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Sample records for stroke diminishes gas

  1. Neutralization of the IL-17 axis diminishes neutrophil invasion and protects from ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Weymar, Anna; Bernreuther, Christian; Velden, Joachim; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Steinbach, Karin; Orthey, Ellen; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Leypoldt, Frank; Simova, Olga; Thom, Vivien; Friese, Manuel A; Prinz, Immo; Hölscher, Christoph; Glatzel, Markus; Korn, Thomas; Gerloff, Christian; Tolosa, Eva; Magnus, Tim

    2012-11-01

    The devastating effect of ischemic stroke is attenuated in mice lacking conventional and unconventional T cells, suggesting that inflammation enhances tissue damage in cerebral ischemia. We explored the functional role of αβ and γδ T cells in a murine model of stroke and distinguished 2 different T cell-dependent proinflammatory pathways in ischemia-reperfusion injury. IFN-γ produced by CD4(+) T cells induced TNF-α production in macrophages, whereas IL-17A secreted by γδ T cells led to neutrophil recruitment. The synergistic effect of TNF-α and IL-17A on astrocytes resulted in enhanced secretion of CXCL-1, a neutrophil chemoattractant. Application of an IL-17A-blocking antibody within 3 hours after stroke induction decreased infarct size and improved neurologic outcome in the murine model. In autoptic brain tissue of patients who had a stroke, we detected IL-17A-positive lymphocytes, suggesting that this aspect of the inflammatory cascade is also relevant in the human brain. We propose that selective targeting of IL-17A signaling might provide a new therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke.

  2. Papers of the Canadian Institute's forum on natural gas purchasing strategies : critical information for natural gas consumers in a time of diminishing natural gas supplies and higher prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This conference provided insight into how to prosper in an increasingly complex natural gas marketplace. The presentations from key industry players offered valuable information on natural gas purchasing strategies that are working in the current volatile price environment. Diminishing natural gas supplies in North America mean that higher prices and volatility will continue. Other market challenges stem from potential cost increases in gas transportation, unbundling of natural gas services, and the changing energy marketing environment. The main factors that will affect prices for the winter of 2004 were outlined along with risk management and the best pricing strategies for businesses. The key strategies for managing the risks associated with natural gas purchase contracts were also reviewed, along with the issue of converging natural gas and electricity markets and the impact on energy consumers. The conference featured 15 presentations, of which 4 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  3. The Tracer Gas Method of Determining the Charging Efficiency of Two-stroke-cycle Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, P H; Deluca, Frank, Jr

    1942-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed for determining the scavenging efficiency or the charging efficiency of two-stroke-cycle engines. The method consists of introducing a suitable tracer gas into the inlet air of the running engine and measuring chemically its concentration both in the inlet and exhaust gas. Monomethylamine CH(sub 3)NH(sub 2) was found suitable for the purpose as it burns almost completely during combustion, whereas the "short-circuited" portion does not burn at all and can be determined quantitatively in the exhaust. The method was tested both on four-stroke and on two-stroke engines and is considered accurate within 1 percent.

  4. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  5. Laser-induced breakdown ignition in a gas fed two-stroke engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E. Y.; Pasechnikov, N. A.; Telekh, V. D.

    2018-01-01

    Laser-induced ignition for internal combustion engines is investigated intensively after demonstration of a compact ‘laser plug’ possibility. Laser spark benefits as compared to traditional spark plugs are higher compression rate, and possibility of almost any fuel ignition, so lean mixtures burning with lower temperatures could reduce harmful exhausts (NO x , CH, etc). No need in electrode and possibility for multi-point, linear or circular ignition can make combustion even more effective. Laser induced combustion wave appears faster and is more stable in time, than electric one, so can be used for ramjets, chemical thrusters, and gas turbines. To the best of our knowledge, we have performed laser spark ignition of a gas fed two-stroke engine for the first time. Combustion temperature and pressure, exhaust composition, ignition timing were investigated at laser and compared to a regular electric spark ignition in a two-stroke model engine. Presented results show possibility for improvement of two-stroke engines performance, in terms of rotation rate increase and NO x emission reduction. Such compact engines using locally mined fuel could be highly demanded in remote Arctic areas.

  6. Myocardial infarction, acute ischemic stroke, and hyperglycemia triggered by acute chlorine gas inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Ataman; Kose, Beril; Açikalin, Ayça; Gunay, Nurullah; Yildirim, Cuma

    2009-10-01

    Chlorine is one of the most common substances involved in toxic inhalation. Until now, several accidental exposures have been reported. The damage to the respiratory tract in the immediate phase after exposure to chlorine is well defined. Death occurs particularly due to pulmonary edema with respiratory failure and circulatory collapse. On the other hand, no association with myocardial infarction, acute stroke, severe hyperglycemia, and acute chlorine inhalation has been reported in literature. In the present study, an elderly (74-year-old) and diabetic case with myocardial infarction, acute stroke, hyperglycemia, and respiratory failure associated with acute chlorine intoxication after a diagnosis of acute chlorine poisoning and treatment in the emergency department is reported and the literature is revisited. Physicians should know that in elderly patients with a systemic disease who apply with chlorine gas inhalation, more serious complications along with damage in respiratory tract might be observed.

  7. ESTIMATION OF GAS EXCHANGE INDICATORS AT 3-D MODELING OF THE WORKING PROCESS OF THE TWO-STROKE PETROL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Korohodskyi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the help of 3-D modeling of the workflow of a two-stroke engine with spark ignition, crank-chamber scavenging and a carburetor feeding system in the modes of external speed characteristic the indices of gas exchange were evaluated. The simulation results are consistent with the experimental data and 3D simulation results in the AVL FIRE and MTFS® software complexes. The model allows performing optimized calculations of multiphase flow in ICE during experimental design work.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment: Radionuclide Release Sensitivity to Diminished Brine and Gas Flows to/from Transuranic Waste Disposal Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad A. Day

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository releases are evaluated through the application of modified parameters to simulate accelerated creep closure, include capillary pressure effects on relative permeability, and increase brine and gas saturation in the operations and experimental (OPS/EXP areas. The modifications to the repository model result in increased pressures and decreased brine saturations in waste areas and increased pressures and brine saturations in the OPS/EXP areas. Brine flows up the borehole during a hypothetical drilling intrusion are nearly identical and brine flows up the shaft are decreased. The modified parameters essentially halt the flow of gas from the southern waste areas to the northern nonwaste areas, except as transported through the marker beds and anhydrite layers. The combination of slightly increased waste region pressures and very slightly decreased brine saturations result in a modest increase in spallings and no significant effect on direct brine releases, with total releases from the Culebra and cutting and caving releases unaffected. Overall, the effects on total high-probability mean releases from the repository are insignificant, with total low-probability mean releases minimally increased. It is concluded that the modified OPS/EXP area parameters have an insignificant effect on the prediction of total releases.

  9. Waste isolation pilot plant performance assessment: Radionuclide release sensitivity to diminished brine and gas flows to/from transuranic waste disposal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Brad A.; Camphouse, R. C.; Zeitler, Todd R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository releases are evaluated through the application of modified parameters to simulate accelerated creep closure, include capillary pressure effects on relative permeability, and increase brine and gas saturation in the operations and experimental (OPS/EXP) areas. The modifications to the repository model result in increased pressures and decreased brine saturations in waste areas and increased pressures and brine saturations in the OPS/EXP areas. Brine flows up the borehole during a hypothetical drilling intrusion are nearly identical and brine flows up the shaft are decreased. The modified parameters essentially halt the flow of gas from the southern waste areas to the northern nonwaste areas, except as transported through the marker beds and anhydrite layers. The combination of slightly increased waste region pressures and very slightly decreased brine saturations result in a modest increase in spallings and no significant effect on direct brine releases, with total releases from the Culebra and cutting and caving releases unaffected. Overall, the effects on total high-probability mean releases from the repository are insignificant, with total low-probability mean releases minimally increased. It is concluded that the modified OPS/EXP area parameters have an insignificant effect on the prediction of total releases.

  10. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Gutfrind

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs. The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM using the FLUX-3D® software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink® in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system.

  11. When will fossil fuel reserves be diminished?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiee, Shahriar; Topal, Erkan

    2009-01-01

    Crude oil, coal and gas are the main resources for world energy supply. The size of fossil fuel reserves and the dilemma that 'when non-renewable energy will be diminished' is a fundamental and doubtful question that needs to be answered. This paper presents a new formula for calculating when fossil fuel reserves are likely to be depleted and develops an econometrics model to demonstrate the relationship between fossil fuel reserves and some main variables. The new formula is modified from the Klass model and thus assumes a continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion times for oil, coal and gas of approximately 35, 107 and 37 years, respectively. This means that coal reserves are available up to 2112, and will be the only fossil fuel remaining after 2042. In the Econometrics model, the main exogenous variables affecting oil, coal and gas reserve trends are their consumption and respective prices between 1980 and 2006. The models for oil and gas reserves unexpectedly show a positive and significant relationship with consumption, while presenting a negative and significant relationship with price. The econometrics model for coal reserves, however, expectedly illustrates a negative and significant relationship with consumption and a positive and significant relationship with price. Consequently, huge reserves of coal and low-level coal prices in comparison to oil and gas make coal one of the main energy substitutions for oil and gas in the future, under the assumption of coal as a clean energy source. (author)

  12. Elements to diminish radioactive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes I, M.E.; Ramirez G, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    In this work it is presented an application of the cause-effect diagram method or Ichikawa method identifying the elements that allow to diminish accidents when the radioactive materials are transported. It is considered the transport of hazardous materials which include radioactive materials in the period: December 1996 until March 1997. Among the identified elements by this method it is possible to mention: the road type, the radioactive source protection, the grade driver responsibility and the preparation that the OEP has in the radioactive material management. It is showed the differences found between the country inner roads and the Mexico City area. (Author)

  13. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  14. Early Detection of Post-Stroke Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man - van Ginkel, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the first two years after stroke approximately one-third of the patients suffer from depression, also referred to as post-stroke depression (PSD). Patients with PSD suffer from symptoms, such as a diminished interest or pleasure (anhedonia), depressed mood, sleep disturbances, loss of energy,

  15. Effects of valve timing, valve lift and exhaust backpressure on performance and gas exchanging of a two-stroke GDI engine with overhead valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Nora, Macklini; Lanzanova, Thompson Diórdinis Metzka; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-stroke operation was achieved in a four-valve direct injection gasoline engine. • Shorter valve opening durations improved torque at lower engine speeds. • The longer the valve opening duration, the lower was the air trapping efficiency. • Higher exhaust backpressure and lower valve lift reduced the compressor work. - Abstract: The current demand for fuel efficient and lightweight powertrains, particularly for application in downsized and hybrid electric vehicles, has renewed the interest in two-stroke engines. In this framework, an overhead four-valve spark-ignition gasoline engine was modified to run in the two-stroke cycle. The scavenging process took place during a long valve overlap period around bottom dead centre at each crankshaft revolution. Boosted intake air was externally supplied at a constant pressure and gasoline was directly injected into the cylinder after valve closure. Intake and exhaust valve timings and lifts were independently varied through an electrohydraulic valve train, so their effects on engine performance and gas exchanging were investigated at 800 rpm and 2000 rpm. Different exhaust backpressures were also evaluated by means of exhaust throttling. Air trapping efficiency, charging efficiency and scavenge ratio were calculated based on air and fuel flow rates, and exhaust oxygen concentration at fuel rich conditions. The results indicated that longer intake and exhaust valve opening durations increased the charge purity and hence torque at higher engine speeds. At lower speeds, although, shorter valve opening durations increased air trapping efficiency and reduced the estimated supercharger power consumption due to lower air short-circuiting. A strong correlation was found between torque and charging efficiency, while air trapping efficiency was more associated to exhaust valve opening duration. The application of exhaust backpressure, as well as lower intake/exhaust valve lifts, made it possible to increase

  16. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  17. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  18. On convexity and Schoenberg's variation diminishing splines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Yuyu; Kozak, J.

    1992-11-01

    In the paper we characterize a convex function by the monotonicity of a particular variation diminishing spline sequence. The result extends the property known for the Bernstein polynomial sequence. (author). 4 refs

  19. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  20. Combustion characteristics of a 4-stroke CI engine operated on Honge oil, Neem and Rice Bran oils when directly injected and dual fuelled with producer gas induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banapurmath, N.R.; Tewari, P.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.V.B. College of Engineering and Technology, Hubli 580031, Karnataka (India); Yaliwal, V.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, SDM College of Engineering and Technology, Dharwad Karnataka (India); Kambalimath, Satish [Wipro Technologies (India); Basavarajappa, Y.H. [K.L.E. Society' s Polytechnic, Hubli (India)

    2009-07-15

    Energy is an essential requirement for economic and social development of any country. Sky rocketing of petroleum fuel costs in present day has led to growing interest in alternative fuels like vegetable oils, alcoholic fuels, CNG, LPG, Producer gas, biogas in order to provide a suitable substitute to diesel for a compression ignition (CI) engine. The vegetable oils present a very promising alternative fuel to diesel oil since they are renewable, biodegradable and clean burning fuel having similar properties as that of diesel. They offer almost same power output with slightly lower thermal efficiency due to their lower energy content compared to diesel. Utilization of producer gas in CI engine on dual fuel mode provides an effective approach towards conservation of diesel fuel. Gasification involves conversion of solid biomass into combustible gases which completes combustion in a CI engines. Hence the producer gas can act as promising alternative fuel and it has high octane number (100-105) and calorific value (5-6 MJ/Nm{sup 3}). Because of its simpler structure with low carbon content results in substantial reduction of exhaust emission. Downdraft moving bed gasifier coupled with compression ignition engine are a good choice for moderate quantities of available mass up to 500 kW of electrical power. Hence bio-derived gas and vegetable liquids appear more attractive in view of their friendly environmental nature. Experiments have been conducted on a single cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection, water-cooled CI engine operated in single fuel mode using Honge, Neem and Rice Bran oils. In dual fuel mode combinations of Producer gas and three oils were used at different injection timings and injection pressures. Dual fuel mode of operation resulted in poor performance at all the loads when compared with single fuel mode at all injection timings tested. However, the brake thermal efficiency is improved marginally when the injection timing was advanced. Decreased

  1. The role of nitric oxide in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou-qing Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is considered to be an acute cerebrovascular disease, including ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. The high incidence and poor prognosis of stroke suggest that it is a highly disabling and highly lethal disease which can pose a serious threat to human health. Nitric oxide (NO, a common gas in nature, which is often thought as a toxic gas, because of its intimate relationship with the pathological processes of many diseases, especially in the regulation of blood flow and cell inflammation. However, recent years have witnessed an increased interest that NO plays a significant and positive role in stroke as an essential gas signal molecule. In view of the fact that the neuroprotective effect of NO is closely related to its concentration, cell type and time, only in the appropriate circumstances can NO play a protective effect. The purpose of this review is to summarize the roles of NO in ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke.

  2. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  3. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  4. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  5. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  6. Pharmacologically increasing collateral perfusion during acute stroke using a carboxyhemoglobin gas transfer agent (Sanguinate™) in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Marilyn J; Linfante, Italo; Abuchowski, Abe; Jubin, Ronald; Chan, Siu-Lung

    2018-05-01

    Similar to patients with chronic hypertension, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) develop fast core progression during middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) resulting in large final infarct volumes. We investigated the effect of Sanguinate™ (SG), a PEGylated carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) gas transfer agent, on changes in collateral and reperfusion cerebral blood flow and brain injury in SHR during 2 h of MCAO. SG (8 mL/kg) or vehicle ( n = 6-8/group) was infused i.v. after 30 or 90 min of ischemia with 2 h reperfusion. Multi-site laser Doppler probes simultaneously measured changes in core MCA and collateral flow during ischemia and reperfusion using a validated method. Brain injury was measured using TTC. Animals were anesthetized with choral hydrate. Collateral flow changed little in vehicle-treated SHR during ischemia (-8 ± 9% vs. prior to infusion) whereas flow increased in SG-treated animals (29 ± 10%; p collateral flow in SHR during MCAO is consistent with small penumbra and large infarction. The ability to increase collateral flow in SHR with SG suggests that this compound may be useful as an adjunct to endovascular therapy and extend the time window for treatment.

  7. Diminished ovarian reserve in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Tuğrul Ayanoğlu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Psoriasis is a multi-systemic chronic inflammatory skin disease. Previous data suggests that women with some chronic inflammatory diseases have diminished ovarian reserve. This study explores ovarian reserve in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: We prospectively analyzed 14 female patients with psoriasis and 35 healthy age and body mass index matched controls. An interview explored demographic characteristics, obstetrical history and menstrual characteristics. Psoriatic area severity index (PASI in patients was assessed. Estrogen, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, thyroid stimulating hormone and with gynecologic ultrasonography, ovarian volume and antral follicular count (AFC were measured in both study and control groups. These values were analyzed with changes of the PASI in the patient group. Results: Patients with psoriasis had significantly higher levels of FSH and FSH/LH ratio than healthy controls (p = 0.039, p = 0.005 respectively. AFC of psoriasis patients were significantly lower than healthy controls (p = 0.002.There were no significant difference among other hormone levels and ovarian volumes (p > 0.05. The hormone levels, ovarian volume and AFC were not correlated with PASI of the patients. Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that patients with psoriasis may have diminished ovarian reserve. Keywords: Psoriasis, Ovarian reserve, Psoriatic area severity index, Antral follicular count, Follicle-stimulating hormone

  8. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  9. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  10. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  11. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  12. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  13. Diminished aversive classical conditioning in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunborg, Geir Scott; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Mentzoni, Rune Aune; Myrseth, Helga; Molde, Helge; Lorvik, Ingjerd Meen; Bu, Eli Torild Hellandsjø; Pallesen, Ståle

    2012-09-01

    Impaired ability to form associations between negative events in gambling and aversive somatic reactions may be a predisposing factor for pathological gambling. The current study investigated whether a group of pathological gamblers and a control group differed in aversive classical conditioning. A differential aversive classical conditioning paradigm, which consisted of three phases. In the habituation phase, one 850-Hz tone stimulus and one 1500-Hz tone stimulus were presented three times each in random order. In the acquisition phase, the two tones were presented 10 times each in random order, and one was always followed by a 100-dB burst of white noise. In the extinction phase the two tones were presented three times each without the white noise. University laboratory testing facilities and out-patient treatment facilities. Twenty pathological gamblers and 20 control participants. Duration of seven cardiac interbeat-intervals (IBIs) following tone offset, gambling severity, tobacco and alcohol use, anxiety and depression. No group differences were found in the habituation and acquisition phases. However, a significant group × stimuli × trials × IBIs interaction effect was found in the extinction phase (P classical conditioning, but that the control group did. Pathological gamblers have a diminished capacity to form associations between aversive events and stimuli that predict aversive events. Aversion learning is likely to be an ineffective treatment for pathological gamblers. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Diminishing musyarakah investment model based on equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, Maheran Mohd; Zain, Shaharir Mohamad; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2017-11-01

    Most of the mudharabah and musyarakah contract funds are involved in debt financing. This does not support the theory that profit sharing contract is better than that of debt financing due to the sharing of risks and ownership of equity. Indeed, it is believed that Islamic banking is a financial model based on equity or musyarakah which emphasis on the sharing of risks, profit and loss in the investment between the investor and entrepreneur. The focus of this paper is to introduce the mathematical model that internalizes diminishing musyarakah, the sharing of profit and equity between entrepreneur and investor. The entrepreneur pays monthly-differed payment to buy out the equity that belongs to the investor (bank) where at the end of the specified period, the entrepreneur owns the business and the investor (bank) exits the joint venture. The model is able to calculate the amount of equity at any time for both parties and hence would be a guide in helping to estimate the value of investment should the entrepreneur or investor exit before the end of the specified period. The model is closer to the Islamic principles for justice and fairness.

  15. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  16. Blast wave parameters at diminished ambient pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Relation between blast wave parameters resulted from a condensed high explosive (HE) charge detonation and a surrounding gas (air) pressure has been studied. Blast wave pressure and impulse differences at compression and rarefaction phases, which traditionally determine damage explosive effect, has been analyzed. An initial pressure effect on a post-explosion quasi-static component of the blast load has been investigated. The analysis is based on empirical relations between blast parameters and non-dimensional similarity criteria. The results can be directly applied to flying vehicle (aircraft or spacecraft) blast safety analysis.

  17. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  18. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  19. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  20. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  2. Global smoothness preservation and the variation-diminishing property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrea Ioan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the center of our paper are two counterexamples showing the independence of the concepts of global smoothness preservation and variation diminution for sequences of approximation operators. Under certain additional assumptions it is shown that the variation-diminishing property is the stronger one. It is also demonstrated, however, that there are positive linear operators giving an optimal pointwise degree of approximation, and which preserve global smoothness, monotonicity and convexity, but are not variation-diminishing.

  3. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die within minutes. Strokes happen more in some populations and geographic areas. Stroke death declines have stalled in 3 out of every 4 states. Blacks have the highest stroke death rates among all ...

  4. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  5. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  6. Understanding Life After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelmblink, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is an acute, neurological dysfunction of vascular origin with sudden occurrence and it influences physical, cognitive and psychological functions. Initial treatment aims at eliminating or reducing the brain damage. Soon, however, the influence of the stroke on the entire life of stroke survivors has to be considered. This thesis explores the meaning of life after stroke to 19 elderly stroke survivors during the first year post stroke. Survivors were interviewed twice and the interviews...

  7. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Simple Techniques Can Help Memory after a Stroke Self-Esteem after Stroke Cognitive Challenges After Stroke Depression Trumps ... spasticity), fatigue and more. Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, recovery, ...

  8. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  9. The role of hydrogen sulfide in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a kind of acute cerebrovascular disease characterized by the focal lack of neurological function, including ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. As society ages rapidly, stroke has become the second leading cause of disability and death, and also become the main threat to human health and life. In recent years, findings from increasing animal and clinical trials have supplied scientific evidences for the treatment of stroke. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S, which has always been seen as a toxic gas, now has been thought to be the third gaseous signaling molecule following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. Accumulating evidences indicate that H 2 S plays an important role in stroke. Given that its neuroprotective effect is dose-dependent, only when its concentration is relatively low, H 2 S can yield the neuroprotection, while high dose may lead to neurotoxicity. All these study results suggest that H 2 S may offer a new promising application for the therapy of stroke. Here, our review will present the role of H 2 S in stroke from its mechanism to animal and clinical studies.

  10. Are there Diminishing Returns to R&D?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob B.

    Semi-endogenous models and, to some extent, also Schumpeterian models are based on the assumption of diminishing returns to R&D. This paper shows that the null hypothesis of constant returns to R&D cannot be rejected for the OECD countries......Semi-endogenous models and, to some extent, also Schumpeterian models are based on the assumption of diminishing returns to R&D. This paper shows that the null hypothesis of constant returns to R&D cannot be rejected for the OECD countries...

  11. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  12. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  13. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  14. Exercise Preferences Are Different after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Banks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore exercise preferences in stroke survivors and controls. Methods. A novel scale—the Exercise Preference Questionnaire—was developed for this study. This questionnaire, together with established assessments of physical activities, mood, and quality of life, was completed in a single assessment session. Results. Twenty-three adult stroke survivors (mean age 63, 65% male and 41 healthy controls (mean age 61, 66% male participated. The groups differed on 4 of the 5 a priori exercise preference factors: relative to controls, stroke survivors preferred exercise to be more structured, in a group, at a gym or fitness centre, and for exercises to be demonstrated. Factor analysis yielded 6 data-driven factors, and these factors also differentiated stroke and control groups. There was evidence that group differences were diminished when activity levels and psychological wellbeing were accounted for. Individual variability in exercise preferences and reported barriers to exercise are outlined. Conclusion. Stroke survivors have different exercise preferences, and a better understanding of these preferences can be used to inform rehabilitation programs and increase adherence.

  15. The role of nitrous oxide in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-wei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke that is caused by poor blood flow into the brain results in cell death, including ischemia stroke due to lack of blood into brain tissue, and hemorrhage due to bleeding. Both of them will give rise to the dysfunction of brain. In general, the signs and symptoms of stroke are the inability of feeling or moving on one side of body, sometimes loss of vision to one side. Above symptoms will appear soon after the stroke has happened. If the symptoms and signs happen in 1 or 2 hours, we often call them as transient ischemic attack. Moreover, hemorrhagic stroke often leads to severe headache. It is known that neuronal death can happen after stroke, and it depends upon the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA excitatory glutamate receptor which is the goal for a lot of neuroprotective agents. Nitrous oxide was discovered by Joseph Priestley in 1772, and then he and his friends, including the poet Coleridge and Robert Sauce, experimented with the gas. They found this gas could make patients loss the sense of pain and still maintain consciousness after inhalation. Shortly the gas was used as an anesthetic, especially in the field of dentists. Now, accroding to theme of Helene N. David and other scientists, both of nitrous oxide at 75 vol% and xenon at 50 vol% could reduce ischemic neuronal death in the cortex by 70% and decrease NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx by 30%. Therefore, more clinical and experimental studies are important to illuminate the mechanisms of how nitrous oxide protects brain tissue and to explore the best protocol of this gas in stroke treatment.

  16. Effect of Yushen zhuyun decoction on rats with diminished ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Yushen zhuyun decoction (YSZYF) on rats with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR). Methods: High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the major phytochemical constituents of YSZYF. Rats with DOR (DOR rats) were prepared by administration of ...

  17. Incidental finding of hypertension and diminished femoral pulses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-06-08

    Jun 8, 2012 ... Case Study: Incidental finding of hypertension and diminished femoral pulses. 168. Vol 55 No 2. S Afr Fam Pract 2013. Introduction. Coarctation of the aorta is ... Surgery of the aorta and its branches. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Company, 2000; p. 3-10. 2. Rao PS. Coarctation of the aorta. Curr Cardiol Rep.

  18. Incidental finding of hypertension and diminished femoral pulses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidental finding of hypertension and diminished femoral pulses: short-segment stenosis of the aorta just distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery. ... Young patients may present within the first few weeks of life with poor feeding, tachypnea and lethargy. They usually progress to overt congestive heart failure and shock.

  19. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, H.E.; van der Worp, H.; Nijenbanning, L.; Diercks, R.L.; Zwerver, J.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study

  20. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  2. On the Issue of Age Diminished Responsibility in Criminal Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova I. A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of standards of the criminal law regulating questions of age diminished responsibility is presented in article. The points of view of scientists in the field of criminal law and criminology are analysed. The problem question of a ratio of provisions of Art. 20 and Art. 22 of the criminal code of Russian Federation is designated. The option of permission of a problem question is offered

  3. Literature of Diminishment: American Regionalism and the Writing of Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Literature of Diminishment redefines regionalism as a philosophical approach that prefers a partial view of oneself and of others, whether human or nonhuman, rather than the comprehensive view pursued by nineteenth-century science. I show how American regionalist writings from the 1820s to 1910s adapt scientific techniques of observation to the aesthetics of the regionalist sketch. Their "sketchy" view of Nature highlights the deficiencies of knowing and nonetheless opens out to a view of bio...

  4. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Surendra K; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Purohit, Vinee; Chaika, Nina V; Gunda, Venugopal; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Mehla, Kamiya; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Powers, Robert; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating levels of ketone bodies (i.e., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone), serves as an alternative energy source. It has also been proposed that a ketogenic diet leads to systemic metabolic changes. Keeping in view the significant role of metabolic alterations in cancer, we hypothesized that a ketogenic diet may diminish glycolytic flux in tumor cells to alleviate cachexia syndrome and, hence, may provide an efficient therapeutic strategy. We observed reduced glycolytic flux in tumor cells upon treatment with ketone bodies. Ketone bodies also diminished glutamine uptake, overall ATP content, and survival in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines, while inducing apoptosis. A decrease in levels of c-Myc, a metabolic master regulator, and its recruitment on glycolytic gene promoters, was in part responsible for the metabolic phenotype in tumor cells. Ketone body-induced intracellular metabolomic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells also leads to a significantly diminished cachexia in cell line models. Our mouse orthotopic xenograft models further confirmed the effect of a ketogenic diet in diminishing tumor growth and cachexia. Thus, our studies demonstrate that the cachectic phenotype is in part due to metabolic alterations in tumor cells, which can be reverted by a ketogenic diet, causing reduced tumor growth and inhibition of muscle and body weight loss.

  5. Organizational Friction: Urban Crime Control Diminish Effect Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    titled, the Urban Crime Control Diminish Effect Theory v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I acknowledge the almighty God the steward of all guidance. I thank my...able to use impersonators to infiltrate the Police Department simply by gaining access to their uniform. He further commented that with his... impersonate a genuine member of the police department for a considerable period of time. An opinion poll was conducted following the discovery of the

  6. Test Your Stroke Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9-1-1. Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? High blood pressure Heart disease Smoking High cholesterol Diabetes Show Answer All of these are risk factors for stroke. If you smoke - quit. If you have high ...

  7. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  8. Stroke Connection Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Submit A Story Edit Module Show Tags Stroke Rehabilitation Two-Part Series Making the Best Decisions at ... first part of a two-part series on stroke rehab, we offer guidance for the decision-making process ...

  9. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your friend. Being around friends can help with healing. Preventing Strokes Some strokes can be prevented in ... Why Does Hair Turn Gray? What Are Wrinkles? Alzheimer Disease Your Brain & Nervous System Why Exercise Is ...

  10. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  11. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  12. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  13. Recovery of diminished mealtime-associated anticipatory behavior by aniracetam in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Kurasawa, M; Nakamura, K

    2000-08-01

    Disease- or age-related neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive and chronobiological impairments greatly aggravate the activities of daily living (ADL) in patients. The present study evaluates the effects of aniracetam on a decline in mealtime-associated anticipatory behavior in aged rats, as an animal model of temporally regulated behaviors or habitual daily activities. Aged rats showed a lower but typical nocturnal motor activity rhythm than young rats when the animals were fed ad lib. Mealtime-associated anticipatory behavior emerged in young rats when the rats were fed at a fixed time for 6 days, but the activity in aged rats was diminished. Repeated administration of aniracetam (100 mg/kg PO) or physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg SC) for 7 days ameliorated the impaired anticipatory behavior in aged rats. Nefiracetam (10 mg/kg PO) was ineffective. All compounds tested had no effect on appetite or motor ability. These results indicate that aging disturbs the timing or temporal regulation of anticipatory behavior, probably resulting from dysfunction in a food-entrainable oscillator linked to central cholinergic systems. The restoration of the time-keeping ability by aniracetam may be mediated by the facilitation of reticulothalamic cholinergic neurotransmission, and the action may lead to the improvement of declined ADL in stroke patients.

  14. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death.......5%) or 1 month (6.9%), respectively. After the age of 60 years, women had more severe strokes than men. Up to ages in the mid-60s, no difference in the risk of death from stroke was seen between the 2 sexes. For people aged >65 years, however, the risk gradually became greater in men than in women...

  15. Elements to diminish radioactive accidents; Elementos para disminuir accidentes radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes I, M.E.; Ramirez G, F.P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    In this work it is presented an application of the cause-effect diagram method or Ichikawa method identifying the elements that allow to diminish accidents when the radioactive materials are transported. It is considered the transport of hazardous materials which include radioactive materials in the period: December 1996 until March 1997. Among the identified elements by this method it is possible to mention: the road type, the radioactive source protection, the grade driver responsibility and the preparation that the OEP has in the radioactive material management. It is showed the differences found between the country inner roads and the Mexico City area. (Author)

  16. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  17. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  18. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  19. Multi-layered see-through movie in diminished reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Yuko; Hashimoto, Takanori; Inoue, Takuya; Shimizu, Naoki; Saito, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents generating a multi-layered see-through movie for an auto-stereoscopic display. This work is based on Diminished Reality (DR), which is one of the research fields of Augmented Reality (AR). In the usual AR, some virtual objects are added on the real world. On the other hand, DR removes some real objects from the real world. Therefore, the background is visualized instead of the real objects (obstacles) to be removed. We use multiple color cameras and one TOF depth camera. The areas of obstacles are defined by using the depth camera based on the distance of obstacles. The background behind the obstacles is recovered by planarprojection of multiple cameras. Then, the recovered background is overlaid onto the removed obstacles. For visualizing it through the auto-stereoscopic display, the scene is divided into multiple layers such as obstacles and background. The pixels corresponding to the obstacles are not visualized or visualized semi-transparently at the center viewpoints. Therefore, we can see that the obstacles are diminished according to the viewpoints.

  20. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Stroke And Substance Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chitsaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: stroke in recreational substance users can be an indirect complication, like endocarditis and cardio embolism in parenteral drug users. With some drug like cocaine, stroke appear to be the result of a direct effect. In young subjects without other risk factors provide persuasive evidence for causality . OPIATES: Heroine is the most abused opiate drug, which is administered by injection, by snorting or by smoking. Stroke affects heroin users by diverse mechanisms,. Injectors are at risk of infections endocarditis, which carries risk for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Cerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage usually occurs after rupture of a septic (mycotic aneurysm. Heroine users can are also at risk for hemorrhagic stroke secondary to liver failure with deranged clotting and to heroin nephropathy with uremia or malignant hypertension. In some heroin users the drug it self is directly causal due to vasculitis, hypersensitivity and immunologic changes. Embolization of foreign material to brain due to mixed of heroine with quinine can cause cerebral embolism. AMPHETAMINE AND other psychostimulants: In abuser of amphetamine hemorrhagic stroke can occur, oral, intravenous, nasal, and inhalational routes of administration have been reported. Most were chronic user, but in several patients, stroke followed a first exposure. Some of amphetamine induced intracranial hemorrhages are secondary to acute hypertension, some to cerebral vacuities, and some to a combination of two. Decongestants and diet pills: Phenylpropanolamine (PPA, an amphetamine – like drug, in decongestants and diet pills, induce acute hypertension, sever headache, psychiatric symptoms, seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. Ephedrine and pseudo ephedrine are present in decongestants and bronchodilators and induce headache, tachyarrhythmia, hypertensive emergency, and hemorrhagic and occlusive stroke. Ecstasy, 3,4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamin (MDMA with amphetamine like can

  2. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available.

  3. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  4. Automatic needle insertion diminishes pain during growth hormone injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Jørgensen, J T; Hertel, N T

    1995-01-01

    Non-compliance in children receiving growth hormone (GH) treatment is often caused by pain on injection and difficulties in administration of GH. It has been suggested that automatic needle insertion diminishes pain perception. We quantitatively measured pain intensity on injection with two...... prototype pens for GH administration, providing either manual or automatic sc needle insertion, using a combined visual analogue/facial scale and a five-item scale in 18 children. With the automatic pen there was a significantly lower maximum pain score compared with the manual pen (median 28.5 versus 52.......0 mm) as well as a lower mean pain score (mean 13.7 versus 23.5 mm). The five-item scale revealed that automatic needle insertion was significantly less painful than manual insertion and 13 patients chose to continue treatment with the automatic pen. In conclusion, pain during GH injection can...

  5. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  6. European Stroke Science Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattle, Heinrich P.; Brainin, Michael; Chamorro, Angel; Diener, Hans Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Leys, Didier; Norrving, Bo; Ward, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The European Stroke Organisation (ESO) held its first European Stroke Science Workshop in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (15-17 December 2011). Stroke experts based in Europe were invited to present and discuss their current research. The scope of the workshop was to review the most recent findings of selected topics in stroke, to exchange ideas, to stimulate new research and to enhance collaboration between European stroke research groups. Seven scientific sessions were held, each starting with a keynote lecture to review the state of the art of the given topic, followed by 4 or 5 short presentations by experts. They were asked to limit their presentations to 10 slides containing only recent information. The meeting was organized by the executive committee of the ESO (Heinrich Mattle, chairman, Michael Brainin, Angel Chamorro, Werner Hacke, Didier Leys) and supported by the European Stroke Conference (Michael Hennerici). In this article we summarize the main contents of this successful workshop. PMID:22836350

  7. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  8. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied the ...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  9. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  10. Stroke caused auditory attention deficits in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Maria Ibraim da Freiria Elias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the auditory selective attention in children with stroke. METHODS: Dichotic tests of binaural separation (non-verbal and consonant-vowel and binaural integration - digits and Staggered Spondaic Words Test (SSW - were applied in 13 children (7 boys, from 7 to 16 years, with unilateral stroke confirmed by neurological examination and neuroimaging. RESULTS: The attention performance showed significant differences in comparison to the control group in both kinds of tests. In the non-verbal test, identifications the ear opposite the lesion in the free recall stage was diminished and, in the following stages, a difficulty in directing attention was detected. In the consonant- vowel test, a modification in perceptual asymmetry and difficulty in focusing in the attended stages was found. In the digits and SSW tests, ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral deficits were detected, depending on the characteristics of the lesions and demand of the task. CONCLUSION: Stroke caused auditory attention deficits when dealing with simultaneous sources of auditory information.

  11. Achievement of the charge exchange work diminishing of an internal combustion engine in part load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan POSTRZEDNIK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal combustion engines, used for driving of different cars, occurs not only at full load, but mostly at the part load. The relative load exchange work at the full (nominal engine load is significantly low. At the part load of the IC engine its energy efficiency ηe is significantly lower than in the optimal (nominal field range of the performance parameters. One of the numerous reasons of this effect is regular growing of the relative load exchange work of the IC engine. It is directly connected with the quantitative regulation method commonly used in the IC engines. From the thermodynamic point of view - the main reason of this effect is the throttling process (causing exergy losses occurring in the inlet and outlet channels. The known proposals for solving of this problem are based on applying of the fully electronic control of the motion of inlet, outlet valves and new reference cycles.The idea presented in the paper leads to diminishing the charge exchange work of the IC engines. The problem can be solved using presented in the paper a new concept of the reference cycle (called as eco-cycle of IC engine. The work of the engine basing on the eco-cycle occurs in two 3-stroke stages; the fresh air is delivered only once for both stages, but in range of each stage a new portion of fuel is burned. Normally the charge exchange occurs once during each engine cycle realized. Elaborated proposition bases on the elimination of chosen charge exchange processes and through this the dropping of the charge exchange work can be achieved.

  12. Immune interventions in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  13. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  14. National Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Event Join a Stroke Challenge Team Comeback Trail Tell Your Story Community Presentations Faces of Stroke Volunteer With Us ... in a video presentation. Watch Video ... to feel the right side of her body. Kathryn’s friends performed the FAST exam and soon ...

  15. Diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarenwattananon, A.; Khandji, A.; Brust, J.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the development of cerebral angiography 60 years ago, there has been a proliferation of increasingly sophisticated, expensive, and, fortunately, safe imaging techniques for patients with cerebrovascular disease. In addition, occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke are now recognized as having a wide variety of possible causes. This chapter addresses the different imaging options available for particular kinds of stroke

  16. The Optimal Golf Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchinger, Mikael; Durigen, Susan; Dahl, Johan Rambech

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary investigation into aspects of the game of golf. A series of models is proposed for the golf stroke, the momentum transfer between club and ball and the flight of the ball.Numerical and asymptotic solutions are presented reproducing many of the features observed...... in the golf stroke of a professional golfer....

  17. Overeducation and depressive symptoms: diminishing mental health returns to education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, Piet; Pattyn, Elise; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2013-11-01

    In general, well-educated people enjoy better mental health than those with less education. As a result, some wonder whether there are limits to the mental health benefits of education. Inspired by the literature on the expansion of tertiary education, this article explores marginal mental health returns to education and studies the mental health status of overeducated people. To enhance the validity of the findings we use two indicators of educational attainment - years of education and ISCED97 categories - and two objective indicators of overeducation (the realised matches method and the job analyst method) in a sample of the working population of 25 European countries (unweighted sample N = 19,089). Depression is measured using an eight-item version of the CES-D scale. We find diminishing mental health returns to education. In addition, overeducated people report more depression symptoms. Both findings hold irrespective of the indicators used. The results must be interpreted in the light of the enduring expansion of education, as our findings show that the discussion of the relevance of the human capital perspective, and the diploma disease view on the relationship between education and modern society, is not obsolete. © 2013 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Ambient groundwater flow diminishes nitrogen cycling in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, M.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.; Detwiler, R. L.; Boano, F.; Cook, P. L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling and experimental studies demonstrate that ambient groundwater reduces hyporheic exchange, but the implications of this observation for stream N-cycling is not yet clear. We utilized a simple process-based model (the Pumping and Streamline Segregation or PASS model) to evaluate N- cycling over two scales of hyporheic exchange (fluvial ripples and riffle-pool sequences), ten ambient groundwater and stream flow scenarios (five gaining and losing conditions and two stream discharges), and three biogeochemical settings (identified based on a principal component analysis of previously published measurements in streams throughout the United States). Model-data comparisons indicate that our model provides realistic estimates for direct denitrification of stream nitrate, but overpredicts nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification. Riffle-pool sequences are responsible for most of the N-processing, despite the fact that fluvial ripples generate 3-11 times more hyporheic exchange flux. Across all scenarios, hyporheic exchange flux and the Damkohler Number emerge as primary controls on stream N-cycling; the former regulates trafficking of nutrients and oxygen across the sediment-water interface, while the latter quantifies the relative rates of organic carbon mineralization and advective transport in streambed sediments. Vertical groundwater flux modulates both of these master variables in ways that tend to diminish stream N-cycling. Thus, anthropogenic perturbations of ambient groundwater flows (e.g., by urbanization, agricultural activities, groundwater mining, and/or climate change) may compromise some of the key ecosystem services provided by streams.

  19. COMBATING CYBERBULLYING AS STRATEGY TO DIMINISH THE STUDENTS’ AGGRESSIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ABU RIA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the relationship between cyberbullying and students’ behaviors. At present, cyber security is one of the most discussed topics in most countries of the world. Cyber space is characterized by lack of borders, dynamism and anonymity, generating both opportunities for the development of the information society and risks to its functioning and its beneficiaries. Noting the noxious impact of cyberbullying on youth behaviors, we propose tackling cyberbullying as a strategy to diminish students' aggressiveness in the school.COMBATEREA BULLYING-ULUI CIBERNETIC CA STRATEGIE DE DIMINUARE A AGRESIVITĂȚII ELEVILORÎn articol este abordată relația dintre bullying-ul cibernetic și comportamentele elevilor. La etapa actuală, securitatea cibernetică este unul dintre cele mai discutate subiecte în majoritatea țărilor lumii. Spaţiul cibernetic se caracterizează prin lipsa frontierelor, dinamism şi anonimat, generând atât oportunităţi de dezvoltare a societăţii informaţionale, cât şi riscuri la adresa funcţionării acesteia și a beneficiarilor săi. Constatând impactul nociv al bullying-ului cibernetic asupra comportamentelor tinerilor, propunem abordarea combaterii bullying-ului cibernetic ca strategie de diminuare a agresi­vității elevilor în școală.

  20. Is proprioception diminished in patients with patellar tendinopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, H E; van der Worp, H; Nijenbanning, L; Diercks, R L; Zwerver, J; van den Akker-Scheek, I

    2016-03-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is a highly prevalent overuse injury, and most treatments are only effective to some extent. This persistence of complaints could be linked to changed proprioception. One study showed diminished proprioception in athletes with lateral epicondylitis. Aim of this study was to determine differences in proprioception, by measuring threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM) between recreational athletes diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy and healthy controls. The TTDPM as measure of proprioception was determined in 22 recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and 22 healthy recreational athletes using a validated instrument. Amount of knee flexion and extension before the movement was noticed by the subject was determined. 80 measurements per athlete (left and right leg, towards extension and flexion and with two starting angles of 20° and 40° flexion) were performed. Mean TTDPM was compared between groups and among the injured recreational athletes between the affected and unaffected knee. No significant difference in TTDPM was found between recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and healthy controls. We did find a significant difference between the injured and non-injured knee in recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy; mean TTDPM was 0.02° higher in the injured knee (p=0.044). No difference was found in proprioception between recreational athletes with patellar tendinopathy and healthy recreational athletes. It is unclear whether such a small difference in TTDPM between affected and unaffected knee is important in clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Normal aging selectively diminishes alpha lateralization in visual spatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiangfei; Sun, Junfeng; Bengson, Jesse J; Mangun, George R; Tong, Shanbao

    2015-02-01

    EEG studies of cue-induced visual alpha power (8-13 Hz) lateralization have been conducted on young adults without examining differences that may develop as a consequence of normal aging. Here, we examined age-related differences in spatial attention by comparing healthy older and younger adults. Our key finding is that cue-induced alpha power lateralization was observed in younger, but not older adults, even though both groups exhibited classic event-related potential signatures of spatial orienting. Specifically, both younger and older adults showed significant early directing-attention negativity (EDAN), anterior directing-attention negativity (ADAN), late directing-attention positivity (LDAP) and contingent negative variation (CNV). Furthermore, target-evoked sensory components were enhanced for attended relative to unattended targets in both younger and older groups. This pattern of results suggests that although older adults can successfully allocate spatial attention, they do so without the lateralization of alpha power that is commonly observed in younger adults. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that younger and older adults might engage different neural mechanisms for attentional orienting, and that alpha power lateralization during visual spatial attention is a phenomenon that diminishes during normal aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  3. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L; Whelan, Stephen A; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S; McComb, Mark E; Bachschmid, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  4. Diminishing self-disclosure to maintain security in partners' care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Edward P; Melville, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Six studies demonstrate that perceivers' desire to bond with targets motivates perceivers to misconstrue their own self-disclosure in ways that maintain perceivers' security in targets' care and commitment. Perceivers who strongly valued relationships with targets reported high levels of global self-disclosure, consistent with many findings suggesting salutary effects of disclosure. However, these same perceivers reported low self-disclosure of needs and desires in hypothetical (Study 1) and actual (Study 2) situations characterized by targets' unresponsive behavior. Similarly, in daily report (Study 3) and behavioral observation (Study 4) studies, perceivers who valued relationships with targets perceived high levels of self-disclosure when targets were responsive, but they perceived low self-disclosure when targets were unresponsive, and these perceptions seemed partly illusory. In turn, these perceptions of low self-disclosure in situations characterized by partners' unresponsive behavior predicted decreased perceptions of diagnosticity of targets' behavior (Studies 1-3) and buffered the negative affective and interpersonal effects of unresponsive behavior (Study 4). Experimental manipulations (Studies 5 and 6) demonstrated the motivational nature of perceived self-disclosure. Collectively, the results suggest that a desire to bond with targets motivates perceivers to downplay the diagnosticity of targets' unresponsive behavior through diminishing their self-disclosure, in turn preserving perceivers' trust in targets' care and commitment.

  5. Measuring mental illness stigma with diminished social desirability effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Patrick J; Corrigan, Patrick W

    2013-06-01

    For persons with mental illness, stigma diminishes employment and independent living opportunities as well as participation in psychiatric care. Public stigma interventions have sought to ameliorate these consequences. Evaluation of anti-stigma programs' impact is typically accomplished with self-report questionnaires. However, cultural mores encourage endorsement of answers that are socially preferred rather than one's true belief. This problem, social desirability, has been circumvented through development of faux knowledge tests (KTs) (i.e., Error-Choice Tests); written to assess prejudice. Our KT uses error-choice test methodology to assess stigmatizing attitudes. Test content was derived from review of typical KTs for façade reinforcement. Answer endorsement suggests bias or stigma; such determinations were based on the empirical literature. KT psychometrics were examined in samples of college students, community members and mental health providers and consumers. Test-retest reliability ranged from fair (0.50) to good (0.70). Construct validity analyses of public stigma indicated a positive relationship with the Attribution Questionnaire and inverse relationships with Self-Determination and Empowerment Scales. No significant relationships were observed with self-stigma measures (recovery, empowerment). This psychometric evaluation study suggests that a self-administered questionnaire may circumvent social desirability and have merit as a stigma measurement tool.

  6. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  7. The Danish Stroke Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated...... at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. MAIN VARIABLES: The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes...... of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients...

  8. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-stroke depression among stroke survivors attending two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burden of stroke worldwide is increasing rapidly. There is paucity of data on post-stroke depression (PSD) among stroke survivors in Uganda, despite the high prevalence of PSD reported elsewhere. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed adult participants with confirmed first stroke with a ...

  10. Perception of stroke among patients with stroke | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perception of patients to stroke is variable. The aim of this study was to determine the perception of stroke among stroke patients. The study was carried out between January 2004 - December 2004 on all the patients presenting with features of stroke at the Federal Medical Center Ido, Nigeria. Data were collected by ...

  11. Cerebrorenal interaction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Beyond the original meaning of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as high-risk state for future dialysis, CKD is now known as an established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Stroke is a major player of cardiovascular disease and has deep two-way relationships with CKD. CKD is an evident risk factor for stroke. Meta-analyses of cohort studies and trials indicate that proteinuria/albuminuria increases the risk of stroke by 71-92%, and reduced glomerular filtration rate increases the risk by 43%. In addition, CKD has a strong relationship with subclinical brain damage including white matter changes, microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and carotid atherosclerosis. CKD is prevalent in acute stroke patients; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate stroke patients and 39% of total intracerebral hemorrhage patients in our institute. Acute and chronic management of stroke are influenced by CKD. Therapeutic effects of several antithrombotic and thrombolytic agents, including recently-developed novel oral anticoagulants, are affected by renal function. Moreover, reduced glomerular filtration rate is independently associated with increased 1- and 10-year mortalities in the end. Stroke also has deep relationships with end-stage kidney disease. Stroke occurs much more commonly in dialysis patients than general population or CKD patients without need for dialysis. The triggers of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with end-stage kidney disease include special characteristics unique to dialysis, such as drastic hemodynamic change, dialysate and anticoagulants, and vascular calcification. As cohorts of dialysis patients become older, more hypertensive, and more diabetic than before, stroke become more prevalent and more serious events in dialysis clinics. Now, clinicians should have much interest in the association between CKD and cerebrovascular diseases, so-called the cerebro-renal interaction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Loneliness in older adults is associated with diminished cortisol output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, N; Holwerda, T J; Stek, M L; Dekker, J J M; Rhebergen, D; Comijs, H C

    2017-04-01

    Loneliness in older adults has been associated with increased mortality and health problems. One of the assumed underlying mechanisms is dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA-axis). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether loneliness in older adults is associated with HPA-axis dysregulation and whether this association differs between depressed and non-depressed persons. Cross-sectional data of 426 lonely and non-lonely older adults in the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO) were used. Linear regression analyses and multinominal logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between loneliness and morning cortisol, cortisol awakening response, diurnal slope and dexamethasone suppression ratio. In all analyses, confounders were introduced. In order to examine whether the association between loneliness and cortisol measures is different in depressed versus non-depressed persons, an interaction term for loneliness x depression diagnosis was tested. Cortisol output in the first hour after awakening and dexamethasone suppression ratio was lower in lonely participants. There were no significant interactions between loneliness and depression diagnosis in the association with the cortisol measures. This study is the first to investigate the association between the HPA-axis and loneliness in a large group of older adults aged 60-93years. We found lower cortisol output in the first hour after awakening and lower dexamethasone suppression ratio in lonely older depressed and non-depressed adults. Whether diminished cortisol output is the underlying mechanism that leads to health problems in lonely older adults is an interesting object for further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Fate of Aspen in a World with Diminishing Snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; Kemp, K. B.

    2010-12-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides) productivity is tightly coupled with soil moisture. In the mountainous regions of the western USA, annual replenishment of soil moisture commonly occurs during snowmelt. Therefore, snow pack depth and duration can play an important role in sustaining aspen productivity. The presence of almost 50 years of detailed climate data across an elevational transect in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwestern Idaho offers a novel opportunity to better understand the role of shifting precipitation patterns on aspen productivity. Over the past 50 years, the proportion of the precipitation falling in the form of snow decreased by almost a factor of 2 at mid to low elevations in the RCEW, coupled with a roughly four week advance of snow ablation, and decline of large snow drifts that release moisture into the early summer. Results from growth ring increment, stable isotope analysis, sapflux and a process model (Biome BGC), will be used to determine the impact of shifting precipitation patterns on tree productivity along this transect over the past 50 years. Aspen trees located on moist microsites continue to transpire water and maintain high stomatal conductance 21 days later in the growing season relative to individuals on drier microsites. Predictions of net primary productivity (NPP) in aspen are very sensitive to precipitation patterns. NPP becomes negative as early as day 183 (90 days post budbreak) for years with little winter and spring precipitation whereas, in years with ample winter and spring precipitation, NPP remains positive until day 260 when leaf fall occurs. These results give unique insight into the conditions that deciduous tree species will encounter in a warming climate where snow water equivalent continues to diminish and soil moisture declines soon after budbreak occurs.

  14. Third European Stroke Science Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dichgans, Martin; Planas, Anna M.; Biessels, Geert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; van der Worp, Bart|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189855010; Sudlow, Cathie; Norrving, B.; Lees, Kennedy; Mattle, Heinrich P.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Eibsee, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, November 19 to 21, 2015: The European Stroke Organization convened >120 stroke experts from 27 countries to discuss latest results and hot topics in clinical, translational, and basic stroke research. Since its inception in 2011, the European Stroke Science

  15. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  16. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    . The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls......BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...

  18. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit stroke merupakan penyebab kematian dan kecacatan kronik yang paling tinggi pada kelompok umur diatas usia 45 tahun terbanyak di Indonesia. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengidentifikasi determinan utama yang berhubungan dengan penyakit stroke pada masyarakat di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa Bogor. Analisis lanjut terhadap 1.912 responden subset baseline data penelitian “Studi Kohort Faktor Risiko Penyakit Tidak Menular” Data dikumpulkan dengan metode wawancara pada penduduk tetap di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa, Kecamatan Bogor Tengah, Bogor tahun 2012. Diagnosis stroke berdasarkan anamnesis dan pemeriksaan dokter spesialis syaraf. Variabel independen meliputi karakteristik sosiodemografi, status kesehatan dan perilaku berisiko. Data dianalisis dengan uji regresi logistik ganda. Penyakit stroke ditemukan pada 49 (2,6% orang. Determinan utama stroke meliputi hipertensi (OR = 4,20; IK 95% = 2,20 – 8,03, penyakit jantung koroner (OR = 2,74; IK 95% = 1,51 – 4,99, diabetes melitus (OR = 2,89; IK 95% = 1,47 – 5,64, dan status ekonomi miskin (OR = 1,83 ; IK 95% = 1,03 – 3,33. Pencegahan penyakit stroke dilakukan dengan peningkatan edukasi (kampanye/penyuluhan melalui pengendalian faktor risiko utama yaitu hipertensi dan pencegahan terjadinya penyakit degeneratif lain yaitu penyakit jantung koroner dan diabetes melitus. Stroke disease is the leading cause of death and chronic disabi lity in most over the age of 45 years in Indonesia. The aim of study was to identify the major determinants of stroke disease in Kebon Kalapa community in Bogor. A deep analyze was conducted in 1.912 respondents based on the subset of baseline data “Risk Factors Cohort Study of Non Communicable Diseases.” Data was collected by interviews on Kebon Kalapa community, Bogor in 2012. Stroke diagnosis was determined by anamnesis and neu-rological examination with specialist. Independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, health status and risk behavior

  19. The Migraine?Stroke Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like head...

  20. Characteristics of Sulfuric Acid Condensation on Cylinder Liners of Large Two-Stroke Marine Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Mayer, Stefan; Schramm, Jesper

    The present work seeks to clarify the characteristics of sulfuric acid condensation on the cylinder liner of a large two–stroke marine engine. The liner is directly exposed to the cylin-der gas (i.e. no protective lube oil film) and is represented by a constant temperature over the full stroke. F...

  1. How to diminish calcium loss and muscle atrophy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    perfect relaxation when asleep or awake. We have to check in space if we can thus diminish the use of medicaments or even eliminate them. Slow Yoga exercises decrease also the amount on food required because life is not so energy demanding in space as it is here under the earth's gravitation. We can stay lean and healthy with such static yet most effective physical exercises. In addition it gives us for free a vegetarian life style, just another benefit so useful in space travel.

  2. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  3. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to produce gas. Often, relatively simple changes in eating habits can lessen bothersome gas. Certain digestive system disorders, ... such as soda and beer, increase stomach gas. Eating habits, such as eating too quickly, drinking through a ...

  4. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of getting ... disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do to ...

  5. Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... negotiate the provision of reasonable accommodations in the workplace. When can a stroke patient begin rehabilitation? Rehabilitation ... at home gives people the advantage of practicing skills and developing compensatory strategies in the context of ...

  6. A Stroke of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author reflects on foreign-language learning by his EFL students as well as his own foreign-language learning. He concludes by musing on the possible and fantastical devastation on language-ability wrought by strokes.

  7. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  8. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. NINDS is conducting a public awareness campaign across the United States to educate people about ...

  9. Quality of Life and Loneliness in Stroke Survivors Living in Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeke, Laurie; Horstman, Patricia; Mallow, Jennifer; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Culp, Stacey; Domico, Jennifer; Barr, Taura

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Negative outcomes of stroke are associated with poorer quality of life (QoL) and impact stroke recovery. The purpose of this study was to characterize QoL and loneliness in a sample of rural Appalachian stroke survivors within 1 year of stroke. Methods Using mail survey methodology, survey data were collected from 121 ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke survivors living in West Virginia using 13 subscales from the Neuro-QOL survey and the three-item UCLA Loneliness Scale. Statistical Package for Social Sciences v. 20 was used to conduct descriptive, comparative, and predictive analyses. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess explanatory value of loneliness for QoL domains while controlling for comorbidities. Results: Participants who were discharged to a nursing home had poorer QoL when compared with those who were discharged to home. Stroke survivors who continued to smoke were less satisfied with social roles and reported higher mean loneliness and depression scores. History of psychological problems negatively correlated with all QoL domains and loneliness scores. Loneliness predicted poorer QoL even when controlling for age, gender, and significant comorbidities. Conclusion Nurses need to assess for loneliness, include loneliness in care planning, and implement smoking cessation and cognitive behavioral interventions. Interventions that target loneliness for stroke survivors could potentially diminish psychological sequelae after stroke and enhance QoL. PMID:25365057

  10. Telestroke in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Jacques; Joubert, Lynette B; de Bustos, Elizabeth Medeiros; Ware, Dallas; Jackson, David; Harrison, Terrence; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a high-frequency disorder placing a significant burden on the health care systems, being the foremost cause of complex chronic disability in adults. Devising systems that can enhance the prevention of stroke recurrence is an important priority and challenge in both the developed and the developing world. The potential for recurrent stroke can be substantially reduced by effective management of vascular risk factors. Telestroke is a tool with potential application to improve risk management of stroke survivors. Lack of acknowledgment of existing practices as well as lack of awareness of potential financial barriers to diffusion of telestroke can lead to limited implementation. Telestroke offers service providers the opportunity to access large numbers of stroke survivors targeting secondary prevention. The ideal 'telestroke model' provides service support, education for the patient and caregiver, as well as integration of specialist and primary care services. Effective use of technological advances, with adequate recognition of the importance of human interaction in the long-term management of a largely elderly population of stroke survivors is challenging but possible. Telestroke should be systems- and not technology-driven. Barriers in the implementation of telestroke have been identified as insufficient planning of IT infrastructure, lack of long-term vision for sustainability, a lack of contextual perspective as well as poor communication across domains. Future telestroke models should provide effective action in an integrated model of care recognizing and involving all existing players and practices. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  12. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakawah MO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Obadah Nakawah, Eugene C Lai Stanely H. Appel Department of Neurology, Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months. Keywords: vascular dyskinesia, stroke, movement disorders

  13. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  14. Improving public education about stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a common and serious disease. Most studies have shown that basic public knowledge about what a stroke is, symptoms of a stroke, and the proper reaction to a stroke is quite deficient. The fact that a stroke affects cognitive, communicative, and motor functions may partially explain the poor reaction to acute stroke symptoms. Several educational studies, using diverse formats and messaging paradigms, have been shown to positively affect public knowledge of stroke symptoms. Such efforts have often used mass media public education campaigns with an emphasis on recognizing symptoms of an acute stroke. Some have been able to demonstrate an increase in the chance of patients (or by-standers) calling 911 and seeking emergency care. However, many programs were of brief duration, and their long-term benefits are uncertain. Continual educational efforts will be needed to improve stroke knowledge and increase the percentage of patients who seek emergency care. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. CFD analysis of the scavenging process in marine two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Hult, Johan; Nogenmyr, Karl-Johan

    2014-01-01

    /charge before the subsequent compression stroke. This implies that the scavenging process is integral to engine performance as it influence the initial condition for the combustion process, thus affecting the fuel economy, power output and emission of hazardous gases. Two-stroke diesel engines for marine......The scavenging process is an integral part of any two-stroke internal combustion engine regardless of being spark ignited (SI) or compression ignited (CI). The scavenging process is responsible for replacing the burned gas from the combustion process from the previous working stroke with fresh air...

  16. Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation after a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation After a Stroke Past ... to help them recover successfully. What is post-stroke rehabilitation? Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills lost to ...

  17. Mini-Stroke vs. Regular Stroke: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is a ministroke different from a regular stroke? Answers from Jerry W. Swanson, M.D. When ... brain, spinal cord or retina, which may cause stroke-like symptoms but does not damage brain cells ...

  18. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Kraywinkel, Klaus; Heidrich, Jan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Wagner, Markus; Berger, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. S...

  20. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2012-01-01

    Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke. Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention. Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001). Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

  1. World Stroke Organization Global Stroke Services Guidelines and Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Norrving, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention,...

  2. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: Findings from Hip Hop Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke is linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether “Child-Mediated Stroke Communication” (CMSC) could improve stroke literacy parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke (HHS). Methods Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from two public schools in Harlem, NYC, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child’s participation in HHS, a novel CMSC intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week following the intervention. Results Fifth and Sixth grade students (n =182) were enrolled into HHS. 102 parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program: before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the five cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911), compared to 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) post-intervention (pstroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that schoolchildren aged 9-12 may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their Parents. PMID:22033995

  3. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring

  4. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  5. The obesity paradox in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    . Data include age, gender, civil status, stroke severity, computed tomography, and cardiovascular risk factors. Patients were followed up to 9·8 years (median 2·6 years). We used Cox regression models to compare risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke in the four body mass index groups......BACKGROUND: Although associated with excess mortality and morbidity, obesity is associated with lower mortality after stroke. The association between obesity and risk of recurrent stroke is unclear. AIMS: The study aims to investigate the association in stroke patients between body mass index...... and risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke. METHODS: An administrative Danish quality-control registry designed to collect a predefined dataset on all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark 2000–2010 includes 45 615 acute first-ever stroke patients with information on body mass index in 29 326...

  6. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  7. Off-Hours Admission and Acute Stroke Care Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Mainz, Jan; Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2014-01-01

    chance of compliance with 8 out of 10 performance measures; however, these differences diminished over time. Unadjusted odds ratio for 30 days case-fatality, for patients admitted off-hours compared with patients admitted on-hours, was 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.21). Adjusting for patient...... characteristics (in particular, stroke severity) decreased the odds ratio to 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.10). Additional adjustment for hospital characteristics and compliance with performance measures had no effect on the odds ratio. Conclusion-Patients admitted off-hours received a poorer quality......Background and Purpose-Studies have reported higher risks of death and other adverse outcomes in acute stroke patients admitted off-hours; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. According to time of admission, our aim was to examine compliance with performance measures for acute...

  8. ACUTE STROKE: FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME PREDICTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha; Ramalingam; Vinodkumar; Vasumathi; Valarmathi; Anu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic strokes account for >80% of total stroke events. Biochemical modalities like serum uric acid, ESR, CRP, Serum Fibrinogen will be a low cost and useful way to predict functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The Barthel ADL index it is an ordinal scale helping us to measure performances in ADL-activities in daily living. The present study aims to study the Biochemical parameters Uric Acid, CRP, ESR and Fibrinogen in Ischemic Stroke patients and to assess fu...

  9. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Sex differences in regulatory cells in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Hilary A; Benedek, Gil; Liang, Jian; Nguyen, Ha; Kent, Gail; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Saugstad, Julie A; Offner, Halina

    2017-08-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Sex differences, including smaller infarcts in females and greater involvement of immune-mediated inflammation in males may affect the efficacy of immune-modulating interventions. To address these differences, we sought to identify distinct stroke-modifying mechanisms in female vs. male mice. The current study demonstrated smaller infarcts and increased levels of regulatory CD19 + CD5 + CD1d hi B10 cells as well as anti-inflammatory CD11b + CD206 + microglia/macrophages in the ipsilateral vs. contralateral hemisphere of female but not male mice undergoing 60min middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 96h of reperfusion. Moreover, female mice with MCAO had increased total spleen cell numbers but lower B10 levels in spleens. These results elucidate differing sex-dependent regulatory mechanisms that account for diminished stroke severity in females and underscore the need to test immune-modulating therapies for stroke in both males and females. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Personal accounts of stroke experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachters-Kaufmann, CSM

    2000-01-01

    As there appeared to be a need for personal accounts of stroke experiences, a book called "Speaking about Stroke" was written for stroke patients and their caregivers. For the past two years, a questionnaire was sent to the people who had ordered the book, to gain an insight into the characteristics

  13. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke. High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke four to six times. Heart disease, especially a condition ... leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability. Four million Americans are living with the effects of stroke. The length of time to recover from a ...

  14. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  15. Stroke prevention: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2012-03-01

    Stroke is a personal, familial, and social disaster. It is the third cause of death worldwide, the first cause of acquired disability, the second cause of dementia, and its cost is astronomic. The burden of stroke is likely to increase given the aging of the population and the growing incidence of many vascular risk factors. Prevention of stroke includes--as for all other diseases--a "mass approach" aiming at decreasing the risk at the society level and an individual approach, aiming at reducing the risk in a given subject. The mass approach is primarily based on the identification and treatment of vascular risk factors and, if possible, in the implementation of protective factors. These measures are the basis of primary prevention but most of them have now been shown to be also effective in secondary prevention. The individual approach combines a vascular risk factor modification and various treatments addressing the specific subtypes of stroke, such as antiplatelet drugs for the prevention of cerebral infarction in large and small artery diseases of the brain, carotid endarterectomy or stenting for tight carotid artery stenosis, and oral anticoagulants for the prevention of cardiac emboli. There is a growing awareness of the huge evidence-to-practice gap that exists in stroke prevention largely due to socio-economic factors. Recent approaches include low cost intervention packages to reduce blood pressure and cheap "polypills" combining in a single tablet aspirin and several drugs to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Polypill intake should however not lead to abandon the healthy life-style measures which remain the mainstay of stroke prevention.

  16. Ischemic Stroke and Cancer: Stroke Severely Impacts Cancer Patients, While Cancer Increases the Number of Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Seok, Jin Myoung; Kim, Seon Gyeong; Hong, Ji Man; Kim, Hahn Young; Lee, Jun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer and ischemic stroke are two of the most common causes of death among the elderly, and associations between them have been reported. However, the main pathomechanisms of stroke in cancer patients are not well known, and can only be established based on accurate knowledge of the characteristics of cancer-related strokes. We review herein recent studies concerning the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of patients with cancer-related stroke. Main Contents This revi...

  17. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gas and gas pains Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  18. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. FIR Filter Implementation Based on the RNS with Diminished-1 Encoded Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Uros Zivaljevic

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A technique, based on the residue number system (RNS with diminished-1 encoded channel, has being used for implementing a finite impulse response (FIR digital filter. The proposed RNS architecture of the filter consists of three main blocks: forward and reverse converter and arithmetic processor for each channel. Architecture for residue to binary (reverse convertor with diminished-1 encoded channel has been proposed. Besides, for all RNS channels, the systolic design is used for the efficient  realization of FIR filter. A numerical example illustrates the principles of diminished-1 residue arithmetic, signal processing, and decoding for FIR filters.

  20. Ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Eva Joan; Geoghegan, Sheena Elizabeth; O'Neill, Desmond

    2014-05-01

    stroke is predominantly a disease of older people. While age bias has been demonstrated in studies of pharmacological therapeutic interventions in stroke, the extent of discrimination by age in stroke rehabilitation studies is unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature to assess the extent of ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies. all randomised control trials (RCT) on stroke rehabilitation entered in the Cochrane database which reported mean age were included. Patient gender and exclusion criteria were also recorded. of 241 RCT's identified, 182 were eligible for inclusion. The mean age of all patients was 64.3, almost a decade younger than those seen by stroke physicians in daily practice in global terms, and 11-12 years younger than encountered in hospital practice in the British Isles. Almost half (46%) of trials excluded patients with cognitive impairment, almost one-quarter (23%) patients with dysphasia and one-eighth (13%) excluded patients with multiple strokes. we have identified a clear difference in the mean age of those included in stroke rehabilitation studies compared with the international mean age of stroke. In addition, a quarter of trials excluded dysphasic patients which may indicate omission of more severe strokes. This means that the evidence base for stroke rehabilitation is deficient in terms of matching the characteristics of patients encountered in clinical practice, and a more representative sample of older people and those with significant disability must be included in future trials.

  1. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  2. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG)

  3. Stroke while jogging.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, W. F.; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging.

  4. Stroke while jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W. F.; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging. Images p229-a Fig. 1 PMID:7448490

  5. Sex differences in stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haast, R.A.M.; Gustafson, D.R.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in

  6. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  8. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  9. Stroke treatment outcomes in hospitals with and without Stroke Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Ignacio García, E; Mira Solves, J J; Ollero Ortiz, A; Vidal de Francisco, D; López-Mesonero, L; Bestué, M; Albertí, O; Acebrón, F; Navarro Soler, I M

    2017-10-23

    Organisational capacity in terms of resources and care circuits to shorten response times in new stroke cases is key to obtaining positive outcomes. This study compares therapeutic approaches and treatment outcomes between traditional care centres (with stroke teams and no stroke unit) and centres with stroke units. We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental study (without randomisation of the units analysed) to draw comparisons between 2 centres with stroke units and 4 centres providing traditional care through the neurology department, analysing a selection of agreed indicators for monitoring quality of stroke care. A total of 225 patients participated in the study. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were used to collect patients' evaluations of the service and healthcare received. Centres with stroke units showed shorter response times after symptom onset, both in the time taken to arrive at the centre and in the time elapsed from patient's arrival at the hospital to diagnostic imaging. Hospitals with stroke units had greater capacity to respond through the application of intravenous thrombolysis than centres delivering traditional neurological care. Centres with stroke units showed a better fit to the reference standards for stroke response time, as calculated in the Quick study, than centres providing traditional care through the neurology department. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Outcome Determinants of Stroke in a Brazilian Primary Stroke Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo W. Kuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke mortality in Brazil is one of the highest among Western countries. Nonetheless, stroke outcome determinants are still poorly known in this country. In this study we evaluate outcome determinants of stroke in a primary stroke center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and outcome data of patients with ischemic stroke (IS, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH admitted at “Hospital Paulistano,” São Paulo, Brazil. In-hospital mortality and functional outcome determinants were assessed. Univariate and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results. Three hundred forty-one patients were included in the study, 52.2% being male with 66.8±15.7 years. The stroke type distribution was IS: 59.2%, TIA: 29.6%, and ICH: 11.1%. ICH was associated with greater severity and poorer functional outcome. The determinants of poorer functional outcome were higher NIHSS, lower Glasgow score, and lower oxygen saturation level. The most important mortality determinant was the presence of visual symptoms. Conclusions. The stroke mortality and stroke outcome determinants found in the present study do not remarkably differ from studies carried out in developed countries. Stroke prognosis studies are crucial to better understand the high burden of stroke in Brazil.

  12. Understanding Stroke - Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Understanding Stroke Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time Past Issues / ... Julie Harris, and motivational speaker David Layton. Preventing Stroke "Until I had my stroke, I didn't ...

  13. Challenging comparison of stroke scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke scales can be classified as clinicometric scales and functional impairment, handicap scales. All studies describing stroke scales were reviewed by internet searching engines with the final search performed on January 1, 2013. The following string of keywords was entered into search engines; stroke, scale, score and disability. Despite advantages of modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Scandinavian stroke scale comparing to the NIHSS, including their simplification and less inter-rater variability; most of the stroke neurologists around the world continue using the NIHSS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI are widely used functional impairment and disability scales. Distinction between grades of mRS is poorly defined. The Asian stroke disability scale is a simplified functional impairment, handicap scale which is as valid as mRS and BI. At the present time, the NIHSS, mRS and BI are routine stroke scales because physicians have used to work with these scales for more than two decades, although it could not be an acceptable reason. On the other side, results of previous stroke trials, which are the basis of stroke management guidelines are driven using these scales.

  14. Post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Z; Birns, J; Bhalla, A

    2013-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of the current evidence on post-stroke urinary incontinence. An electronic database search was performed to identify relevant studies and review articles related to Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the stroke population between the years 1966 and 2012. Urinary incontinence following stroke is a common problem affecting more than one-third of acute stroke patients and persisting in up to a quarter at 1 year. It is well established that this condition is a strong marker of stroke severity and is associated with poorer functional outcomes and increased institutionalisation and mortality rates compared with those who remain continent. Despite evidence linking better outcomes to those patients who regain continence, the results of national audits have demonstrated that the management of UI following stroke is suboptimal, with less than two-thirds of stroke units having a documented plan to promote continence. Current evidence supports a thorough assessment to categorise the type and severity of post-stroke urinary incontinence. An individually tailored, structured management strategy to promote continence should be employed. This has been associated with better stroke outcomes and should be the aim of all stroke health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Misery perfusion, blood pressure control, and 5-year stroke risk in symptomatic major cerebral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shinya; Kishibe, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of strict blood pressure (BP) control in high-risk patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease and misery perfusion (MP) is controversial. Our purposes were (1) to determine whether MP is a predictor of a 5-year risk of subsequent stroke and (2) to investigate the relationships among BP during follow-up, MP, and the stroke risk. We studied 130 nondisabled patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease. Baseline hemodynamic measurements were obtained from (15)O-gas positron emission tomography, and patients received medical treatment and they were followed for 5 years or until stroke recurrence or death. During 5 years, strokes occurred in 6 of 16 patients with MP and in 15 of 114 without MP (log-rank test; Pstrokes in patients with MP and 4 in those without MP (Pstroke declined markedly after 2 years, and there was only 1 ipsilateral ischemic stroke in a patient without MP. Normal systolic BP (strokes in patients with impaired perfusion (including MP), whereas systolic BP outside the 130 to 149 mm Hg range was associated with an increased risk of all strokes in patients without MP. Patients with MP showed a high-5-year stroke recurrence, but a large part of the 5-year stroke risk disappeared after 2 years. Aggressive BP control may be hazardous in patients with impaired perfusion, including MP. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  17. For whom the desert bell tolls: heat stroke or stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolatkale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat stroke is the most complicated and dangerous amongst heat injuries that can lead to irreversible injury and even death with itself or with creating predisposibility to different diseases. The following case report depicts a patient who presented primarily with impairment of consciousness after walking 45 km in the summer heat to cross the Syria-Turkey border and later syncope. This case report aims to highlight the possibility of higher co-incidence with heat stroke and stroke.

  18. British Association of Stroke Physicians: benchmarking survey of stroke services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Dennis, Martin; Cohen, David; Rudd, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    the National Service Framework for Older People requires every general hospital which cares for stroke patients to introduce a specialist stroke service by 2004. to describe the organisation and staffing of specialist hospital-based stroke services in the UK. a national postal survey of consultant members of the British Association of Stroke Physicians (BASP) seeking details of the provision of neurovascular clinics, acute stroke units (ASUs), stroke rehabilitation units (SRUs), and the organisation and staffing of these services. the response rate was 91/126 (72%). Fifty-four neurovascular clinics, 40 ASUs and 68 SRUs were identified. Neurovascular clinics used a number of strategies to maintain rapid access and 30 (56%) were run by a single consultant. Only 50% ASUs usually admitted patients within 24 h of stroke. As the number of beds available on ASUs and SRUs did not reflect the total number of stroke in-patients, 21 (53%) ASUs and 45 (79%) SRUs had admission criteria. Training opportunities were limited: 37% ASUs and 82% SRUs had no specialist registrar. The therapy sessions (1 session=half a day) available per bed per week on a SRU were: physiotherapy 0.8; occupational therapy 0.6; speech and language therapy 0.25. significant development is needed to achieve the NSF target for hospital-based stroke services as few Trusts currently have all components in place and even when available not all stroke patients have access to specialist care. Stroke specialists will be required to run these services but training opportunities are currently limited. Stroke unit therapy staffing levels were lower than was available in randomised controlled trials.

  19. Comparative performance studies of a 4-stroke CI engine operated on dual fuel mode with producer gas and Honge oil and its methyl ester (HOME) with and without carburetor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banapurmath, N.R.; Tewari, P.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.V.B. College of Engineering and Technology, Poona Bangalore Road, Hubli, Karnataka 580031 (India)

    2009-04-15

    In order to meet the energy requirements, there has been growing interest in alternative fuels like biodiesels, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, biogas, hydrogen and producer gas to provide a suitable diesel oil substitute for internal combustion engines. Biomass is basically composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. A proximate analysis of biomass indicates the volatile matter to be between 60-80% and 20-25% carbon and the rest, ash. The first part of sub-stoichiometric oxidation leads to the loss of volatiles from biomass and is exothermic; it results in peak temperatures of 1400-1500 K and generation of gaseous products like carbon monoxide, hydrogen in some proportions and carbon dioxide and water vapor, which in turn are reduced in part to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by the hot bed of charcoal generated during the process of gasification. Therefore, solid biomass can be converted into a mixture of combustible gases, and subsequently utilized for combustion in a CI engine. Producer gas, if used in dual fuel mode, is an excellent substitute for reducing the amount of diesel consumed by the CI engine. Downdraft moving bed gasifiers coupled with an IC engine are a good choice for moderate quantities of available biomass, up to 500 kW of electric power. Vegetable oils present a very promising alternative to diesel oil since they are renewable and have similar properties. Vegetable oils offer almost the same power output with slightly lower thermal efficiency when used in diesel engines. Research in this direction with edible oils have yielded encouraging results, but their use as fuel for diesel engines has limited applications due to higher domestic requirement. In view of this, Honge oil (Pongamia Pinnata Linn) is selected and its viscosity is reduced by the transesterification process to obtain Honge oil methyl ester (HOME). Since vegetable oils produce higher smoke emissions, dual fuel operation could be adopted in order to improve their performance. A gas

  20. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  1. [Smoking and stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoichiro

    2011-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the brain infarction (lacunar and atherothrombotic brain infarction) and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Not only active smoking but also passive smoking and smokeless tobacco products pose a risk. The risk after smoking cessation for 5-10 years is equal to that faced by a non-smoker. Many patients continue smoking even after an attack of stroke; therefore, support measures to enforce nonsmoking are required in this high-risk population. We offer nonsmoking support using the 5A approach, and assess the nonsmoking stage (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance). We also administer medical therapy for smoking cessation when the patients find it difficult to quit smoking on their own accord. Nicotine dependency needs a follow-up like that required for other risk factors in the primary and secondary prevention of the stroke because smoking is a chronic disease that tends to recur.

  2. Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    AYBEK, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    In this study detrusor hyperreflexia was investigated by urodynamic study during the acute phase of stroke in patients who became incontinent after a cerebrovascular accident. Urodynamic studies reveal physiopathological findings of incontinence while the acute period of cerebrovascular accident do not cover neurogenic bladder features. In our study it was observed that most of the patients (60%) had normal bladder functions and detrusor hyperreflexia was a rare rindings. This res...

  3. Stroke Management: Nursing Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Esmaeili

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The subacute and long-term assessment and management of patients who have suffered a stroke includes physical therapy and testing to determine the precise etiology of the event so as to prevent recurrence. The acute management differs. Immediate goals include minimizing brain injury, treating medical complications, and moving toward uncovering the pathophysiologic basis of the patient's symptoms. Methods: This is a review paper that report up to date finding with review some...

  4. Early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godecke, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions. Trials in this early time window are few. Although the seminal AVERT trial suggests that a cautious approach is necessary immediately (stroke, early mobility training and mobilization appear well tolerated, with few reasons to delay initiating some rehabilitation within the first week. The results of large clinical trials of early aphasia therapy are on the horizon, and examples of targeted upper limb treatments with better patient selection are emerging. Early rehabilitation trials are complex, particularly those that intervene across acute and rehabilitation care settings, but these trials are important if we are to optimize recovery potential in the critical window for repair. Concerted efforts to standardize 'early' recruitment, appropriately stratify participants and implement longer term follow-up is needed. Trial standards are improving. New recommendations from a recent Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable will help drive new research.

  5. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  6. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.

    2008-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced n...

  7. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  8. Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Stroke Association’s Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services Rehabilitation, often referred to as rehab, is an important part of stroke recovery. Through rehab, you:  Re-learn basic skills such ...

  9. What You Need to Know about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain. The other kind of stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks ... are very common among African Americans. The best treatment for stroke is prevention. You can reduce your ...

  10. Epidermoid Causing Ischemic Stroke in the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

  11. What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke? Brain tissue affected by blockage Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in ... over 55 years old have more chance of stroke, and the risk gets greater as you get ...

  12. Burden of stroke in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-08-01

    In Cambodia, stroke is not ranked among the top 10 leading causes of death, but infectious disease are among the top three leading causes of death. This finding could be attributed to a lack of awareness among Cambodians of the signs and symptoms of stroke or to poor reporting, incomplete data, lack of neurologists and neurosurgeons, or low accessibility to the hospitals. The only study of stroke in Cambodia is the Prevalence of Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Cambodia survey, which identified several stroke-related risk factors in the population. Tobacco chewing or smoking is the main risk factor for stroke in Cambodia. Traditional therapies, such as oyt pleung (moxibustion) and jup (cupping), are widely practiced for stroke rehabilitation. In Cambodia, there are few neurologists and few important equipment, such as magnetic resonance imaging machines and computed tomography scanners. The Cambodian government should cooperate with the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund to attract foreign expertise and technologies to treat stroke patients. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  13. Infections and Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Grabska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Członkowska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Infections increase the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and may worsen IS prognosis. Adverse effects of in-hospital infections on stroke outcome were also reported. We aimed to study the prevalence of pre- and poststroke infections and their impact on IS outcome. Methods. We analysed clinical data of 2066 IS patients to assess the effect of pre-stroke and post-stroke infections on IS severity, as well as short-term (up to 30 days) and long-term (90 days) outcome. The independent i...

  14. Stroke scale score and early prediction of outcome after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Zuberi, F.Z.; Afsar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as a predictor of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Subjects and Methods: The study included 50 patients who presented to Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the study period with acute stroke and were evaluated with CT scan of brain. Only those patients were enrolled in the study that had acute ischemic stroke. The enrolled subjects were then evaluated for the neurological impairment using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The subjects were followed-up and their functional outcome was assessed using Barthel index (BI) on the 7th day of their admission. Results: Of the fifty patients enrolled in the study, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) were females, with age ranging from 45 years to 95 years and a mean age of 59.9 years. Neurological impairment at presentation was assessed by NIHSS. The score ranged between 2 and 28. The functional outcome was evaluated on the 7th day using Barthel index (BI), which ranged from 0 to 80. NIHSS score was found to be a good predictor of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke (p<0.001). Other factors like gender, hypertension and heart disease did not affect the functional recovery in such patients. Various factors were found to be significant for early prediction of stroke recovery. The NIHSS score was the strongest predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke. Age at the time of the event was also found to be an important predictor for stroke recovery. Conclusion: The NIHSS score is a good predictor of patient's recovery after stroke. Assessing the patient's neurological impairment at first presentation of ischemic stroke can guide the physician regarding the prognosis and management plan. (author)

  15. Identification of stroke mimics among clinically diagnosed acute strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiyatorn, Lojana; Saksornchai, Pichaya; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch

    2013-09-01

    Stroke is a clinically syndrome of a sudden onset of neurological deficit in a vascular cause. Stroke mimics is the non-vascular disorders with stroke-like clinical symptoms. It is important to distinguish true stroke from mimics since treatment plan may differ To determine the incidence of the stroke mimics and identify their etiologies. All non-contrast head CT of the patients with clinically diagnosed stroke who immediately received imaging upon arrival at the emergency department of the university hospital were retrospectively reviewed in 12-month period between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Medical records, laboratory results, MRI, and 6-month clinical follow-up records were reviewed for final diagnosis. Seven hundred four patients were included in this study, including 363 (51.5%) men and 341 (48.5%) women with range in age from 24 to 108 years. Amongst those, 417 (59.2%) were ischemic stroke, 80 (11.40%) were hemorrhagic stroke, 186 (26.4%) were stroke-mimics, and 21 (3%) were inconclusive. The etiologies among stroke-mimics were metabolic/intoxication (35, 18.8%), sepsis (28, 15.0%), seizure (21, 11.3%), syncope (20, 10.8%), subdural hemorrhage (14, 7.5%), vertigo (11, 6.0%), brain tumor (10, 5.30%), central nervous system infection (5, 2.7%), others (26, 14.0%), and unspecified (16, 8.6%). Incidence rates and etiologies of the stroke mimics were similar to the western reports. However the frequency of each mimic was not.

  16. Stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Bahakim, Hassan M.; Kurban, Khadija M.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Nasir, Ali A.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khoja, Waleed A.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the causes, pathogenesis, and risk factors. The Retrospective Study Group (RSG) included children with stroke who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology, or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period July 1992 to February 2001. The Prospective Study Group (PSG) included those seen between February 2001 and March 2003. During the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, 117 children (61 males and 56 females, aged one month-12 years) were evaluated; the majority (89%) of these were Saudis. The calculated annual hospital frequency rate of stroke was 27.1/100,000 of the pediatric (1month-12 years) population The mean age at onset of the initial stroke in the 104 Saudi children was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) median and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). Large-vessel infarcts (LVI, 51.9%) were more common than small-vessel lacunar lesions (SVLL, 19.2%). Five patients (4.8%) had combined LVI and SVLL. Intracranial hemorrhage was less common (18.2%), whereas sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 6 (5.8%) patients. A major risk factor was identified in 94 of 104 (89.4%) Saudi children. Significantly more hematologic disorders and coagulopathies were identified in the PSG compared to the RSG (p=0.001), reflecting a better yield following introduction of more comprehensive hematologic and cogulation laboratory tests during the prospective study period. Hematologic disorders were the most common risk factor (46.2%); presumed perinatal ischemic cerebral injury was risk factor in 23 children (22.1) and infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system in 18 (17.3%). Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying cause in 7 patients (6.7%) and

  17. Changes of motor recovery in chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, Álvaro Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few studies have evaluated changes in motor recovery during the chronic phase of stroke. Objective: To determine changes in motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Materials and methods: A retrospective-descriptive analysis was done of the records of 47 patients with motor sequelae of stroke with clinical evolution longer than 6 months (average: 8 months. Functional changes obtained between two consecutive records (average time between assessments: 6 months in scores of Fugl-Meyer Motor Scale (FM, Box and Block Test, PASS, Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, Barthel Index, Composite Functional Index, Modified Ashworth Scale were analyzed. Results: The whole group had significant changes toward functional motor recovery in all scales (p < 0.01, except for the FM in the lower limb. However, the sizes of the effect were small. In patients with evolution longer than 12 months, both the size of effects and statistical significance diminished. Conclusion: After six months of evolution, patients with motor sequelae of CVA show small changes toward functional motor recovery, which are statistically significant until twelve months.

  18. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots) (American Stroke Association) Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke (American Heart Association) Also in Spanish Prevention and Risk Factors Carotid Endarterectomy (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) ...

  19. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke subtypes assessed four OCSP (Oxfordshire Communi-. African Health Sciences Vol 15 Issue 1, March 2015. 68. 69 ty Stroke Project Classification) subtypes classification. 13 was used with lacunar circulation infarct (LACI) and total anterior (TACI), partial anterior (PACI), posterior. (POCI) circulation infarcts as non ...

  20. 'This stroke was sent…': Stroke-related illness concepts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though there is evidence that stroke incidence is increasing even in low and middle income countries, there is no study of stroke-related illness concepts and HSB in Nigerians. Data from 960 educated Nigerians were analysed. Eight hundred and fifty four respondents (431 aged 20-40 years and 423 aged 41 years or ...

  1. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic

  2. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic origin,

  3. Improving Stroke Management through Specialized Stroke Units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rehabilitation of the stroke patient. The establishment of stroke units has been found to improve the survival of patients and significantly reduce disability by rendering holistic care. Early intervention to rapidly restore and maintain blood supply to the ischemic area in the brain, minimize brain damage and hence impairment ...

  4. Diagnosis in stroke - an uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aichner, F.T.

    2003-01-01

    In practical day-to-day terms, most patients have one of the common causes of stroke: ischemic stroke caused by the complications of atherothrombosis, intracranial small vessel disease, embolism from the heart, primary intracerebral hemorrhage caused by hypertension, or subarachnoid hemorrhage as a result of a ruptured saccular aneurysm. There are three issues to be considered in assessing the reliability of the clinical diagnosis of stroke: the diagnosis of stroke itself: is it a stroke or not; whether the stroke is caused by an infarct or a hemorrhage and particular in ischemic stroke the site and size of the lesion (anterior vs. posterior circulation, lacunar vs. cortical, etc.). No clinical scoring method can differentiate with absolute reliability ischemic stroke from primary intracerebral hemorrhage. To do this brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is required. For vascular diagnosis ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography are ideal and complementary non-invasive techniques. Both have no risks and are reasonably sensitive. Catheterangiography is only reserved for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage with a view to surgical or endovascular treatment or in exceptional cases to establish a more firm prognosis. The diagnosis of ischemic stroke caused by embolism from the heart can only be considered at all if there is an identifiable cardioembolic source which is the case in about 30 % of ischemic stroke, a higher proportion in recent studies using transoesophageal echocardiography. It is not clear that transoesophageal echocardiography provides much more information for clinical decision-making than transthoracic echocardiography, although it certainly provides more anatomical information in selected patients. This article summarizes the diagnostic armamentarium which is used for the diagnosis of stroke and gives an overview of clinically reliable and relevant measures. Refs. 23 (author)

  5. Division of Work and Fragmented Information: An Explanation for the Diminishing Marginal Product of Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Harashima, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an explanation for the diminishing marginal product of labor is demonstrated in a model that incorporates the concept of entropy from information theory. First, I introduce the concept of “division of work” and argue that the division of work (i.e., the allocation of tasks in the production process) and not the division of labor (i.e., worker specialization) is the source of the diminishing marginal product of labor. Division of work results in a fragmentation of the informatio...

  6. A new six stroke single cylinder diesel engine referring Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hao; Guo, Qi; Yang, Lu; Liu, Shenghua; Xie, Xuliang; Chen, Zhaoyang; Liu, Zengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Six stroke engine presented by Conklin and Szybist is an effective way to recover energy of exhaust gas by adding a partial exhaust stroke and steam expansion stroke. Characteristics of the engine are analyzed and its disadvantages are pointed out. A new six stroke diesel engine is presented here. It refers rankine cycle inside cylinder. Total exhaust gas is recompressed and at a relatively low back pressure in the fourth stroke water is injected to which maintains liquid phase until the piston moves to the TDC. At c′ 720 °CA (crank angle) the water becomes saturated. An ideal thermodynamics model of exhaust gas compression, water injection and expansion is constructed to investigate this modification. Properties at characteristic points are calculated to determine the increased indicated work. Results show that the work increases with the advance of water injection timing and the quality of water. The cycle is more efficient and the new engine has potential for saving energy. Moreover, it is forecasted that HC and PM emissions may reform with steam in reality and H 2 is produced which will react with NO X . - Highlights: • A new six stroke diesel engine is introduced and a new ideal cycle is constructed. • Increased indicated work of the cycle proves that the cycle is more efficient. • In reality steam may reform with HC and PM and produced H 2 may react with NO X emission. • The engine has the potential for energy saving and emission reducing

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  8. One Stroke at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollibaugh, Molly

    2012-01-01

    At first glance, a Zentangle creation can seem intricate and complicated. But, when you learn how it is done, you realize how simple it is. Zentangles are patterns, or "tangles," that have been reduced to a simple sequence of elemental strokes. When you learn to focus on each stroke you find yourself capable of things that you may have once…

  9. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  10. Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Lampl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.

  11. The imaging of ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoggard, Nigel; Wilkinson, Iain D.; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    Stroke is a clinical syndrome of a rapidly developing focal neurological deficit that may be classified for practical purposes into ischaemic and haemorrhagic. The role of imaging is to exclude mimics of ischaemic stroke or intracranial haemorrhage and confirm the presence of an ischaemic stroke. Computed tomography (CT) remains the investigation of choice to exclude acute intracranial haemorrhage but diffusion weighted magnetic resonance (MR) has proved to be a sensitive method of detecting early ischaemic infarction. Perfusion weighted MR allows further assessment at the same examination that could help guide the clinician in the risk/benefit analysis of treatment with thrombolytics or neuroprotective agents under evaluation. This can also be achieved with CT. This review article discusses the imaging of ischaemic stroke, relating the pathophysiology of stroke to it. It deals separately in more detail with these newer MR techniques. Hoggard, N. et al. (2001)

  12. Electric-utility oil and gas use in the eighties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolstad, C D; Abbey, D S; Martinez, A J; Williams, D S; Wolak, Jr, F A; Yeamans, M K

    1982-04-01

    This report forecasts possible levels of oil and gas use by electric utilities in the US through 1990. The analysis is done at a regional level. High and low levels of electricity demand as well as nominal and diminished availability of new generating capacity are assumed. Projected oil and gas use for 1990 ranges from 1000 to 3200 barrels per day.

  13. The effectiveness of policies to transform a gas-exporting country into a gas-transit country : The case of The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipperus, Ouren T.; Mulder, Machiel

    The Netherlands has been a major European natural gas producer and exporter for many decades, but now faces the challenge to deal with diminishing resources. In response, the Dutch government initiated a gas-hub strategy, which is the policy to transform the gas industry from an export-oriented

  14. Rehabilitative Games for Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pyae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major problems in medical and healthcare that can cause severe disability and death of patients especially for older population. Rehabilitation plays an important role in stroke therapy. However, most of the rehabilitative exercises are monotonous and tiring for the patients. For a particular time, they can easily get bored in doing these exercises. The role of patient’s motivation in rehabilitation is vital. Motivation and rehabilitative outcomes are strongly related. Digital games promise to help stroke patients to feel motivated and more engaged in rehabilitative training through motivational gameplay. Most of the commercial games available in the market are not well-designed for stroke patients and their motivational needs in rehabilitation. This study aims at understanding the motivational requirements of stroke patients in doing rehabilitative exercises and living in a post-stroke life. Based on the findings from the literature review, we report factors that can influence the stroke patients’ level of motivation such as social functioning, patient-therapist relationship, goal-setting, and music. These findings are insightful and useful for ideating and designing interactive motivation-driven games for stroke patients. The motivational factors of stroke patients in rehabilitation may help the game designers to design motivation-driven game contexts, contents, and gameplay. Moreover, these findings may also help healthcare professionals who concern stroke patient’s motivation in rehabilitative context. In this paper, we reported our Virtual Nursing Home (VNH concept and the games that we are currently developing and re-designing. Based on this literature review, we will present and test out the ideas how we can integrate these motivational factors in our future game design, development, and enhancement.

  15. Basics of acute stroke treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haass, A.

    2005-01-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O 2 delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [de

  16. Endovascular stroke treatment in a small-volume stroke center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Gry N; Fjetland, Lars; Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Martin W; Kurz, Kathinka D

    2017-04-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) of stroke caused by large vessel occlusions (LVO) performed by general interventional radiologists in cooperation with stroke neurologists and neuroradiologists at a center with a limited annual number of procedures. We aimed to compare our results with those previously reported from larger stroke centers. A total of 108 patients with acute stroke due to LVO treated with EVT were included. Outcome was measured using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days. Efficacy was classified according to the modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (mTICI) scoring system. Safety was evaluated according to the incidence of procedural complications and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH). Mean age of the patients was 67.5 years. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on hospital admission was 17. Successful revascularization was achieved in 76%. 39.4% experienced a good clinical outcome (mRS<3). Intraprocedural complications were seen in 7.4%. 7.4% suffered a sICH. 21.3% died within 3 months after EVT. The use of general interventional radiologists in EVT of LVO may be a possible approach for improving EVT coverage where availability of specialized neurointerventionalists is challenging. EVT for LVO stroke performed by general interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists can be safe and efficacious despite the low number of annual procedures.

  17. mStroke: "Mobile Stroke"-Improving Acute Stroke Care with Smartphone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Benjamin Y; Stack, Colleen M; Yang, Julian P; Dodds, Jodi A

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of method and time of system activation on clinical metrics in cases utilizing the Stop Stroke (Pulsara, Inc.) mobile acute stroke care coordination application. A retrospective cohort analysis of stroke codes at 12 medical centers using Stop Stroke from March 2013 to May 2016 was performed. Comparison of metrics (door-to-needle time [DTN] and door-to-CT time [DTC], and rate of DTN ≤ 60 minutes [goal DTN]) was performed between subgroups based on method (emergency medical service [EMS] versus emergency department [ED]) and time of activation. Effects were adjusted for confounders (age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) using multiple linear and logistic regression. The final dataset included 2589 cases. Cases activated by EMS were more severe (median NIHSS score 8 versus 4, P smartphone technology provides unique insight into acute stroke codes. Activation of mobile electronic stroke coordination in the field appears to promote a more expedited and successful care process. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Less Guilty by Reason of Adolescence: Developmental Immaturity, Diminished Responsibility, and the Juvenile Death Penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence; Scott, Elizabeth S.

    2003-01-01

    The authors use a developmental perspective to examine questions about the criminal culpability of juveniles and the juvenile death penalty. Under principles of criminal law, culpability is mitigated when the actor's decision-making capacity is diminished, when the criminal act was coerced, or when the act was out of character. The authors argue…

  19. Nonsuicidal self-injury and diminished pain perception: the role of emotion dysregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franklin, J.C.; Aaron, R.V.; Arthur, M.S.; Shorkey, S.P.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue in the absence of suicidal intent (e.g., cutting or burning the skin). Previous studies have found that people with a history of NSSI display diminished pain perception. However, it remains unclear why this effect

  20. Can Using Human Examples Diminish the Number of Misconceptions Held Concerning Mendelian Genetics Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Explores high school biology and the teaching of genetics. The question is asked, Can the use of relevant, meaningful human genetics concepts diminish the number of misconceptions formed between new and existing concepts? Can the application of the Ausubelian learning theory also decrease the acquisition of misconceptions? (SAH)

  1. Does too much work hamper innovation? Evidence for diminishing returns of work hours for patent grants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celbis, M.G.; Turkeli, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study suggests that individual time is an important factor that needs to be considered in innovation research. We define two types of time: work time and free time. We find that work time has a positive but diminishing effect on innovative output such that after a certain point the

  2. Cor triatriatum and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestro, Jose Danilo Bengzon; Regaldo, Joseph Justin Hipolito; Gonzales, Eddieson Masangcay; Dorotan, Maria Kristina Casanova; Espiritu, Adrian Isidro; Pascual, Jose Leonard Rivera

    2017-08-08

    Cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS) is a congenital anomaly where the left atrium is divided into two compartments by a fibromuscular membrane. This report aims to add to the literature on a rare cardiac condition that can cause neurological morbidity. We report a case of a 19-year-old female with an infarct in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory initially maintained on aspirin. Eighteen months later, she had recurrence of weakness, for which repeat transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and re-evaluation of the first TTE demonstrated a hyperechoic membrane spanning the width of the left atrium, clinching the diagnosis of CTS. Despite anticoagulation with apixaban, she was admitted for a third stroke where she succumbed to hospital-acquired pneumonia. Among cases of CTS associated with stroke, anticoagulation and surgery were the main modes of treatment. This case has the longest follow-up and the first to demonstrate failure of antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulation. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Wen Dan Decoction for hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Hua; Huang, Yan-Mei; Ling, Wei; Li, Yang; Wang, Min; Chen, Xiang-Yan; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2015-04-01

    The use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in stroke is increasing worldwide. Here we report the existing clinical evidence of the Pinellia Ternata containing formula Wen Dan Decoction (WDD) for the treatment of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. PubMed, CNKI, Wan Fang database, Cochrane Library and online Clinical Trial Registry were searched up to 26 February 2013 for randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCTs) using WDD as intervention versus Western conventional medicine as control to treat stroke. Clinical outcomes were improvement of the Neurological Functional Deficit Scores (NFDS) and overall therapeutic efficacy rates including rate of cure. Meta-regression analysis using Hedges'g was performed for RCTs with significant heterogeneity. A total of 22 RCTs of ischemic stroke and 4 RCTs of hemorrhagic stroke, involving 2214 patients (1167 used WDD), met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the 13 RCTs reporting NFDS improvement favored WDD over the control (mean difference=-3.40, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=[-4.64, -2.15]). Rate of overall therapeutic efficacy (odds ratio [OR]=3.39, 95%CI=[1.81, 6.37]) for hemorrhagic stroke were significantly higher in WDD treated patients than the control subjects. In the 1898 patients with ischemic stroke, WDD medication also achieved higher rates of cure (OR=2.22, 95%CI=[1.66, 2.97]) and overall therapeutic efficacy (OR=3.31, 95%CI=[2.54, 4.31]) than the conventional treatment. WDD displays benefits on improvement of neurological function and overall therapeutic efficacy in post-stroke patients. TCM such as WDD may serve as a therapeutic tool of dual actions to explore the common mechanisms underlying cerebral hemorrhage and ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gas-to-hydraulic power converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, C. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A gas piston driven hydraulic piston pump is described in which the gas cycle is of high efficiency by injecting the gas in slugs at the beginning of each power stroke. The hydraulic piston is disposed to operate inside the as piston, and the two pistons, both slidably but nonrotatably mounted, are coupled together with a rotating but non-sliding motion transfer ring extending into antifriction grooves in the sidewalls of the two pistons. To make the hydraulic piston move at a constant speed during constant hydraulic horsepower demand and thus exert a constant pressure on the hydraulic fluid, these grooves are machined with variable pitches and one is the opposite of the other, i.e., the gas piston groove increases in pitch during its power stroke while the hydraulic piston groove decreases. Any number of piston assembly sets may be used to obtain desired hydraulic horsepower.

  5. Pre-stroke use of beta-blockers does not affect ischaemic stroke severity and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, S.; Haentjens, P.; De Smedt, A.; Brouns, R.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Luijckx, G. J.; De Keyser, J.

    Background and purpose: It is unclear whether pre-stroke beta-blockers use may influence stroke outcome. This study evaluates the independent effect of pre-stroke use of beta-blockers on ischaemic stroke severity and 3 months functional outcome. Methods: Pre-stroke use of beta-blockers was

  6. What about self-management post-stroke? Challenges for stroke survivors, spouses and professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satink, A.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management post-stroke is challenging for many persons after a stroke. In this thesis is explored how stroke survivors, spouses and professionals perceived self-management post-stroke and how the process of self-management post-stroke evolved over time. The following studies are conducted: a

  7. Do changing prices portend a shift in fuel consumption, diminished greenhouse gas emissions, and lower fuel tax revenue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The growing uncertainty about oil prices and availability has made long-range transportation planning : more challenging. Rather than relying on trend extrapolation, this study uses market mechanisms to : evaluate key long-range transportation planni...

  8. Stroke, social support and the partner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, WJ

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common conditions with about 45,000 people suffering a first stroke in the Netherlands each year. Although survival after stroke has increased in recent decades, a substantial part of the survivors of stroke remain physically or cognitively impaired and in need of support

  9. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  10. Early infection and prognosis after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J

    2001-01-01

    Infection is a frequent complication in the early course of acute stroke and may adversely affect stroke outcome. In the present study, we investigate early infection developing in patients within 3 days of admission to the hospital and its independent relation to recovery and stroke outcome....... In addition, we identify predictors for early infections, infection subtypes, and their relation to initial stroke severity....

  11. Socioeconomic Status and Self-Rated Oral Health; Diminished Return among Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2018-04-24

    Background. An extensive body of knowledge has documented weaker health effects of socio-economic status (SES) for Blacks compared to Whites, a phenomenon also known as Blacks’ diminished return. It is, however, unknown whether the same diminished return also holds for other ethnic minorities such as Hispanics or not. Aim. Using a nationally representative sample, the current study aimed to compare Non-Hispanic and Hispanic Whites for the effects of SES on self-rated oral health. Methods. For the current cross-sectional study, we used data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), 2001⁻2003. With a nationally representative sampling, CPES included 11,207 adults who were either non-Hispanic Whites ( n = 7587) or Hispanic Whites ( n = 3620. The dependent variable was self-rated oral health, treated as dichotomous measure. Independent variables were education, income, employment, and marital status. Ethnicity was the focal moderator. Age and gender were covariates. Logistic regressions were used for data analysis. Results. Education, income, employment, and marital status were associated with oral health in the pooled sample. Although education, income, employment, and marital status were associated with oral health in non-Hispanic Whites, none of these associations were found for Hispanic Whites. Conclusion. In a similar pattern to Blacks’ diminished return, differential gain of SES indicators exists between Hispanic and non-Hispanic Whites, with a disadvantage for Hispanic Whites. Diminished return of SES should be regarded as a systemically neglected contributing mechanism behind ethnic oral health disparities in the United States. Replication of Blacks’ diminished return for Hispanics suggests that these processes are not specific to ethnic minority groups, and non-White groups gain less because they are not enjoying the privilege and advantage of Whites.

  12. Experimental investigations of a four-stroke single cylinder direct injection diesel engine operated on dual fuel mode with producer gas as inducted fuel and Honge oil and its methyl ester (HOME) as injected fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banapurmath, N.R.; Tewari, P.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.V.B. College of Engineering and Technology, Hubli 580031, Karnataka (India); Hosmath, R.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, K.L.E Society' s College of Engineering and Technology, Belgaum, Karnataka (India)

    2008-09-15

    In order to meet the energy requirements, there has been growing interest in alternative fuels like biodiesels, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, biogas, hydrogen and producer gas to provide a suitable diesel oil substitute for internal combustion engines. Vegetable oils present a very promising alternative to diesel oil since they are renewable and have similar properties. Vegetable oils offer almost the same power output with slightly lower thermal efficiency when used in diesel engine [Srivastava A, Prasad R. Triglycerides-based diesel fuels. Renew Sustain Energy Rev 2000;4:111-33.; Vellguth G. Performance of vegetable oils and their monoesters as fuels for diesel engines. SAE 831358, 1983.; Demirbas A. Biodiesel production from vegetable oils via catalytic and non-catalytic supercritical methanol transesterification methods. Int J Prog Energy Combust Sci 2005;31:466-87.; Jajoo BN, Keoti RS. Evaluation of vegetable oils as supplementary fuels for diesel engines. In: Proceedings of the XV national conference on IC engines and combustion, Anna University Chennai, 1997.; Altin R, Cetinkaya S, Yucesu HS. The potential of using vegetable oil fuels as fuel for diesel engines. Int J Energy Convers Manage 2000;42:529-38, 248.; Gajendra Babu MK, Chandan Kumar Das LM. Experimental investigations on a Karanja oil methyl ester fuelled DI diesel engine. SAE 2006-01-0238, 2006.; Agarwal D, Kumar Agarwal A. Performance and emission characteristics of a Jatropha oil (preheated and blends) in a direct injection compression ignition engine. Int J Appl Therm Eng 2007;27:2314-23. ]. Research in this direction with edible oils have yielded encouraging results, but their use as fuel for diesel engine has limited applications due to higher domestic requirement [Scholl Kyle W, Sorenson Spencer C. Combustion Analysis of soyabean oil methyl ester in a direct injection diesel engine. SAE 930934, 1993.; Nwafor OMI. Effect of advanced injection timing on the performance of rapeseed oil in

  13. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, L

    2012-09-27

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  14. [Plan for stroke healthcare delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Sabín, J; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Gállego, J; Gil-Peralta, A; Casado, I; Castillo, J; Díez Tejedor, E; Gil, A; Jiménez, C; Lago, A; Martínez-Vila, E; Ortega, A; Rebollo, M; Rubio, F

    2006-12-01

    All stroke patients should receive the same degree of specialized healthcare attention according to the stage of their disease, independently of where they live, their age, gender or ethnicity. To create an organized healthcare system able to offer the needed care for each patient, optimizing the use of the existing resource. A committee of 14 neurologists specialized in neurovascular diseases representing different regions of Spain evaluated the available scientific evidence according to the published literature. During the acute phase, all stroke patients must be evaluated in hospitals that offer access to specialized physicians (neurologists) and the indicated diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Hospitals that deliver care to acute stroke patients must be prepared to attend these patients and need to arrange a predefined transferring circuit coordinated with the extrahospitalary emergency service. Since resources are limited, they should be structured into different care levels according to the target population. Thus, three types of hospitals will be defined for stroke care: reference stroke hospital, hospital with stroke unit, hospital with stroke team.

  15. Cognitive performance after ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela R. Ferreira

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment after stroke affects the patient recovery process. Therefore, the identification of factors associated with cognitive outcomes is important since it allows risk profiles of stroke survivors to be determined. OBJECTIVE: To assess cognitive outcome of stroke outpatients and investigate associations among clinical and demographic variables, vascular risk factors, depression symptoms and functional ability; and to describe the neuropsychological profile of these patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional design study was conducted. Subjects who suffered a first-ever ischaemic stroke 6 to 10 months prior to data collection underwent neuropsychological assessment and screening for depressive symptoms and functional ability. The outcome "cognitive performance" was analyzed considering two groups: "cognitive impairment" and "no cognitive impairment". RESULTS: There was a statistically significant association between cognitive impairment and female gender, age, stroke severity and functional ability. Regarding neuropsychological profile, the cognitive impairment group exhibited more generalized deficits in attention, visuospatial organization, verbal functions and verbal memory domains compared to the community control group. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of cognitive impairment among patients was high, especially in women, older participants, individuals with more severe stroke, and greater impairment in functional ability. Multiple cognitive domains are affected and this may hamper recovery and negatively impact independence and quality of life after stroke.

  16. Acupuncture for acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mangmang; Li, Dan; Zhang, Shihong

    2018-03-30

    Sensory stimulation via acupuncture has been reported to alter activities of numerous neural systems by activating multiple efferent pathways. Acupuncture, one of the main physical therapies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been widely used to treat patients with stroke for over hundreds of years. This is the first update of the Cochrane Review originally published in 2005. To assess whether acupuncture could reduce the proportion of people with death or dependency, while improving quality of life, after acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group trials register (last searched on February 2, 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Ovid (CENTRAL Ovid; 2017, Issue 2) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to February 2017), Embase Ovid (1974 to February 2017), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) EBSCO (1982 to February 2017), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED; 1985 to February 2017), China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (1998 to February 2017), and the VIP database (VIP Chinese Science Journal Evaluation Reports; 1989 to February 2017). We also identified relevant trials in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (last searched on Feburuary 20, 2017), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (last searched on April 30, 2017), and Clinicaltrials.gov (last searched on April 30, 2017). In addition, we handsearched the reference lists of systematic reviews and relevant clinical trials. We sought randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture started within 30 days from stroke onset compared with placebo or sham acupuncture or open control (no placebo) in people with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, or both. Needling into the skin was required for acupuncture. Comparisons were made versus (1) all controls (open control or sham acupuncture), and (2) sham acupuncture controls. Two review authors applied

  17. Sudden unexpected death caused by stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Risgaard, Bjarke; Zachariasardóttir, Sára

    2018-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in young individuals globally. Data on the burden of sudden death by stroke are sparse in the young. Aims The aim of this study was to report mortality rates, cause of death, stroke subtype, and symptoms in children and young adults who suffered...... contacted the healthcare system because of neurological symptoms, whereof one was suspected of having a stroke (6%). Conclusions Sudden death by stroke in children and young adults occurs primarily due to hemorrhagic stroke. We report a high frequency of neurological symptoms prior to sudden death by stroke....... Increased awareness among healthcare professionals towards stroke symptoms in children and young adults may lead to earlier detection of stroke, and thereby potentially lowering the incidence of sudden death by stroke....

  18. Editorial for the Third Pangu Stroke Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Jun; Ji, Xunming; Xi, Guohua; Zhang, John

    2015-10-01

    The Pangu Stroke Conference has been held annually in China since 2012 and is based on the successful templates of the Princeton Stroke Conference in the United States and the Marburg Conference on Cerebral Ischemia in Germany. All participants in the Pangu Stroke Conference are expert stroke clinicians or stroke basic science researchers of Chinese origin. This conference promotes collaboration between clinicians and basic science researchers and between stroke researchers in mainland China and other parts of the world. The Pangu Stroke Conference fosters translational stroke research, discussions of stroke research milestones, and proposals for future directions. Some of the keynote presentations in the third Pangu Stroke Conference are included in this special issue. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Therapeutic effects of hMAPC and hMSC transplantation after stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mora-Lee

    Full Text Available Stroke represents an attractive target for stem cell therapy. Although different types of cells have been employed in animal models, a direct comparison between cell sources has not been performed. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of human multipotent adult progenitor cells (hMAPCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs on endogenous neurogenesis, angiogenesis and inflammation following stroke. BALB/Ca-RAG 2(-/- γC(-/- mice subjected to FeCl(3 thrombosis mediated stroke were intracranially injected with 2 × 10(5 hMAPCs or hMSCs 2 days after stroke and followed for up to 28 days. We could not detect long-term engraftment of either cell population. However, in comparison with PBS-treated animals, hMSC and hMAPC grafted animals demonstrated significantly decreased loss of brain tissue. This was associated with increased angiogenesis, diminished inflammation and a glial-scar inhibitory effect. Moreover, enhanced proliferation of cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ and survival of newly generated neuroblasts was observed. Interestingly, these neuroprotective effects were more pronounced in the group of animals treated with hMAPCs in comparison with hMSCs. Our results establish cell therapy with hMAPCs and hMSCs as a promising strategy for the treatment of stroke.

  20. Recovery of the 20 Hz Rebound to Tactile and Proprioceptive Stimulation after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeva Parkkonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor integration is closely linked to changes in motor-cortical excitability, observable in the modulation of the 20 Hz rhythm. After somatosensory stimulation, the rhythm transiently increases as a rebound that reflects motor-cortex inhibition. Stroke-induced alterations in afferent input likely affect motor-cortex excitability and motor recovery. To study the role of somatosensory afferents in motor-cortex excitability after stroke, we employed magnetoencephalographic recordings (MEG at 1–7 days, one month, and 12 months in 23 patients with stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 22 healthy controls. The modulation of the 20 Hz motor-cortical rhythm was evaluated to two different somatosensory stimuli, tactile stimulation, and passive movement of the index fingers. The rebound strengths to both stimuli were diminished in the acute phase compared to the controls and increased significantly during the first month after stroke. However, only the rebound amplitudes to tactile stimuli fully recovered within the follow-up period. The rebound strengths in the affected hemisphere to both stimuli correlated strongly with the clinical scores across the follow-up. The results show that changes in the 20 Hz rebound to both stimuli behave similarly and occur predominantly during the first month. The 20 Hz rebound is a potential marker for predicting motor recovery after stroke.

  1. Effect of hydroxy (HHO) gas addition on performance and exhaust emissions in compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ali Can; Uludamar, Erinc; Aydin, Kadir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, hydroxy gas (HHO) was produced by the electrolysis process of different electrolytes (KOH{sub (aq)}, NaOH{sub (aq)}, NaCl{sub (aq)}) with various electrode designs in a leak proof plexiglass reactor (hydrogen generator). Hydroxy gas was used as a supplementary fuel in a four cylinder, four stroke, compression ignition (CI) engine without any modification and without need for storage tanks. Its effects on exhaust emissions and engine performance characteristics were investigated. Experiments showed that constant HHO flow rate at low engine speeds (under the critical speed of 1750 rpm for this experimental study), turned advantages of HHO system into disadvantages for engine torque, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) emissions and specific fuel consumption (SFC). Investigations demonstrated that HHO flow rate had to be diminished in relation to engine speed below 1750 rpm due to the long opening time of intake manifolds at low speeds. This caused excessive volume occupation of hydroxy in cylinders which prevented correct air to be taken into the combustion chambers and consequently, decreased volumetric efficiency was inevitable. Decreased volumetric efficiency influenced combustion efficiency which had negative effects on engine torque and exhaust emissions. Therefore, a hydroxy electronic control unit (HECU) was designed and manufactured to decrease HHO flow rate by decreasing voltage and current automatically by programming the data logger to compensate disadvantages of HHO gas on SFC, engine torque and exhaust emissions under engine speed of 1750 rpm. The flow rate of HHO gas was measured by using various amounts of KOH, NaOH, NaCl (catalysts). These catalysts were added into the water to diminish hydrogen and oxygen bonds and NaOH was specified as the most appropriate catalyst. It was observed that if the molality of NaOH in solution exceeded 1% by mass, electrical current supplied from the battery increased dramatically due to the too much

  2. Vision-related quality of life in first stroke patients with homonymous visual field defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabel Bernhard A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate vision-related and health-related quality of life (VRQoL, HRQoL in first stroke patients with homonymous visual field defects (VFD with respect to the extent of the lesion. Since VFD occur in approximately 10% of stroke patients the main purpose of the study was to investigate the additional impact of VFD in stroke patients hypothesizing that VFD causes diminished VRQoL. Methods In 177 first stroke patients with persisting VFD 2.5 years after posterior-parietal lesions VRQoL was assessed by the National-Eye-Institute-Visual-Functioning-Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ and HRQoL by the Medical-Outcome-Study Short-Form-36 Health-Survey (SF-36. Questionnaire results of VFD-patients were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls and with general non-selected stroke samples as published elsewhere. VFD-type and visual acuity were partially correlated with questionnaire results. Results Compared to healthy controls VFD-patients had lower NEI-VFQ scores except ocular pain (Z-range -11.34 to -3.35 and lower SF-36 scores except emotional role limitations (Z-range -7.21 to -3.34. VFD-patients were less impaired in SF-36 scores than general stroke patients one month post lesion (6/8 subscales but had lower SF-36 scores compared to stroke patients six months post lesion (5/8 subscales. Visual acuity significantly correlated with NEI-VFQ scores (r-range 0.27 to 0.48 and VFD-type with SF-36 mental subscales (r-range -0.26 to -0.36. Conclusions VFD-patients showed substantial reductions of VRQoL and HRQoL compared to healthy normals, but better HRQoL compared to stroke patients one month post lesion. VFD-patients (although their lesion age was four times higher had significantly lower HRQoL than a general stroke population at six months post-stroke. This indicates that the stroke-related subjective level of HRQoL impairment is significantly exacerbated by VFD. While VRQoL was primarily influenced by visual acuity, mental

  3. Vision-related quality of life in first stroke patients with homonymous visual field defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Carolin; Franke, Gabriele H; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2010-03-26

    To evaluate vision-related and health-related quality of life (VRQoL, HRQoL) in first stroke patients with homonymous visual field defects (VFD) with respect to the extent of the lesion. Since VFD occur in approximately 10% of stroke patients the main purpose of the study was to investigate the additional impact of VFD in stroke patients hypothesizing that VFD causes diminished VRQoL. In 177 first stroke patients with persisting VFD 2.5 years after posterior-parietal lesions VRQoL was assessed by the National-Eye-Institute-Visual-Functioning-Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ) and HRQoL by the Medical-Outcome-Study Short-Form-36 Health-Survey (SF-36). Questionnaire results of VFD-patients were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls and with general non-selected stroke samples as published elsewhere. VFD-type and visual acuity were partially correlated with questionnaire results. Compared to healthy controls VFD-patients had lower NEI-VFQ scores except ocular pain (Z-range -11.34 to -3.35) and lower SF-36 scores except emotional role limitations (Z-range -7.21 to -3.34). VFD-patients were less impaired in SF-36 scores than general stroke patients one month post lesion (6/8 subscales) but had lower SF-36 scores compared to stroke patients six months post lesion (5/8 subscales). Visual acuity significantly correlated with NEI-VFQ scores (r-range 0.27 to 0.48) and VFD-type with SF-36 mental subscales (r-range -0.26 to -0.36). VFD-patients showed substantial reductions of VRQoL and HRQoL compared to healthy normals, but better HRQoL compared to stroke patients one month post lesion. VFD-patients (although their lesion age was four times higher) had significantly lower HRQoL than a general stroke population at six months post-stroke. This indicates that the stroke-related subjective level of HRQoL impairment is significantly exacerbated by VFD. While VRQoL was primarily influenced by visual acuity, mental components of HRQoL were influenced by VFD-type with larger VFD

  4. Plasma cytokines in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Boysen, Gudrun; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    GOALS: The aim of this study was to test the relations between plasma cytokines and the clinical characteristics, course, and risk factors in acute stroke. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on 179 patients with acute stroke included within 24 hours of stroke onset. On inclusion and 3...... months later plasma levels of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNF-R1), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNF-R2) were...

  5. Specific antismoking advice after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Brink-Kjær, Tove

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many stroke survivors would benefit from modification of their lifestyle in order to reduce their risk of recurrent stroke. We investigated if tailored smoking cessation advice would yield a higher smoking cessation rate and a higher rate with sustained abstinence in ex......-smokers in the intervention group than among controls. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients admitted with an acute stroke or a transient ischaemic attack were included in a randomised controlled trial focusing on control of lifestyle risk factors and hypertension. Here, we report the intervention focused on smoking cessation. We...

  6. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  7. The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich; Fassbender, Klaus; Hussain, M Shazam; Ebinger, Martin; Turc, Guillaume; Uchino, Ken; Davis, Stephen; Alexandrov, Anne; Grotta, James

    2017-12-01

    Background The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization was formed in 2016 as an international consortium of medical practitioners involved in pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute stroke. Aims PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization's mission is to improve stroke outcomes by supporting research and advocacy for pre-hospital stroke treatment in Mobile Stroke Units. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will provide a platform to enhance collaborative research across the spectrum of acute stroke management in the pre-hospital setting. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will also facilitate the appropriate proliferation and distribution of Mobile Stroke Units by providing a forum for professional communication, resource for public education, and stimulus for government, industry, and philanthropic support. Summary of review In this "white paper", we describe the evidence supporting pre-hospital stroke treatment, progress to date, practical issues such as application in various environments and staffing, planned research initiatives, and organizational structure. Conclusions PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization is not-for-profit, with membership open to anyone involved (or hoping to become involved) in pre-hospital stroke care. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization has a Steering Committee comprised of members from Europe, U.S., Canada, Australia, and other regions having a Mobile Stroke Unit in operation. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization convenes satellite meetings for membership at the International Stroke Conference and European Stroke Congress each year to address the PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization mission. The first research collaborations agreed upon are to: (1) develop a list of common data elements to be collected by all Mobile Stroke Unit programs and entered into a common research database, and (2) develop a protocol for investigating the natural history of hyper-acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

  8. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia...

  9. Sex-specific responses to stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Turtzo, L Christine; McCullough, Louise D

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a sexually dimorphic disease, with differences between males and females observed both clinically and in the laboratory. While males have a higher incidence of stroke throughout much of the lifespan, aged females have a higher burden of stroke. Sex differences in stroke result from a combination of factors, including elements intrinsic to the sex chromosomes as well as the effects of sex hormone exposure throughout the lifespan. Research investigating the sexual dimorphism of stroke...

  10. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Better understanding and controlling factors associated will improve the prevention of the disease. This study reviews records of patients with ischemic stroke in Central Africa. Material and methods: Patients of Bantu ethnicity with clinical ...

  11. [Post-stroke apathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Dóriga Bonnardeaux, Pedro; Andrino Díaz, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is a motivational disturbance that can be defined as a quantitative reduction of goal-directed behaviour. Patients present with loss of motivation, concern, interest, and emotional response, resulting in a loss of initiative, decreased interaction with their environment, and a reduced interest in social life. Apathy not only appears to be common in stroke patients, but it has also been related to a wide range of negative consequences for the patients and their caregivers, including poor functional recovery, loss of social independence, and caregiver distress. Clear definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for apathy are needed to accomplish an accurate assessment and an individualised treatment plan. Although there have been reports of successful behavioural therapy treatment of apathetic states, there is a paucity of controlled clinical trials on the efficacy of apathetic behaviours using pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Stroke etiology and collaterals: atheroembolic strokes have greater collateral recruitment than cardioembolic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, L C; Bouslama, M; Haussen, D C; Grossberg, J A; Dehkharghani, S; Anderson, A; Belagaje, S R; Bianchi, N A; Grigoryan, M; Frankel, M R; Nogueira, R G

    2017-06-01

    Chronic hypoperfusion from athero-stenotic lesions is thought to lead to better collateral recruitment compared to cardioembolic strokes. It was sought to compare collateral flow in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) versus stroke patients with cervical atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease (CASOD). This was a retrospective review of a prospectively collected endovascular database. Patients with (i) anterior circulation large vessel occlusion stroke, (ii) pre-treatment computed tomography angiography (CTA) and (iii) intracranial embolism from AF or CASOD were included. CTA collateral patterns were evaluated and categorized into two groups: absent/poor collaterals (CTA collateral score 0-1) versus moderate/good collaterals (CTA collateral score 2-4). CT perfusion was also utilized for baseline core volume and evaluation of infarct growth. A total of 122 patients fitted the inclusion criteria, of whom 88 (72%) had AF and 34 (27%) CASOD. Patients with AF were older (P Collateral scores were lower in the AF group (P = 0.01) with patients having poor collaterals in 28% of cases versus 9% in the CASOD group (P = 0.03). Mortality rates (20% vs. 0%; P = 0.02) were higher in the AF patients whilst rates of any parenchymal hemorrhage (6% vs. 26%; P collaterals (odds ratio 4.70; 95% confidence interval 1.17-18.79; P = 0.03). Atheroembolic strokes seem to be associated with better collateral flow compared to cardioembolic strokes. This may in part explain the worse outcomes of AF-related stroke. © 2017 EAN.

  13. Stroke Laterality Bias in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Gavin; Wade, Carrie; McKee, Jacqueline; McCarron, Peter; McVerry, Ferghal; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-11-01

    Little is known of the impact of stroke laterality on the management process and outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Consecutive patients admitted to a general hospital over 1 year with supratentorial AIS were eligible for inclusion in the study. Baseline characteristics and risk factors, delays in hospital admission, imaging, intrahospital transfer to an acute stoke unit, stroke severity and classification, length of hospital admission, as well as 10-year mortality were measured and compared among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. There were 141 patients (77 men, 64 women; median age 73 [interquartile range 63-79] years), There were 71 patients with left hemisphere AIS and 70 with right hemisphere AIS. Delays to hospital admission from stroke onset to neuroimaging were similar among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. Delay in transfer to an acute stroke unit (ASU) following hospital admission was on average 14 hours more for right hemisphere compared to left hemisphere AIS patients (P = .01). Laterality was not associated with any difference in 10-year survival. Patients with mild and nondominant AIS merit particular attention to minimize their intrahospital transfer time to an ASU. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RODENT STROKE MODEL GUIDELINES FOR PRECLINICAL STROKE TRIALS (1ST EDITION)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shimin; Zhen, Gehua; Meloni, Bruno P.; Campbell, Kym; Winn, H Richard

    2009-01-01

    Translational stroke research is a challenging task that needs long term team work of the stroke research community. Highly reproducible stroke models with excellent outcome consistence are essential for obtaining useful data from preclinical stroke trials as well as for improving inter-lab comparability. However, our review of literature shows that the infarct variation coefficient of commonly performed stroke models ranges from 5% to 200%. An overall improvement of the commonly used stroke ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  16. Genetic View To Stroke Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Yoosefee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death. The role of genetics in the etiology and development of this disease is undeniable. As a result of inadequate previous research, more and more studies in the field of genetics are necessary to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, which in turn, may lead to new therapeutic approaches. However, due to the multifactorial nature of stroke and the few studies conducted in this field, genetic diversity is able to predict only a small fraction of the risk of disease. On the other hand, studies have shown genetically different architecture for different types of stroke, and finally pharmacogenomics as an important part of personalized medicine approach, is influenced by genetic studies, all of which confirm the need of addressing the topic by researchers.

  17. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mortality statistics found in the Heart Disease & Stroke Statistics Update . Because mortality is considered "hard" data, it's possible to do time-trend analysis and compute percent changes over time. What are ...

  18. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... of infarcts. For a number of years, tight glycemic control has been regarded as beneficial in critically illness, but recent research has been unable to support this notion. The only completed randomized study on glucose-lowering therapy in stroke has failed to demonstrate effect, and concerns relating...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  19. Diminishing Marginal Returns From Genomic Selection As More Selection Candidates Are Phenotyped

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okeno, Tobias O; Henryon, Mark; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    We used stochastic simulation to test hypotheses that, (i) phenotyping proportion of high ranking selection candidates based on estimated breeding values (EBV) before genotyping could realize as much genetic gains as phenotyping all candidates, and (ii) there is diminishing return to selection...... as more candidates are phenotyped in genomic breeding programs. Three phenotyping criteria, namely, random (RS), EBV and true breeding value (TBV) were investigated under two schemes (across-population and within-litter) using traditional-BLUP and genomic-BLUP models. The EBV ranked above RS and realized...... maximum achievable gains in the breeding program at 80% phenotyping. There was diminishing return to selection as more candidates were phenotyped; indicating that information content is not so large in the last candidate compared to the first candidate phenotyped. These findings demonstrate the need...

  20. Fiberotomy enhances orthodontic tooth movement and diminishes relapse in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L; Binderman, I; Yaffe, A; Beni, L; Vardimon, A D

    2013-08-01

    Accelerated orthodontic tooth movement is triggered by procedures that include mucoperiosteum flap surgery and surgical scarring of cortical bone. Our aim was to test whether fiberotomy by itself will accelerate orthodontic tooth movement and diminish relapse. In 34 Wistar rats, alveolar bone resorption and molar tooth movement were measured after fiberotomy, apical full-thickness flap without detachment of gingiva from the roots, or no surgery. Orthodontic appliance was installed at time of surgery and activated for 14 days, generating movement of the first maxillary molar buccal and then removed. Percent of sections in which alveolar bone resorption was detected was significantly higher (p accelerated orthodontic tooth movement and diminished relapse. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Repeated exposure to media violence is associated with diminished response in an inhibitory frontolimbic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher R; Grinband, Jack; Hirsch, Joy

    2007-12-05

    Media depictions of violence, although often claimed to induce viewer aggression, have not been shown to affect the cortical networks that regulate behavior. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we found that repeated exposure to violent media, but not to other equally arousing media, led to both diminished response in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (right ltOFC) and a decrease in right ltOFC-amygdala interaction. Reduced function in this network has been previously associated with decreased control over a variety of behaviors, including reactive aggression. Indeed, we found reduced right ltOFC responses to be characteristic of those subjects that reported greater tendencies toward reactive aggression. Furthermore, the violence-induced reduction in right ltOFC response coincided with increased throughput to behavior planning regions. These novel findings establish that even short-term exposure to violent media can result in diminished responsiveness of a network associated with behaviors such as reactive aggression.

  2. Impact of a program to diminish gender insensitivity and sexual harassment at a medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C D; Bergen, M R; Korn, D

    2000-05-01

    To measure the effect of an intervention to reduce gender insensitivity and sexual harassment at one medical school. Stanford University School of Medicine undertook a multifaceted program to educate faculty and students regarding gender issues and to diminish sexual harassment. The authors developed a survey instrument to assess the faculty's perceptions regarding environment (five scales) and incidences of sexual harassment. Faculty were surveyed twice during the interventions (1994 and 1995). Between the two years, the authors measured significant improvements in mean ratings for positive climate (p = .004) and cohesion (p = .006) and decreases in the faculty's perceptions of sexual harassment (p = 0006), gender insensitivity (p = .001), and gender discrimination (p = .004). The faculty also reported fewer observations of harassing behavior during the study period. An intervention program to diminish gender insensitivity and sexual harassment can measurably improve a medical school's environment.

  3. Protein consumptions in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Maghsoudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stroke is one of the most common causes of disabilities and death all over the world. The mortality rate of stroke is predicted to be doubled by 2030 in the Middle East countries. Nutrition is an effective strategy in prevention and management of stroke. This study assessed the relationship between various protein types and stroke risk. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was performed in a University hospital. The data regarding consumption of usual food intake of 69 cases (46 men and 23 women and 60 controls (30 men and 30 women was collected with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. The mean consumption of red and white meat and vegetable and processed proteins consumption were compared between two groups. Results: The percent of total of daily protein intake were lower in patients with stroke in both sexes (25.92% vs 30.55% in men and 30.7% vs 31.14% in women. Conclusion: Lower protein consumption may be observed in patients with stroke patients in both sex.

  4. Diminished levels of the soluble form of RAGE are related to poor survival in malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Nikolaus B; Weide, Benjamin; Reith, Maike; Tarnanidis, Kathrin; Kehrel, Coretta; Lichtenberger, Ramtin; Pflugfelder, Annette; Herpel, Esther; Eubel, Jana; Ikenberg, Kristian; Busch, Christian; Holland-Letz, Tim; Naeher, Helmut; Garbe, Claus; Umansky, Viktor; Enk, Alexander; Utikal, Jochen; Gebhardt, Christoffer

    2015-12-01

    RAGE is a central driver of tumorigenesis by sustaining an inflammatory tumor microenvironment. This study links the soluble forms of RAGE (sRAGE and esRAGE) with clinical outcome of melanoma patients. Moreover, tissue expression of RAGE was analyzed using immunohistochemistry on two independent tissue microarrays (TMA) containing 35 or 257 primary melanomas, and 41 or 22 benign nevi, respectively. Serum concentrations of sRAGE and esRAGE were measured in 229 Stage III-IV patients using ELISA and plasma concentrations of sRAGE were analyzed in an independent second cohort with 173 samples of Stage I-IV patients. In this cohort, three well-described SNPs in the RAGE gene were analyzed. RAGE protein expression was highly upregulated in primary melanomas compared to benign nevi in the two TMA (p melanomas (p = 0.046). sRAGE and esRAGE were identified as prognostic markers for survival as diminished sRAGE (p = 0.034) and esRAGE (p = 0.012) serum levels correlated with poor overall survival (OS). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that diminished serum sRAGE was independently associated with poor survival (p = 0.009). Moreover, diminished sRAGE was strongly associated with impaired OS in the second cohort (p forms of RAGE and variants in its genetic locus are prognostic markers for survival in melanoma patients with high risk for progression. © 2015 UICC.

  5. Stroke research questions: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, Anne; Lawrence, Maggie; Horsburgh, Dorothy; Legg, Lynn; Smith, Lorraine N

    stroke is a national research priority. However, in the literature there is still minimal systematic investigation of stroke nursing - especially practice. The aim of this study was to explore stroke nurses' research priorities through a series of focus groups. the study was qualitative and involved focus groups (n = 7) with registered nurses working in stroke care settings and who were members of the Scottish Stroke Nurses Forum. Data were analysed to identify conceptual categories, which were found to relate to the categories defined by Kirkevold (1997) and Booth (2001). five priority areas for stroke nursing were described: preventive/conserving; supporting/consoling; restorative; integrative; and service structure/systems. by consulting stroke nurses it can be ensured that future research truly reflects the nature of nursing care and is of particular relevance to stroke nursing practice. The development of research evidence-base in stroke nursing will lead to increased knowledge, a better quality of care and ultimately better outcomes for patients.

  6. Molecular basis of young ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Borellini, Linda; Motto, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Pezzini, Alessandro; Basilico, Paola; Micieli, Giuseppe; Padovani, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio; Candelise, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and family studies have provided evidence on the role of genetic factors in stroke, particularly in stroke occurring at young age. However, despite its impact, young stroke continues to be understudied. This article reviews the existing literature on the most investigated monogenic disorders (CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, RVCL, COL4A1, Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes) causing stroke in young and a number of candidate genes associated with stroke occurring in patients younger than 50 years. Although our study failed in identifying strong and reliable associations between specific genes and young stroke, our detailed literature revision on the field allowed us to compile a panel of genes possibly generating a susceptibility to stroke, which could be a starting point for future research. Since stroke is a potentially preventable disease, the identification of genes associated with young stroke may promote novel prevention strategies and allow the identification of therapeutic disease targets.

  7. Fatigue after Stroke: The Patient's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Louise Barbour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fatigue after stroke is common and distressing to patients. Aims. Our aims were to explore patients' perceptions of post-stroke fatigue, including the causes of fatigue and the factors that alleviate fatigue, in a mixed methods study. Results. We interviewed 15 patients who had had a stroke and were inpatients on stroke rehabilitation wards. A substantial proportion of patients reported that their fatigue started at the time of their stroke. Various different factors were reported to improve fatigue, including exercise, good sleep, rehabilitation and rest. Fatigue influences patients' sense of “control” after their stroke. Conclusion. Our results are consistent with the possibility that poststroke fatigue might be triggered by factors that occur at the time of the stroke (e.g., the stroke lesion itself, or admission to hospital and then exacerbated by poor sleep and boredom. These factors should be considered when developing complex interventions to improve post-stroke fatigue.

  8. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  9. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Serum Soluble Corin is Decreased in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Fangfang; Shi, Jijun; Han, Xiujie; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yan; Zhi, Zhongwen; Zhang, Fuding; Shen, Yun; Ma, Juanjuan; Song, Yulin; Hu, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Soluble corin was decreased in coronary heart disease. Given the connections between cardiac dysfunction and stroke, circulating corin might be a candidate marker of stroke risk. However, the association between circulating corin and stroke has not yet been studied in humans. Here, we aimed to examine the association in patients wtith stroke and community-based healthy controls. Four hundred eighty-one patients with ischemic stroke, 116 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, and 2498 healthy controls were studied. Serum soluble corin and some conventional risk factors of stroke were examined. Because circulating corin was reported to be varied between men and women, the association between serum soluble corin and stroke was evaluated in men and women, respectively. Patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke had a significantly lower level of serum soluble corin than healthy controls in men and women (all P values, stroke than men in the highest quartile. Women in the lowest quartile of serum soluble corin were also more likely to have ischemic (OR, 3.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.44) and hemorrhagic (OR, 8.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-31.02) stroke than women in the highest quartile. ORs of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly increased with the decreasing levels of serum soluble corin in men and women (all P values for trend, stroke compared with healthy controls. Our findings raise the possibility that serum soluble corin may have a pathogenic role in stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Power stabilized CO2 gas transport laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.D.; Kirk, R.F.; Moreno, F.E.; Ahmed, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The output power of a high power (1 kW or more) CO 2 gas transport laser is stabilized by flowing the gas mixture over copper plated baffles in the gas channel during operation of the laser. Several other metals may be used instead of copper, for example, nickel, manganese, palladium, platinum, silver and gold. The presence of copper in the laser gas circuit stabilizes output power by what is believed to be a compensation of the chemical changes in the gas due to the cracking action of the electrical discharge which has the effect of diminishing the capactiy of the carbon dioxide gas mixture to maintain the rated power output of the laser. (U.S.)

  12. CFD analysis of the scavenging process in marine two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Hult, Johan; Nogenmyr, Karl-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The scavenging process is an integral part of any two-stroke internal combustion engine regardless of being spark ignited (SI) or compression ignited (CI). The scavenging process is responsible for replacing the burned gas from the combustion process from the previous working stroke with fresh air....../charge before the subsequent compression stroke. This implies that the scavenging process is integral to engine performance as it influence the initial condition for the combustion process, thus affecting the fuel economy, power output and emission of hazardous gases. Two-stroke diesel engines for marine...... with the swirling air in the combustion chamber during fuel injection. A known characteristic of swirling flows is an adverse pressure gradient in the center of the rotating flow which might lead to a local deficit in axial velocity and the formation of central recirculation zones, known as vortex breakdown...

  13. Modelling for Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Zander, Claes-Göran; Pedersen, Nicolai

    2013-01-01

    models. While literature is rich on four-stroke automotive engines, this paper considers two-stroke engines and develops a non-linear dynamic model of the exhaust gas system. Parameters are determined by system identication. The paper uses black-box nonlinear model identication and modelling from rst...

  14. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  15. Does use of the recognition of stroke in the emergency room stroke assessment tool enhance stroke recognition by ambulance clinicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Rachael T; Williams, Julia; Edwards, Melanie J; Russell, Ian T; Gompertz, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    U.K ambulance services assess patients with suspected stroke using the Face Arm Speech Test (FAST). The Recognition Of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER) tool has been shown superior to the FAST in identifying strokes in emergency departments but has not previously been tested in the ambulance setting. We investigated whether ROSIER use by ambulance clinicians can improve stroke recognition. Ambulance clinicians used the ROSIER in place of the FAST to assess patients with suspected stroke. As the ROSIER includes all FAST elements, we calculated a FAST score from the ROSIER to enable comparisons between the two tools. Ambulance clinicians' provisional stroke diagnoses using the ROSIER and calculated FAST were compared with stroke consultants' diagnosis. We used stepwise logistic regression to compare the contribution of individual ROSIER and FAST items and patient demographics to the prediction of consultants' diagnoses. Sixty-four percent of strokes and 78% of nonstrokes identified by ambulance clinicians using the ROSIER were subsequently confirmed by a stroke consultant. There was no difference in the proportion of strokes correctly detected by the ROSIER or FAST with both displaying excellent levels of sensitivity. The ROSIER detected marginally more nonstroke cases than the FAST, but both demonstrated poor specificity. Facial weakness, arm weakness, seizure activity, age, and sex predicted consultants' diagnosis of stroke. The ROSIER was not better than the FAST for prehospital recognition of stroke. A revised version of the FAST incorporating assessment of seizure activity may improve stroke identification and decision making by ambulance clinicians.

  16. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doubal, F.N.; Hokke, P.E.; Wardlaw, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Lacunar strokes account for 25% of ischaemic strokes, but their precise aetiology is unknown. Similarities between the retinal and cerebral small vessels mean that clarification of the exact relationship between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, and particularly with stroke

  17. Air Pollution and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan Ken; Miller, Mark R.; Shah, Anoop S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The adverse health effects of air pollution have long been recognised; however, there is less awareness that the majority of the morbidity and mortality caused by air pollution is due to its effects on the cardiovascular system. Evidence from epidemiological studies have demonstrated a strong association between air pollution and cardiovascular diseases including stroke. Although the relative risk is small at an individual level, the ubiquitous nature of exposure to air pollution means that the absolute risk at a population level is on a par with “traditional” risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Of particular concern are findings that the strength of this association is stronger in low and middle income countries where air pollution is projected to rise as a result of rapid industrialisation. The underlying biological mechanisms through which air pollutants exert their effect on the vasculature are still an area of intense discussion. A greater understanding of the effect size and mechanisms is necessary to develop effective strategies at individual and policy levels to mitigate the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution. PMID:29402072

  18. Air Pollution and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan Ken; Miller, Mark R; Shah, Anoop S V

    2018-01-01

    The adverse health effects of air pollution have long been recognised; however, there is less awareness that the majority of the morbidity and mortality caused by air pollution is due to its effects on the cardiovascular system. Evidence from epidemiological studies have demonstrated a strong association between air pollution and cardiovascular diseases including stroke. Although the relative risk is small at an individual level, the ubiquitous nature of exposure to air pollution means that the absolute risk at a population level is on a par with "traditional" risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Of particular concern are findings that the strength of this association is stronger in low and middle income countries where air pollution is projected to rise as a result of rapid industrialisation. The underlying biological mechanisms through which air pollutants exert their effect on the vasculature are still an area of intense discussion. A greater understanding of the effect size and mechanisms is necessary to develop effective strategies at individual and policy levels to mitigate the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution.

  19. Cost of stroke in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevreul, K; Durand-Zaleski, I; Gouépo, A; Fery-Lemonnier, E; Hommel, M; Woimant, F

    2013-07-01

    A cost of illness study was undertaken on behalf of the French Ministry of Health to estimate the annual cost of stroke in France with the goal of better understanding the current economic burden so that improved strategies for care may be developed. Using primary data from exhaustive national databases and both top-down and bottom-up approaches, the stroke-related costs for healthcare, nursing care and lost productivity were estimated. The total healthcare cost of stroke patients in France in 2007 was €5.3 billion, 92% of which was borne by statutory health insurance. The average cost of incident cases was €16 686 per patient in the first year, while the annual cost of prevalent cases was a little less than half that amount (€8099). Nursing care costs were estimated at €2.4 billion. Lost productivity reached €255.9 million and that income loss for stroke patients was partially compensated by €63.3 million in social benefit payments. With healthcare costs representing 3% of total health expenditure in France, stroke constitutes an ongoing burden for the health system and overall economy. Nursing care added nearly half again the amount spent on healthcare, while productivity losses were more limited because nearly 80% of acute incident strokes were in patients over age 65. The high cost of illness underscores the need for improved prevention and interventions to limit the disabling effects of stroke. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  20. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Milija D Mijajlović,1,* Vuk M Aleksić,2,* Nadežda M Šternić,1 Mihailo M Mirković,3 Natan M Bornstein4,5 1Neurology Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, School of Medicine University of Belgrade, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Center Zemun, Belgrade, 3Department of Neurology, General Hospital Valjevo, Valjevo, Serbia; 4Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 5Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, insulin, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, risk factors, stroke

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Stroke Occurring while Bathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Oshima, Takeo; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Mayanagi, Keita; Imai, Akira

    2017-07-01

    Stroke can occur during any human activity. Although cardiac arrests or drowning accidents while bathing have been studied extensively, there are few studies focusing on stroke occurring while bathing. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical characteristics of stroke occurring while bathing and the association between stroke and drowning accidents. Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2015 on 1939 patients with stroke (1224 cerebral infarctions [CIs], 505 intracerebral hemorrhages [ICHs], and 210 subarachnoid hemorrhages [SAHs]) were reviewed to identify patients who sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing-related strokes to strokes occurring during other activities was evaluated. Moreover, the demographics of these 2 groups were compared in each stroke type. Among the 1939 patients, 78 (CI, 32; ICH, 28; and SAH, 18) sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing to other activities in the SAH group was the highest (8.6%), followed by the ICH group (5.5%), whereas that in the CI group was the lowest (2.6%). Regardless of stroke type, only a minority of patients were found to have collapsed inside the bathtub. The higher ratio of bathing in hemorrhagic strokes may indicate that there is a small risk of hemorrhagic stroke while bathing in vulnerable subjects. This retrospective study did not establish a causal relationship between bathing and stroke nor identify risk factors, which means that future prospective studies are warranted. The finding that the great majority of bathing-related stroke patients were found to have collapsed outside the bathtub suggests that the involvement of stroke in drowning accidents in the bathtub may be small. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of the Swedish National Stroke Campaign on stroke awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanstig, A; Asplund, K; Norrving, B; Wahlgren, N; Wester, P; Rosengren, L

    2017-10-01

    Time delay from stroke onset to arrival in hospital is an important obstacle to widespread reperfusion therapy. To increase knowledge about stroke, and potentially decrease this delay, a 27-month national public information campaign was carried out in Sweden. To assess the effects of a national stroke campaign in Sweden. The variables used to measure campaign effects were knowledge of the AKUT test [a Swedish equivalent of the FAST (Face-Arm-Speech-Time)] test and intent to call 112 (emergency telephone number) . Telephone interviews were carried out with 1500 randomly selected people in Sweden at eight points in time: before, three times during, immediately after, and nine, 13 and 21 months after the campaign. Before the campaign, 4% could recall the meaning of some or all keywords in the AKUT test, compared with 23% during and directly after the campaign, and 14% 21 months later. Corresponding figures were 15%, 51%, and 50% for those remembering the term AKUT and 65%, 76%, and 73% for intent to call 112 when observing or experiencing stroke symptoms. During the course of the campaign, improvement of stroke knowledge was similar among men and women, but the absolute level of knowledge for both items was higher for women at all time points. The nationwide campaign substantially increased knowledge about the AKUT test and intention to call 112 when experiencing or observing stroke symptoms, but knowledge declined post-intervention. Repeated public information therefore appears essential to sustain knowledge gains. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Parametric Study of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Mayer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Large commercial ships such as container vesselsand bulk carriers are propelled by low-speed, uniflowscavenged two-stroke diesel engines. The integral in-cylinderprocess in this type of engine is the scavenging process,where the burned gas from the combustion process isevacuated through the exhaust...

  4. The TP73 gene polymorphism (rs4648551, A>G is associated with diminished ovarian reserve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Diniz Vagnini

    Full Text Available It's known that the members of the TP53 family are involved in the regulation of female reproduction. Studies in mice showed that the TP73 gene (member of this family plays a role in the size of follicular pool, ovulation rate and maintenance of genomic stability. In the present study we analyzed data from 605 patients with ≤ 37 years attending their first intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. The association between the TP73 polymorphism (rs4648551, A>G and the following parameters related to ovarian reserve, like age, antral follicular count (AFC, anti-Mullerian hormone levels (AMH and ovarian response prediction index (ORPI was evaluated. Our results showed an association of the AA genotype with diminished ovarian reserve (AMH <1, AFC ≤9. Women presenting the AA genotype had a 2.0-fold increased risk for having AMH <1 and AFC ≤9 (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.23-3.31, P = 0.005. Patients presenting AA genotype had the lowest levels of AMH (P = 0.02, the lowest number of antral follicles (P = 0.01 and the lowest ORPI (P = 0.007. Analyzing the alleles, we can see an enrichment of the A allele in the group of diminished ovarian reserve (OR 1.4, 95%CI 1.02-1.83, P = 0.04. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to analyze this polymorphism in humans for assessing the numbers of ovarian follicles and AMH levels and, therefore, the ovarian reserve. Our findings can contribute to the use of this polymorphism as a potential marker of diminished ovarian reserve.

  5. Diminished functional connectivity on the road to child sexual abuse in pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärgel, Christian; Massau, Claudia; Weiß, Simone; Walter, Martin; Kruger, Tillmann H C; Schiffer, Boris

    2015-03-01

    Pedophilia is a disorder recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause to others. However, the neurobiology of pedophilia and a possible propensity to sexually abuse children are not well understood. In this study, we thus aimed at providing new insights in how functional integration of brain regions may relate to pedophilia or child sexual abuse (CSA). By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, we compared functional connectivity at rest (RSFC) between pedophiles who engaged (P+CSA; N = 12) or did not engage (P-CSA; N = 14) in CSA and healthy controls (HCs; N = 14) within two networks: (i) the default mode network and (ii) the limbic network that has been linked to pedophilia before. Pedophiles who engaged in CSA show diminished RSFC in both networks compared with HC and P-CSA. Most importantly, they showed diminished RSFC between the left amygdala and orbitofrontal as well as anterior prefrontal regions. Though significant age differences between groups could not be avoided, correlation control analysis did not provide evidence for the assumption that the RSFC effects were related to age differences. We found significantly diminished RSFC in brain networks critically involved in widespread motivational and socio-emotional processes. These results extend existing models of the functional neuroanatomy of pedophilia and CSA as altered RSFC between these regions were related to CSA rather than pedophilia and thus may account for an increased propensity to engage in CSA in people suffering from pedophilia. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  6. Professionals' views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction: The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals’ perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their

  7. Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... act. Depression can take hold right after a stroke, during rehabilitation (rehab) or after you go home. It can ... and an important part of recovering from a stroke. Through rehabilitation, you relearn basic skills such as talking, eating, ...

  8. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function.

  9. Stroke Rehabilitation: What Research is Being Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation What Research is Being Done? Past Issues / ... Table of Contents To Find Out More MedlinePlus: Stroke Rehabilitation medlineplus.gov/strokerehabilitation.html National Institute of ...

  10. Spotlight on botulinum toxin and its potential in the treatment of stroke-related spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Michelle; Simpson, David M

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke spasticity affects up to one-half of stroke patients and has debilitating effects, contributing to diminished activities of daily living, quality of life, pain, and functional impairments. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is proven to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal poststroke spasticity. The aim of this review is to highlight BoNT and its potential in the treatment of upper and lower limb poststroke spasticity. We review evidence for the efficacy of BoNT type A and B formulations and address considerations of optimal injection technique, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and potential adverse effects of BoNT. PMID:27022247

  11. Symptoms of Diminished Autonomy over Cigarettes with Non-Daily Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. Savageau

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Data from a nationally representative sample of smokers (ages 12-22 years, n=2,091 was examined to investigate the prevalence of symptoms of diminished autonomy over cigarettes. Six symptoms were assessed: failed cessation, smoking despite a desire to quit, and a need or urge to smoke, irritability, restlessness, or disrupted concentration attributed to nicotine withdrawal. One or more of the six symptoms were present in 18.9% of subjects who smoked less often than once per week. Among subjects who had not smoked 20 cigarettes in their lifetime, 12.6% had symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, and 25% had made an unsuccessful quit attempt.

  12. Determinations of vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke and vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke from baryonic Λ{sub b} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.K. [Shanxi Normal University, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Linfen (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); Geng, C.Q. [Shanxi Normal University, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Linfen (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); Hunan Normal University, Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications (SICQEA), Changsha (China)

    2017-10-15

    We present the first attempt to extract vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke from the Λ{sub b} → Λ{sub c}{sup +}l anti ν{sub l} decay without relying on vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke inputs from the B meson decays. Meanwhile, the hadronic Λ{sub b} → Λ{sub c}M{sub (c)} decays with M = (π{sup -},K{sup -}) and M{sub c} =(D{sup -},D{sup -}{sub s}) measured with high precisions are involved in the extraction. Explicitly, we find that vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke =(44.6 ± 3.2) x 10{sup -3}, agreeing with the value of (42.11 ± 0.74) x 10{sup -3} from the inclusive B → X{sub c}l anti ν{sub l} decays. Furthermore, based on the most recent ratio of vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke / vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke from the exclusive modes, we obtain vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke = (4.3 ± 0.4) x 10{sup -3}, which is close to the value of (4.49 ± 0.24) x 10{sup -3} from the inclusive B → X{sub u}l anti ν{sub l} decays. We conclude that our determinations of vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke and vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke favor the corresponding inclusive extractions in the B decays. (orig.)

  13. Autoimmune Responses to Brain Following Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Kyra

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a synthesis of the work done by our laboratory that demonstrates the presence of cellular immune responses directed towards brain antigens in animals following experimental stroke as well as in patients following ischemic stroke. These responses include both antigenspecific Th1(+) responses, which are associated with worse stroke outcome, and antigen-specific Treg responses, which are associated with better stroke outcome. The likelihood of developing a detrimental Th1(+)...

  14. Age-dependent exacerbation of white matter stroke outcomes: a role for oxidative damageand inflammatory mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Shira; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Subcortical white matter stroke (WMS) constitutes up to 30% of all stroke subtypes. Mechanisms of oligodendrocyte and axon injury and repair play a central role in the damage and recovery following this type of stroke, and a comprehensive study of these processes requires a specialized experimental model that is different from common large artery, “gray matter” stroke models. Diminished recovery from stroke in aged patients implies that damage and repair processes are affected by advanced age, but such effects have not been studied in WMS. Methods WMS was produced with focal microinjection of the vasoconstrictor L-NIO into the subcortical white matter ventral to the mouse forelimb motor cortex in young adult (2 months), middle aged (15 months) and aged mice (24 months). Results WMS produced localized oligodendrocyte cell death with higher numbers of apoptotic cells and greater oxidative damage in aged brains than in young-adult brains. Increased expression of MCP1 and TNFα in motor cortex neurons correlated with a more distributed microglial activation in aged brains 7 days after WMS. At 2 months aged mice displayed increased white matter atrophy and greater loss of corticostriatal connections compared to young-adult mice. Behavioral testing revealed an age-dependent exacerbation of forelimb motor deficits caused by the stroke, with decreased long-term functional recovery in aged animals. Conclusions Age has a profound effect on the outcome of WMS, with more prolonged cell death and oxidative damage, increased inflammation, greater secondary white matter atrophy and a worse behavioral effect in aged vs young-adult mice. PMID:23868277

  15. Planning of ballistic movement following stroke: insights from the startle reflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Fletcher Honeycutt

    Full Text Available Following stroke, reaching movements are slow, segmented, and variable. It is unclear if these deficits result from a poorly constructed movement plan or an inability to voluntarily execute an appropriate plan. The acoustic startle reflex provides a means to initiate a motor plan involuntarily. In the presence of a movement plan, startling acoustic stimulus triggers non-voluntary early execution of planned movement, a phenomenon known as the startReact response. In unimpaired individuals, the startReact response is identical to a voluntarily initiated movement, except that it is elicited 30-40 ms. As the startReact response is thought to be mediated by brainstem pathways, we hypothesized that the startReact response is intact in stroke subjects. If startReact is intact, it may be possible to elicit more task-appropriate patterns of muscle activation than can be elicited voluntarily. We found that startReact responses were intact following stroke. Responses were initiated as rapidly as those in unimpaired subjects, and with muscle coordination patterns resembling those seen during unimpaired volitional movements. Results were striking for elbow flexion movements, which demonstrated no significant differences between the startReact responses elicited in our stroke and unimpaired subject groups. The results during planned extension movements were less straightforward for stroke subjects, since the startReact response exhibited task inappropriate activity in the flexors. This inappropriate activity diminished over time. This adaptation suggests that the inappropriate activity was transient in nature and not related to the underlying movement plan. We hypothesize that the task-inappropriate flexor activity during extension results from an inability to suppress the classic startle reflex, which primarily influences flexor muscles and adapts rapidly with successive stimuli. These results indicate that stroke subjects are capable of planning ballistic

  16. Persistent shoulder pain in the first 6 months after stroke: results of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosink, Meyke; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J; Buitenweg, Jan R; Van Dongen, Robert T; Geurts, Alexander C; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2011-07-01

    To identify factors associated with persistent poststroke shoulder pain (pPSSP) in the first 6 months after stroke. Prospective inception cohort study. Stroke units of 2 teaching hospitals. Patients (N=31) with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Not applicable. The development of pPSSP within the first 6 months after stroke. Clinical assessment of motor, somatosensory, cognitive, emotional, and autonomic functions, undertaken within 2 weeks (t0), at 3 months (t1), and at 6 months (t2) after stroke. Patients with pPSSP (n=9) were compared with patients without pPSSP (n=22). Bivariate logistic regression analyses showed that pPSSP was significantly associated with impaired voluntary motor control (t0, t1, t2), diminished proprioception (t0, t1), tactile extinction (t0), abnormal sensation (t1, t2), spasticity of the elbow flexor muscles (t1, t2), restricted range of motion (ROM) for both shoulder abduction (t2) and shoulder external rotation (t1, t2), trophic changes (t1), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (t0). These findings suggest a multifactorial etiology of pPSSP. The association of pPSSP with restricted, passive, pain-free ROM and signs indicative of somatosensory sensitization may implicate a vicious cycle of repetitive (micro)trauma that can establish itself rapidly after stroke. Intervention should therefore be focused on maintaining and restoring joint ROM as well as preventing injury and somatosensory sensitization. In this perspective, strategies that aim to intervene simultaneously at various levels of function can be expected to be more effective than treatment directed at merely 1 level. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A highly efficient six-stroke internal combustion engine cycle with water injection for in-cylinder exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, James C.; Szybist, James P.

    2010-01-01

    A concept adding two strokes to the Otto or Diesel engine cycle to increase fuel efficiency is presented here. It can be thought of as a four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a two-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. A partial exhaust event coupled with water injection adds an additional power stroke. Waste heat from two sources is effectively converted into usable work: engine coolant and exhaust gas. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection and expansion was used to investigate this modification. By changing the exhaust valve closing timing during the exhaust stroke, the optimum amount of exhaust can be recompressed, maximizing the net mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEP steam ). The valve closing timing for maximum MEP steam is limited by either 1 bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens. The range of MEP steam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline engine and is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEP combustion ) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this concept has the potential to significantly increase the engine efficiency and fuel economy.

  18. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  19. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  20. New developments in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocksmith, Eugenio R; Reding, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that environmental and neuropharmacologic treatments enhance stroke recovery. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation have significantly broadened our understanding of the neuroanatomic relationships involved in recovery from brain injury due to stroke. These tools have also demonstrated the role for pharmacologic enhancement of cortical plasticity coupled with behavioral interventions. Robot-assisted therapy and partial body weight-supported treadmill gait training have demonstrated the role for technologic intervention in the modern neuro-rehabilitation setting. Current research using hemi-field ocular prisms and patching techniques suggest a role in the rehabilitation of hemianopsia and visual neglect. Finally, many advances have been made in the understanding of common stroke complications, such as depression, dysphagia, venous thromboembolic disease, incontinence, and spasticity.

  1. Visual attention in posterior stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Charlotte; Petersen, Anders; Iversen, Helle K

    Objective: Impaired visual attention is common following strokes in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, particularly in the right hemisphere. However, attentional effects of more posterior lesions are less clear. The aim of this study was to characterize visual processing speed...... and apprehension span following posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke. We also relate these attentional parameters to visual word recognition, as previous studies have suggested that reduced visual speed and span may explain pure alexia. Methods: Nine patients with MR-verified focal lesions in the PCA......-territory (four left PCA; four right PCA; one bilateral, all >1 year post stroke) were compared to 25 controls using single case statistics. Visual attention was characterized by a whole report paradigm allowing for hemifield-specific speed and span measurements. We also characterized visual field defects...

  2. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbro Birgitta Johansson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, or various kinds of music therapy. Several studies have shown positive effects been reported but to give general recommendation more studies are needed. Patient heterogeneity and the interactions of age, gender, genes and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation.

  3. Gas gangrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue infection - Clostridial; Gangrene - gas; Myonecrosis; Clostridial infection of tissues; Necrotizing soft tissue infection ... Gas gangrene is most often caused by bacteria called Clostridium perfringens. It also can be caused by ...

  4. Comparison of Community Reintegration and Selected Stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    KEYWORDS: community reintegration, stroke, stroke survivors, participation, gender. INTRODUCTION. Stroke is defined by the ... limitations in carrying out daily activities and poor reintegration into their communities (Mayo et al, ..... Sex differences in the clinical presentation, resource use, and 3-month outcome of acute ...

  5. Genetic and Hemostatic Risk Factors for Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. van den Herik (Evita)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiovascular disorders are the main causes of death worldwide, with stroke accounting for 9-10% of all deaths1,2. Moreover, stroke is the most frequent cause of disability in the western world3. In the Netherlands alone, over 39,000 persons are admitted to hospitals with stroke each

  6. WARFARIN IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOEMBOLIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Dankovtseva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the current literature data on the use of warfarin in patients with cardioembolic stroke is presented. Cardioembolic stroke pathology and particularities of this condition therapywith antithrombotic medications are shown in details. Possibility to apply thrombolysis during warfarin treatment and the use of anticoagulants after cardioembolic stroke is discussed.

  7. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and validity in stroke trials. Objectives: The aim of the work was to evaluate the FOUR score predictability for outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS ...

  8. Diagnostic Uncertainties in Post-stroke Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, M.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Van Dongen, R.T.M.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Geurts, A.C.H.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2008-01-01

    Aim of Investigation Pain is a common complication after stroke. The etiology of post-stroke pain is largely unknown and classification of post-stroke pain subtypes is primarily based on neurological examination and pain assessment. Classification could probably be improved by a better understanding

  9. RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND USE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To review risk factors for stroke and the use of echocardiography in its diagnosis. ... therapy. Several risk factors are shared between ischaemic heart disease and ischaemic stroke and these have been well documented. Stroke has .... history, physical examination, electrocardiography or chest.

  10. Stroke Prevention Trials in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of an International Pediatric Stroke Study launched in 2002, the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP reports a reduction in the number of overt clinical strokes in children with critically high transcranial Doppler velocities (>200 cm/sec who were regularly transfused.

  11. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Cantisani, Teresa Anna; Righetti, Enrico

    2012-09-12

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects that may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2006 and 2009. To assess the effects of piracetam in acute, presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 15 May 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to May 2011), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to May 2011). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within three days of stroke onset. Two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two review authors. We contacted study authors for missing information. We included three trials involving 1002 patients, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85 years, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependence or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependence.

  12. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Arye Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  13. Stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Satink, Ton; Steultjens, Esther

    2011-01-01

    needs, 3) Physical and non-physical needs, 4) Being personally valued and treated with respect, 5) Collaboration with health care professionals and 6) Assuming responsibility and seizing control. DISCUSSION: The synthesis showed that stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation reflected individual......INTRODUCTION: The aim was to obtain the best available knowledge on stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation. The increase in demands for accountability in health care and acknowledgement of the importance of client participation in health decisions calls for systematic ways of integrating...

  14. Hypothermia for treatment of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Youl Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major cause of neurological disability and death in industrialized nations. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to protect the brain from ischemia, stroke, and other acute neurological insults at the laboratory level. It has been shown to improve neurological outcome in certain clinical settings including anoxic brain injury due to cardiac arrest and hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypothermia seems to affect multiple aspects of brain physiology and it is likely that multiple mechanisms underlie its protective effect. Understanding the events that occur in the ischemic brain during hypothermia might help lead to an understanding of how to protect the brain against acute injuries.

  15. Maintaining oral health after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Hazel

    Oral care is essential to maintain oral health and prevent complications such as tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontitis. Poor oral hygiene in dependent, hospitalised patients could lead to serious complications such as chest infection, pneumonia, poor nutritional intake and increased length of hospital stay. Patients who have had a stroke may have physical and cognitive problems that make them dependent on others for their personal care, including oral care. It is essential that nurses and carers understand why maintaining oral hygiene is important following stroke and the consequences of poor oral care.

  16. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Bates

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain, histatin 5 (only one strain, lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis.

  17. When is diminishment a form of enhancement? Rethinking the enhancement debate in biomedical ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Brian D.; Sandberg, Anders; Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-01-01

    The enhancement debate in neuroscience and biomedical ethics tends to focus on the augmentation of certain capacities or functions: memory, learning, attention, and the like. Typically, the point of contention is whether these augmentative enhancements should be considered permissible for individuals with no particular “medical” disadvantage along any of the dimensions of interest. Less frequently addressed in the literature, however, is the fact that sometimes the diminishment of a capacity or function, under the right set of circumstances, could plausibly contribute to an individual's overall well-being: more is not always better, and sometimes less is more. Such cases may be especially likely, we suggest, when trade-offs in our modern environment have shifted since the environment of evolutionary adaptation. In this article, we introduce the notion of “diminishment as enhancement” and go on to defend a welfarist conception of enhancement. We show how this conception resolves a number of definitional ambiguities in the enhancement literature, and we suggest that it can provide a useful framework for thinking about the use of emerging neurotechnologies to promote human flourishing. PMID:24550792

  18. Changes in Global Monsoon Circulations: Evidence of a diminishing global hydrological cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, T. N.; Knaff, J. A.; Pielke, R. A.

    2001-05-01

    We examined changes in several independent intensity indices of four major tropical monsoonal circulations from approximately 1950-1998. These intensity indices included upper-level divergence at several standard levels, land surface precipitation in the monsoon regions and ocean surface pressure. These values were averaged seasonally over appropriate regions of southeastern Asian, western Africa, eastern Africa and Australia/Maritime continent and adjacent ocean areas. As a consistency check we also examined two secondary indices: mean sea level pressure trends averaged over each monsoon region and low level convergence at several levels both from the NCEP reanalysis. We find that in each of the four regions examined, a consistent picture emerges indicating significantly diminished monsoonal circulations over the period of record, evidence of a diminished global hydrological cycle since 1950. Trends since 1978, the period of strongest surface warming, are insignificant and uncorrelated with the surface warming. When strong ENSO years are removed from the time series the trends still show a general, significant reduction of monsoon intensity indicating that ENSO variability is not the direct cause for the observed weakening. A comparison with general circulation model simulations of the effects of rising CO2 shows an increase in monsoonal activity with rising global surface temperature except in the case of the Australian/Maritime continent monsoon. When the effects of aerosols are included the simulated southeastern Asian summer monsoon is also reduced in intensity.

  19. Ski diminishes TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast phenotype via up-regulating Meox2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaowei; Li, Wenjing; Ning, Yan; Liu, Tong; Shao, Jingxiang; Wang, Yaojun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanism of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and Sloan-Kettering Institute (Ski) in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scars (HS). Wound healing is an inherent process, but the aberrant wound healing of skin injury may lead to HS. There has been growing evidence suggesting a role for TGF-β1 and Ski in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. The MTT assay was used to detect the cell proliferation induced by TGF-β1. The Ski gene was transduced into cells with an adenovirus, and then the function of Ski in cell proliferation and differentiation was observed. Ski mRNA levels were measured by RT-PCR. Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of α-SMA, E-cadherin, Meox1, Meox2, Zeb1 and Zeb2. TGF-β1 can promote human skin fibroblast (HSF) cell proliferation in a time-dependent manner, but the promoting effect could be suppressed by Ski. TGF-β1 also induces the formation of the myofibroblast phenotype and the effect of TGF-β1 could be diminished by Ski. Also, Ski modulates the cardiac myofibroblast phenotype and function through suppression of Zeb2 by up-regulating the expression of Meox2. Ski diminishes the myofibroblast phenotype induced by TGF-β1 through the suppression of Zeb2 by up-regulating the expression of Meox2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Poor sleep quality diminishes cognitive functioning independent of depression and anxiety in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Andreana; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Sufficient sleep is essential for optimum cognitive and psychological functioning. Diminished sleep quality is associated with depression and anxiety, but the extent to which poor sleep quality uniquely impacts attention and executive functions independent of the effects of the common underlying features of depression and anxiety requires further exploration. Here 67 healthy young adults were given the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, second edition (MMPI-2), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and tests of attention and executive functions. Similar to findings from a previous study with healthy community-based older adults (Nebes, Buysse, Halligan, Houck, & Monk, 2009), participants who reported poor sleep quality on the PSQI endorsed significantly greater scores on MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical scales related to depression and anxiety (Cohen's d = 0.77-1.05). In addition, PSQI component scores indexing poor sleep quality, duration, and medication use were associated with diminished attention and executive functions, even after controlling for emotional reactivity or demoralization (rs = 0.21-0.27). These results add to the concurrent validity of the PSQI, and provide further evidence for subtle cognitive decrements related to insufficient sleep even in healthy young adults. Future extension of these findings is necessary with larger samples and clinical comparison groups, and using objective indices of sleep dysfunction such as polysomnography.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P viruses.

  2. Diminished Auditory Responses during NREM Sleep Correlate with the Hierarchy of Language Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meytal Wilf

    Full Text Available Natural sleep provides a powerful model system for studying the neuronal correlates of awareness and state changes in the human brain. To quantitatively map the nature of sleep-induced modulations in sensory responses we presented participants with auditory stimuli possessing different levels of linguistic complexity. Ten participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during the waking state and after falling asleep. Sleep staging was based on heart rate measures validated independently on 20 participants using concurrent EEG and heart rate measurements and the results were confirmed using permutation analysis. Participants were exposed to three types of auditory stimuli: scrambled sounds, meaningless word sentences and comprehensible sentences. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, we found diminishing brain activation along the hierarchy of language processing, more pronounced in higher processing regions. Specifically, the auditory thalamus showed similar activation levels during sleep and waking states, primary auditory cortex remained activated but showed a significant reduction in auditory responses during sleep, and the high order language-related representation in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG cortex showed a complete abolishment of responses during NREM sleep. In addition to an overall activation decrease in language processing regions in superior temporal gyrus and IFG, those areas manifested a loss of semantic selectivity during NREM sleep. Our results suggest that the decreased awareness to linguistic auditory stimuli during NREM sleep is linked to diminished activity in high order processing stations.

  3. Stroke Risk Factors among Participants of a World Stroke Day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension is the most common stroke risk factor globally as well as in the Nigerian population, however other modifiable risk factors such as obesity are becoming increasingly prevalent due to unhealthy diets and sedentary lifestyle. Materials and Methods: We screened 224 volunteers from Ile‑Ife during the 2011 and ...

  4. Post-stroke depression among stroke survivors attending two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sci

    stroke confirmed by brain computed tomography (CT) scan; and written informed consent. We excluded patients ... according to the PHQ-9 total severity score. The PHQ-9 classifies the severity total score as mini- .... temporal lobe was the commonest brain lobe involved among the study participants and majority (75%) of.

  5. Stroke risk factors among participants of a world stroke day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-20

    Apr 20, 2015 ... were screened at the two events. The sample was obtained by convenience sampling and is obviously small because recruitment was done only once on the particular occasion of a stroke awareness event. All test measurements were carried out by a team of six doctors, two physiotherapists, four nurses.

  6. Stroke: long-term effect of infections after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    A recent study has shown that infection in the first 2 weeks after stroke correlates with 3-year mortality, and that risk of infection is highest in patients with dysphagia, urinary catheterization, or intracerebral haemorrhage. Studies are needed to assess treatment strategies to prevent early

  7. Ruslands Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to obtain some political power. Russia owns 32,1 % of the world gas reserves, and The European Union is getting 50 % of its gas import from Russia. I will use John Mearsheimer’s theory ”The Tragedy of Great Power Politics” to explain how Russia can use its big reserves of gas on The European Union to get political influence. This paper is about Ru...

  8. Ruslands Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to obtain some political power. Russia owns 32,1 % of the world gas reserves, and The European Union is getting 50 % of its gas import from Russia. I will use John Mearsheimer’s theory ”The Tragedy of Great Power Politics” to explain how Russia can use its big reserves of gas on The European Union to get political influence.

  9. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  10. Breaking up sitting time after stroke (BUST-Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Heidi; Dunstan, David W; Bernhardt, Julie; Walker, Frederick R; Patterson, Amanda; Callister, Robin; Dunn, Ashlee; Spratt, Neil J; English, Coralie

    2017-06-01

    Rationale Prolonged sitting is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and morbidity. The metabolic and cardiovascular effects of breaking up sitting time in people with stroke are unknown. Aims and hypotheses To determine the (i) metabolic and cardiovascular effects and (ii) safety and feasibility of an experimental protocol to break up uninterrupted sitting in people with stroke. We hypothesize that activity breaks will attenuate the effects of uninterrupted sitting on glucose and insulin metabolism, blood pressure, lipid profiles, and plasma fibrinogen and that it will be both safe and feasible. Sample size estimate Based on previous estimates of population variability (SD 1% glucose and 30% insulin), 19 paired observations (i.e. participants) will achieve a power of 0.9 to detect a difference of 0.8% in glucose and 24% in insulin area under the curve (two-tailed testing, α = 0.05). Methods and design People with stroke will complete three experimental conditions one week apart in randomized order: (a) uninterrupted sitting, (b) prolonged sitting with intermittent walking, and (c) prolonged sitting with intermittent standing exercises. Serial blood samples will be collected and blood pressure measured at 30 min intervals for 8 h. Study outcomes Primary outcome will be postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Secondary outcomes will include fibrinogen concentrations, blood pressure, and adverse events and protocol feasibility. Discussion This is the first important step in determining the cardiovascular effects of breaking up sitting time after stroke. Findings will guide future studies testing behavioral strategies to reduce sitting time for the purpose of lowering recurrent stroke risk.

  11. Harnessing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Nigeria produces almost two million barrels of oil a day from its oil fields in the Niger Delta area. Most of the oil comes from reservoirs containing gas, which is produced with the oil. This associated gas is separated from the oil at flow stations and more than 95 per cent of it is flared-currently a total of some two billion standard cubic feet per day (scf/d), which is estimated to be about a quarter of the gas the world flares and vents. The energy available from Nigeria's flared gas is prodigious, equivalent to one quarter of France's gas requirements. The company recognises that flaring wastes a valuable resource and is environmentally damaging. It aims to stop necessary flaring as soon as possible through a series of projects to harness or conserve this gas. Several gas gathering and conservation projects are already underway in response to emerging markets while other plans await new markets. The company is committed to reduce gas flaring as soon as is feasible to the minimum needed to maintain safe operations. But why are solutions being found only now? why has Nigeria been flaring gas for so long? These question lie at the crux of the debate about Nigeria and gas flaring and the answers, which continue to have a major impact on associated gas development today, are rooted in history, economics and geography

  12. Pediatric Stroke: Clinical Findings and Radiological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on radiological approach in pediatric stroke including both ischemic stroke (Arterial Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis and hemorrhagic stroke. Etiopathology and main clinical findings are examined as well. Magnetic Resonance Imaging could be considered as the first-choice diagnostic exam, offering a complete diagnostic set of information both in the discrimination between ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and in the identification of underlying causes. In addition, Magnetic Resonance vascular techniques supply further information about cerebral arterial and venous circulation. Computed Tomography, for its limits and radiation exposure, should be used only when Magnetic Resonance is not available and on unstable patients.

  13. Diminishing-cues retrieval practice: A memory-enhancing technique that works when regular testing doesn't.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, Joshua L; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2017-08-28

    Retrieval practice has been shown to be a highly effective tool for enhancing memory, a fact that has led to major changes to educational practice and technology. However, when initial learning is poor, initial retrieval practice is unlikely to be successful and long-term benefits of retrieval practice are compromised or nonexistent. Here, we investigate the benefit of a scaffolded retrieval technique called diminishing-cues retrieval practice (Finley, Benjamin, Hays, Bjork, & Kornell, Journal of Memory and Language, 64, 289-298, 2011). Under learning conditions that favored a strong testing effect, diminishing cues and standard retrieval practice both enhanced memory performance relative to restudy. Critically, under learning conditions where standard retrieval practice was not helpful, diminishing cues enhanced memory performance substantially. These experiments demonstrate that diminishing-cues retrieval practice can widen the range of conditions under which testing can benefit memory, and so can serve as a model for the broader application of testing-based techniques for enhancing learning.

  14. Frontoparietal white matter integrity predicts haptic performance in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra L. Borstad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontoparietal white matter supports information transfer between brain areas involved in complex haptic tasks such as somatosensory discrimination. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the relationship between microstructural integrity of frontoparietal network white matter and haptic performance in persons with chronic stroke and to compare frontoparietal network integrity in participants with stroke and age matched control participants. Nineteen individuals with stroke and 16 controls participated. Haptic performance was quantified using the Hand Active Sensation Test (HASTe, an 18-item match-to-sample test of weight and texture discrimination. Three tesla MRI was used to obtain diffusion-weighted and high-resolution anatomical images of the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to define 10 frontoparietal tracts total; Four intrahemispheric tracts measured bilaterally 1 thalamus to primary somatosensory cortex (T–S1, 2 thalamus to primary motor cortex (T–M1, 3 primary to secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 to SII and 4 primary somatosensory cortex to middle frontal gyrus (S1 to MFG and, 2 interhemispheric tracts; S1–S1 and precuneus interhemispheric. A control tract outside the network, the cuneus interhemispheric tract, was also examined. The diffusion metrics fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, axial (AD and radial diffusivity (RD were quantified for each tract. Diminished FA and elevated MD values are associated with poorer white matter integrity in chronic stroke. Nine of 10 tracts quantified in the frontoparietal network had diminished structural integrity poststroke compared to the controls. The precuneus interhemispheric tract was not significantly different between groups. Principle component analysis across all frontoparietal white matter tract MD values indicated a single factor explained 47% and 57% of the variance in tract mean diffusivity in stroke and control groups respectively

  15. Aphasia As a Predictor of Stroke Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Ronald M; Boehme, Amelia K

    2017-09-19

    Aphasia is a common feature of stroke, affecting 21-38% of acute stroke patients and an estimated 1 million stroke survivors. Although stroke, as a syndrome, is the leading cause of disability in the USA, less is known about the independent impact of aphasia on stroke outcomes. During the acute stroke period, aphasia has been found to increase length of stay, inpatient complications, overall neurological disability, mortality, and to alter discharge disposition. Outcomes during the sub-acute and chronic stroke periods show that aphasia is associated with lower Functional Independence Measures (FIM) scores, longer stays in rehabilitation settings, poorer function in activities of daily living, and mortality. Factors that complicate the analysis of aphasia on post-stroke outcomes, however, include widely different systems of care across international settings that result in varying admission patterns to acute stroke units, allowable length of stays based on reimbursement, and criteria for rehabilitation placement. Aphasia arising from stroke is associated with worse outcomes both in the acute and chronic periods. Future research will have to incorporate disparate patterns in analytic models, and to take into account specific aphasia profiles and evolving methods of post-stroke speech-language therapy.

  16. Cortical swallowing processing in early subacute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Maren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a major complication in hemispheric as well as brainstem stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia and increased mortality. Little is known about the recovery from dysphagia after stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the different patterns of cortical swallowing processing in patients with hemispheric and brainstem stroke with and without dysphagia in the early subacute phase. Methods We measured brain activity by mean of whole-head MEG in 37 patients with different stroke localisation 8.2 +/- 4.8 days after stroke to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced swallowing. An age matched group of healthy subjects served as controls. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry and group analyses were performed using a permutation test. Results Our results demonstrate strong bilateral reduction of cortical swallowing activation in dysphagic patients with hemispheric stroke. In hemispheric stroke without dysphagia, bilateral activation was found. In the small group of patients with brainstem stroke we observed a reduction of cortical activation and a right hemispheric lateralization. Conclusion Bulbar central pattern generators coordinate the pharyngeal swallowing phase. The observed right hemispheric lateralization in brainstem stroke can therefore be interpreted as acute cortical compensation of subcortically caused dysphagia. The reduction of activation in brainstem stroke patients and dysphagic patients with cortical stroke could be explained in terms of diaschisis.

  17. [Ischemic stroke in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekker, M.S.; Wermer, M.J.; Riksen, N.P.; Klijn, C.J.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2016-01-01

    - In virtually all age groups, the incidence of ischemic stroke is higher in men. However, in women aged between 25-49 years the prevalence is higher than in men. Female-specific risk factors and disorders may explain this peak.- Pregnancy and the post-partum period are associated with physiological

  18. Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Visual dependence after recent stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, I; Derighetti, F; Gellez-Leman, M-C; Bradaï, N; Yelnik, A

    2006-05-01

    After chronic stroke, inability to use pertinent somatosensory or vestibular information have been described. The aim of the study was to determine whether visual dependence occurred early after stroke before rehabilitation. Thirty patients with recent hemiplegia (16 right and 14 left hemispheric stroke) performed the rod and frame test (RFT). Patients were asked to adjust the rod to the vertical position under 3 conditions: basically, with a frame tilted 18 degrees to the right and then with the frame tilted to the left. Bias in each condition (mean, SD) was recorded and compared to adjustments of the rod by 23 controls. Motor control, sensibility, functional level (functional independence measure), age, neglect, and then balance by the postural assessment scale for stroke were assessed. Fifty-six per cent (17/30) of patients but only 26% of controls were influenced by the tilt of the frame on the 2 sides (visual dependence). No correlation was found between visual dependence and the characteristics of the patients. Many patients with recent hemiplegia seem to rely on visual input. The mechanisms of such visual dependence are discussed. Rehabilitation programs should take into account the possible impairment of sensory organisation and should include exercises to be performed under visual disturbances.

  20. Road traffic noise and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Hvidberg, Martin; Andersen, Zorana J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before....

  1. OF STROKE PATIENTS IN IBADAN.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    206 patients clinically diagnosed as stroke/cerebrovascular accidents(CVA) were investigated using computerized tomography. (CT) scan. 19 patients (9%) had normal scan, While 20(9.7%) patients had other lesions including atrophy and tumours. Of the l67(l8.l%) patients proven to have suffered a cerebro~vascular ...

  2. [Stroke health care plan (ICTUS II. 2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Alvarez-Sabín, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díez Tejedor, E; Freijo, M; Gil-Núñez, A; Fernández, J C López; Maestre, J F; Martínez-Vila, E; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Ramírez, J M; Segura, T; Serena, J; Tejada, J; Tejero, C

    2011-09-01

    The Spanish Stroke Group published the "Plan for stroke healthcare delivery" in 2006 with the aim that all stroke patients could receive the same degree of specialised healthcare according to the stage of their disease, independently of where they live, their age, gender or ethnicity. This Plan needs to be updated in order to introduce new developments in acute stroke. A committee of 19 neurologists specialised in neurovascular diseases representing different regions of Spain evaluated previous experience with this Plan and the available scientific evidence according to published literature. The new organised healthcare system must place emphasis on the characteristics of the different care levels with promotion of Reference Stroke Hospitals, set up less restrictive Stroke Code activation criteria that include new therapeutic options, establish new standard measures for endovascular treatment and develop tele-medicine stroke networks. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Chlorine Gas Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carl W.; Martin, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, and might be present after exposures to a number of inhaled chemical irritants. Clinical signs, including hypoxemia, wheezes, rales, and/or abnormal chest radiographs may be present. More severely affected individuals may suffer acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Up to 1% of exposed individuals die. Humidified oxygen and inhaled β-adrenergic agents are appropriate therapies for victims with respiratory symptoms while assessments are underway. Inhaled bicarbonate and systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids also have been reported anecdotally to be beneficial. Chronic sequelae may include increased airways reactivity, which tends to diminish over time. Airways hyperreactivity may be more of a problem among those survivors that are older, have smoked, and/or have pre-existing chronic lung disease. Individuals suffering from irritant-induced asthma (IIA) due to workplace exposures to chlorine also tend to have similar characteristics, such as airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and to be older and to have smoked. Other workplace studies, however, have indicated that workers exposed to chlorine dioxide/sulfur dioxide have tended to have increased risk for chronic bronchitis and/or recurrent wheezing attacks (one or more episodes) but not asthma, while those exposed to ozone have a greater incidence of asthma. Specific biomarkers for acute and chronic exposures to chlorine gas are currently lacking. Animal models for chlorine gas

  4. Ischemic stroke destabilizes circadian rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Jimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central circadian pacemaker is a remarkably robust regulator of daily rhythmic variations of cardiovascular, endocrine, and neural physiology. Environmental lighting conditions are powerful modulators of circadian rhythms, but regulation of circadian rhythms by disease states is less clear. Here, we examine the effect of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythms in rats using high-resolution pineal microdialysis. Methods Rats were housed in LD 12:12 h conditions and monitored by pineal microdialysis to determine baseline melatonin timing profiles. After demonstration that the circadian expression of melatonin was at steady state, rats were subjected to experimental stroke using two-hour intralumenal filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The animals were returned to their cages, and melatonin monitoring was resumed. The timing of onset, offset, and duration of melatonin secretion were calculated before and after stroke to determine changes in circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion. At the end of the monitoring period, brains were analyzed to determine infarct volume. Results Rats demonstrated immediate shifts in melatonin timing after stroke. We observed a broad range of perturbations in melatonin timing in subsequent days, with rats exhibiting onset/offset patterns which included: advance/advance, advance/delay, delay/advance, and delay/delay. Melatonin rhythms displayed prolonged instability several days after stroke, with a majority of rats showing a day-to-day alternation between advance and delay in melatonin onset and duration. Duration of melatonin secretion changed in response to stroke, and this change was strongly determined by the shift in melatonin onset time. There was no correlation between infarct size and the direction or amplitude of melatonin phase shifting. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of guys Hospital stroke score (allen score) in acute supratentorial thrombotic/haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulfiqar, A.; Toori, K. U.; Khan, S. S.; Hamza, M. I. M.; Zaman, S. U.

    2006-01-01

    A consecutive series of 103 patients, 58% male with mean age of 62 year (range 40-75 years), admitted with supratentorial stroke in our teaching hospital were studied. All patients had Computer Tomography scan brain done after clinical evaluation and application of Allen stroke score. Computer Tomography Scan confirmed thrombotic stroke in 55 (53%) patients and haemorrhagic stroke in 48 (47%) patients. Out of the 55 patients with definitive thrombotic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested infarction in 67%, haemorrhage in 6% and remained inconclusive in 27% of cases. In 48 patients with definitive haemorrhagic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested haemorrhage in 60%, infarction in 11% and remained inconclusive in 29% of cases. The overall accuracy of Allen stroke score was 66%. (author)

  6. Risk of Stroke in Migraineurs Using Triptans. Associations with Age, Sex, Stroke Severity and Subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albieri, Vanna; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2016-01-01

    for a first stroke were identified in the Danish Registries. Information on stroke severity/subtype and cardiovascular risk factors was available for stroke patients. FINDINGS: Of the 49,711 patients hospitalized for a first stroke, 1084 were migraineurs using triptans. Adjusting for age, sex, income......, and educational level, risk for stroke was higher among migraineurs in respect to all strokes (RR 1.07; CI 1.01-1.14) and ischemic strokes (RR 1.07; CI 1.00-1.14). Risk for hemorrhagic stroke was increased but only in women (RR 1.41; CI 1.11-1.79). Risk was for mild strokes (RR 1.31; CI 1.16-1.48) while risk...

  7. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke lesions in a dog brain: neuropathological characterisation and comparison to human ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Gredal, Hanne; Wirenfeldt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Dogs develop spontaneous ischaemic stroke with a clinical picture closely resembling human ischaemic stroke patients. Animal stroke models have been developed, but it has proved difficult to translate results obtained from such models into successful therapeutic strategies in human....../macrophages and astrocytes. Conclusions The neuropathological changes reported in the present study were similar to findings in human patients with ischaemic stroke. The dog with spontaneous ischaemic stroke is of interest as a complementary spontaneous animal model for further neuropathological studies....... stroke patients. In order to face this apparent translational gap within stroke research, dogs with ischaemic stroke constitute an opportunity to study the neuropathology of ischaemic stroke in an animal species. Case presentation A 7 years and 8 months old female neutered Rottweiler dog suffered...

  8. Quality of stroke care at an Irish Regional General Hospital and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Robust international data support the effectiveness of stroke unit (SU) care. Despite this, most stroke care in Ireland are provided outside of this setting. Limited data currently exist on the quality of care provided. AIM: The aim of this study is to examine the quality of care for patients with stroke in two care settings-Regional General Hospital (RGH) and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit (SRU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the stroke records of consecutive patients admitted to the SRU between May-November 2002 and April-November 2004 was performed applying the UK National Sentinel Audit of Stroke (NSAS) tool. RESULTS: The results of the study reveal that while SRU processes of care was 74% compliant with standards; compliance with stroke service organisational standards was only 15 and 43% in the RGH and SRU, respectively. CONCLUSION: The quality of stroke care in our area is deficient. Comprehensive reorganisation of stroke services is imperative.

  9. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q 25 , 75 ) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men ( P stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Impact of Libido at 2 Weeks after Stroke on Risk of Stroke Recurrence at 1-Year in a Chinese Stroke Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Jing Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: One out of three stroke patients in mainland China has decreased libido at 2 weeks after stroke. Decreased libido is a protective factor for stroke recurrence at 1-year, which is more prominent among older male patients.

  11. The time course of subsequent hospitalizations and associated costs in survivors of an ischemic stroke in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Khajak J

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Documentation of the hospitalizations rates following a stroke provides the inputs required for planning health services and to evaluate the economic efficiency of any new therapies. Methods Hospitalization rates by cause were examined using administrative data on 18,695 patients diagnosed with ischemic stroke (first or subsequent, excluding transient ischemic attack in Saskatchewan, Canada between 1990 and 1995. Medical history was available retrospectively to January 1980 and follow-up was complete to March 2000. Analyses evaluated the rate and timing of all-cause and cardiovascular hospitalizations within discrete periods in the five years following the index stroke. Cardiovascular hospitalizations included patients with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, stable or unstable angina, heart failure or peripheral arterial disease. Results One-third (36% of patients were identified by a hospitalized stroke. Mean age was 70.5 years, 48.0% were male, half had a history of stroke or a transient ischemic attack at the time of their index stroke. Three-quarters of the patients (72.7% were hospitalized at least once during a mean follow-up of 4.6 years, accruing CAD $24 million in the first year alone. Of all hospitalizations, 20.4% were related to cardiovascular disease and 1.6% to bleeds. In the month following index stroke, 12.5% were admitted, an average of 1.04 times per patient hospitalized. Strokes accounted for 33% of all hospitalizations in the first month. The rate diminished steadily throughout the year and stabilized in the second year when approximately one-third of patients required hospitalization, at a rate of about one hospitalization for every two patient-years. Mean lengths of stay ranged from nine days to nearly 40 days. Close-fitting Weibull functions allow highly specific probability estimates. Other cardiovascular risk factors significantly increased

  12. The time course of subsequent hospitalizations and associated costs in survivors of an ischemic stroke in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, J Jaime; Migliaccio-Walle, Kristen; Ishak, Khajak J; Proskorovsky, Irina; O'Brien, Judith A

    2006-08-14

    Documentation of the hospitalizations rates following a stroke provides the inputs required for planning health services and to evaluate the economic efficiency of any new therapies. Hospitalization rates by cause were examined using administrative data on 18,695 patients diagnosed with ischemic stroke (first or subsequent, excluding transient ischemic attack) in Saskatchewan, Canada between 1990 and 1995. Medical history was available retrospectively to January 1980 and follow-up was complete to March 2000. Analyses evaluated the rate and timing of all-cause and cardiovascular hospitalizations within discrete periods in the five years following the index stroke. Cardiovascular hospitalizations included patients with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, stable or unstable angina, heart failure or peripheral arterial disease. One-third (36%) of patients were identified by a hospitalized stroke. Mean age was 70.5 years, 48.0% were male, half had a history of stroke or a transient ischemic attack at the time of their index stroke. Three-quarters of the patients (72.7%) were hospitalized at least once during a mean follow-up of 4.6 years, accruing CAD $24 million in the first year alone. Of all hospitalizations, 20.4% were related to cardiovascular disease and 1.6% to bleeds. In the month following index stroke, 12.5% were admitted, an average of 1.04 times per patient hospitalized. Strokes accounted for 33% of all hospitalizations in the first month. The rate diminished steadily throughout the year and stabilized in the second year when approximately one-third of patients required hospitalization, at a rate of about one hospitalization for every two patient-years. Mean lengths of stay ranged from nine days to nearly 40 days. Close-fitting Weibull functions allow highly specific probability estimates. Other cardiovascular risk factors significantly increased hospitalization rates. After stroke, there are frequent

  13. Diminished neural resources allocation to time processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lambrechts

    2018-01-01

    Results: Our results suggest that compared to TDC individuals, individuals with ASD are less able to predict the duration of the standard tone accurately, affecting the sensitivity of the comparison process. In addition, contrary to TDC individuals who allocate resources at different times depending on the nature of the task (pitch or duration discrimination, individuals with ASD seem to engage less resources for the Duration task than for the Pitch task regardless of the context. Although individuals with ASD showed top-down adaptation to the context of the task, this neuronal strategy reflects a bias in the readiness to perform different types of tasks, and in particular a diminished allocation of resources to duration processing which could have cascading effect on learning and development of other cognitive functions.

  14. Diminished exercise capacity and mitochondrial bc1 complex deficiency in tafazzin-knockdown mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey ePowers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The phospholipid, cardiolipin, is essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and optimal function. Cardiolipin-deficiency in humans, Barth syndrome, is characterized by exercise intolerance, dilated cardiomyopathy, neutropenia and 3-methyl-glutaconic aciduria. The causative gene is the mitochondrial acyl-transferase, tafazzin that is essential for remodeling acyl chains of cardiolipin. We sought to determine metabolic rates in tafazzin-deficient mice during resting and exercise, and investigate the impact of cardiolipin deficiency on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities. Tafazzin knockdown in mice markedly impaired oxygen consumption rates during an exercise, without any significant effect on resting metabolic rates. CL-deficiency resulted in significant reduction of mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity in neonatal cardiomyocytes that is likely to be caused by diminished activity of complex-III, which requires CL for its assembly and optimal activity. Our results may provide mechanistic insights of Barth syndrome pathogenesis.

  15. Acute hyperinsulinemia decreases plasma osteoprotegerin with diminished effect in type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gitte Maria; Vind, Birgitte; Nybo, Mads

    2009-01-01

    the acute effects of insulin on plasma OPG concentrations in individuals with type 2 diabetes and obese individuals compared with lean controls. DESIGN: The study population consisted of ten type 2 diabetic, ten obese subjects, and ten lean subjects with no family history of diabetes. METHODS: All subjects...... infusion decreased plasma OPG concentrations in all groups (Pobese and type 2 diabetic individuals (P=0.007). Baseline OPG correlated with fasting insulin, baseline lactate, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in the diabetic group, and with baseline FFA...... in the lean group. The relative change of OPG in response to insulin correlated inversely with HbA1c and baseline FFA in the lean group. CONCLUSIONS: Acute hyperinsulinemia decreases plasma OPG, but with diminished effect in individuals with type 2 diabetes and obesity. Increased levels of OPG in arteries...

  16. SAT predicts GPA better for high ability subjects: Implications for Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Thomas; Snyder, Anissa; Pillow, David; Kochunov, Peter

    2011-04-01

    This research examined the predictive validity of the SAT (formerly, the Scholastic Aptitude Test) for high and low ability groups. SAT scores and college GPAs were obtained from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Subjects were classified as high or low ability by g factor scores from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. SAT correlations with GPA were higher for high than low ability subjects. SAT g loadings (i.e., SAT correlations with g) were equivalent for both groups. This is the first study to show that the predictive validity of the SAT varies for ability groups that differ in g. The results contradict a presumption, based on Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns, that a test's predictive validity should be lower for high ability subjects. Further research is needed to identify factors that contribute to the predictive validity of the SAT for groups that differ in g.

  17. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Taylor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  18. Cp/Heph mutant mice have iron-induced neurodegeneration diminished by deferiprone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangliang; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Wang, Chenguang; Xu, Xueying; Song, Ying; Jinnah, H.A.; Wodzinska, Jolanta; Iacovelli, Jared; Wolkow, Natalie; Krajacic, Predrag; Weissberger, Alyssa Cwanger; Connelly, John; Spino, Michael; Lee, Michael K.; Connor, James; Giasson, Benoit; Harris, Z. Leah; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain iron accumulates in several neurodegenerative diseases and can cause oxidative damage, but mechanisms of brain iron homeostasis are incompletely understood. Patients with mutations in the cellular iron-exporting ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) have brain iron accumulation causing neurodegeneration. Here, we assessed the brains of mice with combined mutation of Cp and its homolog hephaestin. Compared to single mutants, brain iron accumulation was accelerated in double mutants in the cerebellum, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Iron accumulated within glia, while neurons were iron deficient. There was loss of both neurons and glia. Mice developed ataxia and tremor, and most died by 9 months. Treatment with the oral iron chelator deferiprone diminished brain iron levels, protected against neuron loss, and extended lifespan. Ferroxidases play important, partially overlapping roles in brain iron homeostasis by facilitating iron export from glia, making iron available to neurons. PMID:26303407

  19. Use of the radio mutagenesis gamma to diminish the germinative periods of the seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Espinosa, K.A.; Damera Martinez, A.; Benito Zamora, E.; Vazquez Hernandez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Among the nuclear techniques that have been used in Cuba in to feasible way for their it lives it uses in the agriculture it dog think about that the radio mutagenesis is that of advance it lives. In this address the fundamental problem consists in that to the being to casuistically method forces to uses to great initial population. The Fruit Bomb Net Maradol was studied and it was obtained to diminish its germination period in 12 days without affecting the quality of the cultivation. The seeds were irradiated with an irradiator with source of Co-60, originator of radiations a (gamma) with to power of dose of 2,76 kGy/h and to half energy of 1,25 MeV. The dose range applied to the seeds was among 50 - 250 Gy

  20. Characterizing and Diminishing Autofluorescence in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Human Respiratory Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. Sally; Richter, Anke; Becker, Steven; Moyer, Jenna E.; Sandouk, Aline; Skinner, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Tissue autofluorescence frequently hampers visualization of immunofluorescent markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded respiratory tissues. We assessed nine treatments reported to have efficacy in reducing autofluorescence in other tissue types. The three most efficacious were Eriochrome black T, Sudan black B and sodium borohydride, as measured using white light laser confocal Λ2 (multi-lambda) analysis. We also assessed the impact of steam antigen retrieval and serum application on human tracheal tissue autofluorescence. Functionally fitting this Λ2 data to 2-dimensional Gaussian surfaces revealed that steam antigen retrieval and serum application contribute minimally to autofluorescence and that the three treatments are disparately efficacious. Together, these studies provide a set of guidelines for diminishing autofluorescence in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human respiratory tissue. Additionally, these characterization techniques are transferable to similar questions in other tissue types, as demonstrated on frozen human liver tissue and paraffin-embedded mouse lung tissue fixed in different fixatives. PMID:24722432

  1. A short educational intervention diminishes causal illusions and specific paranormal beliefs in undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberia, Itxaso; Tubau, Elisabet; Matute, Helena; Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive biases such as causal illusions have been related to paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs and, thus, pose a real threat to the development of adequate critical thinking abilities. We aimed to reduce causal illusions in undergraduates by means of an educational intervention combining training-in-bias and training-in-rules techniques. First, participants directly experienced situations that tend to induce the Barnum effect and the confirmation bias. Thereafter, these effects were explained and examples of their influence over everyday life were provided. Compared to a control group, participants who received the intervention showed diminished causal illusions in a contingency learning task and a decrease in the precognition dimension of a paranormal belief scale. Overall, results suggest that evidence-based educational interventions like the one presented here could be used to significantly improve critical thinking skills in our students.

  2. Discovery and Computational Rationalization of Diminishing Alternation in [n]Dendralenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Mehmet F; Fallon, Thomas; Paddon-Row, Michael N; Sherburn, Michael S

    2016-01-27

    The [n]dendralenes are a family of acyclic hydrocarbons which, by virtue of their ability to rapidly generate structural complexity, have attracted significant recent synthetic attention. [3]Dendralene through [8]dendralene have been previously prepared but no higher member of the family has been reported to date. Here, we describe the first chemical syntheses of the "higher" dendralenes, [9]dendralene through [12]dendralene. We also report a detailed investigation into the spectroscopic properties and chemical reactivity of the complete family of fundamental hydrocarbons, [3]dendralene to [12]dendralene. These studies reveal the first case of diminishing alternation in behavior in a series of related structures. We also report a comprehensive series of computational studies, which trace this dampening oscillatory effect in both spectroscopic measurements and chemical reactivity to conformational preferences.

  3. Diminished macrophage apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation after phorbol ester stimulation in Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine D Palmer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's Disease (CD is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although its pathogenesis is complex, we have recently shown that CD patients have a systemic defect in macrophage function, which results in the defective clearance of bacteria from inflammatory sites.Here we have identified a number of additional macrophage defects in CD following diacylglycerol (DAG homolog phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA activation. We provide evidence for decreased DNA fragmentation, reduced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, impaired reactive oxygen species production, diminished cytochrome c release and increased IL-6 production compared to healthy subjects after PMA exposure. The observed macrophage defects in CD were stimulus-specific, as normal responses were observed following p53 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress.These findings add to a growing body of evidence highlighting disordered macrophage function in CD and, given their pivotal role in orchestrating inflammatory responses, defective apoptosis could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of CD.

  4. Vision-guided ocular growth in a mutant chicken model with diminished visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Eric R; Zelinka, Christopher; Tang, Junhua; Liu, Jun; Code, Kimberly A; Petersen-Jones, Simon; Fischer, Andy J

    2012-09-01

    Visual experience is known to guide ocular growth. We tested the hypothesis that vision-guided ocular growth is disrupted in a model system with diminished visual acuity. We examine whether ocular elongation is influenced by form-deprivation (FD) and lens-imposed defocus in the Retinopathy, Globe Enlarged (RGE) chicken. Young RGE chicks have poor visual acuity, without significant retinal pathology, resulting from a mutation in guanine nucleotide-binding protein β3 (GNB3), also known as transducin β3 or Gβ3. The mutation in GNB3 destabilizes the protein and causes a loss of Gβ3 from photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells (Ritchey et al., 2010). FD increased ocular elongation in RGE eyes in a manner similar to that seen in wild-type (WT) eyes. By comparison, the excessive ocular elongation that results from hyperopic defocus was increased, whereas myopic defocus failed to significantly decrease ocular elongation in RGE eyes. Brief daily periods of unrestricted vision interrupting FD prevented ocular elongation in RGE chicks in a manner similar to that seen in WT chicks. Glucagonergic amacrine cells differentially expressed the immediate early gene Egr1 in response to growth-guiding stimuli in RGE retinas, but the defocus-dependent up-regulation of Egr1 was lesser in RGE retinas compared to that of WT retinas. We conclude that high visual acuity, and the retinal signaling mediated by Gβ3, is not required for emmetropization and the excessive ocular elongation caused by FD and hyperopic defocus. However, the loss of acuity and Gβ3 from RGE retinas causes enhanced responses to hyperopic defocus and diminished responses to myopic defocus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Parametric Study of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Mayer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Large commercial ships such as container vesselsand bulk carriers are propelled by low-speed, uniflowscavenged two-stroke diesel engines. The integral in-cylinderprocess in this type of engine is the scavenging process,where the burned gas from the combustion process isevacuated through the exhaust...... in axial velocity and the formation ofcentral recirculation zones, known as vortex breakdown. Thispaper will present a CFD analysis of the scavenging process ina MAN B&W two-stroke diesel engine. The study include aparameter sweep where the operating conditions such as airamount, port timing and scavenging...

  6. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia.

  7. The effectiveness of an augmented cognitive behavioural intervention for post-stroke depression with or without anxiety (PSDA: the Restore4Stroke-PSDA trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kootker Joyce A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-Stroke Depression with or without Anxiety (PSDA is a common disorder in the chronic phase of stroke. Neuropsychiatric problems, such as PSDA, have a negative impact on social reintegration and quality of life. Currently, there is no evidence-based treatment available for reducing PSDA symptoms. In the recent literature on depression in the general population it has been shown that depression complaints can diminish by cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT. In the current study, the effectiveness of augmented, activation-based and individually tailored CBT on the reduction of depression and anxiety will be investigated in patients with PSDA. Additionally, the effects on various secondary outcome measures, such as quality of life, goal attainment and societal participation will be evaluated. This study is embedded in a consortium of 4 interrelated studies on quality of life after stroke (Restore4Stroke. Methods/design A multi-centre, assessor-blind, randomized controlled trial is conducted. A sample of 106 PSDA patients, as assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS depression subscale >7, will be recruited and randomly allocated to either an experimental or a control group. The experimental intervention consists of an augmented CBT intervention. The intervention is based on CBT principles of recognizing, registering, and altering negative thoughts and cognitions so that mood, and emotional symptoms are improved. CBT is augmented with direct in-vivo activation offered by occupational or movement therapists. Patients in the control group will receive a computerized cognitive training intervention. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention, and at 6 and 12 months follow up. Discussion This study is the first randomized clinical trial that evaluates the (maintenance of effects of augmented CBT on post-stroke depression with or without anxiety symptoms. Together with three other

  8. Two decades of nation-wide community-based stroke support - The Singapore National Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Yin, Ann; Lee, Lay B; De Silva, Deidre A

    2017-04-01

    The Singapore National Stroke Association, registered in 1996, offers support and information to stroke survivors and caregivers, and aims to raise public stroke awareness. In the last 20 years, we have developed programs to equip stroke survivors and caregivers with knowledge, life skills, comfort, and opportunities for socialization and reintegration. We have on-going public education and advocacy initiatives. Obtaining funding, member recruitment, volunteer retention, and leadership renewal are on-going challenges. Singapore National Stroke Association will continue to strive for the betterment of stroke survivors, their caregivers, and the public.

  9. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  10. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  11. GAS BEARING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  12. Requirements for gas quality and gas appliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsky, Howard; Gersen, Sander; Kiewiet, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The gas transmission network in the Netherlands transports two different qualities of gas, low-calorific gas known as G-gas or L-gas and, high calorific gas (H-gas). These two gas qualities are transported in separate networks, and are connected by means of five blending and conversion

  13. Gas separating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  14. Vertigo and stroke: a national database survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huon, Leh-Kiong; Wang, Ting-Chuan; Fang, Te-Yung; Chuang, Li-Ju; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the association between vertigo and stroke in Taiwan using the Bureau of National Health Insurance research database. Information on adult patients with an index vertigo attack in 2006 was retrieved from Bureau of National Health Insurance research database. All patients with specific diagnostic codes for vertigo were included. Occurrence of stroke during a 1-year follow-up period was identified. Risk factors for stroke were examined. Using χ test, t test, and a multilevel logistic regression model, patients with vertigo were categorized into stroke and nonstroke groups for comparative analyses. An age- and sex- matched control cohort was prepared for comparison. Patients with vertigo (n = 527,807) (mean age, 55.1 yr) accounted for 3.1% of the general Taiwanese adult population. The prevalence of stroke among vertigo patients of 0.5% (mean age, 67.8 yr) was slightly higher than that of the control group (0.3%; mean age, 72.3 yr; p vertigo had higher prevalence of comorbid conditions (p diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, or atrial fibrillation had a higher prevalence of stroke (p vertigo had higher chance to develop stroke than the control group. Some strokes may initially manifest as peripheral vertigo, and some central vertigo may eventually evolve into a stroke. Middle aged male, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation are risk factors for subsequent stroke in vertigo patients.

  15. Do Stroke Patients Know Their Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomann, Maarja; Vibo, Riina; Kõrv, Janika

    2016-03-01

    Risk factor management is the key to stroke prevention. Although several studies have assessed the awareness of different risk factors in the general public, there are limited data available on how well acute stroke patients know their own risk factors. The aim of this study was to assess stroke patients' informedness of their own stroke risk factors. All consecutive eligible acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients hospitalized at the Tartu University Hospital, Department of Neurology, during 9 months in 2010 were interviewed about different stroke risk factors within 72 hours from hospitalization. The respective information was also retrieved from medical records. Of the 341 patients admitted during the study period, 195 were eligible for the interview. Diabetes was the best known risk factor (89%) followed by hypertension (80%), atrial fibrillation (78%), previous stroke (77%), and heart failure and/or ischemic heart disease (66%). We found that acute stroke patients are best informed of their diabetes and worst informed of their ischemic heart disease and/or heart failure. There is, however, room for amelioration in the awareness of all of the studied risk factors. More attention should be addressed to explaining the risks and treatment options to patients at risk of stroke and the general population. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stroke Knowledge in Spanish-speaking populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Willey, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Background Spanish is the second most spoken language in the world. Spanish-speaking populations (SSP) have heterogeneous cultural backgrounds, racial and ethnical origins, economic status, and access to health care systems. There are no published reviews about stroke knowledge in SSP. We reviewed the existing literature addressing stroke knowledge among SSP and propose future directions for research. Summary We identified 18 suitable studies by searching PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane and Scielo databases, and looking at reference lists of eligible articles. We also included 2 conference abstracts. Data related to stroke knowledge from studies of Spanish-speakers was analyzed. Key messages Little is known about stroke knowledge in SSP, especially in Latin America. Information is poor even among subjects at risk, stroke patients, stroke survivors, and health care providers. “Ictus”, the word used for stroke in Spanish, is largely unrecognized among subjects at risk. Furthermore, access to medical care and presence of neurologists are suboptimal in many regions. There are several potential issues to solve regarding stroke knowledge and stroke care in SSP. Programs to educate the general population and non-neurologists medical providers in stroke and telemedicine may be suitable options to improve the present situation. PMID:25871697

  17. Epidemiology of stroke patients in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... stroke are not well identified in Ethiopia. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all stroke patients who presented from December 2010 to December ... In developed nations, ischemic stroke accounts for 85. % of the stroke types (1,5-6), but in ..... Emphasis on Stroke in the Young. EthiopJHealth. Dev. 2002 ...

  18. Association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and recurrent stroke risk in patients with different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Ruihao; Song, Bo; Tan, Song; Gao, Yuan; Fang, Hui; Lu, Jie; Xu, Yuming

    2015-07-01

    The association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence remains unclear, and may be influenced by different subtypes of ischemic stroke. We aimed to investigate whether atherogenic dyslipidemia contributed to stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients and in those with certain subtypes of ischemic stroke. We conducted a prospective hospital-based study enrolling patients with acute ischemic stroke. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was defined as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence was analyzed by using multivariable Cox regression model. In the 510 ischemic stroke patients, 64 patients (12·5%) had atherogenic dyslipidemia, and 66 patients (12·9%) experienced stroke recurrence events within 24 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that stroke recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia than those without in all the stroke patients (20·3% vs. 11·9%; P = 0·048), and more evident in those of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (31·0% vs. 14·1%; P = 0·014), but not in the other subtypes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that atherogenic dyslipidemia was associated with higher stroke recurrence risk among stroke patients of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (hazard ratio, 2·79; 95% confidence interval, 1·24-6·28), but not significant in all the stroke patients (hazard ratio, 1·69; 95% confidence interval, 0·85-3·37). Atherogenic dyslipidemia is associated with higher risk of stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Such association might be more pronounced in large-artery atherosclerosis subtype and needs further investigation to establish such relationship. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  19. In-hospital stroke recurrence and stroke after transient ischemic attack: frequency and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Hebun; Scheitz, Jan F; Ebinger, Martin; Rocco, Andrea; Grittner, Ulrike; Meisel, Andreas; Rothwell, Peter M; Endres, Matthias; Nolte, Christian H

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to assess the risk of recurrent ischemic events during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) with optimal current management and to identify associated risk factors. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients treated for acute ischemic stroke or TIA in 3 stroke units between 2010 and 2013. Recurrent stroke was defined as new persisting (≥24 hours) neurological deficit occurring >24 hours after the index event and not attributable to other causes of neurological deterioration. Cox proportional hazard regression identified risk factors associated with recurrent stroke. The study included 5106 patients. During a median length of stay of 5 days (interquartile range, 4-8), stroke recurrence (or stroke after TIA) occurred in 40 patients (0.8%) and was independently associated with history of TIA, symptomatic carotid stenosis (≥70%), or other determined etiology. Patients with recurrent stroke and other determined etiology had cervical arterial dissection (n=2), primary angiitis of the central nervous system (n=1), giant cell arteritis (n=1), and lung cancer with nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (n=1). In patients with initial TIA or minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤5) recurrence was associated additionally with pneumonia after the inciting ischemic event but before stroke recurrence. Patients with initial stroke and aphasia had a lower stroke recurrence rate and there were no recurrences in patients with lacunar stroke. Recurrence was associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality (17.5% versus 3.1%; Pstroke recurrence was low with optimal current management. Patients with a history of TIA, severe symptomatic carotid stenosis, or uncommon causes of stroke were at higher risk. Pneumonia was associated with a higher risk of stroke recurrence in patients with initial TIA or minor stroke but not in the overall population studied. Aphasia may bias the detection rate by concealing new

  20. Hip Hop Stroke: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Stroke Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; Leighton-Herrmann, Ellyn; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Hecht, Mindy; Hedmann, Monique; Huq, Saima; Gerin, William; Chinchilli, Vernon; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Noble, James

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious long-term adult disability in the US. Acute stroke treatments with intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy are proven to reduce disability, however a critical limitation on their effectiveness is the narrow time window for administration, which is 4.5 hours and 6 hours respectively from the onset of symptoms. Our overarching goal is to reduce pre-hospital delays to acute stroke treatments in economically disadvantaged minority communities where the greatest delays exist, using Hip Hop Stroke. Hip Hop Stroke (HHS) is a school-based, child-mediated, culturally-tailored stroke communication multimedia intervention developed using validated models of behavior change and designed to improve stroke literacy (knowledge of stroke symptoms, the urgent need to call 911, and prevention measures) of 4 th , 5 th and 6 th grade students and their parents residing in poor urban communities. Children in the intervention arm will receive the HHS intervention, while those in the attentional control arm will receive standardized nutrition education based on the USDA's MyPyramid program. Children will be trained and motivated to share stroke information with their parents or other adult caregiver. Both children and parents will complete a stroke knowledge assessment at baseline, immediately following the program, and at 3-months post-program. The primary outcome is the effect of the child mediation on parental stroke literacy. Stroke literate children, a captive audience in school systems, may represent a viable channel for spreading stroke information into households of poor urban communities where mass media stroke campaigns have shown the lowest penetration. These children may also call 911 when witnessing a stroke in their homes or communities. The HHS program may highlight the potential role of children in the chain of stroke recovery as a strategy for reducing prehospital delays to acute stroke

  1. Blood Biomarkers for the Early Diagnosis of Stroke: The Stroke-Chip Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Alejandro; López-Cancio, Elena; Pich, Sara; Penalba, Anna; Giralt, Dolors; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Gasull, Teresa; Hernández-Pérez, María; Millan, Mónica; Rubiera, Marta; Cardona, Pedro; Cano, Luis; Quesada, Helena; Terceño, Mikel; Silva, Yolanda; Castellanos, Mar; Garces, Moisés; Reverté, Silvia; Ustrell, Xavier; Marés, Rafael; Baiges, Joan Josep; Serena, Joaquín; Rubio, Francisco; Salas, Eduardo; Dávalos, Antoni; Montaner, Joan

    2017-09-01

    Stroke diagnosis could be challenging in the acute phase. We aimed to develop a blood-based diagnostic tool to differentiate between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in the hyperacute phase. The Stroke-Chip was a prospective, observational, multicenter study, conducted at 6 Stroke Centers in Catalonia. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke were enrolled within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, and blood samples were drawn immediately after admission. A 21-biomarker panel selected among previous results and from the literature was measured by immunoassays. Outcomes were differentiation between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Predictive models were developed by combining biomarkers and clinical variables in logistic regression models. Accuracy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic curves. From August 2012 to December 2013, 1308 patients were included (71.9% ischemic, 14.8% stroke mimics, and 13.3% hemorrhagic). For stroke versus stroke mimics comparison, no biomarker resulted included in the logistic regression model, but it was only integrated by clinical variables, with a predictive accuracy of 80.8%. For ischemic versus hemorrhagic strokes comparison, NT-proBNP (N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide) >4.9 (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.71; P 4.7 (odds ratio, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.45; P =0.010), together with age, sex, blood pressure, stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, and hypertension, were included in the model. Predictive accuracy was 80.6%. The studied biomarkers were not sufficient for an accurate differential diagnosis of stroke in the hyperacute setting. Additional discovery of new biomarkers and improvement on laboratory techniques seem necessary for achieving a molecular diagnosis of stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Hypothermia for Stroke: call to action 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Malcolm R; Petersson, Jesper; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Wagner, Markus; Schwab, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    The European Hypothermia Stroke Research Workshop was held in January 2010, in response to the alarming prospects of a significant increase of stroke expected in the coming years globally. Considering that a minority of patients (around 10%) are currently eligible for thrombolytic treatment, there is a need for an efficacious, cost-effective novel therapy that can be implemented broadly within European health care systems. Accordingly, the primary objective of the workshop was the definition of a research agenda aiming to assess the therapeutic benefits of hypothermia in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. The meeting was organised by the European Stroke Research Network for Hypothermia (EuroHyp) and attended by the representatives of World Stroke Organisation, European Stroke Organisation, Stroke Alliance for Europe, Society for Cryobiology and other organisations--specifically the European Space Agency, and small- and medium-sized enterprises based in EU member states. The participants adopted the 'Hypothermia for Stroke--Call to Action 2010', a declaration specifying the priorities for hypothermia research in acute ischaemic stroke. The research programme outlined--a clinical study programme designed to identify and validate therapeutic cooling as a novel treatment providing benefit to a large number of stroke patients--contains a well-integrated series of Phase II studies aiming to refine the intervention (depth, duration, and mode of cooling; antishivering strategy; patient selection) and a pivotal Phase III clinical trial. The proposed integrated Phase II and III clinical study programme would test the effectiveness of this optimised intervention, and would allow the development of evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines describing the optimal use of therapeutic hypothermia as a treatment strategy for stroke. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2010 World Stroke Organization.

  3. Evaluating a community-based stroke nursing education and rehabilitation programme for patients with mild stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lee; Chen, Chiu-Mei; Liao, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Chun-Yin

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated whether mild stroke patients who received a community-based stroke nursing intervention had better stroke knowledge, behaviour and self-efficacy than those who were exposed to traditional education programmes. The intervention group consisted of sixty five stroke patients randomly selected from seven communities who received three 2-hour stroke interventions per week for 8 weeks. The normal care group consisted of sixty two stroke patients randomly selected from a medical centre who received a general stroke education programme. The stroke patients in two groups were assessed at baseline, after intervention and at the 6-month follow-up. At the 6-month follow-up, the intervention group demonstrated an improvement in the knowledge of stroke risk factors compared with the normal care group. Three months after education, the intervention group exhibited changes in the knowledge of stroke, social participation and self-efficacy compared with those at baseline. Also, self-efficacy was correlated with the knowledge of stroke risk factors after intervention and at the 6-month follow-up; self-efficacy was correlated with social participation after the 6-month follow-up. A community-based stroke nursing intervention might have effects on changes in the knowledge of stroke risk factors, social participation and self-efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Differences in the role of black race and stroke risk factors for first vs recurrent stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissela, Brett M.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; McClure, Leslie A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Rhodes, J. David; Cushman, Mary; Moy, Claudia S.; Sands, Kara A.; Howard, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether black race and other cerebrovascular risk factors have a differential effect on first vs recurrent stroke events. Methods: Estimate the differences in the magnitude of the association of demographic (age, back race, sex) or stroke risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, cigarette smoking, atrial fibrillation, left ventricular hypertrophy, or heart disease) for first vs recurrent stroke from a longitudinal cohort study of 29,682 black or white participants aged 45 years and older. Results: Over an average 6.8 years follow-up, 301 of 2,993 participants with a previous stroke at baseline had a recurrent stroke, while 818 of 26,689 participants who were stroke-free at baseline had a first stroke. Among those stroke-free at baseline, there was an age-by-race interaction (p = 0.0002), with a first stroke risk 2.70 (95% confidence interval: 1.86–3.91) times greater for black than white participants at age 45, but no racial disparity at age 85 (hazard ratio = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.70–1.18). In contrast, there was no evidence of a higher risk of recurrent stroke at any age for black participants (p > 0.05). The association of traditional stroke risk factors was generally similar for first and recurrent stroke. Conclusion: The association of age and black race differs substantially on first vs recurrent stroke risk, with risk factors playing a similar role. PMID:26791153

  5. Velocity, stroke rate, and distance per stroke during elite swimming competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A B; Skehan, P L; Pawelczyk, J A; Boomer, W L

    1985-12-01

    The mean velocity of 9 out of 10 women's events during the U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials was greater in 1984 as compared to 1976. Three of the 10 men's events showed improvement. In 9 out of these 12 events, the increased velocity was accounted for by increased distance per stroke (range, -3 to -13%). In the women's 100-m butterfly and 100-m backstroke, increased velocity was due solely to faster stroke rates. The finalists in each event were compared to those whose velocities were 3-7% slower. In almost all events and stroke styles, the finalists achieved greater distances per stroke than did the slower group. In the men's events increased distance per stroke was associated with decreased stroke rate, except in the backstroke, in which both were increased for the finalists. Although the faster women swimmers generally had greater distances per stroke, they were more dependent than men on faster stroke rates to achieve superiority. The profile of velocity for races of 200 m and longer indicated that as fatigue developed the distance per stroke decreased. The faster swimmers compensated for this change by maintaining or increasing stroke rate more than did their slower competitors. This study indicates that improvements and superiority in stroke mechanics are reflected in the stroke rate and distance per stroke used to swim a race.

  6. National Trends in Patients Hospitalized for Stroke and Stroke Mortality in France, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoffre, Camille; de Peretti, Christine; Gabet, Amélie; Grimaud, Olivier; Woimant, France; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Olié, Valérie

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men in France. In young adults (ie, stroke was observed at a local scale between 1985 and 2011. After the implementation of the 2010 to 2014 National Stroke Action Plan, this study investigates national trends in patients hospitalized by stroke subtypes, in-hospital mortality, and stroke mortality between 2008 and 2014. Hospitalization data were extracted from the French national hospital discharge databases and mortality data from the French national medical causes of death database. Time trends were tested using a Poisson regression model. From 2008 to 2014, the age-standardized rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke increased by 14.3% in patients stroke was stable (+2.0%), irrespective of age and sex. The proportion of patients hospitalized in stroke units substantially increased. In-hospital mortality decreased by 17.1% in patients with ischemic stroke. From 2008 to 2013, stroke mortality decreased, except for women between 45 and 64 years old and for people aged ≥85 years. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors and improved stroke management may explain the increase in the rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke. The decrease observed for in-hospital stroke mortality may be because of recent improvements in acute-phase management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Teleneurology to improve stroke care in rural areas: The Telemedicine in Stroke in Swabia (TESS) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiborg, Andreas; Widder, Bernhard

    2003-12-01

    Assessing both stroke patients and their CT scans by using a conventional videoconference system offers an interesting opportunity to improve stroke care in rural areas. However, until now there have been no studies to suggest whether this method is feasible in routine stroke management. Seven rural hospitals in the southern part of Germany in Swabia were connected to the stroke unit of Günzburg with the use of a videoconference link (Telemedicine in Stroke in Swabia [TESS] Project). The local physicians are free to present every admitted stroke patient to the Günzburg stroke expert, who can assess the clinical status and CT images, thereafter giving therapeutic recommendations. All teleconsultations are rated concerning transmission quality and relevance of telemedicine for stroke management. A total of 153 stroke patients were examined by teleconsultation. Mean age was 67.5 years. Eighty-seven patients had suffered an ischemic stroke, 9 had an intracerebral hemorrhage, and 17 suffered a transient ischemic attack. Forty patients were revealed to have a diagnosis other than stroke. Duration of teleconsultation was 15 minutes on average. User satisfaction was good concerning imaging and audio quality, and patient satisfaction was very good or good in all cases. Relevant contributions could be made in >75% of the cases concerning diagnostic workup, CT assessment, and therapeutic recommendations. Teleconsultation using a videoconference system seems to be a feasible and promising method to improve stroke care in rural areas where management in a stroke unit is hindered by long transportation distances.

  8. Exacerbation of Brain Injury by Post-Stroke Exercise Is Contingent Upon Exercise Initiation Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengwu Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that post-stroke physical rehabilitation may reduce morbidity. The effectiveness of post-stroke exercise, however, appears to be contingent upon exercise initiation. This study assessed the hypothesis that very early exercise exacerbates brain injury, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and promotes energy failure. A total of 230 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion for 2 h, and randomized into eight groups, including two sham injury control groups, three non-exercise and three exercise groups. Exercise was initiated after 6 h, 24 h and 3 days of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after completion of exercise (and at corresponding time points in non-exercise controls, infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were examined. Early brain oxidative metabolism was quantified by examining ROS, ATP and NADH levels 0.5 h after completion of exercise. Furthermore, protein expressions of angiogenic growth factors were measured in order to determine whether post-stroke angiogenesis played a role in rehabilitation. As expected, ischemic stroke resulted in brain infarction, apoptotic cell death and ROS generation, and diminished NADH and ATP production. Infarct volumes and apoptotic cell death were enhanced (p < 0.05 by exercise that was initiated after 6 h of reperfusion, but decreased by late exercise (24 h, 3 days. This exacerbated brain injury at 6 h was associated with increased ROS levels (p < 0.05, and decreased (p < 0.05 NADH and ATP levels. In conclusion, very early exercise aggravated brain damage, and early exercise-induced energy failure with ROS generation may underlie the exacerbation of brain injury. These results shed light on the manner in which exercise initiation timing may affect post-stroke rehabilitation.

  9. Virtual reality in stroke rehabilitation: a meta-analysis and implications for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Levin, Mindy

    2011-05-01

    Approximately two thirds of stroke survivors continue to experience motor deficits of the arm resulting in diminished quality of life. Conventional rehabilitation provides modest and sometimes delayed effects. Virtual reality (VR) technology is a novel adjunctive therapy that could be applied in neurorehabilitation. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the added benefit of VR technology on arm motor recovery after stroke. We searched Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane literature from 1966 to July 2010 with the terms "stroke," "virtual reality," and "upper arm/extremity." We evaluated the effect of VR on motor function improvement after stroke. From the 35 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria totaling 195 participants. Among them, there were 5 randomized clinical trials and 7 observational studies with a pre-/postintervention design. Interventions were delivered within 4 to 6 weeks in 9 of the studies and within 2 to 3 weeks in the remaining 3. Eleven of 12 studies showed a significant benefit toward VR for the selected outcomes. In the pooled analysis of all 5 randomized controlled trials, the effect of VR on motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer) was OR=4.89 (95% CI, 1.31 to 18.3). No significant difference was observed for Box and Block Test or motor function. Among observational studies, there was a 14.7% (95% CI, 8.7%-23.6%) improvement in motor impairment and a 20.1% (95% CI, 11.0%-33.8%) improvement in motor function after VR. VR and video game applications are novel and potentially useful technologies that can be combined with conventional rehabilitation for upper arm improvement after stroke.

  10. Acute stroke unit improves stroke management-four years on from INASC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, E; Keenan, R; Cunningham, N; O'Malley, G; O'Connor, M; Lyons, D; Peters, C

    2015-02-01

    The Irish Heart Foundation carried out the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC) in 2008. Management practices were significantly poorer than those in the UK Sentinel audits. Since then an acute stroke unit has been established in University Hospital Limerick. A stroke database was established. 12 key indicators of stroke management audited by INASC were identified. Results were compared to those in INASC. 89 stroke patients were admitted. 8 of the 12 key indicators scored significantly better than in INASC. 92.5% had a brain scan within 24hrs (INASC-40%, p = strokes received anti-thrombotics (INASC-85%, p = 0.001). 94% had rehab goals agreed by MDT (22% in INASC p = 0.0000). 55% were treated in stroke unit (2% in INASC, p = 0.0000). MDT input improved with regard to physiotherapy (87% vs 43% in INASC, p = Stroke management has significantly improved from 2008, however some deficiencies remain.

  11. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    higher mortality risk (HR, 1.564; 95% CI, 1.441-1.696). The increased risk was, however, time-dependent; initially, risk was 4-fold, after 1 week it was 2.5-fold, and after 3 weeks it was 1.5-fold. After 3 months stroke type did not correlate to mortality. Conclusion-Strokes are generally more severe......Background and Purpose-Stroke patients with hemorrhagic (HS) and ischemic strokes were compared with regard to stroke severity, mortality, and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods-A registry started in 2001, with the aim of registering all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds...... information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  12. Post-stroke language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman; Mrkonjić, Zamir; Zukić, Sanela; Vidović, Mirjana; Imamović, Kata

    2011-03-01

    Post-stroke language disorders are frequent and include aphasia, alexia, agraphia and acalculia. There are different definitions of aphasias, but the most widely accepted neurologic and/or neuropsychological definition is that aphasia is a loss or impairment of verbal communication, which occurs as a consequence of brain dysfunction. It manifests as impairment of almost all verbal abilities, e.g., abnormal verbal expression, difficulties in understanding spoken or written language, repetition, naming, reading and writing. During the history, many classifications of aphasia syndromes were established. For practical use, classification of aphasias according to fluency, comprehension and abilities of naming it seems to be most suitable (nonfluent aphasias: Broca's, transcortical motor, global and mixed transcortical aphasia; fluent aphasias: anomic, conduction, Wernicke's, transcortical sensory, subcortical aphasia). Aphasia is a common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with a prevalence of one-third of all stroke patients in acute phase, although there are reports on even higher figures. Many speech impairments have a tendency of spontaneous recovery. Spontaneous recovery is most remarkable in the first three months after stroke onset. Recovery of aphasias caused by ischemic stroke occurs earlier and it is most intensive in the first two weeks. In aphasias caused by hemorrhagic stroke, spontaneous recovery is slower and occurs from the fourth to the eighth week after stroke. The course and outcome of aphasia depend greatly on the type of aphasia. Regardless of the fact that a significant number of aphasias spontaneously improve, it is necessary to start treatment as soon as possible. The writing and reading disorders in stroke patients (alexias and agraphias) are more frequent than verified on routine examination, not only in less developed but also in large neurologic departments. Alexia is an acquired

  13. [Fitness to drive after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In Germany, patient information and expert testimony on driving ability requires knowledge of the corresponding legislation and the Guideline for expertises on driver aptitude. The testimony should clearly identify handicaps with regard to driving, give estimates on the future risks of a sudden loss of control, and also consider personal attitudes such as inadequate behavior, lack of insight etc. Physical handicaps often can be compensated for by restrains or restrictions such as vehicle modifications, daylight driving only etc.Both, information and testimony must give estimates on the risks of a sudden loss of control while driving by stroke recurrence or epileptic seizures. In accordance with the Risk-of-Harm-Formula of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society methods are being discussed, by which an estimate of harmful traffic accidents due to stroke recurrence can be calculated. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnell, Gaynor

    2000-01-01

    Following the UK Government's initiative for stimulating renewable energy through the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO), the UK landfill gas industry has more than trebled in size in just 4 years. As a result, UK companies are now in a strong position to offer their skills and services overseas. Ireland, Greece and Spain also resort heavily to disposal to landfill. Particularly rapid growth of the landfill gas market is expected in the OECD-Pacific and NAFTA areas. The article explains that landfill gas is a methane-rich mixture produced by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes in landfills: under optimum conditions, up to 500 cubic meters of gas can be obtained from 1 tonne of biodegradable waste. Data on the number and capacity of sites in the UK are given. The Landfill Gas Association runs courses to counteract the skills shortage in the UK, and tailored courses for overseas visitors are planned

  15. Carbon Nanostructure of Diesel Soot Particles Emitted from 2 and 4 Stroke Marine Engines Burning Different Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Ju; Park, Seul-Hyun; Jang, Se-Hyun; Kim, Hwajin; Choi, Sung Kuk; Cho, Kwon-Hae; Cho, Ik-Soon; Lee, Sang-Min; Choi, Jae-Hyuk

    2018-03-01

    Diesel soot particles were sampled from 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines that burned two different fuels (Bunker A and C, respectively), and the effects of the engine and fuel types on the structural characteristics of the soot particle were analyzed. The carbon nanostructures of the sampled particles were characterized using various techniques. The results showed that the soot sample collected from the 4-stroke engine, which burned Bunker C, has a higher degree of order of the carbon nanostructure than the sample collected from the 2-stroke engine, which burned Bunker A. Furthermore, the difference in the exhaust gas temperatures originating from the different engine and fuel types can affect the nanostructure of the soot emitted from marine diesel engines.

  16. MIGRAINE AND STROKE: VASCULAR COMORBIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata eGuidetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Several comorbidities are associated to migraine.Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischaemic stroke and migraine with aura, even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined.Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischaemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true vascular disease or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly.

  17. Concept of Six Stroke Engine

    OpenAIRE

    P.Naresh

    2015-01-01

    One of the most difficult challenges in engine technology today is the urgent need to increase engine thermal efficiency. Higher efficiencies mean less fuel consumption and lower atmospheric emissions per unit of work produced by the engine. In 1862 a Frenchman Alphouse Beau de Rochas gives his theory regarding the ideal cycle of the internal combustion engine. This theory is applied by a German engineer named Nikolaus A. Otto, who firstly built a successful four-stroke SI engine in 1876. The...

  18. Dysphagia after Stroke: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    González-Fernández, Marlís; Ottenstein, Lauren; Atanelov, Levan; Christian, Asare B.

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia affects the vast majority of acute stroke patients. Although it improves within 2 weeks for most, some face longstanding swallowing problems that place them at risk for pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and significantly affect quality of life. This paper discusses the scope, the disease burden, and the tools available for screening and formal evaluation of dysphagia. The most common and recently developed treatment interventions that might be useful in the treatment of this pop...

  19. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  20. Application of numerical method in calculating the internal rate of return of joint venture investment using diminishing musyarakah model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Siti Zaharah Mohd; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-05-01

    Islamic banking in Malaysia offers variety of products based on Islamic principles. One of the concepts is a diminishing musyarakah. The concept of diminishing musyarakah helps Muslims to avoid transaction which are based on riba. The diminishing musyarakah can be defined as an agreement between capital provider and entrepreneurs that enable entrepreneurs to buy equity in instalments where profits and losses are shared based on agreed ratio. The objective of this paper is to determine the internal rate of return (IRR) for a diminishing musyarakah model by applying a numerical method. There are several numerical methods in calculating the IRR such as by using an interpolation method and a trial and error method by using Microsoft Office Excel. In this paper we use a bisection method and secant method as an alternative way in calculating the IRR. It was found that the diminishing musyarakah model can be adapted in managing the performance of joint venture investments. Therefore, this paper will encourage more companies to use the concept of joint venture in managing their investments performance.

  1. Endovascular therapy for acute stroke: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh S Madhugiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy (EVT has gained vogue in the management of patients with acute stroke. Newer stent-retriever devices have led to better recanalization rates. In many centers, EVT is slowly being used as an add on to or in some instances, even as an alternative to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA. The publication of the results of the SYNTHESIS expansion, Interventional Management of Stroke III and Mechanical Retrieval Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy trials in 2013 has questioned the enthusiastic use of EVT in acute stroke. They demonstrate that EVT (using a variety of devices is no superior to IV tPA in the management of acute stroke. In the light of these controversial findings, we review the current status of EVT in the management of acute stroke.

  2. Smoking Through a Topography Device Diminishes Some of the Acute Rewarding Effects of Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn C; Juliano, Laura M

    2016-05-01

    Smoking topography (ST) devices are an important methodological tool for quantifying puffing behavior (eg, puff volume, puff velocity) as well as identifying puffing differences across individuals and situations. Available ST devices are designed such that the smoker's mouth and hands have direct contact with the device rather than the cigarette itself. Given the importance of the sensorimotor aspects of cigarette smoking in smoking reward, it is possible that ST devices may interfere with the acute rewarding effects of smoking. Despite the methodological importance of this issue, few studies have directly compared subjective reactions to smoking through a topography device to naturalistic smoking. Smokers (N = 58; 38% female) smoked their preferred brand of cigarettes one time through a portable topography device and one time naturalistically, in counterbalanced order across two laboratory sessions. Smoking behavior (eg, number of puffs) and subjective effects (eg, urge reduction, affect, smoking satisfaction) were assessed. Negative affect reduction was greater in the natural smoking condition relative to the topography condition, but differences were not significant on measures of urge, withdrawal, or positive affect. Self-reported smoking satisfaction, enjoyment of respiratory tract sensations, psychological reward, craving reduction, and other rewarding effects of smoking were also significantly greater in the naturalistic smoking condition. The effects of using a ST device on the smoking experience should be considered when it is used in research as it may diminish some of the rewarding effects of smoking. When considering the inclusion of a smoking topography device in one's research, it is important to know if use of that device will alter the smoker's experience. This study assessed affective and subjective reactions to smoking through a topography device compared to naturalistic smoking. We found that smoking satisfaction, psychological reward, enjoyment

  3. Vitamin D Levels in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis with Diminished Thyroid Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study examined vitamin D levels in 75 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT with diminished thyroid function. The objective of the study — to determine the content of 25(OHD in patients with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism on the background of AIT. Materials and Methods. 75 patients (59 women and 16 men and 25 apparently healthy subjects (matched for age and sex were followed. The levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, free thyroxine (fT4, free triiodothyronine (fT3, antibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO, and the content of 25(OHD in the blood serum were determined. Results. Patients with AІT were divided according to the levels of TSH and thyroid hormones into the group with subclinical (n = 21 and overt (n = 54 hypothyroidism. TSH level was significantly higher in the group with subclinical (6.80 ± 1.84 mcU/ml and overt hypothyroidism (11.38 ± 2.16 mcU/ml compared with the control group (2.11 ± 0.37 mcU/ml (p < 0.05. The level of antibodies to TPO was 312.83 ± 7.19 U/ml in subclinical hypothyroidism and 546.29 ± 9.81 U/ml — in overt hypothyroidism. 25(OHD level in blood serum was significantly lower in subclinical (18.8 ± 1.2 nmol/l and overt hypothyroidism (21.7 ± 1.3 nmol/l compared with the control group (27.3 ± 1.4 nmol/l (p < 0.05. Highly reliable negative correlation was established between the level of TSH, antibodies to TPO and vitamin D (p < 0.001. Also highly reliable positive correlation was established between the levels of serum 25(OHD and fT4 content (p < 0.001, between TSH and TPO antibody levels (p < 0.05. Conclusions. Vitamin D deficiency is combined with the presence of AIT with diminished thyroid function (in subclinical and overt hypothyroidism. Further studies are needed to determine vitamin D deficiency as a causal factor of AIT.

  4. Carbonaceous species emitted from handheld two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckens, John; Olson, David A.; Hays, Michael D.

    Small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work (e.g., string trimmers, leaf blowers, etc.) can emit a variety of potentially toxic carbonaceous air pollutants. Yet, the emissions effluents from these machines go largely uncharacterized, constraining the proper development of human exposure estimates, emissions inventories, and climate and air quality models. This study samples and evaluates chemical pollutant emissions from the dynamometer testing of six small, handheld spark-ignition engines—model years 1998-2002. Four oil-gas blends were tested in each engine in duplicate. Emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and gas-phase hydrocarbons were predominant, and the PM emitted was organic matter primarily. An ANOVA model determined that engine type and control tier contributed significantly to emissions variations across all identified compound classes; whereas fuel blend was an insignificant variable accounting for engines were generally intermediate in magnitude compared with other gasoline-powered engines, numerous compounds traditionally viewed as motor vehicle markers are also present in small engine emissions in similar relative proportions. Given that small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work account for 5-10% of total US emissions of CO, CO 2, NO x, HC, and PM 2.5, source apportionment models and human exposure studies need to consider the effect of these small engines on ambient concentrations in air polluted environments.

  5. Self-Reported Stroke Risk Stratification: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; McClure, Leslie A; Moy, Claudia S; Howard, Virginia J; Judd, Suzanne E; Yuan, Ya; Long, D Leann; Muntner, Paul; Safford, Monika M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-07-01

    The standard for stroke risk stratification is the Framingham Stroke Risk Function (FSRF), an equation requiring an examination for blood pressure assessment, venipuncture for glucose assessment, and ECG to determine atrial fibrillation and heart disease. We assess a self-reported stroke risk function (SRSRF) to stratify stroke risk in comparison to the FSRF. Participants from the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) were evaluated at baseline and followed for incident stroke. The FSRF was calculated using directly assessed stroke risk factors. The SRSRF was calculated from 13 self-reported questions to exclude those with prevalent stroke and assess stroke risk. Proportional hazards analysis was used to assess incident stroke risk using the FSRF and SRSRF. Over an average 8.2-year follow-up, 939 of 23 983 participants had a stroke. The FSRF and SRSRF produced highly correlated risk scores ( r Spearman =0.852; 95% confidence interval, 0.849-0.856); however, the SRSRF had higher discrimination of stroke risk than the FSRF (c SRSRF =0.7266; 95% confidence interval, 0.7076-0.7457; c FSRF =0.7075; 95% confidence interval, 0.6877-0.7273; P =0.0038). The 10-year stroke risk in the highest decile of predicted risk was 11.1% for the FSRF and 13.4% for the SRSRF. A simple self-reported questionnaire can be used to identify those at high risk for stroke better than the gold standard FSRF. This instrument can be used clinically to easily identify individuals at high risk for stroke and also scientifically to identify a subpopulation enriched for stroke risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Genetics of ischaemic stroke in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Terni, Eva; Giannini, Nicola; Brondi, Marco; Montano, Vincenzo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke may be a clinical expression of several inherited disorders in humans. Recognition of the underlined genetic disorders causing stroke is important for a correct diagnosis, for genetic counselling and, even if rarely, for a correct therapeutic management. Moreover, the genetics of complex diseases such the stroke, in which multiple genes interact with environmental risk factors to increase risk, has been revolutionized by the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) approach. ...

  7. Stroke in Asia: a global disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong S

    2014-10-01

    Although stroke is a world-wide problem, the burden of stroke is particularly serious in Asia; its mortality is higher than in Europe or North America. The situation in Asia is dichotomized. Stroke mortality and case fatality has been declining in northern-eastern countries such as Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and urbanized areas of China. This is attributed to both the risk factor control and stroke care improvement. However, declining stroke incidence is rarely observed, which is in part due to rapidly aging population. As a result, there is an increase in the number of stroke survivors who require long-term, costly care. The extremely low birth rate and relatively insecure social health system markedly increases the caregiver burden. The problem in southern Asian countries, such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Indonesia is more fundamental. With the improving control of infectious diseases, life expectancy is prolonged. However, risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cigarette smoking become prevalent, and are poorly controlled. Stroke neurologists, organized stroke centers, and diagnostic tools are insufficient, which has resulted in high stroke fatality and mortality. Throughout Asia, the most urgent priority should be the primary stroke prevention through promoting a healthy lifestyle, e.g. low salt intake, regular physical exercise, stopping smoking, government sectors should take a stronger initiative to accomplish this. The rapidly aging populations and stroke burden will shrink the economy and destabilize the society, not only in Asia but also globally unless appropriate efforts are promptly initiated, this may result in a global disaster. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  8. Dysphagia in Stroke: A New Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Langdon, Claire; Blacker, David

    2010-01-01

    Dysphagia is extremely common following stroke, affecting 13%–94% of acute stroke sufferers. It is associated with respiratory complications, increased risk of aspiration pneumonia, nutritional compromise and dehydration, and detracts from quality of life. While many stroke survivors experience a rapid return to normal swallowing function, this does not always happen. Current dysphagia treatment in Australia focuses upon prevention of aspiration via diet and fluid modifications, compensato...

  9. Prinsip Umum Penatalaksanaan Cedera Olahraga Heat Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ade Tobing, Saharun Iso

    2016-01-01

    Exercises that are conducted in an extreme heat environment can cause heat injury. Heatinjury is associated with disturbance to temperature regulation and cardiovascular systems. Heatstroke is the most severe type of heat injury. Heat stroke is associated with high morbidity andmortality numbers, particularly if therapy treatment is delayed. In general, heat stroke is caused bytwo things, namely increase in heat production and decrease in heat loss.Heat stroke signs include: (1) rectal temper...

  10. The role of genetics in stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, John; Raghunathan, Senthil; Khanna, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in developed countries. While both modifiable and non‐modifiable risk factors are acknowledged, studies have shown that these may account for just 50% of stroke risk and that other factors, including genetic ones, may be important. Over recent years family history, twin and candidate gene studies have supported this and various mendelian stroke syndromes have now been identified in humans. This article provides an up‐to‐date summary of the com...

  11. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stroke and call 911. [ Young woman at the park watching as her mom pushes her daughter on ... and acted on the signs of a stroke." National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - A component ...

  12. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... history of stroke. Dr. Galen Henderson, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Strokes are preventable, they ... University of Maryland Medical Center University of Maryland School of Medicine Know Stroke: Know the Signs. Act ...

  13. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Search this site: Home About the Campaign Stroke Materials » ... of the National Institutes of Health For more information about stroke, please call 1-800-352-9424 ...

  14. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Census Bureau. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  15. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stroke. Take Sylvia Saxon for example, despite high blood pressure, diabetes and a family history, her stroke came ... signs of stroke." Announcer: If you have: High blood pressure, you're 4 to 6 times more likely ...

  16. Stroke Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Stroke Stories Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents ... these well-known personalities suffered one or more strokes. In each case, he or she has returned ...

  17. The Stroke RiskometerTM App: Validation of a data collection tool and stroke risk predictor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Parmar (Priya); R. Krishnamurthi (Rita); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); A. Hofman (Albert); S.S. Mirza (Saira); Y. Varakin (Yury); M. Kravchenko (Michael); M. Piradov (Michael); A.G. Thrift (Amanda G.); B. Norrving (Bo); W. Wang (Wenzhi); D.K. Mandal (Dipes Kumar); S. Barker-Collo (Suzanne); R. Sahathevan (Ramesh); S.M. Davis (Stephen); G. Saposnik (Gustavo); M. Kivipelto (Miia); S. Sindi (Shireen); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); M. Giroud (Maurice); Y. Béjot (Yannick); M. Brainin (Michael); R. Poulton (Richie); K.M.V. Narayan (K. M. Venkat); M. Correia (Manuel); A. Freire (António); Y. Kokubo (Yoshihiro); D. Wiebers (David); F.K.F. Mensah (Fane ); N.F. Bindhim (Nasser F.); P.A. Barber (P. Alan); N.G. Pandian (Natesa); G.J. Hankey (Graeme); M.M. Mehndiratta (Man Mohan); S. Azhagammal (Shobhana); N.M. Ibrahim (Norlinah Mohd); M. Abbott (Max); E. Rush (Elaine); P. Hume (Patria); T. Hussein (Tasleem); R. Bhattacharjee (Rohit); M. Purohit (Mitali); V.L. Feigin (V.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The greatest potential to reduce the burden of stroke is by primary prevention of first-ever stroke, which constitutes three quarters of all stroke. In addition to population-wide prevention strategies (the 'mass' approach), the 'high risk' approach aims to identify

  18. Embolic stroke of undetermined source: a retrospective analysis from an Italian Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The new clinical construct of embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS suggests that many cryptogenic strokes are related to minor-risk covert embolic cardiac sources or to embolus from non-occlusive plaques in the aortic arch or in the cerebral arteries. The authors analyzed the prevalence of ESUS in a real-life condition in Italy and compared the recurrence rates in cryptogenic strokes, cardioembolic strokes, and ESUS. The authors retrospectively reassessed according to ESUS criteria 391 consecutive admissions in a stroke unit where extensive diagnostic search was routinely performed. Recurrences in each stroke type within a 3-year follow-up period (mean time: 25.44 months - standard deviation: 9.42 were also compared. The prevalence of ESUS in the aforementioned cohort was 10.5%. All ESUS patients received antiplatelet agents. Warfarin was prescribed in 56.9% of cardioembolic strokes. The recurrence rate in ESUS patients was 4.4% per year, slightly higher than in cardioembolic strokes (3.5% and significantly higher than in cryptogenic non-ESUS (1.2% (P<0.0001. This is the first description of a cohort of ESUS patients in an Italian stroke unit. Patients with ESUS have a significantly higher risk of recurrence than in those with non-ESUS cryptogenic strokes, and slightly higher than in those with cardioembolic strokes. Results support the hypothesis of a more extensive diagnostic evaluation in cryptogenic strokes and the feasibility of such approach.

  19. Factor V leiden and ischemic stroke risk: the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Ali G; Cole, John W; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, Oscar C; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2013-05-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study. A population-based case control study identified 354 women and 476 men 15 to 49 years of age with first-ever ischemic stroke and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-5.1%) and nonstroke controls (3.8%; 95% CI 2.7%-5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%; 95% CI 2.6%-6.4%). Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between FVL and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Results of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial by stroke subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Benavente, Oscar; Goldstein, Larry B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The SPARCL trial showed that atorvastatin 80 mg/d reduces the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We tested the hypothesis that the benefit of treatment varies according to index event stroke sub...

  1. Quality of life after stroke. Impact of stroke type and lesion location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, R. J.; Limburg, M.; van der Meulen, J. H.; Jacobs, H. M.; Aaronson, N. K.

    1995-01-01

    Little attention has been focused on the relationship between neurological lesions and quality of life (QL) in stroke research. The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of stroke types and lesion locations on QL. The study sample was composed of 441 stroke patients. Lesion locations and

  2. Peripheral glucose levels and cognitive outcome after ischemic stroke : Results from the Munich Stroke Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zietemann, Vera; Wollenweber, Frank Arne; Bayer-Karpinska, Anna; Biessels, Geert Jan; Dichgans, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between glucose metabolism and stroke outcome is likely to be complex. We examined whether there is a linear or non-linear relationship between glucose measures in the acute phase of stroke and post-stroke cognition, and whether altered glucose metabolism at different

  3. Design and simulation of a two- or four-stroke free-piston engine generator for range extender applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Boru; Smallbone, Andrew; Zuo, Zhengxing; Feng, Huihua; Roskilly, Anthony Paul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A FPE model operated in two thermodynamic cycles is presented. • The engine performance for both gas exchange cycles are described. • Power distribution with different operation parameters are provided. • Advantages and disadvantages for the two thermodynamic cycles are summarised. - Abstract: Free-piston engines (FPEs) are known to have a greater thermal efficiency (40–50%) than an equivalent and more conventional four-stroke reciprocating engines (30–40%). Modern FPEs are proposed for the generation of electric and hydraulic power, with a potential application in hybrid electric vehicles. The numerous FPE configurations considered to date have almost exclusively operated using a two-stroke thermodynamic cycle to improve the thermal efficiency, however it is well known that the application of two-stoke cycles can be limited by noise and exhaust gas emissions constraints. In this article, a numerical model is used to investigate the techno-feasibility of operating Newcastle University’s FPE prototype using a two- or four-stroke thermodynamic cycle. If operated as a four-stroke cycle, the linear generator must be used as both a motor and a generator resulting in a more irregular piston motion compared to corresponding operating in a two-stroke cycle. In four-stroke cycles, almost half the indicated power is consumed in overcoming the pumping losses of the motoring process. Whilst the heat release process is appears to be closer to a constant volume process when operated on two-stroke engine cycle, the peak cylinder pressure and compression ratio proved lower. In addition, a narrower power range is reported for a four-stroke cycle despite a corresponding higher thermal efficiency.

  4. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). METHODS: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  5. Post-Stroke Depression, Apathy and Alexithymia

    OpenAIRE

    Correia Pinto, Oriana Horta Rendeiro; Ribeiro, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several behavioural changes can occur as a consequence of stroke. A large number of studies have evaluated the frequency and severity of post-stroke depression,  apathy  and  alexithymia  that  result from stroke, however the published data is contradictory.Aims: The aim of this article is to present a literature review of the concepts of depression, apathy  and  alexithymia  and  post-stroke neuroanatomical  findings  that  support these psychopathological observations.Methods:...

  6. Noonan Syndrome and Stroke: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Nur Mıhçı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by short stature, webbed neck, typical facial appearance and congenital heart disease. Here we report a 24 year old woman patient with the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome who admitted to our clinic with ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation secondary to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Noonan syndrome patients with stroke due to vascular malformations have been reported, but non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare cause for stroke in patients with Noonan syndrome. Our aim of presenting the case emphasize that Noonan syndrome should be thought as a differential diagnosis in patients with stroke at a young age and dysmorphic facial appearance.

  7. Stroke: Working toward a Prioritized World Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Gorelick, Philip B.; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C.; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M.; Lo, Eng H.; Skolnick, Brett E.; Furie, Karen L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Smith, Jr., Sidney C.; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A.; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C.O.; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M.; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A.; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P.; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H.; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K.; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M.; Davis, Stephen M.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Methods Preliminary work was performed by 7 working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Results Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent ‘silo’ mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (e.g., social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build

  8. Guidelines for the Primary Prevention of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschia, James F.; Bushnell, Cheryl; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Braun, Lynne T.; Bravata, Dawn M.; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A.; Eckel, Robert H.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Fornage, Myriam; Goldstein, Larry B.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Horvath, Susanna E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Jauch, Edward C.; Moore, Wesley S.; Wilson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of stroke among individuals who have not previously experienced a stroke or transient ischemic attack. Evidence-based recommendations are included for the control of risk factors, interventional approaches to atherosclerotic disease of the cervicocephalic circulation, and antithrombotic treatments for preventing thrombotic and thromboembolic stroke. Further recommendations are provided for genetic and pharmacogenetic testing and for the prevention of stroke in a variety of other specific circumstances, including sickle cell disease and patent foramen ovale. PMID:25355838

  9. Incidence of constipation in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiang; Yuan, Mengguo; Liu, Yunfang; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jingqing; Guo, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is growing awareness of a link between the gut and cardiovascular disease. Constipation is common among individuals who have had a stroke, and it negatively affects social functioning and quality of life. However, no systematic study on the incidence of constipation in stroke patients has been reported. We selected studies included in Medline, Embase, Cochrane database, and Web of Science. Studies were included if they reported the incidence in stroke patients. Two authors selected the studies, extracted the data independently, and assessed these. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the stroke subtype and stage of stroke. After detailed evaluations, 8 studies (n  =  1385 participants) were found that contained data that were suitable for meta-analytic synthesis. A forest plot showed that the incidence of constipation was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI]  =  33%–63%). In the analysis of the type of stroke subgroup, the incidence of constipation in patients who had had a hemorrhagic stroke (66% [95% CI  =  40–91%]) was higher than that in patients who had experienced an ischemic stroke (51% [95% CI  =  27%–75%]). The incidence in the acute stage (45% [95% CI  =  36%–54%]) was lower than that in the rehabilitation stage (48% [95% CI  =  23%–73%]). Constipation after a stroke event occurs frequently. This finding may raise awareness about bowel complications to allow correct evaluation and proper management. PMID:28640117

  10. Stroke: working toward a prioritized world agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Gorelick, Philip B; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M; Lo, Eng H; Skolnick, Brett E; Furie, Karen L; Hankey, Graeme J; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C O; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M; Davis, Stephen M; Goldstein, Larry B; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Preliminary work was performed by seven working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent 'silo' mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (eg, social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build centralized electronic archives and

  11. In-hospital stroke: characteristics and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Briggs, R

    2015-01-01

    In-hospital stroke (IS) made up 6.5% of strokes recorded in the Irish National Stroke Register in 2012. International research has demonstrated poorer outcomes post IS compared to out of hospital stroke (OS). We aimed to profile all IS and OS over a 22 month period and compare the two groups by gathering data from the HIPE portal stroke register. The study site is a primary stroke centre. IS represented 11% (50\\/458) of total strokes with over half (27\\/50, 54%) admitted initially with medical complaints. IS patients had a significantly longer length of stay (79.2 +\\/- 87.4 days vs. 21.9 +\\/- 45.9 days, p < 0.01) and higher mortality (13\\/50 vs. 39\\/408, p < 0.01). Patients in the IS group were also less likely to receive stroke unit care (1\\/50 vs. 136\\/408, p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the significant morbidity and mortality associated with IS and highlights the need for efforts to be made to optimize identification and management of acute stroke in this cohort.

  12. A CLINICAL STUDY OF STROKE IN YOUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumbha Thulasi Ram

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRIDUCTION : Stroke is one of the important causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Incidence of stroke steadily increases with age. Experts are concerned of the emerging stroke epidemic in India. Stroke affecting the young has potentially devastating consequence son the individual and his family. Certain risk factors are unique to the young. I t needs more studies for identification and modification of risk factors. The study aims to evaluate clinical features, risk factors, etiology and mortality of stroke in young patients. METHODS : 74 young patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in this study. A detailed history was taken from young stroke patients, systemic examination and required investigations were done. Data was collected in standardized proforma and analysed. RESULTS: Stroke in young accounts for 7.95% of stroke cases of all age groups. The mean age of the patients was 34.66 ± 7.48 years. Among 74 patients, 47(63.51% were male and 27(36.49% were female. Seizures, decreased consciousness, speech involvement and motor deficit were observed in 33.78%, 44.59%, 22.97% and 100% of cases respectively. 82.43% patients had ischemic and 17.57% patients had hemorrhagic stroke. Among ischemic stroke, large artery atherosclerosis was 16.21%, tuberculous meningoencephalitis with vasculitis was 16.21%, lacunar stroke was 10.81%, CVT was 10.81% and cardio embolic stroke was 6.76%. Smoking (59.45%, alcoholism (58.10%, hypertension (43.24%, coronary artery disease (8.10%, diabetes mellitus (10.81%, elevated total cholesterol (25.67%, elevated low density lipo proteins (22.97%, elevated triglycerides (27.02% and low HDL (22.97% were important risk factors. Carotid doppler was abnormal in 9.45% of patients. 6.76% patients had mitral stenosis in echocardiogram. Low protein C and protein S were found in 1.35% of patients. Eight (10.81% patients died during the hospital stay. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The major risk

  13. Job strain and the risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Eleonor I; Nyberg, Solja T; Heikkilä, Katriina

    2015-01-01

    studies to investigate the association between job strain, a measure of work-related stress, and incident stroke. RESULTS: In 1.8 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up 9.2 years), 2023 first-time stroke events were recorded. The age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for job strain relative to no job....... CONCLUSION: Job strain may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, but further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting job strain would reduce stroke risk beyond existing preventive strategies....

  14. Diminished facial emotion expression and associated clinical characteristics in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Katie; Larsson, Emma E C; Mavromara, Liza; Simic, Mima; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2016-02-28

    This study aimed to investigate emotion expression in a large group of children, adolescents and adults with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), and investigate the associated clinical correlates. One hundred and forty-one participants (AN=66, HC= 75) were recruited and positive and negative film clips were used to elicit emotion expressions. The Facial Activation Coding system (FACES) was used to code emotion expression. Subjective ratings of emotion were collected. Individuals with AN displayed less positive emotions during the positive film clip compared to healthy controls (HC). There was no significant difference between the groups on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). The AN group displayed emotional incongruence (reporting a different emotion to what would be expected given the stimuli, with limited facial affect to signal the emotion experienced), whereby they reported feeling significantly higher rates of negative emotion during the positive clip. There were no differences in emotion expression between the groups during the negative film clip. Despite this individuals with AN reported feeling significantly higher levels of negative emotions during the negative clip. Diminished positive emotion expression was associated with more severe clinical symptoms, which could suggest that these individuals represent a group with serious social difficulties, which may require specific attention in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of the Diminishing Returns Concept in the Hydroecologic Restoration of Riverscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, John R.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2012-01-01

    Principles for optimizing the number and placement of ecological restoration actions on rivers and coasts would be useful in project engineering design and program planning. This study demonstrated that the yield of inundated floodplain habitat area from dike breaching conforms to a diminishing returns model. The aggregate effects of establishing hydrologic connections between a tidally influenced main stem river and the floodplain were experimentally examined using a hydrodynamic model. Restoration clusters of size 1, 4, 8, and more, replicated and randomized within the landscape, yielded average wetted floodplain area conforming with an exponential rise to maximum curve2(0.99)r=. Analysis of the average incremental change in floodplain inundation produced per breach showed that opening 25 % of the channels crossing the dike provided the maximum return on investment as measured by wetted area. Midstream breaches yielded 60 % and upstream breaches 2 % of the wetted area produced by downstream breaches. Dike-breach restoration programs therefore can be optimized by strategic determination of the spatial configuration and number of demolitions, though biological factors such as the accessibility of floodplain habitat and total length of channels connected also need to be considered. These findings have implications for cost-benefit analyses in restoration program planning.

  16. Failure to demonstrate that playing violent video games diminishes prosocial behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan J Tear

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Past research has found that playing a classic prosocial video game resulted in heightened prosocial behavior when compared to a control group, whereas playing a classic violent video game had no effect. Given purported links between violent video games and poor social behavior, this result is surprising. Here our aim was to assess whether this finding may be due to the specific games used. That is, modern games are experienced differently from classic games (more immersion in virtual environments, more connection with characters, etc. and it may be that playing violent video games impacts prosocial behavior only when contemporary versions are used. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments 1 and 2 explored the effects of playing contemporary violent, non-violent, and prosocial video games on prosocial behavior, as measured by the pen-drop task. We found that slight contextual changes in the delivery of the pen-drop task led to different rates of helping but that the type of game played had little effect. Experiment 3 explored this further by using classic games. Again, we found no effect. CONCLUSIONS: We failed to find evidence that playing video games affects prosocial behavior. Research on the effects of video game play is of significant public interest. It is therefore important that speculation be rigorously tested and findings replicated. Here we fail to substantiate conjecture that playing contemporary violent video games will lead to diminished prosocial behavior.

  17. Application of the Diminishing Returns Concept in the Hydroecologic Restoration of Riverscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, John R.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2012-03-17

    Principles for optimizing the number and placement of ecological restoration actions on rivers and coasts would be useful in project engineering design and program planning. This study demonstrated that the yield of inundated floodplain habitat area from dike breaching conforms to a diminishing returns model. The aggregate effects of establishing hydrologic connections between a tidally influenced main stem river and the floodplain were experimentally examined using a hydrodynamic model. Restoration clusters of size 1, 4, 8, and more, replicated and randomized within the landscape, yielded average wetted floodplain area conforming with an exponential rise to maximum curve2(0.99)r=. Analysis of the average incremental change in floodplain inundation produced per breach showed that opening 25 % of the channels crossing the dike provided the maximum return on investment as measured by wetted area. Midstream breaches yielded 60 % and upstream breaches 2 % of the wetted area produced by downstream breaches. Dike-breach restoration programs therefore can be optimized by strategic determination of the spatial configuration and number of demolitions, though biological factors such as the accessibility of floodplain habitat and total length of channels connected also need to be considered. These findings have implications for cost-benefit analyses in restoration program planning.

  18. No Spearman’s Law of Diminishing Returns for the working memory and intelligence relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroczek Bartłomiej

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spearman’s Law of Diminishing Returns (SLODR holds that correlation between general (g/fluid (Gf intelligence factor and other cognitive abilities weakens with increasing ability level. Thus, cognitive processing in low ability people is most strongly saturated by g/Gf, whereas processing in high ability people depends less on g/Gf. Numerous studies demonstrated that low g is more strongly correlated with crystallized intelligence/creativity/processing speed than is high g, however no study tested an analogous effect in the case of working memory (WM. Our aim was to investigate SLODR for the relationship between Gf and WM capacity, using a large data set from our own previous studies. We tested alternative regression models separately for three types of WM tasks that tapped short-term memory storage, attention control, and relational integration, respectively. No significant SLODR effect was found for any of these tasks. Each task shared with Gf virtually the same amount of variance in the case of low- and high-ability people. This result suggests that Gf and WM rely on one and the same (neurocognitive mechanism.

  19. Do online reviews diminish physician authority? The case of cosmetic surgery in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Alka V

    2017-05-01

    This article analyzes the substance and perception of online physician reviews, which are qualitative and quantitative assessments of physicians written and shared by patients, in the case of U.S. cosmetic surgery. Like other cash-pay medical specialties, cosmetic surgery is elective and paid for largely out of pocket, with patients having latitude in their choice of surgeon. Drawing on qualitative data from interviews, observations of an American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery professional meeting, and online reviews from the platforms RealSelf and Yelp, I identify two interdependent contributors to physician authority: reputation and expertise. I argue that surgeons see reviews overwhelmingly as a threat to their reputation, even as actual review content often positively reinforces physician expertise and enhances physician reputation. I show that most online reviews linked to interview participants are positive, according considerable deference to surgeons. Reviews add patients' embodied and consumer expertise as a circumscribed supplement to surgeons' technical expertise. Moreover, reviews change the doctor-patient relationship by putting it on display for a larger audience of prospective patients, enabling patients and review platforms to affect physician reputation. Surgeons report changing how they practice to establish and maintain their reputations. This research demonstrates how physician authority in medical consumerist contexts is a product of reputation as well as expertise. Consumerism changes the doctor-patient relationship and makes surgeons feel diminished authority by dint of their reputational vulnerability to online reviews. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Estrogen receptor diminishes DNA-binding activities of chicken GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holth, L T; Sun, J M; Coutts, A S; Murphy, L C; Davie, J R

    1997-12-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) repressed erythroid differentiation and erythroid-specific gene expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of ER alpha (referred to throughout as ER) on DNA-binding activities of transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of erythroid-specific genes, and, in particular, the histone H5 gene. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we found that in the presence of rabbit reticulocyte lysate, human ER reduced the binding activities of chicken immature erythrocyte nuclear extracted proteins to GATA and CACCC sites in the H5 promoter and enhancer. In contrast, the binding activities of NF1 and Sp1 were not affected by ER. Binding of ER to an estrogen response element was enhanced by addition of rabbit reticulocyte lysate. This lysate was also necessary for ER to diminish the DNA-binding activity of GATA-1. These results suggest that additional factor(s) are necessary for full ER function. Both GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins are critical for the developmentally regulated expression of erythroid-specific genes. We hypothesize that interference in DNA-binding activities of GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins is the mechanism by which the ER inhibits regulation of these genes.

  1. Failure to Demonstrate That Playing Violent Video Games Diminishes Prosocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tear, Morgan J.; Nielsen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Past research has found that playing a classic prosocial video game resulted in heightened prosocial behavior when compared to a control group, whereas playing a classic violent video game had no effect. Given purported links between violent video games and poor social behavior, this result is surprising. Here our aim was to assess whether this finding may be due to the specific games used. That is, modern games are experienced differently from classic games (more immersion in virtual environments, more connection with characters, etc.) and it may be that playing violent video games impacts prosocial behavior only when contemporary versions are used. Methods and Findings Experiments 1 and 2 explored the effects of playing contemporary violent, non-violent, and prosocial video games on prosocial behavior, as measured by the pen-drop task. We found that slight contextual changes in the delivery of the pen-drop task led to different rates of helping but that the type of game played had little effect. Experiment 3 explored this further by using classic games. Again, we found no effect. Conclusions We failed to find evidence that playing video games affects prosocial behavior. Research on the effects of video game play is of significant public interest. It is therefore important that speculation be rigorously tested and findings replicated. Here we fail to substantiate conjecture that playing contemporary violent video games will lead to diminished prosocial behavior. PMID:23844191

  2. Increased conformity offers diminishing returns for reducing total knee replacement wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Marquez-Barrientos, Carlos; Banks, Scott A; DesJardins, John D

    2010-02-01

    Wear remains a significant problem limiting the lifespan of total knee replacements (TKRs). Though increased conformity between TKR components has the potential to decrease wear, the optimal amount and planes of conformity have not been investigated. Furthermore, differing conformities in the medial and lateral compartments may provide designers the opportunity to address both wear and kinematic design goals simultaneously. This study used a computational model of a Stanmore knee simulator machine and a previously validated wear model to investigate this issue for simulated gait. TKR geometries with different amounts and planes of conformity on the medial and lateral sides were created and tested in two phases. The first phase utilized a wide range of sagittal and coronal conformity combinations to blanket a physically realistic design space. The second phase performed a focused investigation of the conformity conditions from the first phase to which predicted wear volume was sensitive. For the first phase, sagittal but not coronal conformity was found to have a significant effect on predicted wear volume. For the second phase, increased sagittal conformity was found to decrease predicted wear volume in a nonlinear fashion, with reductions gradually diminishing as conformity increased. These results suggest that TKR geometric design efforts aimed at minimizing wear should focus on sagittal rather than coronal conformity and that at least moderate sagittal conformity is desirable in both compartments.

  3. Ambient groundwater flow diminishes nitrate processing in the hyporheic zone of streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Morvarid; Boano, Fulvio; Cook, Perran L. M.; Detwiler, Russell L.; Rippy, Megan A.; Grant, Stanley B.

    2017-05-01

    Modeling and experimental studies demonstrate that ambient groundwater reduces hyporheic exchange, but the implications of this observation for stream N-cycling is not yet clear. Here we utilize a simple process-based model (the Pumping and Streamline Segregation or PASS model) to evaluate N-cycling over two scales of hyporheic exchange (fluvial ripples and riffle-pool sequences), ten ambient groundwater and stream flow scenarios (five gaining and losing conditions and two stream discharges), and three biogeochemical settings (identified based on a principal component analysis of previously published measurements in streams throughout the United States). Model-data comparisons indicate that our model provides realistic estimates for direct denitrification of stream nitrate, but overpredicts nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification. Riffle-pool sequences are responsible for most of the N-processing, despite the fact that fluvial ripples generate 3-11 times more hyporheic exchange flux. Across all scenarios, hyporheic exchange flux and the Damköhler Number emerge as primary controls on stream N-cycling; the former regulates trafficking of nutrients and oxygen across the sediment-water interface, while the latter quantifies the relative rates of organic carbon mineralization and advective transport in streambed sediments. Vertical groundwater flux modulates both of these master variables in ways that tend to diminish stream N-cycling. Thus, anthropogenic perturbations of ambient groundwater flows (e.g., by urbanization, agricultural activities, groundwater mining, and/or climate change) may compromise some of the key ecosystem services provided by streams.

  4. Inhibition of the Pim1 oncogene results in diminished visual function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available Our objective was to profile genetic pathways whose differential expression correlates with maturation of visual function in zebrafish. Bioinformatic analysis of transcriptomic data revealed Jak-Stat signalling as the pathway most enriched in the eye, as visual function develops. Real-time PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization data confirm that multiple Jak-Stat pathway genes are up-regulated in the zebrafish eye between 3-5 days post-fertilisation, times associated with significant maturation of vision. One of the most up-regulated Jak-Stat genes is the proto-oncogene Pim1 kinase, previously associated with haematological malignancies and cancer. Loss of function experiments using Pim1 morpholinos or Pim1 inhibitors result in significant diminishment of visual behaviour and function. In summary, we have identified that enhanced expression of Jak-Stat pathway genes correlates with maturation of visual function and that the Pim1 oncogene is required for normal visual function.

  5. The relative effectiveness of extinction and counter-conditioning in diminishing children's fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newall, Carol; Watson, Tiffany; Grant, Kerry-Ann; Richardson, Rick

    2017-08-01

    Two behavioural strategies for reducing learned fear are extinction and counter-conditioning, and in this study we compared the relative effectiveness of the two procedures at diminishing fear in children. Seventy-three children aged 7-12 years old (M = 9.30, SD = 1.62) were exposed to pictures of two novel animals on a computer screen during the fear acquisition phase. One of these animals was paired with a picture of a scared human face (CS+) while the other was not (CS-). The children were then randomly assigned to one of three conditions: counter-conditioning (animal paired with a happy face), extinction (animal without scared face), or control (no fear reduction procedure). Changes in fear beliefs and behavioural avoidance of the animal were measured. Counter-conditioning was more effective at reducing fear to the CS + than extinction. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for behavioural treatments of childhood anxiety disorders. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diminished osmotic fragility of mouse erythrocytes following intravenous injection of polymeric plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshima, Hisamasa; Kashima, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the osmotic fragility and the mean corpuscular diameter of erythrocytes in CFNo.1/Nrs male mice caused by internal irradiation with polymeric 239 Pu at the dose levels of 15 μCi/kg, 10 μCi/kg and 5 μCi/kg were studied at 28 and 56 days after intravenous injection of plutonium. At 56 days after injection of plutonium, osmotic fragility curves were found to shift toward lower NaCl concentration in proportion to the amount of plutonium injected, which indicated the reduction of osmotic fragility. The size distribution curves of erythrocytes were slightly shifted toward larger size, depending on the amount of plutonium injected. Mean corpuscular diameter of erythrocytes in the highest dose group was significantly larger than that of control group. Mean corpuscular thickness of erythrocytes in plutonium injected groups was not different from that of control group. The increase in the mean corpuscular diameter-to-thickness ratio might allow the erythrocyte to accumulate a larger volume of water in a hypotonic environment before reaching the critical hemolytic volume. In the present study, it was concluded that the increased diameter-to-thickness ratio of erythrocytes could be related to the diminished osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in animals given polymeric plutonium. (author)

  7. Confronting diminished epistemic privilege and epistemic injustice in pregnancy by challenging a "panoptics of the womb".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lauren

    2015-02-01

    This paper demonstrates how the problematic kinds of epistemic power that physicians have can diminish the epistemic privilege that pregnant women have over their bodies and can put them in a state of epistemic powerlessness. This result, I argue, constitutes an epistemic injustice for many pregnant women. A reconsideration of how we understand and care for pregnant women and of the physician-patient relationship can provide us with a valuable context and starting point for helping to alleviate the knowledge/power problems that are symptomatic of the current system and structure of medicine. I suggest that we can begin to confront this kind of injustice if medicine adopts a more phenomenological understanding of bodies and if physicians and patients--in this case, pregnant women--become what I call "epistemic peers." © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Metabolic Evidence of Diminished Lipid Oxidation in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whigham, Leah D.; Butz, Daniel E.; Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco; Johnson, LuAnn K.; Cook, Mark E.; Porter, Warren P.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Markley, John L.; Lindheim, Steven R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Abbott, David H.; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common female endocrinopathy, is a complex metabolic syndrome of enhanced weight gain. The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate metabolic differences between normal (n=10) and PCOS (n=10) women via breath carbon isotope ratio, urinary nitrogen and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-determined serum metabolites. Breath carbon stable isotopes measured by cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) indicated diminished (p<0.030) lipid use as a metabolic substrate during overnight fasting in PCOS compared to normal women. Accompanying urinary analyses showed a trending correlation (p<0.057) between overnight total nitrogen and circulating testosterone in PCOS women, alone. Serum analyzed by NMR spectroscopy following overnight, fast and at 2 h following an oral glucose tolerance test showed that a transient elevation in blood glucose levels decreased circulating levels of lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolic intermediates (acetone, 2-oxocaporate, 2-aminobutyrate, pyruvate, formate, and sarcosine) in PCOS women, whereas the 2 h glucose challenge led to increases in the same intermediates in normal women. These pilot data suggest that PCOS-related inflexibility in fasting-related switching between lipid and carbohydrate/protein utilization for carbon metabolism may contribute to enhanced weight gain. PMID:24765590

  9. The addition of body armor diminishes dynamic postural stability in military soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Timothy C; Pederson, Jonathan J; Abt, John P; Nagai, Takashi; Deluzio, Jennifer; Wirt, Michael D; McCord, Larry J; Lephart, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    Poor postural stability has been identified as a risk factor for lower extremity musculoskeletal injury. The additional weight of body armor carried by Soldiers alters static postural stability and may predispose Soldiers to lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries. However, static postural stability tasks poorly replicate the dynamic military environment, which places considerable stress on the postural control system during tactical training and combat. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of body armor on dynamic postural stability during single-leg jump landings. Thirty-six 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers performed single-leg jump landings in the anterior direction with and without wearing body armor. The dynamic postural stability index and the individual stability indices (medial-lateral stability index, anterior-posterior stability index, and vertical stability index) were calculated for each condition. Paired sample t-tests were performed to determine differences between conditions. Significant differences existed for the medial-lateral stability index, anterior-posterior stability index, vertical stability index, and dynamic postural stability index (p armor resulted in diminished dynamic postural stability, which may result in increased lower extremity injuries. Training programs should address the altered dynamic postural stability while wearing body armor in attempts to promote adaptations that will result in safer performance during dynamic tasks.

  10. Diminished neural responses predict enhanced intrinsic motivation and sensitivity to external incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Karen E; Ma, Wei Ji; Deci, Edward L; Ryan, Richard M; Chiu, Pearl H

    2015-06-01

    The duration and quality of human performance depend on both intrinsic motivation and external incentives. However, little is known about the neuroscientific basis of this interplay between internal and external motivators. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation, operationalized as the free-choice time spent on a task when this was not required, and tested the neural and behavioral effects of external reward on intrinsic motivation. We found that increased duration of free-choice time was predicted by generally diminished neural responses in regions associated with cognitive and affective regulation. By comparison, the possibility of additional reward improved task accuracy, and specifically increased neural and behavioral responses following errors. Those individuals with the smallest neural responses associated with intrinsic motivation exhibited the greatest error-related neural enhancement under the external contingency of possible reward. Together, these data suggest that human performance is guided by a "tonic" and "phasic" relationship between the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation (tonic) and the impact of external incentives (phasic).

  11. A change will do us good: threats diminish typical preferences for male leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth R; Diekman, Amanda B; Schneider, Monica C

    2011-07-01

    The current research explores role congruity processes from a new vantage point by investigating how the need for change might shift gender-based leadership preferences. According to role congruity theory, favorability toward leaders results from alignment between what is desired in a leadership role and the characteristics stereotypically ascribed to the leader. Generally speaking, these processes lead to baseline preferences for male over female leaders. In this research, the authors propose that a shift in gender-based leadership preferences will emerge under conditions of threat. Because the psychological experience of threat signals a need for change, individuals will favor candidates who represent new directions in leadership rather than consistency with past directions in leadership. Specifically, they find that threat evokes an implicit preference for change over stability (Experiment 1) and gender stereotypes align women with change but men with stability (Experiments 2a and 2b). Consequently, the typical preference for male leaders is diminished, or even reversed, under threat (Experiments 3 and 4). Moreover, the shift away from typical gender-based leadership preferences occurs especially among individuals who highly legitimize the sociopolitical system (Experiment 4), suggesting that these preference shifts might serve to protect the underlying system. © 2011 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc

  12. Diminished epinephrine response to hypoglycemia despite enlarged adrenal medulla in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Kjaer, M; Mikines, K J

    1990-01-01

    Studies in humans have indicated that trained athletes compared with sedentary subjects have an increased capacity to secrete epinephrine. To investigate whether this is due to an adaptation induced by physical training or a selection phenomenon, rats were swim trained (T) 10 wk for 6 h/day or se...... nervous system to reduced blood glucose levels induced by repeated exercise bouts, the epinephrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia is markedly diminished after training.......)]. Cold stress or sham swim training did not increase adrenal weight or volume of adrenal medulla (P greater than 0.05). To stimulate adrenal medulla secretion, rats had an insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Insulin dose needed to suppress plasma glucose below 4.0 mM was four times greater in sedentary...... compared with trained rats. During hypoglycemia the epinephrine response was much smaller in trained than in untrained rats (P less than 0.05). In conclusion, in rats strenuous endurance training causes an enlargement of the adrenal medulla. However, possibly reflecting an adaptation within the central...

  13. Diminished whole-brain but enhanced peri-sylvian connectivity in absolute pitch musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz; Langer, Nicolas; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Several anatomical studies have identified specific anatomical features within the peri-sylvian brain system of absolute pitch (AP) musicians. In this study we used graph theoretical analysis of cortical thickness covariations (as indirect indicator of connectivity) to examine whether AP musicians differ from relative pitch musicians and nonmusicians in small-world network characteristics. We measured "local connectedness" (local clustering = γ), "global efficiency of information transfer" (path length = λ), "small-worldness" (σ = γ/λ), and "degree" centrality as measures of connectivity. Although all groups demonstrated typical small-world features, AP musicians showed significant small-world alterations. "Degree" as a measure of interconnectedness was globally significantly decreased in AP musicians. These differences let us suggest that AP musicians demonstrate diminished neural integration (less connections) among distant brain regions. In addition, AP musicians demonstrated significantly increased local connectivity in peri-sylvian language areas of which the planum temporale, planum polare, Heschl's gyrus, lateral aspect of the superior temporal gyrus, STS, pars triangularis, and pars opercularis were hub regions. All of these brain areas are known to be involved in higher-order auditory processing, working or semantic memory processes. Taken together, whereas AP musicians demonstrate decreased global interconnectedness, the local connectedness in peri-sylvian brain areas is significantly higher than for relative pitch musicians and nonmusicians.

  14. Akt1 deficiency diminishes skeletal muscle hypertrophy by reducing satellite cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Nobuki; Miyazaki, Mitsunori

    2018-02-14

    Skeletal muscle mass is determined by the net dynamic balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Although the Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent pathway plays an important role in promoting protein synthesis and subsequent skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the precise molecular regulation of mTOR activity by the upstream protein kinase Akt is largely unknown. In addition, the activation of satellite cells has been indicated as a key regulator of muscle mass. However, the requirement of satellite cells for load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is still under intense debate. In this study, female germline Akt1 knockout (KO) mice were used to examine whether Akt1 deficiency attenuates load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy through suppressing mTOR-dependent signaling and satellite cell proliferation. Akt1 KO mice showed a blunted hypertrophic response of skeletal muscle, with a diminished rate of satellite cell proliferation following mechanical overload. In contrast, Akt1 deficiency did not affect the load-induced activation of mTOR signaling and the subsequent enhanced rate of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. These observations suggest that the load-induced activation of mTOR signaling occurs independently of Akt1 regulation and that Akt1 plays a critical role in regulating satellite cell proliferation during load-induced muscle hypertrophy.

  15. Marriage of scintillator and semiconductor for synchronous radiotherapy and deep photodynamic therapy with diminished oxygen dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Kuaile; Bu, Wenbo; Ni, Dalong; Liu, Yanyan; Feng, Jingwei; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-02-02

    Strong oxygen dependence and limited penetration depth are the two major challenges facing the clinical application of photodynamic therapy (PDT). In contrast, ionizing radiation is too penetrative and often leads to inefficient radiotherapy (RT) in the clinic because of the lack of effective energy accumulation in the tumor region. Inspired by the complementary advantages of PDT and RT, we present herein the integration of a scintillator and a semiconductor as an ionizing-radiation-induced PDT agent, achieving synchronous radiotherapy and depth-insensitive PDT with diminished oxygen dependence. In the core-shell Ce(III)-doped LiYF4@SiO2@ZnO structure, the downconverted ultraviolet fluorescence from the Ce(III)-doped LiYF4 nanoscintillator under ionizing irradiation enables the generation of electron-hole (e(-)-h(+)) pairs in ZnO nanoparticles, giving rise to the formation of biotoxic hydroxyl radicals. This process is analogous to a type I PDT process for enhanced antitumor therapeutic efficacy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Failure to demonstrate that playing violent video games diminishes prosocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tear, Morgan J; Nielsen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Past research has found that playing a classic prosocial video game resulted in heightened prosocial behavior when compared to a control group, whereas playing a classic violent video game had no effect. Given purported links between violent video games and poor social behavior, this result is surprising. Here our aim was to assess whether this finding may be due to the specific games used. That is, modern games are experienced differently from classic games (more immersion in virtual environments, more connection with characters, etc.) and it may be that playing violent video games impacts prosocial behavior only when contemporary versions are used. Experiments 1 and 2 explored the effects of playing contemporary violent, non-violent, and prosocial video games on prosocial behavior, as measured by the pen-drop task. We found that slight contextual changes in the delivery of the pen-drop task led to different rates of helping but that the type of game played had little effect. Experiment 3 explored this further by using classic games. Again, we found no effect. We failed to find evidence that playing video games affects prosocial behavior. Research on the effects of video game play is of significant public interest. It is therefore important that speculation be rigorously tested and findings replicated. Here we fail to substantiate conjecture that playing contemporary violent video games will lead to diminished prosocial behavior.

  17. Reducing the Polluting Emissions. A Source for Diminishing the Climate Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. DOBRESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The USA and the Western Europe are responsible for 2/3 of the CO2 emissions accumulated until today. On the other hand, Africa has produced only 3% of polluting emission since 1900 until today, by burning mineral fuels. Since 1992, the most industrialized countries have promised to help ôthe most vulnerable nations face the adverse consequences of climate changesö by supporting the costs of adaptation. The commitment was included in the convention frame that gave birth to the Kyoto Treaty, which was rejected by the George W. Bush Administration, even though the initial document, issued in 1992, had been signed by George Bush. The industrialized countries that signed the Kyoto Treaty have decided to create a special fund for ôclimate adaptationö. Hundreds of millions of dollars had to be used in order to diminish the impact of the global warming in the most exposed areas.Lately, maybe because the CO2 emissions increase due to human activities, the planet climate has changed for worse. 2007 was a key year in evaluating the reply the planet would give to the global overheating, mainly caused by the green-house effect and worsen by El Nino oceanic stream. This superposition of climate factors made 2007 to be one of the warmest years ever registered.

  18. A diminished aortic-cardiac reflex during hypotension in aerobically fit young men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X.; Crandall, C. G.; Potts, J. T.; Williamson, J. W.; Foresman, B. H.; Raven, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    We compared the aortic-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in eight average fit (AF: VO2max = 44.7 +/- 1.3 ml.kg-1 x min-1) and seven high fit (HF: VO2max = 64.1 +/- 1.7 ml.min-1 x kg-1) healthy young men during hypotension elicited by steady state sodium nitroprusside (SN) infusion. During SN mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similarly decreased in AF (-12.6 +/- 1.0 mm Hg) and HF (-12.1 +/- 1.1 mm Hg). However, the increases in heart rate (HR) were less (P 0.05) was applied to counteract the decreased carotid sinus transmural pressure during SN, thereby isolating the aortic baroreceptors, the increased HR remained less (P baroreflex sensitivity (i.e., the gain difference between the stage SN and SN + NS) was not different between AF (0.7 +/- 0.2 bpm.mm Hg-1) and HF (0.6 +/- 0.1 bpm.mm Hg-1). These data indicated that the aortic-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during hypotension was significantly diminished with endurance exercise training.

  19. Stroke rehabilitation reaches a threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol E Han

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor training with the upper limb affected by stroke partially reverses the loss of cortical representation after lesion and has been proposed to increase spontaneous arm use. Moreover, repeated attempts to use the affected hand in daily activities create a form of practice that can potentially lead to further improvement in motor performance. We thus hypothesized that if motor retraining after stroke increases spontaneous arm use sufficiently, then the patient will enter a virtuous circle in which spontaneous arm use and motor performance reinforce each other. In contrast, if the dose of therapy is not sufficient to bring spontaneous use above threshold, then performance will not increase and the patient will further develop compensatory strategies with the less affected hand. To refine this hypothesis, we developed a computational model of bilateral hand use in arm reaching to study the interactions between adaptive decision making and motor relearning after motor cortex lesion. The model contains a left and a right motor cortex, each controlling the opposite arm, and a single action choice module. The action choice module learns, via reinforcement learning, the value of using each arm for reaching in specific directions. Each motor cortex uses a neural population code to specify the initial direction along which the contralateral hand moves towards a target. The motor cortex learns to minimize directional errors and to maximize neuronal activity for each movement. The derived learning rule accounts for the reversal of the loss of cortical representation after rehabilitation and the increase of this loss after stroke with insufficient rehabilitation. Further, our model exhibits nonlinear and bistable behavior: if natural recovery, motor training, or both, brings performance above a certain threshold, then training can be stopped, as the repeated spontaneous arm use provides a form of motor learning that further bootstraps performance and

  20. Asian gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on natural gas which now appears ready to take a leading role on the world energy stage. Demand for natural gas, and specifically LNG, will be strong throughout the world, particularly in Asia. Indonesia and Malaysia will become much more dependent on natural gas in the Asian market. In Thailand, where remarkable economic growth has been fueled by imported oil and domestically produced natural gas, LNG may soon have to be imported from neighboring countries. The author sees Thailand's imports of natural gas increasing from 1.5 to 4.5 million tons annually. Similarly, Korea's imports of LNG will rise from 2 to 8 million tons between 1987 and 2000. In Japan, energy demand is expected to increase at an even faster rate in the 1990s. Given the opposition to nuclear power generation and growing concern about the greenhouse effect, it is likely that LNG will satisfy a major portion of Japan's increasing demand for energy. Japanese gas companies are studying the possibility of establishing a national pipeline network to move gas beyond metropolitan areas

  1. A legal-ethical analysis of reproductive endocrinologists' right to refuse ovulation induction to patients with diminished ovarian reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karipcin, Fethiye Sinem; Hossain, Amjad; Phelps, John Y

    2011-11-01

    Review of the legal and ethical basis for reproductive endocrinologists to refuse ovulation induction to patients with diminished ovarian reserve. The Lexis-Nexis search engine was used to perform a legal review pertaining to refusal of treatment. Ethical opinions of medical organizations were also reviewed. Federal antidiscrimination laws provide legal recourse for patients with diminished ovarian reserve who are denied ovulation induction. However, the same laws also permit refusal of care when there is bona fide medical justification to decline services. In addition, the codes of ethics for relevant professional organizations support physicians' decisions to refuse treatment when treatment is futile. Although it is ethically and legally permissible to deny ovulation induction to patients with diminished ovarian reserve when medically justified, refusal may invite retaliatory litigation. Counseling remains a cornerstone in directing these patients to options with more potential for success, such as donor eggs and adoption.

  2. Gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahan, E.; Eudaly, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This evaluation provides performance and cost data for commercially available simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. Intercooled, reheat, and compound cycles are discussed from theoretical basis only, because actual units are not currently available, except on a special-order basis. Performance characteristics investigated include unit efficiency at full-load and off-design conditions, and at rated capacity. Costs are tabulated for both simple- and regenerative-cycle gas turbines. The output capacity of the gas turbines investigated ranges from 80 to 134,000 hp for simple units and from 12,000 to 50,000 hp for regenerative units.

  3. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  4. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  5. Identification of stroke during the emergency call: a descriptive study of callers' presentation of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Annika; von Euler, Mia; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Castrén, Maaret; Bohm, Katarina

    2015-04-28

    To evaluate symptoms presented by the caller during emergency calls regarding stroke, and to assess if symptoms in the Face-Arm-Speech-Time Test (FAST) are related to identification of stroke. Emergency calls to the Emergency Medical Communication Center (EMCC) concerning patients discharged with stroke diagnosis in a large teaching hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, in January-June 2011. The emergency calls of 179 patients who arrived at hospital by ambulance, and who were discharged with a stroke diagnosis and consented to participate were included in the study. Frequencies of stroke symptoms presented and a comparison of symptoms presented in calls with dispatch code stroke or other dispatch code. Of the 179 emergency calls analysed, 64% were dispatched as 'Stroke'. FAST symptoms, that is, facial or arm weakness or speech disturbances, were presented in 64% of the calls and were spontaneously revealed in 90%. Speech disturbance was the most common problem (54%) in all calls, followed by fall/lying position (38%) and altered mental status (27%). For patients with dispatch codes other than stroke, the dominating problem presented was a fall or being in a lying position (66%), followed by speech disturbance (31%) and altered mental status (25%). Stroke-specific symptoms were more common in patients dispatched as stroke. FAST symptoms were reported in 80% of patients dispatched as stroke compared with 35% in those dispatched as something else. This study implicates that fall/lying position and altered mental status could be considered as possible symptoms of stroke during an emergency call. Checking for FAST symptoms in these patients might uncover stroke symptoms. Future studies are needed to evaluate if actively asking for FAST symptoms in emergency calls presenting falls or a lying position can improve the identification of stroke. Stroke2010/703-31/2. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  6. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to stroke severity and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyrexia after stroke (temperature ≥37.5°C) is associated with poor prognosis, but information on timing of body temperature changes and relationship to stroke severity and subtypes varies. Methods We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke, measured stroke severity, stroke subtype and recorded four-hourly tympanic (body) temperature readings from admission to 120 hours after stroke. We sought causes of pyrexia and measured functional outcome at 90 days. We systematically summarised all relevant previous studies. Results Amongst 44 patients (21 males, mean age 72 years SD 11) with median National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) 7 (range 0–28), 14 had total anterior circulation strokes (TACS). On admission all patients, both TACS and non-TACS, were normothermic (median 36.3°C vs 36.5°C, p=0.382 respectively) at median 4 hours (interquartile range, IQR, 2–8) after stroke; admission temperature and NIHSS were not associated (r2=0.0, p=0.353). Peak temperature, occurring at 35.5 (IQR 19.0 to 53.8) hours after stroke, was higher in TACS (37.7°C) than non-TACS (37.1°C, ptemperatures. Sixteen (36%) patients became pyrexial, in seven (44%) of whom we found no cause other than the stroke. Conclusions Normothermia is usual within the first 4 hours of stroke. Peak temperature occurs at 1.5 to 2 days after stroke, and is related to stroke severity/subtype and more closely associated with poor outcome than admission temperature. Temperature-outcome associations after stroke are complex, but normothermia on admission should not preclude randomisation of patients into trials of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23075282

  7. Stroke-induced immunodepression and dysphagia independently predict stroke-associated pneumonia - The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sarah; Harms, Hendrik; Ulm, Lena; Nabavi, Darius G; Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Schmehl, Ingo; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Montaner, Joan; Bustamante, Alejandro; Hermans, Marcella; Hamilton, Frank; Göhler, Jos; Malzahn, Uwe; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Stroke-associated pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke associated with poor outcome. Dysphagia is a known risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia but accumulating evidence suggests that stroke induces an immunodepressive state increasing susceptibility for stroke-associated pneumonia. We aimed to confirm that stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome is associated with stroke-associated pneumonia independently from dysphagia by investigating the predictive properties of monocytic HLA-DR expression as a marker of immunodepression as well as biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-6) and infection (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein). This was a prospective, multicenter study with 11 study sites in Germany and Spain, including 486 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Daily screening for stroke-associated pneumonia, dysphagia and biomarkers was performed. Frequency of stroke-associated pneumonia was 5.2%. Dysphagia and decreased monocytic HLA-DR were independent predictors for stroke-associated pneumonia in multivariable regression analysis. Proportion of pneumonia ranged between 0.9% in the higher monocytic HLA-DR quartile (≥21,876 mAb/cell) and 8.5% in the lower quartile (≤12,369 mAb/cell). In the presence of dysphagia, proportion of pneumonia increased to 5.9% and 18.8%, respectively. Patients without dysphagia and normal monocytic HLA-DR expression had no stroke-associated pneumonia risk. We demonstrate that dysphagia and stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome are independent risk factors for stroke-associated pneumonia. Screening for immunodepression and dysphagia might be useful for identifying patients at high risk for stroke-associated pneumonia.

  8. Variable gas spring for matching power output from FPSE to load of refrigerant compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Beale, W.T.

    1990-04-03

    The power output of a free piston Stirling engine is matched to a gas compressor which it drives and its stroke amplitude is made relatively constant as a function of power by connecting a gas spring to the drive linkage from the engine to the compressor. The gas spring is connected to the compressor through a passageway in which a valve is interposed. The valve is linked to the drive linkage so it is opened when the stroke amplitude exceeds a selected limit. This allows compressed gas to enter the spring, increase its spring constant, thus opposing stroke increase and reducing the phase lead of the displacer ahead of the piston to reduce power output and match it to a reduced load power demand. 6 figs.

  9. Variable gas spring for matching power output from FPSE to load of refrigerant compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Beale, William T.

    1990-01-01

    The power output of a free piston Stirling engine is matched to a gas compressor which it drives and its stroke amplitude is made relatively constant as a function of power by connecting a gas spring to the drive linkage from the engine to the compressor. The gas spring is connected to the compressor through a passageway in which a valve is interposed. The valve is linked to the drive linkage so it is opened when the stroke amplitude exceeds a selected limit. This allows compressed gas to enter the spring, increase its spring constant, thus opposing stroke increase and reducing the phase lead of the displacer ahead of the piston to reduce power output and match it to a reduced load power demand.

  10. A neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton to assist walking post-stroke: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Lewek, Michael D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-02-25

    In persons post-stroke, diminished ankle joint function can contribute to inadequate gait propulsion. To target paretic ankle impairments, we developed a neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton. Specifically, this exoskeleton supplies plantarflexion assistance that is proportional to the user's paretic soleus electromyography (EMG) amplitude only during a phase of gait when the stance limb is subjected to an anteriorly directed ground reaction force (GRF). The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine the short-term effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on the mechanics and energetics of gait. Five subjects with stroke walked with a powered ankle exoskeleton on the paretic limb for three 5 minute sessions. We analyzed the peak paretic ankle plantarflexion moment, paretic ankle positive work, symmetry of GRF propulsion impulse, and net metabolic power. The exoskeleton increased the paretic plantarflexion moment by 16% during the powered walking trials relative to unassisted walking condition (p exoskeleton assistance appeared to reduce the net metabolic power gradually with each 5 minute repetition, though no statistical significance was found. In three of the subjects, the paretic soleus activation during the propulsion phase of stance was reduced during the powered assistance compared to unassisted walking (35% reduction in the integrated EMG amplitude during the third powered session). This feasibility study demonstrated that the exoskeleton can enhance paretic ankle moment. Future studies with greater sample size and prolonged sessions are warranted to evaluate the effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on overall gait outcomes in persons post-stroke.

  11. Use of Oxygen Pulse in Predicting Doppler-Derived Maximal Stroke Volume in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Vishwanath; Rowland, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    Clinical exercise physiologists and physicians administering stress tests in the young have used oxygen pulse as a surrogate measure of stroke volume. It is important to recognize 1) the accuracy of O₂ pulse in predicting maximal stroke volume during exercise, and 2) the normal pattern of O₂ pulse during a progressive exercise test. This study examined both of these issues in a cohort of 44 healthy adolescent males and females (ages 14-16 years) who performed routine progressive cycle exercise to exhaustion. Gas exchange variables were measured by standard open circuit techniques. Stroke volume at rest and during exercise was assessed by the Doppler ultrasound method. At peak exercise O₂ pulse correlated closely with stroke volume (r = .73) with a SEE of 12.6 ml·beat⁻¹. Values of maximal O₂ pulse in nonathletic boys and girls were 13.3 ± 2.5 and 11.0 ± 1.7 ml·beat⁻¹, respectively. After the initial workload, a steady rise was observed in O₂ pulse, entirely reflecting an increasing arterial venous oxygen difference, with a slope of approximately 4 ml/beat per 100 watts work load. The findings support the use of O₂ pulse as a valid predictor of stroke volume during exercise in youth with a moderately high level of accuracy.

  12. Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  13. Stroke survivors' endorsement of a "stress belief model" of stroke prevention predicts control of risk factors for recurrent stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L Alison; Tuhrim, Stanley; Kronish, Ian M; Horowitz, Carol R

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions that stress causes and stress-reduction controls hypertension have been associated with poorer blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension populations. The current study investigated these "stress-model perceptions" in stroke survivors regarding prevention of recurrent stroke and the influence of these perceptions on patients' stroke risk factor control. Stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors (N=600) participated in an in-person interview in which they were asked about their beliefs regarding control of future stroke; BP and cholesterol were measured directly after the interview. Counter to expectations, patients who endorsed a "stress-model" but not a "medication-model" of stroke prevention were in better control of their stroke risk factors (BP and cholesterol) than those who endorsed a medication-model but not a stress-model of stroke prevention (OR for poor control=.54, Wald statistic=6.07, p=.01). This result was not explained by between group differences in patients' reported medication adherence. The results have implications for theory and practice, regarding the role of stress belief models and acute cardiac events, compared to chronic hypertension.

  14. Rehabilitacija bolnikov po možganski kapi: Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation: Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation:

    OpenAIRE

    Goljar, Nika

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of post-stroke rehabilitation, the evidence base remains weaker than in other areas of stroke management. European Stroke Organization (ESO) published (in 2008) its Guidelines for Management of Ischaemic Stroke (updated in 2009). They cover the whole spectrum of ischaemic stroke, including rehabilitation. Following the systematic literature search, the selected articles were screened for data relevance and quality, and the evidence base for post-stroke...

  15. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  16. Ethnic differences in ischemic stroke subtypes in young-onset stroke: the Stroke Prevention in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Megh M; Ryan, Kathleen A; Cole, John W

    2015-10-29

    Prior studies indicate that young African-Americans (AA) have a greater frequency of ischemic stroke than similarly aged European-Americans (EA). We hypothesized that differences in stroke subtype frequency mediated through sex and differing risk factor profiles may play a role in ethnicity-specific stroke. Utilizing our biracial young-onset stroke population, we explored these relationships. Fifty nine hospitals in the Baltimore-Washington area participated in a population-based study of young-onset stroke in men (218-AA, 291-EA) and women (219-AA, 222-EA) aged 16-49. Data on age, sex, ethnicity and stroke risk factors (hypertension (HTN) and smoking) were gathered through standardized interview. A pair of vascular neurologists adjudicated each case to determine TOAST subtype. Logistic regression analyses evaluating for differences in stroke risk factors by TOAST subtype were performed. Analyses controlling for age and sex demonstrated that AA were more likely to have a lacunar stroke than EA (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.12-2.32; p = 0.011) when utilizing the other TOAST subtypes as the reference group. This effect was mediated by HTN, which increases the risk of lacunar stroke (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.38-2.98; p = 0.0003) and large artery stroke (OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 1.01-2.88; p = 0.048) when controlling for sex, ethnicity, and age. Cases below age 40 were more likely to have a cardioembolic stroke than those above age 40 (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.15-2.27; p = 0.006), controlling for sex and ethnicity. Lastly, current smokers were more likely to have a large artery stroke than non-smokers (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.08-2.98; p = 0.024). Our population-based data demonstrate ethnic differences in ischemic stroke subtypes. These findings may help clarify mechanisms of stroke in young adults which may in part be driven by ethnic-specific differences in early-onset traditional risk factors, thereby indicating differing emphasis on workup and prevention.

  17. Tomorrow, gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icart, Laura; Jean, Pascale; Georget, Cyrille; Schmill, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This document contains 12 articles notably addressing the importance of natural gas production and supplies in Europe. The themes of the articles are: the advantages of natural gas in the context of energy and environmental policies, energy diversification, energy supply in the local territories, etc.; the position of GrDF, one of the main French natural gas supplier; LPG (butane, propane), a solution which popularity grows in remote areas; the Gaya project (production of renewable gas from dry biomass); a panorama of gas supply routes in Europe; the situation of gas in Europe's energy supply and consumption; the promotion of LNG fuel for maritime and fluvial ships; why the small scale LNG could be the next revolution; presentation of the new 'Honfleur' ferry (using LNG fuel) that will cross the English Channel by 2019; carbon market and the role of ETS for the energy policy in Europe facing the climatic change challenge; presentation of the French 'Climate Plan' that aims to engage France into a carbon neutrality by 2050; presentation of the French policy against air pollution; economic growth, energy, climate: how to square this circle?

  18. Hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics as primary stroke prevention make better functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Mo; Lin, Wei Chun; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Thiazides have been used for the control of blood pressure and primary prevention of ischemic stroke. No previous studies have assessed the influence of thiazides on functional prognosis after ischemic stroke. Demographics, prestroke conditions, poststroke National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and clinical and laboratory parameters were prospectively registered in 216 Taiwanese patients. One hundred forty patients who completed follow-up 3 months after experiencing ischemic stroke were assessed with the modified Rankin scale as functional prognoses. Twenty-one patients used thiazide to control hypertension before experiencing ischemic stroke. No differences of stroke subtypes and comorbidities before stroke were observed between the 2 groups. The emergency department National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was lesser among thiazide users (4 [2-7] versus 6 [4-16], P = .02). Among 140 patients who completed follow-up in 90 days, thiazide users had more favorable functional status (modified Rankin scale ≤2: 42.4% versus 26.9%, P = .02, odds ratio 3.34, 95%, confidence interval .130-.862). Hypertensive patients treated with thiazides long term had a lesser severity of stroke and better functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Physical Activity Patterns of Acute Stroke Patients Managed in a Rehabilitation Focused Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive stroke unit care, incorporating acute care and rehabilitation, may promote early physical activity after stroke. However, previous information regarding physical activity specific to the acute phase of stroke and the comprehensive stroke unit setting is limited to one stroke unit. This study describes the physical activity undertaken by patients within 14 days after stroke admitted to a comprehensive stroke unit. Methods. This study was a prospective observational study. Behavioural mapping was used to determine the proportion of the day spent in different activities. Therapist reports were used to determine the amount of formal therapy received on the day of observation. The timing of commencement of activity out of bed was obtained from the medical records. Results. On average, patients spent 45% (SD 25 of the day in some form of physical activity and received 58 (SD 34 minutes per day of physiotherapy and occupational therapy combined. Mean time to first mobilisation out of bed was 46 (SD 32 hours post-stroke. Conclusions. This study suggests that commencement of physical activity occurs earlier and physical activity is at a higher level early after stroke in this comprehensive stroke unit, when compared to studies of other acute stroke models of care.

  20. Post-stroke gaseous hypothermia increases vascular density but not neurogenesis in the ischemic penumbra of aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Uzoni, Adriana; Ciobanu, Ovidiu

    2016-01-01

    -PCR and immunofluorescence, we assessed infarct size, vascular density, neurogenesis and as well as the expression of genes coding for proteasomal proteins as well as in post-stroke aged Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to H2S- induced hypothermia. Results: Two days exposure to mild hypothermia diminishes the expression...... of several genes involved in protein degradation, thereby leading to better preservation of infarcted tissue. Further, hypothermia increased the density of newly formed blood vessels in the peri-lesional cortex did not enhance neurogenesis in the infarcted area of aged rats. Likewise, there was improved...

  1. Diminished Alternative Reinforcement as a Mechanism Underlying Socioeconomic Disparities in Adolescent Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Bello, Mariel S.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Strong, David R.; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined socioeconomic disparities in adolescent substance use utilizing a behavioral economic theoretical framework. We tested the hypothesis that teens of lower (vs. higher) socioeconomic status (SES) are vulnerable to substance use because they engage in fewer pleasurable substance-free activities that provide reinforcement and may deter substance use. METHOD In a cross-sectional correlational design, 9th grade students (N=2,839; mean age=14.1 years) in Los Angeles, California, USA completed surveys in Fall 2013 measuring SES (i.e., parental education), alternative reinforcement (engagement in pleasurable substance-free activities, e.g., hobbies), substance use susceptibility, initiation, and frequency, and other factors. RESULTS For multi-substance composite outcomes, lower parental education was associated with greater likelihood of substance use initiation in the overall sample, frequency of use among lifetime substance users, and susceptibility to substance use in never users. Substance-specific analyses revealed that lower parental education was associated with higher likelihood of initiating cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana use as well as greater susceptibility to use cigarettes in never smokers. Each inverse association between parental education and substance-related outcomes was statistically mediated by diminished alternative reinforcement; lower parental education was associated with lower engagement in alternative reinforcers, which, in turn, was associated with greater substance use susceptibility, initiation, and frequency. CONCLUSION These results point to a behavioral economic interpretation for socioeconomic disparities in adolescent substance use. Replication and extension of these findings would suggest that prevention programs that increase access to and engagement in healthy and fun activities may reduce youth socioeconomic health disparities related to substance use. PMID:26051200

  2. Food image-induced brain activation is not diminished by insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfort-DeAguiar, R; Seo, D; Naik, S; Hwang, J; Lacadie, C; Schmidt, C; Constable, R T; Sinha, R; Sherwin, R

    2016-11-01

    The obesity epidemic appears to be driven in large part by our modern environment inundated by food cues, which may influence our desire to eat. Although insulin decreases food intake in both animals and humans, the effect of insulin on motivation for food in the presence of food cues is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intravenous insulin infusion on the brain response to visual food cues, hunger and food craving in non-obese human subjects. Thirty-four right-handed healthy non-obese subjects (19F/15M, age: 29±8 years.; BMI: 23.1±2.1 kg m -2 ) were divided in two groups matched by age and BMI; the insulin group (18 subjects) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-clamp, and the control group (16 subjects) received an intravenous saline infusion, while viewing high and low-calorie food and non-food pictures during a functional MRI scan. Motivation for food was determined via analog scales for hunger, wanting and liking ratings. Food images induced brain responses in the hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala, insula, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC and occipital lobe (whole brain correction, Pinsulin and saline infusion groups. Hunger ratings increased throughout the MRI scan and correlated with preference for high-calorie food pictures (r=0.70; Pbrain activity nor food cravings were affected by hyperinsulinemia or hormonal status (leptin and ghrelin levels) (P=NS). Our data demonstrate that visual food cues induce a strong response in motivation/reward and cognitive-executive control brain regions in non-obese subjects, but that these responses are not diminished by hyperinsulinemia per se. These findings suggest that our modern food cue saturated environment may be sufficient to overpower homeostatic hormonal signals, and thus contribute to the current obesity epidemic.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  4. Exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS during macrophage polarisation leads to diminished inflammatory cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Louise A; Bennett, Jon H; Abate, Wondwossen; Jackson, Simon K

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of concurrent LPS and cytokine priming, reflective of the in vivo milieu, on macrophage production of key periodontitis associated cytokines TNF, IL-1β and IL-6. THP-1 cells were pre-treated with combinations of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), concurrently with polarising cytokines IFNγ and IL-4, or PMA as a non-polarised control. Production of key periodontitis associated cytokines in response to subsequent LPS challenge were measured by enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with cells incubated with IFNγ or IL-4 alone in the "polarisation" phase, macrophages that were incubated with LPS during the first 24h displayed a down-regulation of TNF and IL-1β production upon secondary LPS treatment in the "activation" phase. In all three macrophage populations (M0, M1 and M2), pre-treatment with P. gingivalis LPS during the polarisation process led to a significant decrease in TNF production in response to subsequent activation by LPS (p=0.007, p=0.002 and p=0.004, respectively). Pre-treatment with E. coli LPS also led to a significant down-regulation in TNF production in all three macrophage populations (pLPS during polarisation also led to the down-regulation of IL-1β in the M1 population (pLPS challenge, whereby production of key periodontitis associated cytokines TNF and IL-1β is reduced after exposure to LPS during the polarisation phase, even in the presence of inflammatory polarising cytokines. This diminished cytokine response may lead to the reduced ability to clear infection and transition to chronic inflammation seen in periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diminished neural resources allocation to time processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Anna; Falter-Wagner, Christine M; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2018-01-01

    Interval timing, the ability to judge the duration of short events, has been shown to be compromised in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Timing abilities are ubiquitous and underlie behaviours as varied as sensory integration, motor coordination or communication. It has been suggested that atypical temporal processing in ASD could contribute to some of the disorder's symptoms, in particular motor clumsiness and difficulties in social interaction and communication. Recent behavioural investigations have suggested that interval timing in ASD is characterised by intact sensitivity but reduced precision in duration judgements. In this study we investigated the processing of duration as compared to pitch in a group of high-functioning individuals with ASD using magnetoencephalography (MEG). 18 adolescents and adults with ASD and 18 age- and IQ-matched typically-developing control (TDC) individuals compared two consecutive tones according to their duration or pitch in separate experimental blocks. The analysis was carried out exclusively on physically identical stimuli (500 Hz tones lasting 600 ms), which served, according to instruction, as standard or probe in a Duration or Pitch task respectively. Our results suggest that compared to TDC individuals, individuals with ASD are less able to predict the duration of the standard tone accurately, affecting the sensitivity of the comparison process. In addition, contrary to TDC individuals who allocate resources at different times depending on the nature of the task (pitch or duration discrimination), individuals with ASD seem to engage less resources for the Duration task than for the Pitch task regardless of the context. Although individuals with ASD showed top-down adaptation to the context of the task, this neuronal strategy reflects a bias in the readiness to perform different types of tasks, and in particular a diminished allocation of resources to duration processing which could have cascading effect on learning and

  6. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) diminishes lipid droplet-coating proteins leading to lipolysis in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Mori, Mayumi; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Mikami, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Katsuhisa; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► AIM induces lipolysis in a distinct manner from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis. ► AIM ablates activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor in adipocytes. ► AIM reduces mRNA levels of lipid-droplet coating proteins leading to lipolysis. -- Abstract: Under fasting conditions, triacylglycerol in adipose tissue undergoes lipolysis to supply fatty acids as energy substrates. Such lipolysis is regulated by hormones, which activate lipases via stimulation of specific signalling cascades. We previously showed that macrophage-derived soluble protein, AIM induces obesity-associated lipolysis, triggering chronic inflammation in fat tissue which causes insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of how AIM mediates lipolysis remains unknown. Here we show that AIM induces lipolysis in a manner distinct from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis, without activation or augmentation of lipases. In vivo and in vitro, AIM did not enhance phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in adipocytes, a hallmark of hormone-dependent lipolysis activation. Similarly, adipose tissue from obese AIM-deficient and wild-type mice showed comparable HSL phosphorylation. Consistent with the suppressive effect of AIM on fatty acid synthase activity, the amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids was reduced in adipocytes treated with AIM. This response ablated transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ), leading to diminished gene expression of lipid-droplet coating proteins including fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) and Perilipin, which are indispensable for triacylglycerol storage in adipocytes. Accordingly, the lipolytic effect of AIM was overcome by a PPARγ-agonist or forced expression of FSP27, while it was synergized by a PPARγ-antagonist. Overall, distinct modes of lipolysis appear to take place in different physiological situations; one is a supportive response against nutritional deprivation achieved by

  7. Diminished telomeric 3' overhangs are associated with telomere dysfunction in Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lamm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic chromosomes end with telomeres, which in most organisms are composed of tandem DNA repeats associated with telomeric proteins. These DNA repeats are synthesized by the enzyme telomerase, whose activity in most human tissues is tightly regulated, leading to gradual telomere shortening with cell divisions. Shortening beyond a critical length causes telomere uncapping, manifested by the activation of a DNA damage response (DDR and consequently cell cycle arrest. Thus, telomere length limits the number of cell divisions and provides a tumor-suppressing mechanism. However, not only telomere shortening, but also damaged telomere structure, can cause telomere uncapping. Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC and its severe form Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson Syndrome (HHS are genetic disorders mainly characterized by telomerase deficiency, accelerated telomere shortening, impaired cell proliferation, bone marrow failure, and immunodeficiency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the telomere phenotypes in a family affected with HHS, in which the genes implicated in other cases of DC and HHS have been excluded, and telomerase expression and activity appears to be normal. Telomeres in blood leukocytes derived from the patients were severely short, but in primary fibroblasts they were normal in length. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of telomeres in these fibroblasts activated DDR, an indication of their uncapped state. In addition, the telomeric 3' overhangs are diminished in blood cells and fibroblasts derived from the patients, consistent with a defect in telomere structure common to both cell types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these results suggest that the primary defect in these patients lies in the telomere structure, rather than length. We postulate that this defect hinders the access of telomerase to telomeres, thus causing accelerated telomere shortening in blood cells that rely on telomerase to replenish their telomeres

  8. Diminished Telomeric 3′ Overhangs Are Associated with Telomere Dysfunction in Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Noa; Ordan, Elly; Shponkin, Rotem; Richler, Carmelit; Aker, Memet; Tzfati, Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic chromosomes end with telomeres, which in most organisms are composed of tandem DNA repeats associated with telomeric proteins. These DNA repeats are synthesized by the enzyme telomerase, whose activity in most human tissues is tightly regulated, leading to gradual telomere shortening with cell divisions. Shortening beyond a critical length causes telomere uncapping, manifested by the activation of a DNA damage response (DDR) and consequently cell cycle arrest. Thus, telomere length limits the number of cell divisions and provides a tumor-suppressing mechanism. However, not only telomere shortening, but also damaged telomere structure, can cause telomere uncapping. Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC) and its severe form Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson Syndrome (HHS) are genetic disorders mainly characterized by telomerase deficiency, accelerated telomere shortening, impaired cell proliferation, bone marrow failure, and immunodeficiency. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the telomere phenotypes in a family affected with HHS, in which the genes implicated in other cases of DC and HHS have been excluded, and telomerase expression and activity appears to be normal. Telomeres in blood leukocytes derived from the patients were severely short, but in primary fibroblasts they were normal in length. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of telomeres in these fibroblasts activated DDR, an indication of their uncapped state. In addition, the telomeric 3′ overhangs are diminished in blood cells and fibroblasts derived from the patients, consistent with a defect in telomere structure common to both cell types. Conclusions/Significance Altogether, these results suggest that the primary defect in these patients lies in the telomere structure, rather than length. We postulate that this defect hinders the access of telomerase to telomeres, thus causing accelerated telomere shortening in blood cells that rely on telomerase to replenish their telomeres. In addition, it

  9. Associations between postpartum depressive symptoms and childhood asthma diminish with child age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrskyj, A L; Letourneau, N L; Kang, L J; Salmani, M

    2017-03-01

    Affecting 19% of women, postpartum depression is a major concern to the immediate health of mothers and infants. In the long-term, it has been linked to the development of early-onset asthma at school entry, but only if the depression persists beyond the postnatal period. No studies have tested whether associations with postpartum depressive symptoms and early-onset asthma phenotypes persist into later school age. To determine associations between maternal postpartum depressive symptoms and childhood asthma between the ages of 5-10 by using a nested longitudinal design. Data were drawn from the 1994-2004 administrations of the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, which tracks the health of a nationally representative sample of children in Canada. Child asthma was diagnosed by a health professional, and maternal depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Analyses were conducted by using a multilevel modelling approach, in which longitudinal assessments of asthma in 1696 children were nested within the exposure of postpartum depression. Postpartum depressive symptoms had a 1.5-fold significant association with childhood asthma between the ages 6-8. This was independent of male sex, maternal asthma, non-immigrant status, low household socioeconomic status, being firstborn, low birthweight, low family functioning and urban-rural residence, of which the first 4 covariates elevated the risk of asthma. Statistical significance was lost at age 8 when maternal prenatal smoking replaced urban-rural residence as a covariate. At ages 9-10, an association was no longer evident. Women affected by postpartum depressive symptoms are concerned about long-term health effects of their illness on their infants. Although postpartum depressive symptoms were associated with school-age asthma at ages 6 and 7, this association diminished later. Both home and school life stress should be considered in future studies

  10. Diminishing returns from increased percent Bt cotton: the case of pink bollworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxin Huang

    Full Text Available Regional suppression of pests by transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has been reported in several cropping systems, but little is known about the functional relationship between the ultimate pest population density and the pervasiveness of Bt crops. Here we address this issue by analyzing 16 years of field data on pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella population density and percentage of Bt cotton in the Yangtze River Valley of China. In this region, the percentage of cotton hectares planted with Bt cotton increased from 9% in 2000 to 94% in 2009 and 2010. We find that as the percent Bt cotton increased over the years, the cross-year growth rate of pink bollworm from the last generation of one year to the first generation of the next year decreased. However, as the percent Bt cotton increased, the within-year growth rate of pink bollworm from the first to last generation of the same year increased, with a slope approximately opposite to that of the cross-year rates. As a result, we did not find a statistically significant decline in the annual growth rate of pink bollworm as the percent Bt cotton increased over time. Consistent with the data, our modeling analyses predict that the regional average density of pink bollworm declines as the percent Bt cotton increases, but the higher the percent Bt cotton, the slower the decline in pest density. Specifically, we find that 95% Bt cotton is predicted to cause only 3% more reduction in larval density than 80% Bt cotton. The results here suggest that density dependence can act against the decline in pest density and diminish the net effects of Bt cotton on suppression of pink bollworm in the study region. The findings call for more studies of the interactions between pest density-dependence and Bt crops.

  11. Diminished androgen and estrogen receptors and aromatase levels in hypogonadal diabetic men: reversal with testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, Husam; Dhindsa, Sandeep; Abuaysheh, Sanaa; Batra, Manav; Kuhadiya, Nitesh D; Makdissi, Antoine; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Dandona, Paresh

    2018-03-01

    One-third of males with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have hypogonadism, characterized by low total and free testosterone concentrations. We hypothesized that this condition is associated with a compensatory increase in the expression of androgen receptors (AR) and that testosterone replacement reverses these changes. We also measured estrogen receptor and aromatase expression. This is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Thirty-two hypogonadal and 32 eugonadal men with T2DM were recruited. Hypogonadal men were randomized to receive intramuscular testosterone or saline every 2 weeks for 22 weeks. We measured AR, ERα and aromatase expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC), adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in hypogonadal and eugonadal males with T2DM at baseline and after 22 weeks of treatment in those with hypogonadism. The mRNA expression of AR, ERα (ESR1) and aromatase in adipose tissue from hypogonadal men was significantly lower as compared to eugonadal men, and it increased significantly to levels comparable to those in eugonadal patients with T2DM following testosterone treatment. AR mRNA expression was also significantly lower in MNC from hypogonadal patients compared to eugonadal T2DM patients. Testosterone administration in hypogonadal patients also restored AR mRNA and nuclear extract protein levels from MNC to that in eugonadal patients. In the skeletal muscle, AR mRNA and protein expression are lower in men with hypogonadism. Testosterone treatment restored AR expression levels to that comparable to levels in eugonadal men. We conclude that, contrary to our hypothesis, the expression of AR, ERα and aromatase is significantly diminished in hypogonadal men as compared to eugonadal men with type 2 diabetes. Following testosterone replacement, there is a reversal of these deficits. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  12. The diminished expression of proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors in gastric ulcers of cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Hou, Ming-Chih; Huang, Kuang-Wei; Huang, Hui-Chun; Wang, Ying-Wen; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the higher occurrence of peptic ulcer disease in cirrhotic patients is complex. Platelets can stimulate angiogenesis and promote gastric ulcer healing. We compared the expressions of proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors in the gastric ulcer margin between cirrhotic patients with thrombocytopenia and those of non-cirrhotic patients to elucidate possible mechanisms. Eligible cirrhotic patients (n = 55) and non-cirrhotic patients (n = 55) who had gastric ulcers were enrolled. Mucosa from the gastric ulcer margin and non-ulcer areas were sampled and the mRNA expressions of the proangiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], platelet derived growth factor [PDGF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF]) and their receptors (VEGFR1, VEGFR2, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, FGFR1, FGFR2) were measured and compared. Platelet count and the expressions of these growth factors and their receptors were correlated with each other. The two groups were comparable in terms of gender, ulcer size and infection rate of Helicobacter pylori. However, the cirrhotic group were younger in age, had a lower platelet count than those in the non-cirrhotic group (pexpressions of PDGFB, VEGFR2, FGFR1, and FGFR2 in gastric ulcer margin when compared with those of the non-cirrhotic patients (pexpressions of PDGFB and VEGFR2, FGFR1, and FGFR2 were well correlated with the degree of thrombocytopenia in these cirrhotic patients (ρ>0.5, pimplied that diminished activity of proangiogenic factors and their receptors may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers in cirrhotic patients.

  13. Lentinan diminishes apoptotic bodies in the ileal crypts associated with S-1 administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Yasuyo; Takehana, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    S-1 is an oral agent containing tegafur (a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil) that is used to treat various cancers, but adverse effects are frequent. Two pilot clinical studies have suggested that lentinan (LNT; β-1,3-glucan) may reduce the incidence of adverse effects caused by S-1 therapy. In this study, we established a murine model for assessment of gastrointestinal toxicity associated with S-1 and studied the effect of LNT. S-1 was administered orally to BALB/c mice at the effective dose (8.3mg/kg, as tegafur equivalent) once daily (5days per week) for 3weeks. Stool consistency and intestinal specimens were examined. We investigated the effect of combined intravenous administration of LNT at 0.1mg, which is an effective dose in murine tumor models. We also investigated the effect of a single administration of S-1. During long-term administration of S-1, some mice had loose stools and an increase in apoptotic bodies was observed in the ileal crypts. An increase in apoptotic bodies was also noted after a single administration of S-1 (15mg/kg). Prior or concomitant administration of LNT inhibited the increase in apoptotic bodies in both settings. Administration of LNT also increased the accumulation of CD11b + TIM-4 + cells in the ileum, while depletion of these cells by liposomal clodronate diminished the inhibitory effect of LNT on S-1 toxicity. Combined administration of LNT with S-1 led to a decrease in apoptotic bodies in the ileal crypts, possibly because LNT promoted phagocytosis of damaged cells by CD11b + TIM-4 + cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Diminished Wastewater Treatment: Evaluation of Septic System Performance Under a Climate Change Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Boving, T. B.; Morales, I.; Amador, J.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of climate change are expected to reduce the ability of soil-based onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS), to treat domestic wastewater. In the northeastern U.S., the projected increase in atmospheric temperature, elevation of water tables from rising sea levels, and heightened precipitation will reduce the volume of unsaturated soil and oxygen available for treatment. Incomplete removal of contaminants may lead to transport of pathogens, nutrients, and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) to groundwater, increasing the risk to public health and likelihood of eutrophying aquatic ecosystems. Advanced OWTS, which include pre-treatment steps and provide unsaturated drainfields of greater volume relative to conventional OWTS, are expected to be more resilient to climate change. We used intact soil mesocosms to quantify water quality functions for two advanced shallow narrow drainfield types and a conventional drainfield under a current climate scenario and a moderate climate change scenario of 30 cm rise in water table and 5°C increase in soil temperature. While no fecal coliform bacteria (FCB) was released under the current climate scenario, up to 109 CFU FCB/mL (conventional) and up to 20 CFU FCB/mL (shallow narrow) were released under the climate change scenario. Total P removal rates dropped from 100% to 54% (conventional) and 71% (shallow narrow) under the climate change scenario. Total N removal averaged 17% under both climate scenarios in the conventional, but dropped from 5.4% to 0% in the shallow narrow under the climate change scenario, with additional leaching of N in excess of inputs indicating release of previously held N. No significant difference was observed between scenarios for BOD removal. The initial data indicate that while advanced OWTS retain more function under the climate change scenario, all three drainfield types experience some diminished treatment capacity.

  15. Upper gastrointestinal dysmotility after spinal cord injury: Is diminished vagal sensory processing one culprit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Holmes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widely recognized prevalence of gastric, colonic and anorectal dysfunction after SCI, significant knowledge gaps persist regarding the mechanisms leading to post-SCI gastrointestinal (GI impairments. Briefly, the regulation of GI function is governed by a mix of parasympathetic, sympathetic and enteric neurocircuitry. Unlike the intestines, the stomach is dominated by parasympathetic (vagal control whereby gastric sensory information is transmitted via the afferent vagus nerve to neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS. The NTS integrates this sensory information with signals from throughout the CNS. Glutamatergic and GABAergic NTS neurons project to other nuclei, including the preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV. Finally, axons from the DMV project to gastric myenteric neurons, again, through the efferent vagus nerve. SCI interrupts descending input to the lumbosacral spinal cord neurons that modulate colonic motility and evacuation reflexes. In contrast, vagal neurocircuitry remains anatomically intact after injury. This review presents evidence that unlike the post-SCI loss of supraspinal control which leads to colonic and anorectal dysfunction, gastric dysmotility occurs as an indirect or secondary pathology following SCI. Specifically, emerging data points toward diminished sensitivity of vagal afferents to GI neuroactive peptides, neurotransmitters and, possibly, macronutrients. The neurophysiological properties of rat vagal afferent neurons are highly plastic and can be altered by injury or energy balance. A reduction of vagal afferent signaling to NTS neurons may ultimately bias NTS output toward unregulated GABAergic transmission onto gastric-projecting DMV neurons. The resulting gastroinhibitory signal may be one mechanism leading to upper GI dysmotility following SCI.

  16. Ageing diminishes the modulation of human brain responses to visual food cues by meal ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Y S; Lee, S; Ashoor, G; Nathan, Y; Reed, L J; Zelaya, F O; Brammer, M J; Amiel, S A

    2014-09-01

    Rates of obesity are greatest in middle age. Obesity is associated with altered activity of brain networks sensing food-related stimuli and internal signals of energy balance, which modulate eating behaviour. The impact of healthy mid-life ageing on these processes has not been characterised. We therefore aimed to investigate changes in brain responses to food cues, and the modulatory effect of meal ingestion on such evoked neural activity, from young adulthood to middle age. Twenty-four healthy, right-handed subjects, aged 19.5-52.6 years, were studied on separate days after an overnight fast, randomly receiving 50 ml water or 554 kcal mixed meal before functional brain magnetic resonance imaging while viewing visual food cues. Across the group, meal ingestion reduced food cue-evoked activity of amygdala, putamen, insula and thalamus, and increased activity in precuneus and bilateral parietal cortex. Corrected for body mass index, ageing was associated with decreasing food cue-evoked activation of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precuneus, and increasing activation of left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), bilateral temporal lobe and posterior cingulate in the fasted state. Ageing was also positively associated with the difference in food cue-evoked activation between fed and fasted states in the right DLPFC, bilateral amygdala and striatum, and negatively associated with that of the left orbitofrontal cortex and VLPFC, superior frontal gyrus, left middle and temporal gyri, posterior cingulate and precuneus. There was an overall tendency towards decreasing modulatory effects of prior meal ingestion on food cue-evoked regional brain activity with increasing age. Healthy ageing to middle age is associated with diminishing sensitivity to meal ingestion of visual food cue-evoked activity in brain regions that represent the salience of food and direct food-associated behaviour. Reduced satiety sensing may have a role in the greater risk of

  17. Diminished metal accumulation in riverine fishes exposed to acid mine drainage over five decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A Jeffree

    Full Text Available Bony bream (Nematalosa erebi and black catfish (Neosilurus ater were sampled from the fresh surface waters of the Finniss River in tropical northern Australia, along a metal pollution gradient draining the Rum Jungle copper/uranium mine, a contaminant source for over five decades. Paradoxically, populations of both fish species exposed to the highest concentrations of mine-related metals (cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, uranium and zinc in surface water and sediment had the lowest tissue (bone, liver and muscle concentrations of these metals. The degree of reduction in tissue concentrations of exposed populations was also specific to each metal and inversely related to its degree of environmental increase above background. Several explanations for diminished metal bioaccumulation in fishes from the contaminated region were evaluated. Geochemical speciation modeling of metal bioavailability in surface water showed no differences between the contaminated region and the control sites. Also, the macro-nutrient (calcium, magnesium and sodium water concentrations, that may competitively inhibit metal uptake, were not elevated with trace metal contamination. Reduced exposure to contaminants due to avoidance behavior was unlikely due to the absence of refugial water bodies with the requisite metal concentrations lower than the control sites and very reduced connectivity at time of sampling. The most plausible interpretation of these results is that populations of both fish species have modified kinetics within their metal bioaccumulation physiology, via adaptation or tolerance responses, to reduce their body burdens of metals. This hypothesis is consistent with (i reduced tissue concentrations of calcium, magnesium and sodium (macro-nutrients, in exposed populations of both species, (ii experimental findings for other fish species from the Finniss River and other contaminated regions, and (iii the number of generations exposed to likely

  18. Diminished Neural Processing of Aversive and Rewarding Stimuli During Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Ciara; Mishor, Zevic; Cowen, Philip J.; Harmer, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are popular medications for anxiety and depression, but their effectiveness, particularly in patients with prominent symptoms of loss of motivation and pleasure, has been questioned. There are few studies of the effect of SSRIs on neural reward mechanisms in humans. Methods We studied 45 healthy participants who were randomly allocated to receive the SSRI citalopram, the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, or placebo for 7 days in a double-blind, parallel group design. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure the neural response to rewarding (sight and/or flavor of chocolate) and aversive stimuli (sight of moldy strawberries and/or an unpleasant strawberry taste) on the final day of drug treatment. Results Citalopram reduced activation to the chocolate stimuli in the ventral striatum and the ventral medial/orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, reboxetine did not suppress ventral striatal activity and in fact increased neural responses within medial orbitofrontal cortex to reward. Citalopram also decreased neural responses to the aversive stimuli conditions in key “punishment” areas such as the lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Reboxetine produced a similar, although weaker effect. Conclusions Our findings are the first to show that treatment with SSRIs can diminish the neural processing of both rewarding and aversive stimuli. The ability of SSRIs to decrease neural responses to reward might underlie the questioned efficacy of SSRIs in depressive conditions characterized by decreased motivation and anhedonia and could also account for the experience of emotional blunting described by some patients during SSRI treatment. PMID:20034615

  19. Diminishing returns from increased percent Bt cotton: the case of pink bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunxin; Wan, Peng; Zhang, Huannan; Huang, Minsong; Li, Zhaohua; Gould, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Regional suppression of pests by transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been reported in several cropping systems, but little is known about the functional relationship between the ultimate pest population density and the pervasiveness of Bt crops. Here we address this issue by analyzing 16 years of field data on pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) population density and percentage of Bt cotton in the Yangtze River Valley of China. In this region, the percentage of cotton hectares planted with Bt cotton increased from 9% in 2000 to 94% in 2009 and 2010. We find that as the percent Bt cotton increased over the years, the cross-year growth rate of pink bollworm from the last generation of one year to the first generation of the next year decreased. However, as the percent Bt cotton increased, the within-year growth rate of pink bollworm from the first to last generation of the same year increased, with a slope approximately opposite to that of the cross-year rates. As a result, we did not find a statistically significant decline in the annual growth rate of pink bollworm as the percent Bt cotton increased over time. Consistent with the data, our modeling analyses predict that the regional average density of pink bollworm declines as the percent Bt cotton increases, but the higher the percent Bt cotton, the slower the decline in pest density. Specifically, we find that 95% Bt cotton is predicted to cause only 3% more reduction in larval density than 80% Bt cotton. The results here suggest that density dependence can act against the decline in pest density and diminish the net effects of Bt cotton on suppression of pink bollworm in the study region. The findings call for more studies of the interactions between pest density-dependence and Bt crops.

  20. Extractive purification of hydro-treated gas oil with N-methylpyrrolidone

    OpenAIRE

    Bedda Kahina; Hamada Boudjema; Kuzichkin Nikolay V.; Semikin Kirill V.

    2017-01-01

    The purification of a hydrotreated gas oil by liquid-liquid extraction with N-methylpyrrolidone as solvent has been studied. The results showed that this method, under appropriate experimental conditions, has reduced sulphur content of the gas oil from 174 ppm to 28 ppm, nitrogen content has decreased from 58 ppm to 15 ppm, aromatics content has diminished from 27.1 % to 13.8 % and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were totally extracted. The refined gas...