WorldWideScience

Sample records for stroke cerebral palsy

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  2. Epilepsy in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Due to Perinatal Arterial Ischaemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Reid, Susan M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Harvey, A. Simon; Freeman, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, risk factors, manifestations, and outcome of epilepsy in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) due to perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). Method: The study group comprised 63 participants (41 males, 22 females) from a population-based CP register whose brain imaging showed…

  3. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  4. Cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy affects movement and posture causing activity limitation; it is a lifelong condition, with foreseeable complications. There are evidence-based interventions that will prevent participation restriction. Childhood interventions are generally delivered within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Sadly young adults are often not transferred to an appropriate multidisciplinary adult neurodisability service. An unexplained neurological deterioration should warrant further investigation. Pain is an important underreported symptom and musculoskeletal complaints are prevalent. Disabled adults have less participation socially, in employment, marriage, and independent living related to health problems, discrimination, or lack of access to information, support, and equipment. Evidence-based interventions include a variety of modalities at all International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health levels to include support and adaptations. Rehabilitation interventions that have been shown to be effective include surgery in childhood, ankle-foot orthoses, strength training, and electrical stimulation. Management of spasticity is beneficial and has an evidence base. Orthotics and casting are also used. Systematic reviews of upper limb therapies also show the benefit of physical therapy exercise, strengthening, fitness training, and constraint therapy. Occupational therapy has a weaker evidence base than in other disabling conditions but many modalities are transferable. Speech therapy is effective although no specific intervention is better. Psychological wellbeing interventions, including improving self-efficacy, health knowledge, and coping skills, are beneficial. Management of continence, nutrition, and fatigue promote wellbeing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this article? What Is ...

  6. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Kids / Cerebral Palsy What's in this article? What's CP? ...

  7. MIT-Skywalker: A Novel Gait Neurorehabilitation Robot for Stroke and Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, Tyler; Swaminathan, Krithika; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-10-01

    The MIT-Skywalker is a novel robotic device developed for the rehabilitation or habilitation of gait and balance after a neurological injury. It represents an embodiment of the concept exhibited by passive walkers for rehabilitation training. Its novelty extends beyond the passive walker quintessence to the unparalleled versatility among lower extremity devices. For example, it affords the potential to implement a novel training approach built upon our working model of movement primitives based on submovements, oscillations, and mechanical impedances. This translates into three distinct training modes: discrete, rhythmic, and balance. The system offers freedom of motion that forces self-directed movement for each of the three modes. This paper will present the technical details of the robotic system as well as a feasibility study done with one adult with stroke and two adults with cerebral palsy. Results of the one-month feasibility study demonstrated that the device is safe and suggested the potential advantages of the three modular training modes that can be added or subtracted to tailor therapy to a particular patient's need. Each participant demonstrated improvement in common clinical and kinematic measurements that must be confirmed in larger randomized control clinical trials.

  8. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  9. Cerebral palsy and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haak, Peterson; Lenski, Madeleine; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Li, Min; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common major disabling motor disorder of childhood, is frequently thought of as a condition that affects only children. Deaths in children with CP, never common, have in recent years become very rare, unless the child is very severely and multiply disabled. Thus, virtually all children assigned the diagnosis of CP will survive into adulthood. Attention to the adult with CP has been sparse, and the evolution of the motor disorder as the individual moves through ad...

  10. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  11. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  12. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  13. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  14. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  15. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  16. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  17. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Tahir MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy.

  18. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  19. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  20. First Autologous Cord Blood Therapy for Pediatric Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Palsy Caused by Cephalic Molding during Birth: Individual Treatment with Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial laceration due to traumatic birth injury is an extremely rare event affecting approximately one newborn per a population of 4.5 million. However, depending on the mode of injury, the resulting brain damage may lead to lifelong sequelae, for example, cerebral palsy for which there is no cure at present. Here we report a rare case of neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and cerebral palsy caused by fetal traumatic molding and parietal depression of the head during delivery caused by functional cephalopelvic disproportion due to a “long pelvis.” This patient was treated by autologous cord blood mononuclear cells (45.8 mL, cryopreserved, TNC 2.53×10e8 with a remarkable recovery. Active rehabilitation was provided weekly. Follow-up examinations were at 3, 18, 34, and 57 months. Generous use of neonatal head MRI in case of molding, craniofacial deformity, and a sentinel event during parturition is advocated to enhance diagnosis of neonatal brain damage as a basis for fast and potentially causative treatment modalities including autologous cord blood transplantation in a timely manner.

  1. Dental characteristics of children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Stevanović Radoje; Jovičić Olivera

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is one of the commonest children's physical handicaps with frequency of 1.5-3/1000. Beside many other disturbances, these children may have serious disorders caused by dental diseases. Concerning this fact, the objective of our study was to examine children with cerebral palsy in our country and determine condition of dental health and suggest adequate protective measures. A total of 116 children, 3-18 years old, with cerebral palsy were examined and the results were compared t...

  2. CEREBRAL PALSY. PRENTICE-HALL FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANCE, BURTON, JR.; MCDONALD, EUGENE T.

    THIS INTRODUCTORY TEXT ON CEREBRAL PALSY IS DIVIDED INTO TWO SECTIONS. THE FIRST SECTION OF THE BOOK CONTAINS INFORMATION ABOUT UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING OF CEREBRAL PALSY, PROGRAMS FOR THOSE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY, THE NEUROLOGICAL BASES, ETIOLOGY, AND DIAGNOSIS, AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY. PROBLEMS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL PALSY…

  3. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  4. MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The neurological lesion causing cerebral palsy (CP) is static, but the clinical con- dition changes ... Is it cerebral palsy? There must be evidence of an upper motor neuron (UMN) lesion, with brisk reflexes and possibly clonus; there should also be increased tone or persist- ent primitive ..... are at high risk for hip dislocation.

  5. Clinical correlations in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciu, Ioana

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of persistent (but not necessarily unchanged), movement, posture, muscle tone and motor skills disorders non-progressive, with early onset, due to non-progressive impairments, occurring on an immature brain or a brain under development (prenatal, perinatal, postnatal during the first 3-4 years of life). It is associated to a variable extent with: cognitive disorders, epilepsy, sensory deficits, behaviour disorders. The study of the correlations between the clinical forms/subtypes of CP, comorbidities, and severity of functional impairment. It is a retrospective trial aimed only at patients with the diagnosis of cerebral palsy admitted at Paediatric Neurology Clinic of the "Alexandru Obregia" Clinical Hospital in 2010.Results, discussions and conclusions: Patients with cerebral palsy corresponding with the criteria for inclusion: 379. The spastic CP type has prevailed. Comorbidities like mental retardation, epilepsy, and ophthalmic disorders were found with greater frequency than in the studies in the literature.The unilateral spastic form was statistically correlated with slight functional impairment (GMFCS I), with the absence of comorbidities or mild mental retardation, or with focal epilepsy when there is epilepsy. The bilateral spastic, tetraparetic and dyskinetic forms were correlated significantly with severe functional impairment (GMFCS IV, V), with profound or severe retardation, microcephaly, swallowing disorders, statural, ponderal hypotrophy, blindness and epilepsy. The bilateral spastic paraparetic form, which in the literature is mentioned as having fewer associated disorders (for example strabismus, slight retardation), when there is severe functional impairment, it may have the same comorbidities as the tetraparetic form (similar to the cases studied in the hospital). Comorbidities are the main admission cause and it correlates with the severity and prognosis.

  6. Orthopedic management of spasticity in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacheck, Tom F; Gage, James R

    2007-09-01

    This article summarizes our experience with cerebral palsy. The primary and secondary deformities that occur with cerebral palsy are described, followed by a brief overview of the nature and role of gait analysis in the treatment of gait problems in cerebral palsy. The concept of lever-arm dysfunction is introduced. Our current treatment program is then presented and subsequently illustrated by two case examples. Finally, an outcomes analysis of a group of patients with spastic diplegia treated with selective dorsal rhizotomy is presented to illustrate our current method of evaluating treatment outcomes and the need for team management in the treatment of this complex condition.

  7. Validation of a Cerebral Palsy Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Uldall, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse completeness and validity of data in the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982. METHODS: Completeness has been assessed by comparing data from The Danish National Patient Register (DNPR) with the cases included in the Cerebral Palsy Register (CPR). Agreement between......, but gestational age was subject to a systematic error, and urinary infections in pregnancy (kappa = 0.43) and placental abruption (kappa = 0.52) were seriously under-reported in the CPR. CONCLUSIONS: Completeness of the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982, has been assessed to maximal 85%, emphasizing...

  8. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs...... in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about euro860 000 for men and about euro800 000 for women. The largest component was social care costs......, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high...

  9. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    to understand what it means for persons to live with CP and then figure out how we should help them . Based on his method of open - minded cognitive science, Martiny presents data on neuro - physiological, psychological and social aspects of living with CP. From this theoretical work, Martiny develops......The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...... an embodied - based model of intervention for CP, focusing on the experience of self control as a way to help people with CP. In addition, a theatre performance, Humane Liquidation , and a documentary film, Natural Disorder, are developed so as to both communicate what it means to live with CP and empower...

  10. Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Gül Mete Civelek; Ayçe Atalay

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral palsy diagnosis is a clinical one and it includes motor development delay, abnormal muscle tone and hyperreflexia. Muscle weakness, spasticity, loss of coordination, the continuation of the primitive reflexes and non-developed normal motor control are often seen in children with cerebral palsy. Spasticity is the velocity dependent increase in the resistance against passive muscle stretching. Spasticity treatment program should be established after detailed evaluation of degree an...

  11. Cerebral palsy in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeši-Drljan Čila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the leading causes of neurological impairment in childhood. Preterm birth is a significant risk factor in the occurrence of CP. Clinical outcomes may include impairment of gross motor function and intellectual abilities, visual impairment and epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among gestational age, type of CP, functional ability and associated conditions. Methods. The sample size was 206 children with CP. The data were obtained from medical records and included gestational age at birth, clinical characteristics of CP and associated conditions. Clinical CP type was determined according to Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE and topographically. Gross motor function abilities were evaluated according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Results. More than half of the children with CP were born prematurely (54.4%. Statistically significant difference was noted with respect to the distribution of various clinical types of CP in relation to gestational age (p < 0.001. In the group with spastic bilateral CP type, there is a greater proportion of children born preterm. Statistically significant difference was noted in the functional classification based on GMFCS in terms of gestational age (p = 0.049, children born at earlier gestational age are classified at a higher GMFCS level of functional limitation. The greatest percentage of children (70.0% affected by two or more associated conditions was found in the group that had extremely preterm birth, and that number declined with increasing maturity at birth. Epilepsy was more prevalent in children born at greater gestational age, and this difference in distribution was statistically significant (p = 0.032. Conclusion. The application of antenatal and postnatal protection of preterm children should be a significant component of the CP prevention strategy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  12. Low-load coordination dynamics in athletes, physiotherapists, gymnasts, musicians and patients with spinal cord injury, after stroke, traumatic brain lesion and with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalow, G; Pääsuke, M

    2003-06-01

    Low-load coordination dynamics were measured in athletes, physiotherapists, gymnasts, musicians and patients after stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord lesion during exercise on a special coordination dynamic therapy device to quantify differences in central nervous system (CNS) organization between healthy subjects and patients with CNS injury. In healthy humans coordination dynamics (arrhythmicity of turning) varied between 5.2 and 6.0 for forward and between 6.9 and 10.7 1/s for backward turning. The frequency of turning varied between 1.24 (athletes) and 1.49 Hz (musicians) for forward and between 1.11 and 1.25 Hz for backward turning. Apart from the poor rhythmicity of backward turning among physiotherapists, gymnasts and musicians, inter-group differences were small in comparison to intra-group variation. In patients with spinal cord lesion the coordination dynamics value was 8.3 for forward and 11.0 for backward turning. The frequencies for forward and backward turning were 1.20 and 1.20 Hz respectively. The values for coordination dynamics and frequency of turning thus did only slightly differ from those measured for healthy subjects. The patients after stroke, traumatic brain injury and cerebral palsy had much higher coordination dynamic values (20.4, 22.9 and 30 1/s respectively) and lower forward (0.85, 0.93, and 0.52 Hz) and backward turning frequencies (0.98, 1.06, 0.42 Hz), suggesting strongly pathologic CNS organization. Low-load coordination dynamics (20N) are thus useful to measure progress in CNS organization due to therapy in patients with CNS injury.

  13. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, PB; Bos, AF; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in new-borns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed

  14. Falls and mobility dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Prue

    2017-01-01

    Adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are a growing population, with age-related mobility changes, balance dysfunction, and falls relatively unexplored. This contrasts with other populations with known vulnerabilities such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, or older adults, where falls characteristics have been documented and clinical practice guidelines to address falls and balance dysfunction are readily available. The studies reported in this thesis investigated what is known about f...

  15. Parálisis cerebral Cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Malagon Valdez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El término parálisis cerebral (PC engloba a un gran número de síndromes neurológicos clínicos, de etiología diversa. Estos síndromes se caracterizan por tener una sintomatología común: los trastornos motores. Algunos autores prefieren manejar términos como "encefalopatía fija", "encefalopatías no evolutivas". Se mencionan la utilidad de programas de intervención temprana y métodos especiales de rehabilitación, así como el manejo de las deficiencias asociadas como la epilepsia, deficiencia mental, trastornos del lenguaje, audición, visión, déficit de la atención que mejoran el pronóstico de manera significativa. El pronóstico también depende de la gravedad del padecimiento y de las manifestaciones asociadas.The term cerebral palsy (CP, is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the nonevolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  16. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Bansal MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead levels with environmental factors. Material and Methods: Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Participants: Cases comprised 34 children with cerebral palsy, and controls comprised 34 neurologically normal, age- and sex-matched children. Methods: Clinical and demographic details were recorded as per proforma. Detailed environmental history was recorded to know the source of exposure to lead. These children were investigated and treated as per protocol. Venous blood was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid vials for analysis of blood lead levels. Lead levels were estimated by Schimadzu Flame AA-6800 (atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. P < .05 was taken as significant. Results: Mean blood lead levels were 9.20 ± 8.31 µg/dL in cerebral palsy cases and 2.89 ± 3.04 µg/dL in their controls (P < .001. Among children with cerebral palsy, 19 (55.88% children had blood lead levels ≥5 µg/dL. Lead levels in children with pica were 12.33 ± 10.02 µg/dL in comparison to children with no history of pica, 6.70 ± 4.60 µg/dL (P = .029. No correlation was found between hemoglobin and blood lead levels in cases and controls. Conclusion: In our study, blood lead levels are raised in children with cerebral palsy. However, further studies are required to show effects of raised levels in these children.

  17. PRETERM BIRTH ASSOCIATION WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy ( CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Preterm birth is the birth of baby before 37 completed weeks, a full term birth is birth at 37 to 42 weeks of gestation . AIM: To show the extent of association of preterm deliveries as a risk factor in development of cerebral palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This r etrospective cohort study was conducted by eliciting history from the mothers of 99 cerebral palsy children who w ere treated in Rani Chandra Mani Devi Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India. De tailed history was taken from the mothers of 99 cerebral palsy children who were treated in this hospital. History regarding the period of gestation at which the child was born (preterm or full term, any previous history of pre - term delivery or abortions, was obtained from the mothers and the data analyzed . RESULTS: From this study it was observed the proportional association of pre - term births to cerebral palsy is 33 out 99 i.e., about 33.33%, Of these 33 cerebral palsy children highest association being with birth at 28 wks gestation (51 %. This study also shows th at the mothers with a previous history of preterm delivery have 14.4 times higher risk of subsequent pre term delivery; those with previous history of abortions have 5.7 times risk of pre - term delivery than mothers without such history. CONCLUSION: From th is study it was concluded that the pre - term birth plays a major role as a risk factor in the development of cerebral palsy with mothers having previous pre term delivery and previous abortions adding further to this risk.

  18. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  19. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    cerebral palsy, as well as to IQ level, active epilepsy, and severe visual and hearing impairment. Severe cerebral palsy, defined as both the inability to walk and an IQ of ... disability load Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  20. Association between type of cerebral palsy and the cognitive levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Dewi Kusumaningrum

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion Our data showed that most patients with cerebral palsy had mental retardation of several cognitive level but there was no significant association between each type of cerebral palsy with cognitive levels.

  1. Shock wave therapy for spastic plantar flexor muscles in hemiplegic cerebral palsy children

    OpenAIRE

    Hala A. Abdel Gawad; Amel E. Abdel Karim; Amira H. Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spastic motor type is the most common form of cerebral palsy (CP). Spastic equines foot is the most frequent deformity in ambulated children with CP. Shock wave therapy on spastic muscles of the upper limb in stroke patients provided a significant reduction in muscle tone. Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the efficiency of shock wave therapy on spastic planter flexor muscles and its relation to the gait in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy children. Methods: T...

  2. Profile of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy at Universitas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy is a term used for a group of non-progressive but often changing motor deficits, which are a result of a lesion of the brain occurring at an early developmental stage. Cerebral palsy may be classified physiologically or topographically. Physiologically, there are five types of cerebral palsy1: spastic, dyskinetic, ...

  3. Multimorbidity in Middle-Aged Adults with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Nicole; Hurvitz, Edward A; Peterson, Mark D

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy have less lean body mass, greater relative adiposity, and lower fitness and physical activity participation, and yet the prevalence of age-related multimorbidity in this population has yet to be established. The study objective was to examine the prevalence of lifestyle-related chronic conditions and multimorbidity in a sample of middle-aged adults with cerebral palsy. A clinic-based sample of middle-aged adults with cerebral palsy was examined using Electronic Medical Records Search Engine software. Our cohort included 435 individuals aged 40 to 60 years, with an International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification, 9th and 10th Revisions Diagnosis Code for cerebral palsy. Prevalence of 12 chronic conditions was evaluated, including existing diagnoses or historical record of osteopenia/osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary artery disease, impaired glucose tolerance/type 2 diabetes, other cardiovascular conditions, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, asthma, emphysema, prehypertension/hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Multivariate logistic models were used to estimate multimorbidity (ie, ≥2 chronic conditions), adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, obesity, and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). There were 137 unique multimorbidity combinations. Multimorbidity was significantly more prevalent among obese versus nonobese individuals for both GMFCS I-III (75.8% vs 53.6%) and GMFCS IV-V (79.0% vs 64.2%), but was also significantly higher in nonobese individuals with GMFCS IV-V (64.2%) compared with nonobese individuals with GMFCS I-III (53.6%). Both the obesity status (odds ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-2.79) and the GMFCS IV-V category (odds ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-3.68) were independently associated with multimorbidity. Middle-aged adults with cerebral palsy have high estimates of multimorbidity; both obesity and higher GMFCS levels are independently

  4. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, K. (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases.

  5. Epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruck Isac

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence and characteristics of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy in a tertiary center. METHODS: a total of 100 consecutive patients with cerebral palsy were retrospectively studied. Criteria for inclusion were follow-up period for at least 2 years. Types and incidence of epilepsy were correlated with the different forms of cerebral palsy. Other factors associated with epilepsy such as age of first seizure, neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were also analysed. RESULTS: follow-up ranged between 24 and 151 months (mean 57 months. The overall prevalence of epilepsy was 62%. Incidence of epilepsy was predominant in patients with hemiplegic and tetraplegic palsies: 70.6% and 66.1%, respectively. First seizure occurred during the first year of life in 74.2% of patients with epilepsy. Generalized and partial were the predominant types of epilepsy (61.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Thirty-three (53.2% of 62 patients were seizure free for at least 1 year. Neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were associated with a higher incidence of epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS: epilepsy in cerebral palsy can be predicted if seizures occur in the first year of life, in neonatal period and if there is family history of epilepsy.

  6. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...... participants with CP born between 1965 and 1978 (471 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y) in the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry were compared with 4406 controls without CP born between 1965 and 1978 (2546 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y). Diagnostic subtypes of the 819...

  8. Maternal Infections during Pregnancy and Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Jessica; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Streja, Elani

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common motor disability in childhood. We examined the association between maternal infections during pregnancy and the risk of congenital CP in the child. METHODS: Liveborn singletons in Denmark between 1997 and 2003 were identified from the Danish National...... the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Of the 440 564 singletons with follow-up data, 840 were diagnosed with congenital CP. Maternal genito-urinary tract infections (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4, 3...

  9. Epidemiology of cerebral palsy in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Dunkhase-Heinl, Ulrike; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, subtypes, severity and neuroimaging findings of cerebral palsy (CP) in a cohort of children born in Southern Denmark. Risk factors were analysed and aetiology considered. METHODS: A population-based cohort study covering 17...... prevention of CP is possible if the numbers of preterm births and multiple pregnancies can be reduced. FUNDING: The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Programme is supported by the foundation "Ludvig og Sara Elsass Fond". TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2008-58-0034....

  10. Sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leonardo Scofano Dias

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The most effective treatment that addresses the cause of sialorrhea in children with cerebral palsy is training of sensory awareness and oral motor skills, performed by a speech therapist. Botulinum toxin injection and the use of anticholinergics have a transient effect and are adjuvant to speech therapy; they should be considered in cases of moderate to severe sialorrhea or respiratory complications. Atropine sulfate is inexpensive and appears to have good clinical response combined with good safety profile. The use of trihexyphenidyl for the treatment of sialorrhea can be considered in dyskinetic forms of cerebral palsy or in selected cases.

  11. Early identification and intervention in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anna; Greisen, Gorm; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infants with possible cerebral palsy (CP) are commonly assumed to benefit from early diagnosis and early intervention, but substantial evidence for this is lacking. There is no consensus in the literature on a definition of 'early', but this review focuses on interventions initiated within...

  12. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  13. Cerebral Palsy. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral palsy--also known as CP--is a condition caused by injury to the parts of the brain that control the body's ability to use muscles effectively. Often the injury happens before birth, sometimes during delivery or soon after birth. The symptoms will differ from person to person and change as children and their nervous systems mature. This…

  14. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested...

  15. Educational Solutions for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Lynn; Omichinski, Donna Riccio; Miller, Nicole; Sandella, Danielle; Warschausky, Seth

    2010-01-01

    This paper characterizes educational strengths and needs of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and connects research findings from the University of Michigan's Adapted Cognitive Assessment Lab (ACAL) to current special educational requirements. It acknowledges the uniqueness of educating a child with significant motor and communication disabilities…

  16. Pretend Play of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Pacciulio, Amanda Mota; dos Santos, Camila Abrao; dos Santos, Jair Licio; Stagnitti, Karen Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Evaluate self-initiated pretend play of children with cerebral palsy. Method: Twenty preschool children participated in the study. Pretend play ability was measured by using the child-initiated pretend play assessment culturally adapted to Brazil. Results: There were significant negative correlations between the children's…

  17. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptak, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal practice of medicine includes integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. This article reviews nine treatment modalities used for children who have cerebral palsy (CP), including hyperbaric oxygen, the Adeli Suit, patterning, electrical stimulation, conductive education,…

  18. Trunk movements during gait in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Michael; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lempereur, Mathieu; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Lower limb deficits have been widely studied during gait in cerebral palsy, deficits in upper body have received little attention. The purpose of this research was to describe the characteristics of trunk movement of cerebral palsy children in terms of type of deficits (diplegia/hemiplegia) and gross motor function classification system (1, 2 or 3). Data from 92 cerebral palsy children, which corresponds to 141 clinical gait analysis, were retrospectively selected. Kinematic parameters of trunk were extracted from thorax and spine angles in the sagittal, transverse and coronal planes. The range of motion and the mean positions over the gait cycle were analysed. Intra-group differences between the children with diplegia or hemiplegia, gross motor function classification systems 1 to 3 and typically developing participants were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc tests. Pearson correlation coefficients between the gait profile score normalised walking speed and kinematic parameters of the thorax were assessed. The results revealed: 1) the range of motion of the thorax and spine exhibited more significant differences between groups than the mean positions; 2) greater levels of impairment were associated with higher thorax range of motion, and 3) the children with diplegia and gross motor function classification system 3 exhibited a greater range of motion for all planes with the exception of spine rotation. This study confirmed that greater levels of impairment in cerebral palsy are associated with greater thorax range of motion during gait. The thorax plays an important role during gait in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  20. The relation of breech presentation at term to cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, L; Topp, M; Langhoff-Roos, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between breech delivery and cerebral palsy, considering the influence of intrauterine growth, low Apgar score at birth, and mode of delivery. DESIGN: Register-based, case-control study. POPULATION: A cohort of infants with cerebral palsy born between 1979 and 1986...... in East Denmark, identified by linkage of the cerebral palsy register with the national birth register. Discharge letters from births of breech infants with cerebral palsy were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presentation, mode of delivery, gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score, type of cerebral...... palsy, severity of handicap. RESULTS: Breech presentation at term was associated with a borderline significantly higher risk of cerebral palsy than vertex presentation (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.9-2.4). Breech presentation infants more often had a lower Apgar score (

  1. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    : The collaboration Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe provides a powerful means of monitoring trends in cerebral palsy and its functional consequences. The proportion of nonwalking in children with cerebral palsy seems to be rather stable over years and across centers despite the changes that have occurred......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...... on 10042 children with cerebral palsy born between 1976 and 1996 were gathered from 14 European centers; 9012 patients were eligible for the analyses. RESULTS: Unaided walking as the primary way of walking at 5 years of age was reported for 54%, walking with assistive devices was reported for 16...

  2. Cerebral palsy characterization by estimating ocular motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jully; Atehortúa, Angélica; Moncayo, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a large group of motion and posture disorders caused during the fetal or infant brain development. Sensorial impairment is commonly found in children with CP, i.e., between 40-75 percent presents some form of vision problems or disabilities. An automatic characterization of the cerebral palsy is herein presented by estimating the ocular motion during a gaze pursuing task. Specifically, After automatically detecting the eye location, an optical flow algorithm tracks the eye motion following a pre-established visual assignment. Subsequently, the optical flow trajectories are characterized in the velocity-acceleration phase plane. Differences are quantified in a small set of patients between four to ten years.

  3. Exercise interventions for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer M; Cassidy, Elizabeth E; Noorduyn, Stephen G; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-06-11

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from an injury to the developing brain. It is the most common form of childhood disability with prevalence rates of between 1.5 and 3.8 per 1000 births reported worldwide. The primary impairments associated with CP include reduced muscle strength and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness, resulting in difficulties performing activities such as dressing, walking and negotiating stairs.Exercise is defined as a planned, structured and repetitive activity that aims to improve fitness, and it is a commonly used intervention for people with CP. Aerobic and resistance training may improve activity (i.e. the ability to execute a task) and participation (i.e. involvement in a life situation) through their impact on the primary impairments of CP. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive review of exercise interventions for people with CP. To assess the effects of exercise interventions in people with CP, primarily in terms of activity, participation and quality of life. Secondary outcomes assessed body functions and body structures. Comparators of interest were no treatment, usual care or an alternative type of exercise intervention. In June 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, nine other databases and four trials registers. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of children, adolescents and adults with CP. We included studies of aerobic exercise, resistance training, and 'mixed training' (a combination of at least two of aerobic exercise, resistance training and anaerobic training). Two review authors independently screened titles, abstracts and potentially relevant full-text reports for eligibility; extracted all relevant data and conducted 'Risk of bias' and GRADE assessments. We included 29 trials (926 participants); 27 included children and adolescents up to the age of 19 years, three included adolescents and young adults (10 to 22 years), and one included adults over 20

  4. Pain symptoms in patients with severe cerebral palsy: Prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the presence of pain in patients diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy (CP) according to the degree of motor function impairment. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students of the Association of Parents and Friends of Exceptional Children (APAE) diagnosed with cerebral palsy and ...

  5. Quality of Arithmetic Education for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.; Withagen, Floortje

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the quality of arithmetic education for children with cerebral palsy. The use of individual educational plans, amount of arithmetic instruction time, arithmetic instructional grouping, and type of arithmetic teaching method were explored in three groups: children with cerebral palsy (CP) in…

  6. Risk Factors for Cerebral Palsy in Children in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monokwane, Baphaleng; Johnson, Allison; Gambrah-Sampaney, Claudia; Khurana, Esha; Baier, James; Baranov, Esther; Westmoreland, Kate D; Mazhani, Loeto; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Bearden, David R

    2017-12-01

    Although cerebral palsy is reported to have a higher prevalence in low-resource settings, there are few studies describing risk factors for cerebral palsy in these settings. A better understanding of the unique risk factors affecting children with cerebral palsy in low-resource settings could optimize both resource allocation and preventative strategies. A case-control study comparing children with cerebral palsy at ages two to 18 years with age-matched healthy control subjects was conducted between 2013 and 2014 at a referral center in Gaborone, Botswana. Study participants were enrolled from inpatient and outpatient settings, and data were collected through caregiver interviews, review of medical records, and physical examination of subjects. Risk factors were evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. We studied 56 subjects with cerebral palsy and 56 age-matched control subjects. Significant risk factors for cerebral palsy included a history of serious neonatal infection (odds ratio 15.0, P = 0.009), complications during delivery (odds ratio 13.5, P cerebral palsy in Botswana differ from those described in high-resource settings. Modifiable risk factors such as maternal HIV infection should be targeted as a potential strategy to reduce the incidence of cerebral palsy in Botswana. Further studies are necessary to determine optimal preventative and treatment strategies in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health Model to Gain Perspective of the Benefits of Yoga in Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, and Children to Inform Practice for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneri, Diana; Gannotti, Mary; Bertucco, Matteo; Fournier Hillman, Sarah E

    2018-02-06

    Research pertaining to yoga and children with cerebral palsy (CP) is negligible. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model and levels of evidence for yoga and adults with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS), and children. A secondary purpose was to decide whether any inferences could be made for children with CP. This study included a meta-analysis. A systematic review was performed of yoga and said populations. Outcome measures were categorized according to the ICF model domains of body structures and function, activity, and quality of life. Effect sizes (ESs) were calculated by using Cohen's d. Since there were few commonalities among outcome measures and reporting of outcomes within and among diagnostic groups, direct comparisons of ESs were difficult. Hence, we chose to evaluate the impact of yoga as compared with the control group or other physical exercise by using a General Linear Mixed Model. There were 5 yoga studies with stroke, 15 with MS, and 12 with children. Studies with children used outcomes related to body structure and function, whereas those with stroke and MS used outcomes across all three domains of the ICF. ESs varied from negligible to medium for stroke, from negligible to large for MS and children. The findings of this meta-analysis indicate that yoga is no better or worse than other exercise modalities as a treatment intervention for adults with stroke and MS, and children. Group yoga classes are typically social environments that can contribute to increased physical progress and feelings that contribute to quality of life, which may benefit individuals with CP. More research on yoga and particularly in children and adults with CP would yield valuable information for creating effective and safe yoga programs with a rich array of benefits.

  8. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...... information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants...

  9. Education and employment prospects in cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Kejs, Anne Mette T

    2005-01-01

    information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants......Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819...

  10. REHABILITATION OF PERSONS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa CICEVSKA-JOVANOVA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The persons with cerebral palsy with motoric impairments as a primary demmages, they have other following disables: visual impairments, hearing impairments, speech disables and very often they have intellectual difficulties.This persons in school have problems with writing, they couldn’t oriented in the books, they have difficulties with manipulation with school’s supplies and didactic materials, they couldn’t follow the order of the words in the line during the reading and the writing and etc.Using the exercises of psycho-motor reeducation, all before mentioned difficulties and problems can be mitigate or disappear.

  11. Increased stroke risk in Bell's palsy patients without steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C-C; Su, Y-C; Chien, S-H; Ho, H-C; Hung, S-K; Lee, M-S; Chou, P; Chiu, B C-H; Huang, Y-S

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the risk of stroke development following a diagnosis of Bell's palsy in a nationwide follow-up study. Information on Bell's palsy and other factors relevant for stroke was obtained for 433218 eligible subjects without previous stroke who had ambulatory visit in 2004. Of those, 897 patients with Bell's palsy were identified. Over a median 2.9 years of follow-up, 4581 incident strokes were identified. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals [CI] with Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, co-morbidities, and important risk factors. Standardized incidence ratio of stroke amongst patients with Bell's palsy was analyzed. Compared with non-Bell's palsy patients, patients with Bell's palsy had a 2.02-times (95% CI, 1.42-2.86) higher risk of stroke. The adjusted HR of developing stroke for patients with Bell's palsy treated with and without systemic steroid were 1.67 (95% CI, 0.69-4) and 2.10 (95%, 1.40-3.07), respectively. Patients with Bell's palsy carry a higher risk of stroke than the general population. Our data suggest that these patients might benefit from a more intensive stroke prevention therapy and regular follow-up after initial diagnosis. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  12. Use of Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL®) for a postoperative patient with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataki, Yuki; Kamada, Hiroshi; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Takeuchi, Ryoko; Mizukami, Masafumi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takahashi, Kazushi; Matsuda, Mayumi; Iwasaki, Nobuaki; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Wadano, Yasuyoshi; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2018-03-27

    The Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL ® ) is an exoskeleton wearable robot suit that assists in voluntary control of knee and hip joint motion. There have been several studies on HAL intervention effects in stroke, spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy. However, no study has investigated HAL intervention for patients with cerebral palsy after surgery. We report a case of using HAL in a postoperative patient with cerebral palsy. A 15-year-old boy was diagnosed with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy Gross Motor Function Classification System level IV, with knee flection contracture, equinus foot, and paralysis of the right upper extremity with adduction contracture. He underwent tendon lengthening of the bilateral hamstrings and Achilles tendons. Although the flexion contractures of the bilateral knees and equinus foot improved, muscle strength decreased after the soft tissue surgery. HAL intervention was performed twice during postoperative months 10 and 11. Walking speed, stride, and cadence were increased after HAL intervention. Post HAL intervention, extension angles of the knee in stance phase and hip in the pre-swing phase were improved. In the gait cycle, the proportion of terminal stance in the stance and swing phase was increased. Hybrid Assistive Limb intervention for postoperative patients with cerebral palsy whose muscle strength decreases can enhance improvement in walking ability. Further studies are needed to examine the safety and potential application of HAL in this setting.

  13. Comprehensive visual impairment evaluation for cerebral palsy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the visual impairment in cerebral palsy children with series objective indicators, and conclude their clinical features of visual function.METHODS: Objective tests including following pursuing test, optokinetic nystagmus(OKNdrum test, refractive error examination, fundus examination, ocular deviation examination, pattern visual evoked potential(P-VEPtests and brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRIwere carried out in 43 cerebral palsy children(86 eyeswith ocular visual dysfunction; The visual impairment data of the cerebral palsy children were collected, and the clinical features and possible mechanism were analyzed.RESULTS: 1. Of the 43 cerebral palsy children(86 eyeswith the visual impairment presented diversified, 25(50 eyes, 58.1%of refractive error, 24(48 eyes, 55.8%of strabismus, 12(24 eyes, 27.9%with nystagmus, 19(38 eyes, 44.2%of optical nerve atrophy or hyperplasia, 35(70 eyes, 81.4%of VEP abnormality. Among children with spastic cerebral palsy, the incidence of visual impairment was statistically significant difference compared with other groups(PP>0.05, no nystagmus in patients with severe occipital cortex damage.CONCLUSION: Cerebral palsy children were usually with visual impairment, and presented with special clinical features; Comprehensive objective visual tests are accurate and reliable for evaluation of the visual function in cerebral palsy children.

  14. Gait analysis in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Decoulon, Geraldo; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) children present complex and heterogeneous motor disorders that cause gait deviations. Clinical gait analysis (CGA) is needed to identify, understand and support the management of gait deviations in CP. CGA assesses a large amount of quantitative data concerning patients’ gait characteristics, such as video, kinematics, kinetics, electromyography and plantar pressure data. Common gait deviations in CP can be grouped into the gait patterns of spastic hemiplegia (drop foot, equinus with different knee positions) and spastic diplegia (true equinus, jump, apparent equinus and crouch) to facilitate communication. However, gait deviations in CP tend to be a continuum of deviations rather than well delineated groups. To interpret CGA, it is necessary to link gait deviations to clinical impairments and to distinguish primary gait deviations from compensatory strategies. CGA does not tell us how to treat a CP patient, but can provide objective identification of gait deviations and further the understanding of gait deviations. Numerous treatment options are available to manage gait deviations in CP. Generally, treatments strive to limit secondary deformations, re-establish the lever arm function and preserve muscle strength. Additional roles of CGA are to better understand the effects of treatments on gait deviations. Cite this article: Armand S, Decoulon G, Bonnefoy-Mazure A. Gait analysis in children with cerebral palsy. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:448-460. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000052. PMID:28698802

  15. [Mental impairment in children with cerebral palsy: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkova, S A

    2018-01-01

    The article covers the problems of diagnosis and treatment of mental impairment in children with cerebral palsy. Mental disorders in cerebral palsy include cognitive impairment (disorders of perception, memory, attention, motor-visual coordination, intelligence and speech), border disorders (cerebral/asthenic, neurosis-like, psychopathic-like syndromes) and personality disorders (accentuation of character, mental infantilism). Diagnosis of mental disorders in patients with cerebral palsy is a challenging task, due to various combinations of them with physical, speech and sensory disorders, which requires a differentiated approach. Current trends in comprehensive system of rehabilitation, including medical and social, and psychological-pedagogical correction of cognitive, emotional and behavioral disorders, in cerebral palsy are reviewed. Experience of using cortexin, which compensates for cognitive impairment and improves social adaptation, is discussed.

  16. [Palsy of the upper limb: Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, arthrogryposis, cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Philandrianos, C; Tekpa, B

    2016-10-01

    "Palsy of the upper limb" in children includes various diseases which leads to hypomobility of the member: cerebral palsy, arthrogryposis and obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. These pathologies which differ on brain damage or not, have the same consequences due to the early achievement: negligence, stiffness and deformities. Regular entire clinical examination of the member, an assessment of needs in daily life, knowledge of the social and family environment, are key points for management. In these pathologies, the rehabilitation is an emergency, which began at birth and intensively. Splints and physiotherapy are part of the treatment. Surgery may have a functional goal, hygienic or aesthetic in different situations. The main goals of surgery are to treat: joints stiffness, bones deformities, muscles contractures and spasticity, paresis, ligamentous laxity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of traumatic dental injuries in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term for a group of conditions characterized essentially by motor dysfunctions that may be associated with sensory or cognitive impairment. Such children tend to have a higher incidence of traumatic dental injuries than the general population. This increased incidence is often attributed to poor muscular co-ordination that predisposes individuals with Cerebral palsy to trauma Aim: The study was conducted to assess different dental injuries and the risk factors for dental trauma to occur in patients with cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 70 children and adolescents with cerebral palsy attending special school in Durg and Bhilai city between 7 and 18 years of age. Results: Dentinal fracture was seen in 40% of cases. Few cases had tooth displacement, discoloration, and pulpal involvement. Conclusion: Dentists should be well aware of the possible dental injuries in such patients. Preventive measure measures should be taken by health care provider to reduce traumatic exposure.

  18. Lame from birth: early concepts of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Deformations have been attributed to supernatural causes since antiquity. Cerebral palsy was associated with God's wrath, witchcraft, the evil eye, or maternal imagination. Greek scholars recommended prevention by tight swaddling, a custom that persisted into modern times. In the Middle Ages, the midwife's negligence was held responsible as was difficult teething. Morgagni described in 1769 that the neonatal brain can liquefy, and Bednar described leukomalacia in 1850 as a distinct disorder of the newborn. In 1861, Little associated cerebral palsies with difficult or protracted labor and neonatal asphyxia, but he was challenged by Freud, who in 1897 declared that most cases are prenatal in origin. In 1868, Virchow demonstrated inflammatory changes, a view recently confirmed by Leviton and Nelson. Although a causal relationship of cerebral palsy to the birth never has been established, the habit to put the blame for cerebral palsy on someone remained a frequent attitude.

  19. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...... on 10042 children with cerebral palsy born between 1976 and 1996 were gathered from 14 European centers; 9012 patients were eligible for the analyses. RESULTS: Unaided walking as the primary way of walking at 5 years of age was reported for 54%, walking with assistive devices was reported for 16......%, and no walking ability was reported for 30%. The proportion of children who were unable to walk was rather stable over time in all of the centers, with a mean proportion of 28%. Walking ability related significantly to cerebral palsy types, that is, spastic unilateral, spastic bilateral, dyskinetic, and ataxic...

  20. Health-related physical fitness for children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Désirée B.; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Verschuren, Olaf; Damiano, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Low levels of physical activity are a global health concern for all children. Children with cerebral palsy have even lower physical activity levels than their typically developing peers. Low levels of physical activity, and thus an increased risk for related chronic diseases, are associated with deficits in health-related physical fitness. Recent research has provided therapists with the resources to effectively perform physical fitness testing and physical activity training in clinical settings with children who have cerebral palsy, although most testing and training data to date pertains to those who walk. Nevertheless, based on the present evidence, all children with cerebral palsy should engage, to the extent they are able, in aerobic, anaerobic and muscle strengthening activities. Future research is required to determine the best ways to evaluate health-related physical fitness in non-ambulatory children with cerebral palsy and foster long-term changes in physical activity behavior in all children with this condition. PMID:24820339

  1. Gait Trainer for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urhan, Oguzhan

    2001-01-01

    A device is developed to improve the walking ability of children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy, who have damages to the area of their brain which controls the muscle tone and that causes trouble walking...

  2. Combination of Citicoline and Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Nasiri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Results demonstrated that citicoline in combination to physiotherapy appears to be a promising agent to improve gross motor function in patients with cerebral palsy versus physiotherapy alone. Although, further studies are need to be done.

  3. Postural control in sitting children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogren, E; Hadders-Algra, M; Forssberg, H

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) display postural problems, largely interfering with daily life activities. Clarification of neural mechanisms controlling posture in these children could serve as a base for more successful intervention. Studies on postural adjustments following horizontal forward

  4. Contribution of sensory feedback to plantar flexor muscle activation during push-off in adults with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisk, Rasmus F.; Jensen, Peter; Kirk, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Exaggerated sensory activity has been assumed to contribute to functional impairment following lesion of the central motor pathway. However, recent studies have suggested that sensory contribution to muscle activity during gait is reduced in stroke patients and children with cerebral palsy (CP). We....... Increased passive stiffness around the ankle joint is likely to diminish sensory feedback during gait so that a larger part of plantar flexor muscle activity must be generated by descending motor commands. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Findings suggest that adults with cerebral palsy have less contribution of sensory....... Consequently, muscle activation must to a larger extent rely on descending drive, which is already decreased because of the cerebral lesion....

  5. Social integration of adults with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Uldall, Peter; Hansen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    , estimated in childhood, with regard to walking ability was 65% able to walk without assistance, 22% with assistance, and 12% not able to walk (for 1% of the participants their walking ability was not known). We found no sign of increased social integration over the past two or three decades in Denmark......Social integration and independence is the ultimate goal of habilitation and social support for patients with cerebral palsy (CP). Having a partner and having children provide support for social integration of adults with or without a disability. We studied 416 participants with CP born between......, cohabiting partner, or biological children. The remaining participants had at least one of these types of social contact, but this more optimally socially integrated half of the participants only combined all three types of social contact half as often as the comparison group. This could be due to cognitive...

  6. Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria

    significantly reduced passive stiffness following training. This indicates that it is possible to reverse the development of passive muscle stiffness and maybe even prevent the development of contractures if the problem is revealed sufficiently early. These three studies together highlight the essence of proper......) and passive stiffness (changes in the elastic properties of muscles) of ankle joint muscles at rest, during gait and in relation to gait training in children with cerebral palsy (CP). In study I we found that reflex mediated stiffness is difficult to distinguish clinically from changes in passive muscle...... stiffness and notably that passive muscle stiffness rather than increased reflex stiffness (spasticity) is the most frequent explanation of ankle muscle hyper tonicity in children with CP. These findings emphasises the importance of properly distinguishing different contributions to muscle stiffness...

  7. Cerebral palsy dysphagia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edênia da Cunha Menezes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy (CP encompasses a group of definitive and non-progressive conditions, with a non-progressive character and its installation in neonatal period. Motor disorders caused by CP may lead to changes in swallowing, resulting in limitations in the activities that are attributed to non-progressive disorders that do not reach the developing child's brain. This article reviews the clinical aspects of dysphagia in CP and the treatments in the area. Only papers published in the period from 2009 to 2017 were considered, using a methodological strategy for electronic search in the databases SciELO-Brazil, Lilacs and Medline/Pubmed. The present research analyzed 24 articles, regarding the year of publication, sample and instruments used, verifying that Speech Therapists and other staff involved in the improvement and rehabilitation of cognitive functions have provided better rehabilitation conditions, despite the need for more therapy and diagnostic studies.

  8. Pharmacotherapy of Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Ying Chung; Chia-Ling Chen; Alice May-Kuen Wong

    2011-01-01

    Spasticity is a common disability in children with cerebral palsy. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthotics, rhizotomy, and orthopedic surgery, all play important roles in the management of spasticity. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of available medications for treatment of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Common medications include benzodiazepines, dantrolene sodium, baclofen, tizanidine,...

  9. X-Ray Hip Examination in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Holiuk, Ye.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background. X-ray indicators of the hip are important diagnostic factors of spastic hip dislocation in cerebral palsy. Correct X-ray examination has a decisive influence on the treatment strategy. Correct positioning parameters are well known, but their importance is often underestimated. This could be a trigger factor for further diagnostic and treatment errors. Materials and me-thods. The material was radiographs of the hip joints of 126 patients with cerebral palsy aged 2 to 18 years. Retr...

  10. Assessment of traumatic dental injuries in patients with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    A Dubey; P A Ghafoor; M Rafeeq

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term for a group of conditions characterized essentially by motor dysfunctions that may be associated with sensory or cognitive impairment. Such children tend to have a higher incidence of traumatic dental injuries than the general population. This increased incidence is often attributed to poor muscular co-ordination that predisposes individuals with Cerebral palsy to trauma Aim: The study was conducted to assess different dental injuries and the ris...

  11. Attentional and executive impairments in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottcher, Louise; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function.......Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are reported to have learning and social problems. The aim of the present study was to examine whether children with CP have impairments in attention or executive function....

  12. Stability and Harmony of Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosa, Marco; Marro, Tiziana; Paolucci, Stefano; Morelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the stability and harmony of gait in children with cerebral palsy. Seventeen children with spastic hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy (5.0 [plus or minus] 2.3 years old) who were able to walk autonomously and seventeen age-matched children with typical development (5.7 [plus or minus] 2.5 years old,…

  13. Classifying cerebral palsy: are we nearly there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandaleson, Avanthi; Lee, Yaozong; Kerr, Claire; Graham, H Kerr

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood in developed countries and encompasses a wide range of clinical phenotypes. Classification of CP according to movement disorder or topographical distribution is widely used. However, these classifications are not reliable nor do they accurately predict musculoskeletal pathology. More recently, the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) has been introduced and its validity, reliability, and clinical utility have been confirmed. In 2005 it was suggested that children should be described and classified according to the GMFCS in all outcome studies involving children with CP, in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (JPO). This study aimed to describe utilization of the GMFCS in 3 journals: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS Am), JPO, and Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (DMCN), over a 7-year period (2005 to 2011), and any relationship to the journal's impact factor. A secondary aim was to establish if differences in methodological quality existed between those studies utilizing GMFCS and those that did not. A targeted literature search of the 3 selected journals using the term "cerebral palsy" was conducted using the Medline database. Utilization of the GMFCS was assessed using report of these data in the methods or results section of the retrieved papers. The Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) was employed to evaluate the quality of papers published in JPO. One hundred and fifty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and in 85 (68%) the GMFCS was used. Of these, 112 were published in JPO, of which 51 (46%) utilized the GMFCS, compared with 72% for JBJS Am, and 88% for DMCN. In the JPO, utilization of the GMFCS improved from 13% to 80%, over the 7-year study period. Utilization of the GMFCS has increased rapidly over the past 7 years in the JPO but there is room for further improvement. Not applicable.

  14. Sharing Experience dan Resiliensi: Studi atas Facebook Group Orang Tua Anak Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safrina Rofasita

    2017-06-01

    [Orang tua yang mendapati anaknya terfonis sebagai anak Cerebral Palsy mengalami kedukaan mendalam yang mengakibatkan ketidakpercayaan diri, dan putus asa. Hal itu diakibatkan ketahanan terhadap stres (resiliensi rendah, oleh karena itu orang tua mengikuti sharing experiences penyandang Cerebral Palsy melalui Facebook Group orang tua anak Cerebral Palsy. Penelitian ini bertujuan menjawab pertanyaan adakah pengaruh sharing experiences penyandang Cerebral Palsy terhadap resiliensi orang tua anak Cerebral Palsy yang terhimpun dalam Facebook Group Orang Tua Anak Cerebral Palsy. Penelitian menggunakan methode kombinasi antara kuantitatif dan kualitatif. Penelitian menemukan bahwa Facebook Group berpengaruh pada peningkatan resiliensi orang tua anak cerebal palcy karena mereka mendapatkan pengetahuan dan informasi tambahan dari forum itu.

  15. Cerebral Palsy: Comprehensive Review and Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Mohammed M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common pediatric disorder occurring in about 2 to 2.5 per 1000 live births. It is a chronic motor disorder resulting from a nonprogressive (static) insult to the developing brain. CP is the clinical presentation of a wide variety of cerebral cortical or sub-cortical insults occurring during the first year of life. The commonest cause of CP remains unknown in 50% of the cases; prematurity remains the commonest risk factor. Children with CP suffer multiple problems and potential disabilities such as mental retardation, epilepsy, feeding difficulties, and ophthalmologic and hearing impairments. Screening for those conditions should be part of the initial assessment. The child with CP is best cared for with an individualized treatment plan that provides a combination of interventions. This requires the provision of a number of family-centered services that make a difference in the lives of these children and their families. Management of spasticity can be challenging with a wide variety of possible therapeutic interventions. The treatment must be goal oriented, such as to assist with mobility, reduce or prevent contractures, improve positioning and hygiene, and provide comfort. Each member of the child's multidisciplinary team, including the child and both parents, should participate in the serial evaluations and treatment planning. (author)

  16. Genetic Variation in the Dopamine System Influences Intervention Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochellys Diaz Heijtz

    2018-02-01

    Interpretation: Naturally occurring genetic variation in the dopamine system can influence treatment outcomes in children with cerebral palsy. A polygenic dopamine score might be valid for treatment outcome prediction and for designing individually tailored interventions for children with cerebral palsy.

  17. Survey on Types and Associated disorders of Cerebral Palsy in Eastern and Northern Districts of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin Soleimani

    2011-10-01

    Conclusion: In this study, unilateral - spastic cerebral palsy was found as the most common type. Therefore, more evaluation to determine the about etiology of this type of cerebral palsy in our population is necessary.

  18. Rehabilitation outcomes in children with cerebral palsy during a 2 year period

    OpenAIRE

    ??a?as?o?lu, Afitap; Mesci, Erkan; Yumusakhuylu, Yasemin; Turgut, Selin Turan; Murat, Sadiye

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To observe motor and functional progress of children with cerebral palsy during 2?years. [Subjects and Methods] Pediatric cerebral palsy patients aged 3?15?years (n = 35/69) with 24-month follow-up at our outpatient cerebral palsy clinic were evaluated retrospectively. The distribution of cerebral palsy types was as follows: diplegia (n = 19), hemiplegia (n = 4), and quadriplegia (n = 12). Participants were divided into 3 groups according to their Gross Motor Functional Classificati...

  19. Clinical significance of the corpus callosum in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Ji Chang [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Chul [School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); And Others

    2000-10-01

    To evaluate, using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the clinal significance of the corpus callosum by measuring the size of various portions of the corpus callosum in children with cerebral palsy, and in paired controls. Fifty-two children (30 boys and 22 girls aged between six and 96 (median, 19) months) in whom cerebral palsy was clinically diagnosed underwent MR imaging. There were 23 term patients and 29 preterm, and the control group was selected by age and sex matching. Clinal subtypes of cerebral palsy were classified as hemiplegia (n=14), spastic diplegia (n=22), or spastic quadriplegia (n=16), and according to the severity of motor palsy, the condition was also classified as mild (n=26), moderate (n=13), or severe (n=13). In addition to the length and height of the corpus callosum, the thickness of its genu, body, transitional zone and splenium, as seen on midsagittal T1-weighted MR images, were also measured. Differences in the measured values of the two groups were statistically analysed and differences in the size of the corpus callosum according to the clinical severity and subtypes of cerebral palsy, and gestational age, were also assessed. Except for height, the measured values of the corpus callosum in patients with cerebral palsy were significantly less than those of the control group (p less than 0.05). Its size decreased according to the severity of motor palsy. Compared with term patients, the corpus callosum in preterm patients was considerably smaller (p less than 0.05). There was statistically significant correlation between the severity of motor palsy and the size of the corpus callosum. Quantitative evaluation of the corpus callosum might be a good indicator of neurologic prognosis, and a sensitive marker for assessing the extent of brain injury.

  20. Nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Emine Handan; Güven, Duygu Korkem; Eker, Levent; Elbasan, Bülent; Bülbül, Selda Fatma

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status, and provide information regarding anthropometric measurements of cerebral-palsied children living in the city of Ankara, Turkey. A total of 447 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were assessed for functional motor impairment by the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS). Assesment of nutritional status was based on the triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), arm fat area (AFA) estimates derived from TSF and mid-upper arm circumference measurements. TSF and AFA Z-scores were computed using reference data. Cerebral-palsied children had lower TSF and AFA Z-scores compared to reference data from healthy children. The prevalence of underweight and overweight among boys was 8.3 and 9.5%, respectively, whereas it was 19.0 and 0.5% for girls. Underweight was more prevalent in the low functioning children than in moderate functioning children. The findings of this study indicate that cerebral-palsied children face nutritional challenges. Underweight is more prevalent than overweight among cerebral-palsied children. To optimize the outcomes of rehabilitation and prevention efforts, an understanding of the heterogeneity of nutritional status among children with CP is required.

  1. Sleep disorders in children with cerebral palsy: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lélis, Ana Luíza P A; Cardoso, Maria Vera L M; Hall, Wendy A

    2016-12-01

    Sleep disorders are more prevalent in children with cerebral palsy. The review aimed to identify and synthesize information about the nature of sleep disorders and their related factors in children with cerebral palsy. We performed an electronic search by using the search terms sleep/child*, and sleep/cerebral palsy in the following databases: Latin American literature on health sciences, SCOPUS, medical publications, cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature, psycinfo, worldcat, web of science, and the Cochrane library. The selection criteria were studies: available in Portuguese, English or Spanish and published between 2004 and 2014, with results addressing sleep disorders in children (ages 0-18 y) with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy. 36,361 abstracts were identified. Of those, 37 papers were selected, and 25 excluded. Twelve papers were incorporated in the study sample: eight quantitative studies, three reviews, and one case study. Eleven types of sleep disorders were identified, such as difficult morning awakening, insomnia, nightmares, difficulties in initiating and maintaining nighttime sleep (night waking), and sleep anxiety. Twenty-one factors were linked to sleep disorders, which we classified as intrinsic factors associated with common comorbidities accompanying cerebral palsy, and extrinsic aspects, specifically environmental and socio-familial variables, and clinical-surgical and pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in Cardiorespiratory Responses and Kinematics with Hippotherapy in Youth with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Brandon Rhett; Gloeckner, Adam Robert; Sessums, Suzanne; Lanning, Beth Anne; Grandjean, Peter Walter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize pelvic displacement and cardiorespiratory responses to simulated horseback riding and walking in youth with cerebral palsy and to compare responses to youth without cerebral palsy before and after 8 weeks of hippotherapy. Method: Eight youth with cerebral palsy (M[subscript age] = 10 ± 4…

  3. Rehabilitation outcomes of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Ebru Yilmaz; Caglar, Nil Sayıner; Tugcu, Betul; Tonbaklar, Aysegul

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the results of Bobath-based rehabilitation performed at a pediatric cerebral palsy (CP) inpatient clinic. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 28 children with CP who were inpatients at a pediatric service. Inclusion criteria were: being an inpatient of our hospital aged 2-12 with a diagnosis of CP; having one permanent primary caregiver; and the caregiver having no medical or psychotic problems. All of the patients received Bobath treatment for 1 hour per day, 5 days a week. The locomotor system, neurologic and orthopedic examination, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) of the patients, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) of permanent caregivers were evaluated at the time of admission to hospital, discharge from hospital, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge. [Results] Post-admission scores of GMFM at discharge, and 1 and 3 months later showed significant increase. Social function and emotional role subscores of SF-36 had increased significantly at discharge. [Conclusion] Bobath treatment is promising and randomized controlled further studies are needed for rehabilitation technics.

  4. Biomechanical bases of rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlet'yarova, K. V.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kapilevich, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis and the study results of children's with cerebral palsy (CP) muscles bioelectrical activity while walking on a flat surface are represented. Increased flexion in the hip and shoulder joints and extension in the elbow joint in children with cerebral palsy were observed, with the movement of the lower limbs had less smooth character in comparison with the control group. Herewith, the oscillation amplitude was significantly increased, and the frequency in the m. gastrocnemius and m. lateralis was decreased. It was shown, that the dynamic stereotype of walking in children with cerebral palsy was characterized by excessive involvement of m. gastrocnemius and m.latissimus dorsi in locomotion. Thus, resulting biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters of walking should be considered in the rehabilitation programs development.

  5. Computed tomographic (CT) scans in cerebral palsy (CP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolawole, T.M.; Patel, P.J. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology); Mahdi, A.H. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Paediatrics)

    1989-11-01

    The CT findings in 120 cerebral palsied children are analysed. The 72.5% positive findings are correlated with the clinical types, as well as the aetiological basis for the cerebral palsy. The spastic type, 83.3% of the total number of children, had the highest positive findings. The yield was increased in children with seizures (91.3%) and those in the postnatal group (90%), as well as those with birth trauma and neonatal asphyxia (94%). The findings were those of atrophy in 30.8%, hydrocephalus, in 10%, infarct in 11.6%, porencephaly in 8.3% and others. The atropic changes and their patterns are explained. Treatable lesions, such as tumour, hydrocephalus, subdural haematoma, porencephaly and hygroma were identified in 22.5% of cases. It is concluded that CT scan is definitely efficacious in the management of cerebral palsied children. (orig.).

  6. Esophageal eosinophilia in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nápolis, Ana Carolina Ramos de; Alves, Flavia Araujo; Rezende, Erica Rodrigues Mariano de Almeida; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical picture, test results, and clinical evolution of patients with cerebral palsy associated with diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, monitored at tertiary centre. Cross-sectional, retrospective and descriptive study that evaluated the medical records data of pediatric patients with diagnosis of cerebral palsy and eosinophilic esophagitis in a tertiary center of pediatric gastroenterology between August 2005 and August 2013. Seven out of 131 patients with cerebral palsy had the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The mean age at diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was 52.3 months and the mean number of eosinophils in esophagus was 35 per high-power field. Symptoms more frequent were recurrent vomiting and disphagia. Endoscopic alterations found were mucosal thickening, vertical lines, mucosal opacificacion and white plaques. The frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis found was higher than in general pediatric population. The investigation of eosinophilic esophagitis should be done regularly in those patients, once this entity could overlap other gastrointestinal diseases.

  7. Quality of life as assessed by adults with cerebral palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Maestro-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available We explored the quality of life of adults with cerebral palsy without an intellectual disability and the predictors of quality of life.Because cerebral palsy is a disease that manifests in childhood, much of the research into quality of life for those dealing with it focuses on children; there are few studies that evaluate the quality of life of adults with cerebral palsy. Therefore, it is important to consider their perceptions in order to improve their general wellbeing and self-determination.This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study.Quality of life was measured using the GENCAT Quality of Life Scale. Demographic and personal variables were also collected and examined. Participants comprised 75 adults (58.7 percent men, mean age = 40.84 years with cerebral palsy who were members of the National Cerebral Palsy Association of Spain between 2014 and 2015. A linear multivariate model was examined as well.The overall mean score indicator of participants' quality of life was 103.29, which corresponds to the 56.6th percentile on the GENCAT scale. Examining the level of qualification, we found significant differences in the factors "personal development" and "self-determination," and those with a university education obtained higher scores than their less-educated counterparts. Having a partner was related to higher quality of life standard scores. After constructing a linear model, it was observed that maintaining sexual relationships was another factor that increased participants' quality of life.This study highlights the importance of social and romantic relationships to achieve a better quality of life in adults with cerebral palsy who do not have an intellectual disability. Social integration and sexuality education programs should be developed to improve their quality of life.

  8. Quality of life as assessed by adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro-Gonzalez, Alba; Bilbao-Leon, M Cruz; Zuazua-Rico, David; Fernandez-Carreira, Jose M; Baldonedo-Cernuda, Ricardo F; Mosteiro-Diaz, M Pilar

    2018-01-01

    We explored the quality of life of adults with cerebral palsy without an intellectual disability and the predictors of quality of life. Because cerebral palsy is a disease that manifests in childhood, much of the research into quality of life for those dealing with it focuses on children; there are few studies that evaluate the quality of life of adults with cerebral palsy. Therefore, it is important to consider their perceptions in order to improve their general wellbeing and self-determination. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Quality of life was measured using the GENCAT Quality of Life Scale. Demographic and personal variables were also collected and examined. Participants comprised 75 adults (58.7 percent men, mean age = 40.84 years) with cerebral palsy who were members of the National Cerebral Palsy Association of Spain between 2014 and 2015. A linear multivariate model was examined as well. The overall mean score indicator of participants' quality of life was 103.29, which corresponds to the 56.6th percentile on the GENCAT scale. Examining the level of qualification, we found significant differences in the factors "personal development" and "self-determination," and those with a university education obtained higher scores than their less-educated counterparts. Having a partner was related to higher quality of life standard scores. After constructing a linear model, it was observed that maintaining sexual relationships was another factor that increased participants' quality of life. This study highlights the importance of social and romantic relationships to achieve a better quality of life in adults with cerebral palsy who do not have an intellectual disability. Social integration and sexuality education programs should be developed to improve their quality of life.

  9. T2 Relaxometry MRI Predicts Cerebral Palsy in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-W; Wang, S-T; Huang, C-C; Tu, Y-F; Tsai, Y-S

    2018-01-18

    T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging enables objective measurement of brain maturation based on the water-macromolecule ratio in white matter, but the outcome correlation is not established in preterm infants. Our study aimed to predict neurodevelopment with T2-relaxation values of brain MR imaging among preterm infants. From January 1, 2012, to May 31, 2015, preterm infants who underwent both T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging and neurodevelopmental follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. T2-relaxation values were measured over the periventricular white matter, including sections through the frontal horns, midbody of the lateral ventricles, and centrum semiovale. Periventricular T2 relaxometry in relation to corrected age was analyzed with restricted cubic spline regression. Prediction of cerebral palsy was examined with the receiver operating characteristic curve. Thirty-eight preterm infants were enrolled for analysis. Twenty patients (52.6%) had neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including 8 (21%) with developmental delay without cerebral palsy and 12 (31.6%) with cerebral palsy. The periventricular T2-relaxation values in relation to age were curvilinear in preterm infants with normal development, linear in those with developmental delay without cerebral palsy, and flat in those with cerebral palsy. When MR imaging was performed at >1 month corrected age, cerebral palsy could be predicted with T2 relaxometry of the periventricular white matter on sections through the midbody of the lateral ventricles (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.738; cutoff value of >217.4 with 63.6% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity). T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging could provide prognostic prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants. Age-dependent and area-selective interpretation in preterm brains should be emphasized. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. Mobile applications in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Mariblanca, M; Cano de la Cuerda, R

    2017-12-21

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common developmental disorders. Technological development has enabled a transformation of the healthcare sector, which can offer more individualised, participatory, and preventive services. Within this context of new technology applied to the healthcare sector, mobile applications, or apps, constitute a very promising tool for the management of children with CP. The purpose of this article is to perform a systematic review of the information published about various mobile applications either directly related to CP or with potential to be useful in the context of the disease, and to describe, analyse, and classify these applications. A literature search was carried out to gather articles published in English or Spanish between 2011 and 2017 which presented, analysed, or validated applications either specifically designed or potentially useful for CP. Furthermore, a search for mobile applications was conducted in the main mobile application markets. A total of 63 applications were found in biomedical databases and mobile application markets, of which 40 were potentially useful for CP and 23 were specifically designed for the condition (11 for information, 3 for evaluation, and 9 for treatment). There are numerous mobile applications either specifically designed for or with potential to be useful in the field of CP. However, despite the existing scientific evidence, the low methodological quality of scientific articles makes it impossible to generalise the use of these tools. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlyne eArnould

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP, making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA. The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes-Weinstein aesthesiometer, stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test, proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints, grip strength (Jamar dynamometer, gross manual dexterity (Box and Block Test, and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test. MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, gross manual dexterity in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas grip strength was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with gross manual dexterity. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions.

  12. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  13. Congenital Cytomegalovirus among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Badawi, Nadia; Fernandez, Marian A; Kesson, Alison; McIntyre, Sarah; Leung, Kin-Chuen; Jones, Cheryl A

    2017-02-01

    To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA detected retrospectively in their newborn screening cards (NBSC), to compare the proportion of children with CMV DNA in their NBSC across spastic subtypes of CP, and to compare the sex and other characteristics of children with CP and CMV detected on their NSBC with those in whom CMV DNA was not detected. Retrospective observational study. Data were extracted from patient records on children with CP (birth years 1996-2014) from 2 Australian state CP registers and state-wide paediatric rehabilitation services with consent. NBSCs were retrospectively analyzed for CMV DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers against gB. Positive samples were validated using real time PCR for CMV UL83. Of 401 children recruited, 323 (80.5%) had an available NBSC. Of these, 31 (9.6%; 95% CI, 6.8-13.3) tested positive for CMV DNA by nested PCR for CMV gB, of whom 28 (8.7%; 95% CI, 6.1-12.2) also had CMV DNA detected by real-time PCR for CMV UL83. Detection of CMV DNA was significantly associated with epilepsy, but not with clinical or epidemiologic characteristics, including sex and pattern of spasticity. CMV viremia in the newborn period, indicating congenital CMV infection, is highly prevalent among children with CP. Further research is needed to investigate the mechanisms and contribution of congenital CMV to the causal pathways to CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency mimics cerebral palsy: differentiating factors for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    We describe an infant with molybdenum cofactor deficiency, initially diagnosed as cerebral palsy. Clinical features of molybdenum cofactor deficiency, e.g., neonatal seizures, hypertonus/hypotonus, and feeding and respiratory difficulties, resemble those of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Our patient, a 2-year-old boy, presented with spastic quadriplegia and mental retardation. He manifested intractable neonatal seizures and diffuse cerebral atrophy. When admitted with bronchitis at age 18 months, his uric acid levels in blood and urine were undetectable. A urinary sulfite test revealed positive results. Further tests revealed elevated urinary levels of xanthine, hypoxanthine, and S-sulfocystein. Sequencing of the MOCS2A gene revealed heterozygosity for c.[265T>C] + [266A>G], diagnosed as molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B. Neonatal seizures, progressive cerebral atrophy, and low serum levels of uric acid may provide diagnostic clues in patients with cerebral palsy of undetermined cause. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemorrhagic stroke and cerebral paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Ju, Yan; Chen, Jing; You, Chao

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment outcomes of 10 patients with hemorrhagic cerebral paragonimiasis (CP), and we evaluated the influence of Paragonimus infection on cerebrovascular damage. Ten patients (7 male and 3 female; median age 15.7 years, range 4-46 years) with hemorrhagic CP were diagnosed between April 2009 and January 2013. All patients underwent the head computed tomography scans and 9 patients underwent MRI examinations. Four patients underwent computed tomographic angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital subtraction angiography. Liquid-based cytological examination of cerebrospinal fluid was performed in 7 patients. Follow-up examinations were performed for 9 cases for a period of 12 to 62 months. Hemorrhagic CP accounted for 37% of CP cases (10/27). No patients were initially diagnosed with CP. The major symptoms of hemorrhagic CP included acute headache, vomiting, hemiparalysis, epilepsy, blurred vision, sensory impairment, and tinnitus. Four cases were surgically treated. Most symptoms markedly improved, but fine motor dysfunction and mental dysfunction remained in 3 surgical patients. Hemorrhagic stroke typically occurred during the acute stage and in the early stages of further Paragonimus migration. Delay of treatment increased the risk of initial and recurrent stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. CT findings of cerebral palsy and behaviour development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Zenji

    1987-06-01

    It is well recognized that CT scan is very useful in the early diagnosis of cerebral palsy. The author has studied this time the CT scan findings of cerebral palsy children in their relations to the type of palsy, cause of palsy, complications in the central nervous system, and prognosis of behaviour development, in order to predict the prognosis of behaviour development. Dilatation of the contralateral cerebral ventricle was found in 82 % of hemiplegic type. Abnormal EEG was found in 73 %, but their behaviour development was satisfactory, with good development of speech regardless to the side of palsy. This might be helped by compensational function of the brain due to plasticity. Diplegia presented bilateral moderate dilatation of ventricles with favorable prognosis. Tetraplegia was caused mostly by asphyxia or congenital anomaly and revealed marked dilatation of ventricles or severe cortical atrophy. Some cases presented diffuse cortical low-density, often associated with abnormal EEG, and their prognosis was worst. Athetosis had normal CT finding or mild ventricular dilatation, but all cases of ataxia presented normal CT findings. Hypotonia had mild ventricular dilatation. Two of three mixed type cases had normal CT findings and another had mild ventricular dilatation. No correlation was found between ventricular dilatation and behaviour development, but statistically significant difference was found in the cases with 30 % or more Evans' ratio (P < 0.05). Prognosis of severe ventricular dilatation cases was poor.

  17. CT findings of cerebral palsy and behaviour development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Zenji

    1987-01-01

    It is well recognized that CT scan is very useful in the early diagnosis of cerebral palsy. The author has studied this time the CT scan findings of cerebral palsy children in their relations to the type of palsy, cause of palsy, complications in the central nervous system, and prognosis of behaviour development, in order to predict the prognosis of behaviour development. Dilatation of the contralateral cerebral ventricle was found in 82 % of hemiplegic type. Abnormal EEG was found in 73 %, but their behaviour development was satisfactory, with good development of speech regardless to the side of palsy. This might be helped by compensational function of the brain due to plasticity. Diplegia presented bilateral moderate dilatation of ventricles with favorable prognosis. Tetraplegia was caused mostly by asphyxia or congenital anomaly and revealed marked dilatation of ventricles or severe cortical atrophy. Some cases presented diffuse cortical low-density, often associated with abnormal EEG, and their prognosis was worst. Athetosis had normal CT finding or mild ventricular dilatation, but all cases of ataxia presented normal CT findings. Hypotonia had mild ventricular dilatation. Two of three mixed type cases had normal CT findings and another had mild ventricular dilatation. No correlation was found between ventricular dilatation and behaviour development, but statistically significant difference was found in the cases with 30 % or more Evans' ratio (P < 0.05). Prognosis of severe ventricular dilatation cases was poor. (author)

  18. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about functional electrical stimulation in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is defined as the electrical stimulation of muscles that have impaired motor control, in order to produce a contraction to obtain functionally useful movement. It was first proposed in…

  19. Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy in Children (Under Five) in and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non-progressive disorder of posture and movement due to brain damage/insult/lesion before birth, during delivery or in the perinatal period. It is a neurological disorder of childhood with significant medico-social implications. A retrospective hospital based cross sectional study was conducted to ...

  20. Care of children with cerebral palsy among guardians attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Among the chronic conditions that arise in childhood, cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of disability. According to CDC, recent prevalence of CP in children aged three years and above is estimated at 3.6 per 1000 children globally. Children with CP tend to have multiple disabilities and caring for ...

  1. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  2. Executive Functions in Youth With Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirila, Silja; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Rantanen, Kati; Jokiluoma, Maria; Eriksson, Kai

    Dependent on criteria used, between 35% and 53% of the participants with cerebral palsy fulfilled the criteria of clinically relevant executive function problems as defined by Conners' (1994) Continuous Performance Test. Executive function problems were noticed mainly in participants with bilateral

  3. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  4. Physical and Sedentary Activity in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Carol A.; Williams, Marie T.; Olds, Tim; Lane, Alison E.

    2007-01-01

    Participation in regular physical activity (PA) provides health, psychological, and physiological benefits for people with and without a physical disability. This study investigated the physical and sedentary activity patterns of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). A cross-sectional, descriptive, postal survey was used, consisting of the…

  5. Growth and Nutrition Disorders in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Stevenson, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Growth and nutrition disorders are common secondary health conditions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Poor growth and malnutrition in CP merit study because of their impact on health, including psychological and physiological function, healthcare utilization, societal participation, motor function, and survival. Understanding the etiology of…

  6. Postural control during reaching in preterm children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, JC; Begeer, C; Fock, JM; Otten, Bert; Stremmelaar, E; van Eykern, LA; Hadders-Algra, M

    Postural control during reaching with the dominant arm was assessed in 58 preterm children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 2 to 11 years, comprising 34 with spastic hemiplegia (17 males, 17 females) and 24 with bilateral spastic CP (bilateral CP; 15 male, 9 females). Assessments were made by multiple

  7. Portrayals of People with Cerebral Palsy in Homicide News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucardie, Richard; Sobsey, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Through content analysis, employing qualitative and quantitative methods, Canadian media representation of people with cerebral palsy (PWCP) in public life was examined. Canadian NewsDisc, an online biographic database service, was used to examine the use of stigmatizing language such as afflicted by, afflicted with, suffered from, suffers from,…

  8. Robot-Assisted Task-Specific Training in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Hermano I.; Ladenheim, Barbara; Hippolyte, Christopher; Monterroso, Linda; Mast, Joelle

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to examine the feasibility of applying therapeutic robotics to children and adults with severe to moderate impairment due to cerebral palsy (CP). Pilot results demonstrated significant gains for both groups. These results suggest that robot-mediated therapy may be an effective tool to ameliorate the debilitating effects of CP and…

  9. Physical fitness in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, O.W.

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a non-progressive condition; however, certain negative side effects such as a low muscle strength and cardio respiratory endurance can develop at later stages and can get progressively worse depending on the specifics of a person's condition. Children and adolescents with CP

  10. Trunk recruitment during spoon use in tetraparetic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roon, D.B. van; Steenbergen, B.; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the extent to which individuals suffering from spastic tetraparesis as a consequence of cerebral palsy tune their trunk involvement to accuracy demands in a spoon-handling task. Twenty-two participants (ten adolescents with spastic tetraparesis and 12 control

  11. Physical activity in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.N.; van Schie, P.E.M.; Becher, J.G.S.J.S.; Smits, D.W.; Gorter, J.W.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to describe the physical activity levels of 5- and 7-year-old children with cerebral palsy (CP, n=97), to compare their physical activity levels with those of typically developing peers (TD, n=57) and the Dutch recommendation for physical activity, and to

  12. Pharmacotherapy of Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ying Chung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a common disability in children with cerebral palsy. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthotics, rhizotomy, and orthopedic surgery, all play important roles in the management of spasticity. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of available medications for treatment of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Common medications include benzodiazepines, dantrolene sodium, baclofen, tizanidine, botulinum toxins, phenol, alcohol and intrathecal baclofen. In general, oral medications and intrathecal baclofen are used for treating generalized spasticity, whilst chemodenervation agents (botulinum toxins, phenol, and alcohol are used to treat localized spasticity. There is more sufficient evidence for the recommendation of botulinum toxin A as an effective anti-spasticity treatment in children with cerebral palsy. However, more data concerning safety and long-term effects of botulinum toxin A is needed. Further study is needed to determine which kinds of medications can cause substantial improvement in daily activity, participation level, self-competence, or quality of life in children with cerebral palsy.

  13. Nutrition in neurological disability in paediatrics: cerebral palsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The learning objectives of the case study were: • To discuss the growth monitoring of children with cerebral palsy. (CP). Which growth charts should, or could, be used? • To discuss the nutritional recommendations of infants and children with CP. • To discuss the possible drug-nutrient interactions and the nutrition-related ...

  14. Fuzzy expert system for the intelligent recognition of cerebral palsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes a fuzzy system for intelligent recognition and estimation of possibility of suffering from cerebral palsy (CP) in children between the ages of 3 months and 2 years. The hallmark symptoms of CP are disturbances of movement and/or posture which are manifested as failure to meet appropriate motor ...

  15. Socio-clinical issues in cerebral palsy in Sagamu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a chronic disabling condition resulting from permanent damage to the immature brain. It is commonly encountered worldwide.1-5 The consequences of. CP include retardation of growth and development as well as social and financial sequelae. The ideal management of. CP is comprehensive and ...

  16. Training Guide to Cerebral Palsy Sports. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffery A., Ed.

    This official training manual of the United States Cerebral Palsy Athletic Association includes the latest coaching and training techniques specific to all sports in the national program. The book features guidelines for coaching over a dozen sports, including soccer, swimming, cycling, and track and field. It contains everything coaches,…

  17. Behaviour in Children with Cerebral Palsy with and without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Malin; Olsson, Ingrid; Hagberg, Gudrun; Beckung, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe behavioural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with and without epilepsy. The children were sampled from the Western Sweden CP register and were part of a European Union project. The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire and questions on epilepsy were answered by one parent of each child. Medical…

  18. Tactile Assessment in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Clinimetric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2011-01-01

    This review evaluates the clinimetric properties of tactile assessments for children with cerebral palsy. Assessment of registration was reported using Semmes Weinstein Monofilaments (SWMs) or exteroception. Assessment of two-point discrimination was reported using the Disk-Criminator[R] or paperclip methods; Single point localization and double…

  19. Altered sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark S; Kliim-Due, Mette

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Children diagnosed with spastic Cerebral Palsy (CP) often show perceptual and cognitive problems, which may contribute to their functional deficit. Here we investigated if altered ability to determine whether an observed movement is performed by themselves (sense of agency...

  20. Understanding Participation of Preschool-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa Ann; Palisano, Robert J.; Orlin, Margo N.; Chang, Hui-Ju; Begnoche, Denise; An, Mihee

    2012-01-01

    Participation in home, school, and community activities is a primary outcome of early intervention services for children with disabilities and their families. The objectives of this study were to (a) describe participation of preschool-age children with cerebral palsy (CP); (b) determine effects of sex, age, and gross motor function on intensity…

  1. Predictors of Verbal Working Memory in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the precursors of verbal working memory in 52 children with cerebral palsy with varying degrees of speech impairments in the first grade of special education. Following Baddeley's model of working memory, children's verbal working memory was measured by means of a forced-recognition task. As precursors…

  2. Experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of cerebral palsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen children with cerebral palsy: 5 with dynamic spasticity, 5 with dystonia and 5 with a mixed picture. Results. On a standard scoring system, 13 of the children showed improved function at reassessment. Conclusion. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin is effective in the treatment of selected children with spastic.

  3. Home Literacy Environment: Characteristics of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Marieke; Verhoeven, Ludo; van Balkom, Hans; de Moor, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Various aspects of the home literacy environment are considered to stimulate the emergent literacy development in children without disabilities. It is important to gain insight into the home literacy environment of children with cerebral palsy given that they have been shown to have difficulty acquiring literacy skills. Aims: The aims…

  4. Incidence of inguinal hernia in children with congenital cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Latocha, J E

    1990-01-01

    The incidence of inguinal hernia among 247 children with cerebral palsy was ascertained. During the first year of life, 20 of the 153 boys developed hernia, as did one of the 94 girls. Among boys with birthweights of 1000 to 2000g the incidence was 31 per cent, which is twice the rate for normal...

  5. Everyday life and social consequences of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The disclosure of diagnosis for a child with cerebral palsy (CP) is a highly stressful experience to the parents. The experience can be alleviated by clarity, empathy, and an emphasis on the child's resources and abilities. Despite chronic stress many families function well and manage to strengthen...

  6. Aerobic Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO[subscript 2peak] (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level II and 336 typically developing…

  7. Reproducibility of Tactile Assessments for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan Louise; Ware, Robert S.; Boyd, Roslyn Nancy; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review identified tactile assessments used in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but their reproducibility is unknown. Sixteen children with unilateral CP and 31 typically developing children (TDC) were assessed 2-4 weeks apart. Test-retest percent agreements within one point for children with unilateral CP (and TDC) were…

  8. Management of children with cerebral palsy | Laughton | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of children with cerebral palsy. B Laughton. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  9. Retrospective Descriptive Study of Cerebral Palsy in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    There is very little data pertaining to cerebral palsy (CP) from Nepal. In this retrospective study it was observed that dyskinetic CP was seen in 29% and the sex ratio of males to females was two in the study population of children with CP. Both of these are much higher than data from developed countries. Hence, further randomized cross-sectional…

  10. Childhood Educational Experiences of Women with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeborn, Donna; Mandleco, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the childhood experiences of women with cerebral palsy (CP), from the perspectives of these women. Using the feminist biographical method, eight women with CP participated in two in-depth interviews. Participants ranged in age from 22 to 55 years and had moderate to severe athetoid or spastic CP. Four…

  11. Aerobic capacity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO(2peak) (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level

  12. Association of Maternal Obesity with Child Cerebral Palsy or Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jessica A; Smid, Marcela C; Smiley, Sarah; Stamilio, David M

    2017-05-01

    Objective  The primary aim of this study was to determine if there is an association between maternal obesity and cerebral palsy or death in children. Study Design  This is a retrospective cohort analysis of a randomized controlled clinical trial previously performed by the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network. Women in the original trial were included if at high risk for preterm delivery. The present study included singletons enrolled in the original study with complete data. Obese and nonobese women were compared. A secondary analysis comparing class 3 obese or classes 1 to 2 obese women to nonobese women was performed. The primary outcome was a composite of cerebral palsy or perinatal death. Results  In this study, 1,261 nonobese, 339 obese, and 69 morbidly obese women were included. When adjusted for gestational age at delivery and magnesium exposure, there was no association between maternal obesity and child cerebral palsy or death. In the analysis using obesity severity categories, excess risk for adverse outcome appeared confined to the class 3 obese group. Conclusion  In women at high risk of delivering preterm, maternal obesity was not independently associated with child cerebral palsy or death. The association in unadjusted analysis appears to be mediated by preterm birth among obese patients. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. ocular findings in children with cerebral palsy attending a tertiary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were delivered full term while 4(10.8%) were preterm. Spastic cerebral palsy accounted for 45.9% of all the cases seen. ... disorder, it can be associated with disorders of the sensory pathway (Arnoldi et al 2006:97-107). ... retinopathy of prematurity and cortical blindness. (Pennefather and Tin 2000:78-81). It has actually.

  14. Language and Motor Speech Skills in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirila, Silja; van der Meere, Jaap; Pentikainen, Taina; Ruusu-Niemi, Pirjo; Korpela, Raija; Kilpinen, Jenni; Nieminen, Pirkko

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate associations between the severity of motor limitations, cognitive difficulties, language and motor speech problems in children with cerebral palsy. Also, the predictive power of neonatal cranial ultrasound findings on later outcome was investigated. For this purpose, 36 children (age range 1 year 10 months…

  15. Language and motor speech skills in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirila, Sija; van der Meere, Jaap; Pentikainen, Taina; Ruusu-Niemi, Pirjo; Korpela, Raija; Kilpinen, Jenni; Nieminen, Pirkko; Ruusu-Niemin, P; Kilpinen, R

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate associations between the severity of motor limitations, cognitive difficulties, language and motor speech problems in children with cerebral palsy. Also, the predictive power of neonatal cranial ultrasound findings on later outcome was investigated. For this

  16. The Determinants of Daily Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Hui; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Huang, Chien-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify determinants of daily function in a population-based sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP). The study took into consideration factors from the entire scope of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). Furthermore, the determinants of daily function were examined from…

  17. Sociocultural issues and causes of cerebral palsy in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    834 had cerebral palsy giving a prevalence of 36.45%. Theirages ranged from 5 months to 13 years. Socio-economic stratification of the patients showed concentration in the lower socioeconomic groups IV (35.73%) andV(56.35%). Majority of the children 668 (80.09%) had spastic CP. Eighty seven (10.43%) had hypotonic ...

  18. Infant Motor Profile and cerebral palsy : promising associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    AIM The Infant Motor Profile (IMP) is a novel qualitative assessment of motor behaviour in infancy. The aim of this study was to determine whether IMP scores throughout infancy differ between children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) at 18 months. Furthermore, we evaluated the predictive ability

  19. Survey on Types and Associated disorders of Cerebral Palsy in Eastern and Northern Districts of Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Farin Soleimani; Roshanak Vameghi; Sahel Hemmati; Akbar Biglarian; Hussein Sourtiji

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non-progressive disorder and abnormality of the developing brain and it remains one of the main and prevalent causes of childhood developmental disorder. This study was carried out in order to recognize the types and associated disorders of children with cerebral palsy. Materials & Methods: This study was conducted on one to six years old children with cerebral palsy in eastern and northern districts of Tehran and the European classification of cerebral...

  20. The Neurological Hand Deformity Classification for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Melissa; Elliott, Catherine; Wilton, Judith; Blair, Eve; Blackmore, Marie; Garbellini, Simon

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Neurological Hand Deformity Classification and use it to describe changes in hand deformity over time in children with cerebral palsy. We identified 114 video clips of 26 children with cerebral palsy, aged 1-18 years (mean = 8.4, SD = 4.2), performing upper-limb tasks at multiple time points (n = 3-8) at least 6 months apart. Using the Neurological Hand Deformity Classification, three observers classified hand deformity in the video clips. Inter- and intra-observer reliabilities were estimated using Fleiss and Cohen's kappa (κ) and the temporal changes in classification of hand deformity were investigated. Inter- and intra-observer reliability respectively were κ = 0.87 and κ = 0.91. Hand deformity was identified in all children at all time points, even before the age of 2 years. Ten children did not change hand classification, wrist flexion increased in eight, and eight showed changes from wrist flexion to extension or vice versa. The Neurological Hand Deformity Classification is a reliable tool to classify hand deformity in children with cerebral palsy. For more than one-third of children hand deformity classification did not change. For the remaining children, two patterns of change in hand deformity over time were identified. It is recommended that children with cerebral palsy involving their upper limbs be monitored regularly. This is the first study to document longitudinal changes in hand deformity in children with cerebral palsy. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  1. Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, Ebru; Özbudak, Sibel Demir; Mandiroğlu, Sibel; Biçer, Seda Alakoç; Özgirgin, Neşe; Uçan, Halil

    Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on history, physical findings, the Selective Motor Control Test, the Gross Motor Functional Classification System, the Berg Balance Scale and the Manual Ability Classification System. Previous history of falls/frequent falls, and any falls which occurred during hospitalization, were recorded. Of all 93 patients, 25 (27%) fell and 68 (73%) did not fall. The mean age of the fallers (6.3±2.0 years) was lower than that of the non-fallers (8.1±3.9 years). Behavioral problems according to the mother's statement (OR 26.454), not being able to maintain a long sitting position (OR 10.807), ability to balance on knees without support (OR 9.810), a history of frequent falls (OR 4.893) and a negative Thomas test (OR 4.192 fold) were found to increase the risk of inpatient falls. In these children with cerebral palsy, behavioral problems according to the mother's statement, a history of frequent falls, not being able to maintain a long sitting position, a negative Thomas test, and able to balance on knees without support were associated with the risk of inpatient falls. Children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls. Further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstruction of cerebral arteries in childhood stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkey, I.; Lombay, B.; Panczel, G.

    1992-01-01

    Middle cerebral artery obstruction in children is reviewed by our two cases. Ischemic childhood stroke was caused by moyamoya disease in the first, and by fibromuscular dysplasia in the second patient. In both cases transcranial Doppler sonography and cranial CT were performed, but the final diagnosis was made by angiography. The importance of angiography in childhood stroke is emphasized. (orig.)

  3. CYTOPROTECTIVE AND NEUROTROPHIC THERAPY FOR CEREBRAL STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Martynov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data of Russian and foreign studies on the pathophysiological mechanisms of brain injury in ischemic and hemorrhagicstroke, the specific features of brain plasticity and its activation after cerebral stroke, and main directions for basic and differentiation therapy for acute cerebrovascular pathology. Particular emphasis is placed on the issues of cytoprotective and neurotrophic therapy for cerebral stroke. Analysis of the data available in the literature shows that cytoprotective and neurotrophic therapies are important components of combination treatment in patients with stroke and favorably affect the functional outcome of the disease.

  4. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  5. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  6. The Cerebral Palsy Research Registry: Development and Progress Toward National Collaboration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Donna S.; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Msall, Michael E.; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Dewald, Julius P.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common neurodevelopmental motor disability in children. The condition requires medical, educational, social, and rehabilitative resources throughout the life span. Several countries have developed population-based registries that serve the purpose of prospective longitudinal collection of etiologic, demographic, and functional severity. The United States has not created a comprehensive program to develop such a registry. Barriers have been large population size, poor interinstitution collaboration, and decentralized medical and social systems. The Cerebral Palsy Research Registry was created to fill the gap between population and clinical-based cerebral palsy registries and promote research in the field. This is accomplished by connecting persons with cerebral palsy, as well as their families, to a network of regional researchers. This article describes the development of an expandable cerebral palsy research registry, its current status, and the potential it has to affect families and persons with cerebral palsy in the United States and abroad. PMID:21677201

  7. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-12-01

    riesgo, fisiopatología, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, terapéuticas utilizadas bien como evaluación pre-operatoria, medicación pre-anestésica, manoseo intra y posoperatorio, analgesia posoperatoria y dolor crónico. CONCLUSIONES: El anestesista desempeña un papel importante en la disminución de la morbidez y mortalidad anestésico-quirúrgica en pacientes portadores de parálisis cerebral. El conocimiento de la fisiopatología de los diferentes tipos de parálisis cerebral bien como de las enfermedades asociadas y sus terapéuticas es imprescindible, pues permite al anestesista anticipar y precaver complicaciones intra y posoperatorias en este tipo de paciente.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebral palsy (CP is a non-progressive disease induced by CNS injury, which leads to patients' motor impairment. CP patients are often submitted to surgical procedures due to usual diseases and some surgical situations related with CP. The aim of this article was to review cerebral palsy aspects of interest to anesthesiologists to allow an adequate pre, intra and postoperative management of these patients. CONTENTS: This article addresses cerebral palsy aspects such as etiology, classification, risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapies and, in addition to preoperative evaluation, preanesthetic medication, intra and postoperative management, postoperative analgesia and chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: Anesthesiologists play an important role in decreasing anesthetic-surgical morbidity and mortality of cerebral palsy patients. The understanding of different aspects of cerebral palsy pathophysiologies, in addition to those of associated diseases and their therapies is paramount, because it allows anesthesiologists to anticipate and prevent intra and postoperative complications in this type of patient.

  8. Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Disparities in the Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guibo; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Danielson, Beate; Smith, Lloyd H.; Gilbert, William M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Racial and ethnic disparities in cerebral palsy have been documented, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We determined whether low birth weight accounts for ethnic disparities in the prevalence of cerebral palsy and whether socioeconomic factors impact cerebral palsy within racial and ethnic groups. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort of 6.2 million births in California between 1991 and 2001, we compared maternal and infant characteristics among 8397 infants with cerebral palsy who qualified for services from the California Department of Health Services and unaffected infants. RESULTS: Overall, black infants were 29% more likely to have cerebral palsy than white infants (relative risk: 1.29 [95% confidence interval: 1.19–1.39]). However, black infants who were very low or moderately low birth weight were 21% to 29% less likely to have cerebral palsy than white infants of comparable birth weight. After we adjusted for birth weight, there was no difference in the risk of cerebral palsy between black and white infants. In multivariate analyses, women of all ethnicities who did not receive any prenatal care were twice as likely to have infants with cerebral palsy relative to women with an early onset of prenatal care. Maternal education was associated with cerebral palsy in a dose-response fashion among white and Hispanic women. Hispanic adolescent mothers (aged cerebral palsy. CONCLUSIONS: The increased risk of cerebral palsy among black infants is primarily related to their higher risk of low birth weight. Understanding how educational attainment and use of prenatal care impact the risk of cerebral palsy may inform new prevention strategies. PMID:21339278

  9. Normalization of muscle tone in children with cerebral palsy in special schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruglyak M.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The features of using exercise to reduce muscle tone in children with cerebral palsy in training at a special school. The study involved children with cerebral palsy 7-10 years. Presents the results of evaluation of motor function and muscle tone. The efficacy of the use of physical rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy, a positive effect of using special exercise in stretching the muscles with increased tone, improve motor function and normalization of muscle tone.

  10. When I do, I become someone: experiences of occupational performance in young adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Lena; Öhrvall, Ann-Marie; Himmelmann, Kate; Peny-Dahlstrand, Marie

    2017-10-17

    Persons with cerebral palsy, even if they have relatively good motor functions, have a lower level of independence and participation in everyday activities than persons of the same age without disabilities. However, there are few descriptions of how persons with cerebral palsy themselves perceive their performance of activities in everyday life. The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions that young adults with cerebral palsy have of occupational performance in everyday life. This qualitative interview study includes 10 participants with cerebral palsy classified with Manual Ability Classification System level I-II, aged 19-30 years. The data were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. The interviews resulted in five categories: "Important to do"; "Demanding but can be facilitated"; "Excludes or includes"; "Diminishes me or makes me grow"; and "Comes at a price". The young adults with cerebral palsy consider that, despite life being so demanding, it is extremely important to perform activities themselves and to feel included, as this enables personal growth. Hence, it is necessary to advance intervention methods based on personally important activities to enable individuals with cerebral palsy to find their own way to perform activities. Further research is needed to increase opportunities for individuals with cerebral palsy to perform everyday activities without too much fatigue and struggle. Implications for Rehabilitation For young adults with cerebral palsy it is extremely important to perform everyday activities independently; by DOING activities they form their identity. Intervention models aimed to enable persons with cerebral palsy to be involved and find their own way to perform everyday activities should be emphasized. Attention must be paid to how mental fatigue is manifested in persons with cerebral palsy. To build self-awareness and self-efficacy, individuals with cerebral palsy need information, early in life, about cerebral palsy and

  11. Proximal hamstring lengthening in the sitting cerebral palsy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, E B; Wenger, D R; Mubarak, S J; Sutherland, D H

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively studied 62 nonambulatory children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy who underwent proximal hamstring lengthening to improve hip and spine positioning. Preoperatively, all had hamstring contracture, with difficulty sitting due to hip extensor thrust and increased kyphosis. Thirty-five patients with follow-up greater than or equal to 2 years were studied using a modified Reimer scale to assess sitting ability. Sitting ability improved significantly (p less than 0.01) postoperatively, along with popliteal angle (p less than 0.001) and straight leg raising (p less than 0.001). Proximal hamstring lengthening is effective in treating severe hamstring contractures in the wheelchair-bound child with cerebral palsy.

  12. Cerebral Palsy: A Lifelong Challenge Asks for Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteliadis, Christos P; Hagel, Christian; Karch, Dieter; Heinemann, Karl

    2015-01-01

    One of the oldest and probably well-known examples of cerebral palsy is the mummy of the Pharaoh Siptah about 1196–1190 B.C., and a letter from Hippocrates (460–390 B.C.). Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common congenital or acquired neurological impairments in paediatric patients, and refers to a group of children with motor disability and related functional defects. The visible core of CP is characterized by abnormal coordination of movements and/or muscle tone which manifest very early in the development. Resulting from pre- or perinatal brain damage CP is not a progressive condition per se. However, without systematic medical and physiotherapeutic support the dystonia leads to muscle contractions and to deterioration of the handicap. Here we review the three general spastic manifestations of CP hemiplegia, diplegia and tetraplegia, describe the diagnostic procedures and delineate a time schedule for an early intervention. PMID:26191093

  13. Cerebral Palsy: General Information. Fact Sheet Number 2 = La Paralisis Cerebral: Informacion General. Fact Sheet Number 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstate Research Associates, McLean, VA.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is offered in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy: spastic, athetoid,…

  14. Treatment of the Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajša Meholjić-Fetahović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons - neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine.As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy - spasticity Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles.It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects.This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being habilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs’ muscles and

  15. Feeding and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkin, Gulten; Culha, Canan; Ozel, Sumru; Kirbiyik, Eylem Gulsen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify feeding and gastrointestinal system (GIS) problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to evaluate the relationship between these problems and the severity of CP. A total of 120 children with CP were enrolled consecutively into the study (67 males, 53 females; mean age: 6.0[plus or minus]2.4 years; range:…

  16. Prevalance of Obesity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Ankita; Diwan, Shraddha; Diwan, Jasmin; Vyas, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity are epidemic among children and adolescents. There is worldwide tendency of increasing prevalence of obesity in children. Cerebral palsy (CP) is leading cause of childhood disability.studies have proposed mechanism of children with disability leading towards obesity and related health risks. So this study is aimed at determining whether such trend of obesity exists in children with CP in terms of BMI and WHR.

  17. [Scalp acupuncture for epileptiform discharges of children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyun; Liu, Zhenhuan; Zhao, Wenjian; Jin, Bingxu; Li, Nuo; Luo, Guanjun

    2017-03-12

    To explore the effect of scalp acupuncture for children with cerebral palsy whose video-electroencephalogram(VEEG) showed epileptiform discharges. A total of 184 children with cerebral palsy whose VEEG showed epileptiform discharges or those combined with epilepsy were randomly assigned into a combination group (99 cases) and a rehabilitation group (85 cases). All the cases were treated with the original antiepileptic drugs. The conventional physical training and massage were applied in the rehabilitation group for 3 courses with 20 d at the interval, once a day, 5 times a week and 15 times as one course. Based on the treatment as the rehabilitation group, scalp acupuncture was used in the combination group for 3 courses with 15 d at the interval, once the other day and 10 times as one course. Shenting (GV 24), Benshen (GB 13), Sishencong (EX-HN 1) were selected as the main acupoints, combined with motor zone, foot motor-sensory area, balance zone,and temple-three-needle etc. Clinical onset and VEEG results were observed before and after treatment. After treatment in the combination group, 27 cases improved; 47 cases had no effect; 25 cases aggravated. While in the rehabilitation group, 11 cases improved; 46 cases had no effect; 28 cases aggravated. There was no statistically significance between the two groups ( P >0.05). As for the cases with epilepsy onset in the combination group, 8 cases improved; 4 cases had no effect; 4 cases aggravated. In the rehabilitation group, 4 cases had no effect; 7 cases aggravated. The result in the combination group was better than that in the rehabilitation group ( P 0.05). Scalp acupuncture therapy does not increase the risk of onset or epileptiform discharges in the children with cerebral palsy combined with epilepsy or epileptiform discharges. Scalp acupuncture combined with rehabilitation is better than simple rehabilitation for thosewith cerebral palsy and epilepsy onset.

  18. TREATMENT OF THE SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meholjić-Fetahović, Ajša

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons - neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine. As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy - spasticity Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles. It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects. This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being habilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs’ muscles and kinezitherapy intensified

  19. Phoneme articulation in students with cerebral palsy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić-Zdravković Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are not many studies that analyze the quality of phoneme articulation in students with cerebral palsy who have a cognitive deficit. Studies on articulation abilities in the context of cerebral palsy usually included subjects without cognitive deficits. The aim of this paper was to determine the quality of phoneme articulation in students with cerebral palsy combined with intellectual disability, as well as its relation to age and gender of the participants. The sample consisted of 33 patients with cerebral palsy with combined mild intellectual disability, aged seven to ten years and eleven months (M=8.91; SD=0.947, of both genders. Triage articulation test, which determines the quality of phoneme articulation in the Serbian language (Kostić, Vladisavljević, 1983, was used for data collecting. The participants achieved the best quality of articulation in pronouncing vowels, and the worst in pronouncing phonemes from the group of fricatives. One-way analysis of variance showed no significant differences between the quality of phoneme articulation in the Serbian language and calendar age of the participants (F=1.061, p=0.508. Although boys from the tested sample showed a higher quality of articulated phonemes, that quality was not on the level of statistical significance with regard to the quality of articulated phonemes in girls (F=0.746, p=0.727. The results indicate significant difficulties in phoneme articulation in these students, who were three to seven years behind compared to the expected quality typical of certain age.

  20. Eye Hand Coordination in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Sandra; Joshi, Aditi; Woollacott, Marjorie; van Donkelaar, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Reaching to grasp an object of interest requires complex sensorimotor coordination involving eye, head, hand and trunk. While numerous studies have demonstrated deficits in each of these systems individually, little is known about how children with cerebral palsy (CP) coordinate multiple motor systems for functional tasks. Here we used kinematics, remote eye tracking and a trunk support device to examine the functional coupling of the eye, head and hand and the extent to which it was constrai...

  1. Gastrocnemius operating length with ankle foot orthoses in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan; Wren, Tishya Anne Leong; Steele, Katherine Muterspaugh

    2017-06-01

    Many individuals with cerebral palsy wear ankle foot orthoses during daily life. Orthoses influence joint motion, but how they impact muscle remains unclear. In particular, the gastrocnemius is commonly stiff in cerebral palsy. Understanding whether orthoses stretch or shorten this muscle during daily life may inform orthosis design and rehabilitation. This study investigated the impact of different ankle foot orthoses on gastrocnemius operating length during walking in children with cerebral palsy. Case series, within subject comparison of gastrocnemius operating length while walking barefoot and with two types of ankle foot orthoses. We performed gait analyses for 11 children with cerebral palsy. Each child was fit with two types of orthoses: a dynamic ankle foot orthosis (Cascade dynamic ankle foot orthosis) and an adjustable dynamic response ankle foot orthosis (Ultraflex ankle foot orthosis). Musculoskeletal modeling was used to quantify gastrocnemius musculotendon operating length and velocity with each orthosis. Walking with ankle foot orthoses could stretch the gastrocnemius more than barefoot walking for some individuals; however, there was significant variability between participants and orthoses. At least one type of orthosis stretched the gastrocnemius during walking for 4/6 and 3/5 of the Gross Motor Functional Classification System Level I and III participants, respectively. AFOs also reduced peak gastrocnemius lengthening velocity compared to barefoot walking for some participants, with greater reductions among the Gross Motor Functional Classification System Level III participants. Changes in gastrocnemius operating length and lengthening velocity were related to changes in ankle and knee kinematics during gait. Ankle foot orthoses impact gastrocnemius operating length during walking and, with proper design, may assist with stretching tight muscles in daily life. Clinical relevance Determining whether ankle foot orthoses stretch tight muscles can

  2. Motion Tracking of Infants in Risk of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard

    Every year 2-3 out of 1000 infants are born with cerebral cerebral palsy. Among others, the disorder often affects motor, cognitive and perceptual skills. The disorder is usually detected when the infants are old enough the crawl and walk, i.e. when the infant is 1-2 years old. However, studies......, where the first method is able to do single frame pose estimation, based on simple assumptions on the infant’s body. The second method uses an articulated model that incorporates anatomical constraints. Combining the two methods results in a robust motion tracking system for infants. The results from...

  3. Analysis of cranial CT-scan findings in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, F.; Andoh, T.; Une, K.; Takamatsu, T. (Kitakyushu Municipal Sogo-Ryoiku Center (Japan))

    1981-06-01

    CT-scan findings of 87 cerebral palsied children were studied. They consist of 23 cases of spastic quadriplegia, 9 cases of diplegia, 12 cases of paraplegia, 24 cases of athetosis and mixed type, and 19 cases of hemiplegia. In the former four types, ventricular dilatation and cortical atrophy were measured and abnormal changes in cerebral substance and cerebellar atrophy were observed. Spastic quadriplegia showed most intense changes in every aspect of the abnormalities, while paraplegia had almost normal appearance. Athetosis and mixed type had moderate changes. Hemiplegia always showed asymmetrical view on CT-scan, dilatation of lateral ventricle or atrophy of hemisphere in contralateral side being observed.

  4. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  5. Radiologic manifestations of focal cerebral hyperemia in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Skriver, E B; Herning, M

    1991-01-01

    In 16 acute stroke patients with focal cerebral hyperemia angiography and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied 1 to 4 days post stroke. CT was performed twice with and without contrast enhancement 3 +/- 1 days and 16 +/- 4 days post stroke. Angiographic evidence of focal cerebral hype...

  6. Calcaneal lengthening for planovalgus deformity in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Volker; Wollmerstedt, Nicole; Kirschner, Stephan; Morrison, Robert; Pasold, Eva; Raab, Peter

    2009-05-01

    In children with cerebral palsy, planovalgus deformity of the foot is common. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of calcaneal lengthening for the treatment of planovalgus foot deformity in children with cerebral palsy. We reviewed 19 children (28 feet) treated between 1996 and 2004 in our institution. There were 14 ambulating (19 feet) and 5 nonambulating children (9 feet). The average age of the children at time of surgery was 8.6 years. Followup averaged 4.3 years. We found satisfactory results in 75% of the feet clinically and in 79% radiologically according to Mosca's criteria. We saw no overcorrection but a relapse of the deformity in seven cases. There were six unsatisfactory radiological results, two (out of 19) in the ambulating and four (out of nine) in the nonambulating group. Ambulating children had a significantly better clinical and radiological outcome than nonambulating children (p = 0.042). A significant correlation was found between Ankle-hindfoot Score and clinical result according to Mosca's criteria (p = 0.001). In ambulatory children with cerebral palsy calcaneal lengthening is an effective procedure for the correction of mild to moderate planovalgus foot deformities. In nonambulatory children with severe plano-valgus deformities of the foot, calcaneal lengthening cannot be recommended because of the high relapse rate in these patients.

  7. Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ayrosa C. Lopes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41% and swallowing (12.8% difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003. CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice.

  8. Impact of child and family characteristics on cerebral palsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackauskaite, Gija; Uldall, Peter W; Bech, Bodil H; Østergaard, John R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the relationship between the child's and family's characteristics and the most common treatment modalities in a national population-based sample of 8- to 15-year-old children with cerebral palsy. A cross-sectional study, based on the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. The parents of 462 children answered a questionnaire about their child's treatment and the family's characteristics (living with a single parent, having siblings, living in a city, parental education level). Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed for every treatment modality, stratified by Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level. An IQ below 85 was associated with weekly therapy in GMFCS level I (adjusted odds ratio [ORadj ] 2.5 [CI 1.1-5.7]) and the use of oral spasmolytics in GMFCS levels III to V (ORadj 3.1 [CI 1.3-7.4]). Older children in GMFCS levels III to V used daily orthoses less frequently (ORadj 0.7 [CI 0.6-0.9] per year). Of all of the family characteristics studied, only the parents' education level had significant associations with more than one treatment modality. A child's cognitive function showed an impact on treatment of the motor impairment in children 8 to 15 years of age with cerebral palsy. Parental education level may influence the choice of treatment. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  9. [Mothers' resolution of their children's diagnosis of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstić, Tatjana; Bugarski, Vojislava; Brkić, Nina; Obradović, Biljana

    2013-01-01

    The process of adaptation and acceptance of a child's diagnosis of cerebral palsy requires from parents to process the trauma caused by this knowledge cognitively and emotionally. Parents who manage to come to terms with their children's condition are labeled as resolved. As opposed to them, unresolved parents do not accept the reality of their children's condition and fail to overcome the crisis caused by knowledge of the child's diagnosis. Unresolved status has negative implications for the child, the parents and their relationship. Two case reports of mothers whose children have been diagnosed to have cerebral palsy are given. The first case shows a resolved mother who managed to overcome the initial shock and started to feel a sense of relief from the period when she found out the child's diagnosis. In contrast, another case shows an unresolved mother with no significant changes in thoughts and feelings from the time since she learned the child's diagnosis. She was preoccupied with anger and attempted to minimize the child's problem. Interviews on reaction to diagnosis and reaction to diagnosis classification system allow identification of mothers' resolution of their children's diagnosis of cerebral palsy. The characteristics of resolved and unresolved maternal status are discussed. Parental resolution of diagnosis is essential for the successful adaptation to raising children with disabilities, as well as meeting the requirements of the parental role. It is important to recognize parental cognitions and feelings regarding the child's condition in order to direct psychotherapeutic interventions towards vulnerable population of parents.

  10. Clinical presentation and management of dyskinetic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbaliu, Elegast; Himmelmann, Kate; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Ortibus, Els; Bonouvrié, Laura; Feys, Hilde; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Dan, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent cause of severe physical disability in childhood. Dyskinetic cerebral palsy (DCP) is the second most common type of cerebral palsy after spastic forms. DCP is typically caused by non-progressive lesions to the basal ganglia or thalamus, or both, and is characterised by abnormal postures or movements associated with impaired tone regulation or movement coordination. In DCP, two major movement disorders, dystonia and choreoathetosis, are present together most of the time. Dystonia is often more pronounced and severe than choreoathetosis, with a major effect on daily activity, quality of life, and societal participation. The pathophysiology of both movement disorders is largely unknown. Some emerging hypotheses are an imbalance between indirect and direct basal ganglia pathways, disturbed sensory processing, and impaired plasticity in the basal ganglia. Rehabilitation strategies are typically multidisciplinary. Use of oral drugs to provide symptomatic relief of the movement disorders is limited by adverse effects and the scarcity of evidence that the drugs are effective. Neuromodulation interventions, such as intrathecal baclofen and deep brain stimulation, are promising options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Percutaneous Adductor Release in Nonambulant Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Lal Sahu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adductor spasticity at hips is the main barrier in functional activities and rehabilitation of spastic cerebral palsy patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of percutaneous adductor release under general anesthesia. Methods: From July 2005 to July 2010, 64 hips in 32 patients (19 males and 13 females were recruited from outpatient department having adductor contracture at hips in cerebral palsy children. All children were operated under general anesthesia. All children were followed for twenty-four months. The clinical results were evaluated radiologically, including measurement of CE- angle, AC-index and femoral head coverage and in terms of activity level of children. Results: Of the thirty-two children, twenty-eight showed marked and immediate improvement. None of our children was functionally worse at follow-up. The CE-angle and femoral head coverage did not change significantly. The AC-index improved significantly (p = 0.01.The results were excellent in 12.5% children, good in 50%, fair in 25% and poor in 12.5%. Conclusions: Bilateral mini-invasive adductor release can be an effective treatment for children suffering from adductor contracture refractory to nonoperative management and early adductor release can prevent subluxation and possibly the need for future bony procedure on the proximal femur and pelvis. Keywords: Adductor contracture, Percutaneous, Cerebral palsy, Minimal invasive procedure.

  12. Health Care Transition Experiences of Young Adults With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Ellen McLaughlin

    2015-01-01

    Health care transition (HCT) describes the purposeful, planned movement of adolescents from child to adult-orientated care. The purpose of this qualitative study is to uncover the meaning of transition to adult-centered care as experienced by young adults with cerebral palsy (YA-CP) through the research question: What are the lived experiences of young adults with cerebral palsy transitioning from pediatric to adult healthcare? Six females and 3 males, aged 19-25 years of age, who identified as carrying the diagnosis of cerebral palsy without cognitive impairment, were interviewed. Giorgi's (1985) method for analysis of phenomenology was the framework for the study and guided the phenomenological reduction. The meaning of the lived experiences of YA-CPs transition to adult health care is expert novices with evidence and experience-based expectations, negotiating new systems interdependently and accepting less than was expected. More information and support is needed for the YA-CP during transition to ensure a well-organized move to appropriate adult-oriented health care that is considerate of the lifelong impact of the disorder. The nurses' role as advocate, mentor and guide can optimize the individual's response to the transition process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of Abilities and Comorbidities in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabis, Lidia V; Tsubary, Netta Misgav; Leon, Odelia; Ashkenasi, Arie; Shefer, Shahar

    2015-10-01

    This study examines major comorbidities in children with severe cerebral palsy and the feasibility of psychological tests for measuring abilities in a more impaired population. Eighty psychological evaluations of children with cerebral palsy aged 1.8 to 15.4 years (mean = 5.6) were analyzed. Major comorbid disorders were correlated with severity of motor disability. More than half of the cohort were diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System. Multiple subtests were combined in order to assess the intellectual level. Normal intelligence was found in 22.5%, and 41.3% had moderate or severe intellectual impairment. Epilepsy occurred in 32.5% and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 22.5%. Intellectual disability correlated with motor ability and with epilepsy. In a logistic regression model, epilepsy and motor ability score predicted 29.9% of IQ score variance. Intellectual impairment and epilepsy are common comorbidities. Subtests from different scales should be applied and interpreted with caution. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Preterm birth and cerebral palsy. Predictive value of pregnancy complications, mode of delivery, and Apgar scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica Wedell; Langhoff-Roos, J; Uldall, P

    1997-01-01

    .01), and low Apgar scores at 1 minute (45% vs. 36%, p or = 3 (adjusted OR = 1.53 (95% CI 1.00-2.34), p ... complications preceding preterm birth did not imply a higher risk of cerebral palsy. Delivery by Cesarean section was a prognostic factor for developing cerebral palsy, and the predictive value of Apgar scores was highly limited....

  15. Quality of life of mothers of children with cerebral palsy and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Caring for a child with cerebral palsy (CP) could negatively impact the quality of life (QoL) of the mothers who are usually the primary caregivers. Studies on the impact of caring for Nigerian children with cerebral palsy on the mothers' quality of life are not common hence the quality of life of mothers of children ...

  16. Theory of Mind and Irony Comprehension in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillies, Stephanie; Hody, Anais; Calmus, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to characterise the pragmatic abilities of French children with cerebral palsy through their understanding of irony and other people's mental states. We predicted that children with cerebral palsy would have difficulty understanding false-belief and ironic remarks, due to the executive dysfunction that…

  17. COMPARISON OF MUSCLE STRENGTH, SPRINT POWER AND AEROBIC CAPACITY IN ADULTS WITH AND WITHOUT CEREBRAL PALSY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Bessems, Paul J. C.; Lamberts, Marcel L.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare: (i) muscle strength, sprint power and maximal aerobic capacity; and (ii) the correlations between these variables in adults with and without cerebral palsy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Twenty adults with and 24 without cerebral palsy. Methods: Isometric and

  18. Determinants of hip pain in adult patients with severe cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boldingh, E.J.; Bruggen, M.A. Jacobs-van der; Bos, C.F.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bouter, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to study the relationship between radiographic results of the femoral head and pain in people with severe cerebral palsy. We conducted a cross-sectional study on hip radiography results and pain in 160 patients with severe cerebral palsy. Eighteen percent of our

  19. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. A registry on a specific impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Topp, M

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the commonest disabling impairment in childhood, with a prevalence of 2-3 per 1000 live births. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry is a research registry that contains cases of CP from birth year 1925 and has estimated the birth prevalence since 1950. Data on children with ...

  20. Short-term changes in parents' resolution regarding their young child's diagnosis of cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentinck, I.C.M.; Ketelaar, M.; Schuengel, C.; Stolk, J.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to describe changes in parents' resolution regarding their young child's diagnosis of cerebral palsy over a period of 1 year, and to describe the changes in strategies of resolution. Methods: In this longitudinal study, 38 parents of children with cerebral palsy (mean age

  1. Quantifying the physical, social and attitudinal environment of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickinson, Heather O; Colver, Allan; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy

    2011-01-01

    To develop an instrument to represent the availability of needed environmental features (EFs) in the physical, social and attitudinal environment of home, school and community for children with cerebral palsy.......To develop an instrument to represent the availability of needed environmental features (EFs) in the physical, social and attitudinal environment of home, school and community for children with cerebral palsy....

  2. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. A registry on a specific impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Topp, M

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the commonest disabling impairment in childhood, with a prevalence of 2-3 per 1000 live births. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry is a research registry that contains cases of CP from birth year 1925 and has estimated the birth prevalence since 1950. Data on children with CP...

  3. Health issues in young adults with cerebral palsy: towards a life-span perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilberink, S.R.; Roebroeck, M.E.; Nieuwstraten, W.; Jalink, L.; Verheijden, J.M.; Stam, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain better insight into the health issues of young adults with cerebral palsy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SUBJECTS: Two data sources were used: 54 adults with cerebral palsy (age range 25-36 years) and 48 physicians (members of the Netherlands Society of Physical and Rehabilitation

  4. Pain in young people aged 13 to 17 years with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkinson, Kathryn N; Dickinson, Heather O; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP).......To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP)....

  5. Position as a Cause of Deformity in Children with Cerebral Palsy (1976)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutton, David

    2008-01-01

    Deformities in the child with cerebral palsy have been ascribed to muscle imbalance (Sharrard 1961) and increased tone (Pollock 1959) or to the type of cerebral palsy (Bobath and Bobath 1975). As far as we know, the position in which the child is nursed, especially during the first year of life, has not been considered as a cause of deformity. It…

  6. Executive function in relation to arithmetic development in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenks, K.M.; de Moor, J.; van Lieshout, E.C.D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. Methods: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n

  7. Communicating about Loss: Experiences of Older Australian Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Complex Communication Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Leigha; Balandin, Susan; Clemson, Lindy

    2011-01-01

    Loss and grief is a universal human experience, yet little is known about how older adults with a lifelong disability, such as cerebral palsy, and complex communication needs (CCN) experience loss and manage the grieving process. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Australian participants with cerebral palsy and CCN to determine the types…

  8. Epilepsy and cerebral palsy: characteristics and trends in children born in 1976-1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellier, Elodie; Uldall, Peter; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    Although epilepsy is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), no data exists on prevalence rates of CP and epilepsy.......Although epilepsy is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), no data exists on prevalence rates of CP and epilepsy....

  9. Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

  10. Comparison of muscle strength, sprint power and aerobic capacity in adults with and without cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Bessems, Paul J. C.; Lamberts, Marcel L.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare: (i) muscle strength, sprint power and maximal aerobic capacity; and (ii) the correlations between these variables in adults with and without cerebral palsy. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Twenty adults with and 24 without cerebral palsy. Methods: Isometric and

  11. The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child): Evidence of Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Hui-Yi; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Lu, Lu; Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Huang, Chien-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life for Children (CP QOL-Child) is the first health condition-specific questionnaire designed for measuring QOL in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, its construct validity has not yet been confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Hence, this study assessed the construct validity of the caregiver…

  12. Arithmetic Difficulties in Children with Cerebral Palsy Are Related to Executive Function and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Kathleen M.; de Moor, Jan; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although it is believed that children with cerebral palsy are at high risk for learning difficulties and arithmetic difficulties in particular, few studies have investigated this issue. Methods: Arithmetic ability was longitudinally assessed in children with cerebral palsy in special (n = 41) and mainstream education (n = 16) and…

  13. Effect of Translucency on Transparency and Symbol Learning for Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Ming-Chung

    2011-01-01

    Based on the concept of iconicity, the iconicity hypothesis was emphasized for decades. The aims of this study were to explore the effect of translucency on transparency and symbol learning for children with and without cerebral palsy. Twenty children with cerebral palsy and forty typical peers participated in the study. Ten symbols with high…

  14. Electropalatography in the Description and Treatment of Speech Disorders in Five Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Carlsson, Goran; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Some children with cerebral palsy have articulation disorders that are resistant to conventional speech therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the visual feedback method of electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective tool for treating five children (mean age of 9.4 years) with dysarthria and cerebral palsy and to explore…

  15. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, Piotr; Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy.

  16. European study of frequency of participation of adolescents with and without cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susan I; Flachs, Esben M; Damsgaard, Mogens T

    2014-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy participate less in everyday activities than children in the general populations. During adolescence, rapid physical and psychological changes occur which may be more difficult for adolescents with impairments. Within the European SPARCLE project we measured frequency...... of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy by administering the Questionnaire of Young People's Participation to 667 adolescents with cerebral palsy or their parents from nine European regions and to 4666 adolescents from the corresponding general populations. Domains and single items were analysed using...... respectively linear and logistic regression. Adolescents with cerebral palsy spent less time with friends and had less autonomy in their daily life than adolescents in the general populations. Adolescents with cerebral palsy participated much less in sport but played electronic games at least as often...

  17. A Stepwise Approach: Decreasing Infection in Deep Brain Stimulation for Childhood Dystonic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johans, Stephen J; Swong, Kevin N; Hofler, Ryan C; Anderson, Douglas E

    2017-09-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions, which cause twisting movements or abnormal postures. Deep brain stimulation has been used to improve the quality of life for secondary dystonia caused by cerebral palsy. Despite being a viable treatment option for childhood dystonic cerebral palsy, deep brain stimulation is associated with a high rate of infection in children. The authors present a small series of patients with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a stepwise approach for bilateral globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation placement in order to decrease the rate of infection. Four children with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a total of 13 surgical procedures (electrode and battery placement) were identified via a retrospective review. There were zero postoperative infections. Using a multistaged surgical plan for pediatric patients with dystonic cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation may help to reduce the risk of infection.

  18. The MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy: modification and pretesting of an instrument to measure anticipatory grief in parents whose child has cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Long, Tony

    2014-07-01

    To establish the potential of a modified version of the MM-CGI Childhood Cancer to assess anticipatory grief in parents of children with cerebral palsy, to amend the existing scale for use with the specific patient group, to test the psychometric properties of the modified version (MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy) and to review the clinical potential of the new scale. Parents of children with cerebral palsy may experience reactions similar to parents of children with other enduring or life-limiting conditions, and anticipatory grief may be one such psychological reaction. While the burden of caring is sometimes balanced by positive perceptions of the child, which enhance coping ability, for many parents the outcome is damage to their physical and mental health and impaired family functioning. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design. The MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy was administered in structured interviews with 204 parents. Standardised measures of caregivers' depression, stress and perceived social support were also administered. Mothers and fathers were recruited from healthcare centres and schools for special education. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess internal consistency, and Pearson's product-moment correlation was used to assess construct validity. The subscales were each found to measure a single dimension of anticipatory grief, and significant correlations were established with existing instruments. The instrument demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability and good construct validity. The MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy could be useful for diagnosing anticipatory grief among parents of children with cerebral palsy. This preliminary work moves the programme on to testing in intervention studies. In the absence of an existing measure for the assessment of anticipatory grief, specifically in parents of children with cerebral palsy, the MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy could prove to be an effective assessment tool for clinicians and researchers. © 2013 John Wiley

  19. Social dominance in children with cerebral palsy during a problem-solving task with peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Anne-Pier; Nadeau, Line; Tessier, Réjean

    2017-06-06

    Children with cerebral palsy tend to have poorer social competence outcomes than their peers without a disability in mainstream school settings. To understand their social competence, this study compared children with cerebral palsy with paired children without cerebral palsy with respect to their ability to access resources, defined here as "social dominance", in a problem-solving situation. Children with cerebral palsy were randomly paired to a peer (teammate) and put in a competitive context where each team of two children was instructed to solve an impossible problem. To control for social status, a sociometric measure was administered previously in the classroom (Social Preference score). Behaviors related to social dominance (prosocial and coercive behaviors) were coded using an observation scale validated for this study. The results showed that regardless of social status, children with cerebral palsy were less socially dominant than controls without cerebral palsy. Furthermore, their teams seemed to be less dominant than teams composed of two controls. The lower social competence in children with cerebral palsy could be partly explained by their reduced social dominance behavior in activities requiring speed and fluidity as an expression of executive functions. This might be viewed as a marker for social risks in the integration process at school. Implications for rehabilitation Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II cerebral palsy is a condition that affects not only motor abilities but also social competence in children. Lower social competence in children with cerebral palsy could be partly explained by reduced social dominance behavior in activities such as problem solving with peers. To improve social competence, rehabilitation interventions should include social participation opportunities in which children with cerebral palsy are encouraged to take an active role in the activity.

  20. Anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Lee, Seung Yeol

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ≤ 3, 9 patients showed 3 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting.

  1. Defining cerebral palsy: pathogenesis, pathophysiology and new intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M; Hankins, G D V

    2009-10-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) affects 2/1 000 live-born children. There are several antenatal factors, including preterm delivery, low birth weight, infection/inflammation, multiple gestations, and other pregnancy complications, that have been associated with CP in both the preterm and term infant, with birth asphyxia playing a minor role. Due to the increasing survival of the very preterm and very low birth weight infant secondary to improvements in neonatal and obstetric care, the incidence of CP may be increasing. The topics of neonatal encephalopathy and CP, as well as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, are of vital importance to anyone who ventures to deliver infants. Criteria sufficient to define an acute intrapartum hypoxic event as sufficient to cause CP have been advanced previously by both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the International Cerebral Palsy Task Force. This review will cover the progression toward defining the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of cerebral palsy. Four essential criteria were advanced as prerequisites if one is to propose that an intrapartum hypoxic-ischemic insult has caused a moderate to severe neonatal encephalopathy that subsequently results in CP. Importantly, all four criteria must be met: 1) evidence of metabolic acidosis (pH <7.0 and base deficit of 12 mmol/L or more); 2) early onset of severe or moderate neonatal encephalopathy in infants born at 34 or more weeks' gestation; 3) CP of the spastic quadriplegic or dyskinetic type, and 4) exclusion of other identifiable etiologies, such as trauma, coagulation disorders, infectious conditions, or genetic disorders. Other criteria that together suggest intrapartum timing are also discussed. The focus of this paper is to explore antenatal antecedents as etiologies of CP and the impact of obstetric care on the prevention of CP.

  2. Incidence of inguinal hernia in children with congenital cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Latocha, J E

    1990-01-01

    The incidence of inguinal hernia among 247 children with cerebral palsy was ascertained. During the first year of life, 20 of the 153 boys developed hernia, as did one of the 94 girls. Among boys with birthweights of 1000 to 2000g the incidence was 31 per cent, which is twice the rate for normal ......, particularly for boys with birthweights less than 2000g and with spastic tetraplegia. Conversely, one should be alert to the possibility of concurrent spasticity in preterm males with inguinal hernia....

  3. Neurophysiologic studies of brain plasticity in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, W; Sobaniec, W; Boćkowski, L; Sołowiej, E; Smigielska-Kuzia, J; Artemowicz, B; Sendrowski, K

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of brain plasticity include: a change in the balance of excitation and inhibition; a long-term potentiation or long-term depression; a change in neuronal membrane excitability; the anatomical changes-formation of new axon terminals and new synapses. There are few tools for brain plasticity investigations. The utility of the neurophysiologic in the determination of brain reorganization and repair in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) are described. The authors discuss also their results of quantitative EEG, visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in children with CP. They showed the existence of brain reorganization and repair in children with CP.

  4. Recent advances in the neuroimaging and neuropsychology of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, A Sophia

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of cerebral palsy (CP) and outlines how these advances could inform pediatric neuropsychological rehabilitation. Three main areas are discussed: the improved delineation of differing presentations resulting from more advanced imaging techniques with emerging links to function; a brief review of research examining neuropsychological functioning of children with CP and their quality of life and participation; and lastly, some of the evidence for efficacious interventions and the extent to which these interventions are derived from neuropsychological theory and practice. Advances and gaps in knowledge in addition to suggestions of areas for future focus in research and practice are discussed throughout the article.

  5. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Patient with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Neuman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome involves compression of the third part of the duodenum due to narrowing of the area between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. We will describe the case of a 34-year-old with cerebral palsy who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss and was diagnosed with SMA syndrome via CT-imaging. With failure of conservative measures, our patient underwent a duodenojejunostomy after which improvement in her weight as well as relief of her abdominal symptoms was noted. Given the rarity of this syndrome, physicians need to keep a high index of suspicion in order to prevent the damaging consequences.

  6. CT to delineate hip pathology in cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahboubi, S.; Horstmann, H.

    1987-01-01

    Surgical intervention for cerebral palsy hip dislocation or subluxation is frequently undertaken without a full comprehension of the three-dimensional aspects of the femoral-acetabular complex. CT with a modified technique allows more accurate measurement of the angle of femoral anteversion. In this exhibit the authors compare the modified technique with the old technique. Details of femoral had deficits, acetabular configuration, the arc of the acetabulum, the relative position of the femoral head within the acetabulum, and the soft tissue interposed between the femoral head and the acetabulum are well demonstrated with the new technique

  7. Visual and hearing disabilities and epilepsy frequency in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefer Kumandaş

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate visualand hearing disabilities and epilepsy frequency in childrenwith cerebral palsy.Materials and methods: The medical records of patientswho were followed up with the diagnosis of cerebral palsyin Child Neurology Department were examined retrospectively.Results: In this study, Totally 460 patients of which 63.3%male and 36.7% female were included. Male/female ratiowas 1.7 and 60% of the patients were mature and 40%of them were premature. The distribution of the casesaccording to clinical description was as follows: 39.7%spastic quadriplegia, 28.7% spastic diplegia, 18.2% spastichemiplegia, 7% choreoathetoid cerebral palsy, 3.5%mixed type cerebral palsy, 1.1% hypotonic cerebral palsy,0.9% monoparesis, 0.4% dystonic cerebral palsy and0.4% ataxic cerebral palsy. Disorderss coexisting with cerebralpalsy were epilepsy in 54.3%, strabismus in 38.5%,and hearing loss in 22% of patients.Conclusion: Although cerebral palsy is known as a diseasewith motor disability, brain pathology frequentlycauses hearing and visual disturbances and epilepsy.Early diagnosis and treatment of these accompanyingdisabilities will affect positively quality of life of these patients.J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(2: 245-249

  8. Mutation in the AP4M1 Gene Provides a Model for Neuroaxonal Injury in Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); R. Schot (Rachel); B. Dumee (Belinda); K. Schellekens (Karlijn); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); M. Leguin (Maarten); J. Dudink (Jeroen); P. Govaert (Paul); A.L. van Zwol (Arjen); J. Hirst (Jennifer); M.W. Wessels (Marja); C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); E. de Graaff (Esther); I.F.M. de Coo (René); J.M. Kros (Johan); R. Willemsen (Rob); P.J. Willems (Patrick); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCerebral palsy due to perinatal injury to cerebral white matter is usually not caused by genetic mutations, but by ischemia and/or inflammation. Here, we describe an autosomal-recessive type of tetraplegic cerebral palsy with mental retardation, reduction of cerebral white matter, and

  9. Risk Factors for Malnutrition Among Children With Cerebral Palsy in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Allison; Gambrah-Sampaney, Claudia; Khurana, Esha; Baier, James; Baranov, Esther; Monokwane, Baphaleng; Bearden, David R

    2017-05-01

    Children with cerebral palsy in low-resource settings are at high risk of malnutrition, which further increases their risk of poor health outcomes. However, there are few available data on specific risk factors for malnutrition among children with cerebral palsy in the developing world. We performed a case-control study among children with cerebral palsy receiving care at a tertiary care hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Children with cerebral palsy and malnutrition were identified according to World Health Organization growth curves and compared with subjects with cerebral palsy without malnutrition. Risk factors for malnutrition were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. These risk factors were then used to generate a Malnutrition Risk Score, and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to identify optimal cutoffs to identify subjects at high risk of malnutrition. We identified 61 children with cerebral palsy, 26 of whom (43%) met criteria for malnutrition. Nonambulatory status (odds ratio 13.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.8-50.1, P malnutrition. A Malnutrition Risk Score was constructed based on these risk factors, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated excellent performance characteristics of this score (area under the curve 0.92, 95% CI 0.89-0.94). Malnutrition is common among children with cerebral palsy in Botswana, and a simple risk score may help identify children with the highest risk. Further studies are needed to validate this screening tool and to determine optimal nutritional interventions in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rehabilitation outcomes in children with cerebral palsy during a 2 year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İçağasıoğlu, Afitap; Mesci, Erkan; Yumusakhuylu, Yasemin; Turgut, Selin Turan; Murat, Sadiye

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To observe motor and functional progress of children with cerebral palsy during 2 years. [Subjects and Methods] Pediatric cerebral palsy patients aged 3-15 years (n = 35/69) with 24-month follow-up at our outpatient cerebral palsy clinic were evaluated retrospectively. The distribution of cerebral palsy types was as follows: diplegia (n = 19), hemiplegia (n = 4), and quadriplegia (n = 12). Participants were divided into 3 groups according to their Gross Motor Functional Classification System scores (i.e., mild, moderate, and severe). All participants were evaluated initially and at the final assessment 2 years later. During this time, patients were treated 3 times/week. Changes in motor and functional abilities were assessed based on Gross Motor Function Measure-88 and Wee Functional Independence Measure. [Results] Significant improvements were observed in Gross Motor Function Measure-88 and Wee Functional Independence Measure results in all 35 patients at the end of 2 years. The Gross Motor Function Measure-88 scores correlated with Wee Functional Independence Measure Scores. Marked increases in motor and functional capabilities in mild and moderate cerebral palsy patients were observed in the subgroup assessments, but not in those with severe cerebral palsy. [Conclusion] Rehabilitation may greatly help mild and moderate cerebral palsy patients achieve their full potential.

  11. A population-based study of communication impairment in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, James Yue; Oskoui, Maryam; Shevell, Michael

    2015-03-01

    To explore factors associated with communication impairments in children with cerebral palsy. Data were obtained on children born between 1999 and 2008 from the Quebec Cerebral Palsy Registry (REPACQ). Out of 535 children with cerebral palsy, 297 were identified to have communication impairments (55.5%). Of these, 96 were unable to communicate verbally (32.3%), 195 had some verbal communication (65.7%), and 6 were unspecified (2.0%). These children were significantly more likely to have a more severe motor deficit (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V and Manual Ability Classification System levels IV and V), to have spastic quadriplegia or dyskinetic subtypes of cerebral palsy, and gray matter injury on neuroimaging. Communication impairment is a common comorbidity in cerebral palsy and is associated with a more severe motor deficit, spastic quadriplegic or dyskinetic subtype of cerebral palsy, and gray matter injury on neuroimaging. This information allows clinicians to better predict and manage communication impairment in children with cerebral palsy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  13. Flexed-knee gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, C; Ge, J; Hager, S; Haumont, T; Lennon, N; Niiler, T; Hulbert, R; Miller, F

    2018-04-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of adolescents with cerebral palsy who have undergone single-event multilevel surgery for a flexed-knee gait, followed into young adulthood using 3D motion analysis. Patients and Methods A total of 59 young adults with spastic cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 26 years (sd 3), were enrolled into the study in which their gait was compared with an evaluation that had taken place a mean of 12 years (sd 2) previously. At their visits during adolescence, the children walked with excessive flexion of the knee at initial contact and surgical or therapeutic interventions were not controlled between visits. Results Based on the change in flexed-knee gait over approximately ten years, improvements were seen in increased Gait Deviation Index (p gait (p = 0.007) suggested a mild decline in function. Quality-of-life measures showed that these patients fell within normal limits compared with typical young adults in areas other than physical function. Conclusion While some small significant changes were noted, little clinically significant change was seen in function and gait, with gross motor function maintained between adolescence and young adulthood. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:549-56.

  14. People With Cerebral Palsy: Effects of and Perspectives for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayston, Margaret J.

    2001-01-01

    The movement disorder of cerebral palsy (CP) is expressed in a variety of ways and to varying degrees in each individual. The condition has become more complex over the last 20 years with the increasing survival of children born at less than 28 to 30 weeks gestationai age. Impairments present in children with CP as a direct result of the brain injury or occurring indirectly to compensate for underlying problems include abnormal muscle tone; weakness and lack of fitness; limited variety of muscle synergies; contracture and altered biomechanics, the net result being limited functional ability. Other contributors to the motor disorder include sensory, cognitive and perceptual impairments. In recent years understanding of the motor problem has increased, but less is known about effects of therapy. Evidence suggests that therapy can improve functional possibilities for children with cerebral palsy but is inconclusive as to which approach might be most beneficial. The therapist requires an understanding of the interaction of all systems, cognitive/perceptual, motor, musculoskeletal, sensory and behavioral, in the context of the development and plasticity of the CNS. It is necessary to understand the limitations of the damaged immature nervous system, but important to optimize the child's functional possibilities. PMID:11530888

  15. Rehabilitation Interventions for Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbaskhanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of movement problems that do not worsen over time. They cause physical disability mainly in areas of body movement. It is caused by damage to the motor control centers of developing brain. Management of a child with CP to optimize functional abilities, typically includes the input of many disciplines, including occupational therapy (OT, physical therapy (PT and orthotic treatment. The main aim of this review was to compare the effects of most common rehabilitation intervention on CP. Evidence Acquisition: This systematic review was conducted on published papers that studied rehabilitation interventions approaches for children with CP. A literature search was performed using PubMed, SCOPUS and Google Scholar on papers published from January 1990 to October 2014. Results: From 125 articles related to rehabilitation interventions for children with Cerebral palsy, 36 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The efficacy of rehabilitation interventions for children with CP is still inconclusive. Functional ability and social participation should be the main outcome measures in evaluating rehabilitation efficacy.

  16. Computerized tomographic studies in cerebral palsy. Analysis of 200 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugie, Y. (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 200 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were analysed from the viewpoint of clinical manifestations, disease complications and etiological factors. CT scans of 135 cases (67.5%) were found to be abnormal and there were 14 (7%) borderline cases. The major abnormality found on CT scans was cerebral atrophy. Other important changes included focal or diffuse low density area in the brain tissue, congenital malformation, and cerebellar atrophy. From the clinical point of view, a large number of patients with spastic tetraplegia and spastic diplegia showed highly abnormal CT scans. On the other hand, in patients with spastic monoplegia, spastic paraplegia, and athetotic type, CT findings were normal or revealed only minor cerebral atrophy. Most children showing asymmetric clinical symptoms had corresponding asymmetric CT abnormalities which included ventricular enlargement, low density area in the brain tissue, and hemispherical volume. There was a significant correlation between the severity of physical impairment and the extent of CT abnormalities. Severely affected children had grossly abnormal CT scans such as hydranencephaly, polycystic change, and extensive cerebral atrophy. In the patients complicated with epilepsy, the incidence and severity of abnormal CT were higher than those of non-epileptic patients. Mentally retarded patients had variable enlargement of the subarachnoidal space depending on the severity of their mental retardation. Patients with suspected postnatal etiology also had high incidence of severe CT abnormality. CT scan is a valuable tool for evaluating patients with CP and in some cases, possible etiology of the disease may be discovered.

  17. Peculiarities of somatic pathology in children with cerebral palsy (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy remains one of the most topical problems of pediatric neurology and causes of childhood disability. This term includes group of syndromes that result from violations of or damage to the central nervous system. The incidence of cerebral palsy does not tend to decrease due to such factors, as the improvement of nursing methods and reduced mortality of prematurely born babies and infants with extremely low birth weight. The most common forms of cerebral palsy are spastic forms: spastic diplegia, spastic hemiparesis, double hemiplegia. Their share is 80–85 % of all cases of cerebral palsy. According to available data, children with cerebral palsy suffer from impairments of somatic health, physical development and regulatory mechanisms. The rehabilitation effectiveness of such children often depends on their rehabilitation potential, which depends on concomitant somatic pathology and functional disorders. It was found that anemia had a 3.6 times higher rate in children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy than in their healthy peers, rachitis — 2.9 times more higher, malnutrition — 12.8 times more higher. Among children with cerebral palsy, a group of frequently and chronically ill children included 5.6 times more children than comparison group. Chronic adenoiditis, rhinitis, otitis in children with cerebral palsy were diagnosed 6.5 times more often than in the comparison group. Cerebral palsy is a complicated, multicomponent problem, in the development of pathogenic mechanisms of which, somatic pathology plays a prominent role that suggests the need for multidisciplinary approach to the treatment, involving medical experts of different specialties.

  18. Localization of Basal Ganglia and Thalamic Damage in Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Waugh, Jeff L

    2016-01-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy affects 15%-20% of patients with cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury is associated with dyskinetic cerebral palsy, but the patterns of injury within the basal ganglia predisposing to dyskinetic cerebral palsy are unknown, making treatment difficult. For example, deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna improves dystonia in only 40% of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury heterogeneity may explain this variability. To investigate this, we conducted a qualitative systematic review of basal ganglia and thalamic damage in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Reviews and articles primarily addressing genetic or toxic causes of cerebral palsy were excluded yielding 22 studies (304 subjects). Thirteen studies specified the involved basal ganglia nuclei (subthalamic nucleus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, or lentiform nuclei, comprised by the putamen and globus pallidus). Studies investigating the lentiform nuclei (without distinguishing between the putamen and globus pallidus) showed that all subjects (19 of 19) had lentiform nuclei damage. Studies simultaneously but independently investigating the putamen and globus pallidus also showed that all subjects (35 of 35) had lentiform nuclei damage (i.e., putamen or globus pallidus damage); this was followed in frequency by damage to the putamen alone (70 of 101, 69%), the subthalamic nucleus (17 of 25, 68%), the thalamus (88 of 142, 62%), the globus pallidus (7/35, 20%), and the caudate (6 of 47, 13%). Globus pallidus damage was almost always coincident with putaminal damage. Noting consistent involvement of the lentiform nuclei in dyskinetic cerebral palsy, these results could suggest two groups of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy: those with putamen-predominant damage and those with panlenticular damage involving both the putamen and the globus pallidus. Differentiating between these groups could help predict response to therapies such as deep brain

  19. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spasticity not associated with cerebral palsy: reconsideration of surgical inclusion criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gump, William C; Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Children with spastic diplegia from cerebral palsy (CP) experience measurable improvement in their spasticity and motor function following selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR). The role of this operation in the treatment of other spasticity causes is less well defined. A literature review was undertaken to survey outcomes from SDRs performed outside the CP population. Multiple sclerosis was the most common diagnosis found, accounting for 74 of 145 patients described. Selective dorsal rhizotomies have also been reported in patients with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, neurodegenerative disease, hypoxic encephalopathy, and other causes of spasticity. Outcomes from surgery are generally described as favorable, although postoperative assessments and follow-up times are not standardized across reports. Long-term outcomes are sparsely reported. Larger numbers of patients and more detailed outcomes data have the potential to form a basis for expanding the inclusion criteria for SDR.

  20. Paralisia cerebral, novas perspectivas terapêuticas Cerebral palsy, new therapeutic possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newra Tellechea Rotta

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: a revisão da paralisia cerebral tem como objetivo oferecer ao pediatra informações atualizadas sobre o diagnóstico e tratamento. Fontes dos dados: foram utilizados dados de revisão bibliográfica não sistematizada e da experiência no atendimento dos pacientes da Unidade de Neurologia do Serviço de Pediatria do HCPA-UFRGS. Síntese dos dados: o diagnóstico e tratamento da paralisia cerebral é multidisciplinar. Ao lado do sintoma principal motor, estão os sintomas associados que requerem igual atenção. Os exames de neuroimagem são importantes para melhor localizar a lesão, e mostrar sua extensão e características. O EEG auxilia no diagnóstico das epilepsias associadas. O tratamento principal é fisioterápico, auxiliado pelo tratamento da espasticidade, com antiespásticos orais, ou com toxina botulínica injetável. O tratamento de epilepsia secundária varia de acordo com o tipo de crise. Conclusões: o pediatra é o primeiro médico a entrar em contato com a criança com paralisia cerebral, e deve estar apto para reconhecer precocemente os desvios do desenvolvimento, orientar o manejo e, dentro das possibilidades e necessidades, encaminhar ao especialista.Objective: to provide pediatrician with updated information about diagnoses and treatment of cerebral palsy. This articles aims at supplying pediatricians with tools that will help them diagnose and treat cerebral palsy. Sources: non-systematic review of literature combined with personal experience at the Neurology Unit of Pediatrics Service of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Summary of the findings: the cerebral palsy diagnosis and treatment are based on multidisciplinary clinical exam, EEG, CT and MR. Conclusions: pediatricians are the first physician that see the patient with cerebral palsy. Thus, they should be able to diagnose an treat it.

  1. Radiology in cases of cerebral stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, M.; Reith, W.; Kummer, R. von; Sartor, K.

    1993-01-01

    Today radiologic methods play an important role in the diagnosis of cerebral stroke. The aim of the radiologist, however, should not only be to classify the stroke into the four main categories (ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, subarachnoid hemorrhage, sinovenous thrombis), but also to interprete the findings with regard to the etiology of the disease. The pattern of lesions gives information about the etiology of ischemic stroke; the correct interpretation of these lesion patterns allows one to optimize therapeutic decisions. This paper additionally focusses on the differential diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage and the CT and MR signs of sinovenous thrombosis. New developed concepts in the field of stroke therapy and prophylaxis call for authority and continuous education of the radiolgist on this topic. Pure descriptions of radiologic findings without an understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease will be ignored by the clinician. On the other hand, the radiologist can turn the therapeutic decisions in the right direction by combining morphological descriptions with pathogenetic orientated interpretations. In this way, the radiolgist can contribute to the reduction of costs in the public health system. (orig.) [de

  2. Prevalence of cerebral palsy in Uganda: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Andrews, Carin; Peterson, Stefan; Wabwire Mangen, Fred; Eliasson, Ann Christin; Forssberg, Hans

    2017-12-01

    Few population-based studies of cerebral palsy have been done in low-income and middle-income countries. We aimed to examine cerebral palsy prevalence and subtypes, functional impairments, and presumed time of injury in children in Uganda. In this population-based study, we used a nested, three-stage, cross-sectional method (Iganga-Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance System [HDSS]) to screen for cerebral palsy in children aged 2-17 years in a rural eastern Uganda district. A specialist team confirmed the diagnosis and determined the subtype, motor function (according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS]), and possible time of brain injury for each child. Triangulation and interviews with key village informants were used to identify additional cases of suspected cerebral palsy. We estimated crude and adjusted cerebral palsy prevalence. We did χ 2 analyses to examine differences between the group screened at stage 1 and the entire population and regression analyses to investigate associations between the number of cases and age, GMFCS level, subtype, and time of injury. We used data from the March 1, 2015, to June 30, 2015, surveillance round of the Iganga-Mayuge HDSS. 31 756 children were screened for cerebral palsy, which was confirmed in 86 (19%) of 442 children who screened positive in the first screening stage. The crude cerebral palsy prevalence was 2·7 (95% CI 2·2-3·3) per 1000 children, and prevalence increased to 2·9 (2·4-3·6) per 1000 children after adjustment for attrition. The prevalence was lower in older (8-17 years) than in younger (cerebral palsy was the most common subtype (45 [46%] of 97 children) followed by bilateral cerebral palsy (39 [40%] of 97 children). 14 (27%) of 51 children aged 2-7 years had severe cerebral palsy (GMFCS levels 4-5) compared with only five (12%) of 42 children aged 8-17 years. Few children (two [2%] of 97) diagnosed with cerebral palsy were born preterm. Post-neonatal events were the

  3. Longitudinal Association Between Gross Motor Capacity and Neuromusculoskeletal Function in Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Becher, Jules G.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Eck, Mirjam; van Meeteren, Jetty; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Twisk, Jos W.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; van Schie, P. E M; Schuengel, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M.; Roebroeck, M. E.; Tan, S. S.; Wiegerink, D. J H G; Reinders-Messelink, H. A.; Verheijden, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine associations over longitudinal measurements between neuromusculoskeletal function and gross motor capacity in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Rehabilitation departments of university medical centers and rehabilitations

  4. Longitudinal Association Between Gross Motor Capacity and Neuromusculoskeletal Function in Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Becher, Jules G.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Eck, Mirjam; van Meeteren, Jetty; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Twisk, Jos W.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    Objective: To examine associations over longitudinal measurements between neuromusculoskeletal function and gross motor capacity in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: Rehabilitation departments of university medical centers and rehabilitations

  5. Working memory and fine motor skills predict early numeracy performance of children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, M. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Early numeracy is an important precursor for arithmetic performance, academic proficiency, and work success. Besides their apparent motor difficulties, children with cerebral palsy (CP) often show additional cognitive disturbances. In this study, we examine whether working memory, non-verbal

  6. Pathogenesis of cerebral palsy through the prism of immune regulation of nervous tissue homeostasis: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisovska, Natalya; Daribayev, Zholtay; Lisovskyy, Yevgeny; Kussainova, Kenzhe; Austin, Lana; Bulekbayeva, Sholpan

    2016-11-01

    The cerebral palsy is highly actual issue of pediatrics, causing significant neurological disability. Though the great progress in the neuroscience has been recently achieved, the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy is still poorly understood. In this work, we reviewed available experimental and clinical data concerning the role of immune cells in pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. Maintaining of homeostasis in nervous tissue and its transformation in case of periventricular leukomalacia were analyzed. The reviewed data demonstrate involvement of immune regulatory cells in the formation of nervous tissue imbalance and chronicity of inborn brain damage. The supported opinion, that periventricular leukomalacia is not a static phenomenon, but developing process, encourages our optimism about the possibility of its correction. The further studies of changes of the nervous and immune systems in cerebral palsy are needed to create fundamentally new directions of the specific therapy and individual schemes of rehabilitation.

  7. Functional communication in children with cerebral palsy : an interrater reliability study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Verheij; A. Hammer; A. Beelen; J. Voorman

    2015-01-01

    Poster presentatie op conferentie Background: Assessments of functional communication skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP), classified with the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS), often differ between the child's school teacher and the speech language therapist (SLT).

  8. Treatment of os odontoideum in a patient with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpolat, Yusuf T; Fegale, Ben; Cheng, Wayne K

    2015-08-01

    Severe atlantoaxial instability due to os odontoideum in a patient with spastic cerebral palsy has not been well described. There is no consensus on treatment, particularly with regard to conservative or surgical options. Our patient was a 9-year-old girl with spastic cerebral palsy and unstable os odontoideum as an incidental finding. During the waiting period for elective surgical treatment, the patient developed respiratory compromise. Surgery was performed to reduce the subluxation and for C1-C2 arthrodesis and the girl regained baseline respiratory function. A CT scan was obtained 1 year after the initial surgery and revealed adequate maintenance of reduction and patency of the spinal canal. This patient highlights the fact that unstable os odontoideum can cause mortality due to respiratory distress in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. This is an important factor in deciding treatment options for cerebral palsy patients with low functional demand. We review the relevant literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rehabilitation of adolescent patients with cerebral palsy by means of physical culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindiuk P.A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is researched the effect of exercise in the promptness with mobile games on the power supply of the body of adolescents with cerebral palsy. The study involved 16 adolescent schoolchildren with spastic forms of cerebral palsy of varying severity. In order to determine their level of functional training has been used S.A. Dushanina's multifactor express-diagnostics. It is shown indications of the possibility of multi-factor for the rapid diagnosis of this group. It is established that the lessons of physical culture, which includes a specially organized outdoor games, elements of switch room training and training on cycling performance of functional contribute to the growth of training and have a positive effect on the body of adolescents with cerebral palsy as a whole. Aim of work - to estimate influence of employments a physical culture on energy-supply of organism of teenagers with cerebral palsy.

  10. Cranial ultrasound findings in preterm infants predict the development of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Ann Lawaetz; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    Classification System, blindness and deafness. Results: A total of 249 infants were included. The mortality rate was 9.2%. In all, 217 children were evaluated at 5-9 years of age. Four children were diagnosed with germinal matrix haemorrhage – intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3 (GMH-IVH3) and periventricular...... haemorrhagic infarction (PVHI), of whom two developed cerebral palsy. Nine children were diagnosed with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), of whom six developed cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy was detected in 14 children (6.4%), and one (0.5%) child was in need of a hearing assistive device. Severe brain...... record review. The cohort consisted of very preterm born children (gestational age ≤ 32 + 0) born from 2004 to 2008. For each infant, we obtained results from all cranial ultrasounds performed during hospitalisation. In 2014, patient records were evaluated for cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Function...

  11. Cramped synchronized general movements in preterm infants as an early marker for cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, F; Cioni, G; Einspieler, C; Roversi, MF; Bos, AF; Paolicelli, PB; Ranzi, A; Prechtl, HFR

    Objective: To ascertain whether specific abnormalities (ie, cramped synchronized general movements [GMs]) can predict cerebral palsy and the severity of later motor impairment in preterm infants affected by brain lesions. Design: Traditional neurological examination was performed, and GMs were

  12. Plantar flexor muscle weakness and fatigue in spastic cerebral palsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Armand, Stéphane; De Coulon, Geraldo; Sarah R Dias Da Silva; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy develop an important muscle weakness which might affect the aetiology and extent of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. This study evaluated the aetiology and extent of plantar flexor neuromuscular fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy. Ten patients with cerebral palsy and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals (∼20 years old, 6 females) performed four 30-s maximal isometric plantar flexions interspaced by a resting period of 2-3s to elicit a resting twitch. Maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level and peak twitch were quantified before and immediately after the fatiguing task. Before fatigue, patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than healthy individuals (341±134N vs. 858±151N, pfatiguing task (-10±23%, p>0.05), whereas it decreased by 30±12% (pmuscles of patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than their healthy peers but showed greater fatigue resistance. Cerebral palsy is a widely defined pathology that is known to result in muscle weakness. The extent and origin of muscle weakness were the topic of several previous investigations; however some discrepant results were reported in the literature regarding how it might affect the development of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. Importantly, most of the studies interested in the assessment of fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy did so with general questionnaires and reported increased levels of fatigue. Yet, exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue was quantified in just a few studies and it was found that young patients with cerebral palsy might be more fatigue resistant that their peers. Thus, it appears that (i) conflicting results exist regarding objectively-evaluated fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy and (ii) the mechanisms underlying this muscle fatigue - in comparison to those of healthy peers - remain poorly understood. The present study adds important knowledge to the field as it shows that when young adults with

  13. Maternal Prepregnancy BMI and Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forthun, Ingeborg; Wilcox, Allen J.; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in offspring. METHODS: The study population consisted of 188 788 children in the Mothers and Babies in Norway and Denmark CP study, using data from 2 population-based, prospective birth...... cohorts: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Prepregnancy BMI was classified as underweight (BMI BMI 18.5–22.9), upper normal weight (BMI 23.0–24.9), overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9), and obese (BMI ≥30). CP diagnoses were obtained from...... the national CP registries. Associations between maternal prepregnancy BMI and CP in offspring were investigated by using log-binomial regression models. RESULTS: The 2 cohorts had 390 eligible cases of CP (2.1 per 1000 live-born children). Compared with mothers in the lower normal weight group, mothers...

  14. Predictors of participation of adolescents with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Van Mô; Colver, Allan; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether childhood factors that are amenable to intervention (parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain) predicted participation in daily activities and social roles of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). We randomly selected 1174 children aged 8-12 years from eight...... measures: parent reported stress (Parenting Stress Index Short Form), their child's psychological difficulties (Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire) and frequency and severity of pain; either child or parent reported the child's participation (LIFE Habits questionnaire). We fitted a structural equation...... model to each of the participation domains, regressing participation in childhood and adolescence on parenting stress, child psychological problems and pain, and regressing adolescent factors on the corresponding childhood factors; models were adjusted for impairment, region, age and gender. Pain...

  15. [Cerebral palsy--early diagnosis and treatment (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowicz, R

    1975-01-01

    The main aim of the present Conference has been to debate that early diagnosis and treatment of cerebral palsy. The Conference was attended by specialists taking care of the child with cerebral palsy (C.P.): child neurologists, surgeons--orthopedists, psychologists, rehabilitants, pediatricians. In connection with the fact that the Conference was devoted to the early diagnosis and therapy of C.P., problems concerning the lower age groups of children were debated. The Conference discussed the definitions of "cerebral palsy" used in the literature, the clinical forms, the auxiliary diagnostic methods and their significance in the diagnosing of this pathological syndrome. Early clinical symptoms, enabling to establish the diagnosis of cerebral palsy were particularly extensively debated. In the latter problem particular attention was paid to the diagnostic value of kinetic automatisms of the group of tonic posture reflexes and dysfunctions of the kinetic pattern in children. It was underlined in the debate the C.P. was no separate clinical disease, but a pathological syndrome arisen as a result of the negative influence of different factors and yielding very diverse clinical and neurolopathologic symptoms, according to the kind of noxious factors and the period and degree of maturity of the nervous system in which they acted. The participants in the debate also sressed that, as the child develops and is observed for a longer period it is fairly often necessary to check this diagnosis, as C.P. may prove, as the time passes, to be a degenerative syndrome, a pressure syndrome etc. The psychologists participating in the Conference discussed the psychological problems of the child with C.P. and also the early diagnosis of the pathological syndrome debated. The diversity of the symptoms of the C.N.S. in children suffering from C.P. was underscored, as--apart from dysfunctions within the kinetic area, there can be present sight, hearing and speech dysfunctions, those of

  16. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  17. Congenital Cerebral Palsy, Child Sex and Parent Cardiovascular Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streja, Elani; Wu, Chunsen; Uldall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    up was 50 ± 8 years. After adjustment for maternal age, parental education, child's sex, child's residence, child being small for gestational age and maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, mothers of CP male children had an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1......OBJECTIVE: Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP) and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular...... disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. METHODS: All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were...

  18. Cerebral palsy: classification, diagnosis and challenges of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Catherine

    This article aims to build capacity between nursing and allied healthcare practitioner staff in highlighting the unique challenges that caring for people with cerebral palsy (CP) brings. It gives an insight into how CP is classified and diagnosed, and briefly outlines issues of political correctness in labelling people with this condition. It covers the complexities of brain development in people with CP, with consideration of the key aetiological contributors to the incidence of the condition. A straightforward approach to unravelling the classification of movement disorders in CP is adopted. It concludes that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of CP, with the nurse at the centre of this holistic approach to patient care, is pivotal to future healthcare provision.

  19. The self-esteem of adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, J; Hurlbut, N

    1986-06-01

    This paper examined the self-esteem of 22 adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) (11 girls, 11 boys) who were matched by sex, school, age, and IQ with 22 nondisabled adolescents. Subjects completed the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS), the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale II (FACES II), and a demographic questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that the girls with CP scored significantly lower than the boys with CP, the nondisabled boys, and nondisabled girls on physical self-esteem, and the nondisabled girls and boys with CP on social self-esteem. The scores of the boys with CP were similar to those of the nondisabled groups. This differential effect of disability on males and females is discussed in terms of the interactionist theory and the implications for occupational therapy.

  20. Principles of Bobath neuro-developmental therapy in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimont, L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the basics of Bobath Neurodevelopment Therapy (NDT) for the rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy, based on the fundamentals of neurophysiology. Two factors are continually stressed in therapy: first, postural tension, whose quality provides the foundation for the development of motor coordination, both normal and pathological, and plays a role in shaping the mechanism of the normal postural reflex; and secondly, the impact of damage to the central nervous system on the process of its growth and development. The practical application of the theoretical assumptions includes the use of inhibition, facilitation, and stimulation by key points of control, preparatory to evoking more nearly normal motor responses.

  1. Acquired atlantoaxial instability in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Chang, Wei-Ning; Shah, Suken A; Miller, Freeman

    2003-01-01

    The development of nontraumatic atlantoaxial instability in children with spastic cerebral palsy has not been reported. The authors present three patients with severe spastic quadriplegia who developed C1-C2 instability and cervical myelopathy at mean age 12.6 years. These patients demonstrated a similar clinical picture with symptoms attributed to cervical myelopathy in varied severity including apneic episodes, opisthotonus, alteration in muscle tone, torticollis, respiratory problems, hyperreflexia, and bradycardia. Patient 1 was scheduled for surgery but died due to an apneic episode. Patient 2 refused surgery and has been followed for 3 years while his neurologic condition remains unchanged. Patient 3 underwent occipitocervical decompression and fusion, recovered neurologically, and resumed his previous functional skills. Patients demonstrating considerable functional deterioration or insidious change in their established neurologic status should undergo detailed screening to rule out developing upper cervical instability. Early surgical intervention consisting of spinal decompression and fusion may prevent the development of myelopathy.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Purandare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient.

  3. Brain Disorders (Cerebral Palsy And The Ability Of Academic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Rachmat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this empirically is to get a clear picture of low intervensi given mild mental retardation (cerebral palsy in children to improve their academic abilities. Research that started from Maret 2017 through may 2017, on a boy named AMR student in the Homeschooling Seto Brothers (HKS Bintaro, Tangerang Selatan. This study used a qualitative approach with case study method. The collection of data through observation, interview and document research. The data were analyzed qualitatively. The result sducahowedan increase in academic knowledge after being given an educational intervention for 4 months. This is evidenced by the significant increase in work in class AMR, The LKS (Student Worksheet. Suggestions keep motivate students to remain willing to learn, the cooperation between teachers and parents should pay more attention to giving the effect is more significant in the progress of interventions undertaken in the school, pursued no alternations teacher.

  4. Effects of Prolonged Standing on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Lovelace-Chandler, Venita; Zabel, Reta J.; McMillan, Amy Gross

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD = 2.5, range = 4.0-9.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During…

  5. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy fr...

  6. Factors Which Affect the Depression of Mothers with Cerebral Palsy Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ahmadizadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The high number of cerebral palsy, the severe disability of this disorder, depression in disabilities, and long lasting effects of the child`s disability on the family especially mothers are the common issues. The purpose of this study was investigating the level of depression in mothers with cerebral palsy children and its related factors. Methods: This caused comparative study was carried out in Tehran, in 2011. Two groups of mothers with 4 to 12 years old healthy and cerebral palsy children were randomly selected to participate in this study. Beck questionnaire was used to evaluate mothers’ depression level. The relationship between variables was investigated by independent T-test and Pearson’s correlation. Results: Sixty mothers with cerebral palsy children and sixty mothers with normal children as control group were participated in the study. Mean and standard deviation of age were 33.79±6.02 in mothers and 7.11±2.71 in children. Depression of mothers with cerebral palsy child was significantly higher than control group and there was a significant correlation between depression of mothers with cerebral palsy children, and increasing caring time, dependency in activity of daily living and children`s gross and fine movements ability. Discussion: Although depression was higher in mothers with cerebral palsy children, the depression level of these mothers was affected by some factors related to the child issue. In order to decrease undesirable effects of having a cerebral palsy child, it is necessary to emphasize on children`s abilities to achieve maximum evolution potential and provide physical and mental protections for their mothers.

  7. Subject-specific modelling of lower limb muscles in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, K; Stott, N S; Mithraratne, K; Anderson, I A

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the architecture of spastic muscles in children with cerebral palsy is considerably altered; however, only little is known about the structural changes that occur other than in the gastrocnemius muscle. In the present study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and subject-specific modelling techniques were used to compare the lengths and volumes of six lower limb muscles between children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children. MRI scans of the lower limbs of two children with spastic hemiplegia cerebral palsy, four children with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy (mean age 9.6 years) and a group of typically developing children (mean age 10.2 years) were acquired. Subject-specific models of six lower limb muscles were developed from the MRI data using a technique called Face Fitting. Muscle volumes and muscle lengths were derived from the models and normalised to body mass and segmental lengths, respectively. Normalised muscle volumes in the children with cerebral palsy were smaller than in the control group with the difference being 22% in the calf muscles, 26% in the hamstrings and 22% in the quadriceps, respectively. Only the differences in the hamstrings and the quadriceps were statistically significant (P=0.036, P=0.038). Normalised muscle lengths in the children with cerebral palsy were significantly shorter (Pmuscle in either group. The present results show that lower limb muscles in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy are significantly altered, suggesting an overall mechanical deficit due to predominant muscle atrophy. Further investigations of the underlying causes of the muscle atrophy are required to better define management and treatment strategies for children with cerebral palsy.

  8. Comparison of the psychometric properties of two balance scales in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Yong-Jin; Kim, Gyoung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the item difficulty degree between the Pediatric Balance Scale and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale for children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Forty children with cerebral palsy (male=17, female=23) voluntarily participated in the study. Item difficulty was expressed in the Rasch analysis using a logit value, with a higher value indicative of increasing item difficulty. [Results] Among the 24 items of the combined Pediatric Bala...

  9. IMPACTS OF HIPPOTHERAPY ON CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY FROM PARENTS PERSPECTIVE: A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasia Laiou; Anna Christakou; Vaios Kaminiotis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hippotherapy is a physical treatment strategy with the help of horses and refers to the use of horse’s movement as a treatment tool for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Hippotherapy refers to the incorporation of equine movement by physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech therapists. The present qualitative study investigated the impacts of hippotherapy on Greek children with Cerebral Palsy from parents’ perspective due to their better understanding of child’s specia...

  10. Prevalence of secondary impairments of adults with cerebral palsy according to gross motor function classification system

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 52 adults with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for physical disabilities in South Korea. [Results] The univariate analysis showed that the Gross Motor Functional Classification System level was a significant predictor of spondylopathies, general pain, ar...

  11. Accuracy of the Siriraj Stroke Score in Differentiating Cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Scoring systems based on discriminant analysis technique and multivariate logistic regression have been developed to distinguish cerebral haemorrhage (CH) from cerebral infarction (CI). This distinction is necessary in the acute management of stroke patients. Objectif The Siriraj stroke score (SSS) was ...

  12. Fatigue in the mothers of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Yesim; Ozel, Sumru; Tuncer, Ozgul Bozkurt; Kilinc, Gizem; Seckin, Feryal; Arasil, Tansu

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate fatigue in the mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to determine its associations with clinical parameters of CP, depression and quality of life (QoL). Ninety children (50 girls and 40 boys) with spastic CP and their mothers were included. Control group comprised mothers of healthy children. Gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) was used for determining functional status. Spasticity was evaluated by using modified Ashworth scale. Fatigue symptom inventory (FSI) was used for assessing maternal fatigue, Nottingham health profile (NHP) for maternal QoL, and Beck Depression Scale (BDS) for maternal depression. Mothers of children with CP scored significantly higher in all FSI subgroups (intensity of fatigue, duration of fatigue and interference with QoL), all NHP subgroups and BDS (p  0.05). Our findings indicate that fatigue levels of mothers with CP children are higher than those with healthy children and associated with depression and deterioration in QoL in terms of physical, social and emotional functioning. This should be considered while designing a family centred rehabilitation programme for children with CP. Implications for Rehabilitation Caring for a child with cerebral palsy has psychological, social and financial impacts on familiesand is associated with increased levels of fatigue among mothers. The capacity of current programs and services needs to be strengthened to accommodate theneeds of children with CP and their mothers in order to reduce fatigue of mothers. New programs need to be developed to provide psychosocial support for the mothers andto reduce their fatigue as they continue to care for their children. Provision of assistive technology devices (particularly suitable wheelchairs) will be useful inreduction of fatigue levels of mothers.

  13. MR findings of cerebral palsy and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To demonstrate MR findings of cerebral palsy (CP), correlation with clinical findings, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group. Brain MRI of 94 patients with cerebral palsy (CP) were reviewed. The frequency of each MR finding, statistical correlation with clinical findings including type, severity and extent of CP, and differences between the full-term and pre-term group were analyzed. Abnormal MR findings were found in 83 patients(88%), and were as follows : diffuse brain atrophy(30%); periventricular leukomalacia(PVL)(28%); infarction(11%), basal ganglia abnormality(11%); delayed myelination(10%); nonspecific tissue loss or encephalomalacia(9%); and cortical dysplasia(7%). Hemiplegia was the most common condition among patients with infarction, and was found in 80% of this group; diplegia was found in 50% of cases with diffuse brain atrophy, while paraplegia was found in 36% of those with normal MR findings (p < .05). Mild symptoms were dominant in patients with normal MR findings(82%) and in those with infarctions(90%)(p < .05). PVL was the dominant finding in the pre-term group (65%) whereas findings in the full-term group varied; in this group, 38% of MR findings suggested prenatal insults. Possible causative factors were found in 66% of the full-term and 80% of the pre-term group. Perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group(81%), whereas prenatal and postnatal factors showed relatively higher frequencies in the full-term group(30% and 24%, respectively). Diffuse brain atrophy and PVL were the most common MR findings. The extent of CP the pre-term correlated well with MR findings. PVL and perinatal factors were dominant in the pre-term group, whereas variable MR findings and relatively higher frequencies of pre- and postnatal factors were found in the full-term group.

  14. [Respiratory complications in patients with cerebral palsy undergoing general anesthesia.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Sérgio Silva de; Marques, Ronaldo Soares; Saraiva, Renato Angelo

    2007-10-01

    Anesthesia in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist. The objective of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence and risk of respiratory complications in children with CP undergoing general inhalational anesthesia for computed tomography. Patients with ages ranging from 1 to 17 years, physical status ASA I to III, undergoing general inhalational anesthesia with sevoflurane and laryngeal mask for a CT scan from June 2002 to June 2003, participated in this study. Patients were divided in 3 groups: quadriplegic CP (CPQ), other types of CP (CPO), and patients without CP (NCP). Parents or guardians answered a questionnaire that assessed the past medical history of the patient, upper respiratory infections (URI), asthma, seizures, oropharyngeal dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, etc. Data on the incidence and severity of respiratory complications were gathered prospectively (cough, bronchospasm, laryngeal spasm, hypoxemia, aspiration, etc). The size of the study group was calculated for an expected 5% incidence in the NCP group, with a 15% difference among groups (alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.1), using the Chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and test t Student. Two hundred and ninety patients, divided in three groups, participated in this study. Groups were composed of: CPQ = 100 patients, CPO = 79 patients, and NCP = 111 patients. There were no differences on the prevalence of respiratory infections among the CPQ (4%), CPO (8.9%), and NCP (7.3%) groups. There was a correlation between the presence of URI and the development of complications (relative risk of 10.71). Children with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia do not seem to have an increased risk of respiratory complications during general inhalational anesthesia with sevoflurane and laryngeal mask. This study confirms URI as a risk factor for the development of those complications.

  15. Coparenting in Caregivers of Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Moraes Dourado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Association of Cerebral Palsy defines Cerebral Palsy (CP as a group of disorders of development and posture, which cause limitations in an individual activity. The birth of a child with CP generates an impact, which brings a new reality for the family, mainly parents and others caregivers. The goal of the present work was to describe coparenting relationships in parents of children with CP, comparing between main and secondary caregivers, and still, the relationship between coparenting pair. Data was obtained from 12 coparenting pairs (24 individuals caregivers of children with CP. Were used the instruments: Coparenting Questionnaire (COPQ, to evaluate the coparenting relationships, Socio Demographic Inventory (SDI, to describe information about the main and secondary caregivers and the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS for to measure the children’s gross motor function. The data was treated through the software SPSS (version 20.0, the statistic calculated was frequency, descriptive, and still, a parameter of scores was fixed for the classification of coparentality factors (cooperation, triangulation and conflict. The results indicated that secondary caregivers exhibited higher average in the factors of analysis of cooperation and triangulation (21 and 5,2. The mainly caregivers indicated the bigger average in conflict factor, (11, 3. In general, the coparenting pairs exhibited high cooperation (19-25 points, high triangulation (4-8 points and low conflict (5-11 points. The establishment of a good coparenting relationship, expressed in the mutual support and commitment of the dyads is fundamental for the family functioning and for the child’s global welfare.

  16. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN ANKLE FOOT ORTHOSE (AFO DAN BACKSLAB TERHADAP KUALITAS HIDUP PADA PASIEN CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetyo Catur Utomo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diperkirakan anak dengan kondisi Cerebral Palsy membutuhkan alat bantu untuk mempermudah mobilitas dan mencegah kecacatan lebih lanjut. Diperbandingkan antara pengaruh penggunaan alat bantu dan tanpa alat bantu berupa AFO dan Backslab, terhadap kemudahan mobilitas yang terkait dengan kualitas hidup anak Cerebral Palsy. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menggunakan metode cross sectional two group post only design.  Subjek penelitian adalah 15 anak dengan Cerebral Palsy yang menggunakan AFO dan Backslab dan 15 anak Cerebral Palsy yang hanya melakukan Treatment Fisioterapi, jenis penelitian ini adalah dua kelompok tidak berpasangan. Penelitian bertempat di Klinik Pediatric & Neurodevelopmental Therapy Center (PNTC Surakarta, dalam masa Januari-Maret 2016. Kelompok AFO dan Backslab diberikan kuesioner kualitas hidup, demikian juga kelompok Treatment Fisioterapi. Kuesioner kualitas hidup terdiri dari 6 domain dan 36 pertanyaan. Uji hipotesis menggunakan Independent Sampel T Test. Masing-masing kelompok di uji normalitas dengan menggunakan Shapiro-Wilk, kelompok yang menggunakan AFO dan Backslab mempunyai nilai p=0,408 dan kelompok yang hanya melakukan Treatment Fisioterapi mempunyai nilai p=0,168. Hasil kedua kelompok tersebut menunjukkan data sebaran normal karena mempunyai nilai p>0,05. Uji hipotesis menggunakan independent sampel t-test dengan hasil p=0,000 dimana nilai p<0,05 maka dinyatakan terdapat pengaruh penggunaan AFO dan Backslab terhadap kualitas hidup pada pasien Cerebral Palsy. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa terdapat pengaruh penggunaan AFO dan Backslab terhadap kualitas hidup pada pasien Cerebral Palsy.

  17. Cranial ultrasound findings in preterm infants predict the development of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Ann Lawaetz; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate any association between gestational age, birth weight and findings on cranial ultrasounds during hospitalisation in very preterm infants and mortality and neurological outcome in childhood. This study was a retrospective cohort study based on a patient record review. The cohort consisted of very preterm born children (gestational age ≤ 32 + 0) born from 2004 to 2008. For each infant, we obtained results from all cranial ultrasounds performed during hospitalisation. In 2014, patient records were evaluated for cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Function Classification System, blindness and deafness. A total of 249 infants were included. The mortality rate was 9.2%. In all, 217 children were evaluated at 5-9 years of age. Four children were diagnosed with germinal matrix haemorrhage - intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3 (GMH-IVH3) and periventricular haemorrhagic infarction (PVHI), of whom two developed cerebral palsy. Nine children were diagnosed with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), of whom six developed cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy was detected in 14 children (6.4%), and one (0.5%) child was in need of a hearing assistive device. Severe brain injury (GMH-IVH3, PVHI or PVL) (p = 0.000) and being of male gender (p = 0.03) were associated with cerebral palsy in childhood. Severe brain injuries detected by neonatal cranial ultrasound in very preterm infants is associated with development of cerebral palsy in childhood. none. TRAIL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

  18. Effects of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Hellmich, Martin; Pauls, K Amande M; Marks, Warren; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Fricke, Oliver; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Secondary dystonia encompasses a heterogeneous group with different etiologies. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause. Pharmacological treatment is often unsatisfactory. There are only limited data on the therapeutic outcomes of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The published literature regarding deep brain stimulation and secondary dystonia was reviewed in a meta-analysis to reevaluate the effect on cerebral palsy. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was chosen as the primary outcome measure. Outcome over time was evaluated and summarized by mixed-model repeated-measures analysis, paired Student t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Twenty articles comprising 68 patients with cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation assessed by the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale were identified. Most articles were case reports reflecting great variability in the score and duration of follow-up. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was 64.94 ± 25.40 preoperatively and dropped to 50.5 ± 26.77 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 23.6% (P cerebral palsy. In view of the heterogeneous data, a prospective study with a large cohort of patients in a standardized setting with a multidisciplinary approach would be helpful in further evaluating the role of deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. De novo point mutations in patients diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Perkins, Emma M; Miller, Jack W; Davies, Wayne I L; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Fawcett, Katherine A; Sims, David; Gillard, Elodie; Hudspith, Karl; Skehel, Paul; Williams, Jonathan; O'Regan, Mary; Jayawant, Sandeep; Jefferson, Rosalind; Hughes, Sarah; Lustenberger, Andrea; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Jackson, Mandy; Tucker, Stephen J; Németh, Andrea H

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral palsy is a sporadic disorder with multiple likely aetiologies, but frequently considered to be caused by birth asphyxia. Genetic investigations are rarely performed in patients with cerebral palsy and there is little proven evidence of genetic causes. As part of a large project investigating children with ataxia, we identified four patients in our cohort with a diagnosis of ataxic cerebral palsy. They were investigated using either targeted next generation sequencing or trio-based exome sequencing and were found to have mutations in three different genes, KCNC3, ITPR1 and SPTBN2. All the mutations were de novo and associated with increased paternal age. The mutations were shown to be pathogenic using a combination of bioinformatics analysis and in vitro model systems. This work is the first to report that the ataxic subtype of cerebral palsy can be caused by de novo dominant point mutations, which explains the sporadic nature of these cases. We conclude that at least some subtypes of cerebral palsy may be caused by de novo genetic mutations and patients with a clinical diagnosis of cerebral palsy should be genetically investigated before causation is ascribed to perinatal asphyxia or other aetiologies. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  20. Cerebral Palsy and Patterns of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin Solimani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is the most common chronic motor disorder of childhood, that affecting approximately 3 infants per 1000 live-births. The risk of brain injuries that potentially cause Cerebral Palsy has amplified with increasing in survival rates for preterm infants. In addition Cerebral Palsy has a huge economic impact, to immeasurable health, social, and psychological problems that affected children and their families suffer. Cerebral Palsy, among 18 common congenital disorders, has the highest lifetime costs per new case. Thus, efforts to prevent its occurrence, minimize the morbidity, and improve the patient outcomes are important at both the individual and societal levels. In each trimester, different patterns of brain damage or abnormal insults can represent times and etiology of injuries. Knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of abnormal brain growth during antenatal, perinatal and neonatal damages can be helping us for prevention. Also Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI studies of subjects with multiple forms of cerebral palsy reported significantly more overall abnormalities, malformations, and white matter damage but in this review study we discuss in what extent MRI is useful in detecting cerebral palsy pathogenesis.

  1. Cerebral palsy in eastern Denmark: declining birth prevalence but increasing numbers of unilateral cerebral palsy in birth year period 1986-1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne Holst; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Registry in eastern Denmark has been collecting cases using a uniform data sampling procedure since birth year 1979. Children are included by two child neurologists and an obstetrician. Information on pregnancy, birth, neonatal period, impairments and demographic data are regis......The Cerebral Palsy Registry in eastern Denmark has been collecting cases using a uniform data sampling procedure since birth year 1979. Children are included by two child neurologists and an obstetrician. Information on pregnancy, birth, neonatal period, impairments and demographic data...

  2. Cerebral palsy in eastern Denmark: declining birth prevalence but increasing numbers of unilateral cerebral palsy in birth year period 1986-1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne Holst; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Uldall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Cerebral Palsy Registry in eastern Denmark has been collecting cases using a uniform data sampling procedure since birth year 1979. Children are included by two child neurologists and an obstetrician. Information on pregnancy, birth, neonatal period, impairments and demographic data...... are registered. The total cerebral palsy birth prevalence has been significantly decreasing since the birth period 1983-1986 with 3.0 per 1000 live births until the period 1995-1998 with 2.1 per 1000 live births. The overall decrease was seen in preterm infants (...

  3. The Effect of Care Instruction to Family Caregivers of Children with Cerebral Palsy on Life Quality of Care Givers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikta Hatami-Zadeh

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: Findings of this study showed that life quality of family caregivers promoted after instruction about how to do correct care on cerebral palsied children. therefore, the importance of family instruction can be concluded for better life of cerebral palsied child caregivers. It should be noted that the effectiveness of rehabilitation program for cerebral palsied children might have positive effects on life quality of their caregivers.

  4. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  5. Ultrasound findings and clinical antecedents of cerebral palsy in very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and timing of neonatal ultrasound lesions, and clinical details about pregnancy and the perinatal period, in a total population of extremely premature children with cerebral palsy, born to mothers who were resident in Oxfordshire. METHODS: Eighteen children born at less than 32 completed weeks of gestation were identified from a regional cerebral palsy register. Eighteen controls were matched for gestation, time, and place of birth. Perinatal records and ultrasound reports were systematically reviewed. Sequential neonatal ultrasound images stored on videotape were reanalysed, blind to the outcome of the infants. RESULTS: Sixteen (89%) of the cerebral palsy cases and one (6%) control had parenchymal cysts on neonatal brain scans. Of the cerebral palsy cases, none had cysts detectable on the first day. Six developed cysts within the first 10 days of life, and two of these had periventricular echodensities when first scanned postnatally. Antenatal complications were recorded in 16 cases and nine controls. The early postnatal appearance of cysts in a few babies with a history of severe antenatal complications suggested that antenatal factors may have contributed to the cerebral pathology. CONCLUSIONS: Intrauterine factors may have contributed to adverse neurological outcome, but 16/18 of the preterm cerebral palsy cases had an associated cerebral lesion which developed in the perinatal period. PMID:8777655

  6. Methylphenidate modulates cerebral post-stroke reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Jean; Pariente, Jérémie; Leger, Anne; Dechaumont-Palacin, Sophie; Gerdelat, Angélique; Guiraud, Vincent; Conchou, Fabrice; Albucher, Jean-François; Marque, Philippe; Franceries, Xavier; Cognard, Christophe; Rascol, Olivier; Chollet, François; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2006-11-15

    We hypothesized that a single dose of methylphenidate (MP) would modulate cerebral motor activation and behavior in patients having suffered a subcortical stroke. Eight men with a single stroke on the corticospinal tract resulting in a pure motor hemiparesia were included in a randomized, cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were first evaluated 17 days after stroke onset by validated neurological scales, motor tests and fMRI (flexion/extension of the digits) after 20 mg MP or placebo. Seven days later, the patients underwent the same protocol and received the drug they had not taken at the first evaluation. Each patient was his own control. Placebo intake did not change performance. MP compared to placebo elicited a significant improvement in motor performance of the affected hand at the finger tapping test. MP induced: (1) a hyperactivation of the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor cortex including the motor hand and face areas and of the contralesional premotor cortex; (2) a hypoactivation of the ipsilesional anterior cingulum. Hyperactivation in the face motor area correlated positively with the improvement in performance. We demonstrated that the reorganized network may efficiently be targeted by the drug and that the effect of MP might partly rely on an improvement in attention/effort through cingulum modulation.

  7. Physical activity predicts quality of life and happiness in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Carol Ann; Toohey, Monica; Ferguson, Monika

    2016-01-01

    To examine the associations between physical activity, health-related quality of life and happiness in young people with cerebral palsy. A total of 70 young people with cerebral palsy (45 males, 25 females; mean age 13 years 11 months, SD 2 years 0 month) took part in a cross-sectional, descriptive postal survey assessing physical activity (Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents), functional ability (Gross Motor Function Classification System), quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0) and happiness (single Likert-scale item). Relationships between physical activity, quality of life and happiness were examined using backward stepwise linear regression. Physical activity significantly predicted physical quality of life (R(2 )= 0.64, β = 6.12, p = 0.02), social quality of life (R(2 )= 0.28, β = 9.27, p happiness (R(2 )= 0.08, β = 0.9, p = 0.04). Physical activity was not associated with emotional or school quality of life. This study found a positive association between physical activity, social and physical quality of life, and happiness in young people with cerebral palsy. Findings underscore the potential benefits of physical activity for the wellbeing of young people with cerebral palsy, in addition to its well-recognised physical and health benefits. Physical activity is a key predictor of quality of life and happiness in young people with cerebral palsy. Physical activity is widely recognised as having physical health benefits for young people with cerebral palsy; however, this study also highlights that it may have important benefits for wellbeing, quality of life and happiness. This emphasises the need for clinical services and intervention studies aimed specifically at increasing physical activity amongst children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

  8. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CONDUCTIVE EDUCATION ON MOTOR SKILLS IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Khoshvaght

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive neuro-developmental disorders that are caused by damage to the developing brain and affect movement and posture. Children with cerebral palsy suffer difficulty in motor function (coordination and control.The present inquiry investigated the impact of conductive education on motor skills in children having cerebral palsy. Methods: A quasi-experimental research was done using pretest-posttest and control group design. The study subjects consisted of all children with cerebral palsy in Shiraz. A sample of 30 subjects was randomly chosen to employ convenience sampling procedure and classified to two groups of treatment (15 subjects and control (15 subjects. The pretest was performed for both groups, and the experimental group received conductive education in 20 sessions. While the control subjects did not have this education, finally, the post-test was performed for both groups. The Lincoln-Oseretsky test was used to measure motor skills. The data were analyzed using ANCOVA and MANCOVA. Results: The results showed that conductive education had a significant effect on motor skills (P<0.001 and its subscales such as speed of movement (P<0.001, general static coordination (P<0.001, general dynamic coordination (P<0.001, dynamic manual coordination (P<0.001, synchronous-asymmetrical voluntary movements (P<0.001, and asynchronous-asymmetrical voluntary movements (P<0.001 in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusion: The findings indicated the effectiveness of conductive education on cerebral palsy children’s motor skills. Therefore, it is recommended to design and implement a conductive education program to improve motor skills of cerebral palsy children.

  9. Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register (BCPR): a pilot study to develop a national cerebral palsy (CP) register with surveillance of children for CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Gulam; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley; Islam, Johurul; Alam, Monzurul; Jung, Jenny; Novak, Iona; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl; Badawi, Nadia; Muhit, Mohammad

    2015-09-25

    The causes and pathogenesis of cerebral palsy (CP) are all poorly understood, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). There are gaps in knowledge about CP in Bangladesh, especially in the spheres of epidemiological research, intervention and service utilization. In high-income countries CP registers have made substantial contributions to our understanding of CP. In this paper, we describe a pilot study protocol to develop, implement, and evaluate a CP population register in Bangladesh (i.e., Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register - BCPR) to facilitate studies on prevalence, severity, aetiology, associated impairments and risk factors for CP. The BCPR will utilise a modified version of the Australian Cerebral Palsy Register (ACPR) on a secured web-based platform hosted by the Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Institute, Australia. A standard BCPR record form (i.e., data collection form) has been developed in consultation with local and international experts. Using this form, the BPCR will capture information about maternal health, birth history and the nature of disability in all children with CP aged CP will be identified by using the community based Key Informants Method (KIM). Data from the completed BPCR record together with details of assessment by a research physician will be entered into an online data repository. Once implemented, BCPR will be, to the best of our knowledge, the first formalised CP register from a LMIC. Establishment of the BCPR will enable estimates of prevalence; facilitate clinical surveillance and promote research to improve the care of individuals with CP in Bangladesh.

  10. Novel transcriptional profile in wrist muscles from cerebral palsy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Shankar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a progressive movement disorder. Secondary to the neurological insult, muscles from CP patients often become spastic. Spastic muscle is characterized by an increased resistance to stretch, but often develops the further complication of contracture which represents a prominent disability in children with CP. This study's purpose is to characterize alterations of spastic muscle on the transcriptional level. Increased knowledge of spastic muscle may lead to novel therapies to improve the quality of life for children with CP. Method The transcriptional profile of spastic muscles were defined in children with cerebral palsy and compared to control patients using Affymetrix U133A chips. Expression data were verified using quantitative-PCR (QPCR and validated with SDS-PAGE for select genes. Significant genes were determined using a 2 × 2 ANOVA and results required congruence between 3 preprocessing algorithms. Results CP patients clustered independently and 205 genes were significantly altered, covering a range of cellular processes. Placing gene expression in the context of physiological pathways, the results demonstrated that spastic muscle in CP adapts transcriptionally by altering extracellular matrix, fiber type, and myogenic potential. Extracellular matrix adaptations occur primarily in the basal lamina although there is increase in fibrillar collagen components. Fiber type is predominately fast compared to normal muscle as evidenced by contractile gene isoforms and decrease in oxidative metabolic gene transcription, despite a paradoxical increased transcription of slow fiber pathway genes. We also found competing pathways of fiber hypertrophy with an increase in the anabolic IGF1 gene in parallel with a paradoxical increase in myostatin, a gene responsible for stopping muscle growth. We found evidence that excitation-contraction coupling genes are altered in

  11. Serum cystatin C and cerebral microbleeds in patients with acute cerebral stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Biao; Jü, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hai-Rong; Li, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that kidney dysfunction is associated with cerebral microbleeds (CMB). Cystatin C is a more useful measurement than creatinine-based estimating equations for evaluating kidney function. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between cystatin C levels and CMB in patients with acute cerebral stroke. This cross-sectional study included a total of 485 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 129 patients with cerebral hemorrhage. The serum levels of cystatin C were significantly higher in acute cerebral stroke patients with CMB than in those without (pstroke. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) in patients with acute cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhage were 2.92 (1.81-6.93) and 2.98 (1.76-6.97), respectively. The present study suggests that elevated levels of cystatin C are associated with the presence of CMB in acute stroke patients, independent of conventional risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence of epilepsy among patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertin Sianturi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic condition due to cerebral function disorders. Epilepsy occurs as a common complication of many neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy (CP that can affect further brain damage especially if they are with prolonged seizure. The incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP varies between 25-35%. The high incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP suggests that this disorder has common or related origins. We carried out the retrospective study to determine incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP registered within July 1988 to June 1998 in YPAC Medan and to determine whether the incidence of epilepsy differed according to type of CP. Data were compiled from medical records, including name, sex, parity, mothers age, prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal history, and EEG results. Data were analyzed using statistical computer program and its significance was evaluated by chi square test at p < 0,05. There were 67 cases with CP, 53 cases spastic CP, 13 cases mixed CP and one case dyskinetic CP. Of the 67 cases CP, 47,8% male, 52,2% female and mean age 50,3 (SD 36,9 months. There were 25 (37,3% patients CP associated with epilepsy, 72% general seizures, 20% partial seizures, and 8% infantile spasms. The incidence of epilepsy was significant different among patients with CP associated with type of CP and gestasional age, p < 0,05. We concluded that incidence of epilepsy among patients with CP in YPAC Medan was 37,3% and significantly different among patients with CP according to type CP and gestasional age.

  13. Depression in Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sinanović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to examine depression in parents of children with cerebral palsy, with hypothesis to have more depressive symptom among mothers of children with cerebral palsy. The sample of examinees (between 23 and 62 age was used in this research. The first subsample of examinees (N=23 was made of mothers (average 33±5.83 of children with cerebral palsy. The second subsample of examinees (N=12 was made of fathers of children with cerebral palsy (average 38±9.8. The third subsample of examinees (N=16 represented the control group, and it was made of mothers of children without disorders (average 38±6.57. For the purpose of quantitative measurement of depression, the Zung self-evaluated method for depression was applied. All data research were processed by parametric and nonparametric statistics. The frequencies and percents were also calculated, and Kruskal-Valis single-factor analysis of variants was applied for checking the hypothesis. According to the results of this research, it was concluded that there was no statistically significant difference in the evaluation of depression between mothers and fathers of children with cerebral palsy, as well as there is no statistically significant difference in relation to mothers of children without disorders

  14. Sleep problems in children with cerebral palsy and their relationship with maternal sleep and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayte, Sarah; McCaughey, Elizabeth; Holley, Simone; Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M

    2012-06-01

    To compare sleep problems in children with cerebral palsy to typically developing children. To study the relationship between sleep problems in children with cerebral palsy and maternal sleep quality and depression. Fifty-seven children with cerebral palsy aged 4-12 years were identified from a UK disability database. Maternal sleep disturbance and mood were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Major Depression Inventory. Child sleep problems, assessed with the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, but not maternal variables, were compared to 102 typically developing children. Forty children (70%) were recruited with a mean age of 7.8 (SD 2.4). Sleep anxiety, night wakings, parasomnias and sleep-disordered breathing sub-scales indicated significantly more difficulties than in typically developing children. 40% of mothers of children with cerebral palsy had poor sleep quality of whom 44% had depressed mood. Child and maternal sleep disturbance were significantly correlated. Maternal sleep quality predicted 50% of the variance in maternal depression. Children with cerebral palsy have more sleep problems than typically developing peers. Their mothers also have disturbed sleep that correlates with maternal depression. Childhood sleep problems can be treated and should be identified in routine clinical practice. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  15. Evaluation of relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Hadian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is the term used to describe a movement disorder though to be the result of nonprogressive brain damage. Due to damage to CNS, it is associated with articulation disorder and abnormal feeding reflex. Lack of oral function control and coordination following feeding reflex disorders. Articulation disorders are seen in most of the cerebral palsied patients.This research aimed to determine the relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in cerebral palsy (spasticchildren. Methods: This study was cross sectionally carried out on 52 children with cerebral palsy, 5 to 10 yrs old, in rehabilitation centers and private clinics. The information related to feeding reflexes was collected through direct observation of patient and evaluation of sound articulation through phonetic information test. Results: Statistical analysis carried out by SPSS and chi-square and fisher exact tests. Abnomal chewing and tongue reflex are more prevalent than other feeding reflexes.The relationship between lip reflex and articulation of p/m/r/y/f/č and chewing reflex with articulation of/z/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between biting reflex with articulation of /z/j/l/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between tongue reflex and rooting reflex with articulation of sound is not meaningful. Conclusion: With regard to the result of this research, it can be suggested that in children with cerebral palsy following feeding reflex disorders, abnormal posture during speech occurs that could have effect on articulation.

  16. Digital Posturography Games Correlate with Gross Motor Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Peter M; Calhoun, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to assess whether performance on posturography games correlates with the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) in children with cerebral palsy. Simple games using static posturography technology allowed subjects to control screen events via postural sway. Game performance was compared with GMFMs using correlation analysis in a convenience sample of nine girls and six boys with cerebral palsy. Likert scales were used to obtain subjective responses to the balance games. GMFM scores correlated with game performance, especially measures emphasizing rhythmic sway. Twelve of the 15 subjects enjoyed the game and asserted an interest in playing again. Digital posturography games engage children with cerebral palsy in balance tasks, provide visual feedback in a balance control task, and have the potential to increase autonomy in balance control training among pediatric patients with cerebral palsy. This approach can support the relationship between child and therapist. The potential for interactive posturography to complement the assessment and treatment of balance in cerebral palsy bears continuing study.

  17. Clinical effects of botulinum toxin A and phenol block on gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alice M K; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chen, Carl P C; Chou, Shih-Wei; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Max J L

    2004-04-01

    To compare the treatment effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and phenol blocks in managing lower limb spasticity and gait dysfunction in children with cerebral palsy. This is a case-controlled study that took place in a tertiary center's gait laboratory. A total of 27 ambulatory children with cerebral palsy spastic diplegia, aged from 3 to 7 yrs, and 20 normal children were recruited into this study. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy received BTX-A injections, and 11 received phenol motor point blocks. Gait analyses were assessed by a portable computer-assisted system (Computer DynoGraphy, Infotronic, The Netherlands). Both the BTX-A and phenol groups received gait analysis at 1 wk before and 2 mos after injection treatments. Significant improvements in gait variables of velocity and cadence were noted in children with cerebral palsy after BTX-A injections as compared with the phenol block group. Gaitline and cyclogram patterns also improved significantly in the BTX-A group. The adverse clinical effects of BTX-A injections were less severe as compared with phenol injections. BTX-A injections demonstrated superior treatment effects in improving gait variables and patterns in children with spastic diplegia as compared with phenol blocks. BTX-A injections also revealed fewer clinical side effects and were well tolerated by children with cerebral palsies.

  18. The phonological awareness abilities of children with cerebral palsy who do not speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Ruth; Dodd, Barbara

    2006-09-01

    To investigate the importance of the connection between being able to speak and the emergence of phonological awareness abilities, the performance of children with cerebral palsy (five speakers and six non-speakers) was assessed at syllable, onset-rime, and phoneme levels. The children were matched with control groups of children for non-verbal intelligence. No group differences were found for the identification of syllables, reading non-words, or judging spoken rhyme. The children with cerebral palsy who could speak, however, performed better than the children with cerebral palsy who could not speak and the control group of children without disabilities, judging written words for rhyme. The children with cerebral palsy who could not speak performed poorly in comparison to those who could speak (but not the control group of children) when segmenting syllables and on the phoneme manipulation task. The findings suggest that non-speaking children with cerebral palsy have phonological awareness performance that varies according to the mental processing demands of the task. The ability to speak facilitates performance when phonological awareness tasks (written rhyme judgment, syllable segmentation, and phoneme manipulation) require the use of an articulatory loop.

  19. Prevalence of secondary impairments of adults with cerebral palsy according to gross motor function classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 52 adults with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for physical disabilities in South Korea. [Results] The univariate analysis showed that the Gross Motor Functional Classification System level was a significant predictor of spondylopathies, general pain, arthropathies, and motor ability loss. The prevalence of these impairments at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level I and II was low compared with the prevalence found at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level III-V. The prevalence of secondary impairments among adults with cerebral palsy at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level III-V was high: loss of motor ability, 42.3%; spondylopathies, 38.4%; general pain, 32.7%; and arthropathies, 28.8%. [Conclusion] In this study, adults with severe cerebral palsy showed a high prevalence of motor ability loss, spondylopathies, arthropathies, and pain. It is necessary to develop intervention programs to prevent secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy.

  20. Cramped synchronized general movements in preterm infants as an early marker for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Fabrizio; Cioni, Giovanni; Einspieler, Christa; Roversi, M Federica; Bos, Arend F; Paolicelli, Paola B; Ranzi, Andrea; Prechtl, Heinz F R

    2002-05-01

    To ascertain whether specific abnormalities (ie, cramped synchronized general movements [GMs]) can predict cerebral palsy and the severity of later motor impairment in preterm infants affected by brain lesions. Traditional neurological examination was performed, and GMs were serially videotaped and blindly observed for 84 preterm infants with ultrasound abnormalities from birth until 56 to 60 weeks' postmenstrual age. The developmental course of GM abnormalities was compared with brain ultrasound findings alone and with findings from neurological examination, in relation to the patient's outcome at age 2 to 3 years. Infants with consistent or predominant (33 cases) cramped synchronized GMs developed cerebral palsy. The earlier cramped synchronized GMs were observed, the worse was the neurological outcome. Transient cramped synchronized character GMs (8 cases) were followed by mild cerebral palsy (fidgety movements were absent) or normal development (fidgety movements were present). Consistently normal GMs (13 cases) and poor repertoire GMs (30 cases) either lead to normal outcomes (84%) or cerebral palsy with mild motor impairment (16%). Observation of GMs was 100% sensitive, and the specificity of the cramped synchronized GMs was 92.5% to 100% throughout the age range, which is much higher than the specificity of neurological examination. Consistent and predominant cramped synchronized GMs specifically predict cerebral palsy. The earlier this characteristic appears, the worse is the later impairment.

  1. Combined pelvic and femoral reconstruction in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alassaf, Nabil; Saran, Neil; Benaroch, Theirry; Hamdy, Reggie Cherine

    2018-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of age, femoral head migration, and ambulatory status on radiographic outcomes after combined pelvic and femoral reconstruction in children with cerebral palsy. The secondary aim was to evaluate the fate of the opposite hip after unilateral reconstruction. Methods A retrospective cohort study design of consecutive patients from 1995-2009 was used. The records were screened for patients who underwent varus derotational osteotomy and modified Dega osteotomy. Results Eighty-five hips in 71 patients were included. The mean age was 8.4 ± 3.2 years and the mean follow-up was 6.6 ± 3.1 years. The final measures were a mean migration index of 20% ± 15.58%, centre edge angle of 28.45° ± 15.98°, and Sharp's angle of 40.75° ± 8.5°. Those values were not correlated with age and the initial migration index. Nonambulatory status did not negatively affect hip stability. Final measurements of the contralateral hips were similar to the reconstructed hips, and the cumulative incidence for later reconstruction was 5.67%. Conclusions Regardless of age, preoperative displacement, and ambulation, the combined procedure provides durable radiographic improvement. In unilateral cases, there is a low risk of later deterioration of the opposite side.

  2. Family ecology of young children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForme Fiss, A; Chiarello, L A; Bartlett, D; Palisano, R J; Jeffries, L; Almasri, N; Chang, H-J

    2014-07-01

    Family ecology in early childhood may influence children's activity and participation in daily life. The aim of this study was to describe family functioning, family expectations of their children, family support to their children, and supports for families of young children with cerebral palsy (CP) based on children's gross motor function level. Participants were 398 children with CP (mean age = 44.9 months) and their parents residing in the USA and Canada. Parents completed four measures of family ecology, the Family Environment Scale (FES), Family Expectations of Child (FEC), Family Support to Child (FSC) and Family Support Scale (FSS). The median scores on the FES indicated average to high family functioning and the median score on the FSS indicated that families had helpful family supports. On average, parents reported high expectations of their children on the FEC and strong support to their children on the FSC. On the FES, higher levels of achievement orientation were reported by parents of children in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level II than parents of children in level I, and higher levels of control were reported by parents of children in level I than parents of children in level IV. On the FEC, parents of children with limited gross motor function (level V) reported lower expectations than parents of children at all other levels. Family ecology, including family strengths, expectations, interests, supports and resources, should be discussed when providing interventions and supports for young children with CP and their families. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Spasticity and Its Contribution to Hypertonia in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaers, Guy; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Van Campenhout, Anja; Feys, Hilde; Desloovere, Kaat

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is considered an important neural contributor to muscle hypertonia in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It is most often treated with antispasticity medication, such as Botulinum Toxin-A. However, treatment response is highly variable. Part of this variability may be due to the inability of clinical tests to differentiate between the neural (e.g., spasticity) and nonneural (e.g., soft tissue properties) contributions to hypertonia, leading to the terms “spasticity” and “hypertonia” often being used interchangeably. Recent advancements in instrumented spasticity assessments offer objective measurement methods for distinction and quantification of hypertonia components. These methods can be applied in clinical settings and their results used to fine-tune and improve treatment. We reviewed current advancements and new insights with respect to quantifying spasticity and its contribution to muscle hypertonia in children with CP. First, we revisit what is known about spasticity in children with CP, including the various definitions and its pathophysiology. Second, we summarize the state of the art on instrumented spasticity assessment in CP and review the parameters developed to quantify the neural and nonneural components of hypertonia. Lastly, the impact these quantitative parameters have on clinical decision-making is considered and recommendations for future clinical and research investigations are discussed. PMID:25649546

  4. Multivariate Analysis and Machine Learning in Cerebral Palsy Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP, a common pediatric movement disorder, causes the most severe physical disability in children. Early diagnosis in high-risk infants is critical for early intervention and possible early recovery. In recent years, multivariate analytic and machine learning (ML approaches have been increasingly used in CP research. This paper aims to identify such multivariate studies and provide an overview of this relatively young field. Studies reviewed in this paper have demonstrated that multivariate analytic methods are useful in identification of risk factors, detection of CP, movement assessment for CP prediction, and outcome assessment, and ML approaches have made it possible to automatically identify movement impairments in high-risk infants. In addition, outcome predictors for surgical treatments have been identified by multivariate outcome studies. To make the multivariate and ML approaches useful in clinical settings, further research with large samples is needed to verify and improve these multivariate methods in risk factor identification, CP detection, movement assessment, and outcome evaluation or prediction. As multivariate analysis, ML and data processing technologies advance in the era of Big Data of this century, it is expected that multivariate analysis and ML will play a bigger role in improving the diagnosis and treatment of CP to reduce mortality and morbidity rates, and enhance patient care for children with CP.

  5. Multivariate Analysis and Machine Learning in Cerebral Palsy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP), a common pediatric movement disorder, causes the most severe physical disability in children. Early diagnosis in high-risk infants is critical for early intervention and possible early recovery. In recent years, multivariate analytic and machine learning (ML) approaches have been increasingly used in CP research. This paper aims to identify such multivariate studies and provide an overview of this relatively young field. Studies reviewed in this paper have demonstrated that multivariate analytic methods are useful in identification of risk factors, detection of CP, movement assessment for CP prediction, and outcome assessment, and ML approaches have made it possible to automatically identify movement impairments in high-risk infants. In addition, outcome predictors for surgical treatments have been identified by multivariate outcome studies. To make the multivariate and ML approaches useful in clinical settings, further research with large samples is needed to verify and improve these multivariate methods in risk factor identification, CP detection, movement assessment, and outcome evaluation or prediction. As multivariate analysis, ML and data processing technologies advance in the era of Big Data of this century, it is expected that multivariate analysis and ML will play a bigger role in improving the diagnosis and treatment of CP to reduce mortality and morbidity rates, and enhance patient care for children with CP.

  6. Motor planning in children with cerebral palsy: A longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Jessica Mireille; Spruijt, Steffie; Wilson, Peter H; Steenbergen, Bert

    2017-10-23

    Motor planning is important for daily functioning. Deficits in motor planning can result in slow, inefficient, and clumsy motor behavior and are linked to disruptions in performance of activities of daily living in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the evidence in CP is primarily based on cross-sectional data. Data are presented on the development of motor planning in children with CP using a longitudinal design with three measurement occasions, each separated by 1 year. Twenty-two children with CP (9 boys, 13 girls; age in years;months, M = 7;1, SD = 1;2) and 22 age-matched controls (10 boys, 12 girls, M  = 7;1, SD = 1;3) participated. Children performed a bar transport task in which some conditions ("critical angles") required participants to sacrifice initial posture comfort in order to achieve end-state comfort. Performance on critical trials was analyzed using linear growth curve modeling. In general, children with CP showed poor end-state planning for critical angles. Importantly, unlike in controls, motor planning ability did not improve across the three measurement occasions in children with CP. These longitudinal results show that motor planning issues in CP do not resolve with development over childhood. Strategies to enhance motor planning are suggested for intervention.

  7. [Peptidergic nootropic therapy in cerebral palsy associated with epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholin, A A; Zavadenko, N N; Il Ina, E S; Kolpakchi, L M; Fedonyuk, I D; Bembeeva, R C; Esipova, E S

    To assess the efficacy and safety of сortexin in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy (CP) combined with epilepsy. Eighty-four patients (55 boys and 29 girls), aged from 1 to 11 years, with CP combined with epilepsy received cortexin together with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Cortexin was administered in doses of 5-10 mg depending on the patient's age and body weight intramuscularly during hospitalization. Cortexin as add-on to AEDs reduced for more than two times the number of seizures, along with improvement of motor function, in 31 (36.9%) patients. The improvement of motor function, but without a significant decrease in epileptic seizures, was achieved in 15 (17.8%) of the patients. Reduction of epileptic seizures frequency (>2 times), but without a significant effect on motor function, was observed in 14 cases (16.7%). Twenty-three patients (27.4%) did not respond the therapy. The aggravation of epileptic seizures during cortexin therapy was observed in only 1 girl with West syndrome (1.2%), and this was significantly lower than the probability of seizures aggravation on AED. Polypeptide nootropic medication cortexin demonstrated efficacy and safety as adjunctive therapy in children with CP combined with epilepsy.

  8. JUMP LANDING CHARACTERISTICS IN ELITE SOCCER PLAYERS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cámara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to analyse the parameters that characterize the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, and to determine the relationship among these parameters in elite soccer players with cerebral palsy (CP. Thirteen male members of the Spanish national soccer team for people with CP (mean age: 27.1 ± 4.7 years volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three counter movement jumps. The characteristics of the first peak of the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, which corresponds to the forefoot contact with the ground, were similar to the results obtained in previous studies. However, a higher magnitude of rearfoot contact with the ground (F2 was observed in participants with CP than in participants without CP. Furthermore, a significant correlation between F2 magnitude and the elapsed time until its production (T2 was not observed (r = -0.474 for p = 0.102. This result implies that a landing technique based on a delay in the production of F2 might not be effective to reduce its magnitude, contrary to what has been observed in participants without CP. The absence of a significant correlation between these two parameters in the present study, and the high magnitude of F2, suggest that elite soccer players with CP should use footwear with proper cushioning characteristics.

  9. Management of spastic cerebral palsy through multiple Ayurveda treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinde, Sagar M; Patel, Kalpana S; Kori, Virendra Kumar; Rajagopala, S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a leading cause of childhood disability affecting function and development. The global incidence of CP is 2:1000. It has been reported that children with CP and their caretaker have impaired health-related quality of life (QOL). Of the many types and subtypes of CP, none has any known cure. For a detailed description of the disease CP, though, there is no one to one correlation in Ayurvedic classics; it can be taken as Vata Vyadhi as far as its etiology and symptomatology are concerned. To assess the effect of certain Panchakarma procedures in the management of CP. Total 8 patients were registered and treated with 5 days of Udvartana, 5 days of Abhyanga followed by Sarvanga Swedana and then 8 days of Yoga Basti. The same course of treatment has been repeated for 3 times with an interval of 14 days. Ashtanga Ghrita was given during whole procedures as internal medication. Results of treatment were assessed with anthropometrical measurement, developmental milestone, Modified Ashworth Scale, spasm scale, reflex scale, and muscle power grading. This Ayurvedic management shows good result in CP patients, especially by improving growth (height, weight, chest circumference) and development (head holding and sitting), reducing spasticity of left upper limb and muscle spasm. Multisystem approach is needed to improve the condition of the patient. Panchakarma along with internal medication should be given to improve all the facets of spastic CP. Yoga Basti acts by their own mode of action and can be used freely for such disease conditions.

  10. Postural Muscle Dyscoordination in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda C. van der Heide

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives an overview of the knowledge currently available on muscular dyscoordination underlying postural problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Such information is a prerequisite for developing successful therapeutic interventions in children with CP. Until now, three children with CP functioning at GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System level V have been documented. The children totally or partially lacked direction specificity in their postural adjustments and could not sit independently for more than 3 seconds. Some children functioning at GMFCS level IV have intact direction-specific adjustments, whereas others have problems in generating consistently direction-specific adjustments. Children at GMFCS levels I to III have an intact basic level of control but have difficulties in fine-tuning the degree of postural muscle contraction to the task-specific conditions, a dysfunction more prominently present in children with bilateral spastic CP than in children with spastic hemiplegia. The problems in the adaptation of the degree of muscle contraction might be the reason that children with CP, more often than typically developing children, show an excess of antagonistic coactivation during difficult balancing tasks and a preference for cranial-caudal recruitment during reaching. This might imply that both stereotypies might be regarded as functional strategies to compensate for the dysfunctional capacity to modulate subtly postural activity.

  11. Reliability of goniometric measurements in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Akmer; Livanelioglu, Ayse; Gunel, Mintaze Kerem

    2007-07-01

    A prospective, cross-sectional, observational study was designed to determine the reliability of goniometric measurements in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). The study included 38 children with spastic diplegic CP. Passive range of motion (PROM) of hip extension, abduction, and external rotation, hip flexion with knee extended, and ankle dorsi flexion was measured using universal goniometry. Each child was assessed by three physical therapists once in each session on two different sessions a week apart. Intra-test reliability was determined by paired comparison of measurements for each therapist across the two assessments. Inter-test reliability was determined by paired comparisons of the three therapists' measurements on the same session. The interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for intra- and inter-test reliability. The mean absolute differences for all measures between sessions ranged from 0.10-4.86 degrees for the three physical therapists. There was no statistical significance in the mean differences between the physical therapists in all measurements (p>0.05) except for hip flexion with the knee extended (preliability was high (preliability scores were high for all the physiotherapists, the most experienced physiotherapists' results were higher compared with the others. The results from this study encourage the use of goniometric measurements in assessing children with spastic diplegic CP.

  12. Self-concept of adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannotti, Mary E; Minter, Christin L; Chambers, Henry G; Smith, Peter A; Tylkowski, Chester

    2011-01-01

    To describe the self-concept of adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Cross-sectional design included the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, version 2 (TSCS:2), Functional Independence Measure (FIM™), Beck Depression Index II (BDI®-II), Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF), Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) levels and demographic questions. One hundred and two people with CP (52 females, mean age=26) participated. Thirty-eight participants had unreliable answers as indicated by validity scales and were excluded from the analysis. Ten participants had high self-concept; 41 had average self-concept and 13 had low total self-concept. Self-concept had a fair and inverse association with the BDI-II (Pearson's r= -0.3, pSelf-concept was not associated with GMFCS level or FIM score. Family and Personal sub-domain scores were lowest sub-domain scores for people with low self-concept (pself-concept; and self-concept was not associated with severity of CP, but with lack of depression and life satisfaction. Results suggest the need for family centred care into adulthood. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  13. Gingivitis and salivary osmolality in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues; Ferreira, Maria Cristina Duarte; Guaré, Renata Oliveira; Diniz, Michele Baffi; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Rodrigues, Jonas Almeida; Duarte, Danilo Antonio

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the influence of salivary osmolality on the occurrence of gingivitis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A total of 82 children with spastic CP were included in this cross-sectional study. Oral motor performance and gingival conditions were evaluated. Unstimulated saliva was collected using cotton swabs, and salivary osmolality was measured using a freezing point depression osmometer. Spearman's coefficient, receiver operating characteristic (ROC), and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Strong correlation (r > 0.7) was determined among salivary osmolality, salivary flow rate, visible plaque, dental calculus, and the occurrence of gingivitis. The area under the ROC to predict the influence of salivary osmolality on the occurrence of gingivitis was 0.88 (95% CI 0.81-0.96; P gingivitis was 22.5%, whereas for the group presenting osmolality >84.5 mOsm/kgH 2 O, the proportion of children with gingivitis was 77.5%. Salivary osmolality above 84.5 increased the likelihood of gingivitis fivefold, whereas each additional 0.1 mL of salivary flow reduced the likelihood of gingivitis by 97%. Gingivitis occurs more frequently in children with CP showing increased values of salivary osmolality. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Thermograpic study of upper extremities in patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, R.; Kawelke, S.; Mitternacht, J.; Turova, V.; Blumenstein, T.; Alves-Pinto, A.

    2015-03-01

    Trophic disorders like reduced skin blood circulation are well-known epiphenomenon of cerebral palsy (CP). They can influence quality of life and can lead to skin damages and, as a consequence, to decubitus. Therefore, it is important to analyse temperature regulation in patients with CP. Thermal imaging camera FLIR BCAM SD was used to study the dependency of skin blood circulation in upper extremities of patients with CP on hand dominance, hand force and hand volume. The hand force was evaluated using a conventional dynamometer. The hand volume was measured with a volumeter. A cold stress test for hands was applied in 22 patients with CP and 6 healthy subjects. The warming up process after the test was recorded with the thermal camera. It was confirmed that the hands of patients warm up slower comparing to healthy persons. The patients' working hands warm up faster than non-working ones. A slight correlation was established between the hand grip force of the working hands and their warm up time. No correlation was found between the warming up time and the volume of the hand. The results confirm our assumption that there is a connection of peripheral blood circulation to upper limb motor functions.

  15. [Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Lidija; Bjelaković, Bojko; Lazović, Milica; Stanković, Ivona; Čolović, Hristina; Kocić, Mirjana; Zlatanović, Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP). As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (gross motor function measurement), spasticity (MAS-Modified Ashworth Scale), heart rate (HR) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP.

  16. ASPECTS OF MOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Žgur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Child’s motor development is not an isolated process but it rather involves numerous other developmental aspects, such as cognitive and conative. The research is focused on defining the developmental principles of motor abilities and skills in children with prominent motor deficits who were diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP. The research compares the motor maturity between two groups of children with CP; the younger group (up to 10 years of age and the older group (10 – 16 years of age. The research included 78 primary school children with different forms of CP (diplegia, hemiplegia, mixed forms, aged between 6 and 16. The discriminant analysis used in the research showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between age and motor maturity in children with CP. The structural matrix confirmed the different hierarchical representation of the motor components (strength, coordination, precision and graphomotor skills for the selected motor model, in relation to children’s age. The function of explosive strength showed significant differences between younger and older children as regards their motor maturity. We can conclude that there is a significant developmental difference between the groups of younger and older children with CP, in relation to their motor maturity (different hierarchical representation, with the most obvious difference in motor ability of explosive strength.

  17. Eye hand coordination in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Sandra; Joshi, Aditi; Woollacott, Marjorie; van Donkelaar, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Reaching to grasp an object of interest requires complex sensorimotor coordination involving eye, head, hand and trunk. While numerous studies have demonstrated deficits in each of these systems individually, little is known about how children with cerebral palsy (CP) coordinate multiple motor systems for functional tasks. Here we used kinematics, remote eye tracking and a trunk support device to examine the functional coupling of the eye, head and hand and the extent to which it was constrained by trunk postural control in 10 children with CP (6-16 years). Eye movements in children with CP were similar to typically developing (TD) peers, while hand movements were significantly slower. Postural support influenced initiation of hand movements in the youngest children (TD & CP) and execution of hand movements in children with CP differentially depending on diagnosis. Across all diagnostic categories, the most robust distinction between TD children and children with CP was in their ability to isolate eye, head and hand movements. Results of this study suggest that deficits in motor coordination for accurate reaching in children with CP may reflect coupled eye, head, and hand movements. We have previously suggested that coupled activation of effectors may be the default output for the CNS during early development.

  18. Physical Activity in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Waltersson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the level of physical activity in adults with cerebral palsy (CP and to analyse its relationship with physical activity as adolescents, pain, and gross motor function. A prospective cohort study was performed using data from the Swedish National CP Registry (CPUP for all 129 individuals born in 1991–1993 living in Skåne and Blekinge who reported to CPUP at 14–16 years of age. Physical activity as adult was analysed relative to physical activity as adolescents, pain, and the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Seventy-one individuals at GMFCS I–V were followed up as adults and included in the analyses. Of these, 65% were physically active, but only 56% performed physical activity at least once a week. Their physical activity as adults differed relative to their physical activity as adolescents (p=0.011 but not to pain or GMFCS. Being physically active as an adolescent doubled the probability of being active as an adult (OR 2.1; p=0.054, indicating that physical activity in adults with CP is related to their physical activity as adolescents. Therefore, interventions to increase physical activity among adolescents with CP are likely also to improve physical activity in adulthood.

  19. Pathophysiology of gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, W; Quintern, J; Dietz, V

    1982-05-01

    The surface electromyogram (EMG) of leg muscles was recorded together with the changes of the angle at the ankle joint during slow gait in 10 normal children and 10 with cerebral palsy. The characteristic pattern of muscle activity recorded from the spastic legs mainly consisted of a co-activation of antagonistic leg muscles during the stance phase of a gait cycle and a general reduction in amplitude of EMG activity. The tension of the Achilles tendon, measured in 2 hemiparetic children during gait, increased much more steeply in the spastic leg than in the normal one at the beginning of the stance phase, when the electrically almost silent triceps surae was stretched. It is suggested that muscle hypertonia during gait in spastic children is mainly due to changed muscle fibre mechanical properties, as recently discussed also for spastic adults. While in the latter the reciprocal EMG activity of antagonistic leg muscles was preserved it is proposed that muscle co-activation recorded in spastic children is due to an impaired maturation of the locomotor pattern with an early neuronal adaptation to altered muscle fibre mechanical characteristics.

  20. Cerebral Palsy in Children as a Risk Factor for Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perenc, Lidia; Przysada, Grzegorz; Trzeciak, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine some malnutrition risk factors among children with cerebral palsy (CP). Children with CP often require the assistance of physical therapy centers. Experience suggests that, apart from physical disabilities, this group often suffers from malnutrition. Data were gathered in the hospital among 128 children aged 3-18 years who were suffering from CP. The children were admitted from 2011 to 2013 to the Center for Neurological Physical Therapy for children in the Regional Hospital No. 2. St. Queen Jadwiga in Rzeszow (RORE). Statistical analyses were conducted for data on gender, age, type of CP, motor function level according to Gross Motor Function Classification Scale (GMFCS), body mass index (BMI) and hemoglobin levels in blood. The risk of anemia differs based on gender--the risk is 6 times greater among boys than among girls (p = 0.0398). Risk of malnutrition is 3.5 times higher in children with tetraplegia than in children with diplegia or hemiplegia (p = 0.0043). Higher GMFCS scores are connected to greater proportions of malnourished children (for BMI z-score children with CP, malnourishment risk factors are male gender for anemia and tetraplegia and high GMFCS values. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

  2. An influence of initial swimming training technology on technical preparedness indicators of children with consequences of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy Bosko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop an innovative technology of elementary swimming training in the backstroke way of children with the consequences of infantile cerebral palsy (ICP and to evaluate its effectiveness. Material & Methods: methods were used: analysis of scientific and methodological literature, pedagogical experiment, expert evaluation, statistical methods. The pedagogical experiment involved 29 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy, of which two groups were formed: an experimental group consisting of 14 children, 6 of them with spastic diplegia and 8 with a hemiparetic form, and a control group of 15, of which 6 – with spastic diplegia and 8 – with a hemiparetic form of cerebral palsy. After the experiment, we conducted an expert survey in order to identify the experts' opinion on the level of mastering the technique of swimming by backstroke way of children with the consequences of infantile cerebral palsy. Results: main means of implementing the technology is the web-based information system "SwimCP (Swimming with Cerebral Palsy" developed by us, which promotes the effective learning of the swimming of children with the effects of infantile cerebral palsy in the initial stage of sports training by selecting and recommending an orienting set of exercises, in accordance with the specific form of infantile cerebral palsy and the stage of learning motor action. Conclusion: with the help of expert assessment confirmed that the proposed technology is the initial training to swimming by backstroke way to children with consequences of cerebral palsy is effective.

  3. The Use of Computers and Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices by Children and Young with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Thais Pousada; Loureiro, Javier Pereira; Gonzalez, Betania Groba; Riveiro, Laura Nieto; Sierra, Alejandro Pazos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the use of computers and assistive devices amongst children with cerebral palsy (CP) and establish the satisfaction level of both users and educational staff. The study was carried out with 30 children with cerebral palsy. A questionnaire was designed to characterize the use of new technologies and…

  4. Trends in Prevalence and Characteristics of Post-Neonatal Cerebral Palsy Cases: A European Registry-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, Laurence; Ehlinger, Virginie; Klapouszczak, Dana; Delobel, Malika; Hollody, Katalin; Sellier, Elodie; De La Cruz, Javier; Alberge, Corine; Genolini, Christophe; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to analyze trends over time in prevalence of cerebral palsy of post-neonatal origin, to investigate whether changes are similar according to severity and to describe the disability profile by etiology. Post-neonatal cases, birth years 1976 to 1998, were identified from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe…

  5. Description and Psychometric Properties of the CP QOL-Teen: A Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elise; Mackinnon, Andrew; Davern, Melanie; Boyd, Roslyn; Bohanna, India; Waters, Elizabeth; Graham, H. Kerr; Reid, Susan; Reddihough, Dinah

    2013-01-01

    To assess the measurement properties of a new QOL instrument, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Teen (CP QOL-Teen), in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 13-18 years, examining domain structure, reliability, validity and adolescent-caregiver concordance. Based on age, 695 eligible families were invited to participate by mail.…

  6. Effect of Cardiorespiratory Training on Aerobic Fitness and Carryover to Activity In Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jane M.; Scianni, Aline; Ada, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The question under consideration was does cardiorespiratory training improve aerobic fitness in children with cerebral palsy and is there any carryover into activity? The study design consisted of a systematic review of randomized trials using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Participants were children of school age with cerebral palsy.…

  7. Social, intimate and sexual relationships of adolescents with cerebral palsy compared with able-bodied age-mates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.J.H.G.; Roebroeck, M.E.; Donkervoort, M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Stam, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe the social, intimate and sexual relationships of Dutch adolescents with cerebral palsy compared with their able-bodied age mates. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A total of 103 adolescents with cerebral palsy without severe learning problems aged 16-20 years. Methods:

  8. Physical Activity in the Life of a Woman with Cerebral Palsy: Physiotherapy, Social Exclusion, Competence, and Intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.; Andersen, Mark B.; Morris, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Although physical activity can have substantial mental and physical health benefits, people with cerebral palsy usually lead sedentary lives. To understand, at an individual level, this inactivity, we interviewed a 29-year-old minimally active woman with cerebral palsy (Alana) about the meanings and experiences of physical activity throughout her…

  9. Classification of Speech and Language Profiles in 4-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Prospective Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Gorton, Kristin; Lee, Jimin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors proposed and tested a preliminary speech and language classification system for children with cerebral palsy. Method: Speech and language assessment data were collected in a laboratory setting from 34 children with cerebral palsy (CP; 18 male, 16 female) with a mean age of 54 months (SD = 1.8). Measures of…

  10. Test-Retest Reliability of the 20-sec Wingate Test to Assess Anaerobic Power in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Scholtes, Vanessa A. B.; Brehm, Merel-Anne; Becher, Jules G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of the 20-sec Wingate anaerobic test in children with cerebral palsy. Design: Participants were 22 ambulant children with cerebral palsy, with Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I (limitations in advanced

  11. Test-retest reliability of the 20-sec Wingate test to assess anaerobic power in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, A.J.; Scholtes, V.A.B.; Brehm, M.A.; Becher, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of the 20-sec Wingate anaerobic test in children with cerebral palsy. DESIGN: Participants were 22 ambulant children with cerebral palsy, with Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I (limitations in advanced

  12. Neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm babies: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy among very preterm babies and in particular the associations independent of the coexistence of antenatal and intrapartum factors. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Oxford health region. SUBJECTS: Singleton babies born between 1984 and 1990 at less than 32 weeks' gestation who survived to discharge from hospital: 59 with cerebral palsy and 234 randomly selected controls without cerebral palsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse neonatal factors expressed as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Factors associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy after adjustment for gestational age and the presence of previously identified antenatal and intrapartum risk factors were patent ductus arteriosus (odds ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.5), hypotension (2.3; 1.3 to 4.7), blood transfusion (4.8; 2.5 to 9.3), prolonged ventilation (4.8; 2.5 to 9.0), pneumothorax (3.5; 1.6 to 7.6), sepsis (3.6; 1.8 to 7.4), hyponatraemia (7.9; 2.1 to 29.6) and total parenteral nutrition (5.5; 2.8 to 10.5). Seizures were associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy (10.0; 4.1 to 24.7), as were parenchymal damage (32; 12.4 to 84.4) and appreciable ventricular dilatation (5.4; 3.0 to 9.8) detected by cerebral ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A reduction in the rate of cerebral palsy in very preterm babies requires an integrated approach to management throughout the antenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal periods. PMID:9040385

  13. Intrathecal baclofen treatment in dystonic cerebral palsy: a randomized clinical trial: the IDYS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonouvrié, Laura A; Becher, Jules G; Vles, Johannes S H; Boeschoten, Karin; Soudant, Dan; de Groot, Vincent; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Strijers, Rob L M; Foncke, Elisabeth; Geytenbeek, Joke; van de Ven, Peter M; Teernstra, Onno; Vermeulen, R Jeroen

    2013-10-28

    Dystonic cerebral palsy is primarily caused by damage to the basal ganglia and central cortex. The daily care of these patients can be difficult due to dystonic movements. Intrathecal baclofen treatment is a potential treatment option for dystonia and has become common practice. Despite this widespread adoption, high quality evidence on the effects of intrathecal baclofen treatment on daily activities is lacking and prospective data are needed to judge the usefulness and indications for dystonic cerebral palsy. The primary aim of this study is to provide level one clinical evidence for the effects of intrathecal baclofen treatment on the level of activities and participation in dystonic cerebral palsy patients. Furthermore, we hope to identify clinical characteristics that will predict a beneficial effect of intrathecal baclofen in an individual patient. A double blind placebo-controlled multi-center randomized clinical trial will be performed in 30 children with dystonic cerebral palsy. Patients aged between 4 and 25 years old with a confirmed diagnosis of dystonic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Functioning Classification System level IV or V, with lesions in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia or central cortex and who are eligible for intrathecal baclofen treatment will be included. Group A will receive three months of continuous intrathecal baclofen treatment and group B will receive three months of placebo treatment, both via an implanted pump. After this three month period, all patients will receive intrathecal baclofen treatment, with a follow-up after nine months. The primary outcome measurement will be the effect on activities of and participation in daily life measured by Goal Attainment Scaling. Secondary outcome measurements on the level of body functions include dystonia, spasticity, pain, comfort and sleep-related breathing disorders. Side effects will be monitored and we will study whether patient characteristics influence outcome. The results of

  14. Creative Dance Practice Improves Postural Control in a Child With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribling, Kate; Christy, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effect of creative dance instruction on postural control and balance in an 11-year-old with spastic triplegic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Function Classification Scale level II. We conducted 1-hour dance interventions twice weekly for 8 weeks, with a focus on somatosensory awareness and movement in all planes of motion. Computerized dynamic posturography using the SMART Balance Master/EquiTest (NeuroCom) was used to assess postural control and balance reactions before the first class and following the final class. Gains in standing stability, balance recovery, directional control, and endpoint excursion of movement were found. Participation in creative dance lessons appears to improve somatosensory effectiveness and postural control in a child with cerebral palsy. Dance is a fun way to improve balance and coordination. These interventions could be easily implemented into programs for children with cerebral palsy.

  15. Assessment of bone density in patients with scoliosis neuromuscular secondary to cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbel Jacob Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bone mineral density in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. METHODS: A prospective descriptive study in which, in addition to bone densitometry, the anthropometric data of the patients were assessed. As inclusion criterion we adopted patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, wheelchair users, aged between 10 and 20 years and with neuromuscular scoliosis. RESULTS: We evaluated 31 patients, 20 female, whose average age was 14.2 years. The mean bone density was -3.2 standard deviation (Z-score, with mean biceps circumference of 19.4 cm, calf circumference 18.6 cm and BMI of 13.6 kg/m². CONCLUSION: There is a high incidence of osteoporosis in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

  16. Dorsiflexor muscle-group thickness in children with cerebral palsy: Relation to cross-sectional area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Magnusson, Peter; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2009-01-01

    If the thickness and cross-sectional area of the dorsiflexor muscle group are related in children with cerebral palsy, measurements of muscle thickness may be used to monitor changes in muscle size due to training or immobilisation in these patients. We assessed the validity and reliability.......001), and the reliability of the muscle-thickness measurements was high in the healthy subjects (ICC_{2.1} = 0.94, standard error of measurement = 0.04 cm). The dorsiflexor muscle-thickness was 22% less in the affected compared to the non-affected leg in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (P ..., the dorsiflexor cross-sectional area was 32% less in the affected compared to the non-affected leg (P = 0.002). Measurements of dorsiflexor muscle-thickness can be reliably obtained, and they reflect dorsiflexor cross-sectional area in children with cerebral palsy....

  17. Individualized, home-based interactive training of cerebral palsy children delivered through the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Peder E; Kliim-Due, Mette; Rasmussen, Betina

    2011-01-01

    The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot stu...... was to provide proof of concept that individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet may provide an efficient way of maintaining intensive training of children with cerebral palsy over prolonged periods.......The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot study...

  18. Physical activity as a prescription for the children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Shariat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After so many years devoted to practicing medicine as children physiotherapists, the therapists finally found the importance of balance training exercises in children who suffer from cerebral palsy. It is only through controlling balance that we can achieve improvement in body movement and position that will culminate into performance independence in a child. Formerly, working over controlling balance in cerebral palsy children has been very difficult, because contracture and spasticity did not let us to have an effective balance training exercise. In this respect, we have summarized the results of previous authors that specify the level of effectiveness of exercise therapy. The results of different studies showed that level of effectiveness of exercise therapy on alleviating the symptoms of spastic cerebral palsy is average in accordance with Cohen's effect size Interpretation table.

  19. Parental stress in mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Ferreira Martins Ribeiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate parental stress of mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy; to verify whether parental stress undergoes variations according to the level of motor compromise, the child's phase of life, and sociodemographic variables.METHOD: a cross-sectional, descriptive study, with 223 mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.RESULTS: 45.3% of the mothers presented high levels of stress; there were differences in stress between mothers of children with mild and severe motor impairment; mothers of older children were more stressed than mothers of younger children and of adolescents; paid work and leisure activities reduced the stress.CONCLUSION: mothers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy, whose children present mild to severe motor impairment are vulnerable to parental stress. Paid work and leisure activities were the factors that contributed most to reducing the stress.

  20. Parent-reported quality of life of children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, Catherine; White-Koning, Melanie; I. Michelsen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal was to determine whether the type and severity of the child's impairments and the family's psychosocial, social, and economic characteristics influence parent-reported child quality of life across the spectrum of severity of cerebral palsy. METHODS: Our population-based, cross......-sectional survey conducted in 2004 to 2005 involved 818 children with cerebral palsy, 8 to 12 years of age, from 7 countries (9 regions) in Europe. Child quality of life was assessed through parent reports by using the Kidscreen questionnaire, and data were analyzed separately for each of its 10 domains. RESULTS...... to report poor quality of life in all domains, which suggests that factors other than the severity of the child's impairment may influence the way in which parents report quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The parent-reported quality of life for children with cerebral palsy is associated strongly with impairment...

  1. Gait training facilitates central drive to ankle dorsiflexors in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy. The main underlying cause of these problems is early damage and lack of maturation of the corticospinal tract. In the present study we investigated whether 4 weeks of daily treadmill training with an incline may...... facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve the control of the ankle joint in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Classification System I:6, II:6, III:4) aged 5-14 years old, were recruited for the study. Evaluation of gait ability and intramuscular coherence...... significantly when compared to coherence before training. The largest changes in coherence with training were observed for children

  2. Prognostic Predictors for Ambulation in Thai Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 2 to 18 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeratisiroj, Orawan; Thawinchai, Nuanlaor; Siritaratiwat, Wantana; Buntragulpoontawee, Montana

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine prognostic predictors for ambulation among Thai children with cerebral palsy and identify their ambulatory status. A retrospective cohort study was performed at 6 special schools or hospitals for children with physical disabilities. The prognostic predictors for ambulation were analyzed by multivariable ordinal continuation ratio logistic regression. The 533 participants aged 2 to 18 years were divided into 3 groups: 186 with independent ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS I-II]), 71 with assisted ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System III), and 276 with nonambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System IV-V). The significant positive predictors for ambulation were type of cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia, spastic hemiplegia, dyskinesia, ataxia, hypotonia, and mixed type), sitting independently at age 2 years, and eating independently. These predictors were used to develop clinical scoring for predicting the future ability to walk among Thai children with cerebral palsy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Public health issues related to infection in pregnancy and cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schendel, Diana E.; Schuchat, Anne; Thorsen, Poul

    2002-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common neuromotor developmental disability of childhood, affecting as many as 8,000 to 12,000 children born in the U.S. each year (corresponding to a prevalence rate of between 2 and 3 per 1000 children). Recent improvements in neonatal care have not resulted in a decline...... in the overall prevalence of cerebral palsy and, in fact, greater numbers of very preterm/very low birth weight infants are surviving with cerebral palsy and other developmental problems. Infection in pregnancy may be an important cause of the disorder. In preterm infants, there appears to be about a 2-fold...... States after administration of intrapartum antibiotics became widespread in response to publication of public health consensus guidelines for Group B streptococcus in 1996. However, failure to detect declines could have a number of explanations and these explanations illustrate the many public health...

  4. Parental Stress and Related Factors in Parents of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yi Wang

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy display prominent motor dysfunction associated with other developmental disorders. Parenting a child with cerebral palsy presents a number of challenges and stresses. The first purpose of this study was to compare parental stress in parents of children with cerebral palsy to that in parents of children with typical development. The second purpose was to analyze the correlations between parental stress and parents' characteristics, the child's characteristics, the child's earliest age when rehabilitation was first commenced, and weekly frequency of rehabilitation for the child. A convenience sample of 63 parents of children with cerebral palsy (mean age of children, 4.3 ± 1.8 years was recruited. Forty parents of children with typical development were recruited as a comparison group. All parents filled out the Chinese version of the Parenting Stress Index (PSI, which consists of child domain and parent domain scales. The scores reported by parents of children with cerebral palsy in the child domain, parent domain, and PSI total scale were significantly higher than those for parents in the comparison group. The child domain score was significantly correlated to the child's age and severity of motor disability. A significant correlation was also found between the parent domain score and the child's earliest age of commencing rehabilitation. The PSI total scale score was significantly associated with both the child's severity of motor disability and age of commencing rehabilitation. Clinical professionals should be concerned about parental stress in parents of children with cerebral palsy and provide resources to support such parents. We suggest some strategies to reduce parental stress by strengthening parents' child-care skills.

  5. Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Outcomes following a Conservative Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert A; Pisansky, Andrew; Fleck, Joseph; Hoversten, Patrick; Cotter, Katherine J; Katorski, Jenna; Liberman, Daniel; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy is characterized by motor impairment following injury to the developing brain. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is estimated to affect at least a third of children with cerebral palsy. However there are limited data as patients transition to adulthood. We sought to describe the symptoms, sequelae and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of adult patients with cerebral palsy between 2011 and 2014. Patients with prior bladder reconstruction or catheterization based bladder drainage were excluded from study. Cerebral palsy severity was determined using GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System). A conservative evaluation and treatment paradigm was used. Noninvasive treatments were encouraged. Specifically clean intermittent catheterization, which is often not feasible, is avoided unless urinary retention, hydronephrosis or refractory lower urinary tract symptoms develop. There were 121 patients included in final analysis. Median age was 25 and 61 patients (50%) had GMFCS level V. Noninvasive management failed in 28 of 121 patients (23%) as defined by hydronephrosis in 9, persistent urinary retention in 10 and refractory lower urinary tract symptoms/incontinence in 9. Urethral clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated. Of all patients 25% showed evidence of urolithiasis during the study period. Surgical intervention was rare and associated with significant morbidity. Adults with cerebral palsy may present with variable signs and symptoms of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. Conservative treatment was successful in more than 75% of patients. Clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated in patients in whom conservative treatment failed. Surgical intervention was rarely indicated and it should be reserved for select individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  6. Preliminary study of novel, timed walking tests for children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Lanovaz, Joel; Bisaro, Derek; Oates, Alison; Musselman, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Walking assessment is an important aspect of rehabilitation practice; yet, clinicians have few psychometrically sound options for evaluating walking in highly ambulatory children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of two new measures of walking function-the Obstacles and Curb tests-relative to the 10-Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test in children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy. A total of 16 ambulatory children with spina bifida (n=9) or cerebral palsy (n=7) (9 boys; mean age 7years, 7months; standard deviation 3years, 4months) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children participated. Children completed the walking tests, at both self-selected and fast speeds, twice. To evaluate discriminative validity, scores were compared between typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy groups. Within the spina bifida/cerebral palsy group, inter-test correlations evaluated convergent validity and intraclass correlation coefficients evaluated within-session test-retest reliability. At fast speeds, all tests showed discriminative validity (pspina bifida/cerebral palsy comparisons) and convergent validity (rho=0.81-0.90, p⩽0.001, for inter-test correlations). At self-selected speeds, only the Obstacles test discriminated between groups (p=0.001). Moderately strong correlations (rho=0.73-0.78, p⩽0.001) were seen between the 10-Meter Walk test, Curb test, and Timed Up and Go test. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.97, with higher test-retest reliability for tests performed at fast speeds rather than self-selected speeds. The Obstacles and Curb tests are promising measures for assessing walking in this population. Performing tests at fast walking speeds may improve their validity and test-retest reliability for children with spina bifida/cerebral palsy.

  7. Cerebral Autoregulation in Stroke A Review of Transcranial Doppler Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Elting, Jan W.; De Keyser, Jacques; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Vroomen, Patrick C. A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cerebral autoregulation may become impaired after stroke. To provide a review of the nature and extent of any autoregulation impairment after stroke and its course over time, a technique allowing repeated bedside measurements with good temporal resolution is required.

  8. Patterns of regional cerebral blood flow in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Skriver, E B

    1981-01-01

    In a consecutive group of 56 stroke patients the regional cerebral blood flow was measured within 84 hours after stroke. A 254 multidetector scintillation camera and the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection method was used to study rCBF. Typical rCBF-patterns are described and compared to the findings...

  9. Trends in cerebral palsy among infants of very low birthweight (<1500 g) or born prematurely (<32 weeks) in 16 European centres: a database study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platt, Mary Jane; Cans, Christine; Johnson, Ann

    2007-01-01

    of infants from both of these groups survive into childhood. This paper describes changes in the frequency and distribution of cerebral palsy by sex and neurological subtype in infants with a birthweight below 1000 g and 1000-1499 g in the period 1980-96. METHODS: A group of 16 European centres, Surveillance...... of Cerebral Palsy in Europe, agreed a standard definition of cerebral palsy and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data for children with cerebral palsy born in the years 1980-96 were pooled. The data were analysed to describe the distribution and prevalence of cerebral palsy in VLBW infants. Prevalence trends...

  10. Study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of Brain in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyati Sharma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common forms of severe disability of childhood is cerebral palsy which has a special relationship to preterm birth. Cerebral palsy is a broad term used to describe a spectrum of non-progressive motor disabilities, resulting from brain damage at or around birth. It presents with muscle spasticity with involuntary movements, impaired mobility, seizures etc. At present, cerebral palsy has no cure and it is managed symptomatically. Aim: To study the different lesions in the brain in children with clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy and correlation of the findings on MRI brain with type of cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: Total 60 diagnosed cases of cerebral palsy were evaluated with history and clinical examination. Cerebral palsy children were investigated by performing neuroimaging (MRI. The MRI scans were conducted on a GE Sigma 1.5 Scanner. Routinely, the scans obtained were T1 Weighted, T2 Weighted and FLAIR (axial, coronal and sagittal sequences. In each patient, the images were assessed for any abnormal signal in the brain parenchyma, myelination of brain as per age of the baby and size of the ventricle. Results: The maximum number of children (36% were from the age group 1-2 years followed by 30% in the age group of < 1 year and 18% in age group of 3-4 years. Out of 60 patients 61.66% were males and 38.33% females. The majority of patients were delivered pre-term (68.33% followed by term delivery (31.67%. The majority of patients had spastic quadriplegia type of cerebral palsy. Periventricular leukomalacia was the most common abnormality found on imaging. The corpus callosum agenesis was seen in 1 (20% patient. Conclusion: The MRI scans help to reveal the pathologic causes leading to the condition with the MRI brain findings having a strong correlation with the clinical findings. The relationship between the locality of brain lesions, the structure and clinical functions in children with CP point to

  11. Predictors for early diagnosis of cerebral palsy from national registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granild-Jensen, Jakob Bie; Rackauskaite, Gija; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2015-01-01

    AIM: As early intervention is important in cerebral palsy (CP), an early diagnosis is desirable. The aim of this study was to establish the median diagnostic age of CP and to identify predictors of an early diagnosis in a population-based cohort. METHOD: Using the Danish National Cerebral Palsy...... Registry (NCPR), we identified 1291 children with CP (764 males, 527 females) born between 1995 and 2003. The date of diagnosis was defined as the day the parents were told that their child was spastic or had CP. We calculated the age of diagnosis and analysed the following predictors: type of CP, degree...

  12. Congenital cerebral palsy and prenatal exposure to self-reported maternal infections, fever, or smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streja, Elani; Miller, Jessica; Bech, Bodil H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate the association between maternal self-reported infections, fever, and smoking in the prenatal period and the subsequent risk for congenital cerebral palsy (CP). STUDY DESIGN: We included the 81,066 mothers of singletons born between 1996...... and midgestation. We identified 139 CP cases including 121 cases of spastic CP (sCP) as confirmed by the Danish National Cerebral Palsy Register. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Self-reported vaginal...

  13. Surgical correction of scoliosis in patients with severe cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Klaas; Lange, Tobias; Gosheger, Georg; Bövingloh, Albert Schulze; Borowski, Matthias; Bullmann, Viola; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Schulte, Tobias L

    2016-02-01

    There is a lack of data in the literature on surgical correction of severe neuromuscular scoliosis in patients with serious extent of cerebral palsy. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the radiological and clinical results after posterior-only instrumentation (group P) and combined anterior-posterior instrumentation (group AP) in severe scoliosis in patients with Gross Motor Function Classification System grades IV and V. All eligible patients who underwent surgery in one institution between 1997 and 2012 were analyzed, and charts, surgical reports, and radiographs were evaluated with a minimum follow-up period of 2 years. Fifty-seven patients were included (35 in group P, 22 in group AP), with a median follow-up period of 4.1 years. The preoperative mean Cobb angles were 84° (34 % flexibility) in group P and 109° (27 % flexibility) in group AP. In group P, the Cobb angle was 39° (54 % correction) at discharge and 43° at the final follow-up, while in group AP the figures were 54° (50 % correction) at discharge and 56° at the final follow-up. Major complications occurred in 23 vs. 46 % of the patients, respectively. Preoperative curve flexibility was an important predictor for relative curve correction, independently of the type of surgery. Posterior-only surgery appears to lead to comparable radiological results, with shorter operating times and shorter intensive-care unit and hospital stays than combined surgery. The duration of surgery was a relevant predictor for complications.

  14. Ocular disorders in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Yaman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To document common ocular abnormalities in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy (CP and to find out whether any correlation exists between their occurance and etiologic factors. METHODS: Totally 194 patients with the diagnosis of spastic type CP were enrolled in this retrospective study. Detailed ophthalmic examinations were performed. Demographic data and neuroradiological findings were documented. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney U, Pearson Chi-square tests and Student’s t tests were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean age was 64.7±44.2 months on the first ophthalmic examination. Prevalences of diplegia (47.4% and tetraplegia (36.1% were found to be higher than the frequency of hemiplegia (16.5% in our study population. Etiologic factor was asphyxia in 60.8% of the patients. Abnormal ocular findings were present in 78.9% of the patients. Statistically significant poor vision was detected in tetraplegia group among all the spastic ubtypes of CP (P=0.000. Anisometropia and significant refractive error were found in 14.4% and 70.1% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-six children (18.6% had nystagmus and 107 children (55.2% had strabismus. Lower gestational age and birth weight were statistically higher in patients with esotropia than exotropia (P=0.009 and P=0.024, respectively. Abnormal morphology of the optic disc was present in 152 eyes (39.2%. Severe periventricular leukomalacia (PVL was found in 48 patients and statistically significant poor vision was detected in the presence of PVL (P=0.000. CONCLUSION: Spastic diplegic or tetraplegic CP patients with positive neuroradiological symptoms, younger gestational age and lower birth weight ought to have detailed ophthalmic examinations as early as possible to provide best visual rehabilitation.

  15. Joint-Position Sense and Kinesthesia in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Jason R.; Burton, Harold; Sinclair, Robert J.; Brunstrom, Janice E.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Examine joint-position sense and kinesthesia in all extremities in participants with diplegic or hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Survey of joint-position sense and kinesthesia differences between aged-matched controls and 2 groups with CP. Setting: University movement assessment laboratory. Participants: Population-based sample of participants with CP, diplegia (n=21), hemiplegia (n=17), and age-matched volunteers (n=21) without neurologic disease. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Joint-position sense and kinesthesia were measured in the transverse plane (forearm pronation/supination and hip internal/external rotation) using a custom built device. For joint-position sense, participants actively rotated the tested limb to align the distal end with 10 target positions first with the limb and targets visible to assess their ability to perform the task motorically. The task was then repeated with vision of the limb occluded, with targets remaining visible. Joint-position sense error was determined by the magnitude and direction of the rotation errors for each limb in the vision and no vision conditions. Kinesthesia was evaluated by the ability to detect passive limb rotation without vision. Results: No group differences were detected in the vision condition. Indicative of joint-position sense deficits, a significant increase in errors was found in the no vision condition in all limbs except the dominant upper limb for both groups with CP. Joint-position sense errors were systematically biased toward the direction of internal rotation. Kinesthesia deficits were evident on the nondominant upper limb in diplegia and hemiplegia, and bilaterally in the lower limbs in hemiplegia. In hemiplegia, joint-position sense and kinesthesia deficits were noted on the dominant limbs, but were significantly worse on the nondominant limbs. Conclusions: These results indicate that people with CP have proprioception deficits in all limbs. PMID

  16. Gait improvement surgery in ambulatory children with diplegic cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terjesen, Terje; Lofterød, Bjørn; Skaaret, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Instrumented 3-D gait analyses (GA) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) have shown improved gait function 1 year postoperatively. Using GA, we assessed the outcome after 5 years and evaluated parental satisfaction with the surgery and the need for additional surgery. Patients and methods 34 ambulatory children with spastic diplegia had preoperative GA. Based on this GA, the children underwent 195 orthopedic procedures on their lower limbs at a mean age of 11.6 (6–19) years. On average, 5.7 (1–11) procedures per child were performed. Outcome measures were evaluation of gait quality using the gait profile score (GPS) and selected kinematic parameters, functional level using the functional mobility scale (FMS), and the degree of parental satisfaction. Results The mean GPS improved from 20.7° (95% CI: 19–23) preoperatively to 15.4° (95% CI: 14–17) 5 years postoperatively. There was no significant change in GPS between 1 and 5 years. The individual kinematic parameters at the ankle, knee, and hip improved statistically significantly, as did gait function (FMS). The mean parental satisfaction, on a scale from 0 to 10, was 7.7 (2–10) points. There was a need for additional surgical procedures in 14 children; this was more frequent in those who had the index operation at an early age. Interpretation The main finding was that orthopedic surgery based on preoperative GA gave marked improvements in gait function and quality, which were stable over a 5-year period. Nevertheless, additional orthopedic procedures were necessary in almost half of the children and further follow-up with GA for more than 1 year postoperatively is recommended in children with risk factors for such surgery. PMID:25637100

  17. Congenital cerebral palsy, child sex and parent cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elani Streja

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. METHODS: All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to model risk of cardiovascular outcomes for exposed parents compared to all other parents beginning at the child's 10(th birthday. RESULTS: We identified 733,730 mothers and 666,652 fathers among whom 1,592 and 1,484, respectively, had a child with CP. The mean age for mothers at end of follow up was 50 ± 8 years. After adjustment for maternal age, parental education, child's sex, child's residence, child being small for gestational age and maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, mothers of CP male children had an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.16-2.00, attributable mostly to an increased incidence of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. After additional adjustment for preterm birth, the association was markedly attenuated for cardiovascular disease (1.34, 95%CI: 1.02 - 1.76, became nonsignificant for hypertension, but remained significant for cerebrovascular disease (HR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.45- 5.12. There was no increased risk of cardiovascular events in mothers of female CP children, or fathers of CP children of any sex. CONCLUSIONS: Women that have a male child with CP are at increased risk for premature cardiovascular disease. Part of this association may be related to risk factors for preterm births.

  18. Orthopedic surgery in cerebral palsy: Instructional course lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic surgery (OS plays an important role in the management of cerebral palsy (CP. The objectives of OS are to optimize functions and prevent deformity. Newer developments in OS for CP include emphasis on hip surveillance, minimally invasive procedures, use of external fixators instead of plates and screws, better understanding of lever arm dysfunctions (that can only be corrected by bony OS, orthopedic selective spasticity-control surgery, and single-event multilevel lever arm restoration and anti spasticity surgery, which have led to significant improvements in gross motor function and ambulation, especially in spastic quadriplegia, athetosis, and dystonia. The results of OS can be dramatic and life altering for the person with CP and their caregivers if it is performed meticulously by a specialized surgical team, at the appropriate age, for the correct indications, employing sound biomechanical principles and is followed by physician-led, protocol based, intensive, multidisciplinary, institutional rehabilitation, and long term followup. However, OS can be a double-edged sword, and if performed less than optimally, and without the supporting multidisciplinary medical and rehabilitation team, expertise and infrastructure, it often leads to significant functional worsening of the person with CP, including irretrievable loss of previous ambulatory capacity. OS must be integrated into the long term management of the person with CP and should be anticipated and planned at the optimal time and not viewed as a “last resort” intervention or failure of rehabilitation. This instructional course lecture reviews the relevant contemporary principles and techniques of OS in CP.

  19. Immature spinal locomotor output in children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Cappellini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP, but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analysed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2-12 years and 33 typically developing (TD children (1-12 years. TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children. Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behaviour.

  20. Early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijna eHadders-Algra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the opportunities and challenges for early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy (CP. CP describes a group of disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to disturbances that occurred in the fetal or infant brain. Therefore the paper starts with a summary of relevant information from developmental neuroscience. Most lesions underlying CP occur in the second half of gestation, when developmental activity in the brain reaches its summit. Variations in timing of the damage not only result in different lesions, but also in different neuroplastic reactions and different associated neuropathologies. This turns CP into a heterogeneous entity. This may mean that the best early diagnostics and the best intervention methods may differ for various subgroups of children with CP. Next, the paper addresses possibilities for early diagnosis. It discusses the predictive value of neuromotor and neurological exams, neuro-imaging techniques and neurophysiological assessments. Prediction is best when complementary techniques are used in longitudinal series. Possibilities for early prediction of CP differ for infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and other infants. In the former group best prediction is achieved with the combination of neuro-imaging and the assessment of general movements, in the latter group best prediction is based on carefully documented milestones and neurological assessment. The last part reviews early intervention in infants developing CP. Most knowledge on early intervention is based on studies in high risk infants without CP. In these infants early intervention programs promote cognitive development until preschool age; motor development profits less. The few studies on early intervention in infants developing CP suggest that programs that stimulate all aspects of infant development by means of family coaching are most promising. More research is

  1. Muscle synergy analysis in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Li, Fei; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu; Wu, De; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To explore the mechanism of lower extremity dysfunction of cerebral palsy (CP) children through muscle synergy analysis. Approach. Twelve CP children were involved in this study, ten adults (AD) and eight typically developed (TD) children were recruited as a control group. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals were collected bilaterally from eight lower limb muscles of the subjects during forward walking at a comfortable speed. A nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm was used to extract muscle synergies. In view of muscle synergy differences in number, structure and symmetry, a model named synergy comprehensive assessment (SCA) was proposed to quantify the abnormality of muscle synergies. Main results. There existed larger variations between the muscle synergies of the CP group and the AD group in contrast with the TD group. Fewer mature synergies were recruited in the CP group, and many abnormal synergies specific to the CP group appeared. Specifically, CP children were found to recruit muscle synergies with a larger difference in structure and symmetry between two legs of one subject and different subjects. The proposed SCA scale demonstrated its great potential to quantitatively assess the lower-limb motor dysfunction of CP children. SCA scores of the CP group (57.00 ± 16.78) were found to be significantly less (p < 0.01) than that of the control group (AD group: 95.74 ± 2.04; TD group: 84.19 ± 11.76). Significance. The innovative quantitative results of this study can help us to better understand muscle synergy abnormality in CP children, which is related to their motor dysfunction and even the physiological change in their nervous system.

  2. Physical Strain: A New Perspective on Walking in Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balemans, Astrid C; Bolster, Eline A; Brehm, Merel-Anne; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    2017-12-01

    To describe (1) physical strain of walking, (2) the proportion of participants walking above the anaerobic threshold, and (3) 4 phenotypes of physical strain of walking on the basis of deviations in aerobic capacity and walking energy cost (EC) in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Cohort study. Academic medical center. A sample (N=57) of participants (n=37; mean age, 13.5±4.0y) with CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels I [n=13], II [n=17], and III [n=7]) and typically developing (TD) participants (n=20; mean age, 11.8±3.5y). Not applicable. Oxygen consumption (Vo 2 walk), speed, and EC were determined during walking at a comfortable speed. Peak oxygen consumption (Vo 2 peak) and anaerobic threshold were measured during a maximal cycling exercise test. Aerobic capacity was reduced if lower than the 10th percentile, and EC was increased if higher than 3SD. Physical strain was defined as follows: (Vo 2 walk/Vo 2 peak)×100. Participants with CP had a higher physical strain (GMFCS level I, 55%±12% GMFCS level II, 62%±17%; GMFCS level III, 78%±14%) than did TD participants (40%±11%) (Pexercise and a considerable proportion walks close to or above their anaerobic threshold, probably explaining fatigue and reduced walking distance. Both an increased EC and a reduced Vo 2 peak contribute to high physical strain in children or adolescents with CP. The different causes of high physical strain in individuals with CP require different intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of Independent Walking in Young Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begnoche, Denise M; Chiarello, Lisa A; Palisano, Robert J; Gracely, Edward J; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Orlin, Margo N

    2016-02-01

    The attainment of walking is a focus of physical therapy intervention in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and may affect their independence in mobility and participation in daily activities. However, knowledge of determinants of independent walking to guide physical therapists' decision making is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify child factors (postural control, reciprocal lower limb movement, functional strength, and motivation) and family factors (family support to child and support to family) that predict independent walking 1 year later in young children with CP at Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels II and III. A secondary data analysis of an observational cohort study was performed. Participants were 80 children with CP, 2 through 6 years of age. Child factors were measured 1 year prior to the walking outcome. Parent-reported items representing family factors were collected 7 months after study onset. The predictive model was analyzed using backward stepwise logistic regression. A measure of functional strength and dynamic postural control in a sit-to-stand activity was the only significant predictor of taking ≥3 steps independently. The positive likelihood ratio for predicting a "walker" was 3.26, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.74. The model correctly identified a walker or "nonwalker" 75% of the time. Prediction of walking ability was limited by the lack of specificity of child and family characteristics not prospectively selected and measurement of postural control, reciprocal lower limb movement, and functional strength 1 year prior to the walking outcome. The ability to transfer from sitting to standing and from standing to sitting predicted independent walking in young children with CP. Prospective longitudinal studies are recommended to determine indicators of readiness for independent walking. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  4. Early intervention to improve hand function in hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Purna Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy often have marked hand involvement with excessive thumb adduction and flexion and limited active wrist extension from infancy. Post-lesional aberrant plasticity can lead to progressive abnormalities of the developing motor system. Disturbances of somatosensory and visual function and developmental disregard contribute to difficulties with hand use. Progressive soft tissue and bony changes may occur, leading to contractures which further limit function in a vicious cycle. Early intervention might help to break this cycle: however, the precise nature and appropriateness of the intervention must be carefully considered. Traditional approaches to the hemiplegic upper limb include medications and botulinum toxin injections to manage abnormalities of tone, and surgical interventions. Therapist input, including provision of orthoses, remains a mainstay although many therapies have not been well evaluated. There has been a recent increase in interventions for the hemiplegic upper limb, mostly aimed outside the period of infancy. These include trials of constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual therapy as well as the use of virtual reality and robot-assisted therapy. In future, non-invasive brain stimulation may be combined with therapy. Interventions under investigation in the infant age group include modified constraint-induced movement therapy and action observation therapy. A further approach which may be suited to the infant with thumb-in-palm deformity, but which requires evaluation, is the use of elastic taping. Enhanced cutaneous feedback through mechanical stimulation to the skin provided by the tape during movement has been postulated to modulate ongoing muscle activity. If effective, this would represent a low-cost, safe, widely applicable early intervention.

  5. Variation in cerebral palsy profile by socio-economic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoui, Maryam; Messerlian, Carmen; Blair, Alexandra; Gamache, Philippe; Shevell, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Socio-economic differences in maternal and child health are well recognized, but the role of individual-level and area-level determinants in cerebral palsy (CP) phenotypes is debated. We set out to examine (1) the association between area-level and individual-level measures of socio-economic deprivation and CP phenotype among children, including subtype, severity, and comorbidities; and (2) the direct effect of area-level deprivation not mediated through individual-level deprivation. Regional data from a provincial CP register were analyzed. The outcome of interest was CP phenotype. The area-level exposure was measured using the Pampalon Deprivation Index. Individual-level socio-economic status (SES) was determined using maternal education. We conducted multiple regression models, stratified by preterm birth, controlling for key covariates, and a mediation analysis of area-level deprivation on the association between individual SES and CP phenotype. A socio-economic gradient in mobility was seen in our cohort, above and beyond differences in maternal and perinatal factors. The added direct effect of area-level deprivation was seen only in children whose mothers were educated to a higher level, suggesting no additional contribution of area-level deprivation in children of mothers with a lower level of education. Contextual socio-economic factors can impact the severity of CP. These findings indicate important areas for potential community-level or area-level public health intervention (i.e. neighborhood reinvestment, preventive measures), and suggest that neighborhood-level research in maternal and perinatal health should continue to be pursued. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  6. Aculaser therapy for the treatment of cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Ammad, Haseeb U.

    2012-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensoryneural deafness and speech disorders. In all 500 children were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 4 years from December 2006 till December 2010. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for a minimum of 08 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 342 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 294 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 252 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 182 children showing 72% success rate, out of 96 children with Cortical Blindness 60 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 210 children with Hearing Difficulties, 126 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 380 children with Speech Disorders 244 showed improvement reflecting 64 % improvement rate, out of 192 children with Hemiplegia 142 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 152 children with Quadriplegia 104 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 116 children with

  7. The natural history of hip development in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terjesen, Terje

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a population-based radiographic hip surveillance programme for children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to assess the natural history of hip displacement. The study comprised 335 children (188 males, 147 females), born during 2002 to 2006 in the 10 south-eastern counties in Norway. Their mean age at the first radiograph was 3 years (range 6mo-7y 11mo) and the mean age at the most recent follow-up was 5 years 5 months. Distribution according to CP type was spastic hemiplegia in 38%, diplegia in 27%, quadriplegia in 21%, dyskinesia in 10%, and ataxia in 3%; Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to V were, 44%, 14%, 8%, 11%, and 23% respectively. Migration percentage (MP), acetabular index, and pelvic obliquity were measured on the radiographs. Hip displacement (MP>33%) occurred in 26% of all children (subluxation in 22% and dislocation in 4%) and in 63% of those in GMFCS levels IV or V. Dislocation occurred in 14 children at a mean age of 4 years 5 months (range 1y 10mo-9y 7mo). The mean migration percentage was 20.4% at the initial radiographs and 34.0% at the last follow-up. Mean progression in migration percentage increased markedly with decreasing functional level, from 0.2% per year at GMFCS level I to 9.5% at level V. There is a pronounced trend towards hip displacement in nonambulant children. Close surveillance from age 1 to 2 years is needed to find the appropriate time for preventive surgery. Since 12% of the nonambulant children developed dislocation, our routines for hip surveillance need improvement. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  8. Intensive dysarthria therapy for younger children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Roelant, Ella; Thompson, Vicki; Robson, Sheila; Steen, Nick; Miller, Nick

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if intervention targeting breath support, phonation, and speech rate increases speech intelligibility and participation in the conversational interactions of younger children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (CP). Fifteen children with dysarthria and CP (nine males, six females; age range 5-11 y, mean age 8 y, SD 2 y; CP type: eight spastic, four dyskinetic, one ataxia, two Worster Drought syndrome; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II-IV, median level II) participated in this study. Children received three sessions of individual therapy per week for 6 weeks. Intelligibility of single words and connected speech was compared across five points: 1 and 6 weeks before therapy and 1, 6, and 12 weeks after therapy. Three familiar listeners and three unfamiliar listeners scored each recording. Participation in communicative interactions was measured using the Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six (FOCUS) tool. Analyses of variance and paired t-tests were used to investigate change. Mean speech intelligibility increased after therapy to familiar listeners (single words 10.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.2-14.4; connected speech 9.4%, 95% CI 4.8-14.1) and unfamiliar listeners (single words 9.3%, 95% CI 6.8-11.8; connected speech 10.5%, 95% CI 7.3-13.8). FOCUS scores increased following therapy for parents (mean increase 30.3, 95% CI 10.2-50.4) and for teachers (28.25, 95% CI 14.4-42.1), but changes did not correlate with intelligibility. A wide variation was seen in individual responses to therapy. Brief intensive therapy is associated with gains in intelligibility and communicative interactions for some younger children with dysarthria. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Traumatic dental injuries in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Maria Teresa Botti Rodrigues; Souza, Caroline Bitencourt Cardoso

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most frequent conditions encountered in the daily practice of dentists who treat special-needs individuals and it seems that traumatic dental injuries are often present in these cases. The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the prevalence related to traumatic dental injury (TDI) in individuals with CP attending rehabilitation treatment at the Lar Escola Sao Francisco Rehabilitation Center in São Paulo, Brazil. The sample included 100 individuals with a medical diagnosis of CP (SG) aged 1-15 years (mean 7 years 2 months +/-SD 3 years 4 months) and 100 non-disabled individuals (CG), aged 1-15 years (mean 7 years 5 months +/- SD 4 years 0 month), presenting the same socioeconomic level as SG. Data were collected through clinical examinations according to Andreasen criteria and interviews. According to the Gross Motor Function Classification, the SG presented 34.0% of individuals that walked with or without assistive mobility devices and 66.0% required a wheelchair for mobility. The TDI prevalence observed for CG was 32.0% (n = 32), with 20.0% (n = 20) for SG, showing no statistically significant difference (P = 0.053). For both groups, the teeth most affected were the maxillary central incisors. Crown fracture without pulp exposure was the most frequent type of injury (31.2%) in CG and enamel fracture (30.0%), in SG. The groups differed significantly regarding dental treatment received after TDI (P = 0.012), with CG presenting higher percentages of treated individuals The data suggest that the TDI prevalence in individuals presenting CP and attending rehabilitation treatment was similar compared with non-disabled individuals, but they received less treatment.

  10. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP. As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measurement, spasticity (MAS – Modified Ashworth Scale, heart rate (HR and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. Results. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p<0.05. The level of spasticity was considerably decreased after therapy; the mean value before treatment was 3.21 according to MAS, and after treatment it was 1.95 (p<0.001. After treatment there was a statistically significant improvement of cardiorespiratory indurance, i.e., there was a significant decrease in the mean value of HR and a significant increase of VO2max (p<0.001. Conclusion. Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175092

  11. Prevention of cerebral palsy during labour: role of foetal lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borruto, Franco; Comparetto, Ciro; Treisser, Alain

    2008-07-01

    Intrapartum foetal monitoring goal is to prevent foetal asphyxia and its most severe consequence: cerebral palsy (CP). In this paper we describe the detection methods and the criteria needed to assess asphyxia during labour for preventing CP. Foetal cerebral damage assessment is considered from the medical-legal point of view. CP represents the most frequent pathology of childhood related to pregnancy and childbirth with an incidence of 0.2% in children born alive. It is clinically regarded as the result of a spectrum of diseases due to damage or to faded development of the nervous system which generally appears at the time of the first stage of intra-uterine growth or depends on problems arising at birth. The goal of our analysis is to recall the various moments in which this event can take place and, if possible, the moment and the degree of the event of asphyxia and its effect on foetal conditions, in order to control and treat it. One hundred and eighty-eight fetuses were evaluated by means of Apgar score, intrapartum cardiotocography, observation of the presence of meconium stained amniotic fluid, and clinical features of distress at birth. Lactate concentrations were measured during labour and at delivery in blood samples obtained from the foetal presenting part (foetal scalp) and from the umbilical cord with the use of a rapid electrochemical technique. Evidence of clinical foetal distress was not related to the severity of asphyxia. An increased lactate level was found in asphyctic infants and a clear correlation between lactic acidosis and foetal distress was documented. Low Apgar scores were observed in infants with moderate or severe asphyxia at delivery. Scalp lactate correlated significantly with umbilical artery lactate (P = 0.49, 0.01), but with neither Apgar score at 1 min (R = -0.21, ns) nor at 5 min (R = -0.11, ns). Lactate concentration was higher in case of instrumental delivery compared to spontaneous delivery (P = 0.0001). No perfect

  12. What are the best animal models for testing early intervention in cerebral palsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin John Clowry

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interventions to treat cerebral palsy should be initiated as soon as possible in order to restore the nervous system to the correct developmental trajectory. One drawback to this approach is that interventions have to undergo exceptionally rigorous assessment for both safety and efficacy prior to use in infants. Part of this process should involve research using animals but how good are our animal models? Part of the problem is that cerebral palsy is an umbrella term that covers a number of conditions. There are also many causal pathways to cerebral palsy, such as periventricular white matter injury in premature babies, perinatal infarcts of the middle cerebral artery or generalised anoxia at the time of birth, indeed multiple causes, including intra-uterine infection or a genetic predisposition to infarction, may need to interact to produce a clinically significant injury. In this review we consider which animal models best reproduce certain aspects of the condition, and the extent to which the multifactorial nature of cerebral palsy has been modelled. The degree to which the corticospinal system of various animals models human corticospinal system function and development is also explored. Where attempts have already been made to test early intervention in animal models, the outcomes are evaluated in light of the suitability of the model.

  13. Treadmill training with partial body weight support compared with conventional gait training for low-functioning children and adolescents with nonspastic cerebral palsy: a two-period crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ivan Y W; Chung, Kenny K Y; Chow, Daniel H K

    2013-12-01

    Partial body weight-supported treadmill training has been shown to be effective in gait training for patients with neurological disorders such as spinal cord injuries and stroke. Recent applications on children with cerebral palsy were reported, mostly on spastic cerebral palsy with single subject design. There is lack of evidence on the effectiveness of such training for nonspastic cerebral palsy, particularly those who are low functioning with limited intellectual capacity. This study evaluated the effectiveness of partial body weight-supported treadmill training for improving gross motor skills among these clients. A two-period randomized crossover design with repeated measures. A crossover design following an A-B versus a B-A pattern was adopted. The two training periods consisted of 12-week partial body weight-supported treadmill training (Training A) and 12-week conventional gait training (Training B) with a 10-week washout in between. Ten school-age participants with nonspastic cerebral palsy and severe mental retardation were recruited. The Gross Motor Function Measure-66 was administered immediately before and after each training period. Significant improvements in dimensions D and E of the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 and the Gross Motor Ability Estimator were obtained. Our findings revealed that the partial body weight-supported treadmill training was effective in improving gross motor skills for low-functioning children and adolescents with nonspastic cerebral palsy. .

  14. The corticospinal tract: a biomarker to categorize upper limb functional potential in unilateral cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen eJaspers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP typically present with largely divergent upper limb sensorimotor deficits and individual differences in response to upper limb rehabilitation. This review summarizes how early brain damage can cause dramatic deviations from the normal anatomy of sensory and motor tracts, resulting in unique wiring patterns of the sensorimotor system in CP. Based on the existing literature we suggest that corticospinal tract (CST anatomy and integrity constrains sensorimotor function of the upper limb and potentially also the response to treatment. However, it is not possible to infer CST (reorganization from clinical presentation alone and conventional biomarkers like time of the insult, location and extent of the lesion seem to have limited clinical utility. Here we propose a theoretical framework based on a detailed examination of the motor system using behavioral, neurophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging measures, akin to those used to predict potential for upper limb recovery of adults after stroke. This theoretical framework might prove useful because it provides testable hypotheses for future research with the goal to develop and validate a clinical assessment flowchart to categorize children with unilateral CP.

  15. Muscle synergies and complexity of neuromuscular control during gait in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Rozumalski, Adam; Schwartz, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have impaired movement due to a brain injury near birth. Understanding how neuromuscular control is altered in CP can provide insight into pathological movement. We sought to determine if individuals with CP demonstrate reduced complexity of neuromuscular control during gait compared with unimpaired individuals and if changes in control are related to functional ability. Muscle synergies during gait were retrospectively analyzed for 633 individuals (age range 3.9-70y): 549 with CP (hemiplegia, n=122; diplegia, n=266; triplegia, n=73; quadriplegia, n=88) and 84 unimpaired individuals. Synergies were calculated using non-negative matrix factorization from surface electromyography collected during previous clinical gait analyses. Synergy complexity during gait was compared with diagnosis subtype, functional ability, and clinical examination measures. Fewer synergies were required to describe muscle activity during gait in individuals with CP compared with unimpaired individuals. Changes in synergies were related to functional impairment and clinical examination measures including selective motor control, strength, and spasticity. Individuals with CP use a simplified control strategy during gait compared with unimpaired individuals. These results were similar to synergies during walking among adult stroke survivors, suggesting similar neuromuscular control strategies between these clinical populations. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Its Relation to Severity and Type of Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Sajedi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP suffer from several problems, so the family especially the mothers undertake a lot of social and emotional difficulties. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of depression in mothers of children with CP in comparison with mothers who have normal children and its relation to the type of CP and severity of the disability. During this descriptive-analytic study, 43 mothers who had younger than 8 year-old children with CP under rehabilitation services in SABA clinic, related to the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR, Tehran, Iran, were selected as the case group by simple sampling. A data registration form and the Beck Depression Inventory II were completed by them. The type of CP and the severity of disability were determined by a pediatrician and an occupational therapist respectively, using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Seventy-seven mothers of normal children, serving as the control group for comparing with case group, filled in the same questionnaires. There were significant differences in the mean depression scores (P=0.003 between the two groups. Having a child with CP also increases the risk of developing depression in mothers as much as 2.26 times (OR=2.26. There were no statistically significant differences in depression scores and the severity of disability and also among the five types of CP. It seems that having a child with CP is probably associated with higher prevalence and severity of depression in mothers. So treatment or prevention of depression in mothers of children with CP is highly recommended for improving the rehabilitation process and achieve better results in these children.

  17. Mechanical muscle and tendon properties of the plantar flexors are altered even in highly functional children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Annika; Schranz, Christian; Svehlik, Martin; Tilp, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Recent ultrasound studies found increased passive muscle stiffness and no difference in tendon stiffness in highly impaired children and young adults with cerebral palsy. However, it is not known if muscle and tendon mechanical properties are already altered in highly functional children with cerebral palsy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical and material properties of the plantar flexors in highly functional children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children. Besides strength measurements, ultrasonography was used to assess gastrocnemius medialis and Achilles tendon elongation and stiffness, Achilles tendon stress, strain, and Young's modulus in twelve children with cerebral palsy (GMFCS levels I and II) and twelve typically developing peers during passive dorsiflexion rotations as well as maximum voluntary contractions. Despite no difference in ankle joint stiffness (P>0.05) between groups, passive but not active Achilles tendon stiffness was significantly decreased (-39%) and a tendency of increased passive muscle stiffness was observed even in highly functional children with cerebral palsy. However, material properties of the tendon were not altered. Maximum voluntary contraction showed reduced plantar flexor strength (-48%) in the cerebral palsy group. Even in children with mild spastic cerebral palsy, muscle and tendon mechanical properties are altered. However, it appears that the Achilles tendon stiffness is different only when low forces act on the tendon during passive movements. Although maximum voluntary force is already decreased, forces acting on the Achilles tendon during activity appear to be sufficient to maintain typical material properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antenatal and intrapartum interventions for preventing cerebral palsy: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Emily; Salam, Rehana A; Middleton, Philippa; Makrides, Maria; McIntyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Crowther, Caroline A

    2017-08-08

    Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term encompassing disorders of movement and posture, attributed to non-progressive disturbances occurring in the developing fetal or infant brain. As there are diverse risk factors and causes, no one strategy will prevent all cerebral palsy. Therefore, there is a need to systematically consider all potentially relevant interventions for their contribution to prevention. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane reviews regarding the effects of antenatal and intrapartum interventions for preventing cerebral palsy. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on 7 August 2016, for reviews of antenatal or intrapartum interventions reporting on cerebral palsy. Two authors assessed reviews for inclusion, extracted data, assessed review quality, using AMSTAR and ROBIS, and quality of the evidence, using the GRADE approach. We organised reviews by topic, and summarised findings in text and tables. We categorised interventions as effective (high-quality evidence of effectiveness); possibly effective (moderate-quality evidence of effectiveness); ineffective (high-quality evidence of harm or of lack of effectiveness); probably ineffective (moderate-quality evidence of harm or of lack of effectiveness); and no conclusions possible (low- to very low-quality evidence). We included 15 Cochrane reviews. A further 62 reviews pre-specified the outcome cerebral palsy in their methods, but none of the included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reported this outcome. The included reviews were high quality and at low risk of bias. They included 279 RCTs; data for cerebral palsy were available from 27 (10%) RCTs, involving 32,490 children. They considered interventions for: treating mild to moderate hypertension (two) and pre-eclampsia (two); diagnosing and preventing fetal compromise in labour (one); preventing preterm birth (four); preterm fetal maturation or neuroprotection (five); and managing preterm fetal compromise (one). Quality of

  19. Developmental trajectories of receptive and expressive communication in children and young adults with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, R.C.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Verhoef, M.; van Schie, P.E.M.; Voorman, J.M.; Wiegerink, D.J.H.G.; Geytenbeek, J.J.M.; Roebroeck, M.E.; Becher, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the developmental trajectories of expressive (speech) and receptive (spoken and written language) communication by type of motor disorder and intellectual disability in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The development of 418 participants (261

  20. Kinetic comparison of walking on a treadmill versus over ground in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Krogt, M.M.; Sloot, L.H.; Buizer, A.I.; Harlaar, J.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic outcomes are an essential part of clinical gait analysis, and can be collected for many consecutive strides using instrumented treadmills. However, the validity of treadmill kinetic outcomes has not been demonstrated for children with cerebral palsy (CP). In this study we compared ground

  1. Acquisition and Maintenance of Toothbrushing Skills by Students with Cerebral Palsy and Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Martha E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Three elementary-aged students with quadriplegic cerebral palsy and severe/profound mental retardation were taught three toothbrushing tasks (brushing teeth, rinsing, and wiping mouth) using time delay to fade physical prompts, reinforcement, and error correction. Two students reached criterion on all three tasks; one student reached criterion on…

  2. Changes in endurance and walking ability through functional physical training in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, H.; Holty, L.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Elvers, J.W.H.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and effect of a functional physical training program on aerobic endurance and walking ability of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: Thirteen children (8-13 years, Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II, with normal intelligence or mild

  3. Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

  4. Home literacy predictors of early reading development in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.; Verhoeven, L.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Balkom, H. van; Leeuwe, J. van

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present 1-year long longitudinal study was to determine which home literacy variables were effective in stimulating early reading skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP) directly or indirectly via the reading precursors. Parents of 35 children with CP completed questionnaires

  5. Reference Values for Anaerobic Performance and Agility in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bloemen, Manon; Kruitwagen, Cas; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to provide reference values of anaerobic performance and agility in a group of children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 300 children (184 males, 116 females) with spastic CP were recruited from 26 rehabilitation centres in six different countries. Of these, 215 were classified at…

  6. Neurorehabilitation with versus without resistance training after botulinum toxin treatment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Jensen, Bente Rona; Nielsen, Lone M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of physical rehabilitation with (PRT) and without (CON) progressive resistance training following treatment of spastic plantarflexors with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Fourteen children with CP performed supervised...

  7. Motor imagery training in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a potentially useful therapeutic tool for rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Craje, Céline; Nilsen, D.M.; Gordon, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates that motor deficits in cerebral palsy (CP) are related not only to problems with execution, but also to impaired motor planning. Current rehabilitation mainly focuses on alleviating compromised motor execution. Motor imagery is a promising method of training the more

  8. Social Participation of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: Trade-Offs and Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Debra A.; Lawless, John J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Palisano, Robert J.; Freeman, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a qualitative study about the experiences and perceptions of adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) in relation to social participation. A phenomenological approach was used to interview 10 adolescents with CP, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling. An iterative process of data collection…

  9. Unmet Health Care Needs in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Katie E.; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; McPheeters, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Children with potentially severe health conditions such as cerebral palsy (CP) are at risk for unmet health care needs. We sought to determine whether children with CP had significantly greater unmet health care needs than children with other special health care needs (SHCN), and whether conditions associated with CP increased the odds of unmet…

  10. Control of angular momentum during walking in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body

  11. Control of angular momentum during walking in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, S.M.; Meyns, P.; Jonkers, I.; Kaat, D.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body

  12. Spasticity, dyskinesia and ataxia in cerebral palsy : Are we sure we can differentiate them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, H.; Kremer, D.; Brouwer, O. F.; Contarino, M. F.; van Egmond, M. E.; Elema, A.; Folmer, K.; van Hoorn, J. F.; van de Pol, L. A.; Roelfsema, Vincent; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    Objective: Cerebral palsy (CP) can be classified as spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic or combined. Correct classification is essential for symptom-targeted treatment. This study aimed to investigate agreement among professionals on the phenotype of children with CP based on standardized videos. Methods:

  13. Determinants of Developmental Gain in Daily Activities in Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, Anne J A; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Verschuren, Olaf; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Jongmans, Marian J; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine which child and family characteristics at the child's age of 2 years are determinants of development of self-care and mobility activities over a period of 2 years in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Longitudinal data of 92 children, representing all

  14. Determinants of developmental gain in daily activities in young children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, Anne JA; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Verschuren, Olaf; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Jongmans, Marian J; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine which child and family characteristics at the child's age of 2 years are determinants of development of self-care and mobility activities over a period of 2 years in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Longitudinal data of 92 children, representing all

  15. Kinematic characteristics of reaching movements in preterm children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Heide, JC; Fock, JM; Otten, Bert; Stremmelaar, E; Hadders-Algra, M

    Kinematic characteristics of reaching movements of the dominant arm were assessed in 51 sitting preterm children who were aged 2-11 y and had cerebral palsy (CP), including 33 with spastic hemiplegia and 18 with bilateral CP (Bi-CP). Reference data of 29 typically developing children were present.

  16. Arm Swing during Walking at Different Speeds in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Massaad, Firas; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) have difficulties walking at a normal or high speed. It is known that arm movements play an important role to achieve higher walking speeds in healthy subjects. However, the role played by arm movements while walking at different speeds has received no attention in children with CP. Therefore we investigated the…

  17. Macrostructural and Microstructural Brain Lesions Relate to Gait Pathology in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Gestel, L. Van; Leunissen, I.; Cock, P. De; Sunaert, S.; Feys, H.; Duysens, J.; Desloovere, K.; Ortibus, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Even though lower-limb motor disorders are core features of spastic cerebral palsy (sCP), the relationship with brain lesions remains unclear. Unraveling the relation between gait pathology, lower-limb function, and brain lesions in sCP is complex for several reasons; wide heterogeneity

  18. Effect of seat surface inclination on postural control during reaching in preterm children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna; van der Heide, Jolanda C.; Fock, Johanna M.; Stremmelaar, Elisabeth; van Eykern, Leo A.; Otten, Bert

    Background and Purpose Because it is debatable whether seat surface inclination improves motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP), the effect of seat surface tilting on postural control and quality of reaching was studied. Subjects The subjects were 58 children with CP aged 2 to 11 years

  19. Exploring Issues of Participation among Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: What's Important to Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Michael H.; Stewart, Debra; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine what participation issues are important to adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Two hundred and three adolescents with CP (mean age 16.0 [plus or minus] 1.8 years) were assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). This was done through semistructured interviews by…

  20. Feeding Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Laurie; Majnemer, Annette; Darsaklis, Vasiliki

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the evidence of the effectiveness of different feeding interventions for children with cerebral palsy. Methods: A search of 12 electronic databases identified all relevant studies. For each study, the quality of the methods was assessed according to the study design. A total of 33 articles were retrieved, and 21 studies were…

  1. A neurocognitive perspective on developmental disregard in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, A.; Aarts, P.B.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Steenbergen, B.

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to

  2. Matching Accuracy in Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy during Unimanual and Bimanual Movements with (Mirror) Visual Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study participants with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) were asked to match the position of a target either with the impaired arm only (unimanual condition) or with both arms at the same time (bimanual condition). The target was placed at 4 different locations scaled to the individual maximum reaching distance. To test the…

  3. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  4. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  5. Why is joint range of motion limited in patients with cerebral palsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, M.; Smeulders, M. J. C.; Kreulen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with spastic cerebral palsy of the upper limb typically present with various problems including an impaired range of motion that affects the positioning of the upper extremity. This impaired range of motion often develops into contractures that further limit functioning of the spastic hand

  6. Socio-clinical issues in cerebral palsy in Sagamu, Nigeria | Ogunlesi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common neurological disorder of childhood with significant implications. Objective. To determine the socio-clinical characteristics of children with CP at a paediatric neurology clinic in Sagamu, Nigeria. Methods. Hospital records of 92 children attending the clinic between 2000 and ...

  7. Sensory Feedback Training for Improvement of Finger Perception in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Blumenstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop and to test a feedback training system for improvement of tactile perception and coordination of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. Methods. The fingers of 7 probands with cerebral palsy of different types and severity were stimulated using small vibration motors integrated in the fingers of a hand glove. The vibration motors were connected through a microcontroller to a computer and to a response 5-button keyboard. By pressing an appropriate keyboard button, the proband must indicate in which finger the vibration was felt. The number of incorrect responses and the reaction time were measured for every finger. The perception and coordination of fingers were estimated before and after two-week training using both clinical tests and the measurements. Results. Proper functioning of the developed system in persons with cerebral palsy was confirmed. The tactile sensation of fingers was improved in five of seven subjects after two weeks of training. There was no clear tendency towards improvement of selective use of fingers. Conclusion. The designed feedback system could be used to train tactile perception of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. An extensive study is required to confirm these findings.

  8. Story Retelling and Language Ability in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy and Speech Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Dahlgren Sandberg, Annika; Miniscalco, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on retelling ability and cognition is limited in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and speech impairment. Aims: To explore the impact of expressive and receptive language, narrative discourse dimensions (Narrative Assessment Profile measures), auditory and visual memory, theory of mind (ToM) and non-verbal cognition on the…

  9. Effectiveness of physical therapy interventions for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Heidi; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Suoranta, Jutta

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the effectiveness of physical therapy (PT) interventions on functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHODS: A search was made in Medline, Cinahl, PEDro and the Cochrane library for the period 1990 to February 2007. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on PT in...

  10. Language Development and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics in Preschool Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Eun Sook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate characteristics of language development in relation to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and the other contributing factors to language development in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The study included 172 children with CP who underwent brain MRI and language…

  11. Measurement of Habitual Physical Activity Performance in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanchy, Kelly M.; Tweedy, Sean M.; Boyd, Roslyn

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This systematic review compares the validity, reliability, and clinical use of habitual physical activity (HPA) performance measures in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Measures of HPA across Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-V for adolescents (10-18y) with CP were included if at least 60% of items…

  12. Mirror Visual Feedback Induces Lower Neuromuscular Activity in Children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, Max G.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effects of mirror feedback information on neuromuscular activation during bimanual coordination in eight children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and a matched control group. The "mirror box" creates a visual illusion, which gives rise to a visual perception of a zero lag, symmetric movement between the two…

  13. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Eccentric Strength Training in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Siobhan; Hamer, Peter; Alderson, Jacqueline; Lloyd, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine the neuromuscular outcomes of an eccentric strength-training programme for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: In this randomised, parallel-group trial with waiting control, 14 participants with CP (six males, eight females; mean age 11y, SD 2y range 9-15y), diagnosed with upper-limb spasticity were…

  14. Development of Romantic Relationships and Sexual Activity in Young Adults With Cerebral Palsy: A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.J.; Stam, H.J.; Gorter, J.W.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Roebroeck, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the development of romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP), to investigate whether this development is associated with demographic and physical characteristics, and to compare the sexual activity of this group with an

  15. Outcome Assessments in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Part II: Discriminatory Ability of Outcome Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Anita M; Gorton, George; Oeffinger, Donna; Barnes, Douglas; Calmes, Janine; Nicholson, Diane; Damiano, Diane; Abel, Mark; Kryscio, Richard; Rogers, Sarah; Tylkowski, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Discriminatory ability of several pediatric outcome tools was assessed relative to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level in patients with cerebral palsy. Five hundred and sixty-two patients (400 with diplegia, 162 with hemiplegia; 339 males, 223 females; age range 4-18y, mean 11y 1mo [SD 3y 7mo]), classified as GMFCS Levels I to…

  16. Is Interlimb Coordination during Walking Preserved in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Desloovere, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Duysens, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Arm movements during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are altered compared to typically developing children (TD). We investigated whether these changes in arm movements alter interlimb coordination in CP gait. 3D gait analysis was performed in CP (diplegia [DI]: N = 15 and hemiplegia [HE]: N = 11) and TD (N = 24) children at preferred and…

  17. Motor imagery for walking: A comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  18. Motor imagery for walking: a comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  19. Motor imagery for walking: A comparison between cerebral palsy adolescents with hemiplegia and diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, M.; Kudlinski, C.; Guilbert, J.; Spruijt, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Jouen, F.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate whether motor imagery (MI) could be observed in cerebral palsy (CP) participants presenting a bilateral affected body side (diplegia) as it has been previously revealed in participants presenting a unilateral body affected sided (hemiplegia). MI capacity for

  20. Self-Concept of Children with Cerebral Palsy Compared with that of Children without Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Loy, Yijun; Murdoch, Alison; Taylor, Nicholas F.; Dodd, Karen J

    2007-01-01

    This study examined whether the self-concept of children with cerebral palsy (CP) differed from that of children without impairment. Forty-seven children (24 males, 23 females; mean age 11y 8mo [SD 2y 6mo]) with spastic diplegia or hemiplegia were matched with children without impairment. The level of disability of the children with CP was…

  1. Reproducibility and validity of video screen measurements of gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, Sebastian; van Kampen, Petra J.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Brehm, Merel-Anne; Doorenbosch, Caroline A. M.; Becher, Jules G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the reproducibility and validity of video screen measurement (VSM) of sagittal plane joint angles during gait. METHODS: 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy walked on a 10m walkway. Videos were recorded and 3d-instrumented gait analysis was performed. Two investigators

  2. Reproducibility and validity of video screen measurements of gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, S.; van Kampen, P.M.; van der Krogt, M.M.; Brehm, M.A.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Becher, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the reproducibility and validity of video screen measurement (VSM) of sagittal plane joint angles during gait. Methods: 17 children with spastic cerebral palsy walked on a 10. m walkway. Videos were recorded and 3d-instrumented gait analysis was performed. Two investigators

  3. Cross-Cultural adaptation of an instrument to computer accessibility evaluation for students with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerusa Ferreira Lourenço

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The specific literature indicates that the successful education of children with cerebral palsy may require the implementation of appropriate assistive technology resources, allowing students to improve their performance and complete everyday tasks more efficiently and independently. To this end, these resources must be selected properly, emphasizing the importance of an appropriate initial assessment of the child and the possibilities of the resources available. The present study aimed to translate and adapt theoretically an American instrument that evaluates computer accessibility for people with cerebral palsy, in order to contextualize it for applicability to Brazilian students with cerebral palsy. The methodology involved the steps of translation and cross-cultural adaptation of this instrument, as well as the construction of a supplementary script for additional use of that instrument in the educational context. Translation procedures, theoretical and technical adaptation of the American instrument and theoretical analysis (content and semantics were carried out with the participation of professional experts of the special education area as adjudicators. The results pointed to the relevance of the proposal of the translated instrument in conjunction with the script built to the reality of professionals involved with the education of children with cerebral palsy, such as occupational therapists and special educators.

  4. Knee jerk responses in infants at high risk for cerebral palsy: an observational EMG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, E.G.; Dijkstra, L.J.; Hooijsma, S.J.; Zijdewind, I.; Hadders-Algra, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following our clinical observation of tonic responses in response to the knee jerk in infants at very high risk for cerebral palsy (VHR infants), we systematically studied tonic responses, clonus, and reflex irradiation. We questioned (i) whether these responses occurred more often in

  5. Development of the quality of reaching in infants with cerebral palsy : a kinematic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxum, Anke G; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Dijkstra, Linze-Jaap; Hamer, Elisa G; Hielkema, Tjitske; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To assess development of reaching and head stability in infants at very high risk (VHR-infants) of cerebral palsy (CP) who did and did not develop CP. METHOD: This explorative longitudinal study assessed the kinematics of reaching and head sway in sitting in 37 VHR-infants (18 CP) one to four

  6. Longitudinal Study of Motor Performance and Its Relation to Motor Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, Mirjam; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Voorman, Jeanine M.; Becher, Jules G.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the course of motor performance and analyse its relationship with motor capacity over a period of 3 years in 104 children (66 males, 38 females; 43% of those initially invited) with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 9, 11, and 13 years at the start of the study. Forty-one had hemiplegia, 42 diplegia, 21…

  7. How Executive Functions Are Evaluated in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Armanda; Lopes, Sílvia; Magalhães, Paula; Sampaio, Adriana; Chaleta, Elisa; Rosário, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine how executive functions are assessed in children and adolescents with Cerebral Palsy. Method: A systematic literature review was conducted using four bibliographic databases (WebScience, Scopus, PubMed, and Psycinfo), and only studies that evaluated at least one executive function were selected. Both the research and reporting of results were based on Cochrane's recommendations and PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) guidelines. Results: The instrument most frequently used was the D-KEFS. All studies point to the existence of impairments in the executive functions among children and adolescents with Cerebral Palsy with an impact on several cognitive and life domains. Interpretation: There is a need to further systematize the research protocols to study the executive functions and their assessment in the intervention context. Findings of this review presented a diversity of tests (e.g., D-KEFS) or tasks (e.g., The inhibitory ability task) used with children with Cerebral Palsy. However, no information was given about adaptations performed to the test/task to meet Cerebral Palsy's specificities. Future research could consider including this information, which is key both to researchers and practitioners. The results of this study have important implications and suggestions for future avenues and guidelines for research and practice.

  8. An Exploration of Loneliness: Communication and the Social Networks of Older People with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Liora; Balandin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is a large body of research focusing on the experiences of loneliness of older adults, yet little is known about the loneliness experiences of older adults with lifelong disability. In this paper, the authors present some findings from a larger qualitative study on the loneliness experiences of older people with cerebral palsy.…

  9. Development of bladder control in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roijen, LEG; Postema, K; von Limbeek, J; von Kuppevelt, HJM

    The study aimed to investigate the development of bladder control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to determinate subgroups with deviant development of bladder control and a higher risk of not achieving urinary continence. Children and adolescents between the ages of 4 and 18 years with a

  10. Effect of ankle-foot orthoses on walking efficiency and gait in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brehm, M.A.; Harlaar, J.; Schwartz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of ankle-foot orthoses on walking efficiency and gait in a heterogeneous group of children with cerebral palsy, using barefoot walking as the control condition. Design: A retrospective study. Methods: Barefoot and ankle-foot orthosis data for 172 children with

  11. Effect of ankle-foot orthoses on walking efficiency and gait in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brehm, Merel-Anne; Harlaar, Jaap; Schwartz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of ankle-foot orthoses on walking efficiency and gait in a heterogeneous group of children with cerebral palsy, using barefoot walking as the control condition. DESIGN: A retrospective study. METHODS: Barefoot and ankle-foot orthosis data for 172 children with

  12. Effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait in cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Knol, Dirk L.; Speth, Lucianne A.; Maathuis, Carel G.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Becher, Jules G.

    To evaluate the effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait pattern, muscle length, and spasticity, a multicenter randomized trial was performed in 46 children with spastic cerebral palsy who walk with flexed knees. Their mean age was 8.0 years (range 4 to 11

  13. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  14. Congenital anomalies in children with cerebral palsy: a population-based record linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rankin, Judith; Cans, Christine; Garne, Ester

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have a congenital anomaly (CA) in three regions (Isère Region, French Alps; Funen County, Denmark; Northern Region, England) where population-based CP and CA registries exist, and to classify the children according t...

  15. Relationships between Respiratory Muscle Strength and Daily Living Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Shih-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common childhood disorder characterized by motor disability. Children with CP are at risk of developing significant respiratory problems associated with insufficient respiratory muscle strength. It is crucial to identify important factors which are associated with the limitations in daily living function in such children.…

  16. Surgical treatment for the thumb-in-palm deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, M.; Coester, A.; Kreulen, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thumb-in-palm deformity in patients with spastic cerebral palsy is a deformity that impairs the ability to use the thumb and thus severely limits hand function. From the variety of operative procedures that have been described, it may be clear that there is no consensus on the surgical

  17. Geometrical adaptation in ulna and radius of cerebral palsy patients: measures and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, M.; van de Giessen, M.; Vroemen, J. C.; Veeger, H. E. J.; Maas, M.; Strackee, S. D.; Kreulen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of significant forearm bone torsion might affect planning and evaluating treatment regimes in cerebral palsy patients. We aimed to evaluate the influence of longstanding wrist flexion, ulnar deviation, and forearm pronation due to spasticity on the bone geometries of radius and ulna.

  18. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN LEG-GAITER SPLINT TERHADAP SPASTISITAS KNEE FLEXOR PADA PASIEN ANAK SPASTIC CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Syaifuddin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan: untuk mengetahui adakah pengaruh penggunaan leg-gaiter splint terhadap spastisitas knee flexor pada pasien anak spastic cerebral palsy. Subyek: 20 subyek spastic cerebral palsy. Tempat Penelitian: Pediatric and Neurodevelopmental Treatment Centre, Surakarta. Waktu penelitian: Januari 2016 – Maret 2016. Alat ukur: Modified Ashworth Scale – Bohannon (MAS-B. Desain penelitian: Penelitian ini menggunakan metode pra-eksperimental, dengan menggunakan one group pre-test and post-test design. Hasil: Uji normalitas menggunakan Shapiro-wilk test pada pre-test dan post-test menunjukkan nilai p<0,05, maka data berdistribusi tidak normal. Uji hipotesis menggunakan wilcoxon dengan hasil spastisitas pada tungkai kanan p<0,05 dan hasil spastisitas pada tungkai kiri p<0,05 maka terdapat pengaruh penggunaan leg-gaiter splint pada spastisitas pasien anak spastic cerebral palsy. Kesimpulan: berdasarkan analisis penelitian yang telah dilakukan dapat disimpulkan bahwa penggunaan leg-gaiter splint menurunkan derajat spastisitas knee flexor pada pasien anak spastic cerebral palsy.

  19. Activity limitation in hemiplegic cerebral palsy: Evidence for disorders in motor planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, B.; Gordon, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the recent reconsideration of the definition of cerebral palsy (CP), only disorders of the development of movement and posture are considered that cause activity limitations. Recent research findings provide new insights into the disorder showing that activity limitation in individuals with

  20. Teacher literacy expectations for kindergarten children with cerebral palsy in special education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.; Verhoeven, L.; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2009-01-01

    Teacher expectations are important for the literacy development of children. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent teacher expectations for future literacy success at the end of elementary school differed for children with cerebral palsy (CP) as compared with peers without

  1. Teacher literacy expectations for kindergarten children with cerebral palsy in special education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.H.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2009-01-01

    Teacher expectations are important for the literacy development of children. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent teacher expectations for future literacy success at the end of elementary school differed for children with cerebral palsy (CP) as compared with peers without

  2. Therapist-Designed Adaptive Riding in Children With Cerebral Palsy : Results of a Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angsupaisal, Mattana; Visser, Baudina; Alkema, Anne; Meinsma-van der Tuin, Marja; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background. It is debatable whether adaptive riding (AR) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) improves postural control and gross motor development. Objective. The study aim was to explore the feasibility of an extensive assessment protocol for a randomized controlled trial of therapist-designed

  3. Changes in Trunk and Head Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy after Hippotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Tim L.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Hippotherapy (HPOT) is a therapy that uses horse movement. This pilot investigation objectively evaluated the efficacy of HPOT in improving head/trunk stability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The participants were six children with spastic diplegia and six children without disability. Head and trunk stability was challenged by using a…

  4. Influence of Hippotherapy on Body Balance in the Sitting Position Among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Małachowska-Sobieska, Monika; Synder, Marek

    2016-03-23

    Cerebrally palsied children demonstrated limited independence while performing various activities of daily living, which is due to disorders of postural control. The best solution to improve postural control is the use of therapies that simultaneously focus on the sense of balance and motor skills. Such possibilities for patients with cerebral palsy are offered, for example, by hippotherapy. To assess the influence of hippotherapy on body balance in the sitting position among children with cerebral palsy. The study enrolled thirty-nine children aged 6-12 years with GMFCS level 1 or 2 spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia. The participants were divided into an intervention group (n=19) and a control group (n=20). Children from the intervention group attended 30 minutes of hippotherapy once weekly for 12 consecutive weeks. The Sitting Assessment Scale (SAS) was used to assess the patients' posture and balance. Some children improved their posture and balance during the study. Generally, control of trunk and head position and function of arms were getting better, while footwork was the weakest. Hippotherapy has positive effects on the position and function of individual parts of the body, thus making it possible for cerebrally palsied children to improve posture and the ability to maintain balance in the sitting position.

  5. [Application of exercise therapy on rehabilitation after selective posterior rhizotomy (SPR) in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Lin; Xu, Shi-Gang; Cao, Xu; Zhang, Peng; Zheng, Chen-Ying; Zhou, Li; Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Jiang

    2009-09-01

    To observe the clinical effect of exercise therapy on rehabilitation after selective posterior rhizotomy (SPR) in children with cerebral palsy, so as to provide reliable rehabilitation method for children with cerebral palsy. Two hundred and twenty-six children with cerebral palsy were treated in the study during September 2003 to April 2007. All the patients were randomly divided into the training and control groups. There were 113 patients in the treatment group, including 66 males and 47 females, ranging in age from 3 to 8 years, with an average of (6.5 +/- 1.2) years, and the patients were treated with SPR as well as exercise therapy. Among 113 patients in the control group, 59 patients were male and 54 patients were female, ranging in age from 3 to 10 years, with an average of (6.9 +/- 1.5) years, and the patients were treated with SPR simply. Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), passive range of motion and muscle tension were used to evaluate therapeutic effects before and after treatment for both groups. All the patients were followed up for 6 to 18 months (averaged 8 months). There were significant improvements in training group compared with the control group on GMFM (134.29 +/- 46.43, P children with cerebral palsy, which can decrease spasticity and muscle tension and improve motor function.

  6. Physical Activity Measurement Instruments for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Rotor, Esmerita R.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper is a systematic review of physical activity measurement instruments for field-based studies involving children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Database searches using PubMed Central, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PEDro located 12 research papers, identifying seven instruments that met the inclusion…

  7. Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

  8. Squat test performance and execution in children with and without cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, Maaike M; Harlaar, J.; Dallmeijer, A. J.; Waard, E.J.; van Bennekom, C.A.M.; Houdijk, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge on lower extremity strength is imperative to informed decision making for children with cerebral palsy (CP) with mobility problems. However, a functional and clinically feasible test is not available. We aimed to determine whether the squat test is suitable for this purpose by

  9. Squat test performance and execution in children with and without cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eken, M. M.; Harlaar, J.; Dallmeijer, A. J.; de Waard, E.; van Bennekom, C. A. M.; Houdijk, H.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on lower extremity strength is imperative to informed decision making for children with cerebral palsy (CP) with mobility problems. However, a functional and clinically feasible test is not available. We aimed to determine whether the squat test is suitable for this purpose by

  10. Measurement of the functional impact of adaptive seating technology in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Many young children with cerebral palsy have motor impairments that affect their ability to sit and do activities unsupported. They often rely on special adaptive seating devices for postural control and stability. Healthcare practitioners generally accept that these products improve functioning in

  11. Health status of children with cerebral palsy living in Europe: a multi-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E; White-Koning, M; Marcelli, M

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this report is to describe the health status of 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy (CP) of all severities in Europe using the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ). METHOD: A total of 818 children with CP from nine centres in defined geographical areas participated. CP type...

  12. Emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy in special education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.H.J.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to get an overview of the emergent literacy activities, instructional adaptations and school absence of children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to normally developing peers. The results showed that there were differences between the groups regarding the amount of

  13. Case study An elite runner with cerebral palsy: cost of running ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluate runners where one element of the model is systematically different. This paper reports a case study of an elite runner with cerebral palsy (CP). CP is “a disorder of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitations attributed to non‑progressive disturbances in the developing fetal or infant brain”.

  14. Reliability of classification of cerebral palsy in low-birthweight children in four countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paneth, N.; Qiu, H.; Rosenbaum, P.; Saigal, S.; Bishai, S.; Jetton, J.; Ouden, L. den; Broyles, S.; Tyson, J.; Kugler, K.

    2003-01-01

    The reliability of classification of cerebral palsy (CP) in low-birthweight children was assessed by using clinical and research study records sampled from population-based cohort studies in the USA, the Netherlands, Canada, and Germany. Records of neurological examination findings and functional

  15. Exploring Communication Technology Behaviour of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    rasid, Nadia natasha binte mohamed; Nonis, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Communication among adolescents with cerebral palsy can be restricted with traditional Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) device coupled with environmental and social barriers. The advance of communication technology offer solutions to reduce such barriers. Given that there is limited research in communication behaviours of…

  16. Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Depressed Mothers with Cerebral Palsy Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sedaghati Barogh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Findings Demonstrated that Parent of Children With Cerebral Palsy Experience Elevated Level of Distress, Depression, Anxiety, Posttraumatic Stress Symptom and Subjective Symptom of Stress. Depression is a common condition that typically has a relapsing course. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of the condition. Many of studies have shown that Mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT is an intervention that has shown efficacy in reducing Depression syndrome and depressive relapse. In This Study, Effectiveness of Mindfulness–Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT on Reduction of Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy was examined. Methods: Three Mothers Whose Children Had Cerebral Palsy Were Diagnosed to Have Depression Symptoms, Using Beck Depression Inventory II, Structured Clinical in This Experimental Signal–Case Study. After The Baseline was Determined, Subject Attended on Eight–Session Program of Mindfulness–Based Cognitive Therapy. Results: The Comparison of Baseline and Post–Test was Showed That Depression Symptom has decreased through MBC. Improvement Quotient for Depression of each Subject was good. Discussion: Data Showed that MBCT Reduced Depression Symptoms in Mothers of Children With Cerebral Palsy.

  17. Stationary Cycling and Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case Reports for Two Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Kara L.; DeMuth, Sharon K.; Knutson, Loretta M.; Fowler, Eileen G.

    2010-01-01

    These case reports describe a stationary cycling intervention and outcomes for two child participants (P1 and P2) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Each child completed a 12-week, 30-session cycling intervention consisting of strengthening and cardiorespiratory fitness phases. P1 exhibited higher training intensities, particularly during the…

  18. Dysarthria in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Cerebral Palsy: Speech Subsystem Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Hustad, Katherine C.; Kent, Ray D.; Lin, Yu Ching

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the speech characteristics of Mandarin-speaking children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children to determine (a) how children in the 2 groups may differ in their speech patterns and (b) the variables correlated with speech intelligibility for words and sentences. Method: Data from 6 children…

  19. Factors contributing to the longitudinal development of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Siok Swan; van der Slot, Wilma M A; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Becher, Jules G.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We aimed to determine factors associated with the longitudinal development of social participation in a Dutch population of individuals with Cerebral Palsy (CP) aged 1–24 years. Methods and procedures For this multicentre prospective longitudinal study, 424 individuals with CP aged 1–24 years

  20. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, M.A.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Ament, A.J.H.A.; van Raak, E.P.M.; Becher, J.G.; Rotteveel, J.; Vles, J.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we

  1. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, M.A.; Evers, S.M.; Ament, A.J.; Raak, E.P. van; Vles, J.S.; Becher, J.G.; Vermeulen, R.; Brouwer, O.F.; Maathuis, C.G.B.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C.E.; Gerritsen, J.; Geerts, M.J.; Jongerius, P.H.; Nieuwenhuizen, O.F.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Speth, L.A.; Stroink, H.; Ziel, E.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we

  2. Brain Structure and Executive Functions in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierink, Lonneke; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish the current knowledge about brain structure and executive function (EF) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Five databases were searched (up till July 2012). Six articles met the inclusion criteria, all included structural brain imaging though no functional brain imaging. Study quality was assessed using…

  3. A Perceptual Motor Intervention Improves Play Behavior in Children with Moderate to Severe Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryalls, Brigette O.; Harbourne, Regina; Kelly-Vance, Lisa; Wickstrom, Jordan; Stergiou, Nick; Kyvelidou, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    For children with moderate or severe cerebral palsy (CP), a foundational early goal is independent sitting. Sitting offers additional opportunities for object exploration, play and social engagement. The achievement of sitting coincides with important milestones in other developmental areas, such as social engagement with others, understanding of…

  4. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  5. Context Therapy: A New Intervention Approach for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Johanna; Law, Mary C.; Pollock, Nancy; Wilson, Brenda; Russell, Dianne J.; Walter, Stephen D.; Rosenbaum, Peter; Galuppi, Barb

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe the development of context therapy, a new intervention approach designed for a randomized controlled trial. Method: Therapists were trained to change task and environmental factors to achieve parent-identified functional goals for children with cerebral palsy. Therapists did not provide any remediation strategies to change the…

  6. Mothers' Reactions to the Diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy: Associations with Their Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Tatjana; Batic, Sanja; Mihic, Ljiljana; Milankov, Vesela

    2016-01-01

    The resolution of diagnosis of one's child involves coming to terms with the child's medical condition and accepting it both emotionally and cognitively. This study examined the relation between maternal resolution of the child's diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP) and their educational levels. We also aimed at understanding maternal resolution…

  7. Motor Learning of a Bimanual Task in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Ching; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) have been shown to improve their motor performance with sufficient practice. However, little is known about how they learn goal-oriented tasks. In the current study, 21 children with unilateral CP (age 4-10 years old) and 21 age-matched typically developed children (TDC) practiced a simple bimanual…

  8. Parental Views Regarding Seating and Participation for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolas, Jennifer; Boyle, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the views of parents regarding seating for children with cerebral palsy. Two interviews with parents were conducted. These were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. This small study outlines three themes: the importance of seating, seating and participation, and the parental role in…

  9. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  10. The Relationship between Manual Ability and Ambulation in Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Shevell, Michael; Poulin, Chantal; Lach, Lucyna; Law, Mary; Schmitz, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between gross motor function and manual ability in 120 adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) (15.2, SD 2.1 years, 59.8% male). Adolescents were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS). A neurologist classified CP subtype. Most…

  11. Digital Games and Assistive Technology: Improvement of Communication of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Inês Jesus; Travassos, Xisto Lucas; Sampaio, Renelson; Pereira-Guizzo, Camila de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze the frequency of occurrence of different forms of communication in nonspeaking children during activities with digital games. The participants in this study were three children with multiple disabilities, whose limitations were due to cerebral palsy. All the children had severe oral communication disabilities. Three…

  12. A Neurocognitive Perspective on Developmental Disregard in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwink, Annemieke; Aarts, Pauline B. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Steenbergen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to attentional processes and motor learning. From this…

  13. Assessment of Postural Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavao, Silvia Leticia; dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Woollacott, Marjorie Hines; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed to review studies that assessed postural control (PC) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and describe the methods used to investigate postural control in this population. It also intended to describe the performance of children with CP in postural control. An extensive database search was performed using the keywords: postural…

  14. An eye for possibilities in the development of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early...

  15. Maximal aerobic and anaerobic exercise responses in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balemans, A.C.J.; van Wely, L.; de Heer, S.J.; van den Brink, J.; de Koning, J.J.; Becher, J.G.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study is to compare the maximal aerobic and anaerobic exercise responses of children with cerebral palsy (CP) by level of motor impairment and in comparison with those of typically developing children (TD). METHODS: Seventy children with CP, with varying levels of

  16. Cognitive correlates of mathematical achievement in children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenks, K.M.; Lieshout, E.C. van; Moor, J.M.H. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remarkably few studies have investigated the nature and origin of learning difficulties in children with cerebral palsy (CP). AIMS: To investigate math achievement in terms of word-problem solving ability in children with CP and controls. Because of the potential importance of reading

  17. Children with Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida and Pragmatic Language Impairment: Differences and Similarities in Pragmatic Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Pernille; Nettelbladt, Ulrika; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren

    2009-01-01

    Pragmatically related abilities were studied in three clinical groups of children from 5 to 11 years of age; children with cerebral palsy (CP; n = 10), children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus (SBH; n = 10) and children with pragmatic language impairment (PLI; n = 10), in order to explore pragmatic abilities within each group. A range of…

  18. Inferential Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida and Pragmatic Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Pernille; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren; Nettelbladt, Ulrika

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the ability to make inferences in three groups of children ranging from 5;2 to 10;9 years: 10 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 10 children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus (SBH) and 10 children with pragmatic language impairment (PLI). The relationship between inferential and literal…

  19. Romantic Relationships and and Sexual Experiences of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.H.G. Wiegerink (Diana)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To describe the development of romantic relationships and sexual experiences of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and the physical and emotional obstacles they experience with sexuality. Regarding the ICF domains we investigated whether this development is associated with

  20. Sexuality of Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Experienced Limitations and Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.; Roebroeck, M.; Bender, J.; Stam, H.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this study is to describe the problems young adults with Cerebral Palsy (CP) experience in the various stages of the sexual response cycle, and the physical and emotional obstacles they experience with sexuality. In this prospective cohort study 74 young adults (46 men; 28 women) with

  1. Infants at very high risk of cerebral palsy : a challenging population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hielkema, Tjitske

    2017-01-01

    In general, developmental course of newborns is hard to predict. Risk factors, such as brain lesions or atypical movements, assist prediction of neurodevelopmental disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP). CP is the most common physical disability in paediatrics, causing limited mobility, often due

  2. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  3. The Effect of Otitis Media on Articulation in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Vyver, Marguerite; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study involving 20 Afrikaans-speaking children with cerebral palsy found that recurrent otitis media in early childhood had a negative effect on articulation abilities of the 7 to 11-year-old children but that other factors such as intelligence also played a role. (JDD)

  4. Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

  5. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  6. Gait analysis in children with cerebral palsy via inertial and magnetic sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Noort, J.C.; Ferrari, A.; Cutti, A.G.; Becher, J.G.; Harlaar, J.

    2013-01-01

    3D kinematic measurements in children with cerebral palsy (CP) to assess gait deviations can only be performed in gait laboratories using optoelectronic systems. Alternatively, an inertial and magnetic measurement system (IMMS) can be applied for ambulatory motion-tracking. A protocol named Outwalk

  7. Social interaction and self-esteem of children with cerebral palsy after treatment for severe drooling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, J.J.W. van der; Jongerius, P.H.; Limbeek, J. van; Hulst, K. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of salivary flow reduction following medication (scopolamine and botulinum neurotoxin) on social interaction and emotional development (self-esteem) was evaluated in a group of 45 children with cerebral palsy who suffered from severe drooling. The children ranged in age from 3 to 16 years

  8. A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

  9. Developing and Validating the Communication Function Classification System for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Paneth, Nigel; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Kent, Raymond D.; Lillie, Janet; Eulenberg, John B.; Chester, Ken, Jr.; Johnson, Brenda; Michalsen, Lauren; Evatt, Morgan; Taylor, Kara

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to create and validate the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) for children with cerebral palsy (CP), for use by a wide variety of individuals who are interested in CP. This paper reports the content validity, interrater reliability, and test-retest reliability of the CFCS for children with CP.…

  10. Classification of Topographical Pattern of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: A Registry Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Susan M.; Carlin, John B.; Reddihough, Dinah S.

    2011-01-01

    This study used data from a population-based cerebral palsy (CP) registry and systematic review to assess the amount of heterogeneity between registries in topographical patterns when dichotomised into unilateral (USCP) and bilateral spastic CP (BSCP), and whether the terms diplegia and quadriplegia provide useful additional epidemiological…

  11. Characterization of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: Dependence of Catch Angle on Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Goldsmith, Ashlee; Gaebler, Deborah; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate spasticity under controlled velocities and torques in children with cerebral palsy (CP) using a manual spasticity evaluator. Method: The study involved 10 children with spastic CP (six males, four females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 2y 9mo, range 7-16y; one with quadriplegia, six with right hemiplegia, three with left hemiplegia; Gross…

  12. Frequency of joined disabilities of children with cerebral palsy in Tuzla canton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Babajić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral palsy (CP connotes a group of non-progressive, but often variable symptoms of motor impairment of movement and posture, as well as other impairments which are a consequenceof anomalies or brain impairment in different phases of its development. CP is a pathological condition characterised in the fi rst place by motor function impairment to which other disorders such as: visual andhearing impairment, intellectual defi cit, emotional problems, behaviour disorder, speech disorder, epileptic seizure and similar can join. The aim of this study is to determine frequency of joined disabilities ofchildren with cerebral palsy in Tuzla Canton.Methods: The research covers a total sample of 48 examinees, chronological age from 2-19 years, in Tuzla Canton. Research instrument was a Structural Questionnaire for the parents of children and adolescentswith cerebral palsy. Research data were processed by nonparametric statistics method. Basic statistical parameters of frequency and percentages were calculated, and tabular presentation was made.Results: After classification of examinees as per frequency of joined disabilities was done, work results have shown that speech impairment occurred with 35.4 % of children, visual impairment 33.3 %, epilepsy29.3 %, whereas hearing impairment occurred with 2 % of children.Conclusion: In research of frequency of joined disabilities of children with cerebral palsy in Tuzla Canton, most expressed are speech and visual disorders with children, then epilepsy, whereas a small percentageof children are with hearing disorder.

  13. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Related Factors in Turkey: A Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Gorgulu, Gulderen

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to determine whether there was any difference, with respect to depression, between mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and mothers of healthy children. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether some additional factors had an impact on the depression of the mothers. The study included 49…

  14. Parents' reactions to the diagnosis of cerebral palsy : associations between resolution, age and severity of disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C.; Rentinck, I. C. M.; Stolk, J.; Voorman, J. M.; Loots, G. M. P.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; Becher, J. G.

    Background For parents, receiving a diagnosis, typically in early childhood, that their child has cerebral palsy may conjure up high distress and anxiety. Resolution of these initial reactions may help parents to focus on the challenges and needs of their children. Aims of the study were to test

  15. Motor Control of the Lower Extremity Musculature in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, David J.; Stuberg, Wayne; Stergiou, Nicholas; Kurz, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to quantify the differences in torque steadiness and variability of the muscular control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children. Fifteen children with CP (age = 14.2 [plus or minus] 0.7 years) that had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score of I-III and 15…

  16. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System for Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Palisano, Robert J.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Galuppi, Barbara E.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) for cerebral palsy has been widely used internationally for clinical, research, and administrative purposes. This paper recounts the ideas and work behind the creation of the GMFCS, reports on the lessons learned, and identifies some philosophical challenges inherent in trying to develop an…

  17. Ambulatory Activity of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Which Characteristics Are Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wely, Leontien; Becher, Jules G.; Balemans, Astrid C. J.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess ambulatory activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 7 to 13 years, and identify associated characteristics. Method: Sixty-two children with spastic CP (39 males, 23 females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 1y 8mo; age range 7-13y), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to III, participated.…

  18. Acceptability and Potential Effectiveness of a Foot Drop Stimulator in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Laura A.; Curatalo, Lindsey A.; Alter, Katharine E.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Ankle-foot orthoses are the standard of care for foot drop in cerebral palsy (CP), but may overly constrain ankle movement and limit function in those with mild CP. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be a less restrictive and more effective alternative, but has rarely been used in CP. The primary objective of this study was to…

  19. Longitudinal Development of Hand Function in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmefur, Marie; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena; Bergstrom, Jakob; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how the usefulness of the hemiplegic hand develops in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) aged between 18 months and 8 years. Method: A prospective longitudinal study of 43 children (22 males, 21 females) with unilateral CP was conducted. Inclusion age was 18 months to 5 years 4 months (mean 2y…

  20. Construct Validity of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Megan; Lannin, Natasha; Cusick, Anne; Novak, Iona; Boyd, Roslyn

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the construct validity of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 170 QUEST assessments from a convenience sample of 94 children with CP involved in clinical and research treatment programmes (54 males, 40 females; mean age 6y 10mo, SD…