomatic Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack [PRECORIS] score) and validated the score in a similar Korean cohort (n=1602). In both cohorts, severe coronary artery stenosis was defined by the presence of at least 1≥50% coronary artery stenosis as detected by 64-section CT coronary angiography. A 5-point score (Framingham Risk Score-predicted 10-year coronary heart disease risk [≥20%=3; 10-19%=1; disease or 3-vessel disease were considered (C-statistic=0.83 [0.74-0.92] and 0.70 [0.66-0.74] in derivation and validation cohorts, respectively). The prevalence of occult≥50% coronary artery stenosis and ≥50% left main trunk or 3-vessel disease increased gradually with the PRECORIS score, reaching 44.2% and 13.5% in derivation cohort and 49.8% and 12.8% in validation cohort in patients with a PRECORIS score≥4. The PRECORIS score can identify a population of stroke or transient ischemic attack patients with a high prevalence of occult severe coronary artery stenosis.

  15. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; McEvoy, John W

    2017-07-01

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological Stress, Inflammation, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Petra H; von Känel, Roland

    2017-09-20

    In this review, we summarize evidence on the risk factor psychological stress in the context of coronary heart disease (CHD) in humans and explore the role of inflammation as a potential underlying mechanism. While chronic stress increases the risk of incident CHD and poor cardiovascular prognosis, acute emotional stress can trigger acute CHD events in vulnerable patients. Evidence supporting a potential role for inflammation as a promising biological mechanism comes from population-based studies showing associations between chronic stress and increased inflammation. Similarly, experimental studies demonstrate acute stress-induced increases in inflammatory markers and suggest modulatory potential for pharmacological and biobehavioral interventions. So far, studies investigating patients with cardiovascular disease are few and the full sequence of events from stress to inflammation to CHD remains to be established. Psychological stress is an independent CHD risk factor associated with increased inflammation. Although promising, causality needs to be further explored.

  18. Alcohol and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're a heavy drinker, statistics show that cutting back can help reduce your stroke risk. Be ... and Heart Disease Healthy Eating • Healthy Eating Home • Nutrition AHA Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices ...

  19. American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Americans live with heart disease, stroke or a cardiovascular condition. Your donation will help us save and improve their lives with research, education and emergency care. Warning Signs If you or someone else is ...

  20. Short-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2,5 and PM10 and the risk of heart rhythm abnormalities and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kowalska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of epidemiological studies suggest a significant impact of ambient particulate matter air pollution (PM10 and PM2,5 on the health of the population. Increased level of these pollutants is connected with increased rate of daily mortality and hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases. Among analyzed health effects, heart arrhythmias and stroke are mentioned most frequently. The aim of the study was to present the current knowledge of potential influence of the exposure to fine particulate matter on the presence of arrhythmias and strokes. Subject literature review suggests, that there is a link between short-term exposure to fine dust and the occurrence of arrhythmias. Results of previous studies indicates that this exposure may lead to significant electrophysiological changes in heart, resulting in higher susceptibility to cardiac rhythm abnormalities. In case of stroke, a stronger correlation between number of hospitalizations and death cases and exposure to fine dust was seen for ischaemic stroke than for haemorhhagic stroke. In addition, a significantly more harmful impact of the exposure to ultra particles (particles of aerodynamic diameter below 2,5 μm has been confirmed. Among important mechanisms responsible for observed health impact of particulate matter there are: induction and intensification of inflammation, increased oxidative stress, increased autonomic nervous system activity, vasoconstriction, rheological changes and endothelial dysfunction. Among people of higher susceptibility to fine dust negative health impact are: elderly (over 65 years old, obese people, patients with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, patients with diabetes and those with coagulation disorders. For further improvement of general health status, actions aimed at reducing the risk associated with fine dust and at the same time at continuing studies to clarify the biological mechanisms explaining the influence of fine dust on human health

  1. Short-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2,5 and PM10) and the risk of heart rhythm abnormalities and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Małgorzata; Kocot, Krzysztof

    2016-09-28

    Results of epidemiological studies suggest a significant impact of ambient particulate matter air pollution (PM10 and PM2,5) on the health of the population. Increased level of these pollutants is connected with increased rate of daily mortality and hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases. Among analyzed health effects, heart arrhythmias and stroke are mentioned most frequently. The aim of the study was to present the current knowledge of potential influence of the exposure to fine particulate matter on the presence of arrhythmias and strokes. Subject literature review suggests, that there is a link between short-term exposure to fine dust and the occurrence of arrhythmias. Results of previous studies indicates that this exposure may lead to significant electrophysiological changes in heart, resulting in higher susceptibility to cardiac rhythm abnormalities. In case of stroke, a stronger correlation between number of hospitalizations and death cases and exposure to fine dust was seen for ischaemic stroke than for haemorhhagic stroke. In addition, a significantly more harmful impact of the exposure to ultra particles (particles of aerodynamic diameter below 2,5 μm) has been confirmed. Among important mechanisms responsible for observed health impact of particulate matter there are: induction and intensification of inflammation, increased oxidative stress, increased autonomic nervous system activity, vasoconstriction, rheological changes and endothelial dysfunction. Among people of higher susceptibility to fine dust negative health impact are: elderly (over 65 years old), obese people, patients with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, patients with diabetes and those with coagulation disorders. For further improvement of general health status, actions aimed at reducing the risk associated with fine dust and at the same time at continuing studies to clarify the biological mechanisms explaining the influence of fine dust on human health are necessary.

  2. Stroke volume estimation in heart failure patients using bioimpedance: a realistic simulation of the forward problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovsky, R E; Zlochiver, S; Abboud, S

    2008-01-01

    Bioimpedance techniques may be appropriate for cardiac stroke volume (SV) monitoring since thoracic anatomical changes during the heart contraction reflect on the conductivity distribution. In some bioimpedance techniques, the electrical potential is calculated from the impedance distribution using Poisson's equation. That is called the forward problem and in many applications it is used inherently in the solution of the inverse problem—finding the impedance distribution from the electrical potentials. In this work, the forward problem was simulated using a realistic 3D hybrid phantom of the human thorax. The cardiac cycle of normal patients and patients suffering from cardiogenic pulmonary edema was simulated, including the effect of pulmonary blood perfusion during heart contraction. The forward problem was found to be most sensitive to SV when current was injected from the right breast toward the left scapula (−0.021 µV ml −1 ). Our simulations show that both the heart volume and lung conductivity affect the developing voltage; therefore in SV estimation, the lung conductivity and heart volume should be jointly estimated

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has held a Red Dress runway event during Fashion Week in New York City. The event is ... African American and Hispanic women, in particular, have high rates of the major risk factors for heart ...

  4. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, Pcoronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Low stroke rate and few thrombo-embolic events after HeartMate II implantation under mild anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ares K; Götzenich, Andreas; Sassmannshausen, Helena; Haushofer, Marcus; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Spillner, Jan W

    2012-08-01

    Bleeding and thrombo-embolism are two of the most threatening adverse events associated with the use of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) in the treatment of severe heart failure. We analysed our LVAD patients treated with the HeartMate II (HM II) device by following a low anticoagulation regimen. Between 2008 and February 2011, we implanted 40 HM II LVADs in our institution. Intention to treat was bridge to transplant in 25, destination therapy in 9, bridge to candidacy in 5 cases and bridge to recovery in 1 case. Heparin was started only after 24 h postoperatively, and Phenprocumon (Phen) was started after removal of all chest drains. International normalized ratio (INR) target in the years 2008-2009 was 2.5, and 2.0-2.5 since 2010. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) was prescribed 50-100 mg/day only in patients <55 years or in case of severe atherosclerotic disease of the right coronary artery. All data were analysed consecutively concerning thrombo-embolic and bleeding events. Fifty-two percent of the patients were in INTERMACS level 1 or 2 at the time of implantation. The mean age was 58 ± 11 years, and the mean days under LVAD was 241 days (maximum: 1052 days). The survival rate was 87.5% after 30 years and 75% in the long term. Early postoperatively, no strokes or thrombo-embolic events occurred. In the long term, two patients suffered from ischaemic strokes, but recovered well. In both of these index events, the INR was lasting below 1.4. One of these two patients developed pump thrombosis additionally. Only three patients (ASA + Phen) developed gastrointestinal bleeding (7.5%). Two patients were withdrawn from Phen + ASA because of multiple angiodysplasia. Compared with the literature, even a mild anticoagulation protocol does not increase the risk of thrombotic events, but reduces bleeding events in the use of an HM II LVAD.

  6. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  7. Illness understanding in children and adolescents with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veldtman, G; Matley, S; Kendall, L; Quirk, J; Gibbs, J; Parsons, J; Hewison, J

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate illness knowledge and understanding in children and adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease, and whether the degree of understanding is related to age, sex, or complexity of the heart disease.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study.
SETTING—Tertiary paediatric cardiac centre.
METHODS—Patients' understanding of their congenital heart disease was assessed in a representative sample of volunteers aged between 7-18 years using semistructured interviews based upon Leventha...

  8. Illness understanding in children and adolescents with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veldtman, G R; Matley, S L; Kendall, L; Quirk, J; Gibbs, J L; Parsons, J M; Hewison, J

    2001-01-01

    Aims To evaluate illness knowledge and understanding in children and adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease and to assess whether the degree of understanding is related to age, sex, or complexity of the heart disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary pediatric cardiac center. Methods Patients' understanding of their congenital heart disease was assessed in a representative sample of volunteers aged between 7 and 18 years using semistructured interviews based o...

  9. Nocturnal breathing in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Sylvie; Lanfranchi, Paola; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore; Dore, Annie; Khairy, Paul; Marcotte, François; Mercier, Lise-Andrée

    2008-08-18

    Sleep disordered breathing is frequently observed in patients with cardiovascular disease. Even in the absence of heart disease, acute and chronic hypoxia have been shown to promote sleep-related periodic breathing with central apnea characterized by a repetitive reduction or lack of respiratory activity. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) is associated with chronic hypoxia, regardless of whether an increase in pulmonary artery pressures coexists. Sleep aggravated hypoxia has been observed in many such patients, but it remains to be determined whether sleep disordered breathing is contributory. We, therefore, sought to assess sleep-related breathing pattern in patients with CCHD. Adults with CCHD, resting arterial oxygen saturation 40% were prospectively enrolled in a cross-sectional study. To assess sleep and respiratory indices, subjects underwent a standardized clinical appraisal that included arterial blood gas analysis and a comprehensive sleep study with an ambulatory device. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >or=5/h was considered to indicate sleep apnea. Ten adults with CCHD, aged 38+/-11 years, completed the study. Seven patients had elevated pulmonary artery pressures, with a mean systolic pressure of 86.3+/-18.1 mm Hg. All patients demonstrated normal sleep parameters. Oxygen saturation further declined in 5 patients during sleep. However, no associated alteration in respiratory parameters was observed and no significant arrhythmia. The mean AHI was 1.1+/-1.0/h. No subject met the pre-defined criterion for sleep apnea. Although further oxygen desaturation may be observed during sleep in patients with CCHD, it occurs in the absence of sleep disordered breathing.

  10. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per m...

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Differences Characteristics Patients Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 with and without Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindara Citra Aquarista

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the third highest Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs, which causes death in Indonesia.The incidence of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus is high, 65% of people with diabetes mellitus die due to coronary heart disease and stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the characteristics of Diabetes mellitus type 2 in patients with and without coronary heart disease in Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. This research uses observational analysis with cross sectional study design. The subject of the study is the incidence of diabetes Mellitus type 2 with and without coronary heart disease with undergoing outpatient treatment at Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. The Samples were taken by fixed-disease sampling method with 42 people as the samples. The data analysis uses Chi Square test. The results show for the independent variables that have the most significant difference inHaji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016 is smoking behavior (p = 0.00; PR = 7.85; 95% CI = 2.09 to 29.50 and hypertension (p = 0,002; PR = 3.51; 95% CI = 1.42 to 8.67. In conclusion, the smoking behavior and hypertension can lead to complications of coronary heart disease for patients with type in Diabetes Mellitus type 2 in Haji General Hospital year 2016. It needs awareness to check blood pressure regularly and eliminate the smoking habit as the prevention of complications of coronary heart disease for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Keywords: diabetes mellitus type 2, coronary hearth disease.

  13. Acute Limb Ischemia and Outcomes With Vorapaxar in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: Results From the Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA2°P-TIMI 50).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaca, Marc P; Gutierrez, J Antonio; Creager, Mark A; Scirica, Benjamin M; Olin, Jeffrey; Murphy, Sabina A; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2016-03-08

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) are at heightened risk of acute limb ischemia (ALI), a morbid event that may result in limb loss. We investigated the causes, sequelae, and predictors of ALI in a contemporary population with symptomatic PAD and whether protease-activated receptor 1 antagonism with vorapaxar reduced ALI overall and by type. The Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in stable patients, including 3787 with symptomatic PAD. ALI was a prespecified adjudicated end point using a formal definition. A total of 150 ALI events occurred in 108 patients during follow-up (placebo 3-year rate, 3.9%; 1.3% annualized). For patients with symptomatic PAD, previous peripheral revascularization, smoking, and the ankle-brachial index were predictive of ALI. The majority of ALI events occurred as a result of surgical graft thrombosis (56%), followed by native vessel in situ thrombosis (27%). Stent thrombosis and thromboembolism caused ALI in 13% and 5%, respectively. Amputation occurred in 17.6% presenting with ALI. Vorapaxar reduced first ALI events by 41% (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.86; P=0.006) and total ALI events by 41% (94 versus 56 events; risk ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.93; P=0.022). The efficacy of vorapaxar was consistent across types of ALI. In selected patients with symptomatic PAD and without atrial fibrillation, ALI occurs at a rate of 1.3%/y, is most frequently caused by acute bypass graft thrombosis or in situ thrombosis of a diseased vessel, and often results in limb loss. Vorapaxar reduces ALI in patients with symptomatic PAD with consistency across type, including PAD resulting from surgical graft thrombosis and in-situ thrombosis. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00526474

  14. Burden and outcome of prevalent ischemic brain disease in a national acute stroke registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koton, Silvia; Tsabari, Rakefet; Molshazki, Noa; Kushnir, Moshe; Shaien, Radi; Eilam, Anda; Tanne, David

    2013-12-01

    Previous overt stroke and subclinical stroke are frequent in patients with stroke; yet, their clinical significance and effects on stroke outcome are not clear. We studied the burden and outcome after acute ischemic stroke by prevalent ischemic brain disease in a national registry of hospitalized patients with acute stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke in the National Acute Stroke Israeli prospective hospital-based registry (February to March 2004, March to April 2007, and April to May 2010) with information on previous overt stroke and subclinical stroke per computed tomography/MRI (n=3757) were included. Of them, a subsample (n=787) was followed up at 3 months. Logistic regression models were computed for outcomes in patients with prior overt stroke or subclinical stroke, compared with patients with first stroke, adjusting for age, sex, vascular risk factors, stroke severity, and clinical classification. Two-thirds of patients had a prior overt stroke or subclinical stroke. Death rates were similar for patients with and without prior stroke. Adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]) for disability were increased for patients with prior overt stroke (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03-1.66) and subclinical stroke (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.16-1.82). Relative odds of Barthel Index≤60 for patients with prior overt stroke (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.14-3.68) and with prior subclinical stroke (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15-3.64) were twice higher than for patients with a first stroke. ORs for dependency were significantly increased for patients with prior overt stroke (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.19-3.20) but not for those with subclinical stroke (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.84-2.19). In our national cohort of patients with acute ischemic stroke, nearly two thirds had a prior overt stroke or subclinical stroke. Risk of poor functional outcomes was increased for patients with prior stroke, both overt and subclinical.

  15. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  17. Association of Retinopathy and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities With Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alun D; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Witt, Nicholas; Wijetunge, Sumangali; Thom, Simon A McG; Tillin, Therese; Aldington, Steve J; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2016-11-01

    Abnormalities of the retinal circulation may be associated with cerebrovascular disease. We investigated associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and (1) strokes and subclinical cerebral infarcts and (2) cerebral white matter lesions in a UK-based triethnic population-based cohort. A total of 1185 participants (age, 68.8±6.1 years; 77% men) underwent retinal imaging and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral infarcts and white matter hyperintensities were identified on magnetic resonance imaging, retinopathy was graded, and retinal vessels were measured. Higher retinopathy grade (odds ratio [OR], 1.40 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.16-1.70]), narrower arteriolar diameter (OR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]), fewer symmetrical arteriolar bifurcations (OR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.95]), higher arteriolar optimality deviation (OR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.00-1.34]), and more tortuous venules (OR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.09-1.32]) were associated with strokes/infarcts and white matter hyperintensities. Associations with quantitative retinal microvascular measures were independent of retinopathy. Abnormalities of the retinal microvasculature are independently associated with stroke, cerebral infarcts, and white matter lesions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Causes and Predictors of Death in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Elizabeth Y; Dixson, Jeffrey; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Although the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States has increased during the past 25 years, cardiovascular mortality has decreased due to advances in CHD therapy and prevention. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with CHD who die from cardiovascular versus noncardiovascular causes and the causes and predictors of death, in a cohort of patients with CHD. The Heart and Soul Study enrolled 1,024 participants with stable CHD from 2000 to 2002 and followed them for 10 years. Causes of mortality were assigned based on detailed review of medical records, death certificates, and coroner reports by blinded adjudicators. During 7,680 person-years of follow-up, 401 participants died. Of these deaths, 42.4% were cardiovascular and 54.4% were noncardiovascular. Myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death accounted for 72% of cardiovascular deaths. Cancer, pneumonia, and sepsis accounted for 67% of noncardiovascular deaths. Independent predictors of cardiac mortality were older age, inducible ischemia on stress echocardiography, higher heart rate at rest, smoking, lower hemoglobin, and higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (all p values <0.05); independent predictors of noncardiac mortality included older age, inducible ischemia, higher heart rate, lower exercise capacity, and nonuse of statins (all p values <0.05). In conclusion, mortality in this cohort was more frequently due to noncardiovascular causes, and predictors of noncardiovascular mortality included factors traditionally associated with cardiovascular mortality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  20. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large...... genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering...

  1. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...... of antioxidant vitamins and CHD risk. DESIGN: A cohort study pooling 9 prospective studies that included information on intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids, and vitamin C and that met specific criteria was carried out. During a 10-y follow-up, 4647 major incident CHD events occurred in 293 172 subjects who were...... free of CHD at baseline. RESULTS: Dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins was only weakly related to a reduced CHD risk after adjustment for potential nondietary and dietary confounding factors. Compared with subjects in the lowest dietary intake quintiles for vitamins E and C, those in the highest...

  2. Chronic heart disease caused by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Matsuhashi, Hironobu; Nakano, Hiroshi; Honda, Hajime; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis was made of 5 patients who had chronic heart disease 18 months to 13 years after radiation therapy for breast cancer or rib osteoblastoma. A total dose of X-ray or electron beam was ≥50 Gy for each patient. Computed tomography of the chest and cardiac catheterization led to the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis with chronic pericardial effusion in one patient and chronic effusive pericarditis in the other three patients. Complete or incomplete right bundle branch block was observed on ECG in 3 patients. Endomyocardial biopsy of the right ventricle for 4 patients revealed nonspecific pathological findings, such as hypertrophy, disarray of cardiac muscle cells, various sized cell nuclei, rarefaction of myofibrils, and slight interstitial fibrosis with infrequent cellular infiltration. The results may implicate radiation-induced myocardial disturbance. Long-term follow-up is mandatory for the management of patients treated with radiation. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. In vino veritas: alcohol and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph A

    2005-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies, numbering nearly 100, have documented an inverse association between alcohol consumption and vascular risk. The preponderance of evidence supports an independent beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate alcoholic beverage consumption on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is important to remember that observational data cannot prove causation; unmeasured or incompletely controlled confounding factors cannot be excluded. That said, most authorities now attribute a causal role to the relationship: moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of CHD, and current research centers on the mechanistic underpinnings and whether patterns of drinking are important. Here, I review the association between alcohol use and CHD risk, explore putative mechanisms, and make recommendations.

  4. Genetics and Genomics of Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Samir; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect, and due to major advances in medical and surgical management, there are now more adults living with CHD than children. Until recently, the cause of the majority of CHD was unknown. Advances in genomic technologies have discovered the genetic etiology of a significant fraction of CHD, while at the same time pointing to remarkable complexity in CHD genetics. This review will focus on the evidence for genetic causes underlying CHD and discuss data supporting both monogenic and complex genetic mechanisms underlying CHD. The discoveries from CHD genetic studies draw attention to biological pathways that simultaneously open the door to a better understanding of cardiac development, and impact clinical care of CHD patients. Finally, we address clinical genetic evaluation of patients and families affected by CHD. PMID:28302740

  5. Imaging congenital heart disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, P J

    2011-12-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). The windows of access that are possible with transthoracic echocardiography are, however, rarely adequate for all regions of interest. The choice of further imaging depends on the clinical questions that remain to be addressed. The strengths of MRI include comprehensive access and coverage, providing imaging of all parts of the right ventricle, the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins and aorta. Cine images and velocity maps are acquired in specifically aligned planes, with stacks of cines or dynamic contrast angiography providing more comprehensive coverage. Tissues can be characterised if necessary, and MRI provides relatively accurate measurements of biventricular function and volume flow. These parameters are important in the assessment and follow-up of adults after repairs for tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries and after Fontan operations. The superior spatial resolution and rapid acquisition of CT are invaluable in selected situations, including the visualisation of anomalous coronary or aortopulmonary collateral arteries, the assessment of luminal patency after stenting and imaging in patients with pacemakers. Ionising radiation is, however, a concern in younger patients who may need repeated investigation. Adults with relatively complex conditions should ideally be imaged in a specialist ACHD centre, where dedicated echocardiographic and cardiovascular MRI services are a necessary facility. General radiologists should be aware of the nature and pathophysiology of congenital heart disease, and should be alert for previously undiagnosed cases presenting in adulthood, including cases of atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, patent ductus arteriosus, double-chambered right ventricle and congenitally corrected transposition.

  6. Risk of Nonfatal Stroke in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Comparison Between Disease Management Programs and Standard Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefarn, Stefan; Heumann, Christian; Rettelbach, Anja; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The present retrospective study examines the influence of disease management programs on nonfatal stroke in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Germany. The evaluation is based on retrospective patient data from the Disease Analyzer (IMS Health). The analysis included 169 414 T2DM patients aged 40 years and older with an initial prescription of antihyperglycemic therapy between January 2004 and December 2014. A total of 86 713 patients participated in a disease management program (DMP) for T2DM and 82 701 patients received standard care. The main outcome measure of this study was nonfatal stroke. Kaplan-Meier curves of DMP and SC patients were compared using log rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to provide an adjusted estimate of the DMP effect. It is apparent from the baseline characteristics that the general health of patients receiving standard care was poorer than that of patients participating in a DMP. The baseline HbA1c value was 7.6% in the DMP group and 7.8% in the SC group. Furthermore, the SC group had a higher proportion of preexisting conditions, such as coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral arterial occlusive disease (pAOD), and renal insufficiency. The proportion of patients who received insulin in first year therapy was higher in the SC group. Time to event analysis showed that DMP was associated with a delayed occurrence of stroke, because stroke occurred an average of 350 days later in DMP patients than in patients receiving SC (DMP: 1.216 days, RV: 866 days). The Cox model with covariable adjustment confirmed the significant association of DMPs with nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.69-0.74). The present study indicates that DMPs are positively associated with stroke. The possible reasons for this must be verified in further studies.

  7. Snoring Is Not Associated With All-Cause Mortality, Incident Cardiovascular Disease, or Stroke in the Busselton Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nathaniel S.; Wong, Keith K.H.; Cullen, Stewart R.J.; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To ascertain whether objectively measured snoring increases mortality, cardiovascular disease, or stroke risk over the effects of obstructive sleep apnea and other established risk factors. Design: Community-based cohort. Participants: 400 residents of the Western Australian town of Busselton. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea were quantified via the percentage of the night spent snoring and the respiratory disturbance index as measured by a single night recording in November-December 1990 by a home sleep apnea monitoring device (MESAM IV), along with a range of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Follow-up for deaths and cardiovascular hospitalizations was ascertained via record linkage until the end of 2007. Results: Our analytical sample of 380 people was made up of the 397 people for whom the authors had follow-up data, minus 17 people who reported a previous stroke or heart attack at baseline (n = 380/400 = 95% of cohort). Snoring was observed for a mean/median of 32.0/27.4% of the night (standard deviation = 23.9%; range = 0-97.2%). There were 46 deaths, 68 cardiovascular events, and 24 strokes during 17 yr of follow-up. Snoring as either a categoric or continuous variable was not significantly associated with death, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in both unadjusted Cox regression models and in models that adjusted for obstructive sleep apnea and other risk factors. Conclusions: No measure of snoring was associated with all-cause mortality, or incident cardiovascular disease or stroke over 17 yr in this community-based sample. Citation: Marshall NS; Wong KKH; Cullen SRJ; Knuiman MW; Grunstein RR. Snoring is not associated with all-cause mortality, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in the Busselton Health Study. SLEEP 2012;35(9):1235–1240. PMID:22942501

  8. Long-Term Outcome in Levothyroxine Treated Patients With Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Concomitant Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Nygaard; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Madsen, Jesper Clausager

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Subclinical hypothyroidism is a common condition that may lead to impaired cardiac function. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to examine the effects of levothyroxine treatment in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and heart disease. DESIGN: This was a register-based historical cohort...... study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The study was composed of Danish primary care patients and hospital outpatients age 18 years and older with established heart disease who were diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism in 1997-2011. Patients were stratified according to whether they claimed a subsequent...... myocardial infaction and stroke, and all-cause hospital admissions. RESULTS: Of 61 611 patients with a diagnosis of cardiac disease having their first time thyroid function testing, 1192 patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (mean age 73.6 [SD ± 13.3] y, 63.8% female) were included, of whom 136 (11...

  9. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  10. Association Between Acute Kidney Disease and Intravenous Dye Administration in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demel, Stacie L; Grossman, Aaron W; Khoury, Jane C; Moomaw, Charles J; Alwell, Kathleen; Kissela, Brett M; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Matthew L; Ferioli, Simona; Mackey, Jason; De Los Rios la Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Adeoye, Opeolu; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-04-01

    Computed tomographic angiography and conventional angiography provide timely vascular anatomic information in patients with stroke. However, iodinated contrast dye may cause acute kidney injury (AKI). Within a large, biracial population, we examined in-hospital incidence of new or worsening kidney disease in patients with stroke and its association with administration of intravenous dye. All adult residents of the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region with acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage who presented to an emergency department in 2010 were included. Prevalence of unsuspected kidney disease at the time of emergency department presentation and the incidence of AKI after admission in 2 groups of patients-those who did and those who did not receive intravenous dye-were determined. In 2010, 2299 patients met inclusion criteria (89% ischemic stroke and 11% intracerebral hemorrhage); mean age 69 years (SD 15), 22% black, and 54% women. Among these patients, 37% had kidney disease at baseline, including 22% (516/2299) in whom this was unsuspected. Two percent (2%; 15/853) of patients with baseline kidney disease developed AKI during the hospital stay. Of those with no baseline kidney disease, 1% (14/14 467) developed AKI. There was no association between dye administration and new or worsening kidney disease. Although 22% of patients in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky stroke population had unsuspected kidney disease, the incidence of new or worsening kidney disease was low, and AKI was not associated with dye administration. These findings confirm single-center reports that the risk of severe renal complications after contrast dye is small. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress Physical activity Quitting smoking Many lifestyle habits begin during childhood. Thus, parents and families should ...

  13. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to 6 times more likely to have a stroke. Heart disease and a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation ... if you smoke Or have diabetes, sickle cell disease, high cholesterol, or a family history of stroke. Dr. Galen Henderson, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and ...

  14. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005,...

  15. The trace elements in congenital cyanotic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Hegazi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Congenital cyanotic heart disease were associated with a highly significant decrease in the mean serum selenium and zinc levels, when compared with control group and non significant increase the mean serum copper levels. Changes in these trace elements suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial damage in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

  16. Heart Disease in Women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some research has found that if you had pregnancy complications such as high blood pressure or diabetes your children may also have an increased risk of heart disease in the future. Women with inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, may also have a higher risk of heart ...

  17. status, risk factors disease Socio-economic and coronary heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... status, risk factors disease. Socio-economic and coronary heart. The CORIS baseline study. J. E. ROSSOUW, P. L. JOOSTE, H. J. STEENKAMP, M. L. THOMPSON, ... and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease .... definition, was decided upon after exploration of their strength of association ...

  18. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  19. Heart disease among children with HIV/AIDS attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are very few published studies of heart disease in HIV infected children living in sub-Saharan Africa, a region with more than 50% of the world's population of HIV infected patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, and describe the type and clinical presentation of heart disease among children ...

  20. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublishe...

  1. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  2. Heart disease and gender in mass print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne

    2008-03-01

    Heart disease is a major cause of death, disease and disability in the developed world for both men and women. Nevertheless, the evidence suggests that women are under-diagnosed both because they fail to visit the doctor with relevant symptoms and because doctors tend to dismiss the seriousness of women's symptoms of heart disease. This study examines the way that popular mass print media present the possible links between gender and heart disease. The findings suggest that the 'usual candidates' for heart disease are considered to be high achieving and active men for whom the 'heart attack' is sometimes seen as a 'badge of honour' and a symbol of their success. In contrast, women are less often seen as likely to succumb, but they are portrayed as if they are and ought to be worried about their husbands. Women's own bodies are described as so problematic as to be perhaps useless to diagnose, because they are so difficult to understand and treat.

  3. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  4. Part 11: adult stroke: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Cucchiara, Brett; Adeoye, Opeolu; Meurer, William; Brice, Jane; Chan, Yvonne Yu-Feng; Gentile, Nina; Hazinski, Mary Fran

    2010-11-02

    Advances in stroke care will have the greatest effect on stroke outcome if care is delivered within a regional stroke system designed to improve both efficiency and effectiveness. The ultimate goal of stroke care is to minimize ongoing injury, emergently recanalize acute vascular occlusions, and begin secondary measures to maximize functional recovery. These efforts will provide stroke patients with the greatest opportunity for a return to previous quality of life and decrease the overall societal burden of stroke.

  5. Increased arterial stiffness in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Reiner, Barbara; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Objective Central systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a measure of arterial stiffness and strongly associated with atherosclerosis and end-organ damage. It is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality than peripheral SBP. In particular, for children with congenital heart disease, a higher central SBP might impose a greater threat of cardiac damage. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare central SBP in children with congenital heart disease and in healthy counterparts. Patients and methods Central SBP was measured using an oscillometric method in 417 children (38.9% girls, 13.0 ± 3.2 years) with various congenital heart diseases between July 2014 and February 2017. The test results were compared with a recent healthy reference cohort of 1466 children (49.5% girls, 12.9 ± 2.5 years). Results After correction for several covariates in a general linear model, central SBP of children with congenital heart disease was significantly increased (congenital heart disease: 102.1 ± 10.2 vs. healthy reference cohort: 100.4 ± 8.6, p congenital heart disease subgroups revealed higher central SBP in children with left heart obstructions (mean difference: 3.6 mmHg, p hearts after total cavopulmonary connection (mean difference: 2.1 mmHg, p = .015) compared with the reference. Conclusion Children with congenital heart disease have significantly higher central SBP compared with healthy peers, predisposing them to premature heart failure. Screening and long-term observations of central SBP in children with congenital heart disease seems warranted in order to evaluate the need for treatment.

  6. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nagib Gaui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective: To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast, from 1996 to 2011. Methods: Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results: Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions: Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  7. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes

  8. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  9. γ-Glutamyl Transferase as a Risk Factor for All-Cause or Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among 5912 Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Qiang; Cao, Jian-Lei; Zhao, Sheng-Jie; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Deng, Ai-Jun

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of the measurement of serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) concentrations at admission with 1-year all-cause or cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This prospective, multicenter cohort study was conducted in 4 stroke centers in China. Baseline GGT measurements were tested. The relationship of GGT to the risk of death from all-cause or CVD was examined among 1-year follow-up patients. We recorded results from 5912 patients with stroke. In those patients, 51.0% were men, and the median age was 61 years. In both men and women, high GGT was significantly associated with total mortality from all-cause or CVD ( P mortality from all-cause and CVD, respectively. With an area under the curve of 0.69 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.73), GGT showed a significantly greater discriminatory ability to predict all-cause mortality as compared with others factors. GGT improved the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (area under the curve of the combined model, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.78]; P mortality in patients with ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references

  11. Carcinoid Heart Disease without Severe Tricuspid Valve Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killu, Ammar M; Newman, Darrell B; Miranda, William R; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Pellikka, Patricia; Schaff, Hartzell V; Connolly, Heidi M

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid syndrome causes a rare form of acquired valvular heart disease which typically occurs in the setting of liver metastases. In carcinoid-induced valvular heart disease, the tricuspid valve is almost universally affected; left-sided valve disease occurs infrequently in affected patients. Herein, we report 2 cases of carcinoid-induced valvular heart disease; one case had no evidence of tricuspid valve involvement despite severe involvement of all other valves, while the other case was without severe tricuspid valve involvement. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Burden and impact of congenital syndromes and comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Isabelle; Padrutt, Maria; Bonassin, Francesca; Santos Lopes, Bruno; Gruner, Christiane; Stämpfli, Simon F; Oxenius, Angela; De Pasquale, Gabriella; Seeliger, Theresa; Lüscher, Thomas F; Attenhofer Jost, Christine; Greutmann, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to assess the overall burden of congenital syndromes and non-cardiac comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease and to assess their impact on circumstances of living and outcomes. Within a cohort of 1725 adults with congenital heart defects (65% defects of moderate or great complexity) followed at a single tertiary care center, congenital syndromes and comorbidities were identified by chart review. Their association with arrhythmias, circumstances of living and survival was analyzed. Within the study cohort, 232 patients (13%) had a genetic syndrome, 51% at least one comorbidity and 23% ≥2 comorbidities. Most prevalent comorbidities were systemic arterial hypertension (11%), thyroid dysfunction (9%), psychiatric disorders (9%), neurologic disorders (7%), chronic lung disease (7%), and previous stroke (6%). In contrast to higher congenital heart defect complexity, the presence of comorbidities had no impact on living circumstances but patients with comorbidities were less likely to work full-time. Atrial arrhythmias were more common among patients with moderate/great disease complexity and those with comorbidities but were less common among patients with congenital syndromes (pCongenital syndromes and comorbidities are highly prevalent in adults with congenital heart disease followed at specialist centers and add to the overall complexity of care. The presence of these additional factors has an impact on living circumstances, is associated with arrhythmias and needs to be further explored as prognostic markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Alcohol Consumption in the Aetiology of Different Cardiovascular Disease Phenotypes: a CALIBER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Chronic Stable Angina; Unstable Angina; Coronary Heart Disease Not Otherwise Specified; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Heart Failure; Ventricular Arrhythmias; Cardiac Arrest; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Ischaemic Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhagic Stroke; Intracerebral Haemorrhagic Stroke; Stroke Not Otherwise Specified; Sudden Cardiac Death; Unheralded Coronary Death; Mortality; Coronary Heart Disease (CHD); Cardiovascular Disease (CVD); Fatal Cardiovascular Disease (Fatal CVD); ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI); Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (nSTEMI); Myocardial Infarction Not Otherwise Specified (MI NOS)

  14. Galectin-3: an emerging biomarker in stroke and cerebrovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, A; Hardas, S; Patel, N; Singh Bajaj, N; Arora, G; Arora, P

    2018-02-01

    The carbohydrate-binding molecule galectin-3 has garnered significant attention recently as a biomarker for various conditions ranging from cardiac disease to obesity. Although there have been several recent studies investigating its role in stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases, awareness of this emerging biomarker in the wider neurology community is limited. We performed a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL, Clinicaltrials.gov and the Cochrane library in November and December 2016 for articles related to galectin-3 and cerebrovascular disease. We included both human and pre-clinical studies in order to provide a comprehensive view of the state of the literature on this topic. The majority of the relevant literature focuses on stroke, cerebral ischemia and atherosclerosis, but some recent attention has also been devoted to intracranial and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Higher blood levels of galectin-3 correlate with worse outcomes in atherosclerotic disease as well as in intracranial and subarachnoid hemorrhage in human studies. However, experimental evidence supporting the role of galectin-3 in these phenotypes is not as robust. It is likely that the role of galectin-3 in the inflammatory cascade within the central nervous system following injury is responsible for many of its effects, but its varied physiological functions and multiple sites of expression mean that it may have different effects depending on the nature of the disease condition and the time since injury. In summary, experimental and human research raises the possibility that galectin-3, which is closely linked to the inflammatory cascade, could be of value as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target in cerebrovascular disease. © 2017 EAN.

  15. Prevention and management of stroke in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kilinç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sickle Cell Disease(SCD is one of the most common hemoglobinopathies in the world which causes stroke. The management of stroke depends on the manifestations and the age of the patient. Especially in childhood, anatomic and physiological abnormalities of CNS may be a predisposing factors. Stroke mostly affects the distal segments of the Internal Carotid Artery, but also middle and anterior segments of the cerebral arteries are involved. The most important predisposing factors are the arterial malformations, stenosis and obstructions in cranial arteries, generally involving Internal Carotid Artery, frequently Proximal Middle Cerebral or Anterior Cerebral Arteries. After infarcts at brain vessels, most frequent clinical findings are hemiparesis or hemiplegia, impaired speech, focal seizures, gait disturbances. Risk factors for predisposing stroke are prior transient ischemia, baseline Hb decrease, acute chest sydrome within previous two weeks, systolic blood pressure rises, leucocyte increases. The patient with silent stroke or transient ischemic attacks may be asymptomatic or without neurological symptoms. Neuroimaging abnormalities may be seen without significant clinical findings in children with SCD. We talk about silent stroke if there are neuroradiological abnormalities without clinical findings. Children with silent strokes are more prone to new strokes. If there is a significant stroke a ischemic stroke often present with focal neurological signs and symptoms. If patient is asymptomatic or have suspected stroke, first step may be performance of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD. Children with time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV, measured in Middle Carotid Artery or in distal internal carotid Artery abnormally elevated, defined as TAMV≥200cm/sec, have sixfold increase for stroke than those with normal TAMV≤170cm/sec. For these patients under the risk of stroke, chronic blood transfusion is recommended for prevention of primary

  16. Ischemic stroke related to intracranial branch atheromatous disease and comparison with large and small artery diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, May Wai-Mei; Mak, Windsor; Cheung, Raymond Tak-Fai; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2011-04-15

    The mechanism of ischemic stroke in intracranial branch atheromatous disease (BAD) is different from large artery atherothrombotic disease (LAD) or lacunar infarction (LACI). The concept of BAD is underused in clinical practice and research. Patients admitted over 24-months with ischemic stroke caused by atherosclerotic disease were reviewed retrospectively and classified according to radiological±clinical criteria into LAD, BAD and LACI. The BAD cases were further divided into 5 BAD syndromes. Clinical characteristics, vascular risk factors, results of vascular workup and outcome among these subgroups were compared. 123 cases of LAD (17% of all stroke patients or 33% of all studied patients), 147 BAD (20% or 40%) and 102 LACI (14% or 27%) presented during the study period. Compared to LAD, BAD patients had milder neurological deficits, were less often diabetic and carotid stenosis was less common, while stenosis of the intracranial arteries was more frequent in BAD as compared with LACI patients. Outcome in BAD patients was intermediate between LAD and LACI. Comparisons among the BAD syndromes indicated they were homogenous conditions. BAD is the most prevalent ischemic stroke subtype in our cohort. The homogeneity among the BAD syndromes suggests they might represent a distinctive stroke entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  18. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Coronary heart disease: dietary links and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, S; Lanzmann-Petithory, D

    2001-04-01

    For decades it has been postulated that the main environmental factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) was the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Nevertheless, confirmation of the role of SFA in CHD through intervention trials has been disappointing. It was only when the diet was enriched in n-3 fatty acids that CHD was significantly prevented, especially cardiac death. In addition to n-3 fatty acids, many other foodstuffs or nutrients such as fibers, antioxidants, folic acid, calcium and even alcohol contribute to prevent CHD. Thus the relationship between diet and CHD morbidity and mortality appears to be much more complex than formerly suspected considering as key factors only SFA, linoleic acid, cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Some of the mechanisms are briefly described, but many additional nutrients (or non nutrients) may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. Finally, as a result of the most recent epidemiologic studies the ideal diet may comprise: 8% energy from SFA, 5% from polyunsaturated fatty acids with a ratio 5/1 of linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid+longer chains n-3, oleic acid as desired, large intake of cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits, fish twice a week, cheese and yogurt as dairy products, rapeseed and olive oils as edible fat. Without side effects, such a diet can be highly palatable, easily enjoyed by many populations and may prevent effectively and rapidly (within a few weeks or months) CHD.

  20. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Zakirova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. Endothelial vasodilating function was assessed by endothelium-dependent (EDVD and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDVD of brachial artery. Vasoconstrictive function was assessed by the level of endothelin (ET-1. Endothelial adhesive function was evaluated by plasma concentration of intracellular adhesion molecules – JCAM-1, VCAM-1 and Е-selectin.Results. Normal EDVD and EIDVD were observed in patients with AP of FC-II. The more severe FC of AP the more prominent endothelial vasodilating dysfunction was revealed as well as the higher levels of ET-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules. Patients with AP of FC-IV had hyperexpression of JCAM-1, VCAM-1, Е-selectin and ET-1 and low levels of EDVD and EIDVD.Conclusion. Progression of IHD related with growing endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction.

  1. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Coelho Molck

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS. Methods: 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA. Results: Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300 kb were identified in 10% (8/78 of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993 kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706 kb duplication in 2p22.3. Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. Conclusion: These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD.

  2. Parental overprotection and heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lephuong; Nolan, Robert P; Irvine, Jane; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2011-09-01

    The care of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging from a mental health perspective, as these patients continue to face a variety of biopsychosocial issues that may impact emotional functioning. Despite these issues, there are limited data on the psychosocial functioning of adults with CHD, and there are no data on the impact of parental overprotection on heart-focused anxiety in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between patient recollections of parental overprotection and current heart-focused anxiety in adults with CHD. A cross-sectional sample of 190 adult patients with CHD (51% male; mean age = 32.28, SD = 11.86 years) completed validated measures of perceived parental overprotection (Parental Bonding Instrument) and heart-focused anxiety (Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire). The results indicated that perceived parental overprotection (β = 0.19, p = 0.02) and heart defect complexity (β = 0.17, p = 0.03) were significantly related to heart-focused anxiety. Contrary to hypotheses, perceived parental overprotection did not vary as a function of heart defect complexity (F (2, 169) = 0.02, p = 0.98). Perceived parental overprotection and heart defect complexity are associated with heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease. These results can inform the development of clinical interventions aimed at improving the psychosocial adjustment of this patient population.

  3. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short......-time electrocardiography is seen in dogs with heart failure (HF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease severity at early stages of MMVD. The aims of this study were 1) to associate HR and HRV with severity of MMVD in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS...

  4. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  5. Parental reactions to children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, A; Benson, R S; Ivler, L; Patton, C

    1978-01-01

    Informal discussions with 260 families of children with congenital heart disease are reported. Parents raised questions concerning etiology, timing of the diagnosis, pathophysiology and symptomatology, and need for restriction. Depending upon the stage and seriousness of the disease, common parental behavior was observed. A psychological process similar to mourning is required at the time of diagnosis and at the time of corrective surgery in order to promote the family's adaptation to the child with congenital heart disease. Management suggestions are included.

  6. Baseline Depressive Symptoms Predict Subsequent Heart Disease; A 20-Year Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moghani Lankarani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is common among patients with heart disease. Depression is also associated with worse outcomes among patients with heart disease. Fewer studies have shown whether or not baseline depressive symptoms predict subsequent heart disease in general population.

  7. Comparative assessment of the diets of healthy individuals, subjects with preclinical coronary heart disease and patients with severe heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, D.M.; Eganyan, R.A.; Kovaleva, O.F.; Zhidko, N.I.; Danielov, G.Eh.; Rozhnov, A.V.; Shcherbakova, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    92 males aged 26 to 55 (28 healthy individuals, 45 persons with preclinical coronary heart disease and 19 patients with functional class 1-2 coronary heart disease) were examined to study the peculiarities and dietary patterns of persons with a high physical working capacity and having no typical clinical signs of the disease. All persons were subjected to a complex examination which included questionnarire, myocardial scintigraphy with 201 Tl at a maximum physical loading, echocardiography, coronaroangiography. Certain dietary peculiarities are established in persons with preclinical coronary heart disease

  8. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. State of the Art Coronary Heart Disease Risk Estimation based on the Framingham Heart Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Tomečková, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2005), s. 180-186 ISSN 0022-1732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Framingham heart study * coronary heart disease * risk validation study * calibration * discrimination Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  10. Stress-induced heart symptoms and perceptual biases in patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study is to clarify whether biased symptom perception towards heart symptoms may explain a reduced quality of life in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD). The present study tested the hypothesis that the combination of ConHD and high trait anxiety

  11. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Andersen

    2016-06-01

    To conclude, existing studies do not support the use of RAAS inhibitory treatments in right heart failure due to congenital heart disease but contain important limitations. Hence, there is a need for new well-designed trials including higher numbers of patients and validated endpoints to optimize and guide future treatment of this patient group.

  12. A heart-healthy and "stroke-free" world through policy development, systems change, and environmental supports: a 2020 vision for sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, George A

    2003-01-01

    The vision of a heart-healthy and "stroke-free" world is achievable through the aggressive prevention and control of cardiovascular risk factors. In sub-Saharan Africa, a region plagued by infectious and parasitic diseases, nutritional deficiencies, and excessive maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and risk factors is rarely on the public health agenda. In Africa, however, as recently documented by the World Health Organization's Africa Regional Office, CVD and other chronic non-communicable diseases are on the increase and already represent a significant burden on public health services. Age-specific mortality and morbidity associated with CVD and chronic diseases are higher in sub-Saharan Africa than in established market economies. Correspondingly, adverse trends in risk factor profile are beginning to appear especially in many urban centers in sub-Saharan Africa. Addressing and reversing these trends will take more than just targeting individuals and their behaviors and lifestyle choices. More importantly, to support heart-healthy choices, emphasis must be placed on policy development, systems changes, and issues in the social environment factors such as the need to strengthen legislation and regulatory mechanisms, which control the leading risk factors (eg, tobacco, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition). We must develop and conduct heart-healthy and "stroke-free" initiatives to take place in diverse community settings: schools, worksites, communities, and healthcare systems. In addition, public health capacity and infrastructure must be strengthened to provide adequate surveillance and the assurance that best practices are implemented. Action is needed to integrate health promotion, risk factor control and disease prevention within the primary healthcare setting. Above all, population-based approaches must be used to promote education and awareness of the importance of CVD risk factors. In sub

  13. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias : A consensus document fromthe European Heart RhythmAssociation (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart RhythmSociety (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart RhythmSociety (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLEACE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S.; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S.; Steffel, Jan; Marin, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Marcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S.; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both

  14. Poststroke Depression: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Ovbiagele, Bruce; El Husseini, Nada; Hackett, Maree L; Jorge, Ricardo E; Kissela, Brett M; Mitchell, Pamela H; Skolarus, Lesli E; Whooley, Mary A; Williams, Linda S

    2017-02-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is common, affecting approximately one third of stroke survivors at any one time after stroke. Individuals with PSD are at a higher risk for suboptimal recovery, recurrent vascular events, poor quality of life, and mortality. Although PSD is prevalent, uncertainty remains regarding predisposing risk factors and optimal strategies for prevention and treatment. This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on the topic of PSD. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. Members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise and reviewed appropriate literature, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, and expert opinion. This multispecialty statement provides a comprehensive review of the current evidence and gaps in current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, management, and prevention of PSD, and provides implications for clinical practice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Prevalence of Fabry disease in young patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Véronique; Moore, David F; Gioia, Laura C; Saposnik, Gustavo; Selchen, Daniel; Lanthier, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    A German study diagnosed 4% of young cryptogenic ischemic stroke patients with Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GAL-A) gene resulting in an accumulation of glycosphingolipids. A lower prevalence was found in other geographic regions. To determine the prevalence of Fabry disease in a Canadian population of young cryptogenic ischemic stroke patients. Patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke at age 16-55 were retrospectively identified in our institutional stroke database and underwent a focused clinical evaluation. We sequenced the α-GAL-A gene and measured the levels of blood globotriaosylsphingosine in subjects with mutations of undetermined pathogenicity. Fabry disease was diagnosed in patients with pathogenic mutations or increased levels of blood globotriaosylsphingosine. Ninety-three of 100 study subjects had normal α-GAL-A gene polymorphisms. Seven had mutations of undetermined pathogenicity, including one with increased globotriaosylsphingosine (prevalence, 1%; 95% confidence interval, ischemic stroke presentation as the first clinical manifestation of Fabry disease. Both Fabry patients experienced recurrent ischemic stroke. Fabry disease accounts for a small proportion of young Canadians with cryptogenic ischemic stroke. Identification of Fabry biomarkers remains a research priority to delineate stroke patients disserving routine screening. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  17. Congenital and Acquired Valvular Heart Disease in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sarah A; Ward, Cary C

    2017-08-24

    The number of pregnancies complicated by valvular heart disease is increasing. This review describes the hemodynamic effects of clinically important valvular abnormalities during pregnancy and reviews current guideline-driven management strategies. Valvular heart disease in women of childbearing age is most commonly caused by congenital abnormalities and rheumatic heart disease. Regurgitant lesions are well tolerated, while stenotic lesions are associated with a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications. Management of symptomatic disease during pregnancy is primarily medical, with percutaneous interventions considered for refractory symptoms. Most guidelines addressing the management of valvular heart disease during pregnancy are based on case reports and observational studies. Additional investigation is required to further advance the care of this growing patient population.

  18. Guidelines for Adult Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstein, Carolee J; Stein, Joel; Arena, Ross; Bates, Barbara; Cherney, Leora R; Cramer, Steven C; Deruyter, Frank; Eng, Janice J; Fisher, Beth; Harvey, Richard L; Lang, Catherine E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Pugh, Sue; Reeves, Mathew J; Richards, Lorie G; Stiers, William; Zorowitz, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a synopsis of best clinical practices in the rehabilitative care of adults recovering from stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The panel reviewed relevant articles on adults using computerized searches of the medical literature through 2014. The evidence is organized within the context of the AHA framework and is classified according to the joint AHA/American College of Cardiology and supplementary AHA methods of classifying the level of certainty and the class and level of evidence. The document underwent extensive AHA internal and external peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Stroke rehabilitation requires a sustained and coordinated effort from a large team, including the patient and his or her goals, family and friends, other caregivers (eg, personal care attendants), physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, recreation therapists, psychologists, nutritionists, social workers, and others. Communication and coordination among these team members are paramount in maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of rehabilitation and underlie this entire guideline. Without communication and coordination, isolated efforts to rehabilitate the stroke survivor are unlikely to achieve their full potential. As systems of care evolve in response to healthcare reform efforts, postacute care and rehabilitation are often considered a costly area of care to be trimmed but without recognition of their clinical impact and ability to reduce the risk of downstream medical morbidity resulting from

  19. Serum zinc values in children with congenital heart disease | Sadoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Some children with congenital heart diseases (CHD) may have increased pulmonary blood flow that causes recurrent bronchopneumonia and congestive heart failure. Serum zinc is reduced in children with pneumonia and patients on diuretics. Objective: To evaluate the serum zinc level of children with CHD ...

  20. Carcinoid heart disease: two clinical cases and a review | Weinreich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and quality of life for patients with carcinoid heart disease. Therapy includes somatostatin analogues and treatment for heart failure, removal of primary or metastatic tumour deposits, valve replacement in the presence of valvular involvement, and radioisotopes therapy. Keywords: carcinoid, cardiac involvement, treatment ...