WorldWideScience

Sample records for stroke association american

  1. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  2. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Racial-ethnic disparities in stroke care: the American experience: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Biller, Jose; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Griffith, Patrick; Gorelick, Philip B; Howard, George; Leira, Enrique C; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Peterson, Eric; Rosamond, Wayne; Trimble, Brian; Valderrama, Amy L

    2011-07-01

    Our goal is to describe the effect of race and ethnicity on stroke epidemiology, personal beliefs, access to care, response to treatment, and participation in clinical research. In addition, we seek to determine the state of knowledge on the main factors that may explain disparities in stroke care, with the goal of identifying gaps in knowledge to guide future research. The intended audience includes physicians, nurses, other healthcare professionals, and policy makers. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and represent different areas of expertise in relation to racial-ethnic disparities in stroke care. The writing group reviewed the relevant literature, with an emphasis on reports published since 1972. The statement was approved by the writing group; the statement underwent peer review, then was approved by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. There are limitations in the definitions of racial and ethnic categories currently in use. For the purpose of this statement, we used the racial categories defined by the US federal government: white, black or African American, Asian, American Indian/Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander. There are 2 ethnic categories: people of Hispanic/Latino origin or not of Hispanic/Latino origin. There are differences in the distribution of the burden of risk factors, stroke incidence and prevalence, and stroke mortality among different racial and ethnic groups. In addition, there are disparities in stroke care between minority groups compared with whites. These disparities include lack of awareness of stroke symptoms and signs and lack of knowledge about the need for urgent treatment and the causal role of risk factors. There are also differences in attitudes, beliefs, and compliance among minorities compared with whites. Differences in socioeconomic status and insurance coverage

  4. Physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinger, Sandra A; Arena, Ross; Bernhardt, Julie; Eng, Janice J; Franklin, Barry A; Johnson, Cheryl Mortag; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Macko, Richard F; Mead, Gillian E; Roth, Elliot J; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Tang, Ada

    2014-08-01

    This scientific statement provides an overview of the evidence on physical activity and exercise recommendations for stroke survivors. Evidence suggests that stroke survivors experience physical deconditioning and lead sedentary lifestyles. Therefore, this updated scientific statement serves as an overall guide for practitioners to gain a better understanding of the benefits of physical activity and recommendations for prescribing exercise for stroke survivors across all stages of recovery. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, morbidity and mortality reports, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence and indicate gaps in current knowledge. Physical inactivity after stroke is highly prevalent. The assessed body of evidence clearly supports the use of exercise training (both aerobic and strength training) for stroke survivors. Exercise training improves functional capacity, the ability to perform activities of daily living, and quality of life, and it reduces the risk for subsequent cardiovascular events. Physical activity goals and exercise prescription for stroke survivors need to be customized for the individual to maximize long-term adherence. The recommendation from this writing group is that physical activity and exercise prescription should be incorporated into the management of stroke survivors. The promotion of physical activity in stroke survivors should emphasize low- to moderate-intensity aerobic activity, muscle-strengthening activity, reduction of sedentary behavior, and risk management for secondary prevention of stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Ackerson, Teri; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Becker, Kyra; Biller, José; Brown, Michael; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Hoh, Brian; Jauch, Edward C; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Scott, Phillip A; Sheth, Kevin N; Southerland, Andrew M; Summers, Deborah V; Tirschwell, David L

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an up-to-date comprehensive set of recommendations for clinicians caring for adult patients with acute arterial ischemic stroke in a single document. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators. These guidelines supersede the 2013 guidelines and subsequent updates. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained. Members were not allowed to participate in discussions or to vote on topics relevant to their relations with industry. The members of the writing group unanimously approved all recommendations except when relations with industry precluded members voting. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 4 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. These guidelines use the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2015 Class of Recommendations and Levels of Evidence and the new American Heart Association guidelines format. These guidelines detail prehospital care, urgent and emergency evaluation and treatment with intravenous and intra-arterial therapies, and in-hospital management, including secondary prevention measures that are appropriately instituted within the first 2 weeks. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care in both the prehospital and hospital settings. These guidelines are based on the best evidence currently available. In many instances, however, only limited data exist demonstrating the urgent need for continued research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. An updated definition of stroke for the 21st century: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Ralph L; Kasner, Scott E; Broderick, Joseph P; Caplan, Louis R; Connors, J J Buddy; Culebras, Antonio; Elkind, Mitchell S V; George, Mary G; Hamdan, Allen D; Higashida, Randall T; Hoh, Brian L; Janis, L Scott; Kase, Carlos S; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Lee, Jin-Moo; Moseley, Michael E; Peterson, Eric D; Turan, Tanya N; Valderrama, Amy L; Vinters, Harry V

    2013-07-01

    Despite the global impact and advances in understanding the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases, the term "stroke" is not consistently defined in clinical practice, in clinical research, or in assessments of the public health. The classic definition is mainly clinical and does not account for advances in science and technology. The Stroke Council of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association convened a writing group to develop an expert consensus document for an updated definition of stroke for the 21st century. Central nervous system infarction is defined as brain, spinal cord, or retinal cell death attributable to ischemia, based on neuropathological, neuroimaging, and/or clinical evidence of permanent injury. Central nervous system infarction occurs over a clinical spectrum: Ischemic stroke specifically refers to central nervous system infarction accompanied by overt symptoms, while silent infarction by definition causes no known symptoms. Stroke also broadly includes intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The updated definition of stroke incorporates clinical and tissue criteria and can be incorporated into practice, research, and assessments of the public health.

  7. Dietary patterns are associated with incident stroke and contribute to excess risk of stroke in Black Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Newby, PK; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J; Locher, Julie L; Kissela, Brett M; Shikany, James M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Black Americans and residents of the Southeastern United States, are at increased risk of stroke. Diet is one of many potential factors proposed that might explain these racial and regional disparities. Methods Between 2003–2007, the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study enrolled 30,239 black and white Americans aged 45 years or older. Dietary patterns were derived using factor analysis and foods from food frequency data. Incident strokes were adjudicated using medical records by a team of physicians. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk of stroke. Results Over 5.7 years, 490 incident strokes were observed. In a multivariable-adjusted analysis, greater adherence to the Plant-based pattern was associated with lower stroke risk (HR=0.71; 95% CI=0.56–0.91; ptrend=0.005). This association was attenuated after addition of income, education, total energy intake, smoking, and sedentary behavior. Participants with a higher adherence to the Southern pattern experienced a 39% increased risk of stroke (HR=1.39; 95% CI=1.05, 1.84), with a significant (p = 0.009) trend across quartiles. Including Southern pattern in the model mediated the black-white risk of stroke by 63%. Conclusions These data suggest that adherence to a Southern style diet may increase the risk of stroke while adherence to a more plant-based diet may reduce stroke risk. Given the consistency of finding a dietary impact on stroke risk across studies, discussing nutrition patterns during risk screening may be an important step in reducing stroke. PMID:24159061

  8. Poststroke Depression: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Ovbiagele, Bruce; El Husseini, Nada; Hackett, Maree L; Jorge, Ricardo E; Kissela, Brett M; Mitchell, Pamela H; Skolarus, Lesli E; Whooley, Mary A; Williams, Linda S

    2017-02-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is common, affecting approximately one third of stroke survivors at any one time after stroke. Individuals with PSD are at a higher risk for suboptimal recovery, recurrent vascular events, poor quality of life, and mortality. Although PSD is prevalent, uncertainty remains regarding predisposing risk factors and optimal strategies for prevention and treatment. This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on the topic of PSD. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. Members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise and reviewed appropriate literature, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, and expert opinion. This multispecialty statement provides a comprehensive review of the current evidence and gaps in current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, management, and prevention of PSD, and provides implications for clinical practice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Defining Optimal Brain Health in Adults: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B; Furie, Karen L; Iadecola, Costantino; Smith, Eric E; Waddy, Salina P; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Bae, Hee-Joon; Bauman, Mary Ann; Dichgans, Martin; Duncan, Pamela W; Girgus, Meighan; Howard, Virginia J; Lazar, Ronald M; Seshadri, Sudha; Testai, Fernando D; van Gaal, Stephen; Yaffe, Kristine; Wasiak, Hank; Zerna, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive function is an important component of aging and predicts quality of life, functional independence, and risk of institutionalization. Advances in our understanding of the role of cardiovascular risks have shown them to be closely associated with cognitive impairment and dementia. Because many cardiovascular risks are modifiable, it may be possible to maintain brain health and to prevent dementia in later life. The purpose of this American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association presidential advisory is to provide an initial definition of optimal brain health in adults and guidance on how to maintain brain health. We identify metrics to define optimal brain health in adults based on inclusion of factors that could be measured, monitored, and modified. From these practical considerations, we identified 7 metrics to define optimal brain health in adults that originated from AHA's Life's Simple 7: 4 ideal health behaviors (nonsmoking, physical activity at goal levels, healthy diet consistent with current guideline levels, and body mass index brain health but recognize that the truly ideal circumstance may be uncommon because there is a continuum of brain health as demonstrated by AHA's Life's Simple 7. Therefore, there is opportunity to improve brain health through primordial prevention and other interventions. Furthermore, although cardiovascular risks align well with brain health, we acknowledge that other factors differing from those related to cardiovascular health may drive cognitive health. Defining optimal brain health in adults and its maintenance is consistent with the AHA's Strategic Impact Goal to improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20% and to reduce deaths resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20% by the year 2020. This work in defining optimal brain health in adults serves to provide the AHA/American Stroke Association with a foundation for a new strategic direction going forward in cardiovascular health

  10. Guidelines for Adult Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstein, Carolee J; Stein, Joel; Arena, Ross; Bates, Barbara; Cherney, Leora R; Cramer, Steven C; Deruyter, Frank; Eng, Janice J; Fisher, Beth; Harvey, Richard L; Lang, Catherine E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Pugh, Sue; Reeves, Mathew J; Richards, Lorie G; Stiers, William; Zorowitz, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a synopsis of best clinical practices in the rehabilitative care of adults recovering from stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The panel reviewed relevant articles on adults using computerized searches of the medical literature through 2014. The evidence is organized within the context of the AHA framework and is classified according to the joint AHA/American College of Cardiology and supplementary AHA methods of classifying the level of certainty and the class and level of evidence. The document underwent extensive AHA internal and external peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Stroke rehabilitation requires a sustained and coordinated effort from a large team, including the patient and his or her goals, family and friends, other caregivers (eg, personal care attendants), physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, recreation therapists, psychologists, nutritionists, social workers, and others. Communication and coordination among these team members are paramount in maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of rehabilitation and underlie this entire guideline. Without communication and coordination, isolated efforts to rehabilitate the stroke survivor are unlikely to achieve their full potential. As systems of care evolve in response to healthcare reform efforts, postacute care and rehabilitation are often considered a costly area of care to be trimmed but without recognition of their clinical impact and ability to reduce the risk of downstream medical morbidity resulting from

  11. Management of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdeyn, Colin P; Zipfel, Gregory J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Cooke, Daniel L; Feldmann, Edward; Sheehan, Jason P; Torner, James C

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this statement is to review the current data and to make suggestions for the diagnosis and management of both ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. The writing group met in person and by teleconference to establish search terms and to discuss narrative text and suggestions. Authors performed their own literature searches of PubMed, Medline, or Embase, specific to their allocated section, through the end of January 2015. Prerelease review of the draft statement was performed by expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. The focus of the scientific statement was subdivided into epidemiology; diagnosis; natural history; treatment, including the roles of surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and embolization; and management of ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. Areas requiring more evidence were identified. Brain arteriovenous malformations are a relatively uncommon but important cause of hemorrhagic stroke, especially in young adults. This statement describes the current knowledge of the natural history and treatment of patients with ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations, suggestions for management, and implications for future research. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Telemedicine Quality and Outcomes in Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Lawrence R; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Schwamm, Lee H; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Audebert, Heinrich J; Fanale, Christopher V; Hess, David C; Majersik, Jennifer J; Nystrom, Karin V; Reeves, Mathew J; Rosamond, Wayne D; Switzer, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-01

    Telestroke is one of the most frequently used and rapidly expanding applications of telemedicine, delivering much-needed stroke expertise to hospitals and patients. This document reviews the current status of telestroke and suggests measures for ongoing quality and outcome monitoring to improve performance and to enhance delivery of care. A literature search was undertaken to examine the current status of telestroke and relevant quality indicators. The members of the writing committee contributed to the review of specific quality and outcome measures with specific suggestions for metrics in telestroke networks. The drafts were circulated and revised by all committee members, and suggestions were discussed for consensus. Models of telestroke and the role of telestroke in stroke systems of care are reviewed. A brief description of the science of quality monitoring and prior experience in quality measures for stroke is provided. Process measures, outcomes, tissue-type plasminogen activator use, patient and provider satisfaction, and telestroke technology are reviewed, and suggestions are provided for quality metrics. Additional topics include licensing, credentialing, training, and documentation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Treatment and Outcome of Hemorrhagic Transformation After Intravenous Alteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Shadi; Willey, Joshua Z; Cucchiara, Brett; Goldstein, Joshua N; Gonzales, Nicole R; Khatri, Pooja; Kim, Louis J; Mayer, Stephan A; Sheth, Kevin N; Schwamm, Lee H

    2017-12-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) is the most feared complication of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke. Treatment of sICH is based on expert opinion and small case series, with the efficacy of such treatments not well established. This document aims to provide an overview of sICH with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. A literature review was performed for randomized trials, prospective and retrospective studies, opinion papers, case series, and case reports on the definitions, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome of sICH. The document sections were divided among writing group members who performed the literature review, summarized the literature, and provided suggestions on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with sICH caused by systemic thrombolysis with alteplase. Several drafts were circulated among writing group members until a consensus was achieved. sICH is an uncommon but severe complication of systemic thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. Prompt diagnosis and early correction of the coagulopathy after alteplase have remained the mainstay of treatment. Further research is required to establish treatments aimed at maintaining integrity of the blood-brain barrier in acute ischemic stroke based on inhibition of the underlying biochemical processes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Risk Factors for Stroke in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L; Keene, Keith L; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C; Kittner, Steven J; Rich, Stephen S; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Langefeld, Carl D; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, Yongmei; Sale, Michèle M; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, W T; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African Americans, despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14 746 African Americans (1365 ischemic and 1592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested genetic variants with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613; P=3.9×10(-8)) in African Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/mRNA presplicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, and IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. We identified a novel genetic variant associated with total stroke in African Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies genetic risk factors for stroke in African-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L.; Keene, Keith L.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F.; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C.; Kittner, Steven J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H.; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, YongMei; Sale, Michèle M.; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, WT; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B.; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African-Americans despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population genome-wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Methods Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14,746 African-Americans (1,365 ischemic and 1,592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested SNPs with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. Results The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613, P=3.9×10−8) in African-Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/ mRNA pre-splicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. Conclusions We identified a novel SNP associated with total stroke in African-Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African-Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. PMID:26089329

  16. Impact of the New American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Definition of Stroke on the Results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kasab, Sami; Lynn, Michael J; Turan, Tanya N; Derdeyn, Colin P; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. We also compared the use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in both treatment groups. By considering CITS as equivalent to stroke, the number of primary end points increased from 34 to 43 in the medical group and from 52 to 66 in the stenting group of SAMMPRIS. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the primary end points in the 2 groups were significantly different (P = .009). The percentage of patients with reported TIAs who underwent brain MRI was 69% in the medical group and 61% in the stenting group (P = .40). Using the AHA/ASA definition of stroke resulted in a substantially higher primary end point rate in both treatment groups and an even higher benefit from medical therapy over stenting than originally shown in SAMMPRIS. The higher rate of CITS in the stenting group was not due to ascertainment bias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration Associated with Stroke Among Elderly Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Design: Population-based cohort study. Participants: The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Methods: Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions (AMD and type, history of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes) were defined based on the occurrence of relevant ICD-9 codes in relevant diagnosis fields of the baseline Medicare Data. We excluded 215,900 persons who had a diagnosis of MI or stroke during baseline period to form a cohort of 1,303,186 individuals who were free of major cardio-cerebral vascular disease (CVD) at baseline. Main Outcome Measures: In two years of follow-up (January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003), a total of 89,501 incident stroke cases were identified, including 80,018 ischemic, 7048 hemorrhagic, and 2,435 stroke cases of both types. Results: Baseline mean age was 75 years (Standard Divination=7.7), with 60% women and 88% whites. The prevalence of AMD was 10.6%, with 19.7% being neovascular AMD and 80.3% being non-neovascular AMD. Baseline age, gender, race, hypertension, and diabetes adjusted 2-year incident odds ratios and 95% confidence internal of stroke associated with AMD were 1.31 (1.26, 1.36) for neovascular AMD, 1.18 (1.15, 1.21) for non-neovascular AMD, and 1.21 (1.18, 1.23) for either neovascular or non-neovascular AMD. Conclusion: The findings are suggestive of an association between AMD, especially neovascular AMD, and incident stroke, independent of demographic factors and co-morbidity. These findings, if confirmed by other studies that control for smoking and other lifestyle covariables not measured in this study, suggest the possibility of shared common

  18. Is age-related macular degeneration associated with stroke among elderly americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-03-08

    To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Population-based cohort study. The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions (AMD and type, history of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, hypertension, and diabetes) were defined based on the occurrence of relevant ICD-9 codes in relevant diagnosis fields of the baseline Medicare Data. We excluded 215,900 persons who had a diagnosis of MI or stroke during baseline period to form a cohort of 1,303,186 individuals who were free of major cardio-cerebral vascular disease (CVD) at baseline. In two years of follow-up (January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003), a total of 89,501 incident stroke cases were identified, including 80,018 ischemic, 7048 hemorrhagic, and 2,435 stroke cases of both types. Baseline mean age was 75 years (Standard Divination=7.7), with 60% women and 88% whites. The prevalence of AMD was 10.6%, with 19.7% being neovascular AMD and 80.3% being non-neovascular AMD. Baseline age, gender, race, hypertension, and diabetes adjusted 2-year incident odds ratios and 95% confidence internal of stroke associated with AMD were 1.31 (1.26, 1.36) for neovascular AMD, 1.18 (1.15, 1.21) for non-neovascular AMD, and 1.21 (1.18, 1.23) for either neovascular or non-neovascular AMD. The findings are suggestive of an association between AMD, especially neovascular AMD, and incident stroke, independent of demographic factors and co-morbidity. These findings, if confirmed by other studies that control for smoking and other lifestyle covariables not measured in this study, suggest the possibility of shared common antecedents between stroke and AMD.

  19. Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B Gregory; Brown, Robert D; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Broderick, Joseph P; Cockroft, Kevin M; Connolly, E Sander; Duckwiler, Gary R; Harris, Catherine C; Howard, Virginia J; Johnston, S Claiborne Clay; Meyers, Philip M; Molyneux, Andrew; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Ringer, Andrew J; Torner, James

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Writing group members used systematic literature reviews from January 1977 up to June 2014. They also reviewed contemporary published evidence-based guidelines, personal files, and published expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulated recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. The guideline underwent extensive peer review, including review by the Stroke Council Leadership and Stroke Scientific Statement Oversight Committees, before consideration and approval by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients presenting with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The guidelines address presentation, natural history, epidemiology, risk factors, screening, diagnosis, imaging and outcomes from surgical and endovascular treatment. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease : A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to

  1. Scientific Rationale for the Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria for Intravenous Alteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerschalk, Bart M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Demchuk, Andrew M; Fugate, Jennifer E; Grotta, James C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Levy, Elad I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Saposnik, Gustavo; Saver, Jeffrey L; Smith, Eric E

    2016-02-01

    To critically review and evaluate the science behind individual eligibility criteria (indication/inclusion and contraindications/exclusion criteria) for intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (alteplase) treatment in acute ischemic stroke. This will allow us to better inform stroke providers of quantitative and qualitative risks associated with alteplase administration under selected commonly and uncommonly encountered clinical circumstances and to identify future research priorities concerning these eligibility criteria, which could potentially expand the safe and judicious use of alteplase and improve outcomes after stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, morbidity and mortality reports, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence and to indicate gaps in current knowledge and, when appropriate, formulated recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on and approved the final version of this document. The document underwent extensive American Heart Association internal peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. After a review of the current literature, it was clearly evident that the levels of evidence supporting individual exclusion criteria for intravenous alteplase vary widely. Several exclusionary criteria have already undergone

  2. Part 11: adult stroke: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Cucchiara, Brett; Adeoye, Opeolu; Meurer, William; Brice, Jane; Chan, Yvonne Yu-Feng; Gentile, Nina; Hazinski, Mary Fran

    2010-11-02

    Advances in stroke care will have the greatest effect on stroke outcome if care is delivered within a regional stroke system designed to improve both efficiency and effectiveness. The ultimate goal of stroke care is to minimize ongoing injury, emergently recanalize acute vascular occlusions, and begin secondary measures to maximize functional recovery. These efforts will provide stroke patients with the greatest opportunity for a return to previous quality of life and decrease the overall societal burden of stroke.

  3. Stroke in Indigenous Africans, African Americans, and European Americans: Interplay of Racial and Geographic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa; Sarfo, Fred; Howard, Virginia J; Irvin, Marguerite R; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Akinyemi, Rufus; Bennett, Aleena; Armstrong, Kevin; Tiwari, Hemant K; Akpalu, Albert; Wahab, Kolawole W; Owolabi, Lukman; Fawale, Bimbo; Komolafe, Morenikeji; Obiako, Reginald; Adebayo, Philip; Manly, Jennifer M; Ogbole, Godwin; Melikam, Ezinne; Laryea, Ruth; Saulson, Raelle; Jenkins, Carolyn; Arnett, Donna K; Lackland, Daniel T; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Howard, George

    2017-05-01

    The relative contributions of racial and geographic factors to higher risk of stroke in people of African ancestry have not been unraveled. We compared stroke type and contributions of vascular risk factors among indigenous Africans (IA), African Americans (AA), and European Americans (EA). SIREN (Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network) is a large multinational case-control study in West Africa-the ancestral home of 71% AA-whereas REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) is a cohort study including AA and EA in the United States. Using harmonized assessments and standard definitions, we compared data on stroke type and established risk factors for stroke in acute stroke cases aged ≥55 years in both studies. There were 811 IA, 452 AA, and 665 EA stroke subjects, with mean age of 68.0±9.3, 73.0±8.3, and 76.0±8.3 years, respectively ( P stroke was more frequent among IA (27%) compared with AA (8%) and EA (5.4%; P strokes were more prevalent in IA (47.1%), followed by AA (35.1%) and then EA (21.0%; P risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle may contribute to the higher proportion of ischemic stroke in AA compared with IA, whereas racial factors may contribute to the higher proportion of hypertension and diabetes mellitus among stroke subjects of African ancestry. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Census Bureau. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  5. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 22,2017 Heart disease is the ... a marathon.” Learn more: Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke Make the Effort to Prevent Heart Disease with ...

  6. American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Americans live with heart disease, stroke or a cardiovascular condition. Your donation will help us save and improve their lives with research, education and emergency care. Warning Signs If you or someone else is ...

  7. National Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Event Join a Stroke Challenge Team Comeback Trail Tell Your Story Community Presentations Faces of Stroke Volunteer With Us ... in a video presentation. Watch Video ... to feel the right side of her body. Kathryn’s friends performed the FAST exam and soon ...

  8. Self-Care for the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K; Buck, Harleah G; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Dunbar, Sandra B; Lee, Christopher S; Lennie, Terry A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Mitchell, Judith E; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Webber, David E

    2017-08-31

    Self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process addressing both the prevention and management of chronic illness, with core elements of self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, and self-care management. In this scientific statement, we describe the importance of self-care in the American Heart Association mission and vision of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The evidence supporting specific self-care behaviors such as diet and exercise, barriers to self-care, and the effectiveness of self-care in improving outcomes is reviewed, as is the evidence supporting various individual, family-based, and community-based approaches to improving self-care. Although there are many nuances to the relationships between self-care and outcomes, there is strong evidence that self-care is effective in achieving the goals of the treatment plan and cannot be ignored. As such, greater emphasis should be placed on self-care in evidence-based guidelines. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Antibody levels to persistent pathogens and incident stroke in Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Gillespie, Brenda W; Aiello, Allison E; Haan, Mary N; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pathogens have been proposed as risk factors for stroke; however, the evidence remains inconclusive. Mexican Americans have an increased risk of stroke especially at younger ages, as well as a higher prevalence of infections caused by several persistent pathogens. Findings Using data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (n = 1621), the authors used discrete-time regression to examine associations between stroke risk and (1) immunoglobulin G antibody levels to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), Cytomegalovirus, Varicella Zoster Virus, Toxoplasma gondii and Herpes simplex virus 1, and (2) concurrent exposure to several pathogens (pathogen burden), defined as: (a) summed sero-positivity, (b) number of pathogens eliciting high antibody levels, and (c) average antibody level. Models were adjusted for socio-demographics and stroke risk factors. Antibody levels to H. pylori predicted incident stroke in fully adjusted models (Odds Ratio: 1.58; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.09, 2.28). No significant associations were found between stroke risk and antibody levels to the other four pathogens. No associations were found for pathogen burden and incident stroke in fully adjusted models. Our results suggest that exposure to H. pylori may be a stroke risk factor in Mexican Americans and may contribute to ethnic differences in stroke risk given the increased prevalence of exposure to H. pylori in this population. Future studies are needed to confirm this association.

  10. British Association of Stroke Physicians: benchmarking survey of stroke services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Dennis, Martin; Cohen, David; Rudd, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    the National Service Framework for Older People requires every general hospital which cares for stroke patients to introduce a specialist stroke service by 2004. to describe the organisation and staffing of specialist hospital-based stroke services in the UK. a national postal survey of consultant members of the British Association of Stroke Physicians (BASP) seeking details of the provision of neurovascular clinics, acute stroke units (ASUs), stroke rehabilitation units (SRUs), and the organisation and staffing of these services. the response rate was 91/126 (72%). Fifty-four neurovascular clinics, 40 ASUs and 68 SRUs were identified. Neurovascular clinics used a number of strategies to maintain rapid access and 30 (56%) were run by a single consultant. Only 50% ASUs usually admitted patients within 24 h of stroke. As the number of beds available on ASUs and SRUs did not reflect the total number of stroke in-patients, 21 (53%) ASUs and 45 (79%) SRUs had admission criteria. Training opportunities were limited: 37% ASUs and 82% SRUs had no specialist registrar. The therapy sessions (1 session=half a day) available per bed per week on a SRU were: physiotherapy 0.8; occupational therapy 0.6; speech and language therapy 0.25. significant development is needed to achieve the NSF target for hospital-based stroke services as few Trusts currently have all components in place and even when available not all stroke patients have access to specialist care. Stroke specialists will be required to run these services but training opportunities are currently limited. Stroke unit therapy staffing levels were lower than was available in randomised controlled trials.

  11. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Better understanding and controlling factors associated will improve the prevention of the disease. This study reviews records of patients with ischemic stroke in Central Africa. Material and methods: Patients of Bantu ethnicity with clinical ...

  12. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots) (American Stroke Association) Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke (American Heart Association) Also in Spanish Prevention and Risk Factors Carotid Endarterectomy (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) ...

  13. American Medical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMA Wire For healthy individual market, keep tax rules that spur coverage Senate tax plan would scrap ... Foundation AMA Insurance Copyright 1995 - 2017 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Terms of Use Privacy Policy ...

  14. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  15. Impact of Stroke Risk Factors on Ethnic Stroke Disparities Among Midlife Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajiv C; Sánchez, Brisa N; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Li, Chengwei; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-10-01

    We examined the contribution of stroke risk factors to midlife (age 45-59 years) Mexican American and non-Hispanic White ischemic stroke (IS) rate disparities from 2000 to 2010. Incident IS cases (n=707) and risk factors were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project, Nueces County, TX (2000-2010). US Census data (2000-2010) were used to estimate the population at-risk for IS, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2000-2010) was used to estimate risk factor prevalence in the stroke-free population. Poisson regression models combined IS counts (numerator) and population at-risk counts (denominator) classified by ethnicity and risk factor status to estimate unadjusted and risk factor-adjusted associations between ethnicity and IS rates. Separate models were run for each risk factor and extended to include an interaction term between ethnicity and risk factor. The crude rate ratio (RR) for ethnicity (Mexican American versus non-Hispanic White) was 2.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-2.36) and was attenuated in models that adjusted for diabetes mellitus (RR: 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26-1.78) and hypertension (RR: 1.84; 95% CI, 1.50-2.26). In addition, diabetes mellitus had a stronger association with IS rates among Mexican Americans (RR: 6.42; 95% CI, 5.31-7.76) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (RR: 4.07; 95% CI, 3.68-4.51). The higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and stronger association of diabetes mellitus with IS among midlife Mexican Americans likely contribute to persistent midlife ethnic stroke disparities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Implementation of a stroke registry is associated with an improvement in stroke performance measures in a tertiary hospital in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ana Lucia; Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Muruet, Walter; Villarreal, Héctor Jorge; Gutiérrez-Herrera, Mildred; Huerta, Lena; Carrasco, Diana; Soto-García, Anally; Espinosa-Ortega, Meztli

    2015-04-01

    Stroke registries provide a simple way for improving patient care, and its use has been associated with a better adherence to the published guidelines. Few Latin American countries had established stroke registries. Our study is the first in Mexico to report the effects of implementing a stroke registry. To determine if the implementation of a systematized registry is associated with an improved adherence to the performance measures. We compared prospective data (August 2008-November 2010) against historical controls (February 2005-July 2008). Our stroke registry (i-Registro Neurovascular) consists of a standardized clinical form that includes demographic and clinical variables (risk factors, medications, neuroimaging, etiology, acute and outpatient treatments, and neurologic scores [National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin Scale]). We evaluated 9 performance measures suggested by the American Heart Association and the Joint Commission. We analyzed the data from 574 patients, 260 from the prospective phase and 314 from historical controls. No significant statistical differences in demographic characteristics or stroke risk factors were found. The implementation of the stroke registry was associated with a statistically significant (P cost and readily achievable and a viable option for encouraging an increased report of guidelines adherence of other hospitals in Latin America. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. From 2.5 million children (aged hemorrhagic strokes and randomly selected age- and facility-matched stroke-free controls (3 per case). We determined exposure to CHD (diagnosed before stroke) and used conditional logistic regression to analyze stroke risk factors. CHD was identified in 15 of 412 cases (4%) versus 7 of 1236 controls (0.6%). Cases of childhood stroke (occurring between ages 29 days to 20 years) with CHD had 19-fold (odds ratio, 19; 95% confidence interval 4.2-83) increased stroke risk compared to controls. History of CHD surgery was associated with >30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding perioperative strokes, the history of CHD surgery still increased the childhood stroke risk (odds ratio, 13; confidence interval 1.5-114). The majority of children with stroke and CHD were outpatients at the time of stroke, and almost half the cases who underwent cardiac surgery had their stroke >5 years after the most recent procedure. An estimated 7% of ischemic and 2% of hemorrhagic childhood strokes in the population were attributable to CHD. CHD is an important childhood stroke risk factor. Children who undergo CHD surgery remain at elevated risk outside the perioperative period and would benefit from optimized long-term stroke prevention strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Stroke outreach in an inner city market: A platform for identifying African American males for stroke prevention interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjail Zarinah Sharrief

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: There are significant racial disparities in stroke incidence and mortality. Health fairs and outreach programs can be used to increase stroke literacy, but they often fail to reach those at highest risk, including African American males. Methods: We conducted a stroke outreach and screening program at an inner city market in order to attract a high-risk group for a stroke education intervention. A modified Framingham risk tool was used to estimate stroke risk and a 10-item quiz was developed to assess stroke literacy among 80 participants. We report results of the demographic and stroke risk analyses and stroke knowledge assessment. Results: The program attracted a majority male (70% and African American (95% group of participants. Self-reported hypertension (57.5%, tobacco use (40%, and diabetes (23.8% were prevalent. Knowledge of stroke warning signs, risk factors, and appropriate action to take for stroke symptoms was not poor when compared to the literature. Conclusions: Stroke outreach and screening in an inner city public market may be an effective way to target a high-risk population for stroke prevention interventions. Stroke risk among participants was high despite adequate stroke knowledge.

  19. Stroke Outreach in an Inner City Market: A Platform for Identifying African American Males for Stroke Prevention Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrief, Anjail Zarinah; Johnson, Brenda; Urrutia, Victor Cruz

    2015-01-01

    There are significant racial disparities in stroke incidence and mortality. Health fairs and outreach programs can be used to increase stroke literacy, but they often fail to reach those at highest risk, including African American males. We conducted a stroke outreach and screening program at an inner city market in order to attract a high-risk group for a stroke education intervention. A modified Framingham risk tool was used to estimate stroke risk and a 10-item quiz was developed to assess stroke literacy among 80 participants. We report results of the demographic and stroke risk analyses and stroke knowledge assessment. The program attracted a majority male (70%) and African American (95%) group of participants. Self-reported hypertension (57.5%), tobacco use (40%), and diabetes (23.8%) were prevalent. Knowledge of stroke warning signs, risk factors, and appropriate action to take for stroke symptoms was not poor when compared to the literature. Stroke outreach and screening in an inner city public market may be an effective way to target a high-risk population for stroke prevention interventions. Stroke risk among participants was high despite adequate stroke knowledge.

  20. Predictors of stroke - associated mortality in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Tonduangu, K; Muyeno, K; Phanzu, M; Kebolo Baku, A; Muvova, D; Lelo, T; Odio, W; Lukoki, L; Bikangi Nkiabungu, F; Kilembe, M; Tshiamala, P; Katalay, L; Mwema, M; Muyembe, T

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the association of the stroke-related mortality with gender, age, ethnicity, social class, blood pressure, fibrinogen, selected clinical data and meteorologic parameters in hospitalized Africans. A series of 1032 consecutively hospitalized incident cases of acute stroke between 1987 and 1991 was studied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to estimate the risk (odds ratio=OR) of stroke mortality for meteorologic parameters on the month before the accident onset and selected sociodemophysiological variables on the day of admission. The variables significantly associated with stroke mortality in multivariate analysis were male sex (OR= 2.3 [1.3 - 4.1]), low social class (OR= 2.0 [1.2 - 4.0]), migrant tribes (OR= 1.7 [1.5 - 1.8]), ischemic stroke (OR= 1.4 [1.2 - 1.6]), heart rate >=100 bpm (OR= 1.1 [1.0 - 1.2]), age > or =60 years (OR= 1.03 [1.01 - 1.06]), systolic blood pressure> 160 mmHg (OR= 1. 02 [1.01 - 1.03]), and fibrinogen > or =400 mg/dl (OR= 1.01 [1.002 - 1. 02]). However, diastolic blood pressure > 90 mmHg and global radiation< 340 Cal/cm(2)/day were significantly (p< 0.05) and inversely associated with stroke mortality. Our results indicate that male sex, older age, low social class, migration, ischemic stroke and higher baseline levels of heart rate, systolic blood pressure and fibrinogen are significant predictors of stroke mortality, but lower global radiation and higher diastolic blood pressure are inversely linked.

  1. Comprehensive stroke centers may be associated with improved survival in hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, James S; Cheng, Jerry Q; Rybinnik, Igor; Kostis, John B

    2015-05-06

    Comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) provide a full spectrum of neurological and neurosurgical services to treat complex stroke patients. CSCs have been shown to improve clinical outcomes and mitigate disparities in ischemic stroke patients. It is believed that CSCs also improve outcomes in hemorrhagic stroke. We used the Myocardial Infarction Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) database, which includes data on patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH; International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] 431) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH; ICD-9 430) from all nonfederal acute care hospitals in New Jersey (NJ) between 1996 and 2012. Out-of-hospital deaths were assessed by matching MIDAS records with NJ death registration files. The primary outcome variable was 90-day all-cause mortality. The primary independent variable was CSC versus primary stroke center (PSC) and nonstroke center (NSC) admission. Multivariate logistic models were used to measure the effects of available covariates. Overall, 36 981 patients were admitted with a primary diagnosis of ICH or SAH during the study period, of which 40% were admitted to a CSC. Patients admitted to CSCs were more likely to have neurosurgical or endovascular interventions than those admitted to a PSC/NSC (18.9% vs. 4.7%; Phemorrhagic stroke. This was particularly true for those admitted with SAH. Hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to CSCs are more likely to receive neurosurgical and endovascular treatments and be alive at 90 days than patients admitted to other hospitals. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  2. Association of Osteopontin, Neopterin, and Myeloperoxidase With Stroke Risk in Patients With Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attacks: Results of an Analysis of 13 Biomarkers From the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Peter; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Bao, Weihang; Preston, Gregory M; Welch, K Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Established risk factors do not fully identify patients at risk for recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels) evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on stroke risk in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease. This analysis explored the relationships between 13 plasma biomarkers assessed at trial enrollment and the occurrence of outcome strokes. We conducted a case-cohort study of 2176 participants; 562 had outcome strokes and 1614 were selected randomly from those without outcome strokes. Time to stroke was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. There was no association between time to stroke and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 , monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, resistin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, or soluble CD40 ligand. In adjusted analyses, osteopontin (hazard ratio per SD change, 1.362; P strokes. After adjustment for the Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II and treatment, osteopontin, neopterin, and myeloperoxidase remained independently associated with outcome strokes. The addition of these 3 biomarkers to Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II increased the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve by 0.023 ( P =0.015) and yielded a continuous net reclassification improvement (29.1%; P stroke and improved risk classification when added to a clinical risk algorithm. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00147602. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Thromboembolic stroke associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meumann, Ella M; Chuen, Jason; Fitt, Greg; Perchyonok, Yuliya; Pond, Franklin; Dewey, Helen M

    2014-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome occurs due to compression of the neurovascular structures as they exit the thorax. Subclavian arterial compression is usually due to a cervical rib, and is rarely associated with thromboembolic stroke. The mechanism of cerebral embolisation associated with the thoracic outlet syndrome is poorly understood, but may be due to retrograde propagation of thrombus or transient retrograde flow within the subclavian artery exacerbated by arm abduction. We report an illustrative patient and review the clinical features, imaging findings and management of stroke associated with thoracic outlet syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Drivers of von Willebrand Factor Levels in an Ischemic Stroke Population and Association With Risk for Recurrent Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Keene, Keith L; Chen, Wei-Min; Dzhivhuho, Godfrey; Rowles, Joe L; Southerland, Andrew M; Furie, Karen L; Rich, Stephen S; Worrall, Bradford B; Sale, Michèle M

    2017-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) plays an important role in thrombus formation during cerebrovascular damage. We sought to investigate the potential role of circulating vWF in recurrent cerebrovascular events and identify genetic contributors to variation in vWF level in an ischemic stroke population. We analyzed the effect of circulating vWF on risk of recurrent stroke using survival models in the VISP trial (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention) and the use of vWF in reclassification over traditional factors. We conducted a genome-wide association study) with imputation, based on 1000 Genomes Project data, for circulating vWF levels and then interrogated loci previously associated with vWF levels. We performed expression quantitative trait locus analysis for vWF across different tissues. Elevated vWF levels were associated with increased risk for recurrent stroke in VISP. Adding vWF to traditional clinical parameters also improved recurrent stroke risk prediction. We identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with circulating vWF at the ABO locus ( P stroke in VISP. In the VISP population, genetic determinants of vWF levels that impact vWF gene expression were identified. These data add to our knowledge of the pathophysiologic and genetic basis for recurrent stroke risk and may have implications for clinical care decision making. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Genetic variants associated with myocardial infarction in the PSMA6 gene and Chr9p21 are also associated with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, M G; Soto-Ortolaza, A I; Diehl, N N; Rayaprolu, S; Brott, T G; Wszolek, Z K; Meschia, J F; Ross, O A

    2013-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke shares common traditional risk factors with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI). This study evaluated whether genetic risk factors for CAD and MI also affect susceptibility to ischaemic stroke in Caucasians and African Americans. Included in the study were a Caucasian series (713 ischaemic stroke patients, 708 controls) and a small African American series (166 ischaemic stroke patients, 117 controls). Twenty single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously shown to be associated with CAD or MI were genotyped and assessed for association with ischaemic stroke and ischaemic stroke subtypes using odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable logistic regression models. In Caucasians, four SNPs on chromosome 9p21 were significantly associated with risk of cardioembolic stroke, the strongest of which was rs1333040 (OR 1.55, P = 0.0007); similar but weaker trends were observed for small vessel stroke, with no associations observed regarding large vessel stroke. Chromosome 9p21 SNPs were also associated with risk of ischaemic stroke in African Americans (rs1333040, OR 0.65, P = 0.023; rs1333042, OR 0.55, P = 0.070; rs2383207, OR 0.55, P = 0.070). The PSMA6 SNP rs1048990 on chromosome 14q13 was associated with overall ischaemic stroke in both Caucasians (OR 0.80, P = 0.036) and African Americans (OR 0.31, P = 0.020). Our results provide evidence that chromosome 9p21 variants are associated with cardioembolic ischaemic stroke in Caucasians and with overall ischaemic stroke in African Americans. The PSMA6 variant rs1048990 also appears to affect susceptibility to ischaemic stroke in both populations. These findings require validation, particularly the preliminary findings regarding African Americans given the small size of that series. © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  6. Two decades of nation-wide community-based stroke support - The Singapore National Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Yin, Ann; Lee, Lay B; De Silva, Deidre A

    2017-04-01

    The Singapore National Stroke Association, registered in 1996, offers support and information to stroke survivors and caregivers, and aims to raise public stroke awareness. In the last 20 years, we have developed programs to equip stroke survivors and caregivers with knowledge, life skills, comfort, and opportunities for socialization and reintegration. We have on-going public education and advocacy initiatives. Obtaining funding, member recruitment, volunteer retention, and leadership renewal are on-going challenges. Singapore National Stroke Association will continue to strive for the betterment of stroke survivors, their caregivers, and the public.

  7. Mexican Americans Receive Less Intensive Stroke Rehabilitation Than Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Lewis B; Sais, Emma; Fuentes, Michael; Ifejika, Nneka L; Jiang, Xiaqing; Horn, Susan D; Case, Erin; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-06-01

    Mexican Americans (MAs) have worse neurological, functional, and cognitive outcomes after stroke. Stroke rehabilitation is important for good outcome. In a population-based study, we sought to determine whether allocation of stroke rehabilitation services differed by ethnicity. Patients with stroke were identified as part of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project, TX, USA. Cases were validated by physicians using source documentation. Patients were followed prospectively for 3 months after stroke to determine rehabilitation services and transitions. Descriptive statistics were used to depict the study population. Continuous baseline variables were compared using 2 sample t tests or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests by ethnicity. Categorical baseline variables were compared using χ 2 tests. Ethnic comparisons of rehabilitation services were compared using χ 2 tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression. Seventy-two subjects (50 MA and 22 non-Hispanic white [NHW]) were followed. Mean age, NHW-69 (SD 13), MA-66 (SD 11) years, sex (NHW 55% male, MA 50% male) and median presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale did not differ significantly. There were no ethnic differences among the proportion of patients who were sent home without any rehabilitation services ( P =0.9). Among those who received rehabilitation, NHWs were more likely to get inpatient rehabilitation (73%) compared with MAs (30%), P =0.016. MAs (51%) were much more likely to receive home rehabilitation services compared with NHWs (0%) ( P =0.0017). In this population-based study, MAs were more likely to receive home-based rehabilitation, whereas NHWs were more likely to get inpatient rehabilitation. This disparity may, in part, explain the worse stroke outcome in MAs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Stroke-induced immunodepression and dysphagia independently predict stroke-associated pneumonia - The PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sarah; Harms, Hendrik; Ulm, Lena; Nabavi, Darius G; Mackert, Bruno-Marcel; Schmehl, Ingo; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Montaner, Joan; Bustamante, Alejandro; Hermans, Marcella; Hamilton, Frank; Göhler, Jos; Malzahn, Uwe; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Stroke-associated pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke associated with poor outcome. Dysphagia is a known risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia but accumulating evidence suggests that stroke induces an immunodepressive state increasing susceptibility for stroke-associated pneumonia. We aimed to confirm that stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome is associated with stroke-associated pneumonia independently from dysphagia by investigating the predictive properties of monocytic HLA-DR expression as a marker of immunodepression as well as biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-6) and infection (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein). This was a prospective, multicenter study with 11 study sites in Germany and Spain, including 486 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Daily screening for stroke-associated pneumonia, dysphagia and biomarkers was performed. Frequency of stroke-associated pneumonia was 5.2%. Dysphagia and decreased monocytic HLA-DR were independent predictors for stroke-associated pneumonia in multivariable regression analysis. Proportion of pneumonia ranged between 0.9% in the higher monocytic HLA-DR quartile (≥21,876 mAb/cell) and 8.5% in the lower quartile (≤12,369 mAb/cell). In the presence of dysphagia, proportion of pneumonia increased to 5.9% and 18.8%, respectively. Patients without dysphagia and normal monocytic HLA-DR expression had no stroke-associated pneumonia risk. We demonstrate that dysphagia and stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome are independent risk factors for stroke-associated pneumonia. Screening for immunodepression and dysphagia might be useful for identifying patients at high risk for stroke-associated pneumonia.

  9. Status of cardiovascular disease and stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L; Isasi, Carmen R; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L; Ramirez, Sarah M; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2014-08-12

    This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA's 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Writing group members were nominated by the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before consideration and approval by the

  10. Association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and recurrent stroke risk in patients with different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Ruihao; Song, Bo; Tan, Song; Gao, Yuan; Fang, Hui; Lu, Jie; Xu, Yuming

    2015-07-01

    The association between atherogenic dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence remains unclear, and may be influenced by different subtypes of ischemic stroke. We aimed to investigate whether atherogenic dyslipidemia contributed to stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients and in those with certain subtypes of ischemic stroke. We conducted a prospective hospital-based study enrolling patients with acute ischemic stroke. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was defined as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol dyslipidemia and stroke recurrence was analyzed by using multivariable Cox regression model. In the 510 ischemic stroke patients, 64 patients (12·5%) had atherogenic dyslipidemia, and 66 patients (12·9%) experienced stroke recurrence events within 24 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that stroke recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia than those without in all the stroke patients (20·3% vs. 11·9%; P = 0·048), and more evident in those of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (31·0% vs. 14·1%; P = 0·014), but not in the other subtypes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that atherogenic dyslipidemia was associated with higher stroke recurrence risk among stroke patients of large-artery atherosclerosis subtype (hazard ratio, 2·79; 95% confidence interval, 1·24-6·28), but not significant in all the stroke patients (hazard ratio, 1·69; 95% confidence interval, 0·85-3·37). Atherogenic dyslipidemia is associated with higher risk of stroke recurrence in ischemic stroke patients. Such association might be more pronounced in large-artery atherosclerosis subtype and needs further investigation to establish such relationship. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  11. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke subtypes assessed four OCSP (Oxfordshire Communi-. African Health Sciences Vol 15 Issue 1, March 2015. 68. 69 ty Stroke Project Classification) subtypes classification. 13 was used with lacunar circulation infarct (LACI) and total anterior (TACI), partial anterior (PACI), posterior. (POCI) circulation infarcts as non ...

  12. Factors Associated With Ischemic Stroke Survival and Recovery in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winovich, Divya Thekkethala; Longstreth, William T; Arnold, Alice M; Varadhan, Ravi; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Cushman, Mary; Newman, Anne B; Odden, Michelle C

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about factors that predispose older adults to poor recovery after a stroke. In this study, we sought to evaluate prestroke measures of frailty and related factors as markers of vulnerability to poor outcomes after ischemic stroke. In participants aged 65 to 99 years with incident ischemic strokes from the Cardiovascular Health Study, we evaluated the association of several risk factors (frailty, frailty components, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and cystatin C) assessed before stroke with stroke outcomes of survival, cognitive decline (≥5 points on Modified Mini-Mental State Examination), and activities of daily living decline (increase in limitations). Among 717 participants with incident ischemic stroke with survival data, slow walking speed, low grip strength, and cystatin C were independently associated with shorter survival. Among participants stroke. Inflammation, kidney function, and frailty also seemed to be determinants of survival and recovery after an ischemic stroke. These markers of vulnerability may identify targets for differing pre and poststroke medical management and rehabilitation among older adults at risk of poor stroke outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor Is Probably Associated With 3-Month Prognosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengbao; Xu, Tan; Guo, Daoxia; Huangfu, Xinfeng; Zhong, Chongke; Yang, Jingyuan; Wang, Aili; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Peng, Yanbo; Xu, Tian; Wang, Jinchao; Sun, Yingxian; Peng, Hao; Li, Qunwei; Ju, Zhong; Geng, Deqin; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Yonghong; He, Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is positively associated with poor prognosis of heart failure and myocardial infarction, and it can also predict the risk of ischemic stroke in population. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between serum HGF and prognosis of ischemic stroke. A total of 3027 acute ischemic stroke patients were included in this post hoc analysis of the CATIS (China Antihypertensive Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke). The primary outcome was composite outcome of death or major disability (modified Rankin Scale score ≥3) within 3 months. After multivariate adjustment, elevated HGF levels were associated with an increased risk of primary outcome (odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.03; P trend =0.015) when 2 extreme quartiles were compared. Each SD increase of log-transformed HGF was associated with 14% (95% confidence interval, 2%-27%) increased risk of primary outcome. Adding HGF quartiles to a model containing conventional risk factors improved the predictive power for primary outcome (net reclassification improvement: 17.50%, P stroke at baseline, and elevated HGF levels were probably associated with 3-month poor prognosis independently of stroke severity among ischemic stroke patients, especially in those without heparin pre-treatment. Further studies from other samples of ischemic stroke patients are needed to validate our findings. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Stroke while driving: Frequency and association with automobile accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Mayanagi, Keita; Nishimoto, Masaaki; Oshima, Takeo; Yoshii, Masami; Miyatake, Satoru; Imai, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular events while driving have occasionally been reported. In contrast, there have been few studies on stroke while driving. Aim The objectives of this study were to (1) report the frequency of stroke while driving and (2) evaluate its association with automobile accidents. Methods Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2016 on 2145 stroke patients (1301 with ischemic stroke, 585 with intracerebral hemorrhage, and 259 with subarachnoid hemorrhage) were reviewed to identify patients who sustained a stroke while driving. The ratio of driving to performing other activities was evaluated for each stroke type. Furthermore, the drivers' response to stroke was reviewed to understand how automobile accidents occurred. Results Among the 2145 patients, 85 (63 ischemic stroke, 20 intracerebral hemorrhage, and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhage) sustained a stroke while driving. The ratio of driving to performing other activities was significantly higher in ischemic stroke (4.8%) than in intracerebral hemorrhage (3.4%) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (0.8%). A majority of drivers either continued driving or pulled over to the roadside after suffering a stroke. However, 14 (16%) patients were involved in automobile accidents. In most patients, an altered mental status due to severe stroke was the presumed cause of the accident. Conclusion Stroke occurred while driving in 4.0% of all strokes and accidents occurred in 16% of these instances.

  15. Magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    study was aimed to assess the magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients attended the medical department of ... Methods: An institution based cross sectional study was conducted among 427 adult (≥30 years old) stroke patient records in June ... risk of mortality, about 85% of all strokes are ischemic. (1-3).

  16. Stroke Risk Perception in Atrial Fibrillation Patients is not Associated with Clinical Stroke Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournaise, Anders; Skov, Jane; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Leppin, Anja

    2015-11-01

    Clinical risk stratification models, such as the CHA2DS2-VASc, are used to assess stroke risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. No study has yet investigated whether and to which extent these patients have a realistic perception of their personal stroke risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the association between AF patients' stroke risk perception and clinical stroke risk. In an observational cross-sectional study design, we surveyed 178 AF patients with a mean age of 70.6 years (SD 8.3) in stable anticoagulant treatment (65% treatment duration >12 months). Clinical stroke risk was scored through the CHA2DS2-VASc, and patients rated their perceived personal stroke risk on a 7-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between clinical stroke risk assessment and patients' stroke risk perception (rho = .025; P = .741). Approximately 60% of the high-risk patients had an unrealistic perception of their own stroke risk, and there was no significant increase in risk perception from those with a lower compared with a higher risk factor load (χ(2) = .010; P = .522). Considering possible negative implications in terms of lack of motivation for lifestyle behavior change and adequate adherence to the treatment and monitoring of vitamin K antagonist, the apparent underestimation of risk by large subgroups warrants attention and needs further investigation with regard to possible behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan Constitution and Bylaws Organizational Chart Fact Sheet History The ... Jobs Find a Job Information for Advertisers Health Policy Health Policy Health Policy Handbook Resources and Tools ...

  18. Pre-stroke apathy symptoms are associated with an increased risk of delirium in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimiec, Elzbieta; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Pasinska, Paulina; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Szyper, Aleksandra; Pera, Joanna; Slowik, Agnieszka; Dziedzic, Tomasz

    2017-08-09

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms can be interrelated to delirium. We aimed to investigate an association between pre-stroke neuropsychiatric symptoms and the risk of delirium in stroke patients. We included 606 patients (median age: 73, 53% female) with stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted within 48 hours from symptoms onset. We assessed delirium on a daily basis during the first 7 days of hospitalization. To make diagnosis of delirium we used DSM-5 criteria. We used Neuropsychiatric Inventory to assess neuropsychiatric symptoms occurring within 4 weeks prior to stroke. We diagnosed delirium in 28.2% of patients. On univariate analysis, higher score of pre-stroke depression (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.04-2.40, P = 0.03), apathy (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.44-3.45, P delirium. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, stroke severity, right hemisphere lesion, pre-stroke cognitive decline, pre-stroke disability and infections, higher apathy score (OR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.17-3.50, P = 0.01), but no other neuropsychiatric symptoms, remained independent predictor of delirium. We conclude that pre-stroke apathy symptoms are associated with increased risk of delirium in stroke patients.

  19. American Public Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... faculty at @PBRCNews! Thanks to co-… Most food advertising to kids remains unhealthy, says @uconnruddcenter: https://t.co/wlWhLnwuEA Follow us on Twitter PH Jobs Coalition Development Associate | Community Anti-Drug ...

  20. The confounding of race and geography: how much of the excess stroke mortality among African Americans is explained by geography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongyan; Howard, George; Coffey, Christopher S; Roseman, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    The excess stroke mortality among African Americans and Southerners is well known. Because a higher proportion of the population living in the 'Stroke Belt' is African American, then a portion of the estimated excess risk of stroke death traditionally associated with African-American race may be attributable to geography (i.e., race and geography are 'confounded'). In this paper we estimate the proportion of the excess stroke mortality among African Americans that is attributable to geography. The numbers of stroke deaths at the county level are available from the vital statistics system of the US. A total of 1,143 counties with a population of at least 500 whites and 500 African Americans were selected for these analyses. The black-to-white stroke mortality ratio was estimated with and without adjustment for county of residence for those aged 45-64 and for those aged 65 and over. The difference in the stroke mortality ratio before versus after adjustment for county provides an estimate of the proportion of the excess stroke mortality inappropriately attributed to race (that is in fact attributable to geographic region). For ages 45-64, the black-to-white stroke mortality ratio was reduced from 3.41 to 3.04 for men, and from 2.82 to 2.60 for women, suggesting that between 10 and 15% of the excess mortality traditionally attributed to race is rather due to geography. Over the age of 65, the black-to-white stroke mortality ratio was reduced from 1.31 to 1.27 for men, and from 1.097 to 1.095 for women, suggesting that between 2 and 13% of the excess mortality attributed to black race is actually attributable to geography. The reductions of all the four age strata gender groups were highly significant. These results suggest that a significant, although relatively small, proportion of the excess mortality traditionally attributed to race is rather a factor of geography. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Drivers of costs associated with reperfusion therapy in acute stroke: the Interventional Management of Stroke III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kit N; Simpson, Annie N; Mauldin, Patrick D; Hill, Michael D; Yeatts, Sharon D; Spilker, Judith A; Foster, Lydia D; Khatri, Pooja; Martin, Renee; Jauch, Edward C; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Palesch, Yuko Y; Broderick, Joseph P

    2014-06-01

    The Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III study tested the effect of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) alone when compared with intravenous tPA followed by endovascular therapy and collected cost data to assess the economic implications of the 2 therapies. This report describes the factors affecting the costs of the initial hospitalization for acute stroke subjects from the United States. Prospective cost analysis of the US subjects was treated with intravenous tPA alone or with intravenous tPA followed by endovascular therapy in the IMS III trial. Results were compared with expected Medicare payments. The adjusted cost of a stroke admission in the study was $35 130 for subjects treated with endovascular therapy after intravenous tPA treatment and $25 630 for subjects treated with intravenous tPA alone (P<0.0001). Significant factors related to costs included treatment group, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time from stroke onset to intravenous tPA, age, stroke location, and comorbid diabetes mellitus. The mean cost for subjects who had routine use of general anesthesia as part of endovascular therapy was $46 444 when compared with $30 350 for those who did not have general anesthesia. The costs of embolectomy for IMS III subjects and patients from the National Inpatient Sample cohort exceeded the Medicare diagnosis-related group payment in ≥75% of patients. Minimizing the time to start of intravenous tPA and decreasing the use of routine general anesthesia may improve the cost-effectiveness of medical and endovascular therapy for acute stroke. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00359424. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Carotid IMT is more associated with stroke than risk calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, M O; Akpa, O M; Agunloye, A M

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether a natural marker of atherosclerosis (carotid intima-media thickness: CIMT) or calculated risk score is more associated with stroke. We therefore comparatively examined the relationship between CIMT as well as two cardiovascular risk calculators (Omnibus Risk Score -ORS and Framingham Risk Score- FRS) and the occurrence of stroke among hypertensive African patients. CIMT was measured in 555 consecutive consenting hypertensive adults (377 stroke patients and 178 stroke-free subjects). The 10-year cardiovascular risk was calculated for each participant with the FRS and ORS. The strengths of association between FRS, ORS, CIMT, and stroke occurrence were examined using logistic regression. The discriminative capacity of FRS, ORS, and CIMT for stroke occurrence was assessed with c-statistics. Higher average CIMT (OR 11.71; 95% CI 1.65-83.07; P = 0.01) was strongly associated with stroke after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and blood sugar. Neither the FRS (OR: 1.03; CI: 0.89-1.19, P = 0.68) nor the ORS (OR: 1.08; CI: 0.90-1.30; P = 0.41) was significantly associated with stroke. CIMT had a higher c-statistic for differentiating stroke patients from hypertensive controls (right: c = 0.63, P < 0.001; left: c = 0.67, P < 0.001; average: c = 0.66, P < 0.001) than some conventional risk factors. Neither FRS (P = 0.39) nor ORS (P = 0.55) was able to independently differentiate between stroke and hypertensive patients. CIMT, but neither FRS nor ORS, is independently associated with stroke among Nigerian African hypertensive patients. CIMT may be a better tool for estimating the overall risk of stroke than FRS or ORS in this population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Association Between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genotype and Upper Extremity Motor Outcome After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-06-01

    The identification of intrinsic factors for predicting upper extremity motor outcome could aid the design of individualized treatment plans in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors, including intrinsic genetic factors, for upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke. A total of 97 patients with subacute stroke were enrolled. Upper limb motor impairment was scored according to the upper limb of Fugl-Meyer assessment score at 3 months after stroke. The prediction of upper extremity motor outcome at 3 months was modeled using various factors that could potentially influence this impairment, including patient characteristics, baseline upper extremity motor impairment, functional and structural integrity of the corticospinal tract, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were used to identify the significance of each factor. The independent predictors of motor outcome at 3 months were baseline upper extremity motor impairment, age, stroke type, and corticospinal tract functional integrity in all stroke patients. However, in the group with severe motor impairment at baseline (upper limb score of Fugl-Meyer assessment stroke. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype may be a potentially useful predictor of upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke with severe baseline motor involvement. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Modified Ideal Cardiovascular Health Status is Associated with Lower Prevalence of Stroke in Rural Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Guo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2010, the American Heart Association developed a new definition of ideal cardiovascular health (CVH based on seven cardiovascular health metrics. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between modified ideal CVH metrics and the risk of stroke in the rural population of Northeast China. Methods: We included 11,417 adults from the rural population in Northeast China and collected all the information, including the baseline characteristics, history of stroke, and the seven ideal CVH metrics. Results: Our results showed that the presence of stroke was associated with high body mass index (BMI, poor diet score (salt intake, high total cholesterol (TC, high blood pressure (BP, and high fasting plasma glucose (FPG. The prevalence of stroke increased as the number of ideal CVH metrics decreased, and peaked to 13.1% among those with only one ideal CVH metric. Participants with only one ideal CVH had a 4.40-fold increased susceptibility of stroke than those with all seven ideal health metrics. Conclusion: This study revealed that people with a better CVH status had a lower prevalence of stroke and the susceptibility of stroke increased with the decreasing of the number of ideal CVH metrics.

  5. Association of Leukoaraiosis With Convalescent Rehabilitation Outcome in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Joe; Ito, Keiichi; Kotake, Tomomitsu; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Hideo; Kadono, Izumi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the factors influencing inpatient convalescent rehabilitation outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke, particularly severity of leukoaraiosis on magnetic resonance imaging. Participants included 520 patients with ischemic stroke (317 men and 203 women; mean age, 72.8±8.4 years) who were transferred from acute care hospitals for inpatient convalescent rehabilitation. Ischemic stroke subtypes included lacunar infarction (n=41), atherothrombosis (n=223), artery-to-artery embolism (n=67), cardiogenic embolism (n=97), undetermined embolism (n=76), and uncategorized ischemic stroke (n=16). Leukoaraiosis was graded according to periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) and deep white matter hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging. Functional Independence Measure scores were assessed on admission and at discharge. Multiple regression analysis revealed that rehabilitation outcomes, measured as total Functional Independence Measure scores, were significantly associated with leukoaraiosis estimated by PVH grade. This association was observed after adjustment for factors such as severity, age, and poststroke history. In all patients, PVH grades were associated with Functional Independence Measure motor scores (Prehabilitation outcome in patients with ischemic stroke. Furthermore, the PVH grade was associated with motor function outcome, whereas the deep white matter hyperintensity grade correlated with cognitive function outcome, likely because the progression patterns and anatomic backgrounds of PVH and deep white matter hyperintensity differ according to ischemic stroke subtype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Association between arterial calcifications and nonlacunar and lacunar ischemic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Anouk C; Fonville, Susanne; Zadi, Taihra; van Hattem, Antonius M G; Saiedie, Ghesrouw; Koudstaal, Peter J; van der Lugt, Aad

    2014-03-01

    Nonlacunar cerebral infarcts are presumed to be caused by thromboembolism from the heart or extracranial arteries, whereas lacunar infarcts are thought to be caused by small vessel disease. We investigated to what extent arterial calcifications differ between nonlacunar and lacunar ischemic strokes. We studied 820 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation who underwent multidetector computed tomography angiography and had no rare cause of stroke. The presence of likely cardioembolic pathogenesis was determined according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. The remaining 708 patients were categorized as nonlacunar or lacunar strokes, either transient ischemic attacks or strokes, based on clinical symptoms corrected by brain imaging results. We measured volume of calcifications in the aortic arch, symptomatic extracranial and intracranial carotid artery using multidetector computed tomography angiography. The difference in calcifications between nonlacunar and lacunar strokes was assessed with a multivariable logistic regression analysis. We adjusted for degree of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors. We found an independent association between volume of aortic arch calcifications and nonlacunar ischemic strokes (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.11 [1.02-1.21]). No independent associations between extracranial and intracranial carotid artery calcifications and nonlacunar strokes were present. The only difference we found between nonlacunar and lacunar strokes was a higher calcification volume in the aortic arch in nonlacunar strokes. Our findings only partially confirm the notion of distinct etiologies and suggest that the potential role of other plaque components, plaque morphology, and aortic arch calcifications in ischemic stroke subtypes awaits further evaluation.

  7. Post-stroke depression: Prevalence, associated factors and impact ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of post-stroke depression (PSD), its associated factors and impact on quality of life (QoL) among outpatients in a Nigerian hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 140 adults made up of 70 stroke survivors and matched controls with stable hypertension.

  8. Thirty-day stroke mortality and associated clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although stroke mortality in developing countries is more than 85%, the case fatality in Uganda is not known. Objective We determined 30 day case fatality, associated clinical and laboratory presentations among adult stroke patients admitted to Mulago Hospital. Design Prospective descriptive study. Setting Mulago national ...

  9. Comorbid Psychiatric Disease Is Associated With Lower Rates of Thrombolysis in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, Diana M; Daumit, Gail L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Faigle, Roland

    2018-03-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) improves outcomes after acute ischemic stroke but is underused in certain patient populations. Mental illness is pervasive in the United States, and patients with comorbid psychiatric disease experience inequities in treatment for a range of conditions. We aimed to determine whether comorbid psychiatric disease is associated with differences in IVT use in acute ischemic stroke. Acute ischemic stroke admissions between 2007 and 2011 were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Psychiatric disease was defined by International Classification of Diseases , Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes for secondary diagnoses of schizophrenia or other psychoses, bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety. Using logistic regression, we tested the association between IVT and psychiatric disease, controlling for demographic, clinical, and hospital factors. Of the 325 009 ischemic stroke cases meeting inclusion criteria, 12.8% had any of the specified psychiatric comorbidities. IVT was used in 3.6% of those with, and 4.4% of those without, psychiatric disease ( P disease was associated with lower odds of receiving IVT (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.85). When psychiatric diagnoses were analyzed separately individuals with schizophrenia or other psychoses, anxiety, or depression each had significantly lower odds of IVT compared to individuals without psychiatric disease. Acute ischemic stroke patients with comorbid psychiatric disease have significantly lower odds of IVT. Understanding barriers to IVT use in such patients may help in developing interventions to increase access to evidence-based stroke care. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Dietary fiber intake is inversely associated with stroke incidence in healthy Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-12-01

    Prospective studies of dietary fiber intake in relation to stroke risk have reported inconsistent results. This study assessed the association between intake of total fiber and fiber sources and stroke incidence in healthy Swedish adults. The analysis was based on 69,677 participants (aged 45-83 y) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men who were free from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes at baseline (1 January 1998). Diet was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. Cases of stroke were ascertained through linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate RRs, adjusted for potential confounders. During 10.3 y of follow-up, 3680 incident stroke cases, including 2722 cerebral infarctions, 363 intracerebral hemorrhages, 160 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 435 unspecified strokes, were ascertained. High intakes of total fiber and fiber from fruits and vegetables but not from cereals were inversely associated with risk of stroke. After adjustment for other risk factors for stroke, the multivariable RRs of total stroke for the highest vs. lowest quintile of intake were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.99) for total fiber, 0.85 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.95) for fruit fiber, 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.00) for vegetable fiber, and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.04) for cereal fiber. These findings indicate that intake of dietary fiber, especially fruit and vegetable fibers, is inversely associated with risk of stroke. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Dietary intakes of glutamic acid and glycine are associated with stroke mortality in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Chisato; Wada, Keiko; Tamura, Takashi; Kawachi, Toshiaki; Konishi, Kie; Tsuji, Michiko; Nakamura, Kozue

    2015-04-01

    Dietary intakes of glutamic acid and glycine have been reported to be associated with blood pressure. However, the link between intakes of these amino acids and stroke has not been studied. We aimed to examine the association between glutamic acid and glycine intakes and the risk of mortality from stroke in a population-based cohort study in Japan. The analyses included 29,079 residents (13,355 men and 15,724 women) of Takayama City, Japan, who were aged 35-101 y and enrolled in 1992. Their body mass index ranged from 9.9 to 57.4 kg/m(2). Their diets were assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths from stroke were ascertained over 16 y. During follow-up, 677 deaths from stroke (328 men and 349 women) were identified. A high intake of glutamic acid in terms of a percentage of total protein was significantly associated with a decreased risk of mortality from total stroke in women after controlling for covariates; the HR (95% CI) for the highest vs. lowest quartile was 0.72 (0.53, 0.98; P-trend: 0.03). Glycine intake was significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality from total and ischemic stroke in men without history of hypertension at baseline; the HRs (95% CIs) for the highest vs. lowest tertile were 1.60 (0.97, 2.51; P-trend: 0.03) and 1.88 (1.01, 3.52; P-trend: 0.02), respectively. There was no association between animal or vegetable protein intake and mortality from total and any subtype of stroke. The data suggest that glutamic acid and glycine intakes may be associated with risk of stroke mortality. Given that this is an initial observation, our results need to be confirmed. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Stroke prevention strategies in North American patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, William F; Conen, David; Olshansky, Brian

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antithrombotic prophylaxis with oral anticoagulation (OAC) substantially reduces stroke and mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). HYPOTHESIS: Analysis of data in GLORIA-AF, an international, observational registry of patients with newly-diagnosed AF, can identify factor...

  13. Statin Adherence Is Associated With Reduced Recurrent Stroke Risk in Patients With or Without Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Alexander C; Conell, Carol; Ren, Xiushui; Kamel, Hooman; Chan, Sheila L; Rao, Vivek A; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-07-01

    Outpatient statin use reduces the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke among patients with stroke of atherothrombotic cause. It is not known whether statins have similar effects in ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation (AFib). We studied outpatient statin adherence, measured by percentage of days covered, and the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with or without AFib in a 21-hospital integrated healthcare delivery system. Among 6116 patients with ischemic stroke discharged on a statin over a 5-year period, 1446 (23.6%) had a diagnosis of AFib at discharge. The mean statin adherence rate (percentage of days covered) was 85, and higher levels of percentage of days covered correlated with greater degrees of low-density lipoprotein suppression. In multivariable survival models of recurrent ischemic stroke over 3 years, after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, medical comorbidities, and hospital center, higher statin adherence predicted reduced stroke risk both in patients without AFib (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.97) and in patients with AFib (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.81). This association was robust to adjustment for the time in the therapeutic range for international normalized ratio among AFib subjects taking warfarin (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.89). The relationship between statin adherence and reduced recurrent stroke risk is as strong among patients with AFib as it is among patients without AFib, suggesting that AFib status should not be a reason to exclude patients from secondary stroke prevention with a statin. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease Is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Stroke: A Thailand National Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Adrian D; Mannu, Gurdeep S; Clark, Allan B; Tiamkao, Somsak; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Barlas, Raphae S; Mamas, Mamas; Myint, Phyo Kyaw

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatic valvular heart disease is associated with the increased risk of cerebrovascular events, although there are limited data on the prognosis of patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (RMVD) after stroke. We examined the association between RMVD and both serious and common cardiovascular and noncardiovascular (respiratory and infective) complications in a cohort of hospitalized stroke patients based in Thailand. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were also explored. Data were obtained from a National Insurance Database. All hospitalized strokes between October 1, 2004, and January 31, 2013, were included in the current study. Characteristics and outcomes were compared for RMVD and non-RMVD patients. Logistic regression, propensity score matching, and multivariate models were used to assess study outcomes. In total, 594 681 patients (mean [SD] age=64 [14.5] years) with a diagnosis of stroke (ischemic=306 154; hemorrhagic=195 392; undetermined=93 135) were included in this study, of whom 5461 had RMVD. Results from primary analyses showed that after ischemic stroke, and controlling for potential confounding covariates, RMVD was associated (Pstroke patients, RMVD was associated with increased odds (fully adjusted model) for respiratory failure (1.26 [1.01-1.57]), and in patients with undetermined stroke, RMVD was associated with increased odds (fully adjusted analyses) for shock (3.00 [1.46-6.14]), respiratory failure (2.70 [1.91-3.79]), and pneumonia (2.42 [1.88-3.11]). RMVD is associated with the development of cardiac arrest, shock, arrhythmias, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and sepsis after acute stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. American Psychological Association annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Presents the 2009 American Psychological Association annual report. It highlights a very important year for APA and psychology by summarizing activities within each directorate. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology-and the unique skills of psychologists-to the attention of the public. This report aims to give insight into the contributions psychologists make to our communities and our country. 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Cardiovascular Health in African Americans: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnethon, Mercedes R; Pu, Jia; Howard, George; Albert, Michelle A; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Bertoni, Alain G; Mujahid, Mahasin S; Palaniappan, Latha; Taylor, Herman A; Willis, Monte; Yancy, Clyde W

    2017-11-21

    Population-wide reductions in cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality have not been shared equally by African Americans. The burden of cardiovascular disease in the African American community remains high and is a primary cause of disparities in life expectancy between African Americans and whites. The objectives of the present scientific statement are to describe cardiovascular health in African Americans and to highlight unique considerations for disease prevention and management. The primary sources of information were identified with PubMed/Medline and online sources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (eg, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk) underlies the relatively earlier age of onset of cardiovascular diseases among African Americans. Hypertension in particular is highly prevalent among African Americans and contributes directly to the notable disparities in stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease among African Americans. Despite the availability of effective pharmacotherapies and indications for some tailored pharmacotherapies for African Americans (eg, heart failure medications), disease management is less effective among African Americans, yielding higher mortality. Explanations for these persistent disparities in cardiovascular disease are multifactorial and span from the individual level to the social environment. The strategies needed to promote equity in the cardiovascular health of African Americans require input from a broad set of stakeholders, including clinicians and researchers from across multiple disciplines. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Association of Osteopontin, Neopterin, and Myeloperoxidase With Stroke Risk in Patients With Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Peter; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2017-01-01

    from those without outcome strokes. Time to stroke was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: There was no association between time to stroke and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, resistin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, N-terminal fragment of pro...

  18. Neighborhood cohesion is associated with reduced risk of stroke mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cari Jo; Guo, Hongfei; Lunos, Scott; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Beck, Todd; Evans, Denis A; Mendes de Leon, Carlos; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2011-05-01

    Greater social cohesion is related to lower rates of coronary heart disease, but its relation to stroke risk is unstudied. This study examined whether neighborhood social cohesion was protective against stroke mortality and incidence. Data come from 5789 participants (60% female; 62% black; mean age, 74.7 years) in a longitudinal study of chronic diseases in the elderly. Stroke mortality, ascertained through December 31, 2007, was verified through the National Death Index; 186 stroke deaths were identified in 11 years of follow-up. Stroke incidence was determined in a subset (N=3816) with linkage to Medicare claims files; 701 first-ever strokes were identified. Cohesion was measured by 6 items assessing frequency of contact and social interactions with neighbors; items were z-scored and averaged. Individual scores were averaged across 82 census block groups, forming a neighborhood-level measure of social cohesion. Marginal Cox proportional hazard models tested the association of neighborhood-level cohesion with stroke mortality and incidence. Each 1-point increase in cohesion related to a 53% reduced risk of stroke mortality (hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.90), adjusting for relevant covariates, including sociodemographics, known stroke risk factors, and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status. A race×cohesion interaction (P=0.04) revealed cohesion was protective in whites (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.67) but not blacks (hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.35 to 3.86). Cohesion was unrelated to stroke incidence (P>0.5). Neighborhood-level social cohesion was independently protective against stroke mortality. Research is needed to further examine observed race differences and pathways by which cohesion is health-protective.

  19. Workplace wellness recognition for optimizing workplace health: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Calitz, Chris; Arena, Ross; Baase, Catherine; Isaac, Fikry W; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Peterson, Eric D; Pronk, Nico; Sanchez, Eduardo; Terry, Paul E; Volpp, Kevin G; Antman, Elliott M

    2015-05-19

    The workplace is an important setting for promoting cardiovascular health and cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention in the United States. Well-designed, comprehensive workplace wellness programs have the potential to improve cardiovascular health and to reduce mortality, morbidity, and disability resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke. Nevertheless, widespread implementation of comprehensive workplace wellness programs is lacking, and program composition and quality vary. Several organizations provide worksite wellness recognition programs; however, there is variation in recognition criteria, and they do not specifically focus on cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention. Although there is limited evidence to suggest that company performance on employer health management scorecards is associated with favorable healthcare cost trends, these data are not currently robust, and further evaluation is needed. As a recognized national leader in evidence-based guidelines, care systems, and quality programs, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is uniquely positioned and committed to promoting the adoption of comprehensive workplace wellness programs, as well as improving program quality and workforce health outcomes. As part of its commitment to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association will promote science-based best practices for comprehensive workplace wellness programs and establish benchmarks for a national workplace wellness recognition program to assist employers in applying the best systems and strategies for optimal programming. The recognition program will integrate identification of a workplace culture of health and achievement of rigorous standards for cardiovascular health based on Life's Simple 7 metrics. In addition, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association will develop resources that assist employers in meeting these rigorous

  20. Is fatigue after stroke associated with physical deconditioning? A cross-sectional study in ambulatory stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Susan J; Barugh, Amanda J; Greig, Carolyn A; Saunders, David H; Fitzsimons, Claire; Dinan-Young, Susie; Young, Archie; Mead, Gillian E

    2011-02-01

    To determine the relationship between a measure of fatigue and 2 indices of physical fitness, lower limb extensor power (LLEP) and walking economy. This was a cross-sectional study of patients with stroke. Fatigue was assessed by vitality (VIT) score of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2). LLEP of the unaffected limb was measured using a lower leg extensor power rig. Walking economy was calculated by measuring oxygen consumption (mL·kg(-1)·m(-1)) during walking at a comfortable speed. Bivariate analyses were performed relating VIT to indices of fitness. Multiple regression analyses were also performed and included age, sex, and either SF-36v2 emotional role function or SF-36v2 mental health, as predictors of VIT. Community setting. Participants (N=66; 36 men; mean age ± SD, 71.0±9.9y) were all community dwelling, had survived a stroke, were able to walk independently, and had completed their stroke rehabilitation. Not applicable The main outcome measure is SF-36v2 (VIT), with walking economy and LLEP of the limb unaffected by the stroke being independent variables. Walking economy was not significantly related to VIT (R=-.024, P=.86, n=60). LLEP was positively related to VIT in bivariate analysis (R=.38, P=.003, n=58). After controlling for age, sex, and SF-36 emotional role function (or SF-36v2 mental health if the extreme outlier was excluded), LLEP remained a significant predictor of VIT. We found an association between fatigue and reduced LLEP. If a larger study confirms these findings, it would support the need to develop and test interventions to increase LLEP as a treatment for fatigue after stroke. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Elevated body temperature in ischemic stroke associated with neurological improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanevski, A N; Naess, H; Thomassen, L; Waje-Andreassen, U; Nacu, A; Kvistad, C E

    2017-11-01

    Some studies suggest that high body temperature within the first few hours of ischemic stroke onset is associated with improved outcome. We hypothesized an association between high body temperature on admission and detectable improvement within 6-9 hours of stroke onset. Consecutive ischemic stroke patients with NIHSS scores obtained within 3 hours and in the interval 6-9 hours after stroke onset were included. Body temperature was measured on admission. A total of 315 patients with ischemic stroke were included. Median NIHSS score on admission was 6. Linear regression showed that NIHSS score 6-9 hours after stroke onset was inversely associated with body temperature on admission after adjusting for confounders including NIHSS score body temperature and neurological improvement within few hours after admission. This finding may be limited to patients with documented proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion on admission and suggests a beneficial effect of higher body temperature on clot lysis within the first three hours. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Excess Stroke in Mexican Americans Compared with Non-Hispanic Whites: The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Smith, Melinda A.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Risser, Jan M. H.; Uchino, Ken; Garcia, Nelda; Longwell, Paxton J.; McFarling, David A.; Akuwumi, Olubumi; Al-Wabil, Areej; Al-Senani, Fahmi; Brown, Devin L.; Moyé, Lemuel A.

    2004-01-01

    Mexican Americans are the largest subgroup of Hispanics, the largest minority population in the United States. Stroke is the leading cause of disability and third leading cause of death. The authors compared stroke incidence among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites in a population-based study. Stroke cases were ascertained in Nueces County, Texas, utilizing concomitant active and passive surveillance. Cases were validated on the basis of source documentation by board-certified neurolog...

  3. Is Neck Dissection Associated with an Increased Risk of Postoperative Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, John D; Patel, Urjeet A; Maas, Matthew B; Samant, Sandeep; Smith, Stephanie Shintani

    2017-08-01

    Objective Prior studies have reported widely disparate rates of postoperative stroke, with conflicting analyses of whether neck dissection is an independent risk factor. Study Design Cohort study. Setting American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 2005 to 2013. Subjects and Methods We compared the 30-day rate of postoperative stroke between patients undergoing complete or modified radical neck dissection and a control cohort composed of those undergoing resections in the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx without neck dissection. Propensity scores and paired statistics were used to compare the groups while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results We identified 9697 patients, including 5827 with neck dissection and 3870 without neck dissection. In the full cohort, the rate of postoperative stroke was greater with neck dissection than without it (0.31% vs 0.11%, P = .052), although the relationship was attenuated by propensity score matching to adjust for comorbidities (0.30% vs 0.13%, P = .18). Among patients with ≥2 risk factors for carotid artery stenosis, neck dissection was associated with an increased rate of postoperative stroke (2.68% with bilateral neck dissection, 0.41% with unilateral neck dissection, and 0.24% without neck dissection, P = .04). The incidence of stroke was strongly associated with 30-day mortality (7.4% vs 0.2%, P Stroke is a rare but highly morbid complication after head and neck surgery. Compared with other head and neck surgery, neck dissection in patients at risk for carotid artery stenosis is associated with an increased risk of postoperative stroke.

  4. Clinical and Demographic Characteristics Associated With Suboptimal Primary Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Prevention: Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Grace M; Calvert, Melanie; Feltham, Max G; Ryan, Ronan; Finnikin, Samuel; Marshall, Tom

    2018-03-01

    large number of future strokes and TIAs in the population. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Association between nih stroke scale score and functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saif, S.; Fazal, N.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between baseline national institutes of health stroke scale score and functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical unit-IV, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, from May 2009 to October 2009. Patients and Methods: Patients who presented with stroke within 24 hours of onset of symptom and had a developing infarct on the CT- scan were further evaluated for neurological impairment using NIH stroke scale. The baseline NIHSS score was calculated using a proforma. Age of the patient, gender and time of presentation to the hospital was recorded. Follow-up was done on the 7th day of admission using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Results: Total number of subjects was 150. Good outcome (GOS=1-2) was noticed in those subjects who had a low baseline NIHSS score (0-6) while poor outcome (GOS=3-5) was noticed in those subjects who had a higher baseline NIHSS score (>16)( p value< 0.05). In cases who had a moderate score (7-15); the ratio of good outcome to bad outcome was almost 70:30. Likewise good outcome (GOS=1-2) was noticed in those subjects who were younger (less than 45 years) while poor outcome (GOS=3-5) was noticed in the elderly (more than 45 years)( p value< 0.05). Similarly patients who presented within 12 hrs of symptom onset had a good outcome compared to those who presented after 12 hrs( p value< 0.05). Conclusion: Baseline NIH Stroke Scale score is strongly associated with functional outcome after 1 week of acute ischemic stroke. (author)

  6. Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Stroke in Chinese Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.P.; He, Y.; Lai, J.Q.; Wang, D.; Zhang, J.; Fu, P.; Yang, X.G.; Qi, L.

    2011-01-01

    We recently featured Chinese dietary patterns that were associated with obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. In this study, we examined the association of those dietary patterns and risk of stroke among 26,276 Chinese adults aged >= 45 y by using data from the 2002 China

  7. Association Between Onset-to-Door Time and Clinical Outcomes After Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Ryu; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Matsushita, Tomonaga; Hata, Jun; Kiyuna, Fumi; Fukuda, Kenji; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    ischemic stroke, regardless of reperfusion treatment or stroke severity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Poststroke Fatigue: Emerging Evidence and Approaches to Management: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Janice L; Becker, Kyra J; Kim, Jong S; Choi-Kwon, Smi; Saban, Karen L; McNair, Norma; Mead, Gillian E

    2017-07-01

    At least half of all stroke survivors experience fatigue; thus, it is a common cause of concern for patients, caregivers, and clinicians after stroke. This scientific statement provides an international perspective on the emerging evidence surrounding the incidence, prevalence, quality of life, and complex pathogenesis of poststroke fatigue. Evidence for pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for management are reviewed, as well as the effects of poststroke fatigue on both stroke survivors and caregivers. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. BMI increase through puberty and adolescence is associated with risk of adult stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Claes; Bygdell, Maria; Sondén, Arvid; Jern, Christina; Rosengren, Annika; Kindblom, Jenny M

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the contribution of prepubertal childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI change through puberty and adolescence, 2 distinct developmental BMI parameters, for risk of adult stroke in men. In this population-based study in Gothenburg, Sweden, men born in 1945-1961 with information on both childhood BMI at age 8 and BMI change through puberty and adolescence (BMI at age 20-BMI at age 8) were followed until December 2013 (n = 37,669). Information on stroke events was retrieved from high-quality national registers (918 first stroke events, 672 ischemic stroke events [IS], 207 intracerebral hemorrhage events [ICH]). BMI increase through puberty and adolescence (hazard ratio [HR] 1.21 per SD increase; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-1.28), but not childhood BMI, was independently associated with risk of adult stroke. Subanalyses revealed that BMI increase through puberty and adolescence was associated with both IS (HR per SD increase 1.19; 95% CI 1.11-1.28) and ICH (HR per SD increase 1.29; 95% CI 1.15-1.46). High BMI increase during puberty was strongly associated with increased risk of adult hypertension (odds ratio per SD increase 1.35; 95% CI 1.32-1.39). BMI increase through puberty and adolescence is associated with risk of adult IS and ICH in men. We propose that greater BMI increases during puberty contribute to increased risk of adult stroke at least partly via increased blood pressure. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Relevance of genetics and genomics for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, the Stroke Council, and the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Donna K; Baird, Alison E; Barkley, Ruth A; Basson, Craig T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ganesh, Santhi K; Herrington, David M; Hong, Yuling; Jaquish, Cashell; McDermott, Deborah A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2007-06-05

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem in the United States and around the world. Evidence accumulated over decades convincingly demonstrates that family history in a parent or a sibling is associated with atherosclerotic CVD, manifested as coronary heart disease, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial disease. Although there are several mendelian disorders that contribute to CVD, most common forms of CVD are believed to be multifactorial and to result from many genes, each with a relatively small effect working alone or in combination with modifier genes and/or environmental factors. The identification and the characterization of these genes and their modifiers would enhance prediction of CVD risk and improve prevention, treatment, and quality of care. This scientific statement describes the approaches researchers are using to advance understanding of the genetic basis of CVD and details the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic CVD, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Current areas of interest and investigation--including gene-environment interaction, pharmacogenetics, and genetic counseling--are also discussed. The statement concludes with a list of specific recommendations intended to help incorporate usable knowledge into current clinical and public health practice, foster and guide future research, and prepare both researchers and practitioners for the changes likely to occur as molecular genetics moves from the laboratory to clinic.

  12. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jukema, J Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P; Sabayan, Behnam; de Craen, Anton J M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association of performance in cognitive domains executive function and memory with incident coronary heart disease and stroke in older participants without dementia. We included 3,926 participants (mean age 75 years, 44% male) at risk for cardiovascular diseases from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite executive function score. Likewise, scores of the Picture Learning Test (immediate and delayed memory) were transformed into a composite memory score. Associations of executive function and memory were longitudinally assessed with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke using multivariable Cox regression models. During 3.2 years of follow-up, incidence rates of coronary heart disease and stroke were 30.5 and 12.4 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In multivariable models, participants in the lowest third of executive function, as compared to participants in the highest third, had 1.85-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-2.45) higher risk of coronary heart disease and 1.51-fold (95% CI 0.99-2.30) higher risk of stroke. Participants in the lowest third of memory had no increased risk of coronary heart disease (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0.74-1.32) or stroke (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.57-1.32). Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Repeat Stroke Associated with 'Migraine with Aura' and Middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a 21 year-old female, known migraineur, who presented with visual aura followed by throbbing left hemicranial headache, associated with sudden onset of weakness of the right side of the body and moderate to severe pains on the paretic limb (mixed lacuna stroke), three days after the onset of headache.

  14. Association of American Indian Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the OMH website Tribal Stories Needed for CDC Museum Exhibition Stories should highlight how Native traditions and ... of American Indian Physicians. Website designed by Back40 Design & managed by Javelin CMS

  15. American Health Information Management Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Government Corporate & Government Training Signature Partners Sponsorship Exhibitors Advertise With AHIMA Copyright & Permissions Privacy Policy RSS LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Copyright © 2017 by The American Health ...

  16. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Position Statements Publications Bookstore American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Legislative & Regulatory Agenda AAGP eNews (Members Only) Tools ... Funding Training Resources and Curricula For Clinicians >> Geriatric Psychiatry Identifier Webinar: Billing and Coding Consumer Material Clinical ...

  17. Sodium Valproate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Is Associated With Reduced Stroke Risk After Previous Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Rebecca L; Crichton, Siobhan; Wolfe, Charles D A; Yi, Qilong; Li, Linxin; Hankey, Graeme J; Rothwell, Peter M; Markus, Hugh S

    2018-01-01

    A variant in the histone deacetylase 9 ( HDAC9 ) gene is associated with large artery stroke. Therefore, inhibiting HDAC9 might offer a novel secondary preventative treatment for ischemic stroke. The antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (SVA) is a nonspecific inhibitor of HDAC9. We tested whether SVA therapy given after ischemic stroke was associated with reduced recurrent stroke rate. Data were pooled from 3 prospective studies recruiting patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack and long-term follow-up: the South London Stroke Register, The Vitamins to Prevent Stroke Study, and the Oxford Vascular Study. Patients receiving SVA were compared with patients who received antiepileptic drugs other than SVA using survival analysis and Cox Regression. A total of 11 949 patients with confirmed ischemic event were included. Recurrent stroke rate was lower in patient taking SVA (17 of 168) than other antiepileptic drugs (105 of 530; log-rank survival analysis P =0.002). On Cox regression, controlling for potential cofounders, SVA remained associated with reduced stroke (hazard ratio=0.44; 95% confidence interval: 0.3-0.7; P =0.002). A similar result was obtained when patients taking SVA were compared with all cases not taking SVA (Cox regression, hazard ratio=0.47; 95% confidence interval: 0.29-0.77; P =0.003). These results suggest that exposure to SVA, an inhibitor of HDAC, may be associated with a lower recurrent stroke risk although we cannot exclude residual confounding in this study design. This supports the hypothesis that HDAC9 is important in the ischemic stroke pathogenesis and that its inhibition, by SVA or a more specific HDAC9 inhibitor, is worthy of evaluation as a treatment to prevent recurrent ischemic stroke. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. The Association Between Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Chlamydia pneumoniae has been linked with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases; however, data on stroke and cerebrovascular accidents are sparse. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between C. pneumoniae infection and ischemic stroke. Patients and Methods In a case-control study, 141 patients, admitted with ischemic stroke, were compared with gender and age-matched control subjects (n = 141. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, the presence of C. pneumoniae IgG and IgA in the patients’ sera was determined. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 15 and were compared between the two groups using T-test and chi square test. Results The mean ages of the case and control groups were 68.97 ± 12.29 and 66.95 ± 6.68 years old, respectively. The difference between these two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.102. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgG were 78.7% in the patients with stroke and 52.5% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgA were 41.1% in the stroke and 15.6% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The results supported the hypothesis that serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular accident.

  19. The association between weather conditions and stroke admissions in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Yunsur; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Daş, Murat; Ahmedali, Asliddin; Kul, Seval; Bayram, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    Although several factors such as cigarette smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, physical inactivity and dietary factors have been well documented to increase the risk for stroke, there are conflicting data about the role of meteorological variables in the etiology of stroke. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the association between weather patterns, including daily temperature, humidity, wind speed, and air pressure, and stroke admissions to the Emergency Department of Atatürk Training and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey, between January 2009 and April 2010. Generalized additive models with logistic link function were used to investigate the relationship between predictors and days with and without stroke admission at lags 0-4. A total of 373 stroke patients were admitted to the emergency department (ED) between January 2009 and April 2010. Of patients, 297 had ischemic stroke (IS), 34 hemorrhagic stroke (HS), and 42 subarachnoidal hemorrhage (SAH). Although we did not find any association between overall admissions due to stroke and meteorological parameters, univariable analysis indicated that there were significantly more SAH cases on days with lower daily mean temperatures of 8.79 ± 8.75 °C as compared to relatively mild days with higher temperatures (mean temperature = 11.89 ± 7.94 °C, p = 0.021). The multivariable analysis demonstrated that admissions due to SAH increased on days with lower daily mean temperatures for the same day (lag 0; odds ratio (OR) [95 % confidence interval (95 % CI)] = 0.93 [0.89-0.98], p = 0.004) and lag 1 (OR [95 % CI] =0.76 [0.67-0.86], p = 0.001). Furthermore, the wind speed at both lag 1 (OR [95 % CI] = 1.63 [1.27-2.09], p = 0.001) and lag 3 (OR [95 % CI] = 1.43 [1.12-1.81], p = 0.004) increased admissions due to HS, respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that there was an association between ED admissions due to SAH and HS and weather conditions suggesting that

  20. Association of Retinopathy and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities With Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alun D; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Witt, Nicholas; Wijetunge, Sumangali; Thom, Simon A McG; Tillin, Therese; Aldington, Steve J; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2016-11-01

    Abnormalities of the retinal circulation may be associated with cerebrovascular disease. We investigated associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and (1) strokes and subclinical cerebral infarcts and (2) cerebral white matter lesions in a UK-based triethnic population-based cohort. A total of 1185 participants (age, 68.8±6.1 years; 77% men) underwent retinal imaging and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral infarcts and white matter hyperintensities were identified on magnetic resonance imaging, retinopathy was graded, and retinal vessels were measured. Higher retinopathy grade (odds ratio [OR], 1.40 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.16-1.70]), narrower arteriolar diameter (OR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]), fewer symmetrical arteriolar bifurcations (OR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.95]), higher arteriolar optimality deviation (OR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.00-1.34]), and more tortuous venules (OR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.09-1.32]) were associated with strokes/infarcts and white matter hyperintensities. Associations with quantitative retinal microvascular measures were independent of retinopathy. Abnormalities of the retinal microvasculature are independently associated with stroke, cerebral infarcts, and white matter lesions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Workplace Health & Safety Journal Awards & Recognition Occupational Health Nurses Week Member Discounts Monthly Newsletter Foundation About ... effective January 1, 2018. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. is the primary association for the ...

  2. Practice advisory: Recurrent stroke with patent foramen ovale (update of practice parameter): Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Gronseth, Gary; Kent, David M; Kizer, Jorge R; Homma, Shunichi; Rosterman, Lee; Kasner, Scott E

    2016-08-23

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology guideline for patients with stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO) by addressing whether (1) percutaneous closure of PFO is superior to medical therapy alone and (2) anticoagulation is superior to antiplatelet therapy for the prevention of recurrent stroke. Systematic review of the literature and structured formulation of recommendations. Percutaneous PFO closure with the STARFlex device possibly does not provide a benefit in preventing stroke vs medical therapy alone (risk difference [RD] 0.13%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.2% to 2.0%). Percutaneous PFO closure with the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder possibly decreases the risk of recurrent stroke (RD -1.68%, 95% CI -3.18% to -0.19%), possibly increases the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) (RD 1.64%, 95% CI 0.07%-3.2%), and is highly likely to be associated with a procedural complication risk of 3.4% (95% CI 2.3%-5%). There is insufficient evidence to determine the efficacy of anticoagulation compared with antiplatelet therapy in preventing recurrent stroke (RD 2%, 95% CI -21% to 25%). Clinicians should not routinely offer percutaneous PFO closure to patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke outside of a research setting (Level R). In rare circumstances, such as recurrent strokes despite adequate medical therapy with no other mechanism identified, clinicians may offer the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder if it is available (Level C). In the absence of another indication for anticoagulation, clinicians may routinely offer antiplatelet medications instead of anticoagulation to patients with cryptogenic stroke and PFO (Level C). © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Global Survey of the Frequency of Atrial Fibrillation-Associated Stroke: Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source Global Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perera, Kanjana S.; Vanassche, Thomas; Bosch, Jackie; Swaminathan, Balakumar; Mundl, Hardi; Giruparajah, Mohana; Barboza, Miguel A.; O'Donnell, Martin J.; Gomez-Schneider, Maia; Hankey, Graeme J.; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Roxas, Artemio; Lavallee, Philippa; Sargento-Freitas, Joao; Shamalov, Nikolay; Brouns, Raf; Gagliardi, Rubens J.; Kasner, Scott E.; Pieroni, Alessio; Vermehren, Philipp; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Wang, Yongjun; Muir, Keith; Coutinho, Jonathan M.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Hart, Robert G.; Czeto, K.; Kahn, M.; Mattina, K. R.; Ameriso, S. F.; Pujol-Lereis, V.; Hawkes, M.; Pertierra, L.; Perera, N.; de Smedt, A.; van Dyck, R.; van Hooff, R. J.; Yperzeele, L.; Gagliardi, V. D. B.; Cerqueir, L. G.; Yang, X.; Chen, W.; Amarenco, P.; Guidoux, C.; Ringleb, P. A.; Bereczki, D.; Vastagh, I.; Canavan, M.; Toni, D.; Anzini, A.; Colosimo, C.; de Michele, M.; Di Mascio, M. T.; Durastanti, L.; Falcou, A.; Fausti, S.; Mancini, A.; Mizumo, S.; Uchiyama, S.; Kim, C. K.; Jung, S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, J. A.; Jo, J. Y.; Arauz, A.; Quiroz-Compean, A.; Colin, J.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Marianito, V. P.; Cunha, L.; Santo, G.; Silva, F.; Coelho, J.; Kustova, M.; Meshkova, K.; Williams, G.; Siegler, J.; Zhang, C.; Gallatti, N.; Kruszewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasingly recognized as the single most important cause of disabling ischemic stroke in the elderly. We undertook an international survey to characterize the frequency of AF-associated stroke, methods of AF detection, and patient features. Consecutive patients

  4. Multiple Silent Lacunes Are Associated with Recurrent Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Skjøth, Flemming; Yavarian, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    in a cohort of patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: We included 786 patients (mean age 59.5 (SD 14.0); 42.9% females) in a registry-based, observational cohort study on patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. On brain MRI we assessed the number of silent lacunes....... Incidence rates per 100 person-years of ischemic stroke recurrence were 1.6, 2.5, and 5.0 for none, single, and multiple silent lacunes respectively. Corresponding incidence rates were 2.6, 2.4, and 4.4 for death, and 3.4, 4.0, and 6.6 for cardiovascular events respectively. Adjusted HRs of ischemic stroke...... recurrence were 1.53 (0.67-3.49) and 2.52 (1.25-5.09) for a single and multiple silent lacunes, respectively. Further adjustment for white matter hyperintensities maintained positive association although not significant. Corresponding adjusted HRs were 0.56 (0.25-1.25) and 0.65 (0.33-1.25) for death and 1...

  5. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  6. Burden of Intracranial Atherosclerosis Is Associated With Long-Term Vascular Outcome in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Su; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Won, Hong-Hee; Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Gyeong-Moon

    2017-10-01

    Ischemic stroke patients often have intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS), despite heterogeneity in the cause of stroke. We tested the hypothesis that ICAS burden can independently reflect the risk of long-term vascular outcome. This was a retrospective cohort study analyzing data from a prospective stroke registry enrolling consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 1081 patients were categorized into no ICAS, single ICAS, and advanced ICAS (ICAS ≥2 different intracranial arteries) groups. Primary and secondary end points were time to occurrence of recurrent ischemic stroke and composite vascular outcome, respectively. Study end points by ICAS burden were compared using Cox proportional hazards models in overall and propensity-matched patients. ICAS was present in 405 patients (37.3%). During a median 5-year follow-up, recurrent stroke and composite vascular outcome occurred in 6.8% and 16.8% of patients, respectively. As the number of ICAS increased, the risk for study end points increased after adjustment of potential covariates (hazard ratio per 1 increase in ICAS, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.42 for recurrent ischemic stroke and hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.33 for composite vascular outcome). The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for recurrent stroke and composite vascular outcome in patients with advanced ICAS compared with those without ICAS were 1.56 (0.88-2.74) and 1.72 (1.17-2.53), respectively, in the overall patients. The corresponding values in the propensity-matched patients were 1.28 (0.71-2.30) and 1.95 (1.27-2.99), respectively. ICAS burden was independently associated with the risk of subsequent composite vascular outcome in patients with ischemic stroke. These findings suggest that ICAS burden can reflect the risk of long-term vascular outcome. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Diabetic Ketoacidosis-Associated Stroke in Children and Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ruth Foster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is a state of severe insulin deficiency, either absolute or relative, resulting in hyperglycemia and ketonemia. Although possibly underappreciated, up to 10% of cases of intracerebral complications associated with an episode of DKA, and/or its treatment, in children and youth are due to hemorrhage or ischemic brain infarction. Systemic inflammation is present in DKA, with resultant vascular endothelial perturbation that may result in coagulopathy and increased hemorrhagic risk. Thrombotic risk during DKA is elevated by abnormalities in coagulation factors, platelet activation, blood volume and flow, and vascular reactivity. DKA-associated cerebral edema may also predispose to ischemic injury and hemorrhage, though cases of stroke without concomitant cerebral edema have been identified. We review the current literature regarding the pathogenesis of stroke during an episode of DKA in children and youth.

  8. Diabetic ketoacidosis-associated stroke in children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer Ruth; Morrison, Gavin; Fraser, Douglas D

    2011-02-22

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a state of severe insulin deficiency, either absolute or relative, resulting in hyperglycemia and ketonemia. Although possibly underappreciated, up to 10% of cases of intracerebral complications associated with an episode of DKA, and/or its treatment, in children and youth are due to hemorrhage or ischemic brain infarction. Systemic inflammation is present in DKA, with resultant vascular endothelial perturbation that may result in coagulopathy and increased hemorrhagic risk. Thrombotic risk during DKA is elevated by abnormalities in coagulation factors, platelet activation, blood volume and flow, and vascular reactivity. DKA-associated cerebral edema may also predispose to ischemic injury and hemorrhage, though cases of stroke without concomitant cerebral edema have been identified. We review the current literature regarding the pathogenesis of stroke during an episode of DKA in children and youth.

  9. Prevalence of Positive Troponin and Echocardiogram Findings and Association With Mortality in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Peter; Khoury, Jane; Eckerle, Bryan; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Mathew L; De Los Rios la Rosa, Felipe; Mackey, Jason; Adeoye, Opeolu; Martini, Sharyl; Ferioli, Simona; Kissela, Brett M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-05-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients may have raised serum cardiac troponin levels on admission, although it is unclear what prognostic implications this has, and whether elevated levels are associated with cardiac causes of stroke or structural cardiac disease as seen on echocardiogram. We investigated the positivity of cardiac troponin and echocardiogram testing within a large biracial AIS population and any association with poststroke mortality. Within a catchment area of 1.3 million, we screened emergency department admissions from 2010 using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition , discharge codes 430 to 436 and ascertained all physician-confirmed AIS cases by retrospective chart review. Hypertroponinemia was defined as elevation in cardiac troponin above the standard 99th percentile. Multiple logistic regression was performed, controlling for stroke severity, history of cardiac disease, and all other stroke risk factors. Of 1999 AIS cases, 1706 (85.3%) had a cardiac troponin drawn and 1590 (79.5%) had echocardiograms. Hypertroponinemia occurred in 353 of 1706 (20.7%) and 160 of 1590 (10.1%) had echocardiogram findings of interest. Among 1377 who had both tests performed, hypertroponinemia was independently associated with echocardiogram findings (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 2-4.2). When concurrent myocardial infarctions (3.5%) were excluded, hypertroponinemia was also associated with increased mortality at 1 year (35%; odds ratio, 3.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-5.6) and 3 years (60%; odds ratio, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-4.11). Hypertroponinemia in the context of AIS without concurrent myocardial infarction was associated with structural cardiac disease and long-term mortality. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether further cardiac evaluation might improve the long-term mortality rates seen in this group. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. High serum levels of sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 are associated with acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin-Wei; Wang, En; Bao, Yu-Yan; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Ming; Hu, Xiao-Fei; Jin, Xiao-Ping

    2016-10-01

    Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) are potent antagonists of Wnt signalling and might therefore play important roles in cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether serum sclerostin and Dkk-1 levels are associated with acute ischaemic stroke and specific stroke subtypes. Serum levels of sclerostin and Dkk-1 were measured by ELISA on day 1 and on day 6 after stroke in 62 patients with large artery atherosclerotic (LAA) stroke, on day 1 after stroke in 62 age- and gender-matched patients with small-artery occlusion (SAO) stroke and on admission in 62 healthy controls. Stroke severity was determined based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and by measuring stroke volume on diffusion-weighted imaging. Outcome was measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on day 90. Compared with controls, serum sclerostin and Dkk-1 levels were significantly higher in both patients with LAA stroke and with SAO stroke, and no difference was detected between the stroke subtypes. Sclerostin and Dkk-1 levels remained stable between the first and sixth day after stroke in the patients with LAA stroke. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate sclerostin and Dkk-1 as markers of a high risk of stroke and produced area under curve values of 0.773 and 0.776. Adjusted logistic regression showed that serum sclerostin and Dkk-1 levels remained as independent markers of stroke. No correlations were found between sclerostin or Dkk-1 levels and stroke severity or stroke outcome. High serum levels of sclerostin and Dkk-1 are associated with acute ischaemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical and Imaging Features Associated with an Increased Risk of Late Stroke in Patients with Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, A R; Schroeder, T V; Sillesen, H

    2014-01-01

    /CAS. METHODS: Review of clinical and/or imaging based scoring systems, predictive algorithms and imaging parameters that may be associated with an increased (or decreased) risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid disease. RESULTS: Parameters associated with an increased risk of late stroke include...... intracranial disease. CONCLUSIONS: A number of imaging parameters have been shown to be predictive of an increased risk of late stroke in previously asymptomatic patients. None have been independently validated, but many could easily be evaluated in natural history studies or randomized trials in order......BACKGROUND: The 2011 American Heart Association Guidelines on the management of asymptomatic carotid disease recommends that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) (with carotid artery stenting (CAS) as an alternative) may be considered in highly selected patients with 70-99% stenoses. However, no guidance...

  12. Problems with balance and binocular visual dysfunction are associated with post-stroke fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schow, Trine; Teasdale, Thomas William; Jensen Quas, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Trine Schow, Thomas William Teasdale, Kirsten Jensen Quas& Morten Arendt Rasmussen (2016): Problems with balance and binocular visual dysfunction are associated with post-stroke fatigue, Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, DOI: 10.1080/10749357.2016.1188475......Trine Schow, Thomas William Teasdale, Kirsten Jensen Quas& Morten Arendt Rasmussen (2016): Problems with balance and binocular visual dysfunction are associated with post-stroke fatigue, Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, DOI: 10.1080/10749357.2016.1188475...

  13. Infarct location and sleep apnea: evaluating the potential association in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephanie M; Yaggi, H Klar; Taylor, Stanley; Qin, Li; Ivan, Cristina S; Austin, Charles; Ferguson, Jared; Radulescu, Radu; Tobias, Lauren; Sico, Jason; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Williams, Linda S; Lampert, Rachel; Miech, Edward J; Matthias, Marianne S; Kapoor, John; Bravata, Dawn M

    2015-10-01

    The literature about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and stroke location is conflicting with some studies finding an association and others demonstrating no relationship. Among acute ischemic stroke patients, we sought to examine the relationship between stroke location and the prevalence of OSA; OSA severity based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), arousal frequency, and measure of hypoxia; and number of central and obstructive respiratory events. Data were obtained from patients who participated in a randomized controlled trial (NCT01446913) that evaluated the effectiveness of a strategy of diagnosing and treating OSA among patients with acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Stroke location was classified by brain imaging reports into subdivisions of lobes, subcortical areas, brainstem, cerebellum, and vascular territory. The association between acute stroke location and polysomnographic findings was evaluated using logistic regression for OSA presence and negative binomial regression for AHI. Among 73 patients with complete polysomnography and stroke location data, 58 (79%) had OSA. In unadjusted models, no stroke location variable was associated with the prevalence or severity of OSA. Similarly, in multivariable modeling, groupings of stroke location were also not associated with OSA presence. These results indicate that OSA is present in the majority of stroke patients and imply that stroke location cannot be used to identify a group with higher risk of OSA. The results also suggest that OSA likely predated the stroke. Given this high overall prevalence, strong consideration should be given to obtaining polysomnography for all ischemic stroke patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Risk of Stroke in Migraineurs Using Triptans. Associations with Age, Sex, Stroke Severity and Subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albieri, Vanna; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2016-01-01

    for a first stroke were identified in the Danish Registries. Information on stroke severity/subtype and cardiovascular risk factors was available for stroke patients. FINDINGS: Of the 49,711 patients hospitalized for a first stroke, 1084 were migraineurs using triptans. Adjusting for age, sex, income......, and educational level, risk for stroke was higher among migraineurs in respect to all strokes (RR 1.07; CI 1.01-1.14) and ischemic strokes (RR 1.07; CI 1.00-1.14). Risk for hemorrhagic stroke was increased but only in women (RR 1.41; CI 1.11-1.79). Risk was for mild strokes (RR 1.31; CI 1.16-1.48) while risk...

  15. American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Five principles developed by American Evaluation Associ intended to guide professional practice of evaluators & to inform evaluation clients and the general public about principles they can expect to be upheld by professional evaluators.

  16. The association of insular stroke with lesion volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishanth Kodumuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The insula has been implicated in many sequelae of stroke. It is the area most commonly infarcted in people with post-stroke arrhythmias, loss of thermal sensation, hospital acquired pneumonia, and apraxia of speech. We hypothesized that some of these results reflect the fact that: (1 ischemic strokes that involve the insula are larger than strokes that exclude the insula (and therefore are associated with more common and persistent deficits; and (2 insular involvement is a marker of middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion. We analyzed MRI scans of 861 patients with acute ischemic hemispheric strokes unselected for functional deficits, and compared infarcts involving the insula to infarcts not involving the insula using t-tests for continuous variables and chi square tests for dichotomous variables. Mean infarct volume was larger for infarcts including the insula (n = 232 versus excluding the insula (n = 629: 65.8 ± 78.8 versus 10.2 ± 15.9 cm3 (p < 0.00001. Even when we removed lacunar infarcts, mean volume of non-lacunar infarcts that included insula (n = 775 were larger than non-lacunar infarcts (n = 227 that excluded insula: 67.0 cm3 ± 79.2 versus 11.5 cm3 ± 16.7 (p < 0.00001. Of infarcts in the 90th percentile for volume, 87% included the insula (χ2 = 181.8; p < 0.00001. Furthermore, 79.0% infarcts due to MCA occlusion included the insula; 78.5% of infarcts without MCA occlusion excluded the insula (χ2 = 93.1; p < 0.0001. The association between insular damage and acute or chronic sequelae likely often reflects the fact that insular infarct is a marker of large infarcts caused by occlusion of the MCA more than a specific role of the insula in a range of functions. Particularly in acute stroke, some deficits may also be due to ischemia of the MCA or ICA territory caused by large vessel occlusion.

  17. 12/15-Lipoxygenase Inhibition or Knockout Reduces Warfarin-Associated Hemorrhagic Transformation After Experimental Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zheng, Yi; Karatas, Hulya; Wang, Xiaoying; Foerch, Christian; Lo, Eng H; van Leyen, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    For stroke prevention, patients with atrial fibrillation typically receive oral anticoagulation. The commonly used anticoagulant warfarin increases the risk of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) when a stroke occurs; tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment is therefore restricted in these patients. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) inhibition would reduce HT in warfarin-treated mice subjected to experimental stroke. Warfarin was dosed orally in drinking water, and international normalized ratio values were determined using a Coaguchek device. C57BL6J mice or 12/15-LOX knockout mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with 3 hours severe ischemia (model A) or 2 hours ischemia and tissue-type plasminogen activator infusion (model B), with or without the 12/15-LOX inhibitor ML351. Hemoglobin was determined in brain homogenates, and hemorrhage areas on the brain surface and in brain sections were measured. 12/15-LOX expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. Warfarin treatment resulted in reproducible increased international normalized ratio values and significant HT in both models. 12/15-LOX knockout mice suffered less HT after severe ischemia, and ML351 reduced HT in wild-type mice. When normalized to infarct size, ML351 still independently reduced hemorrhage. HT after tissue-type plasminogen activator was similarly reduced by ML351. In addition to its benefits in infarct size reduction, 12/15-LOX inhibition also may independently reduce HT in warfarin-treated mice. ML351 should be further evaluated as stroke treatment in anticoagulated patients suffering a stroke, either alone or in conjunction with tissue-type plasminogen activator. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Plaque inflammation and unstable morphology are associated with early stroke recurrence in symptomatic carotid stenosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marnane, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Although symptomatic carotid stenosis is associated with 3-fold increased risk of early stroke recurrence, the pathophysiologic mechanisms of high early stroke risk have not been established. We aimed to investigate the relationship between early stroke recurrence after initial symptoms and histological features of plaque inflammation and instability in resected carotid plaque.

  19. Moderate hyperglycaemia is associated with favourable outcome in acute lacunar stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Hyperglycaemia in acute ischaemic stroke is traditionally associated with a worsened outcome. However, it is unclear whether the impact of hyperglycaemia on stroke outcome is similar in lacunar and non-lacunar infarctions. The relation between serum glucose measured within 6 h after stroke onset and

  20. Prepregnancy Obesity and Associations With Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in Women in the Years After Childbirth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle Dalgas; Andersson, Charlotte; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular events (stroke or myocardial infarction) are often associated with poorer prognosis in younger, compared with older individuals. We examined the associations between prepregnancy obesity and the risks of myocardial infarction and stroke in young, healthy women. METHODS......) in underweight (BMIischemic stroke, and a composite outcome (myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death) were assessed using multivariable Cox...... regression models. We included 273 101 women with a median age of 30.4 years (interquartile range, 27.2-33.8). A total of 68 women experienced a myocardial infarction, and 175 women experienced an ischemic stroke. The adjusted hazard ratios of myocardial infarction compared with normal weight were 2.50 (95...

  1. Preliminary Reliability and Validity of an Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention Scale in an African American Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Dawn M; Clark, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    African Americans are at heightened risk of first stroke, and regular exercise can reduce stroke risk. Benefits and barriers to exercise subscales from 2 instruments were combined to create the Exercise Benefits and Barriers for Stroke Prevention (EBBSP) scale. Reliability and validity of the EBBSP scale were examined in a nonrandom sample of 66 African Americans who were primarily female, average age 43.3 ± 9.4 years, and high school graduates. Both subscales had adequate internal consistency reliability. Factor analysis revealed two factors for each subscale. More benefits and fewer perceived barriers were significantly related to current exercise and future intentions to exercise. The EBBSP scale may be useful in research focused on understanding, predicting, and promoting exercise for stroke prevention in adults.

  2. Serum Potassium Is Positively Associated With Stroke and Mortality in the Large, Population-Based Malmö Preventive Project Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda S; Mattsson, Nick; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Wollmer, Per; Söderholm, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Low serum potassium is associated with stroke in populations with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus but has not been studied in a mainly healthy population. We aimed to study the relation between serum potassium and incident stroke and mortality in the Malmö Preventive Project, a large cohort with screening in early mid-life and follow-up >25 years. Serum potassium measurements and covariates were available in 21 353 individuals (79% men, mean age 44 years). Mean follow-up time was 26.9 years for stroke analyses and 29.3 years for mortality analyses. There were 2061 incident stroke events and 8709 deaths. Cox regression analyses adjusted for multiple stroke risk factors (age, sex, height, weight, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, serum sodium, current smoking, prevalent diabetes mellitus, prevalent coronary artery disease, and treatment for hypertension) were fitted. There was an independent, linear association between serum potassium, per mmol/L increase, and both stroke (hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.52; P stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage and in both hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Serum potassium, measured in early mid-life, was linearly associated with both incidence of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage and all-cause mortality. An interaction with serum sodium implies that factors related to electrolyte balance and incident hypertension may be mediating factors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Do Trials of Resistance Training to Improve Mobility After Stroke Adhere to the American College of Sports Medicine Guidelines? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrey, Genevieve; Holland, Anne E; Mentiplay, Benjamin F; Clark, Ross A; Williams, Gavin

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether resistance training to improve mobility outcomes after stroke adheres to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines, and whether adherence was associated with better outcomes. Online databases searched from 1975 to October 30, 2016. Randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of lower limb strength training on mobility outcomes in adult participants with stroke. Two independent reviewers completed data extraction. Quality of trials was determined using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Trials were scored based on their protocol's adherence to 8 ACSM recommendations. To determine if a relation existed between total adherence score and effect size, Spearman ρ was calculated, and between individual recommendations and effect size, Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used. Thirty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria, and 34 were scored on their adherence to the guidelines. Adherence was high for frequency of training (100% of studies), but few trials adhered to the guidelines for intensity (32%), specificity (24%), and training pattern (3%). Based on the small number of studies that could be included in pooled analysis (n=12), there was no relation between overall adherence and effect size (Spearman ρ=-.39, P=.21). Adherence to the ACSM guidelines for resistance training after stroke varied widely. Future trials should ensure strength training protocols adhere more closely to the guidelines, to ensure their effectiveness in stroke can be accurately determined. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of Diabetes and Prognosis of Minor Stroke and Its Subtypes: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yongjun; Li, Hao; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Wang, Yilong; He, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and prognosis of minor stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether DM contributes to the prognosis of minor stroke or its specific subtype. Methods All minor ischemic stroke patients were derived from the China National Stroke Registry and classified into 5 subtypes according to the TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. DM was defined as either self-reported physician diagnosis of diabetes or use of hypoglycemic medications during hospitalization or at discharge. Patients were followed up for 1 year for clinical outcomes of recurrent stroke, death and functional outcome. Poor functional outcomes were defined as a score of 2–6 for modified Rankin Score. Associations between DM and prognosis of minor stroke and its subtypes were analyzed by univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 4,548 patients with minor stroke, 1,230(27.0%) patients had DM, 1,038(22.8%) had poor outcomes and 570(13.0%) of 4,401 patients had recurrent stroke at 1 year. In multivariable analyses, DM were significantly associated with 1-year stroke recurrence (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08–1.59) and poor outcome (OR, 1.51; 95%CI: 1.28–1.77). Among the subtypes of minor stroke, DM was only significantly associated with 1-year stroke recurrence (OR, 1.63; 95%CI: 1.07–2.50) and poor outcome (OR, 1.73; 95%CI: 1.22–2.45) in the small-artery occlusion subtype. Conclusions DM significantly increased the risk of stroke recurrence and poor outcome in the small-artery occlusion subtype, but not in other subtypes of minor stroke. PMID:27070309

  5. Magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    Thus, improving personal behaviour/ life style/ and early screening are important to prevent stroke in the study area. [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2016;30(3):129-134]. Key words: Stroke, factor, Felege Hiwot Hospital, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Background. Stroke or cerebrovascular accident is defined as the abrupt onset of neurologic ...

  6. A Family History of Stroke Is Associated with Increased Intima-Media Thickness in Young Ischemic Stroke - The Norwegian Stroke in the Young Study (NOR-SYS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øygarden, Halvor; Fromm, Annette; Sand, Kristin Modalsli; Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Eide, Geir Egil; Thomassen, Lars; Naess, Halvor; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Positive family history (FH+) of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a risk factor for own CVD. We aimed to analyze the effect of different types of FH (stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral artery disease (PAD) on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in young and middle-aged ischemic stroke patients. First-degree FH of CVD was assessed in ischemic stroke patients ≤ 60y using a standardized interview. Carotid ultrasound was performed and far wall cIMT in three carotid artery segments was registered, representing the common carotid (CCA-IMT), carotid bifurcation (BIF-IMT) and the internal carotid artery (ICA-IMT). Measurements were compared between FH+ and FH negative groups and stepwise backward regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with increased cIMT. During the study period 382 patients were enrolled, of which 262 (68%) were males and 233 (61%) reported FH of CVD. Regression analyses adjusting for risk factors revealed age as the most important predictor of cIMT in all segments. The association between FH+ and cIMT was modified by age (p = 0.014) and was significant only regarding ICA-IMT. FH+ was associated with increased ICA-IMT in patients aged stroke (p = 0.034), but not a FH+ of CHD or PAD. FH of stroke is associated with higher ICA-IMT in young ischemic stroke patients. Subtyping of cardiovascular FH is important to investigate heredity in young ischemic stroke patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01597453.

  7. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  8. Higher Blood Glucose within the Normal Range Is Associated with More Severe Strokes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Rolf J; Ratan, Rajiv R; Reding, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Background. Higher fasting blood glucose (FBG) concentrations in the hyperglycemic range are associated with more severe strokes. Whether this association also extends into patients with FBG in the normoglycemic range is unclear. We studied the association of stroke severity and FBG in normoglyce...

  9. American Psychological Association: Annual Report, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the 2008 annual reports from the various directorates and offices of the American Psychological Association (APA). In 2008, APA continued to work on initiatives, programs, and products that lend value to the member's psychology career, support the future of their discipline, and serve the public. APA's goal is to strengthen…

  10. Association of Breakfast Intake With Incident Stroke and Coronary Heart Disease: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-02-01

    The association between breakfast intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke, among Asian people remains unknown. We sought to prospectively investigate whether the omission of breakfast is related to increased risks of stroke and coronary heart disease in general Japanese populations. A total of 82,772 participants (38,676 men and 44,096 women) aged 45 to 74 years without histories of cardiovascular disease or cancer were followed up from 1995 to 2010. Participants were classified as having breakfast 0 to 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 6, or 7 times/wk. The hazard ratios of cardiovascular disease were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During the 1 050 030 person-years of follow-up, we documented a total of 4642 incident cases, 3772 strokes (1051 cerebral hemorrhages, 417 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 2286 cerebral infarctions), and 870 coronary heart disease. Multivariable analysis showed that those consuming no breakfast per week compared with those consuming breakfast everyday had hazard ratios (95% confidence interval; P for trend) of 1.14 (1.01-1.27; 0.013) for total cardiovascular disease, 1.18 (1.04-1.34; 0.007) for total stroke, and 1.36 (1.10-1.70; 0.004) for cerebral hemorrhage. Similar results were observed even after exclusion of early cardiovascular events. No significant association between the frequency of breakfast intake and the risk of coronary heart disease was observed. The frequency of breakfast intake was inversely associated with the risk of stroke, especially cerebral hemorrhage in Japanese, suggesting that eating breakfast everyday may be beneficial for the prevention of stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Selective associative phonagnosia after right anterior temporal stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, Simona; Coccia, Michela; Polonara, Gabriele; Reverberi, Carlo; Ceravolo, Gabriella; Silvestrini, Mauro; Fringuelli, Fabio; Baldinelli, Sara; Provinciali, Leandro; Gainotti, Guido

    2017-05-12

    We report the case of a 48 year old men who developed a selective impairment in famous voice recognition after ischemic stroke in right subcortical structures (lenticular nucleus and head of the caudate) and right anterior temporal lobe. He underwent fibrinolytic treatment. During the following days he progressively recovered and was discharged without neurological focal sign. Patent foramen ovale was found. When he got back to his house he noticed that he was unable to recognize the voice of his favoured singers and needed to ask who was the singer to his relatives. Neuropsychological examination revealed a selective impairment in famous voice recognition in the absence of alteration of voice perception, face perception and famous face recognition. All other neuropsychological domains were spared. In particular language, memory and executive functions were intact. Neuroimaging carried out by means of PET and MRI revealed two small ischemic lesions in the right subcortical region, involving lenticular and caudate nuclei and in the right temporal pole. To our knowledge, this is the first case described in literature of a patient showing a selective associative phonagnosia after right anterior temporal stroke. The present case helps to clarify the brain circuits underlying famous voice recognition and adds evidence in favour of a right hemisphere involvement in processing knowledge of familiar voices. These findings are discussed in relation to current models of brain organization of person-specific and general semantic knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. No association between exacerbation frequency and stroke in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windsor C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Claire Windsor,1 Emily Herrett,1 Liam Smeeth,1 Jennifer Kathleen Quint1,2 1Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 2Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have a higher risk of stroke than the general population. Chronic inflammation associated with COPD is thought to contribute to this risk. Exacerbations of COPD are associated with a rise in inflammation, suggesting that there may be an association between exacerbation frequency and the risk of stroke. This study examined that association.Methods: Using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, COPD patients with a first stroke between January 2004 and December 2013 were identified as cases and matched on age, sex, and general practice to controls with COPD but without a stroke (6,441 cases and 19,323 controls. Frequent exacerbators (FEs were defined as COPD patients with ≥2 exacerbations, and infrequent exacerbators (IEs have ≤1 exacerbation in the year prior to their stroke. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the association between exacerbation frequency and stroke overall, and by stroke subtype (hemorrhagic, ischemic, or transient ischemic attack. Exacerbations were also categorized into 0, 1, 2, or ≥3 exacerbations in the year prior to stroke.Results: There was no evidence that FE had an increased odds of stroke compared to IE (OR [odds ratio] =0.95, 95% CI [confidence interval] =0.89–1.01. There was strong evidence that the risk of stroke decreased with each exacerbation of COPD experienced per year (Ptrend =0.003. In the subgroup analysis investigating stroke subtype, FE had 33% lower odds of hemorrhagic stroke than IE (OR =0.67, 95% CI =0.51–0.88, P=0.003. No association was found within other stroke types

  13. Lack of association between a functional variant of the BRCA-1 related associated protein (BRAP) gene and ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Chen, Chung-Hung; Huang, Zhi-Zhang; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Lin, Ruey-Tay

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Atherosclerosis shares common pathogenic features with myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke. BRCA-1 associated protein (BRAP), a newly identified risk gene for MI, aggravates the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to test the association between the BRAP gene and stroke in a Taiwanese population. Methods A total of 1,074 stroke patients and 1,936 controls were genotyped for the functional SNP rs11066001. In our previous studies, t...

  14. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent non-fatal, self-reported stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Nicola R.; Lim, Carmen C.W.; Levinson, Daphna; Fiestas, Fabian; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Posada-Villa, Jose; Haro, Josep Maria; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Xavier, Miguel; Iwata, Noboru; de Jonge, Peter; Bruffaerts, Ronny; O’Neill, Siobhan; Kessler, Ron C.; Scott, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the associations between a wide range of mental disorders and subsequent onset of stroke. Lifecourse timing of stroke was examined using retrospectively reconstructed data from cross-sectional surveys. Methods Data from the World Mental Health Surveys were accessed. This data was collected from general population surveys over 17 countries of 87,250 adults. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of DSM-IV mental disorders. A weighted subsample (n = 45,288), was used for analysis in the present study. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent stroke onset. Results Bivariate models showed that 12/16 mental disorders were associated with subsequent stroke onset (ORs ranging from 1.6 to 3.8). However, after adjustment for mental disorder comorbidity and smoking, only significant relationships between depression and stroke (OR 1.3) and alcohol abuse and stroke (OR 1.5) remained. Among females, having a bipolar disorder was also associated with increased stroke incidence (OR 2.1). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with stroke onset in a dose–response fashion (OR 3.3 for 5+ disorders). Conclusions Depression and alcohol abuse may have specific associations with incidence of non-fatal stroke. General severity of psychopathology may be a more important predictor of non-fatal stroke onset. Mental health treatment should be considered as part of stroke risk prevention. Limitations of retrospectively gathered cross sectional surveys design mean further research on the links between mental health and stroke incidence is warranted. PMID:26094010

  15. Association of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor gene polymorphisms with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Zeng, F; Zhang, N; Huang, T; Meng, Q; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    To explore the association between polymorphisms of the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF) gene and ischaemic stroke. The SREBF1c 54G>C and SREBPF2 1784G>C genotypes were assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 446 Han Chinese ischaemic stroke patients and 355 Han Chinese control subjects without cerebrovascular disease. The frequencies of the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype and the C allele were significantly higher in the ischaemic stroke group than in controls. Patients with ischaemic stroke who had the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, compared with ischaemic stroke patients and control subjects with the GC or GG genotypes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between SREBF2 1784G>C and ischaemic stroke; an inverse association was observed between HDL level and risk of ischaemic stroke. The CC genotype of the SREBF2 1784G>C polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, possibly through decreasing the HDL level, which was inversely associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke.

  16. Hemorrhagic Stroke Associated with Pulmonary Edema and Catastrophic Cardiac Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Chang Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral arteriovenous fistula (AVF is a vascular malformation that is rare in the pediatric population. Older children with cerebral AVF tend to present with neurologic problems related to intracranial venous hypertension or intracranial hemorrhage. Cardiac and pulmonary complications following acute neurologic injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage are common in adults, but are rarely reported in children. However, complications have been reported in cases of enterovirus 71 rhombencephalitis in infants and children and can cause high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report a 14-year-old boy who presented with cardiac failure associated with pulmonary edema following cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to AVF. After aggressive investigation and management, we intervened before significant hypoxia and hypotension developed, potentially reducing the risk of long-term adverse neurologic consequences in this patient.

  17. Air Pollution and Ischemic Stroke Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitshak Sade, Maayan; Novack, Victor; Ifergane, Gal; Horev, Anat; Kloog, Itai

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated consistent associations between cardiovascular illness and particulate matter (PM) stroke received less attention. We hypothesized that air pollution, an inflammation progenitor, can be associated with stroke incidence in young patients in whom the usual risk factors for stroke are less prevalent. We aimed to evaluate the association between stroke incidence and exposure to PM stroke between 2005 and 2012. Exposure assessment was based on a hybrid model incorporating daily satellite remote sensing data at 1-km spatial resolution. We performed case-crossover analysis, stratified by personal characteristics and distance from main roads. We identified 4837 stroke cases (89.4% ischemic stroke). Interquartile range of PM ischemic stroke and increases of interquartile range average concentrations of particulate matter ischemic stroke associated with PM among young adults. This finding can be explained by the inflammatory mechanism, linking air pollution and stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Psychological factors are associated with subjective cognitive complaints 2 months post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijsse, Britta; van Heugten, Caroline M; van Mierlo, Marloes L; Post, Marcel W M; de Kort, Paul L M; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which psychological factors are related to post-stroke subjective cognitive complaints, taking into account the influence of demographic and stroke-related characteristics, cognitive deficits and emotional problems. In this cross-sectional study, 350 patients were assessed at 2 months post-stroke, using the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional consequences following stroke (CLCE-24) to identify cognitive complaints. Psychological factors were: proactive coping, passive coping, self-efficacy, optimism, pessimism, extraversion, and neuroticism. Associations between CLCE-24 cognition score and psychological factors, emotional problems (depressive symptoms and anxiety), cognitive deficits, and demographic and stroke characteristics were examined using Spearman correlations and multiple regression analyses. Results showed that 2 months post-stroke, 270 patients (68.4%) reported at least one cognitive complaint. Age, sex, presence of recurrent stroke(s), comorbidity, cognitive deficits, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and all psychological factors were significantly associated with the CLCE-24 cognition score in bivariate analyses. Multiple regression analysis showed that psychological factors explained 34.7% of the variance of cognitive complaints independently, and 8.5% (p psychological factors, proactive coping was independently associated with cognitive complaints (p cognitive complaints. Because cognitive complaints are common after stroke and are associated with psychological factors, it is important to focus on these factors in rehabilitation programmes.

  19. The association between delays in screening for and assessing dysphagia after acute stroke, and the risk of stroke-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Benjamin D; Smith, Craig J; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Enderby, Pam; James, Martin; Paley, Lizz; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    There is no robust evidence that screening patients with acute stroke for dysphagia reduces the risk of stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP), or of how quickly it should be done after admission. We aimed to identify if delays in bedside dysphagia screening and comprehensive dysphagia assessments by a speech and language therapist (SALT) were associated with patients' risk of SAP. Nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study of patients admitted with acute stroke in England and Wales. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression models were fitted, adjusting for patient variables and stroke severity. The exposures were time from (1) admission to bedside dysphagia screen, and (2) admission to comprehensive dysphagia assessment. Of 63 650 patients admitted with acute stroke, 55 838 (88%) had a dysphagia screen, and 24 542 (39%) a comprehensive dysphagia assessment. Patients with the longest delays in dysphagia screening (4th quartile adjusted OR 1.14, 1.03 to 1.24) and SALT dysphagia assessment (4th quartile adjusted OR 2.01, 1.76 to 2.30) had a higher risk of SAP. The risk of SAP increased in a dose-response manner with delays in SALT dysphagia assessment, with an absolute increase of pneumonia incidence of 1% per day of delay. Delays in screening for and assessing dysphagia after stroke, are associated with higher risk of SAP. Since SAP is one of the main causes of mortality after acute stroke, early dysphagia assessment may contribute to preventing deaths from acute stroke and could be implemented even in settings without access to high-technology specialist stroke care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. History of the american college health association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Following Dr Edward Hitchcock's lead at Amherst College in 1861, soon other institutions of higher education established physical education departments that evolved into independent college health programs. As the field of college health expanded, leaders from numerous campuses began meeting to share information and discuss formation of a national organization. As a result, the American Student Health Association was founded in 1920 to promote campus health care for students and advance the interests of college health. The name was changed to the American College Health Association in 1948. The past history of this organization has been well documented in the literature, so this review will focus more on ACHA's accomplishments over the past 20 years.(1)(,) (2)(,) (3)(,) (4).

  1. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Cole, John W.; Stine, O. Colin; Dueker, Nicole; McArdle, Patrick F.; Sparks, Mary J.; Shen, Jess; Laurie, Cathy C.; Nelson, Sarah; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Ling, Hua; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) is among the leading causes of death in Western countries. There is a significant genetic component to IS susceptibility, especially among young adults. To date, research to identify genetic loci predisposing to stroke has met only with limited success. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of early-onset IS to identify potential stroke susceptibility loci. The GWA analysis was conducted by genotyping 1 million SNPs in a biracial population of 889 IS cases...

  2. Report from the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, L D

    1989-01-01

    This article focuses on some of the difficult circumstances that the American Psychological Association (APA) and the mental health community are facing during the 1980s. While a great deal has been learned about mental health issues of older persons and research has demonstrated that they can benefit by appropriate services, the majority of elders needing mental health services are still not receiving them. Service, research and policy issues of concern to APA are discussed and several positive APA activities are noted.

  3. Post-stroke hemiparesis: Does chronicity, etiology, and lesion side are associated with gait pattern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Gabriela Lopes; Larissa, Coutinho de Lucena; Brasileiro, Ana Carolina de Azevedo Lima; Silva, Emília Márcia Gomes de Souza; Galvão, Élida Rayanne Viana Pinheiro; Maciel, Álvaro Cavalcanti; Lindquist, Ana Raquel Rodrigues

    2017-07-01

    Studies that evaluate gait rehabilitation programs for individuals with stroke often consider time since stroke of more than six months. In addition, most of these studies do not use lesion etiology or affected cerebral hemisphere as study factors. However, it is unknown whether these factors are associated with post-stroke motor performance after the spontaneous recovery period. To investigate whether time since stroke onset, etiology, and lesion side is associated with spatiotemporal and angular gait parameters of individuals with chronic stroke. Fifty individuals with chronic hemiparesis (20 women) were evaluated. The sample was stratified according to time since stroke (between 6 and 12 months, between 13 and 36 months, and over 36 months), affected cerebral hemisphere (left or right) and lesion etiology (ischemic and hemorrhagic). The participants were evaluated during overground walking at self-selected gait speed, and spatiotemporal and angular gait parameters were calculated. Results Differences between gait speed, stride length, hip flexion, and knee flexion were observed in subgroups stratified based on lesion etiology. Survivors of a hemorrhagic stroke exhibited more severe gait impairment. Subgroups stratified based on time since stroke only showed intergroup differences for stride length, and subgroups stratified based on affected cerebral hemisphere displayed between-group differences for swing time symmetry ratio. In order to recruit a more homogeneous sample, more accurate results were obtained and an appropriate rehabilitation program was offered, researchers and clinicians should consider that gait pattern might be associated with time since stroke, affected cerebral hemisphere and lesion etiology.

  4. Association Between Markers of Inflammation and Total Stroke by Hypertensive Status Among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Kotler, Gregory; Everett, Brendan M.; Glynn, Robert J.; Lee, I-Min; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Sesso, Howard D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Markers of systemic inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP], soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [sICAM-1], and fibrinogen) have been associated with a greater risk of total and ischemic stroke, in addition to elevated blood pressure. However, the role of these inflammatory markers on stroke pathophysiology by hypertension status is uncertain. METHODS Blood samples were collected and assayed for hsCRP, sICAM-1, and fibrinogen among 27,330 initially healthy women from the Women’s Health Study, and women were followed up from 1992 to 2013. Prior to randomization, the baseline questionnaire collected self-reported hypertension status, cardiovascular risk factors, and lifestyle factors. New cases of total, ischemic, and hemorrhagic stroke were updated annually through questionnaires and confirmed by medical records according to the National Survey of Stroke criteria. Multivariable Cox models estimated overall associations between each inflammatory marker and stroke and separately stratified by hypertension status. RESULTS We observed 629 incident total strokes over 477,278 person-years. In adjusted analyses, extreme quartiles of hsCRP and sICAM-1 were each associated with a significantly greater risk of total stroke (hsCRP: hazard ratios [HR] = 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–2.26; sICAM-1: HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.00–1.63). Fibrinogen was not associated with a significantly greater stroke risk. In analyses stratified by hypertension status, elevated hsCRP was associated with a nonstatistically significant greater risk of total stroke among prehypertensive and hypertensive women. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that hsCRP and sICAM-1 are associated with hypertension status and stroke risk among women. Further work should examine the role of inflammatory markers on ischemic stroke subtypes and clarify mechanisms. PMID:27235695

  5. Self-Reported Fatigue and Associated Factors Six Years after Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Elf

    Full Text Available Several studies have found that fatigue is one of the most commonly reported symptoms after stroke and the most difficult to cope with. The present study aimed to investigate the presence and severity of self-reported fatigue six years after stroke onset and associated factors. The cohort "Life After Stroke Phase I" (n = 349 persons was invited at six years to report fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale 7-item version, perceived impact of stroke and global recovery after stroke (Stroke Impact Scale, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Checklist and participation in everyday social activities (Frenchay Activities Index. At six years 37% of the 102 participants in this cross-sectional study reported fatigue. The results showed that in nearly all SIS domains the odds for post-stroke fatigue were higher in persons with a higher perceived impact. Furthermore, the odds for post-stroke fatigue were higher in those who had experienced a moderate/severe stroke and had signs of depression and anxiety. Fatigue is still present in one-third of persons as long as six years after stroke onset and is perceived to hinder many aspects of functioning in everyday life. There is an urgent need to develop and evaluate interventions to reduce fatigue.

  6. Regular group exercise is associated with improved mood but not quality of life following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. McDonnell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. People with stroke living in the community have an increased prevalence of depression and lower quality of life than healthy older adults. This cross-sectional observational study investigated whether participation in regular exercise was associated with improved mood and quality of life.Methods. We recruited three groups of community dwelling participants: 13 healthy older adults, 17 adults post-stroke who regularly participated in group exercise at a community fitness facility and 10 adults post-stroke who did not regularly exercise. We measured mood using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS and quality of life using the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL scale.Results. Levels of stress and depression were significantly greater in the people with stroke who did not undertake regular exercise (p = 0.004 and p = 0.004 respectively, although this group had more recent strokes (p < 0.001. Both stroke groups had lower quality of life scores (p = 0.04 than the healthy adults.Conclusions. This small, community-based study confirms that people following stroke report poorer quality of life than stroke-free individuals. However, those who exercise regularly have significantly lower stress and depression compared to stroke survivors who do not. Future research should focus on the precise type and amount of exercise capable of improving mood following stroke.

  7. Disparities in adult African American women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology: an analysis of 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Cumba, Marites T; McCullough, Joel Emery; Barlow, Erika Laverne; Lipsky, Martin S

    2008-06-01

    Heart disease and stroke are the first and third leading causes of death of American women, respectively. African American women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women and are also more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. As knowledge is a first step in seeking care, this study examined the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among African American women. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data. A composite heart attack and stroke knowledge score was computed for each respondent from the 13 heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge questions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using low scores on the heart attack and stroke knowledge questions as the dependent variable. Twenty percent of the respondents were low scorers, and 23.8% were high scorers. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult African American women who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to be aged 18-34 (OR = 1.36, CI 1.35, 1.37), be uninsured (OR = 1.32, CI 1.31, 1.33), have an annual household income heart attack and stroke symptoms varied significantly among African American women, depending on socioeconomic variables. Targeting interventions to African American women, particularly those in lower socioeconomic groups, may increase knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms, subsequently improving preventive action taken in response to these conditions.

  8. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  9. The progress of research into interleukin gene polymorphism associated with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a common disease, stroke seriously impairs human health. Interleukin (IL is an important type of inflammatory mediators, which is involved in the pathogenesis of stroke. With the study of genomics, we discovered that some gene loci of IL were associated with stroke, such as IL-1α-889 C/T, IL-1RN rs380092 and IL-10-1082 G/G. Meanwhile, some gene loci of IL might become independent risk factors of stroke, such as IL-4 C582T and IL4-589C>T. Therefore, the IL gene polymorphism had become a research focus in pathogenesis of stroke. Our paper describes the relationship between IL subtype and its gene polymorphism with stroke. We look forward to provide a useful information for further research.

  10. The Association of Lesion Location and Sleep Related Breathing Disorder in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisse, Anna Lena; Kemmling, André; Teuber, Anja; Wersching, Heike; Young, Peter; Dittrich, Ralf; Ritter, Martin; Dziewas, Rainer; Minnerup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD) are common in patients with ischemic stroke and are associated with poor outcome. SRBD after stroke were assumed to be a direct consequence of injury of specific central nervous system structures. However, whether specific locations of ischemic infarcts cause SRBD is yet unknown. We therefore investigated the association of ischemic lesion location with SRBD. Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated on our stroke unit were included in a prospective observational study. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and polygraphy in the acute phase after stroke. SRBD was defined by an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥10. MRI were evaluated using standardized maps to depict voxel-wise probability distribution of infarction for patients with and without SRBD. Groups were compared using logistic regression analysis. Of 142 patients included, 86 (59%) had a SRBD. Age, body mass index and prevalence of arterial hypertension were significantly higher in patients with SRBD. There was no statistically significant association between any lesion location and SRBD. We found no association of lesion location and SRBD in stroke patients, whereas established risk factors for SRBD, known from general population, were significantly associated with SRBD. Given the high prevalence of SRBD in stroke patients, these findings suggest that cerebral ischemia facilitates the occurrence of SRBD in patients with pre-existing risk factors rather than causing it by damaging specific central nervous system structures. Our findings can be used to identify stroke patients who might benefit from polygraphy screening.

  11. Association of ischaemic stroke subtype with long-term cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, G; Papavasileiou, V; Makaritsis, K; Milionis, H; Michel, P; Vemmos, K

    2014-08-01

    There is no strong evidence that all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. Our aim was to investigate whether all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. All consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke registered in the Athens Stroke Registry between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010 were categorized according to the TOAST classification and were followed up for up to 10 years. Outcomes assessed were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke recurrence, and a composite cardiovascular outcome consisting of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, acute heart failure, sudden cardiac death, stroke recurrence and aortic aneurysm rupture. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate the probability of each end-point in each patient group. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the independent covariates of each end-point. Two thousand seven hundred and thirty patients were followed up for 48.1 ± 41.9 months. The cumulative probabilities of 10-year cardiovascular mortality in patients with cardioembolic stroke [46.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 40.6-52.8], lacunar stroke (22.1%, 95% CI 16.2-28.0) or undetermined stroke (35.2%, 95% CI 27.8-42.6) were either similar to or higher than those of patients with large-artery atherosclerotic stroke (LAA) (28.7%, 95% CI 22.4-35.0). Compared with LAA, all other TOAST types had a higher probability of 10-year stroke recurrence. In Cox proportional hazards analysis, compared with patients with LAA, patients with any other stroke type were associated with similar or higher risk for the outcomes of overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, stroke recurrence and composite cardiovascular outcome. Large-artery atherosclerotic stroke and cardioembolic stroke are associated with the highest risk for future cardiovascular events, with the latter carrying at least as high a risk as LAA stroke. © 2014 The Author

  12. Serum Soluble Corin is Decreased in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Fangfang; Shi, Jijun; Han, Xiujie; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yan; Zhi, Zhongwen; Zhang, Fuding; Shen, Yun; Ma, Juanjuan; Song, Yulin; Hu, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    Soluble corin was decreased in coronary heart disease. Given the connections between cardiac dysfunction and stroke, circulating corin might be a candidate marker of stroke risk. However, the association between circulating corin and stroke has not yet been studied in humans. Here, we aimed to examine the association in patients wtith stroke and community-based healthy controls. Four hundred eighty-one patients with ischemic stroke, 116 patients with hemorrhagic stroke, and 2498 healthy controls were studied. Serum soluble corin and some conventional risk factors of stroke were examined. Because circulating corin was reported to be varied between men and women, the association between serum soluble corin and stroke was evaluated in men and women, respectively. Patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke had a significantly lower level of serum soluble corin than healthy controls in men and women (all P values, stroke than men in the highest quartile. Women in the lowest quartile of serum soluble corin were also more likely to have ischemic (OR, 3.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-5.44) and hemorrhagic (OR, 8.54; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-31.02) stroke than women in the highest quartile. ORs of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly increased with the decreasing levels of serum soluble corin in men and women (all P values for trend, stroke compared with healthy controls. Our findings raise the possibility that serum soluble corin may have a pathogenic role in stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Association With Restless Legs Syndrome, Diabetes Mellitus, Obesity, and Sleep-Disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šiarnik, Pavel; Klobučníková, Katarína; Šurda, Pavol; Putala, Matúš; Šutovský, Stanislav; Kollár, Branislav; Turčáni, Peter

    2018-01-15

    Sleep disorders are frequent in stroke patients. The prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and restless legs syndrome (RLS) among stroke survivors is up to 91%, 72%, and 15%, respectively. Although the relationship between EDS and SDB is well described, there are insufficient data regarding the association of EDS with RLS. The aim of this study was to explore the association between EDS, SDB, and RLS in acute ischemic stroke. We enrolled 152 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was used to assess EDS. SDB was assessed using standard overnight polysomnography. All patients filled in a questionnaire focused on RLS. Clinical characteristics and medication were recorded on admission. EDS was present in 16 (10.5%), SDB in 90 (59.2%) and RLS in 23 patients (15.1%). EDS was significantly more frequent in patients with RLS in comparison with the patients without RLS (26.1% versus 7.8%, P = .008). ESS was significantly higher in the population with RLS compared to the population without RLS (7 [0-14] versus 3 [0-12], P = .032). We failed to find any significant difference in the frequency of EDS and values of ESS in the population with SDB compared to the population without SDB. Presence of RLS (beta = 0.209; P = .009), diabetes mellitus (beta = 0.193; P = .023), and body mass index (beta = 0.171; P = .042) were the only independent variables significantly associated with ESS in multiple linear regression analysis. Our results suggest a significant association of ESS with RLS, diabetes mellitus, and obesity in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  14. Association Between Acute Kidney Disease and Intravenous Dye Administration in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demel, Stacie L; Grossman, Aaron W; Khoury, Jane C; Moomaw, Charles J; Alwell, Kathleen; Kissela, Brett M; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Matthew L; Ferioli, Simona; Mackey, Jason; De Los Rios la Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Adeoye, Opeolu; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-04-01

    Computed tomographic angiography and conventional angiography provide timely vascular anatomic information in patients with stroke. However, iodinated contrast dye may cause acute kidney injury (AKI). Within a large, biracial population, we examined in-hospital incidence of new or worsening kidney disease in patients with stroke and its association with administration of intravenous dye. All adult residents of the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region with acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage who presented to an emergency department in 2010 were included. Prevalence of unsuspected kidney disease at the time of emergency department presentation and the incidence of AKI after admission in 2 groups of patients-those who did and those who did not receive intravenous dye-were determined. In 2010, 2299 patients met inclusion criteria (89% ischemic stroke and 11% intracerebral hemorrhage); mean age 69 years (SD 15), 22% black, and 54% women. Among these patients, 37% had kidney disease at baseline, including 22% (516/2299) in whom this was unsuspected. Two percent (2%; 15/853) of patients with baseline kidney disease developed AKI during the hospital stay. Of those with no baseline kidney disease, 1% (14/14 467) developed AKI. There was no association between dye administration and new or worsening kidney disease. Although 22% of patients in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky stroke population had unsuspected kidney disease, the incidence of new or worsening kidney disease was low, and AKI was not associated with dye administration. These findings confirm single-center reports that the risk of severe renal complications after contrast dye is small. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Factors Associated with Nursing Home Admission after Stroke in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christina L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Desai, Manisha; Hedlin, Haley; Rapp, Stephen R; Cene, Crystal; Savla, Jyoti; Shippee, Tetyana; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Stefanick, Marcia L; Masaki, Kamal

    2015-10-01

    We examined the social and economic factors associated with nursing home (NH) admission in older women, overall and poststroke. The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) included women aged 50-79 years at enrollment (1993-1998). In the WHI Extension Study (2005-2010), participants annually reported any NH admission in the preceding year. Separate multivariate logistic regression models analyzed social and economic factors associated with long-term NH admission, defined as an admission on 2 or more questionnaires, overall and poststroke. Of 103,237 participants, 8904 (8.6%) reported NH admission (2005-2010); 534 of 2225 (24.0%) women with incident stroke reported poststroke NH admission. Decreased likelihoods of NH admission overall were demonstrated for Asian, Black, and Hispanic women (versus whites, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = .35-.44, P stroke (aOR = 2.59, 95% CI = 2.15-3.12). Increased odds of NH admission after stroke were demonstrated for women with moderate disability after stroke (aOR = 2.76, 95% CI = 1.73-4.42). Further adjustment for stroke severity eliminated the association found for race/ethnicity, income, and social support. The level of care needed after a disabling stroke may overwhelm social and economic structures in place that might otherwise enable avoidance of NH admission. We need to identify ways to provide care consistent with patients' preferences, even after a disabling stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2014-10-30

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents.

  17. Falls Are Associated With Lower Self-Reported Functional Status in Patients After Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, Eline; Schiemanck, Sven Kersten; Nollet, Frans; Kwakkel, Gert; Meijer, Jan-Willem; van de Port, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between falls and functional status after stroke. Design: Secondary analysis of data from the randomized controlled FIT-Stroke trial. Outcomes were measured at the time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation (t0) and after 12 weeks (t1). Between t0 and t1,

  18. Burden and factors associated with post-stroke depression in East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the burden and factors associated with post-stroke depression in East central Nigeria. Method: We carried out this cross-sectional study of 50 stroke survivors (mean age=54.8 ± 8.8 years), at the physiotherapy Department of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. Data were collected ...

  19. Factors associated with hospital arrival time after the onset of stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Late presentation to hospital after onset of stroke affects management and outcomes of the patients. This study aimed to determine the factors associated with time taken to present to hospital after the onset of acute stroke symptoms. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted at two teaching ...

  20. Association of serial biochemical markers with acute ischemic stroke: the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Lindsell, Christopher; Broderick, Joseph; Fagan, Susan C; Tilley, Barbara C; Levine, Steven R

    2006-10-01

    Biochemical markers of acute neuronal injury may aid in the diagnosis and management of acute ischemic stroke. Serum samples from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study were analyzed for the presence of 4 biochemical markers of neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell injury. These biochemical markers, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100beta, and soluble thrombomodulin, were studied for an association with initial stroke severity, infarct volume, and functional outcome. In the original NINDS study, serum samples were drawn from all patients on presentation to the Emergency Department and at approximately 2 and 24 hours after initiation of study therapy. In this analysis, stored serum samples were available for 359 patients; 107 patients had samples for all 3 time points. Serum marker concentrations were measured by ELISA techniques. We examined the relation between serum concentrations of each marker and the degree of baseline neurological deficit, functional outcome, and infarct size on computed tomography at 24 hours and the effect of fibrinolytic therapy. Higher 24-hour peak concentrations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta were associated with higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale baseline scores (r=0.186, P<0.0001; r=0.117, P=0.032; and r=0.263, P<0.0001, respectively). Higher peak concentrations of MBP and S100beta (r=0.209, P<0.0001; r=0.239, P<0.0001) were associated with larger computed tomography lesion volumes. Patients with favorable outcomes had smaller changes in MBP and S100beta (P<0.05) concentrations in the first 24 hours. Soluble thrombomodulin was not associated with any severity or outcome measure. This study corroborates previous work demonstrating correlations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta with clinical and radiographic features in acute stroke. Despite significantly better outcomes in the tissue plasminogen activator-treated group, we

  1. Factors associated with delayed presentation in patients with TIA and minor stroke in China: analysis of data from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyu; Chao, Yangyun; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, David Z; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Wang, Yongjun; Xu, Yuming

    2013-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the management of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke in China. Data from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR) were used to identify patients who were admitted to 132 urban hospitals across China with TIA or minor stroke. Factors associated with delayed presentation to hospital were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze relationships between patient characteristics and time of presentation. Of the 7467 patients entered into the CNSR (1204 with TIA, 6263 with minor stroke), 780 patients (64·78%) with TIA and 3467 patients (55·36%) with minor stroke had delayed presentation to hospital (>24 hours). In both groups, factors associated with early presentation (≤24 hours) included transportation by ambulance and direct presentation to the emergency room. In patients with minor stroke, early presentation was associated with older age (65-80 years), motor and sensory symptoms, speech impairment, atrial fibrillation, previous TIA, and living in central or eastern China; and delayed presentation was associated with female sex, cognitive dysfunction, and diabetes. In patients with TIA, early presentation was associated with motor symptoms, and delayed presentation was associated with headache or vertigo. In China, many patients with TIA and minor stroke do not seek medical treatment immediately. Further education is needed to teach members of the public about the warning signs and symptoms of TIA and minor stroke, and encourage the use of ambulance transportation after TIA or stroke.

  2. Mining association rules between stroke risk factors based on the Apriori algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhang, Yiyan; Kang, Hongyu; Xin, Yi; Shi, Caicheng

    2017-07-20

    Stroke is a frequently-occurring disease and is a severe threat to human health. We aimed to explore the associations between stroke risk factors. Subjects who were aged 40 or above were requested to do surveys with a unified questionnaire as well as laboratory examinations. The Apriori algorithm was applied to find out the meaningful association rules. Selected association rules were divided into 8 groups by the number of former items. The rules with higher confidence degree in every group were viewed as the meaningful rules. The training set used in association analysis consists of a total of 985,325 samples, with 15,835 stroke patients (1.65%) and 941,490 without stroke (98.35%). Based on the threshold we set for the Apriori algorithm, eight meaningful association rules were obtained between stroke and its high risk factors. While between high risk factors, there are 25 meaningful association rules. Based on the Apriori algorithm, meaningful association rules between the high risk factors of stroke were found, proving a feasible way to reduce the risk of stroke with early intervention.

  3. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Imaging recommendations for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients: a joint statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C; Albers, Gregory W; Bello, Jacqueline A; Derdeyn, Colin P; Hetts, Steven W; Johnson, Michele H; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Lev, Michael H; Liebeskind, David S; Rowley, Howard A; Schaefer, Pamela W; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2013-11-01

    In the article entitled "Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery", we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  6. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  7. Lombardia GENS: a collaborative registry for monogenic diseases associated with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersano, Anna; Baron, Pierluigi; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Trobia, Nadia; Sterzi, Roberto; Motto, Cristina; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Ferrarese, Carlo; Santoro, Patrizia; Parati, Eugenio; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro; Candelise, Livia

    2012-01-01

    The Italian region of Lombardy, with its existing stroke centers and high-technology laboratories, provides a favorable context for studying monogenic diseases associated with stroke. The Lombardia GENS project was set up to create a regional network for the diagnosis of six monogenic diseases associated with stroke: CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine, hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Marfan syndrome. The network comprises 36 stroke centers and seven high-technology laboratories, performing molecular analysis. In this context, all stroke/TIA patients fulfilling clinical criteria for monogenic diseases are currently being included in an ongoing study. Demographic, clinical and family data and diagnostic criteria are collected using standardized forms. On the basis of stroke incidence in Lombardy and the reported prevalence of the diseases considered, we expect, during the course of the study, to collect datasets and DNA samples from more than 200 stroke patients suspected of having monogenic diseases. This will allow evaluation of the regional burden and better phenotype characterization of monogenic diseases associated with stroke.

  8. Association of MTHFR C677T Genotype With Ischemic Stroke Is Confined to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Thijs, Vincent; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M.; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Dichgans, Martin; Meschia, James; Maguire, Jane; Levi, Christopher; Rost, Natalia S.; Rosand, Jonathan; Hassan, Ahamad; Bevan, Steve; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Elevated plasma homocysteine levels are associated with stroke. However, this might be a reflection of bias or confounding because trials have failed to demonstrate an effect from homocysteine lowering in stroke patients, although a possible benefit has been suggested in lacunar stroke. Genetic studies could potentially overcome these issues because genetic variants are inherited randomly and are fixed at conception. Therefore, we tested the homocysteine levels–associated genetic variant MTHFR C677T for association with magnetic resonance imaging–confirmed lacunar stroke and compared this with associations with large artery and cardioembolic stroke subtypes. Methods— We included 1359 magnetic resonance imaging–confirmed lacunar stroke cases, 1824 large artery stroke cases, 1970 cardioembolic stroke cases, and 14 448 controls, all of European ancestry. Furthermore, we studied 3670 ischemic stroke patients in whom white matter hyperintensities volume was measured. We tested MTHFR C677T for association with stroke subtypes and white matter hyperintensities volume. Because of the established association of homocysteine with hypertension, we additionally stratified for hypertension status. Results— MTHFR C677T was associated with lacunar stroke (P=0.0003) and white matter hyperintensity volume (P=0.04), but not with the other stroke subtypes. Stratifying the lacunar stroke cases for hypertension status confirmed this association in hypertensive individuals (P=0.0002), but not in normotensive individuals (P=0.30). Conclusions— MTHFR C677T was associated with magnetic resonance imaging–confirmed lacunar stroke, but not large artery or cardioembolic stroke. The association may act through increased susceptibility to, or interaction with, high blood pressure. This heterogeneity of association might explain the lack of effect of lowering homocysteine in secondary prevention trials which included all strokes. PMID:26839351

  9. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with lower long-term hospital bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z

    2016-01-01

    Background  Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator improves functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke. Few studies have investigated the effects of thrombolysis in a real-world setting. We evaluated the impact of thrombolysis on long-term hospital bed day use...... patients admitted to stroke centers not yet offering thrombolysis in 2004-2006. The outcomes were length of the stroke admission, total all-cause hospital bed day use during the first year after the stroke, and the long-term risk of readmissions. Thrombolysed and non-thrombolysed patients were compared...... in the overall risk of readmission (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI: 0.79-1.04); however, thrombolysis was associated with reduced risk of pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97).  Conclusions  Thrombolysis in ischemic stroke was associated with lower long-term hospital bed day use...

  10. Damage to the Left Precentral Gyrus Is Associated With Apraxia of Speech in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Ryo; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Kataoka, Yuka; Yazawa, Yukako; Furui, Eisuke; Matsuda, Minoru; Mori, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder, which is clinically characterized by the combination of phonemic segmental changes and articulatory distortions. AOS has been believed to arise from impairment in motor speech planning/programming and differentiated from both aphasia and dysarthria. The brain regions associated with AOS are still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to address this issue in a large number of consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients. We retrospectively studied 136 patients with isolated nonlacunar infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery territory (70.5±12.9 years old, 79 males). In accordance with speech and language assessments, the patients were classified into the following groups: pure form of AOS (pure AOS), AOS with aphasia (AOS-aphasia), and without AOS (non-AOS). Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping analysis was performed on T2-weighted images or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Using the Liebermeister method, group-wise comparisons were made between the all AOS (pure AOS plus AOS-aphasia) and non-AOS, pure AOS and non-AOS, AOS-aphasia and non-AOS, and pure AOS and AOS-aphasia groups. Of the 136 patients, 22 patients were diagnosed with AOS (7 patients with pure AOS and 15 patients with AOS-aphasia). The voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping analysis demonstrated that the brain regions associated with AOS were centered on the left precentral gyrus. Damage to the left precentral gyrus is associated with AOS in acute to subacute stroke patients, suggesting a role of this brain region in motor speech production. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Association between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Aileen; Guidetti, Susanne; Tham, Kerstin; Eriksson, Gunilla

    2017-09-01

    Within occupational therapy, it is assumed that individuals are satisfied when participating in everyday occupations that they want to do. However, there is little empirical evidence to show this. The aim of this study is to explore and describe the relation between satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations in a Swedish cohort, 5 years post stroke. Sixty-nine persons responded to the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ). The questionnaire measures subjective restrictions in participation, i.e. the discrepancy between doing and wanting to do 30 different occupations in everyday life, and satisfaction per activity. Results were analysed with McNemar/chi-square. Seventy percent of the persons perceived participation restrictions. Individuals that did not perceive restrictions in their participation had a significantly higher level of satisfaction (p = .002) compared to those that had restrictions. Participants that performed activities that they wanted to do report between 79 and 100% satisfaction per activity. In this cohort, there was a significant association between satisfaction and participating in everyday occupations one wants to do, showing that satisfaction is an important aspect of participation and substantiates a basic assumption within occupational therapy. The complexity of measuring satisfaction and participation in everyday occupations is discussed.

  12. Lack of association between a functional variant of the BRCA-1 related associated protein (BRAP) gene and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Chen, Chung-Hung; Huang, Zhi-Zhang; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Lin, Ruey-Tay

    2013-01-28

    Atherosclerosis shares common pathogenic features with myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke. BRCA-1 associated protein (BRAP), a newly identified risk gene for MI, aggravates the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to test the association between the BRAP gene and stroke in a Taiwanese population. A total of 1,074 stroke patients and 1,936 controls were genotyped for the functional SNP rs11066001. In our previous studies, the rare allele of this SNP has been repeatedly shown to exert a recessive effect. Therefore, in the current study, we tested for the same recessive model. First, the genotype distributions between all the controls and all the stroke cases were compared. Then to reduce heterogeneity, we explored several population subsets by selecting young stroke subjects (using 45 years of age as the cutoff point), age- and sex-comparable controls, plaque-free controls, and stroke subtypes. We did not find any significant association for the entire data set (OR = 0.94, p = 0.74) or for the subset analyses using age- and sex-comparable controls (p = 0.70) and plaque-free controls (p = 0.91). Analyses of the four stroke subtypes also failed to show any significant associations (p = 0.42 - 0.98). For both young and old subjects, the GG genotype of rs11066001 was similar in the stroke cases and unmatched controls (8.1% vs. 9.4% in young subjects and 8.0% vs. 7.8% in old subjects). Comparing stroke cases with plaque-free controls also failed to find any significant association. The BRAP polymorphism may not play an important role in ischemic stroke in the studied population.

  13. Lack of association between a functional variant of the BRCA-1 related associated protein (BRAP gene and ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Yi-Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis shares common pathogenic features with myocardial infarction (MI and ischemic stroke. BRCA-1 associated protein (BRAP, a newly identified risk gene for MI, aggravates the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to test the association between the BRAP gene and stroke in a Taiwanese population. Methods A total of 1,074 stroke patients and 1,936 controls were genotyped for the functional SNP rs11066001. In our previous studies, the rare allele of this SNP has been repeatedly shown to exert a recessive effect. Therefore, in the current study, we tested for the same recessive model. First, the genotype distributions between all the controls and all the stroke cases were compared. Then to reduce heterogeneity, we explored several population subsets by selecting young stroke subjects (using 45 years of age as the cutoff point, age- and sex-comparable controls, plaque-free controls, and stroke subtypes. Results We did not find any significant association for the entire data set (OR = 0.94, p = 0.74 or for the subset analyses using age- and sex-comparable controls (p = 0.70 and plaque-free controls (p = 0.91. Analyses of the four stroke subtypes also failed to show any significant associations (p = 0.42 – 0.98. For both young and old subjects, the GG genotype of rs11066001 was similar in the stroke cases and unmatched controls (8.1% vs. 9.4% in young subjects and 8.0% vs. 7.8% in old subjects. Comparing stroke cases with plaque-free controls also failed to find any significant association. Conclusions The BRAP polymorphism may not play an important role in ischemic stroke in the studied population.

  14. Co-morbidities and mortality associated with intracranial bleeds and ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Jason; Natalwala, Ammar; Mann, Jake; Uppal, Hardeep; Mummadi, Sangha Mitra; Haque, Amirul; Aziz, Amir; Potluri, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and acquired disability; however, there has been no comprehensive comparison of co-morbid risk factors between different stroke subtypes. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors and mortality for subdural haematoma (SDH), subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We compiled a database of all patients admitted with these conditions to a large teaching hospital in Birmingham, United Kingdom during the period 2000-2007 using the International Classification of Disease (ICD) 10th revision codes. Generalised linear models were constructed to calculate relative risks (RRs) associated with co-morbidities. In total, 4804 patients were admitted with diagnoses of SDH (1004), SAH (807), ischaemic stroke (2579) and haemorrhagic stroke (414). Patients with SDH were less likely to have pneumonia (0.492, 95% CI, 0.330-0.734; p ischaemic heart disease (0.56, 95% CI, 0.40-0.79; p ischaemic stroke. Epilepsy was positively associated with ischaemic stroke (1.94, 95% CI, 1.36-2.76; p ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes (41% and 40% respectively, vs. 73% in SDH and 64% in SAH; p < 0.001). These findings may guide clinical risk stratification, and improve the prognostic information given to patients.

  15. Cooperative Strategies to Develop Effective Stroke and Heart Attack Awareness Messages in Rural American Indian Communities, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C.; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S.; Harwell, Todd S.; Helgerson, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. Methods During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Results Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Conclusion Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities. PMID:23680509

  16. Cooperative strategies to develop effective stroke and heart attack awareness messages in rural american Indian communities, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie S; Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S; Harwell, Todd S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2013-05-16

    National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities.

  17. Association of the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in microRNAs 130b, 200b, and 495 with Ischemic Stroke Susceptibility and Post-Stroke Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkwon Kim

    Full Text Available The microRNA (miRNA is a small non-coding RNA molecule that modulates gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Platelets have a crucial role in both hemostasis and thrombosis, a condition that can occlude a cerebral artery and cause ischemic stroke. miR-130b, miR-200b, and miR-495 are potential genetic modulators involving platelet production and activation. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in these miRNAs might potentially contribute to the susceptibility to ischemic stroke and post-stroke mortality. This study included 523 ischemic stroke patients and 400 control subjects. We investigated the association of three miRNA SNPs (miR-130bT>C, miR-200bT>C, and miR-495A>C with ischemic stroke prevalence and post-stroke mortality. In the multivariate logistic regression, there was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of miR-130bT>C, miR-200bT>C, or miR-495A>C between the ischemic stroke and control groups. In the subgroup analysis based on ischemic stroke subtype, the miR-200b CC genotype was less frequently found in the large-artery atherosclerosis stroke subtype compared with controls (TT+CT vs CC; adjusted odds ratio for CC, 0.506; 95% confidence interval, 0.265-0.965. During a mean follow-up period of 4.80 ± 2.11 years after stroke onset, there were 106 all-cause deaths among the 523 stroke patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis did not find a significant association between post-stroke mortality and three miRNA SNPs. Our findings suggest that the functional SNP of miR-200b might be responsible for the susceptibility to large-artery atherosclerotic stroke.

  18. Sex Differences in the Association Between Insulin Resistance and Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Blacks Without Diabetes Mellitus: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effoe, Valery S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Echouffo Tcheugui, Justin B; Chen, Haiying; Joseph, Joshua J; Kalyani, Rita R; Bell, Ronny A; Wu, Wen-Chih H; Casanova, Ramon; Bertoni, Alain G

    2017-02-02

    Studies exploring the association between insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease in blacks have not been conclusive, especially for coronary heart disease (CHD). The McAuley index and homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) perform differently in predicting cardiovascular disease. We investigated this association in the Jackson Heart Study, a large longitudinal cohort of blacks. IR was estimated for 3565 participants without diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline using the McAuley index and HOMA-IR, and their associations with incident CHD and stroke (composite outcome) were compared. A lower McAuley index and higher HOMA-IR are indicative of IR. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for incident CHD and/or stroke. There were 158 events (89 CHD-only, 58 stroke-only, and 11 CHD/stroke) over a median follow-up of 8.4 years. After adjustment for demographic factors, the risk of the composite outcome decreased with each SD increase in the McAuley index (hazard ratio 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.96), with no attenuation after further accounting for CHD and stroke risk factors. When considered individually, McAuley index and HOMA-IR were associated with CHD (hazard ratio 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.92 and hazard ratio 1.33, 95% CI: 1.03-1.72, respectively), but not stroke risk. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women (P interaction =0.01). Both HOMA-IR and the McAuley index demonstrate strong associations with CHD but not stroke risk in blacks. The logHOMA-IR and CHD association was present in men, but not in women. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  19. Improvement of touch sensation after stroke is associated with resting functional connectivity changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C Bannister

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Distributed brain networks are known to be involved in facilitating behavioural improvement after stroke, yet few, if any, studies have investigated the relationship between improved touch sensation after stroke and changes in functional brain connectivity. Objective: We aimed to identify how recovery of somatosensory function in the first six months after stroke was associated with functional network changes as measured using resting-state connectivity analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Methods: Ten stroke survivors underwent clinical testing and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI scans at one and six months post-stroke. Ten age-matched healthy participants were included as controls. Results: Patients demonstrated a wide range of severity of touch impairment one month post-stroke, followed by variable improvement over time. In the stroke group, significantly stronger interhemispheric functional correlations between regions of the somatosensory system, and with visual and frontal areas, were found at six months than at one month post-stroke. Clinical improvement in tactile discrimination was associated with stronger correlations at six months between contralesional secondary somatosensory cortex (SII and inferior parietal cortex (IPC and middle temporal gyrus, and between contralesional thalamus and cerebellum. Conclusions: The strength of connectivity between somatosensory regions and distributed brain networks, including vision and attention networks, may change over time in stroke survivors with impaired touch discrimination. Connectivity changes from contralesional SII and contralesional thalamus are associated with improved touch sensation at 6-months post-stroke. These functional connectivity changes could represent future targets for therapy.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Young-Onset Stroke Identifies a Locus on Chromosome 10q25 Near HABP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Stanne, Tara M; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Ho, Weang Kee; Traylor, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Malik, Rainer; Xu, Huichun; Kittner, Steven J; Cole, John W; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Zhao, Wei; Engelter, Stefan; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lathrop, Mark; Leys, Didier; Thijs, Vincent; Metso, Tiina M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pezzini, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio A; Norrving, Bo; Bevan, Steve; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; Walters, Matthew R; Jannes, Jim; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David; Doheny, Kimberly; Laurie, Cathy C; Kanse, Sandip M; Bis, Joshua C; Fornage, Myriam; Mosley, Thomas H; Hopewell, Jemma C; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christine; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Meschia, James F; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Worrall, Bradford; Jern, Christina; Levi, Christopher; Dichgans, Martin; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Markus, Hugh S; Debette, Stephanie; Rolfs, Arndt; Saleheen, Danish; Mitchell, Braxton D

    2016-02-01

    Although a genetic contribution to ischemic stroke is well recognized, only a handful of stroke loci have been identified by large-scale genetic association studies to date. Hypothesizing that genetic effects might be stronger for early- versus late-onset stroke, we conducted a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies, focusing on stroke cases with an age of onset genetic variants at loci with association Pstroke susceptibility locus at 10q25 reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis of all samples from the discovery and follow-up stages (rs11196288; odds ratio =1.41; P=9.5×10(-9)). The associated locus is in an intergenic region between TCF7L2 and HABP2. In a further analysis in an independent sample, we found that 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in high linkage disequilibrium with rs11196288 were significantly associated with total plasma factor VII-activating protease levels, a product of HABP2. HABP2, which encodes an extracellular serine protease involved in coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory pathways, may be a genetic susceptibility locus for early-onset stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Cocaine-associated stroke: three cases and rehabilitation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolat, R D; O' Dell, M W; Golamco-Estrella, S P; Avella, H

    2000-04-01

    Cocaine-associated stroke (CAS) is an important cause of disability, especially among younger adults. Improved management has increased survival but little has been discussed about rehabilitation, including medication management. Therefore, experience and therapeutic drug management are described during inpatient rehabilitation with three patients with CAS. Case 14 is a 50-year-old male with a history of hypertension who presented with right hemiparesis, aphasia and depression. He was treated with paroxetine for depression and bromocriptine for poor initiation with a good response, improving by 50 FIM points in 44 days. Case 2 is a 44 year-old female with quadriparesis, aphasia, and deficits in attention and initiation. Methylphenidate for attention deficits and bromocriptine for poor initiation was associated with an excellent functional gain (50 FIM points in 37 days). She eventually returned to work. Case 3 is a 46-year-old female with a history of hypertension who presented with right hemiparesis, aphasia and depression. Without neuropharmacologic intervention, she gained 35 FIM points during an uneventful 47 day rehabilitation stay. Acutely, cocaine can induce cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebrovascular spasm, cerebral vasculitis and intracerebral haemorrhage. Chronic use depletes and destroys dopaminergic pathways, which may be a major factor in depression, and attention and initiation deficits-all observed in these cases. Generally, rapid improvements were seen in mood and cognition in two cases where medication was used. Based on the current literature and pathophysiology of CAS, it is suggested that trials of dopaminergic agents for cognition and extremely cautious use of buproprion for depression may be warrented. Details of the above cases and the practical and theoretical issues of neuropharmacologic intervention in CAS are discussed.

  2. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  3. Which risk factors are more associated with ischemic stroke than intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Emer R; Kapral, Moira K; Fang, Jiming; Eikelboom, John W; ó Conghaile, Aengus; Canavan, Michelle; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The decision to prescribe oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation is based on an assessment of the competing risks of ischemic stroke and major bleeding, of which intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most important type. We sought to determine the comparative importance of risk factors for ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation with particular emphasis on risk factors common to both stroke types. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or ICH and atrial fibrillation included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network constituted the cohort. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline risk factors and presentation with ICH versus ischemic stroke. Risk factors included: (1) those previously reported to be risk factors for both ischemic stroke and major bleeding (particularly ICH) ("shared" risk factors, including age, alcohol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, prior stroke/transient ischemic attack and preadmission dementia); and (2) other risk factors associated with either stroke subtype alone. A total of 3197 patients presented with atrial fibrillation and acute stroke, of which 12.2% presented with ICH. Of the "shared" risk factors, age (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34 per decade) and prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.12-1.87) were more associated with ischemic stroke than ICH, whereas a history of hypertension (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.68-1.17), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.23; 95% CI, 0.92-1.64), renal impairment (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71), and alcohol intake were not more strongly associated with either stroke subtype. Of the risk factors known to be associated with both ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with atrial fibrillation, we found that none had a stronger association with ICH. Older age was more strongly associated with ischemic stroke than ICH.

  4. Association of plasma homocysteine and white matter hypodensities in a sample of stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveed, G.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of homocysteine in vascular disorders have yielded conflicting data. There are also differences based on various ethnicities and cultures. In this study, we have examined the homocysteine patterns in local stroke patients, so as to ascertain the homocysteine status in a sample of local population. Homocysteine-white matter hypodensities relationship in stroke is emerging, as an important aspect in stroke pathophysiology and is thought to have prognostic and therapeutic values. Methods: We included 150 stroke patients who were diagnosed as having clinical stroke on the basis of history; physical examination and CT (Computerized Tomography) scan of brain. These patients were recruited from neurology and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals of Lahore. The presence or absence of white matter hypodensities were diagnosed after consultation with a radiologist. Blood samples were collected from the same stroke patients. Results: We found a strong association between white matter hypodensities and total homocysteine in plasma of stroke patients p<0.001. Conclusion: Homocysteine is a risk factor for white matter hypodensities in stroke patients in our study. (author)

  5. Gender association of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoula, Sofia; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Kostoulas, Charilaos; Tatsioni, Athina; Bouba, Ioanna; Maranis, Sotirios; Georgiou, Ioannis; Kyritsis, Athanassios P

    2011-12-01

    We examined the association of the NG011648 polymorphism (insertion/deletion) of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene with ischaemic stroke occurrence, subtype of ischaemic stroke and ischaemic stroke patients' gender. Patients with first ever ischaemic stroke were recruited prospectively in a period of 18 months. Controls were matched with the patients for age, gender, and known risk factors for stroke. Demographic data, medical history, and vascular risk factors were collected. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme analysis. Stroke and control groups were compared in regard to the prevalence of the NG011648 polymorphism. One hundred and seventy-six patients with ischaemic stroke and 178 controls were recruited and genotyped for NG011648 polymorphism (I/D) of the ACE gene. No significant difference in allele and genotype distributions emerged between control and patient groups, nor in the two subtype groups of lacunars and large artery atherosclerosis. After the data were stratified by gender, a low incidence of II homozygosity in female patients versus female controls (p = 0.05) and male patients (p = 0.013, Z score: -2.49) was found. Our results indicate that I/D polymorphisms may have a role in stroke onset, in respect to gender, with a possible favourable effect of II genotype in females.

  6. Pharmacotherapy prior to and in acute ischaemic stroke. The use of pharmacotherapy and drug-associated outcomes in real world practice - findings from the Polish Hospital Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewada, Maciej; Sarzyńska-Długosz, Iwona Marta; Skowrońska, Marta; Kamiński, Bogumił; Kobayashi, Adam; Członkowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a preventable disease and acute ischaemic stroke can be effectively treated. Specific pharmacotherapy is recommended in either prevention or acute ischemic stroke treatment. We aimed to evaluate the use and the early and late outcomes impact of drugs administered before and in acute ischaemic stroke in a real world practice. Ischaemic stroke patients hospitalized between 1st March 2007 and 29th February 2008 and reported in Polish Hospital Stroke Registry were analysed. Fully anonymous data were collected with standardized, web-based questionnaire with authorized access. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for case-mix and evaluate the impact of drugs used prior to or in acute ischaemic stroke on outcomes. The early outcomes were defined as in-hospital mortality or poor outcome (death or dependency - modified Rankin Scale  3) at hospital discharge, while late outcomes covered one-year survival. A total number of 26 153 ischaemic stroke patients (mean age: 71.8 years; females: 51.6%) was reported. The ana-lysis of pharmacotherapy showed that preventive use of hypo-tensive agents, anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation, antiplatelets and statins is inadequate. Regression models confirmed some expected drug benefits and additionally revealed that antihypertensive drugs or aspirin used prior to stroke and oral anticoagulants or statins used in hospital were associated with better stroke outcome. The prevention of ischaemic stroke needs to be monitored and improved. Evidence-based treatment of acute ischaemic stroke requires further promotion. The benefits of acute ischaemic stroke treatment with statins require to be confirmed in randomized controlled settings.

  7. Fatigue after stroke: a systematic review of associations with impaired physical fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Fiona; Kutlubaev, Mansur A; Dennis, Martin S; Greig, Carolyn; Mead, Gillian E

    2012-02-01

    Fatigue is a common and distressing post stroke symptom. One important hypothesis is that fatigue after stroke may be triggered by physical deconditioning, which sets up a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle of fatigue, avoidance of physical activity, further deconditioning, and more fatigue. If an association between physical activity and fatigue after stroke could be established, this would provide a rationale for developing a physical activity-based treatment. Systematically review all observational studies, which have measured both fatigue poststroke and one or more measures of physical fitness and/or physical activity at the same time-point and reported the association between fatigue and fitness variables. Publications were identified by systematically searching databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, and Sportdiscus using keywords 'fatigue', 'stroke', 'fitness', or 'activity' and their associated terms or synonyms. Publications that provided data on associations between fatigue in stroke patients and levels of physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and/or muscle strength and mass were included. Twenty-nine potential studies were retrieved after scrutinizing the titles and abstracts, of which only three fulfilled our inclusion criteria. No association between fatigue and any measures of physical activity or fitness were found. One study did find, through structural equation modeling techniques that fatigue indirectly influences exercise through self-efficacy expectations. There is very limited evidence regarding associations between exercise, fitness, and fatigue after stroke. It still remains highly plausible that exercise can have a positive influence on fatigue. Future research should be longitudinal in design.

  8. Risk Factors for Pregnancy-Associated Stroke in Women With Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eliza C; Gatollari, Hajere J; Too, Gloria; Boehme, Amelia K; Leffert, Lisa; Marshall, Randolph S; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Willey, Joshua Z

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia affects 3% to 8% of pregnancies and increases risk of pregnancy-associated stroke (PAS). Data are limited on which women with preeclampsia are at highest risk for PAS. Using billing data from the 2003 to 2012 New York State Department of Health inpatient database, we matched women with preeclampsia and PAS 1:3 to preeclamptic controls based on age and race/ethnicity. Pre-defined PAS risk factors included pregnancy complications, infection present on admission, vascular risk factors, prothrombotic states, and coagulopathies. We constructed multivariable conditional logistic regression models to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for independent risk factors for PAS. Among women aged 12 to 55 years admitted to New York State hospitals for any reason during the study period (n=3 373 114), 88 857 had preeclampsia, and 197 of whom (0.2%) had PAS. In multivariable analysis, women with preeclampsia and stroke were more likely than controls to have severe preeclampsia or eclampsia (OR, 7.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6-11.3), infections present on admission (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.6-5.8), prothrombotic states (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.2), coagulopathies (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.3-7.1), or chronic hypertension (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.8-5.5). Additional analyses matched and stratified by severity of preeclampsia confirmed these results. Infections, chronic hypertension, coagulopathies, and underlying prothrombotic conditions increase PAS risk in women with preeclampsia. These women may warrant closer monitoring. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Genetic Variant of Kalirin Gene Is Associated with Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ischemic stroke is a complex disorder resulting from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Previous studies showed that kalirin gene variations were associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the association between this gene and ischemic stroke was unknown. We performed this study to confirm if kalirin gene variation was associated with ischemic stroke. Methods. We enrolled 385 ischemic stroke patients and 362 controls from China. Three SNPs of kalirin gene were genotyped by means of ligase detection reaction-PCR method. Data was processed with SPSS and SHEsis platform. Results. SNP rs7620580 (dominant model: OR = 1.590, p = 0.002 and adjusted OR = 1.662, p = 0.014; additive model: OR = 1.490, p = 0.002 and adjusted OR = 1.636, p = 0.005; recessive model: OR = 2.686, p = 0.039 and SNP rs1708303 (dominant model: OR = 1.523, p = 0.007 and adjusted OR = 1.604, p = 0.028; additive model: OR = 1.438, p = 0.01 and adjusted OR = 1.476, p = 0.039 were associated with ischemic stroke. The GG genotype and G allele of SNP rs7620580 were associated with a risk for ischemic stroke with an adjusted OR of 3.195 and an OR of 1.446, respectively. Haplotype analysis revealed that A–T–G,G-T-A, and A-T-A haplotypes were associated with ischemic stroke. Conclusions. Our results provide evidence that kalirin gene variations were associated with ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population.

  10. American Lung Association's radon public information program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    The American Lung Association (ALA), the nation's oldest voluntary health organization, is dedicated to the conquest of lung disease and the promotion of lung health. The objective of the ALA Radon Public Information Program is to reduce public exposure to elevated indoor radon levels through implementing grassroots-based radon public awareness campaigns by 22 local ALA groups. The program, which is funded by a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was initiated in December 1989; the first phase will continue until May, 1991. Activities of local Lung Associations include distribution of free or reduced-cost radon kits; presenting programs in elementary and secondary schools; presenting information on TV news series and talk shows, and on radio Public Service Announcements and talk shows; presenting articles and feature stories in the print media; holding conferences, workshops, and displays at fairs and other exhibitions; distributing radon fact sheets through libraries and utility company mailings; and distributing videos through video chains and libraries. The local Lung Associations also serve as promoters for the EPA/Advertising Council Radon Public Service Announcement Campaign. We will highlight the activities of the groups in communicating radon health risks to the public; we will describe the results obtained and will attempt to evaluate the merits of the various approaches on the basis of the initial results

  11. Heather Switzer named American Association of University Women American Dissertation Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2008-01-01

    Heather Switzer, planning, governance, and globalization doctoral student in the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech, has been named an American Association of University Women American Dissertation Fellow.

  12. An associative Brain-Computer-Interface for acute stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    An efficient innovative Brain-Computer-Interface system that empowers chronic stroke patients to control an artificial activation of their lower limb muscle through task specific motor intent has been tested in the past. In the current study it was applied to acute stroke patients. The system...... (tibialis anterior). This activation is precisely and individually timed such that the sensory signal arising from the stimulation reaches the motor cortex during its maximum activation due to the intention. The output of the motor cortical area representing the dorsiflexor muscles was significantly...

  13. Association of reduced folate carrier-1 (RFC-1) polymorphisms with ischemic stroke and silent brain infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunkyung; Kim, Jung O; Lee, Jeong Han; Park, Hye Mi; Jeon, Young Joo; Oh, Seung Hun; Bae, Jinkun; Park, Young Seok; Kim, Ok Joon; Kim, Nam Keun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world and in South Korea. Ischemic stroke and silent brain infarction (SBI) are complex, multifactorial diseases influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Moderately elevated plasma homocysteine levels are a major risk factor for vascular diseases, including stroke and SBI. Folate and vitamin B12 are important regulators of homocysteine metabolism. Reduced folate carrier (RFC), a bidirectional anion exchanger, mediates folate delivery to a variety of cells. We selected three known RFC-1 polymorphisms (-43C>T, 80A>G, 696T>C) and investigated their relationship to cerebral infarction in the Korean population. We used the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to analyze associations between the three RFC-1 polymorphisms, disease status, and folate and homocysteine levels in 584 ischemic stroke patients, 353 SBI patients, and 505 control subjects. The frequencies of the RFC-1 -43TT, 80GG, and 696CC genotypes differed significantly between the stroke and control groups. The RFC-1 80A>G substitution was also associated with small artery occlusion and SBI. In a gene-environment analysis, the RFC-1 -43C>T, 80A>G, and 696T>C polymorphisms in the ischemic stroke group had combined effects with all environmental factors. In summary, we found that the RFC-1 -43C>T, 80A>G, and 696T>C polymorphisms may be risk factors for ischemic stroke.

  14. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Language barriers between physicians and patients are not associated with thrombolysis of stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostanski, Sara K; Williams, Olajide; Stillman, Joshua I; Marshall, Randolph S; Willey, Joshua Z

    2016-10-01

    Acute stroke is a time-sensitive condition in which rapid diagnosis must be made in order for thrombolytic treatment to be administered. A certain proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis will be found on further evaluation to have a diagnosis other than stroke, so-called "stroke mimics." Little is known about the role of language discordance in the emergency department diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. This is a retrospective analysis of all acute ischemic stroke patients who received IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in our emergency department between July 2011 and December 2015. Baseline characteristics, patient language, and final diagnosis were compared between encounters in which the treating neurologist and patient spoke the same language (concordant cases) and encounters in which they did not (discordant cases). A total of 350 patients received IV tPA during the study period. English was the primary language for 52.6%, Spanish for 44.9%, and other languages for 2.6%; 60.3% of cases were classified as language concordant and 39.7% as discordant. We found no significant difference in the proportion of stroke mimics in the language concordant compared to discordant groups (16.6% vs 9.4%, p = 0.06). Similarly, the proportion of stroke mimics did not differ between English- and Spanish-speaking patients (15.8% vs 11.5%, p = 0.27). Language discordance was not associated with acute stroke misdiagnosis among patients treated with IV tPA. Prospective evaluation of communication during acute stroke encounters is needed to gain clarity on the role of language discordance in acute stroke misdiagnosis.

  16. Sleep Parameters, Functional Status, and Time Post-Stroke are Associated with Offline Motor Skill Learning in People with Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siengsukon, Catherine; Al-Dughmi, Mayis; Al-Sharman, Alham; Stevens, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence demonstrates that individuals with stroke benefit from sleep to enhance learning of a motor task. While stage NREM2 sleep and REM sleep have been associated with offline motor skill learning in neurologically intact individuals, it remains unknown which sleep parameters or specific sleep stages are associated with offline motor skill learning in individuals with stroke. Twenty individuals with chronic stroke (>6 months following stroke) and 10 control participants slept for three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory with polysomnography. Participants practiced a tracking task the morning before the third night and underwent a retention test the morning following the third night. Offline learning on the tracking task was assessed. Pearson's correlations assessed for associations between the magnitude of offline learning and sleep variables, age, upper-extremity motor function, stroke severity, depression, and time since stroke occurrence. Individuals with stroke performed with significantly less error on the tracking task following a night of sleep (p = 0.006) while the control participants did not (p = 0.816). Increased sleep efficiency (r = -0.285), less time spent in stage NREM3 sleep (r = 0.260), and more time spent in stage REM sleep (r = -0.266) were weakly-to-moderately associated with increased magnitude of offline motor learning. Furthermore, higher upper-extremity motor function (r = -0.400), lower stroke severity (r = 0.360), and less time since stroke occurrence (r = 0.311) were moderately associated with increased magnitude of offline motor learning. This study is the first study to provide insight into which sleep stages and individual characteristics may be associated with offline learning in people with stroke. Further research is needed to delineate which factors or combination of factors promote offline motor learning in people with neurologic injury to best promote motor recovery in these

  17. Sleep parameters, functional status and time post-stroke are associated with off-line motor skill learning in people with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eSiengsukon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mounting evidence demonstrates that individuals with stroke benefit from sleep to enhance learning of a motor task. While stage NREM2 sleep and REM sleep have been associated with off-line motor skill learning in neurologically-intact individuals, it remains unknown which sleep parameters or specific sleep stages are associated with off-line motor skill learning in individuals with stroke. Methods: Twenty individuals with chronic stroke (> 6 months following stroke and 10 neurologically slept for three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory with polysomnography. Participants practiced a tracking task the morning before the third night and underwent a retention test the morning following the third night. Off-line learning on the tracking task was assessed. Pearson’s correlations assessed for associations between the magnitude of off-line learning and sleep variables, age, upper extremity motor function, stroke severity, depression and time since stroke occurrence.Results: Individuals with stroke performed with significantly less error on the tracking task following a night of sleep (p=.006 while the control participants did not (p=.816. Increased sleep efficiency (r= -.285, less time spent in stage NREM3 sleep (r=.260, and more time spent in stage REM sleep (r= -.266 was weakly-to-moderately associated with increased magnitude of off-line motor learning. Furthermore, higher upper-extremity motor function (r = -.400, lower stroke severity (r = .360, and less time since stroke occurrence (r=.311 were moderately associated with increased magnitude of off-line motor learning. Conclusion: This study is the first study to provide insight into which sleep stages and individual characteristics may be associated with off-line learning in people with stroke. Future work should continue to understand which factors or combination of factors promote off-line motor learning in people with neurologic injury to best promote motor recovery in

  18. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Post Stroke Fatigue; Point Prevalence, Characterization, Associations and Radiological Correlation in a Rehabilitation Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, A

    2017-11-01

    Post stroke fatigue (PSF) is a frequently reported symptom by stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. This cross sectional observational study was undertaken in a rehabilitation facility to look at its prevalence and relationship with various variables like personal factors, type of stroke, social context, hemispheric involvement on CT scan and mobility status. The results showed that PSF was present in 83% (25 out of 30) of the patients included in the study. No clear association could be established between PSF, social, radiological and functional characteristics.

  20. Association between Factor V Gene Polymorphism and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazzani, Adel Ali; Kumar, Amit; Selim, Magdy

    2018-02-22

    Ischemic stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disease. Reports on relationship between Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism and ischemic stroke have revealed inconsistent results. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to determine the role of Factor V single nucleotide gene polymorphism in ischemic stroke. We searched the literature using academic electronic databases that is, PubMed, Trip Data Base, EBSCO, and Google Scholar, last search up to September 2017. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from fixed or random effects models whichever applicable using software STATA version 13 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX). Forty case-control studies met the inclusion criteria, which included 6860 cases and 18,025 controls. Altogether, 19 studies in young adults (age  40). Four studies did not report the mean age at recruitment. Significant association between Factor V G1691A gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke were observed under dominant model (OR 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62, P value analysis suggested substantial association of Factor V gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in cases with onset at young age (OR 1.84; 95% CI: 1.47 to 2.30), but was not statistical significant in cases at old age (>40 years). Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism was associated with risk of ischemic stroke mainly in young adults. Further research with adequately powered prospective studies in homogenous subjects are required to determine the nature of association in young stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors Associated With Gastrostomy Tube Removal in Patients With Dysphagia After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmskoetter, Janina; Herbert, Teri Lynn; Bonilha, Heather S

    2017-04-01

    Gastrostomy feeding tubes are commonly placed in patients with dysphagia after stroke. The subsequent removal of the tube is a primary goal during rehabilitation. The purpose of our review was to identify predictors and factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. We conducted a literature review following the PRISMA statement and included the search databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Articles were included in the final analysis per predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our search retrieved a total of 853 results consisting of 416 articles (after eliminating duplicates). Six articles met our final eligibility criteria. The following factors were identified in at least 1 article as being significantly associated with gastrostomy tube removal: reduced age, decreased number of comorbidities, prolonged inpatient rehabilitation stay, absence of bilateral stroke, nonhemorrhagic stroke, reduced dysphagia severity, absence of aspiration, absence of premature bolus loss, and timely initiation of pharyngeal swallow. Aspiration was the only factor that was investigated by 2 studies-both using multiple regression and both showing stable results, with absence of aspiration increasing the chances for tube removal. In conclusion, little is known about factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. Most of the identified factors are associated with stroke or disease severity; however, the role of the individual factors remains unclear. The strongest predictor appears to be absence of aspiration on modified barium swallow studies emphasizing the importance of instrumental swallow studies in this patient population.

  2. Is well-being associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian; Iversen, Helle K.

    2011-01-01

    four different symptom groups of LUTS. Conclusions. The results indicate that poor well-being is present in stroke patients with LUTS, especially in women. Likewise, the data showed significant association between poor well-being and LUTS. Screening for well......Objective. This study aimed to assess self-reported well-being in a clinical sample of stroke patients and to identify possible associations with prevalence, severity and bother of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Material and methods. A cross-sectional, clinical survey was initiated whereby...... stroke patients were invited to complete The WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5) and a LUTS instrument, the Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire. Of 519 stroke patients invited, 482 subjects were eligible and 407 (84%) respondents answered the questionnaires. Results. Poor well...

  3. In-hospital stroke recurrence and stroke after transient ischemic attack: frequency and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Hebun; Scheitz, Jan F; Ebinger, Martin; Rocco, Andrea; Grittner, Ulrike; Meisel, Andreas; Rothwell, Peter M; Endres, Matthias; Nolte, Christian H

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to assess the risk of recurrent ischemic events during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) with optimal current management and to identify associated risk factors. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients treated for acute ischemic stroke or TIA in 3 stroke units between 2010 and 2013. Recurrent stroke was defined as new persisting (≥24 hours) neurological deficit occurring >24 hours after the index event and not attributable to other causes of neurological deterioration. Cox proportional hazard regression identified risk factors associated with recurrent stroke. The study included 5106 patients. During a median length of stay of 5 days (interquartile range, 4-8), stroke recurrence (or stroke after TIA) occurred in 40 patients (0.8%) and was independently associated with history of TIA, symptomatic carotid stenosis (≥70%), or other determined etiology. Patients with recurrent stroke and other determined etiology had cervical arterial dissection (n=2), primary angiitis of the central nervous system (n=1), giant cell arteritis (n=1), and lung cancer with nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (n=1). In patients with initial TIA or minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤5) recurrence was associated additionally with pneumonia after the inciting ischemic event but before stroke recurrence. Patients with initial stroke and aphasia had a lower stroke recurrence rate and there were no recurrences in patients with lacunar stroke. Recurrence was associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality (17.5% versus 3.1%; Pstroke recurrence was low with optimal current management. Patients with a history of TIA, severe symptomatic carotid stenosis, or uncommon causes of stroke were at higher risk. Pneumonia was associated with a higher risk of stroke recurrence in patients with initial TIA or minor stroke but not in the overall population studied. Aphasia may bias the detection rate by concealing new

  4. Associations of estimated Δ-5-desaturase and Δ-6-desaturase activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Roya; Kurl, Sudhir; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Virtanen, Jyrki K

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The role of PUFA in reducing the risk of stroke is uncertain. The concentrations of PUFA in the human body are determined both by dietary intake and by activities of desaturase enzymes. Desaturase enzymes have been associated with chronic diseases, but little is known about their association with stroke risk. We investigated the associations of Δ-6-desaturase (D6D) and Δ-5-desaturase (D5D) activities with stroke risk factors and risk of stroke among 1842 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, aged 42-60 years and free of CVD at baseline in 1984-1989. ANCOVA and Cox regression models were used for the analyses. Whole serum desaturase activities were estimated as product:precursor ratios - γ-linolenic acid:linoleic acid for D6D and arachidonic acid:dihomo-γ-linolenic acid for D5D. Higher D6D activity was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin and TAG concentrations and worse homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA) indices. In contrast, higher D5D activity was associated with lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, serum insulin, LDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein concentrations, higher HDL-cholesterol concentration, and better HOMA indices. During the mean follow-up of 21·2 years, 202 stroke cases occurred. Neither D6D activity (multivariable-adjusted extreme-quartile hazard ratios (HR) 1·18; 95 % CI 0·80, 1·74) nor D5D activity (HR 1·06; 95 % CI 0·70, 1·60) were associated with stroke risk. In conclusion, higher D5D activity was favourably associated and higher D6D activity unfavourably associated with several stroke risk factors, but not with the risk of incident stroke.

  5. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q 25 , 75 ) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men ( P stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. 125 years of the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher D; Cautin, Robin L

    2017-11-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) began 125 years ago as a small club of a few dozen members in the parlor of its founder, G. Stanley Hall. In the decades since, it has faced many difficulties and even a few existential crises. Originally a scientific society, it spent the decades between the world wars figuring out how to accommodate the growing community of applied psychologists while still retaining and enhancing its scientific reputation. After World War II, with an expanded mandate, it developed formal training models for clinical psychologists and became an important player in legal cases pertaining to civil rights and other social justice issues. With practitioners taking an ever-greater role in the governance of the organization in the late 1970s, and the financial viability of the association in doubt in the 1980s, many psychological scientists felt the need to create a separate organization for themselves. The 1990s and early 2000s brought more challenges: declining divisional memberships; a legal dispute over fees with practitioners; and a serious upheaval over the APA Board of Directors' cooperation with governmental defense and intelligence agencies during the "war on terror." These clashes appear to have precipitated a decline in the association's membership for the first time in its history. The APA has faced many storms over its century-and-a-quarter, but has, thus far, always ultimately found a way forward for itself, for its members, and for the wider discipline of psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. American football and fatal exertional heat stroke: a case study of Korey Stringer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Knox, John A.; Vanos, Jennifer; Cooper, Earl R.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-08-01

    On August 1, 2001, Korey Stringer, a Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings, became the first and to date the only professional American football player to die from exertional heat stroke (EHS). The death helped raise awareness of the dangers of exertional heat illnesses in athletes and prompted the development of heat safety policies at the professional, collegiate, and interscholastic levels. Despite the public awareness of this death, no published study has examined in detail the circumstances surrounding Stringer's fatal EHS. Using the well-documented details of the case, our study shows that Stringer's fatal EHS was the result of a combination of physiological limitations, organizational and treatment failings, and extreme environmental conditions. The COMfort FormulA (COMFA) energy budget model was used to assess the relative importance of several extrinsic factors on Stringer's EHS, including weather conditions, clothing insulation, and activity levels. We found that Stringer's high-intensity training in relation to the oppressive environmental conditions was the most prominent factor in producing dangerous, uncompensable heat stress conditions and that the full football uniform played a smaller role in influencing Stringer's energy budget. The extreme energy budget levels that led to the fatal EHS would have been avoided according to our modeling through a combination of reduced intensity and lower clothing insulation. Finally, a long delay in providing medical treatment made the EHS fatal. These results highlight the importance of modern heat safety guidelines that provide controls on extrinsic factors, such as the adjustment of duration and intensity of training along with protective equipment modifications based on environmental conditions and the presence of an emergency action plan focused on rapid recognition and immediate on-site aggressive cooling of EHS cases.

  8. Limited fine hand use after stroke and its association with other disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2008-08-01

    To describe the recovery of fine hand use and the associations between fine hand use and, respectively, somatosensory functions, grip strength, upper extremity movements and self-care, in the first week and at 3 and 18 months after stroke, and to describe whether these associations change over time. Prospective observational study. Sixty-six consecutive patients with stroke. The following parameters were assessed in the first week, and at 3 and 18 months after stroke: fine hand use, grip strength (not assessed in the first week), touch, proprioceptive and upper extremity movement functions; and self-care. Seventy percent of all patients had limited fine hand use in the first week, 41% at 3 months and 45% at 18 months after stroke. The associations between fine hand use and the other functioning were moderate to high, but decreased over time for fine hand use and, respectively, somatosensory functions, upper extremity movements and self-care. Limited fine hand use is common after acute stroke. Our results suggest that, with time after stroke, upper extremity movements and self-care become less dependent on fine hand use and fine hand use becomes less dependent on touch function, although no ultimate conclusions can be drawn on causality.

  9. Factors Associated with Delay in Presentation to the Hospital for Young Adults with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lester Y; Caplan, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with ischemic stroke may present late to medical care, but the reasons for these delays are unknown. We sought to identify factors that predict delay in presentation. We performed a retrospective cohort study of adults aged 18-50 admitted to a single academic medical center between 2007 and 2012. Eighty six of 141 (61%) young adults with ischemic stroke presented at the health center more than 4.5 h after stroke onset. Diabetes was associated with delays in presentation (p = 0.033, relative risk (RR) 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.8)), whereas systemic cancer was associated with early presentations (p = 0.033, RR 0.26 (95% CI 0.044-1.6)). Individuals who were single were more likely to present late than those who were married or living with a partner (p = 0.0045, RR 1.7 (95% CI 1.3-2.2)). Individuals who were unemployed were more likely to present late than those who were employed or in school (p = 0.020, RR 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.8)). Age (dichotomized as 18-35 and 36-50), race, home medications, other medical conditions (including common stroke mimics in young adults), and stroke subtype were not determinants of delay in presentation, although there was a trend toward delayed presentations in women (p = 0.076) and with low stroke severity (dichotomized as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) ≤5 and NIHSS >5, p = 0.061). A majority of young adults with ischemic stroke presented outside the time window for intravenous fibrinolysis. Diabetes, single status, and unemployed status were associated with delayed presentation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Analysis of the morbidity and associated factors of early onset post-stroke depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZHANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the morbidity and associated factors of early onset depression after acute ischemic stroke, in order to improve its diagnostic rate and cure rate.  Methods The depression symptoms of 150 patients with acute ischemic stroke were evaluated by using Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HAMD-17 2 weeks after onset. According to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-Ⅳ criteria, patients with HAMD-17 score ≥ 7 were diagnosed as post-stroke depression (PSD. Clinical data of those patients, including gender, age, education, laboratory indexes, predisposing factors, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, Trial of Org10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST type, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP classification, and concurrent carotid artery stenosis were recorded. Univariate and multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the related factors of PSD.  Results The morbidity of PSD in patients 2 weeks after stroke onset was 18% (27/150. Univariate and multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed triglyceride level (P = 0.042, neural function deficiency (P = 0.001 and concurrent carotid artery stenosis (P = 0.003 were independent risk factors for early onset PSD. Further subgroup analysis indicated concurrent carotid artery stenosis was the independent risk factor for PSD in non-minor stroke patients (P = 0.014. Conclusions Stroke patients with severe neurological deficits and carotid artery stenosis are susceptible to early onset PSD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.007

  11. Loci associated with ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (SiGN): a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of disease-associated loci through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is the leading genetic approach to the identification of novel biological pathways underlying diseases in humans. Until recently, GWAS in ischaemic stroke have been limited by small sample sizes and have yielded few loci associated with ischaemic stroke. We did a large-scale GWAS to identify additional susceptibility genes for stroke and its subtypes. To identify genetic loci associated with ischaemic stroke, we did a two-stage GWAS. In the first stage, we included 16 851 cases with state-of-the-art phenotyping data and 32 473 stroke-free controls. Cases were aged 16 to 104 years, recruited between 1989 and 2012, and subtypes of ischaemic stroke were recorded by centrally trained and certified investigators who used the web-based protocol, Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS). We constructed case-control strata by identifying samples that were genotyped on nearly identical arrays and were of similar genetic ancestral background. We cleaned and imputed data by use of dense imputation reference panels generated from whole-genome sequence data. We did genome-wide testing to identify stroke-associated loci within each stratum for each available phenotype, and we combined summary-level results using inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis. In the second stage, we did in-silico lookups of 1372 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified from the first stage GWAS in 20 941 cases and 364 736 unique stroke-free controls. The ischaemic stroke subtypes of these cases had previously been established with the Trial of Org 10 172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification system, in accordance with local standards. Results from the two stages were then jointly analysed in a final meta-analysis. We identified a novel locus (G allele at rs12122341) at 1p13.2 near TSPAN2 that was associated with large artery atherosclerosis-related stroke (first stage odds ratio

  12. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON MENOPAUSE-2017 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobin, Rhoda H; Goodman, Neil F

    2017-07-01

    cardiovascular disease, age, and time from menopause. 2. the use of transdermal as compared with oral estrogen preparations may be considered less likely to produce thrombotic risk and perhaps the risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. 3. when the use of progesterone is necessary, micronized progesterone is considered the safer alternative. 4. in symptomatic menopausal women who are at significant risk from the use of hormone replacement therapy, the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and possibly other nonhormonal agents may offer significant symptom relief. 5. AACE does not recommend use of bioidentical hormone therapy. 6. AACE fully supports the recommendations of the Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie regarding the management of menopause in women with breast cancer. 7. HRT is not recommended for the prevention of diabetes. 8. In women with previously diagnosed diabetes, the use of HRT should be individualized, taking in to account age, metabolic, and cardiovascular risk factors. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; ACE = American College of Endocrinology; BMI = body mass index; CAC = coronary artery calcification; CEE = conjugated equine estrogen; CEPO = Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie; CAD = coronary artery disease; CIMT = carotid intima media thickness; CVD = cardiovascular disease; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; HRT = hormone replacement therapy; HT = hypertension; KEEPS = Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MBS = metabolic syndrome; MPA = medroxyprogesterone acetate; RR = relative risk; SERM = selective estrogen-receptor modulator; SSRI = selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor; VTE = venous thrombo-embolism; WHI = Women's Health Initiative.

  13. Relationship Between Visceral Infarction and Ischemic Stroke Subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Caitlin; Hung, Peter; Patel, Praneil; Gupta, Ajay; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-03-01

    Most cryptogenic strokes are thought to have an embolic source. We sought to determine whether cryptogenic strokes are associated with visceral infarcts, which are usually embolic. Among patients prospectively enrolled in CAESAR (Cornell Acute Stroke Academic Registry), we selected those with a contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic scan within 1 year of admission. Our exposure variable was adjudicated stroke subtype per the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Our outcome was renal or splenic infarction as assessed by a single radiologist blinded to stroke subtype. We used Fisher exact test and multiple logistic regression to compare the prevalence of visceral infarcts among cardioembolic strokes, strokes of undetermined etiology, and noncardioembolic strokes (large- or small-vessel strokes). Among 227 patients with ischemic stroke and a contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic scan, 59 had a visceral infarct (35 renal and 27 splenic). The prevalence of visceral infarction was significantly different among cardioembolic strokes (34.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23.7%-44.6%), strokes of undetermined etiology (23.9%; 95% CI, 15.0%-32.8%), and strokes from large-artery atherosclerosis or small-vessel occlusion (12.5%; 95% CI, 1.8%-23.2%; P =0.03). In multiple logistic regression models adjusted for demographics and vascular comorbidities, we found significant associations with visceral infarction for both cardioembolic stroke (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2-9.9) and stroke of undetermined source (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.1-10.5) as compared with noncardioembolic stroke. The prevalence of visceral infarction differed significantly across ischemic stroke subtypes. Cardioembolic and cryptogenic strokes were associated with a higher prevalence of visceral infarcts than noncardioembolic strokes. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Neuroserpin polymorphisms and stroke risk in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Barney J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroserpin, primarily localized to CNS neurons, inhibits the adverse effects of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA on the neurovascular unit and has neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke. We sought to evaluate the association of neuroserpin polymorphisms with risk for ischemic stroke among young women. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-matched control subjects (43.1% African-American. Neuroserpin single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs chosen through HapMap were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke. Results Of the five SNPs analyzed, the A allele (frequency; Caucasian = 0.56, African-American = 0.42 of SNP rs6797312 located in intron 1 was associated with stroke in an age-adjusted dominant model (AA and AT vs. TT among Caucasians (OR = 2.05, p = 0.023 but not African-Americans (OR = 0.71, p = 0.387. Models adjusting for other risk factors strengthened the association. Race-specific haplotype analyses, inclusive of SNP rs6797312, again demonstrated significant associations with stroke among Caucasians only. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that neuroserpin is associated with early-onset ischemic stroke among Caucasian women.

  15. Power of Peer Support to Change Health Behavior to Reduce Risks for Heart Disease and Stroke for African American Men in a Faith-Based Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohye; Schorr, Erica; Hadidi, Niloufar Niakosari; Kelley, Robin; Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Lindquist, Ruth

    2018-02-01

    Peer support has powerful potential to improve outcomes in a program of health behavior change; yet, how peer support is perceived by participants, its role, and how it contributes to intervention efficacy is not known, especially among African Americans. The purpose of this study was to identify the subjectively perceived experience and potential contributions of peer support to the outcomes of a peer group behavioral intervention designed to change health behavior to reduce risks for heart disease and stroke in African American men in a faith-based community. A peer support group intervention was implemented to increase health knowledge and to improve health behaviors in line with the American Heart Association's Life Simple 7 domains (get active, control cholesterol, eat better, manage blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, and stop smoking). Fourteen peer group sessions and eight follow-up interviews with program participants were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Seven key themes emerged, including (1) enhancing access to health behavior information and resources, (2) practicing and applying problem-solving skills with group feedback and support, (3) discussing health behavior challenges and barriers, (4) sharing health behavior changes, (5) sharing perceived health outcome improvements and benefits, (6) feelings of belonging and being cared for, and (7) addressing health of family and community. Qualitative findings revealed a positive perception of peer support and greater understanding of potential reasons why it may be an effective strategy for African American men.

  16. Association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in the Eastern Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Q-Q; Lu, J; Sun, H; Zhang, J-S

    2015-04-27

    The association between the MTHFR genetic polymorphism and ischemic stroke has been reported by a number of investigators. However, the results have been controversial and conflicting. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the MTHFR variants C677T and A1298C and the risk of ischemic stroke in an Eastern Chinese Han population. A total of 199 patients with ischemic stroke and 241 controls were recruited. Genotyping of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms was carried out using the Taqman 7900HT Sequence Detection System. The overall estimates (odds ratio: OR) for the allele (C) and genotype (AC+CC) of the A1298C polymorphism were 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16-2.10], and 2.36 (95%CI = 1.39-4.00), respectively, establishing significant association of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with ischemic stroke. In contrast, there were no statistically significant differences compared to controls between MTHFR C677T polymorphic variants in the association ischemic stroke risk. Furthermore, haplotype-based analysis demonstrated that compared with the C-677-A-1298 haplotype, the C-677-C-1298 and T-677-C-1298 haplotypes showed significant increased risk of ischemic stroke (OR = 1.56; 95%CI = 1.07- 2.2; P = 0.02; OR = 1.76; 95%CI = 1.17-2.65; P A1298C polymorphism and the haplotypes C-677-C-1298 and T-677-C-1298 in MTHFR might modulate the risk of ischemic stroke in the Eastern Chinese Han population.

  17. Association between Family Risk of Stroke and Myocardial Infarction with Prevalent Risk Factors and Coexisting Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard E.; Howard, George; Go, Rodney C.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Feng, Rui; McClure, Leslie A.; Prineas, Ronald J.; Banerjee, Amitava; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial transmission of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) is partially mediated by transmission of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular risk factors. We examined relationships between family risk of stroke and MI with risk factors for these phenotypes. Methods Cross-sectional association between the stratified log-rank family score (SLFS) for stroke and MI with prevalent risk factors was assessed in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort. Results Individuals in the 4th quartile of SLFS scores for stroke were more likely to have prevalent risk factors including hypertension (OR: 1.43; 95% CI: [1.30, 1.58]), left ventricular hypertrophy (OR 1.42; 95% CI: [1.16, 1.42]), diabetes (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: [1.12, 1.43]) and atrial fibrillation (OR 1.23; 95% CI: [1.03, 1.45]) compared to individuals in the 1st quartile. Likewise, individuals in the 4th quartile of SLFS scores for MI were more likely to have prevalent risk factors including hypertension (OR 1.57; 95% CI: [1.27, 1.94]) and diabetes (OR 1.29; 95% CI: [1.12, 1.43]) than the 1st quartile. In contrast to stroke, the family risk score for MI was associated with dyslipidemia (OR 1.38; 95% CI: [1.23, 1.55]) and overweight/obesity (OR 1.22; 95% CI: [1.10, 1.37]). Conclusions Family risk of stroke and MI are strongly associated with the majority of risk factors associated with each disease. Family history and genetic studies separating nonspecific contributions of intermediate phenotypes from specific contributions to the disease phenotype may lead to more thorough understanding of transmission for these complex disorders. PMID:22328552

  18. Insulin resistance is associated with a poor response to intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Ana I; García-Bermejo, Pablo; Cortijo, Elisa; Bustamante, Rosa; Rojo Martínez, Esther; González Sarmiento, Enrique; Fernández-Herranz, Rosa; Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-11-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) may not only increase stroke risk, but could also contribute to aggravate stroke prognosis. Mainly through a derangement in endogenous fibrinolysis, IR could affect the response to intravenous thrombolysis, currently the only therapy proved to be efficacious for acute ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that high IR is associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and poorer long-term outcome after stroke thrombolysis. We performed a prospective, observational, longitudinal study in consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients presenting with middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion who received intravenous thrombolysis. Patients with acute hyperglycemia (≥155 mg/dL) receiving insulin were excluded. IR was determined during admission by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR). Poor long-term outcome, as defined by a day 90 modified Rankin scale score ≥ 3, was considered the primary outcome variable. Transcranial Duplex-assessed resistance to MCA recanalization and symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation were considered secondary end points. A total of 109 thrombolysed MCA ischemic stroke patients were included (43.1% women, mean age 71 years). The HOMA-IR was higher in the group of patients with poor outcome (P = 0.02). The probability of good outcome decreased gradually with increasing HOMA-IR tertiles (80.6%, 1st tertile; 71.4%, 2nd tertile; and 55.3%, upper tertile). A HOMA-IR in the upper tertile was independently associated with poor outcome when compared with the lower tertile (odds ratio [OR] 8.54 [95% CI 1.67-43.55]; P = 0.01) and was associated with more persistent MCA occlusions (OR 8.2 [1.23-54.44]; P = 0.029). High IR may be associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and worse long-term outcome after acute ischemic stroke thrombolysis.

  19. Exploratory Cohort Study of Associations between Serum C - Reactive Protein and Fatigue after Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simiao Wu

    Full Text Available Post-stroke fatigue is a common and distressing problem but little is known about its biological mechanisms. This cohort study was to investigate associations between C-reactive protein (CRP and fatigue after stroke.Patients were assessed at one, six and 12 months after their stroke onset, with the Fatigue Assessment Scale, a case definition of post-stroke fatigue, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and daily step counts. Blood samples were collected at each assessment and the CRP level was determined by a standard CRP immunoassay. Cross-sectional associations between CRP and fatigue at each time point were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient and independent-samples t-test. Whether CRP levels at one month predict fatigue scores at six and 12 months was explored by multiple linear regression, with anxiety, depression, and daily step counts as covariates.Sixty-five patients (mean age 67 years, 65% men were included: 61 at one month, 49 at six months, and 41 at 12 months. CRP levels and fatigue scores were not associated at one month (p = 0.88 or 12 months (p = 0.56, but weakly associated at six months (r = 0.27, p = 0.04; however, this association was no longer significant (p = 0.14 after controlling for the effects of covariates. The CRP level was not associated with the fulfilment of case definition of post-stroke fatigue at any time points (all p > 0.05. The CRP level at one month was not a significant predictor for fatigue levels at either six months (p = 0.93 or 12 months (p = 0.78.There is insufficient evidence for the association between CRP and PSF in stroke patients. Future studies with larger sample sizes and controlling for potential confounders are needed to investigate whether this association exists.

  20. Association between high homocyst(e)ine and ischemic stroke due to large- and small-artery disease but not other etiologic subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, J W; Hankey, G J; Anand, S S; Lofthouse, E; Staples, N; Baker, R I

    2000-05-01

    Elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine may be a causal and modifiable risk factor for ischemic stroke, but the results of previous studies have been conflicting. One possible explanation is that homocyst(e)ine may only be associated with certain pathophysiological subtypes of ischemic stroke. We conducted a case-control study of 219 hospital cases with a first-ever ischemic stroke and 205 randomly selected community control subjects stratified by age, sex, and postal code. With the use of established criteria, cases of stroke were classified by etiologic subtype in a blinded fashion. The prevalence of conventional vascular risk factors, fasting plasma homocyst(e)ine levels, vitamin levels, and nucleotide 677 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotypes were determined in cases and controls. Increasing homocyst(e)ine was a strong and independent risk factor for ischemic stroke (adjusted OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4 to 5.1 for a 5-micromol/L increase in fasting plasma homocyst(e)ine from 10 to 15 micromol/L). Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of homocyst(e)ine was associated with an adjusted OR of ischemic stroke of 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2). Mean plasma homocyst(e)ine was significantly higher in cases of ischemic stroke due to large-artery disease (14.1 micromol/L, 95% CI 12.5 to 15.9, Pine, the upper 3 quartiles were associated with an adjusted OR of ischemic stroke due to large-artery disease of 3.0 (95% CI 0.8 to 10.8) for the second quartile, 5.6 (95% CI 1.6 to 20) for the third quartile, and 8.7 (95% CI 2.4 to 32) for the fourth quartile (P for trend=0.0005). However, despite a clear association between the TT MTHFR genotype and elevated fasting plasma homocyst(e)ine, there was no association between MTHFR genotype and ischemic stroke or subtype of ischemic stroke. There is a strong, graded association between increasing plasma homocyst(e)ine and ischemic stroke caused by large-artery atherosclerosis and, to a much lesser extent, small

  1. Association of mean platelet volume and platelet count with the development and prognosis of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Wang, Q; He, B; Liu, P; Chen, J-Y; Quan, H; Ma, X

    2016-06-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet (PLT) count are the two major parameters that reflect the functions and activities of PLTs. The associations of MPV and PLT count with the occurrence and prognosis of stroke have not been fully clarified. This study aimed to investigate the association of MPV and PLT count with the development and prognosis of first-ever ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in order to provide evidence for early diagnosis and treatment of both strokes. This study included 281 first-ever ischemic stroke and 164 first-ever hemorrhagic stroke patients between 2010 and 2012. All participants received routine blood tests within 2 h after admission and were categorized into good or poor prognosis group based on the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. MPV and PLT counts were transformed into categorical variables and their association with the occurrence and prognosis of both strokes was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. The risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in MPV group (>13 fL) was 22.17 and 5.21 times higher compared with normal MPV group. The PLT count was positively correlated with the risk of ischemic stroke, but negatively correlated with the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. MPV and PLT count was not correlated with the prognosis of either stroke. Increased MPV is an independent risk factor for both strokes. Elevated PLT count increases the risk for ischemic stroke, but decreases the risk for hemorrhagic stroke. However, neither MPV nor PLT count has significant association with the prognosis of either stroke. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Phase II studies of the glycine antagonist GV150526 in acute stroke : the North American experience. The North American Glycine Antagonist in Neuroprotection (GAIN) Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    GV150526, a selective glycine site antagonist, reduces infarct volume in rats with focal cerebral ischemia. Safety and efficacy in humans with acute stroke are being investigated. We sought to further explore the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary outcome of GV150526 treatment in patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke. Two trials were conducted in North America. The North American Glycine Antagonist in Neuroprotection trial (GAIN 1) (GLYA2001; United States only) was designed as a sequential dose escalation study. GAIN 2 (GLYA2005; United States and Canada) was designed to further assess the safety of the highest dose tolerated in GAIN 1. Both trials were randomized (2:1), double-blind, and placebo controlled. Treatment was started within 12 hours of symptom onset; patients with both ischemic stroke and primary intracerebral hemorrhage were included in both trials. The dose escalation study (GAIN 1) completed 3 dosing tiers. Enrollment was suspended before escalation to the fourth tier because of laboratory reports of transiently elevated bilirubin levels in a concurrent European study that employed the dose targeted for this tier. After review by an independent safety committee of the worldwide safety data, the second study (GAIN 2) commenced. One hundred nine patients were randomized and dosed with study drug, either an 800-mg loading dose followed by 200 mg every 12 hours for 3 days of GV150526 or placebo. The incidence of serious adverse events was similar in the drug and placebo groups. Mild irritation at the infusion site and symptoms suggestive of mild and reversible altered mentation were reported more frequently in the GV150526 group than in the placebo group. Hyperbilirubinemia was reported in 6% of GV150526-treated patients compared with 3% of placebo-treated patients. Outcome at 4 weeks after stroke was better in GV150526-treated patients, but the studies were not powered to show statistical significance, and the baseline neurological

  3. Bow hunter's stroke associated with atlantooccipital assimilation--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K; Tsutsui, T

    1999-09-01

    A 39-year-old male presented with bow hunter's stroke manifesting as repeated vertebrobasilar ischemic attacks induced by head rotation 45 degrees to the left. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography clearly showed the occluded right vertebral artery (VA) between the axis and atlas. Single photon emission computed tomography study showed diffuse hypoperfusion of the brain stem and bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, suggesting hemodynamic compromise of these regions. He refused surgery and was treated conservatively. The most likely mechanism is that the affected VA was fixed by the ossification of the atlantooccipital membrane, vascular groove, and transverse foramen of the atlas, and therefore became elongated and compressed by head-turning.

  4. Explanatory factors for the association between depression and long-term physical disability after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerbe, Luis; Ayis, Salma A; Crichton, Siobhan; Rudd, Anthony G; Wolfe, Charles D A

    2015-11-01

    To identify explanatory factors for the association between depression at 3 months after stroke and physical disability at 3 years. Data from the South London Stroke Register (1998-2013) were used. Patients (n = 3,612) were assessed at stroke onset. Follow-up at 3 months included assessment for depression with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (scores ≥ 7 = depression), physical disability (Barthel index) cognitive function, smoking habit, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) use, perception of recovery and social support. Physical disability was reassessed at 3 years. The associations between depression at 3 months and physical disability at 3 years were estimated with multinomial regression adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, stroke severity and possible explanatory factors for the association (introduced in the models first individually and then sequentially): pre-stroke medical history and physical disability, cognitive function, smoking, SSRIs, perception of recovery and social support at 3 months. One thousand three hundred and seven survivors were assessed at 3 months, of which 418 (32.0%) had depression. Survivors with depression had a higher physical disability rate at 3 years. These associations remained significant after adjustment for individual explanatory factors but were not significant after adjustment for combined explanatory factors. Physical disability at 3 months was a relevant explanatory factor for this association. SSRIs were associated with severe, relative risk: 6.62 (2.92-15.02) P disability, relative risk: 3.45 (1.58-7.52) P = 0.002, at 3 years. The association between depression and physical disability appears to be multifactorial. The use of SSRIs after stroke requires further research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms associated with lipid metabolism involved in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Flauzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disorder that results from the interaction between the individual genetic components and environmental factors. Previous studies have established hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, elevated body mass index, disturbances of coagulation and increasing age as predictors of stroke risk factors. The stroke is a more crippling than deadly disease that requires long-term institutionalization, as it decreases the quality of life of patients, resulting in higher costs to social and economic levels. It thus becomes increasingly important to emphasize the Preventive Medicine strategies. Dyslipidemia has been associated with pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and genetic polymorphisms that occur in the metabolic pathway, such as lipids metabolism, has been one of the hereditary factors related to ischemic stroke. The identification of the genetic component in the cause of dyslipidemia has been intensively investigated in recent years. Among the several genetic polymorphisms, the gene of the low-density lipoprotein receptor has been the object of many studies in the population worldwide. Data on lipid profile and study of polymorphisms of genes encoding structural proteins and enzymes related to lipid metabolism may reveal the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a population, enabling a targeted intervention for the control and prevention of atherosclerotic diseases such as ischemic stroke.

  6. Recognition of Stroke by EMS is Associated with Improvement in Emergency Department Quality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Michael E; Band, Roger; Jia, Judy; Pajerowski, William; David, Guy; Guo, Michelle; Mechem, C Crawford; Messé, Steven R; Carr, Brendan G; Mullen, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Hospital arrival via Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and EMS prenotification are associated with faster evaluation and treatment of stroke. We sought to determine the impact of diagnostic accuracy by prehospital providers on emergency department quality measures. A retrospective study was performed of patients presenting via EMS between September 2009 and December 2012 with a discharge diagnosis of transient ischemic attack (TIA), ischemic stroke (IS), or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Hospital and EMS databases were used to determine EMS impression, prehospital and in-hospital time intervals, EMS prenotification, NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), symptom duration, and thrombolysis rate. 399 cases were identified: 14.5% TIA, 67.2% IS, and 18.3% ICH. EMS providers correctly recognized 57.6% of cases. Compared to cases missed by EMS, correctly recognized cases had longer median on-scene time (17 vs. 15 min, p = 0.01) but shorter transport times (12 vs. 15 min, p = 0.001). Cases correctly recognized by EMS were associated with shorter door-to-physician time (4 vs. 11 min, p < 0.001) and shorter door-to-CT time (23 vs. 48 min, p < 0.001). These findings were independent of age, NIHSS, symptom duration, and EMS prenotification. Patients with ischemic stroke correctly recognized by EMS were more likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, independent of age, NIHSS, symptom duration both with and without prenotification. Recognition of stroke by EMS providers was independently associated with faster door-to-physician time, faster door-to-CT time, and greater odds of receiving thrombolysis. Quality initiatives to improve EMS recognition of stroke have the potential to improve hospital-based quality of stroke care.

  7. Morphological classification of mobile plaques and their association with early recurrence of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Kitazono, Takanari; Okada, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the frequency and morphological characteristics of carotid mobile plaques and examined the relationship between carotid mobile plaques and recurrent strokes. The study included 94 consecutive acute stroke patients with large-artery atherosclerosis associated with extracranial carotid stenosis. We investigated the presence of mobile plaques by carotid ultrasonography and classified patients into two groups (mobile group and non-mobile group). We compared backgrounds, MRI and ultrasonographic findings, neurological severity on admission and at discharge, and the rate of early recurrent stroke between both groups. Mobile plaques were detected in 12 patients (12.8%). There were four types of mobile plaques: (1) the jellyfish-type plaque, in which the fibrous cap fluctuated like a jellyfish; (2) the streaming-band-type plaque, in which the string attached to the plaque was swaying; (3) the mobile-thrombus-type plaque, in which a mobile mass was attached to the plaque surface, and (4) the fluctuating-ulcer-type plaque, which contained a mobile substance in the plaque ulcer. Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores on admission were less severe in the mobile group than in the non-mobile group (median 1 vs. 4, respectively; p = 0.004), the rate of early recurrent stroke was significantly higher in the mobile group than in the non-mobile group (33.3 vs. 7.3%, respectively; p = 0.022). There were no significant differences in NIHSS scores at discharge between groups. Morphologically, several types of mobile plaques were detected in consecutive patients with acute stroke associated with carotid stenosis. Mobile plaques are strongly associated with an early recurrence of stroke. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Higher Education Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Dementia after a Stroke or TIA. The Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Saira Saeed; Portegies, Marileen L P; Wolters, Frank J; Hofman, Albert; Koudstaal, Peter J; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-01-01

    Higher education is associated with a lower risk of dementia, possibly because of a higher tolerance to subclinical neurodegenerative pathology. Whether higher education also protects against dementia after clinical stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) remains unknown. Within the population-based Rotterdam Study, 12,561 participants free of stroke, TIA and dementia were followed for occurrence of stroke, TIA and dementia. Across the levels of education, associations of incident stroke or TIA with subsequent development of dementia and differences in cognitive decline following stroke or TIA were investigated. During 124,862 person-years, 1,463 persons suffered a stroke or TIA, 1,158 persons developed dementia, of whom 186 developed dementia after stroke or TIA. Risk of dementia after a stroke or TIA, compared to no stroke or TIA, was highest in the low education category (hazards ratio [HR] 1.46, 95% CI 1.18-1.81) followed by intermediate education category (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03-1.81). No significant association was observed in the high education category (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.25-1.54). In gender stratified analyses, decrease in risk of dementia with increasing education was significant only in men. Higher education is associated with a lower risk of dementia after stroke or TIA, particularly in men, which might be explained by a higher cognitive reserve. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Association of Computed Tomography Ischemic Lesion Location With Functional Outcome in Acute Large Vessel Occlusion Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Marielle; Boers, Anna M M; Aigner, Annette; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Yoo, Albert J; Roos, Yvo B; Dippel, Diederik W J; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Zwam, Wim H; Fiehler, Jens; Marquering, Henk A; Majoie, Charles B L M

    2017-09-01

    Ischemic lesion volume (ILV) assessed by follow-up noncontrast computed tomography correlates only moderately with clinical end points, such as the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). We hypothesized that the association between follow-up noncontrast computed tomography ILV and outcome as assessed with mRS 3 months after stroke is strengthened when taking the mRS relevance of the infarct location into account. An anatomic atlas with 66 areas was registered to the follow-up noncontrast computed tomographic images of 254 patients from the MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands). The anatomic brain areas were divided into brain areas of high, moderate, and low mRS relevance as reported in the literature. Based on this distinction, the ILV in brain areas of high, moderate, and low mRS relevance was assessed for each patient. Binary and ordinal logistic regression analyses with and without adjustment for known confounders were performed to assess the association between the ILVs of different mRS relevance and outcome. The odds for a worse outcome (higher mRS) were markedly higher given an increase of ILV in brain areas of high mRS relevance (odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-1.55 per 10 mL) compared with an increase in total ILV (odds ratios, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.19 per 10 mL). Regression models using ILV in brain areas of high mRS relevance instead of total ILV showed a higher quality. The association between follow-up noncontrast computed tomography ILV and outcome as assessed with mRS 3 months after stroke is strengthened by accounting for the mRS relevance of the affected brain areas. Future prediction models should account for the ILV in brain areas of high mRS relevance. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Dietary choline and betaine; associations with subclinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk and incidence of CVD, coronary heart disease and stroke: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Heather R; Musani, Solomon K; Dibaba, Daniel T; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Taylor, Herman A; Tucker, Katherine L; Bidulescu, Aurelian

    2018-02-01

    Several mechanisms have been described through which dietary intake of choline and its derivative betaine may be associated in both directions with subclinical atherosclerosis. We assessed the association of dietary intake of choline and betaine with cardiovascular risk and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Data from 3924 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) African-American participants with complete food frequency questionnaire at baseline and follow-up measurements of heart disease measures were used. Multivariable linear regression models were employed to assess associations between choline and betaine intake with carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcium, abdominal aortic calcium and left ventricular mass. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate associations with time to incident coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). During an average nine years of follow-up, 124 incident CHD events, 75 incident stroke events and 153 incident CVD events were documented. In women, greater choline intake was associated with lower left ventricular mass (p = 0.0006 for trend across choline quartiles) and with abdominal aortic calcium score. Among all JHS participants, there was a statistically significant inverse association between dietary choline intake and incident stroke, β = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Betaine intake was associated with greater risk of incident CHD when comparing the third quartile of intake with the lowest quartile of intake (HR 1.89, 95 % CI 1.14, 3.15). Among our African-American participants, higher dietary choline intake was associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, and thus putative dietary benefits. Higher dietary betaine intake was associated with a nonlinear higher risk of incident CHD.

  11. Prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with young-onset stroke: the genetics of early-onset stroke study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baijia; Ryan, Kathleen A; Hamedani, Ali; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; Koontz, Deborah; Bean, Christopher J; Gallagher, Margaret; Hooper, W Craig; McArdle, Patrick F; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, O Colin; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Cole, John W

    2014-04-01

    Although the prothrombin G20210A mutation has been implicated as a risk factor for venous thrombosis, its role in arterial ischemic stroke is unclear, particularly among young adults. To address this issue, we examined the association between prothrombin G20210A and ischemic stroke in a white case-control population and additionally performed a meta-analysis. From the population-based Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study, we identified 397 individuals of European ancestry aged 15 to 49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke and 426 matched controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) in the entire population and for subgroups stratified by sex, age, oral contraceptive use, migraine, and smoking status. A meta-analysis of 17 case-control studies (n=2305 cases ischemic stroke did not achieve statistical significance (OR=2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.9-6.5; P=0.07). However, among adults aged 15 to 42 years (younger than median age), cases were significantly more likely than controls to have the mutation (OR=5.9; 95% CI=1.2-28.1; P=0.03), whereas adults aged 42 to 49 years were not (OR=1.4; 95% CI=0.4-5.1; P=0.94). In our meta-analysis, the mutation was associated with significantly increased stroke risk in adults ≤55 years (OR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1-1.9; P=0.02), with significance increasing with addition of the GEOS results (OR=1.5; 95% CI=1.1-2.0; P=0.005). The prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults and may have an even stronger association among those with earlier onset strokes. Our finding of a stronger association in the younger young adult population requires replication.

  12. Clinical and imaging features associated with intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications in patients with ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Arda [Mersin University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Akpinar, Erhan [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat [Hacettepe University, Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial internal carotid artery calcifications (ICAC), a frequent finding on imaging studies, are predictive of future stroke risk in population-based studies. The clinical significance of this observation among ischemic stroke patients is however less clear. In this study, we analyzed ICAC burden in relation to vascular risk factor profile, stroke etiology, and extent of craniocervical vascular calcifications in a consecutive series of ischemic stroke patients. The burden of ICAC was determined both on non-contrast CT and CT-angiography source images by semiquantitative scoring algorithms. The distribution of vascular risk factors, etiologic stroke subtype, and calcification burden in other craniocervical arteries was assessed among patients with no ICAC, mild-moderate ICAC, and severe ICAC. Of 319 patients included into the study, 28 % had no ICAC, 35 % had mild-moderate ICAC, and 37 % had severe ICAC on CT angiography. Independent factors associated with ICAC burden in multivariate analysis included age (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.006), and coronary artery disease (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a stroke etiology of large artery atherosclerosis or cardioaortic embolism was significantly related to higher ICAC burden (p = 0.006). Patients with severe ICAC were more likely to harbor calcifications in other vascular beds (p < 0.001). All of these findings persisted when analyses were repeated with CT-based ICAC burden assessments. ICAC burden reflects a continuum of atherosclerotic disease involving carotid arteries together with other craniocervical vascular beds. ICAC is significantly associated with stroke of large vessel or cardioembolic origin. This information might help the clinician in prioritizing etiologic work-up in the acute period. (orig.)

  13. Crossed Leg Sign Is Associated With Severity of Unilateral Spatial Neglect After Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe crossed leg sign in patients with right hemisphere stroke is thought to be associated with perceptual disorders, such as unilateral spatial neglect (USN. The aim of this study was to compare the crossed leg sign with the severity of USN during the acute phase of stroke.Experimental proceduresThis was an observational and prospective clinical study of individuals with a diagnosis of right parietal stroke, as confirmed by neuroimaging. The occurrence of the crossed leg sign, the time at which this occurred after the stroke, and a clinical diagnosis of USN were measured and recorded. The patients’ age, sex, and lesion severity, as determined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Glasgow coma scale, were included in the analyses as confounding variables. The outcome of interest was the degree of USN, as measured by the cancellation and bisection tests. Binary logistic regression was used to analyze the effect of crossed leg syndrome on the severity of USN. In the adjusted multiple regression model, a p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.ResultsOverall, 60 patients were included in this study. There were no associations between patient demographics and the presence of the crossed leg sign. There was, however, an association between the crossed leg sign and the absolute value of the deviation in the line bisection test (B = −0.234; p = 0.039. The crossed leg sign was not associated with other measures of USN.ConclusionBased on the results of our study, we can conclude that a crossed leg sign in the acute phase of stroke is associated with USN severity, specifically the misinterpretation of the midline.

  14. Loci associated with ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (SiGN) : A genome-wide association study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulit, SL; Algra, A; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    Background: The discovery of disease-associated loci through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is the leading genetic approach to the identification of novel biological pathways underlying diseases in humans. Until recently, GWAS in ischaemic stroke have been limited by small sample sizes and

  15. Poststroke Epilepsy Is Associated With a High Mortality After a Stroke at Young Age: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, Renate M; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Maaijwee, Noortje A M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; van Dijk, Ewoud J; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2015-08-01

    Poststroke epilepsy is a common complication after a young stroke. We investigated the association between poststroke epilepsy and mortality. We performed a prospective cohort study among 631 patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke, aged 18 to 50 years. Survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were used to estimate cumulative mortality and hazard ratios for patients with and without epilepsy. After mean follow-up of 12.5 years (SD 8.6), 76 (12.0%) developed poststroke epilepsy. Case fatality was 27.4% for patients with poststroke epilepsy and 2.1% for those without. Poststroke epilepsy was associated with 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-14.0) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9). Epilepsy is a common problem after a young stroke and is associated with an increased short-term and long-term mortality. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. The Prothrombin G20210A Mutation is Associated with Young-Onset Stroke: The Genetics of Early Onset Stroke Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baijia; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Hamedani, Ali; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J.; Koontz, Deborah; Bean, Christopher J.; Gallagher, Margaret; Hooper, W. Craig; McArdle, Patrick F.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stine, O. Colin; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.; Cole, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the prothrombin G20210A mutation has been implicated as a risk factor for venous thrombosis, its role in arterial ischemic stroke is unclear, particularly among young-adults. To address this issue, we examined the association between prothrombin G20210A and ischemic stroke in a Caucasian case-control population and additionally performed a meta-analysis Methods From the population-based Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study we identified 397 individuals of European ancestry aged 15-49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke and 426 matched-controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios in the entire population and for subgroups stratified by gender, age, oral contraceptive use, migraine and smoking status. A meta-analysis of 17 case-control studies (n=2305 cases ischemic stroke did not achieve statistical significance (OR=2.5,95%CI=0.9-6.5,p=0.07). However, among adults aged 15-42 (younger than median age), cases were significantly more likely than controls to have the mutation (OR=5.9,95%CI=1.2-28.1,p=0.03), whereas adults ages 42-49 were not (OR=1.4,95%CI=0.4-5.1,p=0.94). In our meta-analysis, the mutation was associated with significantly increased stroke risk in adults ischemic stroke in young-adults and may have an even stronger association among those with earlier onset strokes. Our finding of a stronger association in the younger-young adult population requires replication. PMID:24619398

  17. Is Weight-Bearing Asymmetry Associated with Postural Instability after Stroke? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jip F. Kamphuis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Improvement of postural stability is an important goal during poststroke rehabilitation. Since weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA towards the nonparetic leg is common, training of weight-bearing symmetry has been a major focus in post-stroke balance rehabilitation. It is assumed that restoration of a more symmetrical weight distribution is associated with improved postural stability. Objective. To determine to what extent WBA is associated with postural instability in people after stroke. Methods. Electronic databases were searched (Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL until March 2012. Main Eligibility Criteria. (1 Participants were people after stroke. (2 The association between WBA and postural stability was reported. Quality of reporting was assessed with the STROBE checklist and a related tool for reporting of confounding. Results. Nine observational studies met all criteria. Greater spontaneous WBA was associated with higher center of pressure (COP velocity and with poorer synchronization of COP trajectories between the legs (two and one studies, resp.. Evidence for associations between WBA and performance on clinical balance tests or falls was weak. Conclusion. Greater WBA after stroke was associated with increased postural sway, but the current literature does not provide evidence for a causal relationship. Further studies should investigate whether reducing WBA would improve postural stability.

  18. Depression and anxiety symptoms are associated to disruption of default mode network in subacute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicentini, Jéssica Elias; Weiler, Marina; Almeida, Sara Regina Meira; de Campos, Brunno Machado; Valler, Lenise; Li, Li Min

    2017-12-01

    Depression and anxiety symptoms are common after stroke and associated to reduction in quality of life and poor physical and social outcomes. The Default Mode Network (DMN) plays an important role in the emotional processing. We investigated whether these symptoms are associated to a disruption of DMN functional connectivity in the first month after stroke. Thirty-four subacute ischemic stroke patients were submitted to: 1) behavioral assessment through Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders; 2) neuropsychological assessment using Mini Mental State Examination and Montreal Cognitive Assessment; 3) resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition using a 3 T scanner (Philips Achieva). Patients with depression and/or anxiety symptoms showed an increased DMN functional connectivity in left inferior parietal gyrus and left basal nuclei, when compared to stroke controls. Specific correlation between BDI/BAI scores and DMN functional connectivity indicated that depression symptoms are correlated with increased functional connectivity in left inferior parietal gyrus, while anxiety symptoms are correlated with increased functional connectivity in cerebellum, brainstem and right middle frontal gyrus. Our study provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms of post stroke depression and anxiety, suggesting an alternate explanation other than regional structural damage following ischemic event, that these psychiatric symptoms are related to brain network dysfunction.

  19. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus with associated vasculopathy causing stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, Camila; Persad, Leah; Alikhan, Ali

    2017-07-15

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human, double-stranded DNA virus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox); later the virus becomes dormant in the dorsal root, cranial nerve, and autonomic ganglia along the entire span of the nervous system, retaining the capacity to reactivate and cause a variety of dermal and neurological complications. Recently there has been increasing recognition, both clinically and epidemiologically, of the relationship between VZV and subsequent strokes. Herein, we describe a case of a previously healthy individual with reactivation of VZV causing herpes zoster opthtalmicus along with devastating multifocal vasculopathy. It is crucial for dermatologists to recognize the dermatomal vesicular eruption in this high risk area to aid in prompt diagnosis in an effort to improve clinical prognosis.

  20. Association of dialysis with in-hospital disability progression and mortality in community-onset stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Tomoko; Hanafusa, Norio; Yasunaga, Hideo; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2018-02-22

    End-stage renal disease is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, but the effect on post-stroke clinical outcomes has not been thoroughly investigated. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, which includes administrative claims and discharge abstract data, we examined the association between risk factors including dialysis therapy and in-hospital disability progression or mortality in patients with community-onset stroke. We extracted data of patients aged ≥20 years old who were admitted to the hospital within 3 days after onset of stroke between July 2010 and March 2013. The disability level was divided into modified Rankin Scale (mRS) 0-1, 2-3, 4-5, and 6 (death). Disability progression was defined as an increase in disability level. Odds ratios for in-hospital disability progression and mortality were calculated using logistic regression models. Of 435,403 patients, 7,562 (1.7%) received dialysis therapy. The median length of stay was 21 and 20 days for patients with and without dialysis, respectively. During the hospital stay, disability progressed in 100,402 (23.1%) patients and 45,919 (10.5%) died. Patients on dialysis had a higher prevalence of disability progression (26.8%) and mortality (13.1%) compared to those without dialysis (23.0% and 10.5%, respectively). Dialysis was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital disability progression (odds ratio, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-1.66) and mortality (odds ratio 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-1.84). These risks were comparable among subtypes of stroke. Dialysis was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital disability progression and mortality among patients with community-onset stroke, regardless of stroke subtype. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. National Trends in Patients Hospitalized for Stroke and Stroke Mortality in France, 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoffre, Camille; de Peretti, Christine; Gabet, Amélie; Grimaud, Olivier; Woimant, France; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Olié, Valérie

    2017-11-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men in France. In young adults (ie, stroke was observed at a local scale between 1985 and 2011. After the implementation of the 2010 to 2014 National Stroke Action Plan, this study investigates national trends in patients hospitalized by stroke subtypes, in-hospital mortality, and stroke mortality between 2008 and 2014. Hospitalization data were extracted from the French national hospital discharge databases and mortality data from the French national medical causes of death database. Time trends were tested using a Poisson regression model. From 2008 to 2014, the age-standardized rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke increased by 14.3% in patients stroke was stable (+2.0%), irrespective of age and sex. The proportion of patients hospitalized in stroke units substantially increased. In-hospital mortality decreased by 17.1% in patients with ischemic stroke. From 2008 to 2013, stroke mortality decreased, except for women between 45 and 64 years old and for people aged ≥85 years. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors and improved stroke management may explain the increase in the rates of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke. The decrease observed for in-hospital stroke mortality may be because of recent improvements in acute-phase management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Association of the 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism 102T/C with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole F; Bennike, Bente; Dam, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    common polymorphisms in the 5-HT2A receptor gene. The two polymorphisms under investigation, namely the 102T/C and the -1438A/G variations of the 5-HT2A receptor gene, were examined in a case control association study involving 99 stroke patients and a comparable number of controls. Among patients...... and stroke was significant in both males and females. There was no association between stroke and the -1438A/G polymorphism. Taken together, this study indicates that the 102T/C polymorphism in the 5-HT2A receptor gene could be an independent risk factor for developing stroke....

  3. Incidence of Depression After Stroke, and Associated Risk Factors and Mortality Outcomes, in a Large Cohort of Danish Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese S. H.; Wium-Andersen, Ida K.; Wium-Andersen, Marie K.

    2016-01-01

    Importance: More than 30 million people live with a stroke diagnosis worldwide. Depression after stroke is frequent, and greater knowledge of associated risk factors and outcomes is needed to understand the etiology and implications of this disabling complication. Objectives: To examine whether......, history of depression, and stroke severity (in patients with stroke). The associations were strongest for the reference population. In both populations, depressed individuals, especially those with new onset, had increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for new-onset depression, 1.89 [95% CI, 1...

  4. Association of Kidney Disease Measures With Ischemic Versus Hemorrhagic Strokes Pooled Analyses of 4 Prospective Community-Based Cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodi, Khan; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yinying; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Astor, Brad C.; Woodward, Mark; Longstreth, W. T.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Gansevoort, Ronald; Coresh, Josef

    Background and purpose-Although low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria are associated with increased risk of stroke, few studies compared their contribution to risk of ischemic versus hemorrhagic stroke separately. We contrasted the association of these kidney measures with ischemic

  5. Remote pre-procedural ischemic stroke as the greatest risk in carotid‑stenting‑associated stroke and death: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašiová, Mária; Špak, Ľubomír; Farkašová, Ľudmila; Pataky, Štefan; Koščo, Martin; Hudák, Marek; Moščovič, Matej; Leško, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    The goal of carotid artery stenting (CAS) is to decrease the stroke risk in patients with carotid stenosis. This procedure carries an immediate risk of stroke and death and many patients do not benefit from it, especially asymptomatic patients. It is crucial to accurately select the patients who would benefit from carotid procedure, and to rule out those for whom the procedure might be hazardous. Remote ischemic stroke is a known risk factor for stroke recurrence during surgery. The aim of our study was to determine the periprocedural complication risk (within 30 days after CAS) associated with carotid stenting (stroke, death) in patients with and without remote pre-procedural ischemic stroke, to analyze periprocedural risk in other specific patient subgroups treated with CAS, and to determine the impact of observed variables on all-cause mortality during long-term follow-up. We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from all patients treated with protected CAS between June 20, 2008 and December 31, 2015. Patient age, gender, type of carotid stenosis (symptomatic versus asymptomatic), side of stenosis (right or left carotid artery), type of cerebral protection (proximal versus distal), presence of comorbidities (remote ischemic pre-procedural ischemic stroke, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, peripheral artery disease), previous ipsilateral carotid endarterectomy (CEA), contralateral carotid occlusion (CCO) and previous contralateral CAS/CEA were analyzed to identify higher CAS risk and to determine the impact of these variables on all-cause mortality during follow-up. Survival data were obtained from the Health Care Surveillance Authority registry. Mean follow-up was 1054 days (interquartile range 547.3; 1454.8). Remote pre-procedural ischemic stroke was defined as any-territory ischemic stroke >6 months prior to CAS. Primary periprocedural endpoint incidence (stroke/death) in 502 patients was 3.8% (N.=19) of all patients, 5

  6. Leucocyte count in young adults with first-ever ischaemic stroke: associated factors and association on prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikinheimo, Terttu; Putaala, Jukka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2015-02-01

    Limited data exist on the associated factors and correlation of leucocyte count to outcome in young adults with first-ever ischaemic stroke. Our objectives were to investigate factors associated with elevated leucocyte count and whether there is correlation between leucocyte count and short- and long-term outcomes. Of our database of 1008 consecutive patients aged 15 to 49, we included those with leucocyte count measured within the first two days from stroke onset. Outcomes were three-month and long-term disability, death, and vascular events. Linear regression was used to explore baseline variables associated with leucocyte count. Logistic regression and Cox proportional models studied the association between leucocyte count and clinical outcomes. In our study cohort of 781 patients (61.7% males; mean age 41.4 years), mean leucocyte count was high: 8.8 ± 3.1 × 10(9) cells/L (Reference range: 3.4-8.2 × 10(9) cells/L). Higher leucocyte levels were associated with dyslipidaemia, smoking, peripheral arterial disease, stroke severity, and lesion size. After adjustment for age, gender, relevant risk factors, both continuous leucocyte count and the highest quartile of leucocyte count were independently associated with unfavourable three-month outcome. Regarding events in the long-term (follow-up 8.1 ± 4.2 years in survivors), no association between leucocyte count and the event risks appeared. Among young stroke patients, high leucocyte count was a common finding. It was associated with vascular disease and its risk factors as well as severity of stroke, but it was also independently associated with unfavourable three-month outcome in these patients. There was no association with the long-term outcome. [Correction added on 31 October 2013 after first online publication: In the Results section of the Abstract, the cohort of 797 patients in this study was corrected to 781 patients.]. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  7. Effect modification by population dietary folate on the association between MTHFR genotype, homocysteine, and stroke risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Newcombe, Paul; Hubacek, Jaroslav A

    2011-01-01

    The MTHFR 677C→T polymorphism has been associated with raised homocysteine concentration and increased risk of stroke. A previous overview showed that the effects were greatest in regions with low dietary folate consumption, but differentiation between the effect of folate and small-study bias...... was difficult. A meta-analysis of randomised trials of homocysteine-lowering interventions showed no reduction in coronary heart disease events or stroke, but the trials were generally set in populations with high folate consumption. We aimed to reduce the effect of small-study bias and investigate whether...

  8. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  9. Association of MTHFR C677T Genotype With Ischemic Stroke Is Confined to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Subtype

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes Carola; Traylor, Matthew Stephen; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Thijs, Vincent; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Dichgans, Martin; Meschia, James; Maguire, Jane; Levi, Christopher; Rost, Natalia S; Rosand, Jonathan; Hassan, Ahamad; Bevan, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose—Elevated plasma homocysteine levels are associated with stroke. However, this might be a reflection of bias or confounding because trials have failed to demonstrate an effect from homocysteine lowering in stroke patients, although a possible benefit has been suggested in lacunar stroke. Genetic studies could potentially overcome these issues because genetic variants are inherited randomly and are fixed at conception. Therefore, we tested the homocysteine levels–associat...

  10. Effective mechanical thrombectomy in a patient with hyperacute ischemic stroke associated with cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seol-Hee; Park, Soonchan; Lee, Nam Joon; Kang, Youngjin; Cho, Kyung-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is the most common neurologic manifestation of cardiac myxoma. However, there has been no current guideline on the treatment of hyperacute ischemic stroke due to cardiac myxoma. We describe a patient with hyperacute stroke caused by cardiac myxoma who had a good outcome with rapid recanalization through mechanical thrombectomy. A 46-year-old man was admitted with acute symptoms of right side hemiplegia and global aphasia. Brain computed tomography (CT) angiography showed a T occlusion of the left internal carotid artery. Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was administered. However, his clinical symptoms did not improve. Thus, we performed endovascular treatment and had a successful outcome. A pathologic examination of the retrieved clot revealed a tumor emboli from a cardiac myxoma. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a left atrial myxoma in which a large mass was attached to the posterior wall of the aorta. The patient's neurologic deficits recovered with the exception of left eye blindness. Reperfusion therapy with mechanical thrombectomy might be safe and effective for the rapid revascularization of large vessel occlusions in hyperacute ischemic stroke, from which the tumor thrombi can be retrieved. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cholesterol Levels Are Associated with 30-day Mortality from Ischemic Stroke in Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Kuan; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Hsu, Shih-Pin; Chen, Chih-Hung; Lien, Li-Ming; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Chen, An-Chih; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chi, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ta-Chang; Sun, Yu; Lee, Siu-Pak; Sung, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Chiang, Tsuey-Ru; Lin, Shinn-Kuang; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Ma, Henry; Wen, Chi-Pang; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the impact of serum cholesterol levels on 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke in dialysis patients. From the Taiwan Stroke Registry data, we identified 46,770 ischemic stroke cases, including 1101 dialysis patients and 45,669 nondialysis patients from 2006 to 2013. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 1.46-fold greater in the dialysis group than in the nondialysis group (1.75 versus 1.20 per 1000 person-days). The mortality rates were 1.64, .62, 2.82, and 2.23 per 1000 person-days in dialysis patients with serum total cholesterol levels of cholesterol levels of 120-159 mg/dL, the corresponding adjusted hazard ratios of mortality were 4.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-17.4), 8.06 (95% CI = 2.02-32.2), and 6.89 (95% CI = 1.59-29.8) for those with cholesterol levels of cholesterol levels of ≥160 mg/dL or <120 mg/dL on admission are at an elevated hazard of 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein and cognitive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A; Liu, J; Meng, X; Li, J; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Su, Z; Zhang, N; Dai, L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y

    2018-01-01

    The association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and cognitive impairment is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the potential association between oxLDL and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke. We measured the levels of oxLDL and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score in patients with acute ischemic stroke who were recruited from the Study of Oxidative Stress in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke. Cognitive impairment was defined as an MMSE score of impairment was assessed by multivariate logistic or linear regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. A total of 3726 patients [1287 (34.54%) female] were included in this study, with a mean age of 63.62 ± 11.96 years. After adjusting for potential confounders in our logistic regression model, each SD increase in oxLDL was associated with a 26% increase in the prevalence of cognitive impairment (odds radio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.39; P impairment (all interactions, P > 0.05). Elevated levels of oxLDL were associated with a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke. © 2017 EAN.

  13. Adherence to postacute rehabilitation guidelines is associated with functional recovery in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Pamela W; Horner, Ronnie D; Reker, Dean M; Samsa, Gregory P; Hoenig, Helen; Hamilton, Byron; LaClair, Barbara J; Dudley, Tara K

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if compliance with poststroke rehabilitation guidelines was associated with better functional outcomes. An inception cohort of 288 stroke patients in 11 Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Centers hospitalized between January 1998 and March 1999 were followed prospectively for 6 months. Data were abstracted from medical records and telephone interviews. The primary study outcome was the Functional Independence Motor Score (FIM). Secondary outcomes included Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), SF-36 physical functioning, and the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). Acute and postacute rehabilitation guideline compliance scores (range 0 to 100) were derived from an algorithm. All outcomes were adjusted for case-mix. Average compliance scores in acute and postacute care settings were 68.2% (SD 14) and 69.5% (SD 14.4), respectively. After case-mix adjustment, level of compliance with postacute rehabilitation guidelines was significantly associated with FIM motor, IADL, and the SIS physical domain scores. SF-36 physical function was not associated with guideline compliance. Level of compliance with rehabilitation guidelines in acute settings was unrelated to any of the outcome measures. Greater levels of adherence to postacute stroke rehabilitation guidelines were associated with improved patient outcomes. Compliance with guidelines may be viewed as a quality-of-care indicator with which to evaluate new organizational and funding changes involving postacute stroke rehabilitation.

  14. Factors Associated With Intestinal Constipation in Chronic Patients With Stroke Sequelae Undergoing Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Tânia Mara Nascimento de Miranda; Aguiar, Márcia Helena de Assis; Furtado, Íris Aline Brito; Ribeiro, Samile Pereira; de Oliveira, Pérola; Mello, Paulo Andrade; Padula, Marcele Pescuma Capeletti; Beraldo, Paulo Sérgio Siebra

    The objective of this study was to define which stroke-related factors constitute independent variables in the incidence of intestinal constipation (IC) of chronic patients admitted to a hospital rehabilitation program. All patients consecutively admitted for rehabilitation were recruited for the study. In the Poisson multiple regression analysis using a hierarchical model, sociodemographic variables, comorbidities, medication, previous history of constipation, life habits, and stroke-related variables were considered for defining factors associated with IC. A 31% prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25.3-37.1) of IC was detected. Among the factors associated, female gender (adjusted prevalence ratio [PRadjusted] = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.20-2.68), intestinal complaints prior to stroke (PRadjusted = 3.71; 95% CI: 2.60-5.31), intake of less than 800 ml of fluid per day (PRadjusted = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.20- 2.45), age greater than 65 years at brain injury (PRadjusted = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.01-2.75), and partially impaired anterior brain circulation (PRadjusted = 3.35; 95% CI: 1.02-10.97) were associated with IC. Female gender, elderly, prior history of IC, low fluid intake, and partial impairment of anterior brain circulation were factors independently associated with IC in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. These findings require further validation and may serve toward improving bowel retraining programs for this patient group.

  15. Is Visuospatial Hemineglect Longitudinally Associated With Postural Imbalance in the Postacute Phase of Stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nes, Ilse J. W.; van Kessel, Marlies E.; Schils, Fanny; Fasotti, Luciano; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Kwakkel, Gert

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to determine the longitudinal association of visuospatial hemineglect with postural imbalance in postacute stroke patients and to establish whether this relationship is confounded by other determinants. Methods. A prospective cohort study of 53 postacute

  16. Factors associated with coronary artery disease and stroke in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokma, Jouke P.; Zegstroo, Ineke; Kuijpers, Joey M.; Konings, Thelma C.; van Kimmenade, Roland R. J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Kiès, Philippine; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2017-01-01

    To determine factors associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and ischaemic stroke in ageing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients. We performed a multicentre case-control study, using data from the national CONgenital CORvitia (CONCOR) registry to identify ACHD patients within five

  17. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH STROKE SURVIVOR BEHAVIORS AS IDENTIFIED BY FAMILY CAREGIVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carmanny; Bakas, Tamilyn

    2013-01-01

    Stroke survivor behaviors that caregivers identify as bothersome can lead to family caregiver stress, which can result in premature institutionalization of the survivor. The purpose of this study was to explore demographic and theory-based factors associated with survivor bothersome behaviors as identified by family caregivers. A secondary analysis of a combined sample of 96 family caregivers of stroke survivors was conducted using baseline data from 2 existing studies. Bothersome behaviors were measured using the Revised Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist (RMBPC). Theory-based factors were measured using well-validated scales. Male stroke survivors exhibited more bothersome behaviors (t = 3.53, p nursing interventions designed to reduce bothersome behaviors as identified by family caregivers. PMID:23686515

  18. The new American Heart Association algorithm: is it progress?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach to patients with cardiac failure, valvular heart disease and arrhythmias. ... increased risk by this definition.1 The need for further noninvasive testing is now left to ... artery disease.6. Abstract. The new 2014 American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) guideline for the perioperative.

  19. Association of ideomotor apraxia with lesion site, etiology, neglect, and functional independence in patients with first ever stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2015-04-01

    Ideomotor apraxia (IMA) is characterized by the inability to correctly imitate hand gestures and voluntarily pantomime tool use. The relationship between IMA and characteristics of stroke has not been totally elucidated. This study aimed to find out associations between presence of IMA and stroke etiology, site of the lesions, neglect, and temporal and functional parameters of stroke in patients with first ever stroke. Thirty-nine patients with first ever stroke were included. Patients with severe cognitive deficits were excluded. Assessment tools included Ideomotor Apraxia Test, Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Brunnstrom recovery stages, Mini Mental Test (MMT), and star cancellation test. Etiology (hemorrhagic or ischemic) and site of stroke was assessed through brain imaging methods. Location and size of ischemic lesion was determined by using the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project system. IMA was identified in 35.9% of the patients. Patients with IMA had significantly lower FIM scores both on admission and discharge (P = 0.001, P = 0.001). Presence of IMA was significantly associated with the presence of neglect (P = 0.004), total anterior circulation ischemia (TACI) (P stroke etiology had no impact on the presence of IMA. IMA was in concordance with poor cognitive and functional state and was not limited to left hemisphere lesions. The study revealed strong associations between IMA, neglect, and TACI. Every patient with stroke should be evaluated for the presence of IMA on admission to rehabilitation unit.

  20. External Validation of the ISAN, A2DS2, and AIS-APS Scores for Predicting Stroke-Associated Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Arriaza, Elena; Moniche, Francisco; Blanca, Pardo-Galiana; Bustamante, Alejandro; Escudero-Martínez, Irene; Uclés, Oscar; Ollero-Ortiz, Ángela; Sánchez-García, Jose Antonio; Gamero, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ángeles; Vidal De Francisco, Diana; Romera, Mercedes; De la Cruz, Carlos; Sanz, Gema; Montaner, Joan

    2018-03-01

    The Prestroke Independence, Sex, Age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (ISAN), Age, Atrial Fibrillation, Dysphagia, male sex, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (A2DS2), and acute ischemic stroke-associated pneumonia score (AIS-APS) scores were created to predict stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP), one of the most important medical stroke complications. External validation of all such scores in an acute stroke population was the aim of our study. Patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke were prospectively enrolled in the multicenter Stroke-Induced Pneumonia in Andalucía project between October 2014 and May 2016. Receiver operating characteristic curves and linear regression analyses were used to determine discrimination ability of the scores. The Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and the plot of observed versus predicted SAP risk were used to assess model calibration. Among 201 included patients, SAP rate was 15.5% (31). Higher ISAN, A2DS2, and AIS-APS scores were related to SAP (all P manage SAP. The AIS-APS score would be recommendable for the development of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Repeated sessions of noninvasive brain DC stimulation is associated with motor function improvement in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paulo S; Nunes, Alice; Rigonatti, Sergio P; Nitsche, Michael A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fregni, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that a simple technique of noninvasive brain stimulation - transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) - is associated with a significant motor function improvement in stroke patients. We tested the motor performance improvement in stroke patients following 4 weekly sessions of sham, anodal- and cathodal tDCS (experiment 1) and the effects of 5 consecutive daily sessions of cathodal tDCS (experiment 2). A blinded rater evaluated motor function using the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test. There was a significant main effect of stimulation condition (p=0.009) in experiment 1. Furthermore there was a significant motor function improvement after either cathodal tDCS of the unaffected hemisphere (p=0.016) or anodal tDCS of the affected hemisphere (p=0.046) when compared to sham tDCS. There was no cumulative effect associated with weekly sessions of tDCS, however consecutive daily sessions of tDCS (experiment 2) were associated with a significant effect on time (pmotor function improvement in stroke patients; and support that consecutive daily sessions of tDCS might increase its behavioral effects. Because the technique of tDCS is simple, safe and non-expensive; our findings support further research on the use of this technique for the rehabilitation of patients with stroke.

  2. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin; Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  3. Associations between lower limb strength and gait velocity following stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentiplay, Benjamin F; Adair, Brooke; Bower, Kelly J; Williams, Gavin; Tole, Genevieve; Clark, Ross A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify literature examining associations between isometric strength and gait velocity following stroke. An electronic search was performed using six online databases. Targeted searching of reference lists of included articles and three relevant journals was also performed. Two independent reviewers identified relevant articles, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of included articles. Inclusion criteria involved studies that assessed univariate correlations between gait velocity and isometric strength of individual lower limb muscle groups in a stroke population. Twenty-one studies were included for review. The majority of included studies had a relatively small sample size. After accounting for sample size and methodological quality, the knee extensors showed poor-to-moderate correlations with gait velocity while the ankle dorsiflexors showed the strongest association with gait velocity. Current evidence suggests that the strength of the ankle dorsiflexors has a stronger correlation to gait velocity compared with other lower limb muscle groups. Consequently, a focus on increasing ankle dorsiflexor strength to improve gait velocity following stroke may be beneficial. However, due to limitations of the research identified, further research is needed to determine the associations between lower limb strength and gait velocity following stroke.

  4. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J. [Stiftung des Buergerlichen Rechts, Juedisches Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  5. Associations of arterial stiffness and cognitive function with physical fitness in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Yoon, Eun Sun; Park, Soo Hyun; Heffernan, Kevin S; Lee, Chong; Jae, Sae Young

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether arterial stiffness is associated with cognitive function after adjustment for physical fitness in patients with chronic stroke. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted in 102 patients with chronic stroke who participated in an exercise rehabilitation programme. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured as indices of arterial stiffness and central systolic loading. Cognitive function was assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination. Parameters of physical fitness included the 6-min walk test, flexibility, balance, and muscle strength tests. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with Mini Mental State Examination (r = -0.45, p physical fitness (r = -0.45~ -0.55, p  physical fitness (r = 0.32~0.46, p physical fitness (beta = -0.11, p = 0.39). Arterial stiffness measured by carotid femoral pulse wave velocity is associated with cognitive function in patients with chronic stroke, but not after adjustment for physical fitness. Maintaining appropriate levels of physical fitness may have a favourable effect on both vascular and cognitive function in patients with stroke.

  6. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  7. Blood Biomarkers for the Early Diagnosis of Stroke: The Stroke-Chip Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Alejandro; López-Cancio, Elena; Pich, Sara; Penalba, Anna; Giralt, Dolors; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Gasull, Teresa; Hernández-Pérez, María; Millan, Mónica; Rubiera, Marta; Cardona, Pedro; Cano, Luis; Quesada, Helena; Terceño, Mikel; Silva, Yolanda; Castellanos, Mar; Garces, Moisés; Reverté, Silvia; Ustrell, Xavier; Marés, Rafael; Baiges, Joan Josep; Serena, Joaquín; Rubio, Francisco; Salas, Eduardo; Dávalos, Antoni; Montaner, Joan

    2017-09-01

    Stroke diagnosis could be challenging in the acute phase. We aimed to develop a blood-based diagnostic tool to differentiate between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in the hyperacute phase. The Stroke-Chip was a prospective, observational, multicenter study, conducted at 6 Stroke Centers in Catalonia. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke were enrolled within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, and blood samples were drawn immediately after admission. A 21-biomarker panel selected among previous results and from the literature was measured by immunoassays. Outcomes were differentiation between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Predictive models were developed by combining biomarkers and clinical variables in logistic regression models. Accuracy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic curves. From August 2012 to December 2013, 1308 patients were included (71.9% ischemic, 14.8% stroke mimics, and 13.3% hemorrhagic). For stroke versus stroke mimics comparison, no biomarker resulted included in the logistic regression model, but it was only integrated by clinical variables, with a predictive accuracy of 80.8%. For ischemic versus hemorrhagic strokes comparison, NT-proBNP (N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide) >4.9 (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.71; P 4.7 (odds ratio, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.45; P =0.010), together with age, sex, blood pressure, stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, and hypertension, were included in the model. Predictive accuracy was 80.6%. The studied biomarkers were not sufficient for an accurate differential diagnosis of stroke in the hyperacute setting. Additional discovery of new biomarkers and improvement on laboratory techniques seem necessary for achieving a molecular diagnosis of stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. A Targeted Self-Management Approach for Reducing Stroke Risk Factors in African American Men Who Have Had a Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Welter, Elisabeth; Colon-Zimmermann, Kari; Blixen, Carol; Perzynski, Adam T; Amato, Shelly; Cage, Jamie; Sams, Johnny; Moore, Shirley M; Pundik, Svetlana; Sundararajan, Sophia; Modlin, Charles; Sila, Cathy

    2018-02-01

    This study compared a novel self-management (TargetEd MAnageMent Intervention [TEAM]) versus treatment as usual (TAU) to reduce stroke risk in African American (AA) men. Six-month prospective randomized controlled trial with outcomes evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Academic health center. Thirty-eight (age 60 were randomly assigned to TEAM (n = 19) or TAU (n = 19). Self-management training, delivered in 1 individual and 4 group sessions (over 3 months). Blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), lipids, medication adherence, weight, and standardized measures of health behaviors (diet, exercise, smoking, substances), depression, and quality of life. Qualitative assessments evaluated the perspectives of TEAM participants. T tests for paired differences and nonparametric tests. Thematic content qualitative analysis. Mean age was 52.1 (standard deviation [SD] = 7.4) and mean body mass index was 31.4 (SD = 7.4). Compared to TAU, TEAM participants had significantly lower mean systolic blood pressure by 24 weeks, and there was also improvement in HbA 1c and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ( P = .03). Other biomarker and health behaviors were similar between groups. Qualitative results suggested improved awareness of risk factors as well as positive effects of group support.

  9. Educators' Perceptions of the American Association on Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Such, Twila G.; Goldberg, I. Ignacy

    1973-01-01

    Surveyed were the views and opinions of 216 Education Division members of the American Association on Mental Deficiency (AAMD) in an attempt to discover underlying satisfactions or dissatisfactions with the AAMD. (DB)

  10. Are activity limitations associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in stroke patients? A cross-sectional, clinical survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2009-01-01

    stroke patients were invited to complete four activity limitations measurements: Barthel Index, mobility velocity, mobility distance, mobility aids and one LUTS measurement: the Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire. Of 519 stroke patients, 482 subjects were eligible. Results......Objective. To assess self-reported activity limitations in a clinical sample of stroke patients and to identify their association with prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Material and methods. A cross-sectional, clinical survey was initiated whereby...... time that activity limitations are closely related to LUTS in stroke patients and that rehabilitation should also be directed towards the treatment of LUTS....

  11. Risk factors associated with falls in adult patients after stroke living in the community: baseline data from a stroke cohort in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Elen Beatriz; Nascimento, Carla; Marinho, Camila; Oliveira, Ilana; Monteiro, Maiana; Castro, Mayra; Myllane-Fernandes, Paula; Ventura, Laís M G B; Maso, Iara; Lopes, Antonio Alberto; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with stroke have a high risk of falling, and their fall predictors may differ from those of other populations. To estimate fall frequency and identify factors related to fall occurrence in a sample of patients with stroke residing in the community. Clinical data were collected from 150 consecutive stroke patients with independent gait, and the following scales were applied: modified Barthel Index (mBI), Timed Up & Go Test (TUG), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Univariate analysis was performed; variables with possible association (P stroke onset (OR, 1.012 for every month increase; 95% CI, 1.002-1.021; P = .015) remained predictors. When we grouped individuals according to affected cerebral hemisphere, both hemispheres had similar accuracy, but TUG cutoff point was lower in individuals with right- versus left-hemisphere lesions. Patients with poor TUG performance, longer times since stroke onset, and right-hemisphere injury have particularly high fall rates, and TUG cutoff points for fall prediction vary according to cerebral hemisphere.

  12. Changes in muscle group work associated with changes in gait speed of persons with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvataneni, Krishnaji; Olney, Sandra J; Brouwer, Brenda

    2007-08-01

    Knowledge of associations between changes in muscle work with changes in gait speed could assist gait training in persons with stroke. The purpose of the study was to determine changes in the work of major muscle groups during gait that were associated with increases in walking speed of persons with stroke following training. The gait of 28 subjects (14 males, 14 females) with mean age of 64.2 (SD 11.7) years, at 4.8 (SD 6.9) years post stroke was studied using two-dimensional motion analysis before and after a strength training program. Outcome variables were changes in gait speed and changes in work associated with the hip flexors and extensors, knee flexors and extensors and ankle plantar flexors bilaterally. A stepwise linear regression analysis determined best positive work predictors of changes in gait speed. Hip extension work in early stance and ankle plantarflexion work in late stance of the affected side accounted for 74.9% of the variance in change of gait speed; a second model showed that hip extension work in early stance of the affected and less-affected sides accounted for 74.3%, a similar amount of variance. This work is the first to explore the changes in muscle work during gait that are associated with speed increases in persons with stroke. Augmenting hip extensor work in early stance on both sides, as well as ankle plantarflexion thrust on the affected side may be particularly beneficial in increasing the speed of walking of persons with stroke.

  13. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid; Donnan, Geoffrey A. [The University of Melbourne, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies. (orig.)

  14. American Exceptionalism and the American Surgical Association: The Rise of Surgery in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Ira; Lillemoe, Keith D

    2018-04-01

    To explore use of the notion of American exceptionalism by fellows of the American Surgical Association (ASA) (1880 through World War I) and how this proved instrumental in the rise of surgery in the United States. American exceptionalism is the belief that the United States is innately different from other nations because of its economic, geographic, political, religious, and social foundations. Although, currently, the concept of American exceptionalism implies superiority, in its original 19th century connotation, the idea referred to the distinctive character of America as a free nation. An analysis of published literature along with unpublished documents to provide new knowledge and unique insight into the use of American exceptionalism by members of the ASA as they promoted their specialty. Beginning with Samuel Gross's desire that the organization he founded represent "the genius of our republican institutions," to Frederick Dennis's declaration that "American surgery eclipses all other nations because of the wonderful adaptability of the American mind," plus Lewis Pilcher's explanation of how the "stimulating climate, prevailing religious tone, regard for learning, and pride of citizenship are the fruit of the American mind when turned to surgical problems," and ending with Edmond Souchon's 106 page article in the Transactions on surgical firsts, the ASA was the avenue that helped the nation's surgeons define and defend themselves. Use of the concept of American exceptionalism by fellows of the ASA was a key factor in the development of surgery in the United States.

  15. Ipsilateral hippocampal atrophy is associated with long-term memory dysfunction after ischemic stroke in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaapsmeerders, Pauline; van Uden, Inge W M; Tuladhar, Anil M; Maaijwee, Noortje A M; van Dijk, Ewoud J; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Arntz, Renate M; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C; Dorresteijn, Lucille D A; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Kessels, Roy P C

    2015-07-01

    Memory impairment after stroke in young adults is poorly understood. In elderly stroke survivors memory impairments and the concomitant loss of hippocampal volume are usually explained by coexisting neurodegenerative disease (e.g., amyloid pathology) in interaction with stroke. However, neurodegenerative disease, such as amyloid pathology, is generally absent at young age. Accumulating evidence suggests that infarction itself may cause secondary neurodegeneration in remote areas. Therefore, we investigated the relation between long-term memory performance and hippocampal volume in young patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. We studied all consecutive first-ever ischemic stroke patients, aged 18-50 years, admitted to our academic hospital center between 1980 and 2010. Episodic memory of 173 patients was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test and the Rey Complex Figure and compared with 87 stroke-free controls. Hippocampal volume was determined using FSL-FIRST, with manual correction. On average 10 years after stroke, patients had smaller ipsilateral hippocampal volumes compared with controls after left-hemispheric stroke (5.4%) and right-hemispheric stroke (7.7%), with most apparent memory dysfunctioning after left-hemispheric stroke. A larger hemispheric stroke was associated with a smaller ipsilateral hippocampal volume (b=-0.003, Pstroke (b=-0.028 ml, P=0.002) and right-hemispheric stroke (b=-0.015 ml, P=0.03). Our results suggest that infarction is associated with remote injury to the hippocampus, which may lower or expedite the threshold for cognitive impairment or even dementia later in life. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with symptoms of depression after 6 months in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wei; Xiang, Lei; Zhang, Ya-Jing; Ji, Yong; Li, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Our aim was to determine whether there was a relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH] D) and post-stroke depression (PSD). Two hundred and forty-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first 24 h after stroke onset were consecutively recruited and followed up for 6 months. Clinical information was collected. Serum 25[OH] D levels were measured at baseline. Based on the symptoms, diagnoses of depression were made in accordance with DSM-IV criteria for depression at 6-month after stroke. At 6-month, 91 patients (37.3 %) showed depression and in 60 patients (24.6 %) this depression was classified as major. There was a significant difference in median serum 25[OH] D levels between PSD patients and no depression cases [8.3 (IQR, 6.8-9.5) vs. 15.6 (IQR, 13.2-20.3) ng/ml, respectively; P < 0.001]. Serum 25[OH] D levels ≤ 11.2 ng/ml were independently associated with PSD [odds ratio 10.32, 95 % confidence interval 4.97-28.63; P < 0.001], after adjusting for possible confounders. Serum 25[OH] D levels reduced at admission was found to be associated with PSD. Additional research is needed on vitamin D supplementation to improve the outcome of patients with PSD.

  17. Gait Change Is Associated with Cognitive Outcome after an Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Sagnier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognition and gait have often been studied separately after stroke whereas it has been suggested that these two domains could interact through a cognitive-motor interference.Objective: To evaluate the influence of gait changes on cognitive outcome after an ischemic stroke (IS.Methods: We conducted a prospective and monocentric study including patients admitted for an acute supratentorial IS with a National Institute of Health Stroke Score ≤ 15. Cognition, gait and motor disability were evaluated at baseline, 3 months and 1 year post-stroke, using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, the 10-m walking test (10-MWT and the Fugl-Meyer motor assessment (FMMA. The effect of changes in 10-MWT over the year of follow-up on MoCA changes was estimated using a generalized linear mixed model with FMMA, age and gender as covariates.Results: Two hundred and Twelve patients were included (71% male, age 64 ± 13 years old. 10-MWT improved from baseline to 1 year (p < 0.001, as did MoCA (p < 0.001 and FMMA (p < 0.001 scores. Ninety-nine patients (47% had a MoCA <26 at 1 year. Changes in 10-MWT were independently associated with changes in MoCA (β = −0.2, 95% CI −0.24 to −0.07, Bonferroni-corrected p-value = 0.002. Analyses of MoCA sub-scores suggested that changes in gait performance was associated with changes in executive functions and recall.Conclusion: Gait performance is associated with cognitive outcome after a mild to moderate IS, suggesting that they should be managed together to improve post-stroke independence.

  18. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-03-01

    Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We investigated the association between atopy as assessed by IgE sensitization, a well-accepted biomarker of allergy, and incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in five Danish population-based cohorts. A total of 14,849 participants were included in the study. Atopy was defined as serum-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were analyzed by Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and adjusted for study cohort, gender, education, body mass index, alcohol intake, smoking habits, physical activity during leisure time, serum lipids, and blood pressure. The prevalence of atopy was 26.9 % (n = 3,994). There were 1,170, 817, and 1,063 incident cases of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, respectively (median follow-up 11.2 years). The hazard ratios, HRs (95 % confidence intervals, CIs) for atopics versus non-atopics: for ischemic heart disease (HR 1.00, 95 % CI 0.86, 1.16), stroke (HR 1.18, 95 % CI 0.99, 1.41), and diabetes (HR 1.06, 95 % CI 0.91, 1.23). Our results did not support the hypothesis that atopy is associated with higher risk of ischemic heart disease, stroke, or diabetes. However, a small-moderately increased risk cannot be excluded from our data.

  19. Risk factors associated with injury attributable to falling among elderly population with history of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divani, Afshin A; Vazquez, Gabriela; Barrett, Anna M; Asadollahi, Marjan; Luft, Andreas R

    2009-10-01

    Stroke survivors are at high risk for falling. Identifying physical, clinical, and social factors that predispose stroke patients to falls may reduce further disability and life-threatening complications, and improve overall quality of life. We used 5 biennial waves (1998-2006) from the Health and Retirement Study to assess risk factors associated with falling accidents and fall-related injuries among stroke survivors. We abstracted demographic data, living status, self-evaluated general health, and comorbid conditions. We analyzed the rate ratio (RR) of falling and the OR of injury within 2 follow-up years using a multivariate random effects model. We identified 1174 stroke survivors (mean age+/-SD, 74.4+/-7.2 years; 53% female). The 2-year risks of falling, subsequent injury, and broken hip attributable to fall were 46%, 15%, and 2.1% among the subjects, respectively. Factors associated with an increased frequency of falling were living with spouse as compared to living alone (RR, 1.4), poor general health (RR, 1.1), time from first stroke (RR, 1.2), psychiatric problems (RR, 1.7), urinary incontinence (RR, 1.4), pain (RR, 1.4), motor impairment (RR, 1.2), and past frequency of > or = 3 falls (RR, 1.3). Risk factors associated with fall-related injury were female gender (OR, 1.5), poor general health (OR, 1.2), past injury from fall (OR, 3.2), past frequency of > or = 3 falls (OR, 3.1), psychiatric problems (OR, 1.4), urinary incontinence (OR, 1.4), impaired hearing (OR, 1.6), pain (OR, 1.8), motor impairment (OR, 1.3), and presence of multiple strokes (OR, 3.2). This study demonstrates the high prevalence of falls and fall-related injuries in stroke survivors, and identifies factors that increase the risk. Modifying these factors may prevent falls, which could lead to improved quality of life and less caregiver burden and cost in this population.

  20. Anxiety and depression associated with caregiver burden in caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denno, Melissa S; Gillard, Patrick J; Graham, Glenn D; DiBonaventura, Marco D; Goren, Amir; Varon, Sepi F; Zorowitz, Richard

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety/depression and caregiver burden in informal caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity. Data were collected via online surveys from informal caregivers 18 years or older who cared for stroke survivors. Internet-based survey. 2007 through 2009 U.S. National Health and Wellness Survey database or Lightspeed Research general panel respondents (N=153). Not applicable. Anxiety and depression were self-reported by the caregiver as a physician diagnosis. Depression severity was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Caregiver burden was measured by the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) and the Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS). Logistic regression analyses were conducted with anxiety, depression, and the PHQ-9 depression severity categories as a result of each caregiver burden scale. Data were analyzed for 153 informal caregivers; they were mostly women (70.6%) and white (78.4%), with a mean age of 51.6 years. For every 1-point increase in the OCBS Difficulty Scale, the odds of anxiety or depression were 2.57 times as great (Pcaregiver burden increases, caregivers are more likely to have anxiety and depression. Depression severity also increases. Providing treatment to stroke survivors with spasticity that lessens the time and more importantly, the difficulty of caregiving may lead to a reduction in caregiver anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exertional Heat Stroke and American Football: What the Team Physician Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Jillian E; Belval, Luke N; Casa, Douglas J; O'Connor, Francis G

    Football is recognized as a leading contributor to sports injury secondary to the contact collision nature of the endeavor. While direct deaths from head and spine injury remain a significant contributor to the number of catastrophic injuries, indirect deaths (systemic failure) predominate. Exertional heat stroke has emerged as one of the leading indirect causes of death in high school and collegiate football. This review details for the team physician the unique challenge of exercising in the heat to the football player, and the prevention, diagnosis, management, and return-to-play issues pertinent to exertional heat illnesses.

  2. Association between ambient air pollution and hospitalization for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in China: A multicity case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Tian, Yaohua; Xu, Yan; Huang, Zhe; Huang, Chao; Hu, Yonghua; Zhang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    There is growing interest in the association between ambient air pollution and stroke, but few studies have investigated the association in developing countries. The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between levels of ambient air pollutants and hospital admission for stroke in China. A time-stratified case-crossover analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015 in 14 large Chinese cities among 200,958 ischemic stroke and 41,746 hemorrhagic stroke hospitalizations. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the percentage changes in stroke admissions in relation to interquartile range increases in air pollutants. Air pollution was positively associated with ischemic stroke. A difference of an interquartile range of the 6-day average for particulate matter less than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone corresponded to 0.7% (95% CI: 0%, 1.4%), 1.6% (95% CI: 1.0%, 2.3%), 2.6% (95% CI: 1.8%, 3.5%), 0.5% (95% CI: -0.2%, 1.1%), and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.3%, 2.3%) increases in ischemic stroke admissions, respectively. For hemorrhagic stroke, we observed the only significant association in relation to nitrogen dioxide on the current day (percentage change: 1.6%; 95% CI: 0.3%, 2.9%). Our findings contribute to the limited scientific literature concerning the effect of ambient air pollution on stroke in developing countries. Our findings may have significant public health implications for primary prevention of stroke in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations Between Sensorimotor Impairments in the Upper Limb at 1 Week and 6 Months After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; De Bruyn, Nele; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena; Peeters, Andre; Feys, Hilde; Thijs, Vincent; Verheyden, Geert

    2016-07-01

    Longitudinal information regarding the prevalence of upper limb somatosensory deficits and the association with motor impairment and activity limitations is scarce. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to map the extent and distribution of somatosensory deficits, and to determine associations over time between somatosensory deficits and motor impairment and activity limitations. We recruited 32 participants who were assessed 4 to 7 days after stroke, and reassessed at 6 months. Somatosensory measurements included the Erasmus-modified Nottingham sensory assessment (Em-NSA), perceptual threshold of touch, thumb finding test, 2-point discrimination, and stereognosis subscale of the NSA. Evaluation of motor impairment comprised the Fugl-Meyer assessment, Motricity Index, and Action Research Arm Test. In addition, at 6 months, activity limitation was determined using the adult assisting hand assessment stroke, the ABILHAND, and hand subscale of the Stroke Impact Scale. Somatosensory impairments were common, with 41% to 63% experiencing a deficit in one of the modalities within the first week and 3% to 50% at 6 months. In the acute phase, there were only very low associations between somatosensory and motor impairments (r = 0.03-0.20), whereas at 6 months, low to moderate associations (r = 0.32-0.69) were found for perceptual threshold of touch, thumb finding test, and stereognosis with motor impairment and activity limitations. Low associations (r = 0.01-0.29) were found between somatosensory impairments in the acute phase and motor impairments and activity limitations at 6 months. This study showed that somatosensory impairments are common and suggests that the association with upper limb motor and functional performance increases with time after stroke.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A138).

  4. Association of Serum Osteoprotegerin With Left Ventricular Mass in African-American Adults With Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noheria, Amit; Mosley, Thomas H.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND African-Americans with hypertension are susceptible to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Serum osteoprotegerin level has been reported to be associated with LVH. We investigated the association of osteoprotegerin with LV mass (LVM) in 898 African-Americans with hypertension (mean age 65 years, 71% women). METHODS Osteoprotegerin levels were measured in serum by an immunoassay and log-transformed for analyses. LVM index (LVMi; LVM/height2.7) was estimated using M-mode echocardiography. Linear regression analyses using generalized estimating equations were used to assess the association of osteoprotegerin with LVMi. RESULTS Serum osteoprotegerin was correlated with LVMi (r = 0.21; P osteoprotegerin quartile. This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, body mass index (BMI), history of smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure (BP), total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), estimated renal function, history of myocardial infarction and stroke, lifestyle factors (physical activity score, years of education, amount of alcohol consumption), medications (aspirin, antihypertensives, statins, estrogens), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = 0.02). Additionally, osteoprotegerin was correlated with early/atrial (E/A) ratio (r = −0.16; P osteoprotegerin level is weakly but independently associated with a higher LVM. PMID:20339356

  5. Self-Reported Stroke Risk Stratification: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George; McClure, Leslie A; Moy, Claudia S; Howard, Virginia J; Judd, Suzanne E; Yuan, Ya; Long, D Leann; Muntner, Paul; Safford, Monika M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2017-07-01

    The standard for stroke risk stratification is the Framingham Stroke Risk Function (FSRF), an equation requiring an examination for blood pressure assessment, venipuncture for glucose assessment, and ECG to determine atrial fibrillation and heart disease. We assess a self-reported stroke risk function (SRSRF) to stratify stroke risk in comparison to the FSRF. Participants from the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) were evaluated at baseline and followed for incident stroke. The FSRF was calculated using directly assessed stroke risk factors. The SRSRF was calculated from 13 self-reported questions to exclude those with prevalent stroke and assess stroke risk. Proportional hazards analysis was used to assess incident stroke risk using the FSRF and SRSRF. Over an average 8.2-year follow-up, 939 of 23 983 participants had a stroke. The FSRF and SRSRF produced highly correlated risk scores ( r Spearman =0.852; 95% confidence interval, 0.849-0.856); however, the SRSRF had higher discrimination of stroke risk than the FSRF (c SRSRF =0.7266; 95% confidence interval, 0.7076-0.7457; c FSRF =0.7075; 95% confidence interval, 0.6877-0.7273; P =0.0038). The 10-year stroke risk in the highest decile of predicted risk was 11.1% for the FSRF and 13.4% for the SRSRF. A simple self-reported questionnaire can be used to identify those at high risk for stroke better than the gold standard FSRF. This instrument can be used clinically to easily identify individuals at high risk for stroke and also scientifically to identify a subpopulation enriched for stroke risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Swallowing Kinematics and Factors Associated with Laryngeal Penetration and Aspiration in Stroke Survivors with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate swallowing kinematics and explore kinematic factors related with penetration-aspiration in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Videofluoroscopic images of 68 patients with post-stroke dysphagia and 34 sex- and age-matched healthy controls swallowing a thin liquid were quantitatively analyzed using two-dimensional motion digitization. The measurements included the movement distances and velocities of the hyoid and larynx, and the maximal tilt angles and angular velocities of the epiglottis. All velocity variables were significantly decreased in the stroke patients compared to the controls. There was a significant difference in the maximal horizontal displacement of the larynx, but there were no significant differences in other displacements of the larynx, the maximal displacements of the hyoid bone, and the maximum tilt angle of the epiglottis between the two groups. The maximal tilt angle of the epiglottis was lower in the aspiration subgroup than in the no penetration/aspiration and penetration subgroups as well as the controls. The maximal tilt angle from the y axis showed a dichotomous pattern at 90° of the angle, and all 11 patients with an angle dysphagia. The association of reduced epiglottic movement with the risk of aspiration in patients with post-stroke dysphagia was supported by the quantitative analysis.

  7. Risk of death and stroke associated with anticoagulation therapy after mitral valve repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valeur, Nana; Mérie, Charlotte; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2016-01-01

    patients who underwent mitral valve repair during the period between 1997 and 2012. Medication, hospitalisation and mortality data were studied. The association of use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) at discharge and risk of stroke/death was evaluated by means of Cox regression, landmark analyses...... and propensity matched models. RESULTS: 2188 patients without prior VKA use, stroke or death day 7 after discharge were included and median follow-up was 4.9 years (0-13.7). 859 (39%) were discharged on VKAs and 523 (24%) experienced death or stroke, 60 of these occurred within the first 3 months and 24 between...... 3 and 6 months. Compared with patients without post-discharge VKA, patients on VKA had a lower risk of death/stroke at 3 months (HR=0.28, CI (0.13 to 0.62), p=0.002) and in the time period from 3 to 6 months (HR=0.85, CI (0.35 to 2.07), p=0.72). Risk of significant bleeding complications within 3...

  8. Polygenic Risk for Depression Increases Risk of Ischemic Stroke: From the Stroke Genetics Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Qi, Qibin; Dave, Tushar; Mitchell, Braxton D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Liu, Simin; Park, Ki; Salinas, Joel; Dunn, Erin C; Leira, Enrique C; Xu, Huichun; Ryan, Kathleen; Smoller, Jordan W

    2018-03-01

    Although depression is a risk factor for stroke in large prospective studies, it is unknown whether these conditions have a shared genetic basis. We applied a polygenic risk score (PRS) for major depressive disorder derived from European ancestry analyses by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium to a genome-wide association study of ischemic stroke in the Stroke Genetics Network of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Included in separate analyses were 12 577 stroke cases and 25 643 controls of European ancestry and 1353 cases and 2383 controls of African ancestry. We examined the association between depression PRS and ischemic stroke overall and with pathogenic subtypes using logistic regression analyses. The depression PRS was associated with higher risk of ischemic stroke overall in both European ( P =0.025) and African ancestry ( P =0.011) samples from the Stroke Genetics Network. Ischemic stroke risk increased by 3.0% (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.05) for every 1 SD increase in PRS for those of European ancestry and by 8% (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.13) for those of African ancestry. Among stroke subtypes, elevated risk of small artery occlusion was observed in both European and African ancestry samples. Depression PRS was also associated with higher risk of cardioembolic stroke in European ancestry and large artery atherosclerosis in African ancestry persons. Higher polygenic risk for major depressive disorder is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke overall and with small artery occlusion. Additional associations with ischemic stroke subtypes differed by ancestry. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Relationship between Kidney Dysfunction and Ischemic Stroke Outcomes: Albuminuria, but Not Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate, Is Associated with the Risk of Further Vascular Events and Mortality after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Dong-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria are known to be associated with ischemic stroke outcomes. In this study, we investigated the longitudinal relationships of the two markers with mortality, vascular events and functional outcomes in a stroke cohort. A total of 295 patients with acute ischemic stroke were prospectively recruited in a single center between May 2012 and February 2015. Renal dysfunction was defined as a decreased eGFR (albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g). Good functional outcome at 6 months was defined as a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2, and the occurrence of major vascular events (stroke, acute coronary syndrome or peripheral artery occlusion) or death was monitored. The associations between renal dysfunction and mortality, major vascular events, and 6-month functional outcome were evaluated by the Cox proportional hazards model and logistic regression analysis. Unadjusted and adjusted hazards ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve for composite adverse events (major vascular events or death) was also computed according to the presence or absence of albuminuria. Albuminuria, not eGFR, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.028; HR 2.15; 95% CI 1.09-4.25) and major vascular events (P = 0.044; HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.02-4.94) in the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, alcohol history, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and eGFR. In addition, albuminuria was negatively associated with 6-month functional outcome in the multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, alcohol history and eGFR (P = 0.001; OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.20-0.65), but the association disappeared when NIHSS score was

  10. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association ( P =6×10 - 4 ) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at P risk and stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P =1.2×10 - 9 , 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Association between Carotid Artery Stenosis and Cognitive Impairment in Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yue

    Full Text Available To investigate potential associations between carotid artery stenosis and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke and to provide important clinical implications. We measured the degree of carotid artery stenosis and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination score (MMSE at admission in 3116 acute ischemic stroke patients. The association between carotid stenosis and cognitive impairment assessed by MMSE was tested using multivariate regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. After adjusting for age, gender, education level, marriage, alcohol use, tobacco use, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction and NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, we found that participants with high-grade stenosis of the carotid artery had a higher likelihood of cognitive impairment compared to those without carotid artery stenosis (OR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.05-2.11, p<0.001. Left common carotid artery stenosis was associated with cognitive impairment in the univariate analysis, although this effect did not persist after adjustment for the NIHSS score. Cognitive impairment was associated with high-grade stenosis of the right carotid artery.

  12. Recommended Dietary Pattern to Achieve Adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) Guidelines: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Linda; Carson, Jo Ann S; Appel, Lawrence J; Burke, Lora E; Economos, Christina; Karmally, Wahida; Lancaster, Kristie; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Johnson, Rachel K; Thomas, Randal J; Vos, Miriam; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2016-11-29

    In 2013, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology published the "Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk," which was based on a systematic review originally initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The guideline supports the American Heart Association's 2020 Strategic Impact Goals for cardiovascular health promotion and disease reduction by providing more specific details for adopting evidence-based diet and lifestyle behaviors to achieve those goals. In addition, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans issued updated evidence relevant to reducing cardiovascular risk and provided additional recommendations for adopting healthy diet and lifestyle approaches. This scientific statement, intended for healthcare providers, summarizes relevant scientific and translational evidence and offers practical tips, tools, and dietary approaches to help patients/clients adapt these guidelines according to their sociocultural, economic, and taste preferences. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. A priori-defined dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk of stroke in a large Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Claudia; Krogh, Vittorio; Grioni, Sara; Sieri, Sabina; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Pala, Valeria; Berrino, Franco; Chiodini, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Panico, Salvatore

    2011-08-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death. Several foods and nutrients have been linked to stroke, but their effects may be best investigated considering the entire diet. In the present EPICOR study, we investigated the association between stroke and adherence to 4 a priori-defined dietary patterns: Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005), Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), Greek Mediterranean Index, and Italian Mediterranean Index. We followed 40,681 volunteers and estimated the HR and 95%CI for stroke according to dietary pattern by using multivariate Cox models with adjustment for risk factors. During a mean follow-up of 7.9 y, 178 stroke cases were diagnosed (100 ischemic, 47 hemorrhagic). Scores of 3 dietary patterns (not HEI) were inversely associated with risk of all types of stroke, with the strongest association for the Italian Index [HR = 0.47 (95%CI = 0.30-0.75); third vs. first tertile]. All patterns were significantly inversely associated with ischemic stroke except the Greek Index, with the strongest association for the Italian Index [HR = 0.37 (95%CI = 0.19-0.70); third vs. first tertile]. Only the Italian Index tended to be inversely associated with hemorrhagic stroke [HR = 0.51 (95%CI = 0.22-1.20); P = 0.07)]. These epidemiological findings suggest that adherence to any one dietary pattern investigated would protect against at least one type of stroke. For our Italian population, a diet with a high score on the Italian Index was associated with the greatest risk reduction, probably because it was conceived to capture healthy eating in the context of foods typically available in Italy.

  14. 2010 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA). It provides the highlights of the association's and individual directorate's activities to APA members. APA continued its efforts to advance psychological practice and ensure the public's access to high-quality psychological services, apply psychological…

  15. 2009 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA) describes the association's activities and accomplishments in 2009. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology--and the unique skills of psychologists--to the attention of the public. This report aims…

  16. 2005 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA) describes the association's activities and accomplishments in 2005. The examples provided in this report are a small sampling of all that APA is doing to advance the discipline of psychology in an ever-changing world.

  17. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

    2015-01-01

    Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We...... investigated the association between atopy as assessed by IgE sensitization, a well-accepted biomarker of allergy, and incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in five Danish population-based cohorts. A total of 14,849 participants were included in the study. Atopy was defined as serum......-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were...

  18. Long-term heart disease and stroke mortality among former American prisoners of war of World War II and the Korean Conflict: results of a 50-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, W F; Brass, L M

    2001-09-01

    For the first 30 years after repatriation, former American prisoners of war (POWs) of World War II and the Korean Conflict had lower death rates for heart disease and stroke than non-POW veteran controls and the U.S. population, but subsequent morbidity data suggested that this survival advantage may have disappeared. We used U.S. federal records to obtain death data through 1996 and used proportional hazards analysis to compare the mortality experience of POWs and controls. POWs aged 75 years and older showed a significantly higher risk of heart disease deaths than controls (hazard ratio = 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.56), and their stroke mortality was also increased, although not significantly (hazard ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.91). These results suggest that circulatory disease sequelae of serious, acute malnutrition and the stresses associated with imprisonment may not appear until after many decades.

  19. Association of CT perfusion parameters with hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A R; Jain, M; Kanthala, A R; Damania, D; Stead, L G; Wang, H Z; Jahromi, B S

    2013-10-01

    Prediction of hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke could help determine treatment and prognostication. With increasing numbers of patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing multimodal CT imaging, we examined whether CT perfusion could predict hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent CTP scanning within 12 hours of symptom onset were examined. Patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were defined as cases and controls, respectively, and were matched as to IV rtPA administration and presentation NIHSS score (± 2). Relative mean transit time, relative CBF, and relative CBV values were calculated from CTP maps and normalized to the contralateral side. Receiver operating characteristic analysis curves were created, and threshold values for significant CTP parameters were obtained to predict hemorrhagic transformation. Of 83 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 16 developed hemorrhagic transformation (19.28%). By matching, 38 controls were found for only 14 patients with hemorrhagic transformation. Among the matched patients with hemorrhagic transformation, 13 developed hemorrhagic infarction (6 hemorrhagic infarction 1 and 7 hemorrhagic infarction 2) and 1 developed parenchymal hematoma 2. There was no significant difference between cases and controls with respect to age, sex, time to presentation from symptom onset, and comorbidities. Cases had significantly lower median rCBV (8% lower) compared with controls (11% higher) (P = .009; odds ratio, 1.14 for a 0.1-U decrease in rCBV). There was no difference in median total volume of ischemia, rMTT, and rCBF among cases and controls. The area under the receiver operating characteristic was computed to be 0.83 (standard error, 0.08), with a cutoff point for rCBV of 1.09. Of the examined CTP parameters, only lower rCBV was found to be significantly associated with a relatively higher chance of hemorrhagic transformation.

  20. Association between periodontitis and ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leira, Yago; Seoane, Juan; Blanco, Miguel; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Takkouche, Bahi; Blanco, Juan; Castillo, José

    2017-01-01

    Several observational studies have suggested an association between periodontitis and cerebral ischemia. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate whether this link exists, and if so, the degree to which it is significant. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guideline for systematic review was used. The search strategy included using electronic databases and hand searching works published up to March 2015. MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, Proceedings Web of Science and Current Contents Connect were searched by two independent reviewers. Case-control, cross-sectional or cohort studies including patients with measures of periodontitis and ischemic stroke were eligible to be included in the analysis. Quality assessments of selected studies were performed. From a total of 414 titles and abstracts, 57 potentially relevant full text papers were identified. After inclusion criteria were applied, 8 studies were included in the present systematic review (5 case-control and 3 cohort studies). Although it was not the intention, cross-sectional studies were excluded due to eligibility criteria were not accomplished. Therefore, meta-analyses were conducted with data retrieved from the 8 studies included. These meta-analyses showed statistically significant association between periodontitis and ischemic stroke in both cohort pooled relative risks at 2.52 (1.77–3.58), and case-control studies pooled relative risks at 3.04 (1.10–8.43). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis demonstrated an association between periodontitis and ischemic stroke. However, well-designed prospective studies should be carried out to provide robust evidence of the link between both diseases. In regards to ischemic stroke subtypes, further case-control studies should be carried out to investigate whether there is any association between the different subtypes of cerebral infarcts and periodontitis.

  1. Total antioxidant capacity of the diet is associated with lower risk of ischemic stroke in a large Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Daniele; Agnoli, Claudia; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Krogh, Vittorio; Brighenti, Furio; Mazzeo, Teresa; Masala, Giovanna; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Berrino, Franco; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Rollo, Patrizia Concetta; Gallo, Valentina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies suggest that oxidative stress and systemic inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Consuming a diet with a high total antioxidant capacity (TAC) has been related to reduced inflammation and increased circulating antioxidants in cross-sectional and randomized intervention studies. This study investigates the relation between dietary TAC and risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in 41,620 men and women not previously diagnosed with stroke or myocardial infarction, representing the Italian segment of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Controlling for potential confounders, a diet rich in TAC was associated with a reduction in HR for all types of stroke, but this association was only marginally significant (P-trend = 0.054). When only ischemic stroke cases were considered, data suggest a stronger inverse association with dietary TAC, with HR = 0.41 (95% CI = 0.23-0.74). Regarding single antioxidants, data from subanalyses on stroke types suggest that vitamin C is significantly associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke [HR = 0.58 (95% CI = 0.34-0.99)], whereas vitamin E was associated with increased HR of hemorrhagic stroke in the highest tertile of intake [HR = 2.94 (95% CI = 1.13-7.62)]. In conclusion, our findings suggest that antioxidants may play a role in reducing the risk of cerebral infarction but not hemorrhagic stroke. However, a high intake of vitamin E could be positively associated to the risk of brain hemorrhagic events; therefore, more focused investigations about this observation are needed.

  2. Are 12-lead ECG findings associated with the risk of cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke in young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinen, Jani; Putaala, Jukka; Aarnio, Karoliina; Aro, Aapo L; Sinisalo, Juha; Kaste, Markku; Haapaniemi, Elena; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Lehto, Mika

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) in a young patient is a disaster and recurrent cardiovascular events could add further impairment. Identifying patients with high risk of such events is therefore important. The prognostic relevance of ECG for this population is unknown. A total of 690 IS patients aged 15-49 years were included. A 12-lead ECG was obtained 1-14 d after the onset of stroke. We adjusted for demographic factors, comorbidities, and stroke characteristics, Cox regression models were used to identify independent ECG parameters associated with long-term risks of (1) any cardiovascular event, (2) cardiac events, and (3) recurrent stroke. Median follow-up time was 8.8 years. About 26.4% of patients experienced a cardiovascular event, 14.5% had cardiac events, and 14.6% recurrent strokes. ECG parameters associated with recurrent cardiovascular events were bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, left ventricular hypertrophy, and a broader QRS complex. Furthermore, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms were associated with increased risks of cardiac events. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke. A 12-lead ECG can be used for risk prediction of cardiovascular events but not for recurrent stroke in young IS patients. KEY MESSAGES ECG is an easy, inexpensive, and useful tool for identifying young ischemic stroke patients with a high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events and it has a statistically significant association with these events even after adjusting for confounding factors. Bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, broader QRS complex, LVH according to Cornell voltage duration criteria, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms are predictors for future cardiovascular or cardiac events in these patients. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke.

  3. The Association of Four-Limb Blood Pressure with History of Stroke in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Sun, Fengyu; Dong, Lihang; Chang, Huiying; Gu, Xingbo; Zhang, Haiyu; Sheng, Lijiang; Tian, Ye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association of ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI), interarm blood pressure (BP) difference and interankle BP difference, obtained by simultaneous four-limb BP measurement, with history of stroke in a Chinese adult population. This cross-sectional study included 1485 participants aged ≥35 years in the framework of the China Hypertension Survey. We performed simultaneous four-limb BP measurement using oscillometric devices with the participants in the supine position and calculated ABI and interarm/interankle BP differences between the 4 limbs. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association of these BP parameters and other factors with a history of stroke. In univariate analyses, participants with ABI stroke than those without (p stroke after adjustment for interarm BP difference ≥15 mmHg, interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg, and traditional risk factors for stroke (p = 0.001). An interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg was associated with prior stroke after the two variables of hypertension and ABI were removed from the logistic regression model (p = 0.0142). Net reclassification improvement analysis showed that inclusion of interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg to the independent risk factors (age, family history of stroke, hypertension, and ABI) improved net reclassification by 11.92%. ABI stroke prevalence in Chinese adults and it just detected a small propotion of paticipants. The addition of interankle BP difference ≥10 mmHg to the independent risk factors for stroke may improve the prediction of stroke.

  4. Elevated plasma homocysteine upon ischemic stroke is associated with increased long-term mortality in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Ioanna; Klironomos, Stefanos; Kostulas, Konstantinos; Sjostrand, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide, despite preventive and therapeutic advances during the last twenty years. Blood-borne biomarkers have been studied in association to short- and long-term outcome, in order to investigate possible modifiable predictors of disability and death. Increased homocysteine has been associated with increased vascular risk and unfavorable outcome, but homocysteine lowering treatment has not consistently been successful in risk reduction. The aim of this study was to investigate homocysteine levels upon acute ischemic stroke in association to long-term mortality. Of 622 patients included in our hospital-based registry, 331 survived the first month after admission, and had a diagnosis of ischemic stroke and available homocysteine values. All-cause and vascular mortality were investigated based on the national patient- and cause of death-registries. Survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate time to death and predictors of outcome. Of 331 patients, 148 (45%) had low homocysteine (homocysteine (> = 13 micromol/L). During 10 years of follow-up (median 5.5 years), 47 patients (32%) with low homocysteine and 94 (51%) with high homocysteine died (phomocysteine group, and was 80 months in the high homocysteine group (p with log-rank test 0.002). High homocysteine was not independently associated with increased risk for death after adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and eGFR (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.86-1.93; p = 0.2). Subgroup analysis by sex showed that high homocysteine was an independent predictor of mortality in women after adjustment for age and vascular comorbidities (HR 1.85; 95% CI 1.03-3.31; p = 0.04), but not in men (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.52-1.43; p = 0.6). Increased plasma homocysteine (> = 13 micromol/L) upon acute ischemic stroke was not independently associated with mortality in our study. In the subgroup of women, high homocysteine was associated with increased five-year risk of death

  5. Association between clinical condition and F-waves changes in the acute phase of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo José Luvizutto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To relate F-waves with clinical and laboratory exams in the acute phase of stroke. Methods Inclusion criteria for this cross-sectional study were: hemiplegia, absence of previous cranial trauma, myopathy, diabetes, alcoholism or other known causes of peripheral neuropathy, and normal sensory and motor conduction. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, glycemia, glucosilate hemoglobin, and CPK were obtained at admission by routine blood exams. After hospital admission, the F-wave latencies and persistence were obtained from the deep peroneal nerve using symmetrical techniques. Results Evaluation of 20 individuals – mean age 66 years, 50% male and 85% Caucasian – showed association of F-wave persistence with glycemia (r = 0.71; p < 0.001 and NIHSS categorized (NIHSS 1-7 = 65.0 x NIHSS 9-23 = 100; p = 0.004. Multivariate analysis found only association of F-wave persistence with glycemia β = 0.59 (0.44–0.74; p < 0.001. Conclusion The increase in the persistence of F-waves are associated with hyperglycemia in the acute phase of stroke.

  6. Preservation of structural brain network hubs is associated with less severe post-stroke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Kocher, Madison; Nesland, Travis; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke aphasia is typically associated with ischemic damage to cortical areas or with loss of connectivity among spared brain regions. It remains unclear whether the participation of spared brain regions as networks hubs affects the severity of aphasia. We evaluated language performance and magnetic resonance imaging from 44 participants with chronic aphasia post-stroke. The individual structural brain connectomes were constructed from diffusion tensor. Hub regions were defined in accordance with the rich club classification and studied in relation with language performance. Number of remaining left hemisphere rich club nodes was associated with aphasia, including comprehension, repetition and naming sub-scores. Importantly, among participants with relative preservation of regions of interest for language, aphasia severity was lessened if the region was not only spared, but also participated in the remaining network as a rich club node: Brodmann area (BA) 44/45 - repetition (p = 0.009), BA 39 - repetition (p = 0.045) and naming (p hubs is directly associated with aphasia severity after stroke.

  7. Angioinvasive Aspergillus-associated Stroke in an Immunocompetent Host Following Cardiac Surgery and ECMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi, Tapan; Madan, Nikhil; Majic, Tamara; Rosengart, Axel; Maya, Marcel; Bannykh, Serguei; Lahiri, Shouri

    2017-05-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis is an uncommon cause of stroke among immunocompetent patients and has not been reported in association with cardiac surgery or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We report the case of an immunocompetent host who developed aspergillus-associated stroke following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and ECMO. A 59-year-old woman developed cardiogenic shock after 3-vessel-CABG requiring intra-aortic balloon pump placement and subsequent veno-arterial ECMO. Noncontrast computed tomography of the brain was suggestive of multiple bihemispheric ischemic infarcts. Postmortem pathologic analysis revealed aspergillus-associated inflammation of blood vessels and ischemic and petechial hemorrhagic strokes in the affected territories. Ischemic infarcts in the setting of CABG or ECMO are often presumed to be thromboembolic from the heart or device, related to underlying hemodynamic instability, or due to a clinically apparent systemic infection such as endocarditis. This report suggests that invasive cerebral aspergillosis should be considered in seemingly immunocompetent patients following CABG or ECMO. The mechanism is unclear, but may be related to systemic inflammatory dysregulation resulting in increased susceptibility to uncommon pathogens.

  8. Associations of Ischemic Lesion Volume With Functional Outcome in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: 24-Hour Versus 1-Week Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucker, Amber; Boers, Anna M; Bot, Joseph C J; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Lingsma, Hester F; Yoo, Albert J; van Zwam, Wim H; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W J; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2017-05-01

    Ischemic lesion volume (ILV) on noncontrast computed tomography at 1 week can be used as a secondary outcome measure in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Twenty-four-hour ILV on noncontrast computed tomography has greater availability and potentially allows earlier estimation of functional outcome. We aimed to assess lesion growth 24 hours after stroke onset and compare the associations of 24-hour and 1-week ILV with functional outcome. We included 228 patients from MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands), who received noncontrast computed tomography at 24-hour and 1-week follow-up on which ILV was measured. Relative and absolute lesion growth was determined. Logistic regression models were constructed either including the 24-hour or including the 1-week ILV. Ordinal and dichotomous (0-2 and 3-6) modified Rankin scale scores were, respectively, used as primary and secondary outcome measures. Median ILV was 42 mL (interquartile range, 21-95 mL) and 64 mL (interquartile range: 30-120 mL) at 24 hours and 1 week, respectively. Relative lesion growth exceeding 30% occurred in 121 patients (53%) and absolute lesion growth exceeding 20 mL occurred in 83 patients (36%). Both the 24-hour and 1-week ILVs were similarly significantly associated with functional outcome (both P <0.001). In the logistic analyses, the areas under the curve of the receiver-operator characteristic curves were similar: 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.90) and 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.91) for including the 24-hour and 1-week ILV, respectively. Growth of ILV is common 24-hour poststroke onset. Nevertheless, the 24-hour ILV proved to be a valuable secondary outcome measure as it is equally strongly associated with functional outcome as the 1-week ILV. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN10888758. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Association of childhood body mass index and change in body mass index with first adult ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjærde, Line K.; Gamborg, Michael; Ängquist, Lars

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The incidence of ischemic stroke among young adults is rising and is potentially due to an increase in stroke risk factors occurring at younger ages, such as obesity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether childhood body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI are associated with adult ischemic....... Participants were 307 677 individuals (8899 ischemic stroke cases) with measured weight and height at ages 7 to 13 years. The dates of the analysis were September 1, 2015, to May 27, 2016. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Childhood BMI, change in BMI, and birth weight. Ischemic stroke events were divided into early...... (55 years) or late (>55 years) age at diagnosis. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 307 677 participants (approximately 49% female and 51% male). During the study period, 3529 women and 5370 men experienced an ischemic stroke. At all ages from 7 to 13 years, an above-average BMI z score...

  10. Higher education is associated with a lower risk of dementia after a stroke or TIA : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Mirza (Saira); M.L.P. Portegies (Marileen); F.J. Wolters (Frank J.); A. Hofman (Albert); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); M.A. Ikram (Arfan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Higher education is associated with a lower risk of dementia, possibly because of a higher tolerance to subclinical neurodegenerative pathology. Whether higher education also protects against dementia after clinical stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) remains

  11. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of Older Adults: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults aged 75 and older. Despite the effect of CVD on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, individuals aged 75 and older have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older adults with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older adults typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision-making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, a detailed review was conducted of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older adults. A pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision-making in older adults with CVD was found, as well as a paucity of data on the effect of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on outcomes that are particularly important to older adults, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older adults representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older adults in the study design. The results of these studies will provide the foundation for

  12. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke--A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Söder

    Full Text Available Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis-atherosclerosis paradigm.In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used.Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3% had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01, prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI (p = 0.03, and dental calculus (p = 0.017. In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02-4.74 for stroke.Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention.

  13. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke--A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-01-01

    Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis-atherosclerosis paradigm. In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3%) had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01), prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI) (p = 0.03), and dental calculus (p = 0.017). In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02-4.74) for stroke. Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention.

  14. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke – A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis–atherosclerosis paradigm. Methods In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Results Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3%) had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01), prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI) (p = 0.03), and dental calculus (p = 0.017). In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02–4.74) for stroke. Conclusion Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention. PMID:26405803

  15. Association of Childhood Body Mass Index and Change in Body Mass Index With First Adult Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjærde, Line K; Gamborg, Michael; Ängquist, Lars; Truelsen, Thomas C; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Baker, Jennifer L

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of ischemic stroke among young adults is rising and is potentially due to an increase in stroke risk factors occurring at younger ages, such as obesity. To investigate whether childhood body mass index (BMI) and change in BMI are associated with adult ischemic stroke and to assess whether the associations are age dependent or influenced by birth weight. This investigation was a population-based cohort study of schoolchildren born from 1930 to 1987, with follow-up through national health registers from 1977 to 2012 in Denmark. Participants were 307 677 individuals (8899 ischemic stroke cases) with measured weight and height at ages 7 to 13 years. The dates of the analysis were September 1, 2015, to May 27, 2016. Childhood BMI, change in BMI, and birth weight. Ischemic stroke events were divided into early (≤55 years) or late (>55 years) age at diagnosis. The study cohort comprised 307 677 participants (approximately 49% female and 51% male). During the study period, 3529 women and 5370 men experienced an ischemic stroke. At all ages from 7 to 13 years, an above-average BMI z score was positively associated with early ischemic stroke. At age 13 years, a BMI z score of 1 was associated with hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.26 (95% CI, 1.11-1.43) in women and 1.21 (95% CI, 1.10-1.33) in men. No significant associations were found for below-average BMI z scores. Among children with above-average BMI z scores at age 7 years, a score increase of 0.5 from ages 7 to 13 years was positively associated with early ischemic stroke in women (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.20) and in men (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.16). Similarly, among children with below-average BMI z scores at age 7 years, a score increase of 0.5 from ages 7 to 13 years was positively associated with early ischemic stroke in women (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23) and in men (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.18). Adjusting for birth weight minimally affected the associations. Independent of birth weight, above

  16. Inflammatory Mechanisms Associated with Skeletal Muscle Sequelae after Stroke: Role of Physical Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Junior, Hélio José; Gambassi, Bruno Bavaresco; Diniz, Tiego Aparecido; Fernandes, Isabela Maia da Cruz; Caperuto, Érico Chagas; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Lira, Fabio Santos

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory markers are increased systematically and locally (e.g., skeletal muscle) in stroke patients. Besides being associated with cardiovascular risk factors, proinflammatory cytokines seem to play a key role in muscle atrophy by regulating the pathways involved in this condition. As such, they may cause severe decrease in muscle strength and power, as well as impairment in cardiorespiratory fitness. On the other hand, physical exercise (PE) has been widely suggested as a powerful tool for treating stroke patients, since PE is able to regenerate, even if partially, physical and cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise in poststroke patients remain poorly understood. Thus, in this study we analyze the candidate mechanisms associated with muscle atrophy in stroke patients, as well as the modulatory effect of inflammation in this condition. Later, we suggest the two strongest anti-inflammatory candidate mechanisms, myokines and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, which may be activated by physical exercise and may contribute to a decrease in proinflammatory markers of poststroke patients. PMID:27647951

  17. Inflammatory Mechanisms Associated with Skeletal Muscle Sequelae after Stroke: Role of Physical Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio José Coelho Junior

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory markers are increased systematically and locally (e.g., skeletal muscle in stroke patients. Besides being associated with cardiovascular risk factors, proinflammatory cytokines seem to play a key role in muscle atrophy by regulating the pathways involved in this condition. As such, they may cause severe decrease in muscle strength and power, as well as impairment in cardiorespiratory fitness. On the other hand, physical exercise (PE has been widely suggested as a powerful tool for treating stroke patients, since PE is able to regenerate, even if partially, physical and cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise in poststroke patients remain poorly understood. Thus, in this study we analyze the candidate mechanisms associated with muscle atrophy in stroke patients, as well as the modulatory effect of inflammation in this condition. Later, we suggest the two strongest anti-inflammatory candidate mechanisms, myokines and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, which may be activated by physical exercise and may contribute to a decrease in proinflammatory markers of poststroke patients.

  18. Pain following stroke, initially and at 3 and 18 months after stroke, and its association with other disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, D K; Welmer, A-K

    2012-10-01

    A general hypothesis is that pain following stroke (PFS) causes disabilities. However, the clinical implication of PFS on other disabilities after stroke and vice versa has not been fully investigated. The aims of this observational study were to analyze the correlation between PFS and other disabilities at different time points after stroke, whether PFS can be a predictor of coming disabilities and whether other disabilities can be predictors of coming PFS. Patients with a first-ever stroke were assessed initially (n = 109), and at 3 (n = 95) and 18 months (n = 66) after stroke for PFS, mobility, self-care as well as touch, proprioceptive, muscle tone, and movement functions. PFS was correlated to impaired upper extremity movement function on all occasions, while the correlations between PFS and other disabilities varied across the three occasions. Initial PFS and PFS at 3 months did not independently predict coming disabilities. Initial mobility limitation independently predicted PFS at 3 months and impaired touch function, initially and at 3 months, independently predicted PFS at 18 months. No other disabilities independently predicted coming PFS. The present results do not support the hypothesis that PFS causes other disabilities. Our results indicate that PFS is correlated to other disabilities; however, no ultimate conclusions can be drawn on causality. PFS was not a predictor of coming disabilities, while some disabilities were predictors of coming PFS. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  19. Lesion location associated with balance recovery and gait velocity change after rehabilitation in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun Im; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Yoon, Seo Yeon

    2017-06-01

    Impaired gait function after stroke contributes strongly to overall patient disability. However, the response to rehabilitation varies between individuals. The aims of this study were to identify predictors of gait velocity change and to elucidate lesion location associated with change of balance and gait function. We reviewed 102 stroke patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to gait ability post-rehabilitation, and we analyzed differences in their characteristics, such as demographic information, lesion factors, and initial balance function. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the predictors of rehabilitation response. Lesion location and volume were measured on brain magnetic resonance images. We generated statistical maps of the lesions related to functional gains in gait and balance using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM). The group of patients who regained independent ambulation function showed a smaller lesion size, a shorter duration from stroke onset, and higher initial balance function. In the regression model, gait velocity changes were predicted with the initial Berg balance scale (BBS) and duration post-onset. Absolute BBS changes were also correlated with the duration post-onset and initial BBS, and relative BBS changes were predicted by the baseline BBS. Using VLSM, lesion locations associated with gait velocity changes and balance adjusting for other factors were the insula, internal capsule, and adjacent white matter. Initial balance function as well as the interval between stroke onset and the initiation of therapy might influence balance recovery and gait velocity changes. Damage to the insula and internal capsule also affected gait velocity change after rehabilitation.

  20. Association of American Indian cultural identity with physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Glen E; McDougall, Casey L; Dansie, Elizabeth; Garroutte, Eva; Buchwald, Dedra; Henderson, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Cultural factors are associated with health behaviors among American Indians. Accordingly, the objective of our study was to investigate whether cultural identity, defined as the primary language spoken at home, is associated with: 1) higher total physical activity levels, and 2) levels of leisure-time physical activity recommended for health benefits in a diverse sample of American Indians. Cross-sectional analysis of 5,207 American Indian adults 18 to 82 years. Participants resided on the Oglala Sioux (n=2,025) and Cheyenne River Sioux (n=1,528) reservations in South Dakota, and the Gila River Indian Community (n=1,654) in Arizona. Bicultural participants in South Dakota, but not Arizona, reported significantly higher total physical activity compared to the English-only group (Pcultures with which they identify are recommended.

  1. Meta-analysis in more than 17,900 cases of ischemic stroke reveals a novel association at 12q24.12

    OpenAIRE

    Kilarski, L. L.; Achterberg, S.; Devan, W. J.; Traylor, M.; Malik, R.; Lindgren, A.; Pare, G.; Sharma, P.; Slowik, A.; Thijs, V.; Walters, M.; Worrall, B. B.; Sale, M. M.; Algra, A.; Kappelle, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResults: In an overall analysis of 17,970 cases of ischemic stroke and 70,764 controls, we identified a novel association on chromosome 12q24 (rs10744777, odds ratio [OR] 1.10 [1.07-1.13], p 5 7.12 3 10-11) with ischemic stroke. The association was with all ischemic stroke rather than an individual stroke subtype, with similar effect sizes seen in different stroke subtypes. There was no association with intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 1.03 [0.90-1.17], p 5 0.695).Conclusion: Our resu...

  2. Diurnal Variation of Intravenous Thrombolysis Rates for Acute Ischemic Stroke and Associated Quality Performance Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Reuter

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionBased on data from the Baden-Wuerttemberg stroke registry, we aimed to explore the diurnal variation of acute ischemic stroke (IS care delivery.Materials and methods92,530 IS patients were included, of whom 37,471 (40% presented within an onset-to-door time ≤4.5 h. Daytime was stratified in 3-h time intervals and working vs. non-working hours. Stroke onset and hospital admission time, rate of door-to-neurological examination time ≤30 min, onset-/door-to-imaging time IV thrombolysis (IVT rates, and onset-/door-to-needle time were determined. Multivariable regression models were used stratified by stroke onset and hospital admission time to assess the relationship between IVT rates, quality performance parameters, and daytime. The time interval 0:00 h to 3:00 h and working hours, respectively, were taken as reference.ResultsThe IVT rate of the whole study population was strongly associated with the sleep–wake cycle. In patients presenting within the 4.5-h time window and potentially eligible for IVT stratification by hospital admission time identified two time intervals with lower IVT rates. First, between 3:01 h and 6:00 h (IVT rate 18% and likely attributed to in-hospital delays with the lowest diurnal rate of door-to-neurological examination time ≤30 min and the longest door-to-needle time Second, between 6:01 h and 15:00 h (IVT rate 23–25% compared to the late afternoon and evening hours (IVT rate 27–29% due to a longer onset-to-imaging time and door-to-imaging time. No evidence for a compromised stroke service during non-working hours was observed.ConclusionThe analysis provides evidence that acute IS care is subject to diurnal variation which may affect stroke outcome. An optimization of IS care aiming at constantly high IVT rates over the course of the day therefore appears desirable.

  3. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio is associated with thromboembolic stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertaş, Gökhan; Sönmez, Osman; Turfan, Murat; Kul, Seref; Erdoğan, Ercan; Tasal, Abdurrahman; Bacaksiz, Ahmet; Vatankulu, Mehmet Akif; Altıntaş, Ozge; Uyarel, Hüseyin; Göktekin, Omer

    2013-01-15

    Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the role of NLR in patients with thromboembolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to compare the NLR ratios between non-valvular AF patients with or without thromboembolic stroke. A total of 126 non-valvular AF patients with or without stroke were included in the study; 126 consecutive patients (52 males and 74 females), mean age, 70 ± 10.2 years old. No patient had a recent history of an acute infection or an inflammatory disease. Baseline NLR was measured by dividing neutrophil count to lymphocyte count. WBC count>12.000 cells per μL or 38 º are excluded from the study. Mean NLR was significantly higher among persons with stroke compared to individuals without a stroke (5.6 ± 3.4 vs. 3.1 ± 2.1, p=0.001). There were no significant differences in RDW levels between the two groups (p>0.05). HAS-BLED and CHADS(2) scores were significantly higher in the stroke group. Higher NLR, an emerging marker of inflammation, is associated with thromboembolic stroke in non-valvular AF patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Moyamoya syndrome as a risk factor for stroke in Saudi children: Novel and usual associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Amal Y.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Elgamal, Essam A.; Al-Salman, Mussaad M.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Othman, Saleh A.; El-Desouki, Mahmoud I.; Maldergem, L. V.

    2006-01-01

    To report on moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as a risk factor for stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children. The usual and novel associations of MMS in this cohort will also be described. Children with stroke were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology at King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February201 to March 2003 (retrospective study). Investigations for suspected cases included hemostatic assays, biochemical, and serological tests. Neuroimaging included CT, MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), single photon computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scan and conventional cerebral angiography. Moyamoya syndrome was the underlying risk factor for stroke in 6 (5.8%) of the 104 children (aged one month to 12 years). They were 4 females and 2 males. Their first cerebral ischemic event occurred at a mean age of 45 months (median = 44 months, range 17-66 months). In all 6 cases, MMS was associated with an underlying hematologic abnormality or other diseases. Protein C deficiency was identified in one girl and protein S deficiency in another. Two patients had retrospectively, sickle cell disease (SCD) and sickle cell-b-thalassemia (Sb-thalssemia), which had been associated in the latter with membranous ventricular septal defect. Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS, OMIM 100300) was associated with MMS in an 18-month-old girl. A 4-year-old boy had wrinkly skin syndrome (WWS, OMIM 278250) phenotype. The association of MMS and protein C deficiency was first reported in this cohort of patients, whereas the association of the syndrome with WWS and AOS has not, hitherto, been described. The 3 patients who had MMS associated with protein C deficiency, SCD, and AOS underwent successful revascularization surgery in the form of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis. Moyamoya syndrome constitutes an important risk factor of

  5. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  6. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2011 Membership Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2013-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to gather information on general demographics, employment-related characteristics, licensing, and professional affiliations. The surveys are used in the development of national media opportunities and public policy initiatives to help increase recognition for the field of…

  7. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2013 Membership Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to collect data regarding membership demographics as well as variables concerning the work environment for art therapists. These surveys can provide a detailed description of these characteristics and how they may change over time. This article statistically compares the…

  8. Associations among Asian Americans' Enculturation, Emotional Experiences, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y. Joel; Tran, Kimberly K.; Lai, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Using a computer-based text analysis of 218 Asian Americans' writing samples, the authors found that enculturation as well as use of negative emotion and positive emotion words were associated with depressive symptoms. Enculturation was also found to moderate the relation between use of negative emotion words and cognitive--affective depressive…

  9. Past and future American Psychological Association guidelines for statistical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finch, S; Thomason, N; Cumming, G

    2002-01-01

    We review the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA) since 1929 and document their advice for authors about statistical practice. Although the advice has been extended with each revision of the guidelines, it has largely focused on null hypothesis significance testing

  10. The American Psychiatric Association and the history of psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshbein, Laura

    2011-09-01

    The history committee within the American Psychiatric Association was actively involved in the history of psychiatry in the early decades of the twentieth century, as well as from 1942 to 2009.This paper explores the role of this committee in the context of changes in the psychiatric profession over the twentieth century.

  11. Independent Consulting and the American Evaluation Association: Twenty Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Deborah G.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of American Evaluation Association's (AEA) Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group (IC TIG). The TIG goes back a joint meeting held in San Francisco in 1984 of the Evaluation Network (ENet) and the Evaluation Research Society (ERS), two years before the organizations merged to become the AEA. On the fringes…

  12. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Young-Onset Stroke Identifies a Locus on Chromosome 10q25 Near HABP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.-C. Cheng (Yu-Ching); T.M. Stanne (Tara M.); A.-K. Giese (Anne-Katrin); W.K. Ho (Weang K.); M. Traylor (Matthew); P. Amouyel (Philippe); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); R. Malik (Rainer); H. Xu (Huichun); T. Kittner (Thomas); J.W. Cole (John W.); J.R. O´Connell; J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed (Asif); W. Zhao (Wei); S.T. Engelter (Stefan); C. Grond-Ginsbach (Caspar); Y. Kamatani (Yoichiro); M. Lathrop (Mark); D. Leys (Didier); V. Thijs (Vincent); T.M. Metso (Tiina M.); T. Tatlisumak (Turgut); A. Pezzini (Alessandro); E.A. Parati (Eugenio A.); B. Norrving (Bo); S. Bevan (Steve); P.M. Rothwell (Peter); C. Sudlow (Cathie); A. Slowik (Agnieszka); A.G. Lindgren (Arne G.); M. Walters (Matthew); J. Jannes (Jim); J. Shen (Jess); D.R. Crosslin (David); K.F. Doheny (Kimberly); C.C. Laurie (Cathy); S.M. Kanse (Sandip ); J.C. Bis (Joshua); M. Fornage (Myriam); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); J. Hopewell; K. Strauch (Konstantin); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); C. Gieger (Christian); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); A. Peters (Annette); C. Meisinger (Christine); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); W.T. Longstreth Jr; J.F. Meschia (James F.); S. Seshadri (Sudha); P. Sharma (Pankaj); B.B. Worrall (Bradford B.); C. Jern (Christina); C. Levi (Christopher); C. Kubisch (Christian); G. Boncoraglio (Giorgio Battista); H.S. Markus (Hugh); S. Debette (Stéphanie); A. Rolfs (Arndt); D. Saleheen; B.D. Mitchell (Braxton)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose - Although a genetic contribution to ischemic stroke is well recognized, only a handful of stroke loci have been identified by large-scale genetic association studies to date. Hypothesizing that genetic effects might be stronger for early-versus late-onset stroke,

  13. Identifying the brain regions associated with acute spasticity in patients diagnosed with an ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Spasticity is a common impairment found in patients that have been diagnosed with a stroke. Little is known about the pathophysiology of spasticity at the level of the brain. This retrospective study was performed to identify an association between the area of the brain affected by an ischemic stroke and the presence of acute spasticity. Physical and occupational therapy assessments from all patients (n = 441) that had suffered a stroke and were admitted into a local hospital over a 4-year period were screened for inclusion in this study. Subjects that fit the inclusion criteria were grouped according to the presence (n = 42) or absence (n = 129) of acute spasticity by the Modified Ashworth Scale score given during the hospital admission assessment. Magnetic resonance images from 20 subjects in the spasticity group and 52 from the control group were then compared using lesion density plots and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. An association of acute spasticity with the gray matter regions of the insula, basal ganglia, and thalamus was found in this study. White matter tracts including the pontine crossing tract, corticospinal tract, internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus were also found to be significantly associated with acute spasticity. This is the first study to describe an association between a region of the brain affected by an infarct and the presence of acute spasticity. Understanding the regions associated with acute spasticity will aid in understanding the pathophysiology of this musculoskeletal impairment at the level of the brain.

  14. Stem cell therapies in preclinical models of stroke associated with aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel ePopa-Wagner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke has limited treatment options, demanding a vigorous search for new therapeutic strategies. Initial enthusiasm to stimulate restorative processes in the ischemic brain by means of cell-based therapies has meanwhile converted into a more balanced view recognizing impediments related to unfavorable environments that are in part related to aging processes. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable and clinically important to test the efficacy of cell therapies in aged brain microenvironments. Although widely believed to be refractory to regeneration, recent studies using both neural precursor cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for stroke therapy suggest that the aged rat brain is not refractory to cell-based therapy, and that it also supports plasticity and remodeling. Yet, important differences exist in the aged compared with young brain, i.e., the accelerated progression of ischemic injury to brain infarction, the reduced rate of endogenous neurogenesis and the delayed initiation of neurological recovery. Pitfalls in the development of cell-based therapies may also be related to age-associated comorbidities, e.g., diabetes or hyperlipidemia, which may result in maladaptive or compromised brain remodeling, respectively. These age-related aspects should be carefully considered in the clinical translation of restorative therapies.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke associated with nephrotic syndrome: Incidence and significance — Retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Iwaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report 10 cases with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS with nephrotic syndrome (NS, and clarified its incidence and clinical characteristics. The patients having albumin less than 3.0 g/dl and serum cholesterol greater than 250 mg/dl at the same time were retrospectively screened from 11,161 cases of stroke. Furthermore, the patients of AIS showing heavy proteinuria were selected. The 10 cases were diagnosed as AIS with NS. Its incidence was 0.09% of all kinds of stroke and 0.12% of AIS. Their subtypes were 6 large-artery atherosclerosis, 3 small-vessel occlusion, and 1 cardioembolism. We carried out a retrospective cohort study to assess the association between NS and atherosclerosis progression in AIS patients. Seven AIS patients with NS due to diabetic nephropathy (cases; NS group were compared with patients with AIS and diabetes mellitus (DM without NS (control group. Control group subjects were matched in a 2:1 ratio to cases by age, sex, use of medications for DM, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level. The NS group had high cerebral artery atherosclerosis scores, especially in the anterior circulation. The NS group demonstrated atherosclerosis of the internal carotid and lower extremity arteries, although there were no statistical differences between the two groups. Study subjects had high serum fibrinogen and D-dimer levels, suggesting that AIS patients with NS have a greater degree of hypercoagulability than AIS patients without NS.

  16. Clinical Variables Associated with Hydration Status in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Acute stroke patients with dysphagia are at increased risk for poor hydration. Dysphagia management practices may directly impact hydration status. This study examined clinical factors that might impact hydration status in acute ischemic stroke patients with dysphagia. A retrospective chart review was completed on 67 ischemic stroke patients who participated in a prior study of nutrition and hydration status during acute care. Prior results indicated that patients with dysphagia demonstrated elevated BUN/Cr compared to non-dysphagia cases during acute care and that BUN/Cr increased selectively in dysphagic patients. This chart review evaluated clinical variables potentially impacting hydration status: diuretics, parenteral fluids, tube feeding, oral diet, and nonoral (NPO) status. Exposure to any variable and number of days of exposure to each variable were examined. Dysphagia cases demonstrated significantly more NPO days, tube fed days, and parenteral fluid days, but not oral fed days, or days on diuretics. BUN/Cr values at discharge were not associated with NPO days, parenteral fluid days, oral fed days, or days on diuretics. Patients on modified solid diets had significantly higher mean BUN/Cr values at discharge (27.12 vs. 17.23) as did tube fed patients (28.94 vs. 18.66). No difference was noted between these subgroups at baseline (regular diet vs. modified solids diets). Any modification of solid diets (31.11 vs. 17.23) or thickened liquids (28.50 vs. 17.81) resulted in significantly elevated BUN/Cr values at discharge. Liquid or diet modifications prescribed for acute stroke patients with dysphagia may impair hydration status in these patients.

  17. Clinical and imaging features associated with an increased risk of early and late stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naylor, A R; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T V

    2015-01-01

    intracranial disease; (v) a failure to recruit intracranial collaterals; (vi) low GSM; (vii) MR diagnosis of intra-plaque haemorrhage; (vii) spontaneous embolisation on TCD; and (viii) increased FDG uptake in the carotid plaque on PET. Clinical/imaging parameters associated with a lower risk of stroke include......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to identify clinical and/or imaging parameters that are associated with an increased (decreased) risk of early/late stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease. IN THE FIRST 14 DAYS: Natural history studies suggest that 8-15% of patients with 50......-99% stenoses will suffer a stroke within 72 hours of their index symptom. Currently, there are insufficient validated data to identify highest-risk patients for emergency carotid endarterectomy (CEA), but an increased risk of stroke appears to be predicted by (i) an ABCD(2) score of 4-7; (ii) the presence...

  18. Association between polyvascular atherosclerosis and estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with ischaemic stroke: data analysis of the patients in the Chinese National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xia; Chen, Yu; Jing, Jing; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Liu, Liping; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Li, Chao; Wang, Yilong

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ischemic stroke (IS) patients with polyvascular disease (PolyVD) and analysed the relationship between PolyVD and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in IS patients. Data from 9152 consecutive IS patients from the China National Stroke Registry were analysed. PolyVD was defined as patients with IS and coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Chronic kidney disease was defined as eGFR stroke, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. PolyVD was observed in 1387 of 9152 patients (15.16%). Among these patients, 1351 (14.76%) had CAD, 56 (0.61%) had PAD, and 20 (0.22%) had CAD and PAD in addition to IS. The prevalence of CKD in IS patients with PolyVD and IS alone was 29.56 and 16.28%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The PolyVD group had a significantly higher risk of lower eGFR (OR: 1.414, 95% CI: 1.202-1.665, P < 0.0001) compared with patients with IS alone. IS patients with PolyVD had a high prevalence of CKD, and PolyVD was independently associated with a low eGFR.

  19. The associations between insomnia and health-related quality of life in rehabilitation units at 1month after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Hyoung; Jung, Han-Young; Choi, Ha-Yoon; Park, Chan-Hyuk; Kim, Eun-Suk; Lee, Sook-Joung; Ko, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Joa, Kyung-Lim

    2017-05-01

    The principal objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between insomnia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the early stage of stroke rehabilitation. The subjects were 214 first-time stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit at one of three Korean hospitals. Within 7days after stroke, functions were evaluated using; the Berg Balance Scale, the Modified Barthel Index, the Mini Mental State Examination, the Frontal Assessment Battery, Screening Tests for Aphasia and Neurologic-Communication Disorders, and the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Insomnia, depression, anxiety, and HRQoL were investigated at one month after stroke. Insomnia was defined as presence of at least one of the four following; difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and non-restorative sleep. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form Health survey SF-8. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between insomnia and HRQoL. The prevalence of insomnia at one month after stroke was 59.5%. Patients with insomnia were more likely to be older and female and to have depression and anxiety. Patients with insomnia had poorer physical and mental HRQoL. By multivariate analyses, physical HRQoL was significantly associated with type of stroke, hypnotic usage, balancing function, and insomnia. Mental HRQoL was significantly associated with balancing function, depression, and insomnia. Insomnia was found to be negatively associated with physical and mental HRQoL in stroke patients during the early stage of rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolated insular strokes and plasma MR-proANP levels are associated with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Frontzek

    Full Text Available In this study, we assessed the relationship of insular strokes and plasma MR-proANP levels with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation (NDAF.This study is based on a prospective acute stroke cohort (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00390962. Patient eligibility was dependent on the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke, absence of previous stroke based on past medical history and MRI, no history of AF and congestive heart failure (cohort A and, additionally, no stroke lesion size ≥ 20 mL (sub-cohort A*. AF, the primary endpoint, was detected on 24-hour electrocardiography and/or echocardiography. Involvement of the insula was assessed by two experienced readers on MRI blinded to clinical data. MR-proANP levels were obtained through a novel sandwich immunoassay. Logistic-regression-models were fitted to estimate odds ratios for the association of insular strokes and MR-proANP with NDAF. The discriminatory accuracy of insular strokes and MR-proANP was assessed by a model-wise comparison of the area under the receiver-operating-characteristics-curve (AUC with known predictors of AF.104 (cohort A and 83 (cohort A* patients fulfilled above-mentioned criteria. Patients with isolated insular strokes had a 10.7-fold higher odds of NDAF than patients with a small ischemic stroke at any other location. The AUC of multivariate logistic regression models for the prediction of NDAF improved significantly when adding stroke location and MR-proANP levels. Moreover, MR-proANP levels remained significantly elevated throughout the acute hospitalization period in patients with NDAF compared to those without.Isolated insular strokes and plasma MR-proANP levels on admission are independent predictors of NDAF and significantly improve the prediction accuracy of identifying patients with NDAF compared to known predictors including age, the NIHSS and lesion size. To accelerate accurate diagnosis and enhance secondary prevention in acute stroke, higher levels of MR

  1. What You Need to Know about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain. The other kind of stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks ... are very common among African Americans. The best treatment for stroke is prevention. You can reduce your ...

  2. A genome-wide association study of hypertension and blood pressure in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebowale Adeyemo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for the existence of genetic susceptibility variants for the common form of hypertension ("essential hypertension" remains weak and inconsistent. We sought genetic variants underlying blood pressure (BP by conducting a genome-wide association study (GWAS among African Americans, a population group in the United States that is disproportionately affected by hypertension and associated complications, including stroke and kidney diseases. Using a dense panel of over 800,000 SNPs in a discovery sample of 1,017 African Americans from the Washington, D.C., metropolitan region, we identified multiple SNPs reaching genome-wide significance for systolic BP in or near the genes: PMS1, SLC24A4, YWHA7, IPO7, and CACANA1H. Two of these genes, SLC24A4 (a sodium/potassium/calcium exchanger and CACNA1H (a voltage-dependent calcium channel, are potential candidate genes for BP regulation and the latter is a drug target for a class of calcium channel blockers. No variant reached genome wide significance for association with diastolic BP (top scoring SNP rs1867226, p = 5.8 x 10(-7 or with hypertension as a binary trait (top scoring SNP rs9791170, p = 5.1 x 10(-7. We replicated some of the significant SNPs in a sample of West Africans. Pathway analysis revealed that genes harboring top-scoring variants cluster in pathways and networks of biologic relevance to hypertension and BP regulation. This is the first GWAS for hypertension and BP in an African American population. The findings suggests that, in addition to or in lieu of relying solely on replicated variants of moderate-to-large effect reaching genome-wide significance, pathway and network approaches may be useful in identifying and prioritizing candidate genes/loci for further experiments.

  3. Predictors of Stroke After Transient Ischemic Attack in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Laura L; Watson, Christopher G; Kapur, Kush; Danehy, Amy R; Rivkin, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) in children has received far less attention compared with TIA in adults. The risk factors of stroke after TIA in children are relatively unknown. We aimed to determine the percentage of children who have stroke after TIA and the risk factors associated with stroke after TIA. We searched the medical records at Boston Children's Hospital for the year 2010 to find children who were evaluated for TIA to determine associated risk factors of stroke after TIA. We included children who were evaluated in 2009 through 2010 for TIA and had magnetic resonance imaging. We examined follow-up imaging through August 2014 for subsequent stroke. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for factors in our cohort who are associated with stroke after presentation with TIA. We identified 63 children who experienced a TIA. The mean time of imaging follow-up was 4.5 years after TIA presentation. Of the 63 children, 10 (16%) developed radiological evidence of ischemic cerebral injury within the follow-up period. Four of the 10 (6%) demonstrated diffusion abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging at TIA presentation, whereas 8 (13%) had a stroke after their TIA. Arteriopathy, female sex, and autoimmune disorders were significantly associated with stroke after TIA. In our cohort of children, stroke occurred after TIA at a rate similar to that seen in adults, but the risk factors for stroke after TIA in children are different. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Association between Severe Upper Limb Spasticity and Brain Lesion Location in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Picelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Association between the site of brain injury and poststroke spasticity is poorly understood. The present study investigated whether lesion analysis could document brain regions associated with the development of severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 39 chronic stroke patients. Spasticity was assessed at the affected upper limb with the modified Ashworth scale (shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers. Brain lesions were traced from magnetic resonance imaging performed within the first 7 days after stroke and region of interest images were generated. The association between severe upper limb spasticity (modified Ashworth scale ≥2 and lesion location was determined with the voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping method implemented in MRIcro software. Colored maps representing the z statistics were generated and overlaid onto the automated anatomical labeling and the Johns Hopkins University white matter templates provided with MRIcron. Thalamic nuclei were identified with the Talairach Daemon software. Injuries to the insula, the thalamus, the basal ganglia, and white matter tracts (internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus were significantly associated with severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. Further advances in our understanding of the neural correlates of spasticity may lead to early targeted rehabilitation when key regions are damaged.

  5. Symptoms of Insomnia and Sleep Duration and Their Association with Incident Strokes: Findings from the Population-Based MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, A Katharina; Stöckl, Doris; Heier, Margit; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Meisinger, Christa

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between symptoms of insomnia and sleep duration and incident total (non-fatal plus fatal) strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in a large cohort of men and women from the general population in Germany. In four population-based MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease)/KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) surveys conducted between 1984 and 2001, 17,604 men and women (aged 25 to 74 years) were asked about issues like sleep, health behavior, and medical history. In subsequent surveys and mortality follow-ups, incident stroke cases (cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, unknown stroke type) were gathered prospectively until 2009. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using sequential Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 917 strokes (710 non-fatal strokes and 207 fatal strokes) were observed. Trouble falling asleep and difficulty staying asleep were not significantly related to any incident stroke outcome in either sex in the multivariable models. Among men, the HR for the association between short (≤5 hours) and long (≥10 hours) daily sleep duration and total strokes were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.01-2.06) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16-2.29), after adjustment for basic confounding variables. As for non-fatal strokes and fatal strokes, in the analyses adjusted for age, survey, education, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the increased risks persisted, albeit somewhat attenuated, but no longer remained significant. Among women, in the multivariable analyses the quantity of sleep was also not related to any stroke outcome. In the present study, symptoms of insomnia and exceptional sleep duration were not significantly predictive of incident total strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in

  6. Symptoms of Insomnia and Sleep Duration and Their Association with Incident Strokes: Findings from the Population-Based MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Katharina Helbig

    Full Text Available To examine the relationship between symptoms of insomnia and sleep duration and incident total (non-fatal plus fatal strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in a large cohort of men and women from the general population in Germany.In four population-based MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease/KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg surveys conducted between 1984 and 2001, 17,604 men and women (aged 25 to 74 years were asked about issues like sleep, health behavior, and medical history. In subsequent surveys and mortality follow-ups, incident stroke cases (cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, unknown stroke type were gathered prospectively until 2009. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated using sequential Cox proportional hazards regression models.During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 917 strokes (710 non-fatal strokes and 207 fatal strokes were observed. Trouble falling asleep and difficulty staying asleep were not significantly related to any incident stroke outcome in either sex in the multivariable models. Among men, the HR for the association between short (≤5 hours and long (≥10 hours daily sleep duration and total strokes were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.01-2.06 and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16-2.29, after adjustment for basic confounding variables. As for non-fatal strokes and fatal strokes, in the analyses adjusted for age, survey, education, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the increased risks persisted, albeit somewhat attenuated, but no longer remained significant. Among women, in the multivariable analyses the quantity of sleep was also not related to any stroke outcome.In the present study, symptoms of insomnia and exceptional sleep duration were not significantly predictive of incident total strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in

  7. 2012 Annual report of the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Provides the 2012 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In 2012, APA celebrated its 120th anniversary. It has grown from its original 31 members to the largest association of psychologists in the United States and a worldwide leader within the discipline. This edition of the report introduces each directorate and office within APA and talks about their goals and objectives. the president of APA, Dr. Norman Anderson, also gives a brief report which updates you on the activities of the association during its 120th anniversary as the professional home for psychologists and an advocate for the discipline. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Shriner

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans.

  9. Associations Between Collateral Status and Thrombus Characteristics and Their Impact in Anterior Circulation Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Heitor C; Treurniet, Kilian M; Dutra, Bruna G; Jansen, Ivo G H; Boers, Anna M M; Santos, Emilie M M; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Dippel, Diederik W J; van der Lugt, Aad; van Zwam, Wim H; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Lingsma, Hester F; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Yoo, Albert J; Marquering, Henk A; Majoie, Charles B L M

    2018-02-01

    Thrombus characteristics and collateral score are associated with functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. It has been suggested that they affect each other. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between clot burden score, thrombus perviousness, and collateral score and to determine whether collateral score influences the association of thrombus characteristics with functional outcome. Patients with baseline thin-slice noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography images from the MR CLEAN trial (Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands) were included (n=195). Collateral score and clot burden scores were determined on baseline computed tomographic angiography. Thrombus attenuation increase was determined by comparing thrombus density on noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography using a semiautomated method. The association of collateral score with clot burden score and thrombus attenuation increase was evaluated with linear regression. Mediation and effect modification analyses were used to assess the influence of collateral score on the association of clot burden score and thrombus attenuation increase with functional outcome. A higher clot burden score (B=0.063; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.118) and a higher thrombus attenuation increase (B=0.014; 95% confidence interval, 0.003-0.026) were associated with higher collateral score. Collateral score mediated the association of clot burden score with functional outcome. The association between thrombus attenuation increase and functional outcome was modified by the collateral score, and this association was stronger in patients with moderate and good collaterals. Patients with lower thrombus burden and higher thrombus perviousness scores had higher collateral score. The positive effect of thrombus perviousness on clinical outcome was only present in patients with

  10. Combined life satisfaction of persons with stroke and their caregivers: associations with caregiver burden and the impact of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Koch Lena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the life satisfaction of the person with stroke combined with their caregiver, i.e. the dyad, despite the fact that life satisfaction is an important rehabilitation outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the dyads combined life satisfaction and to understand this in relationship to the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life and caregiver burden. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the life satisfaction of persons and their informal caregivers was measured in 81 dyads one year post stroke. Their global life satisfaction, measured with LiSat-11, was combined to a dyad score and the dyads were then categorized as satisfied, dissatisfied or discordant. The groups were compared and analyzed regarding levels of caregiver burden, measured with the Caregiver Burden scale, and the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life, measured with the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS. Results The satisfied dyads comprised 40%, dissatisfied 26% and those that were discordant 34%. The satisfied dyads reported a significantly lower impact of the stroke in everyday life compared with the dyads that were not satisfied. As expected, dyads that were not satisfied reported a significantly greater caregiver burden compared with the satisfied dyads. The discordant group was further broken down into a group of dissatisfied and satisfied caregivers. The caregivers that were not satisfied in the discordant group perceived a significantly greater level of caregiver burden compared with the satisfied group. Even caregivers who were satisfied with life but whose care recipients were not satisfied reported caregiver burden. Conclusions Measuring combined life satisfaction provides a unique focus and appears to be a feasible way of attaining the dyads' perspective. The findings suggest that those dyads with a discordant life satisfaction could be vulnerable because of the caregivers' reported caregiver burden. These findings

  11. Combined life satisfaction of persons with stroke and their caregivers: associations with caregiver burden and the impact of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Aileen L; Eriksson, Gunilla; von Koch, Lena; Tham, Kerstin

    2011-01-11

    Little is known about the life satisfaction of the person with stroke combined with their caregiver, i.e. the dyad, despite the fact that life satisfaction is an important rehabilitation outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the dyads combined life satisfaction and to understand this in relationship to the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life and caregiver burden. In this cross-sectional study, the life satisfaction of persons and their informal caregivers was measured in 81 dyads one year post stroke. Their global life satisfaction, measured with LiSat-11, was combined to a dyad score and the dyads were then categorized as satisfied, dissatisfied or discordant. The groups were compared and analyzed regarding levels of caregiver burden, measured with the Caregiver Burden scale, and the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life, measured with the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). The satisfied dyads comprised 40%, dissatisfied 26% and those that were discordant 34%. The satisfied dyads reported a significantly lower impact of the stroke in everyday life compared with the dyads that were not satisfied. As expected, dyads that were not satisfied reported a significantly greater caregiver burden compared with the satisfied dyads. The discordant group was further broken down into a group of dissatisfied and satisfied caregivers. The caregivers that were not satisfied in the discordant group perceived a significantly greater level of caregiver burden compared with the satisfied group. Even caregivers who were satisfied with life but whose care recipients were not satisfied reported caregiver burden. Measuring combined life satisfaction provides a unique focus and appears to be a feasible way of attaining the dyads' perspective. The findings suggest that those dyads with a discordant life satisfaction could be vulnerable because of the caregivers' reported caregiver burden. These findings support the importance of a dyadic perspective and add to the

  12. Nursing Roles within a Stroke Telemedicine Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terri-Ellen J. Kiernan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Time sensitive acute stroke treatments and the growing shortage of vascular neurologists compound to create a gap in the delivery of care to meet the American Stroke Association guidelines in underserviced regions. Audio/video consultation (telemedicine, which has been evolving since the late 1990's, is a putative solution. While telemedicine can serve as a valuable facilitative tool, the telestroke consultation is only one piece of a complex collaboration between hub and spoke environments and clinical personnel. The growing use of telemedicine in stroke offers more opportunities for all nurses to participate in the continuum of cerebrovascular disease care. A review of this collaboration will include but will not be limited to: algorithms of the acute stroke evaluation, hub and spoke staff meetings, stroke education for spoke staff, and patient follow–up post acute treatment. Our team's telemedicine experience, utilizing research, education, and clinical practice, will be described.

  13. Inflammatory Stroke Extracellular Vesicles Induce Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Davis, Simon; Fischer, Roman; Dickens, Alex M; Neuhaus, Ain A; Burgess, Annette I; Rothwell, Peter M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are protein-lipid complexes released from cells, as well as actively exocytosed, as part of normal physiology, but also during pathological processes such as those occurring during a stroke. Our aim was to determine the inflammatory potential of stroke EVs. EVs were quantified and analyzed in the sera of patients after an acute stroke (size, is significantly increased in stroke patients when compared to age-matched controls. Proteomic analysis reveals an overall increase in acute phase proteins, including C-reactive protein. EV fractions applied to monocyte-differentiated macrophage cultures induced inflammatory gene expression. Together these data show that EVs from stroke patients are proinflammatory in nature and are capable of inducing inflammation in immune cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite.......57-1.32). CONCLUSION: Lower executive function, but not memory, is associated with higher risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Lower executive function, as an independent risk indicator, might better reflect brain vascular pathologies....

  15. CDKN2B methylation is associated with carotid artery calcification in ischemic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shuyu Zhou; Yumeng Zhang; Li Wang; Zhizhong Zhang; Biyang Cai; Keting Liu; Hao Zhang; Minhui Dai; Lingli Sun; Xiaomeng Xu; Huan Cai; Xinfeng Liu; Guangming Lu; Gelin Xu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B (CDKN2A/2B) near chromosome 9p21 have been associated with both atherosclerosis and artery calcification, but the underlying mechanisms remained largely unknown. Considering that CDKN2A/2B is a frequently reported site for DNA methylation, this study aimed to evaluate whether carotid artery calcification (CarAC) is related to methylation levels of CDKN2A/2B in patients with ischemic stroke. Methods DNA methylation levels of CDKN2A/2B were mea...

  16. Obesity increases risk of ischemic stroke in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew B; Cole, John W; McArdle, Patrick F; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Ryan, Kathleen A; Sparks, Mary J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Body mass index has been associated with ischemic stroke in older populations, but its association with stroke in younger populations is not known. In light of the current obesity epidemic in the United States, the potential impact of obesity on stroke risk in young adults deserves attention. A population-based case-control study design with 1201 cases and 1154 controls was used to investigate the relationship of obesity and young onset ischemic stroke. Stroke cases were between the ages of 15 and 49 years. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between body mass index and ischemic stroke with and without adjustment for comorbid conditions associated with stroke. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, and ethnicity, obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) was associated with an increased stroke risk (odds ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-1.94) although this increased risk was highly attenuated and not statistically significant after adjustment for smoking, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. These results indicate that obesity is a risk factor for young onset ischemic stroke and suggest that this association may be partially mediated through hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or other variables associated with these conditions. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied the ...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  18. Risk of Stroke or Death Is Associated With the Timing of Carotid Artery Stenting for Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis: A Secondary Data Analysis of the German Statutory Quality Assurance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantilas, Pavlos; Kuehnl, Andreas; Kallmayer, Michael; Knappich, Christoph; Schmid, Sofie; Breitkreuz, Thorben; Zimmermann, Alexander; Eckstein, Hans-Henning

    2018-03-27

    Subgroup analyses from randomized trials indicate that the time interval between the neurologic index event and carotid artery stenting is associated with periprocedural stroke and death rates in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. The aim of this article is to analyze whether this observation holds true under routine conditions in Germany. Secondary data analysis was done on 4717 elective carotid artery stenting procedures that were performed for symptomatic carotid stenosis. The patient cohort was divided into 4 groups according to the time interval between the index event and intervention (group I 0-2, II 3-7, III 8-14, and IV 15-180 days). Primary outcome was any in-hospital stroke or death. For risk-adjusted analyses, a multilevel multivariable regression model was used. The in-hospital stroke or death rate was 3.7% in total and 6.0%, 4.4%, 2.4%, and 3.0% in groups I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Adjusted analysis showed a decreased risk for any stroke or death in group III, a decreased risk for any major stroke or death in groups III and IV, and a decreased risk for any death in groups II and III compared to the reference group I. A short time interval between the neurologic index event and carotid artery stenting of up to 7 days is associated with an increased risk for stroke or death under routine conditions in Germany. Although results cannot prove causal relationships, carotid artery stenting may be accompanied by an increased risk of stroke or death during the early period after the index event. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  19. Tooth Loss Is Associated with Brain White Matter Change and Silent Infarction among Adults without Dementia and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Yang-Ki; Park, Hyunyoung; Cheong, Jin-Sung; Yang, Hyunduk; Lee, Sungik; Do, Seung-Yeon; Kang, Ji-Sook

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a predictor of stroke and cognitive impairment. The association between the number of lost teeth (an indicator of periodontal disease) and silent infarcts and cerebral white matter changes on brain CT was investigated in community-dwelling adults without dementia or stroke. Dental examination and CT were performed in 438 stroke- and dementia-free subjects older than 50 yr (mean age, 63 ± 7.9 yr), who were recruited for an early health check-up program as part of the Prevention of Stroke and Dementia (PRESENT) project between 2009 and 2010. In unadjusted analyses, the odds ratio (OR) for silent cerebral infarcts and cerebral white matter changes for subjects with 6-10 and > 10 lost teeth was 2.3 (95% CI, 1.38-4.39; P = 0.006) and 4.2 (95% CI, 1.57-5.64; P dementia-free adults. PMID:23772160

  20. Cancer in young adults with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Karoliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Haapaniemi, Elena; Melkas, Susanna; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. Little is known about cancer among young adults with ischemic stroke. We studied the frequency of cancer and its association with long-term risk of death among young patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. 1002 patients aged 15 to 49 years, registered in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry, and with a median follow-up of 10.0 years (interquartile range 6.5-13.8) after stroke were included. Historical and follow-up data were derived from the Finnish Care Register and Statistics Finland. Survival between groups was compared with the Kaplan-Meier life-table method, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify factors associated with mortality. One or more cancer diagnosis was made in 77 (7.7%) patients, of whom 39 (3.9%) had cancer diagnosed prestroke. During the poststroke follow-up, 41 (53.2%) of the cancer patients died. Median time from prestroke cancer to stroke was 4.9 (1.0-9.5) years and from stroke to poststroke cancer was 6.7 (2.7-10.9) years. Poststroke cancer was associated with age>40 years, heavy drinking, and cigarette smoking. The cumulative mortality was significantly higher among the cancer patients (68.6%, 95% confidence interval 52.0%-85.3%) compared with patients without cancer (19.7%, 95% confidence interval 16.3%-23.2%). Active cancer at index stroke, melanoma, and lung/respiratory tract cancer had the strongest independent association with death during the follow-up when adjusted for known poststroke mortality prognosticators. Cancer, and especially active cancer and no other apparent cause for stroke, is associated with unfavorable survival among young stroke patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Chromosome 9p21 genetic variants are associated with myocardial infarction but not with ischemic stroke in a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Tai, Chih-Ta; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Lin, Ruey-Tay

    2011-08-01

    Genetic variants on chromosome 9p21 confer a robust risk for coronary artery disease but inconsistent risk for stroke. This study investigated whether such genetic variants exert differential risks on myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke in a Taiwanese population. The study recruited 425 MI patients, 687 patients with ischemic stroke, and 1377 healthy controls. Four key single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 9p21 were genotyped. Multivariate permutation analyses demonstrated that the risk T allele of rs1333040 and G allele of rs2383207 were associated with MI (P = 0.045 and 0.002, respectively). Subjects with the rs2383207 GG genotype had a 1.85-fold (P = 0.021) risk for MI when compared with the subjects with the AA genotype. Further analysis showed that significant results only exist in the young MI group (stroke (adjusted P ranged from 0.097 to 0.540). Haplotype analysis showed global P values of 0.032 for MI and 0.290 for stroke. Genetic variations in the 9p21 region are associated with MI but not with stroke in a Taiwanese population. Early-onset MI was more likely to carry the risk genotypes of 9p21 SNPs.

  2. Stroke Location Is an Independent Predictor of Cognitive Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Fanny; Sagnier, Sharmila; Asselineau, Julien; Bigourdan, Antoine; Guttmann, Charles R; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Poli, Mathilde; Renou, Pauline; Perez, Paul; Dousset, Vincent; Sibon, Igor; Tourdias, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    months post stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. 2009 American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, P

    2010-08-01

    The American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, published in 2009, provide valuable recommendations based on current evidence. Inevitably, controversies and uncertainties will continue to challenge clinicians and patients. On topics where evidence is not clear-cut, judgement may be coloured by pre-existing practises and the structure of the health service in each country, so one has to be aware of the pitfalls of transferring recommendations to one's own practise.

  4. Causal Associations of Adiposity and Body Fat Distribution With Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke Subtypes, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Caroline E; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Palmer, Tom M; White, Jon; Prieto-Merino, David; Zabaneh, Delilah; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Wong, Andrew; Warren, Helen R; McLachlan, Stela; Trompet, Stella; Moldovan, Max; Morris, Richard W; Sofat, Reecha; Kumari, Meena; Hyppönen, Elina; Jefferis, Barbara J; Gaunt, Tom R; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Zhou, Ang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Mutsert, Renée de; Noordam, Raymond; Caulfield, Mark J; Jukema, J Wouter; Worrall, Bradford B; Munroe, Patricia B; Menon, Usha; Power, Chris; Kuh, Diana; Lawlor, Debbie A; Humphries, Steve E; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Sattar, Naveed; Kivimaki, Mika; Price, Jacqueline F; Davey Smith, George; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon D; Holmes, Michael V; Casas, Juan P

    2017-06-13

    . Central adiposity may have a stronger effect on stroke risk. Future estimates of the burden of adiposity on health should include measures of central and general adiposity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Genome-wide association analysis of young onset stroke identifies a locus on chromosome 10q25 near HABP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Stanne, Tara M.; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Ho, Weang Kee; Traylor, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Malik, Rainer; Xu, Huichun; Kittner, Steven J.; Cole, John W.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Zhao, Wei; Engelter, Stefan; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lathrop, Mark; Leys, Didier; Thijs, Vincent; Metso, Tiina M.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pezzini, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio A.; Norrving, Bo; Bevan, Steve; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; Walters, Matthew R; Jannes, Jim; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David; Doheny, Kimberly; Laurie, Cathy C.; Kanse, Sandip M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Fornage, Myriam; Mosley, Thomas H.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christine; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, WT; Meschia, James F.; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Worrall, Bradford; Jern, Christina; Levi, Christopher; Dichgans, Martin; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Debette, Stephanie; Rolfs, Arndt; Saleheen, Danish; Mitchell, Braxton D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although a genetic contribution to ischemic stroke is well recognized, only a handful of stroke loci have been identified by large-scale genetic association studies to date. Hypothesizing that genetic effects might be stronger for early- versus late-onset stroke, we conducted a two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focusing on stroke cases with an age of onset genetic variants at loci with association Pstroke susceptibility locus at 10q25 reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis of all samples from the Discovery and Follow-up Stages (rs11196288, OR=1.41, P=9.5×10−9). The associated locus is in an intergenic region between TCF7L2 and HABP2. In a further analysis in an independent sample, we found that two SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with rs11196288 were significantly associated with total plasma factor VII-activating protease levels, a product of HABP2. Conclusions HABP2, which encodes an extracellular serine protease involved in coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory pathways, may be a genetic susceptibility locus for early-onset stroke. PMID:26732560

  6. Leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events, but not with stroke: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cairu; Engström, Gunnar; Hedblad, Bo

    2010-04-01

    Elevated leukocyte count is a classic marker of systemic inflammation. This study examined whether the leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events (CE) and stroke during a long follow-up period. A total of 17,131 men and 2932 women, aged 27-61 years, without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), were enrolled. Incidence of CE and stroke was studied in relation to leukocyte concentrations over a mean follow-up of 24 years. During the follow-up period, 2600 CE and 1333 stroke events occurred. After risk factor adjustments, leukocyte concentrations in the highest quartile (vs. lowest, >7.0 vs. leukocytes and CE was most pronounced in younger men (aged 27-46) and men without hypertension. In younger men, high leukocytes were associated with early CE (within 10 years of follow-up) and late CE (>10 years of follow-up). In older men (46-61 years), leukocytes were not associated with CE after more than 10 years of follow-up. The leukocyte count was not associated with incidence of stroke. Elevated leukocyte count in men is associated with increased incidence of CE, but not with stroke. The increased risk persisted after more than 10 years of follow-up in younger, but not in older men. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Copeptin Levels in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Stroke Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Rozanski, Michal; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim E; Winter, Benjamin; Koch, Peter M; Nolte, Christian H; Hertel, Sabine; Ziera, Tim; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-09-01

    Copeptin levels are increased in patients diagnosed with stroke and other vascular diseases. Copeptin elevation is associated with adverse outcome, predicts re-events in patients with transient ischemic attack and is used in ruling-out acute myocardial infarction. We evaluated whether copeptin can also be used as a diagnostic marker in the prehospital stroke setting. We prospectively examined patients with suspected stroke on the Stroke Emergency Mobile-an ambulance that is equipped with computed tomography and point-of-care laboratory. A blood sample was taken from patients immediately after arrival. We analyzed copeptin levels in patients with final hospital-based diagnosis of stroke or stroke mimics as well as in vascular or nonvascular patients. In addition, we examined the associations of symptom onset with copeptin levels and the prognostic value of copeptin in patients with stroke. Blood samples of 561 patients were analyzed. No significant differences were seen neither between cerebrovascular (n=383) and other neurological (stroke mimic; n=90) patients (P=0.15) nor between vascular (n=391) and nonvascular patients (n=170; P=0.57). We could not detect a relationship between copeptin levels and time from onset to blood draw. Three-month survival status was available in 159 patients with ischemic stroke. Copeptin levels in nonsurviving patients (n=8: median [interquartile range], 27.4 [20.2-54.7] pmol/L) were significantly higher than in surviving patients (n=151: median [interquartile range], 11.7 [5.2-30.9] pmol/L; P=0.024). In the prehospital setting, copeptin is neither appropriate to discriminate between stroke and stroke mimic patients nor between vascular and nonvascular patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01382862. The Pre-Hospital Acute Neurological Therapy and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke Patients study (PHANTOM-S) was registered (NCT01382862). This sub-study was observational and not registered separately

  8. The prevalence of spirituality, optimism, depression, and fatalism in a bi-ethnic stroke population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Sánchez, Brisa N; Smith, Melinda A; Garcia, Nelda M; Risser, Jan M H; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2012-12-01

    To provide insight into the reduced post-stroke all-cause mortality among Mexican Americans, we explored ethnic differences in the pre-stroke prevalence of (1) spirituality, (2) optimism, (3) depression, and (4) fatalism in a Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke population. The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project is a population-based stroke surveillance study in Nueces County, Texas. Seven hundred ten stroke patients were queried. For fatalism, optimism, and depression scales, unadjusted ethnic comparisons were made using linear regression models. Regression models were also used to explore how age and gender modify the ethnic associations after adjustment for education. For the categorical spirituality variables, ethnic comparisons were made using Fisher's exact tests. Mexican Americans reported significantly more spirituality than non-Hispanic whites. Among women, age modified the ethnic associations with pre-stroke depression and fatalism but not optimism. Mexican American women had more optimism than non-Hispanic white women. With age, Mexican American women had less depression and fatalism, while non-Hispanic white women had more fatalism and similar depression. Among men, after adjustment for education and age, there was no ethnic association with fatalism, depression, and optimism. Spirituality requires further study as a potential mediator of increased survival following stroke among Mexican Americans. Among women, evaluation of the role of optimism, depression, and fatalism as they relate to ethnic differences in post-stroke mortality should be explored.

  9. Poststroke Epilepsy Is Associated With a High Mortality After a Stroke at Young Age: Follow-Up of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke Patients and Unelucidated Risk Factor Evaluation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntz, R.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; Maaijwee, N.A.M.M.; Schoonderwaldt, H.C.; Dorresteijn, L.D.; Dijk, E.J. van; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Poststroke epilepsy is a common complication after a young stroke. We investigated the association between poststroke epilepsy and mortality. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study among 631 patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke,

  10. Identifying factors associated with hospital readmissions among stroke patients in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kun-Yang; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Ma, Ai-Hsuan Sandra; Chen, Yu-Hui; Wu, Chen-Long

    2005-06-01

    Hospital readmissions contribute significantly to the cost of medical care, and may reflect unresolved problems at discharge or a lack of resources in post-hospital care. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of patient characteristics at discharge, the need for nursing care, discharge planning program, post-hospital care arrangements, and caregiver characteristics on readmissions of stroke patients. Patients discharged from neurological wards in seven hospitals in the Taipei area were recruited into the study. Surveys were conducted before their discharge, and at one month after discharge. Of the 489 patients included in the study, 24.3% were readmitted. After controlling for other variables, factors associated with readmissions were number of limitations in activities of daily living (ADL), first incidence of stroke, the need for wound nursing care, the adoption of a care plan, and the discharge locations. Contrary to expectation, age, length of stay, counseling before discharge, and caregiver burden were not associated with readmissions. The findings of this study indicate that ADL limitation is an effective predictor of readmissions. Increasing home nursing resources to meet the demand for wound nursing care may also be effective in reducing readmissions. Discharging patients into institutions for a short period of time may also prove to be more economically viable due to the reduction in readmissions.

  11. Lesion Sites Associated with Allocentric and Egocentric Visuospatial Neglect in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzie, Jeffrey M; Girgulis, Katie A; Semrau, Jennifer A; Findlater, Sonja E; Desai, Jamsheed A; Dukelow, Sean P

    2015-09-01

    Visuospatial neglect is a disorder that can often result from stroke and is characterized by an inability to attend to contralesional stimuli. Two common subtypes include allocentric (object-centered) neglect and egocentric (viewer-centered) neglect. In allocentric neglect, spatial inattention is localized to the contralesional side of an object regardless of its relative position to the observer. In egocentric neglect, spatial inattention is localized to the contralesional side of the individual's midline. The neuroanatomical correlates of each subtype are unknown. However, recent work has suggested that damage to temporal, inferior parietal, and occipital areas may result in allocentric neglect and that damage to frontoparietal areas may result in egocentric neglect. We used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) to compare lesion location to behavioral performance on the conventional six subtests of the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT) in 62 subjects with acute right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Results identified an anatomical dissociation in lesion location between subjects with neglect based on poor performance on allocentric tests (line bisection, copying, and drawing tasks) and on egocentric tests (star, letter, and line cancellation). VLSM analyses revealed that poor performance on the allocentric tests was associated with lesions to the superior and inferior parietal cortices, and the superior and middle temporal gyri. In contrast, poor performance on the egocentric tests was associated with lesions in the precentral gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, insula, and putamen. Interestingly, the letter cancellation test and average performance on egocentric tests were associated with frontal and parietal lesions. Some of these parietal lesion locations overlapped with lesion locations associated with allocentric neglect. These findings are consistent with suggestions that damage to temporal and parietal areas is more associated with allocentric neglect and damage

  12. Association of cardiovascular emerging risk factors with acute coronary syndrome and stroke: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Linares, José Manuel; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco Manuel; Salgado Parreño, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we estimated the risk of acute coronary syndrome and stroke associated with several emerging cardiovascular risk factors. This was a case-control study, where an age - and sex-matched acute coronary syndrome group and stroke group were compared with controls. Demographic and clinical data were collected through patient interviews, and blood samples were taken for analysis. In the bivariate analysis, all cardiovascular risk factors analyzed showed as predictors of acute coronary syndrome and stroke, except total cholesterol and smoking. In the multivariate logistic regression model for acute coronary syndrome, hypertension and body mass index, N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A were independent predictors. For stroke, the predictors were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide. Controlling for age, sex, and classical cardiovascular risk factors, N-terminal section brain natriuretic peptide and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A were independent emerging cardiovascular risk factors for acute coronary syndrome, but pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A was not for stroke. High levels of cardiovascular risk factors in individuals with no episodes of cardiovascular disease requires the implementation of prevention programs, given that at least half of them are modifiable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Decreased nighttime heart rate variability is associated with increased stroke risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binici, Zeynep; Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Køber, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of stroke in healthy individuals is challenging and there is a diurnal variation of stroke onset. We hypothesized that heart rate variability with a focus on nighttime heart rate variability will predict the risk of stroke in apparently healthy middle-age and elderly subjects....

  14. Contribution of Established Stroke Risk Factors to the Burden of Stroke in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Annette; Grittner, Ulrike; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Siegerink, Bob; Busch, Markus A

    2017-07-01

    As stroke in young adults is assumed to have different etiologies and risk factors than in older populations, the aim of this study was to examine the contribution of established potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factors to the burden of stroke in young adults. A German nationwide case-control study based on patients enrolled in the SIFAP1 study (Stroke In Young Fabry Patients) 2007 to 2010 and controls from the population-based GEDA study (German Health Update) 2009 to 2010 was performed. Cases were 2125 consecutive patients aged 18 to 55 years with acute first-ever stroke from 26 clinical stroke centers; controls (age- and sex-matched, n=8500, without previous stroke) were from a nationwide community sample. Adjusted population-attributable risks of 8 risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, smoking, heavy episodic alcohol consumption, low physical activity, and obesity) and their combinations for all stroke, ischemic stroke, and primary intracerebral hemorrhage were calculated. Low physical activity and hypertension were the most important risk factors, accounting for 59.7% (95% confidence interval, 56.3-63.2) and 27.1% (95% confidence interval, 23.6-30.6) of all strokes, respectively. All 8 risk factors combined explained 78.9% (95% confidence interval, 76.3-81.4) of all strokes. Population-attributable risks of all risk factors were similar for all ischemic stroke subtypes. Population-attributable risks of most risk factors were higher in older age groups and in men. Modifiable risk factors previously established in older populations also account for a large part of stroke in younger adults, with 4 risk factors explaining almost 80% of stroke risk. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Association Between Carotid Bulb Diaphragm and Ischemic Stroke in Young Afro-Caribbean Patients: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joux, Julien; Boulanger, Marion; Jeannin, Severine; Chausson, Nicolas; Hennequin, Jean-Luc; Molinié, Vincent; Smadja, Didier; Touzé, Emmanuel; Olindo, Stephane

    2016-10-01

    Carotid bulb diaphragm (CBD) has been described in young carotid ischemic stroke (CIS) patients, especially in blacks. However, the prevalence of CBD in CIS patients is unknown, and whether CBD is a risk factor for CIS remains unclear. We assessed the association between CBD and incident CIS in a population-based study. We selected all young (young (stroke-free patients admitted for a road crash who routinely had computed tomographic angiography. Odds ratio (ORs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression adjusted for hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes and smoking. CIS associated with ipsilateral CBD incidence was 3.8 per 100 000 person-years (95% confidence interval, 1.4-6.1). Prevalence of ipsilateral CBD was 23% in all CIS and 37% in undetermined CIS patients. When restricted to undetermined CIS, CBD prevalence was 24 times higher than that in controls (adjusted OR, 24.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-325.6). CBD is associated with an increased risk of ipsilateral CIS in young Afro-Caribbean population. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Evaluation of differences in brain neurophysiology and morphometry associated with hand function in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borich, Michael R; Neva, Jason L; Boyd, Lara A

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation interventions need to be optimized to maximize therapeutic effects and minimize stroke-related disability. However, a comprehensive understanding of the neural substrates underlying recovery is lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between brain anatomy, physiology and hand motor function in individuals with chronic stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches were used to evaluate cortical excitability and brain structural morphometry in individuals with chronic stroke. Hemispheric differences and relationships between these measures and hand dexterity were evaluated. Hemispheric differences were observed for TMS and MRI measures. Bilateral hand dexterity correlated with TMS resting motor threshold and precentral gyral thickness. Transcallosal inhibition across hemispheres was positively associated with midcallosal white matter volume. Regression modeling results demonstrated that combining TMS and MRI measures predicted unique amounts of variance in hand dexterity. RESULTS confirm and extend findings showing differences in brain structure and function after stroke. RESULTS suggested a structure-function relationship underlying interhemispheric connectivity in chronic stroke. The utility of combined TMS and MRI measures to predict motor function can be used in future investigations to aid identifying optimal biomarkers of stroke recovery to predict response to rehabilitation to maximize treatment outcomes.

  17. Association of quality of life of carers with quality of life and functional independence of stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Ganjiwale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke has a great impact not only on patients′ but also on their caregivers′ lives. Carers may experience high levels of burden that can result in deterioration of their health status, social life, and well-being. Association between quality of life (QOL of carers and that of stroke survivors in Indian setting is not much researched. Aims and Settings: To find out QOL and mental health of caregivers of individuals with stroke visiting Physiotherapy Department of Tertiary Care Center in Western India. Design and Methodology: A cross-sectional survey to find QOL and mental health of caregiver of stroke survivors, self-administered screening instrument WHO-QOL BREF, functional independence measurement (FIM scale, and BRIEF COPE were used for data collection on adult populations. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was performed by descriptive analysis and correlation. Result: Fifty-four stroke patients and their caregivers (all adults were included in the study. Average FIM score was 83.75 (18.46 while median was 90 (25. FIM score of patients did not much affect QOL of caregivers. Discussion: Analysis of QOL data showed that QOL of caregivers was good in all domains, but patient′s QOL was good only in social relations. There was no correlation found in QOL of carers and stroke survivors. Nine percent of change in caregivers social relationship scores can be attributed to patients′ sphincter scores. Conclusion: QOL of carers and stroke survivors may be independent. Stroke patients in the study required a moderate assistance for their functional independence which does not seem to affect the caregivers QOL significantly.

  18. Risk of Stroke-Associated Pneumonia With Acid-Suppressive Drugs: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sai-Wai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Ying-Tung; Wang, Yu-Hsun; Yeh, Chao-Bin

    2015-07-01

    Acid-suppressive drugs, including histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), are common medications used for treating upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. However, acid-suppressive drugs have been reported to increase the risk of pneumonia in numerous disease populations. However, the relationship between acid-suppressive drugs and stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between acid-suppressive drug usage and pneumonia among patients with stroke by using a nationwide data set. A population-based cohort study was conducted using a data set from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Data on patients with new-onset stroke from 2010 to 2011 were collected. Patients with and without acid-suppressive drug usage were followed up to identify the occurrence of any type of pneumonia. We estimated the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) by using the Cox proportional hazards model. The study cohort comprised 7965 patients with new-onset stroke. The incidence of pneumonia was 6.9% (552/7965) and more than 40% (225/552) of patients developed pneumonia within 3 months after an acute stroke. Acid-suppressive drug usage was an independent risk factor of pneumonia. The adjusted HR for the risk of pneumonia in patients with new-onset stroke using acid-suppressive drugs was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-1.75, P risk of chronic SAP (adjusted HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.04-2.05). Acid-suppressive drug usage was associated with a slightly increased risk of SAP. Physicians should exercise caution when prescribing acid-suppressive drugs to patients with stroke, particularly at the chronic stage.

  19. Use of Guidelines for Reducing Stroke Risk in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: A Review From a Latin American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Silva, Gisele Sampaio; Ameriso, Sebastián F

    2018-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prominent risk factor for stroke and a leading cause of death and disability throughout Latin America. Contemporary evidence-based guidelines for the management of AF and stroke incorporate the use of practical and relatively simple scoring methods to estimate both stroke and bleeding risk, in order to assist in matching patients with appropriate interventions. This review examines consistencies and differences among guidelines for reducing stroke risk in patients with AF, assessing the role of user-friendly scoring methods to determine appropriate patients for anticoagulation and other treatment options. Current options include warfarin and direct oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. These agents have been found to be superior or noninferior to standard vitamin K antagonist anticoagulation in large randomized trials. Potential benefits of these agents mainly include lower ischemic stroke rates, reduced intracranial bleeding, no need for regular monitoring, and fewer drug-drug and drug-food interactions. Expert opinions regarding clinical situations for which data are presently lacking, such as emergency bleeding and stroke in anticoagulated patients, are also provided. Enhanced attention and adherence to evidence-based guidelines are essential components for a strategy to reduce stroke morbidity and mortality across Latin America.

  20. Association of Indoor Smoke-Free Air Laws with Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Three States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett R. Loomis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether comprehensive smoke-free air laws enacted in Florida, New York, and Oregon are associated with reductions in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI and stroke. Methods. Analyzed trends in county-level, age-adjusted, hospital admission rates for AMI and stroke from 1990 to 2006 (quarterly for Florida, 1995 to 2006 (monthly for New York, and 1998 to 2006 (monthly for Oregon to identify any association between admission rates and passage of comprehensive smoke-free air laws. Interrupted time series analysis was used to adjust for the effects of preexisting moderate local-level laws, seasonal variation in hospital admissions, differences across counties, and a secular time trend. Results. More than 3 years after passage of statewide comprehensive smoke-free air laws, rates of hospitalization for AMI were reduced by 18.4% (95% CI: 8.8–28.0% in Florida and 15.5% (95% CI: 11.0–20.1% in New York. Rates of hospitalization for stroke were reduced by 18.1% (95% CI: 9.3–30.0% in Florida. The few local comprehensive laws in Oregon were not associated with reductions in AMI or stroke statewide. Conclusion. Comprehensive smoke-free air laws are an effective policy tool for reducing the burden of AMI and stroke.

  1. Associations between serum uric acid levels and the incidence of nonfatal stroke: a nationwide community-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Keita; Konta, Tsuneo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Kubota, Isao; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kasahara, Masato; Asahi, Koichi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Hyperuricemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality. This study investigated the association between serum uric acid and the incidence of nonfatal stroke in a Japanese community-based population. We used a nationwide database of 155,322 subjects (aged 40-73, male 39 %) who participated in the annual "Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan" checkup from 2008 to 2010. We examined the relationship between the quintiles of serum uric acid levels at baseline and the incidence of nonfatal stroke during a 2-year study period using self-reported data. The crude incidence of nonfatal stroke was significantly associated with serum uric acid levels at baseline, showing the lowest values in subjects with the 3rd quintile (Q3: men, 5.0-5.6; women, 3.8-4.3) of uric acid levels (mg/dL) and the highest values in subjects with the highest quintile (Q5: men ≥7.1, women ≥5.5) both in men and women (P uric acid levels for incident stroke was high, irrespective of characteristics such as age, sex, and renal function. This study has shown that serum uric acid is independently associated with the incidence of nonfatal stroke in the general Japanese population.

  2. Psychological health of caregivers and association with functional status of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Em, Serda; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Caglayan, Mehmet; Ceylan Cevik, Figen; Kaya, Cemal; Oktayoglu, Pelin; Nas, Kemal

    2017-07-01

    Stroke does not only affect the physical state of patients but also the emotional state of their relatives, most effectively their caregivers. The study aims to examine the mood of caregivers experienced with care for patients with stroke who are highly dependent on the assistance and also to establish the relationship between the emotional state of caregivers and the severity of disability of the patients. This study contained a total of 76 patients with sufficient cognitive functions and severe physical disabilities with hemiplegia caused by a cerebrovascular accident and their caregivers and 94 controls. The functional state of patients was assessed by the Barthel Index (BI). Furthermore, emotional state of the caregivers was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and their life quality was assessed by the SF36 Health Survey. The mean anxiety (9.73 ± 4.88) and depression rates (9.81 ± 5.05) in the caregivers were significantly higher than those in controls (p<0.001, respectively). Significant impairments were observed in both their mental and physical health. Regression analysis also showed a significant negative correlation between the BI scores and the HADS scores. Caregivers had an impaired emotional state and the level of their anxiety was associated with the severity of functional disability of the patients. Therefore, the support provided to the caregiver might be influential on the functional recovery of the patients.

  3. Effects of stroke education of junior high school students on stroke knowledge of their parents: Tochigi project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yokota, Chiaki; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Okamura, Tomonori; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Ohyama, Satoshi; Ishigami, Akiko; Okumura, Kosuke; Toyoda, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    Educating the youth about stroke is a promising approach for spreading stroke knowledge. The aim of this study was to verify communication of stroke knowledge to parents by educating junior high school students about stroke. We enrolled 1127 junior high school students (age, 13-15 years) and their parents in the Tochigi prefecture, Japan. All students received a stroke lesson, watched an animated cartoon, and read the related Manga comic as educational aids. The students took back home the Manga and discussed what they learned with their parents. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were given to all at baseline and immediately after the lesson. A total of 1125 students and 915 parents answered the questionnaires. In the students, the frequency of correct answers increased significantly for all questions on stroke symptoms except for headache, and for all questions on risk factors after the lesson. In the parents, the correct answer rates increased for stroke symptoms except for headache and numbness in one side of the body, and for all questions on risk factors except for hypertension. Ninety-one percent of students and 92.7% of parents correctly understood the Face, Arm, Speech, and Time (FAST) mnemonic after the lesson. Improvement of stroke knowledge immediately after the stroke lesson was observed in parents as well as their children, which indicated that our teaching materials using the Manga was effective in delivering the stroke knowledge to parents through their children. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Suicide among psychologists and a proposal for the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D

    1989-02-01

    The response of the American Medical Association and of the American Psychiatric Association to suicide among their members is contrasted with the response of the American Psychological Association. It is suggested that an association should be concerned with suicide among its members and two proposals are suggested.

  5. Ischemic Stroke Profile, Risk Factors, and Outcomes in India: The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylaja, P N; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Kaul, Subhash; Srivastava, M V Padma; Khurana, Dheeraj; Schwamm, Lee H; Kesav, Praveen; Arora, Deepti; Pannu, Aman; Thankachan, Tijy K; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2018-01-01

    The Indo-US Collaborative Stroke Project was designed to characterize ischemic stroke across 5 high-volume academic tertiary hospitals in India. From January 2012 to August 2014, research coordinators and physician coinvestigators prospectively collected data on 2066 patients with ischemic stroke admitted Stroke Scale score was 10 (interquartile range, 5-15) and 24.5% had National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16. Hypertension (60.8%), diabetes mellitus (35.7%), and tobacco use (32.2%, including bidi/smokeless tobacco) were common risk factors. Only 4% had atrial fibrillation. All patients underwent computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; 81% had cerebrovascular imaging. Stroke etiologic subtypes were large artery (29.9%), cardiac (24.9%), small artery (14.2%), other definite (3.4%), and undetermined (27.6%, including 6.7% with incomplete evaluation). Intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was administered in 13%. In-hospital mortality was 7.9%, and 48% achieved modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 90 days. On multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus predicted poor 3-month outcome and younger age, lower admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and small-artery etiology predicted excellent 3-month outcome. These comprehensive and novel clinical imaging data will prove useful in refining stroke guidelines and advancing stroke care in India. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Position of the American Dietetic Association: weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagle, Helen M; Strain, Gladys Witt; Makris, Angela; Reeves, Rebecca S

    2009-02-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that successful weight management to improve overall health for adults requires a lifelong commitment to healthful lifestyle behaviors emphasizing sustainable and enjoyable eating practices and daily physical activity. Given the increasing incidence of overweight and obesity along with the escalating health care costs associated with weight-related illnesses, health care providers must discover how to effectively treat this complex condition. Food and nutrition professionals should stay current and skilled in weight management to assist clients in preventing weight gain, optimizing individual weight loss interventions, and achieving long-term weight loss maintenance. Using the American Dietetic Association's Evidence Analysis Process and Evidence Analysis Library, this position paper presents the current data and recommendations for weight management. The evidence supporting the value of portion control, eating frequency, meal replacements, and very-low-energy diets are discussed as well as physical activity, behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. Public policy changes to create environments that can assist all populations to achieve and sustain healthful lifestyle behaviors are also reviewed.

  7. Association between neuroserpin and molecular markers of brain damage in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Sobrino, Tomás; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Millán, Mónica; Brea, David; Miranda, Elena; Moldes, Octavio; Pérez, Juan; Lomas, David A; Leira, Rogelio; Dávalos, Antoni; Castillo, José

    2011-05-11

    Neuroserpin has shown neuroprotective effects in animal models of cerebral ischemia and has been associated with functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Our aim was to study whether neuroserpin serum levels could be associated to biomarkers of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption. We prospectively included 129 patients with ischemic stroke (58.1% male; mean age, 72.4 ± 9.6 years) not treated with tPA within 12 hours (h) of symptoms onset (mean time, 4.7 ± 2.1 h). Poor functional outcome at 3 months was considered as a modified Rankin scale score >2. Serum levels of neuroserpin, Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), active Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and cellular fibronectin (cFn) (determined by ELISA) and glutamate (determined by HPLC) were measured on admission, 24 and 72 h. The main variable was considered the decrease of neuroserpin levels within the first 24 h. ROC analysis was used to select the best predictive value for neuroserpin to predict poor functional outcome due to a lack of linearity. The decrease of neuroserpin levels within the first 24 h was negatively correlated with serum levels at 24 hours of glutamate (r = -0.642), IL-6 (r = -0.678), ICAM-1 (r = -0.345), MMP-9 (r = -0.554) and cFn (r = -0.703) (all P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, serum levels of glutamate (OR, 1.04; CI95%, 1.01-1.06, p = 0.001); IL-6 (OR, 1.4; CI95%, 1.1-1.7, p = 0.001); and cFn (OR, 1.3; CI95%, 1.1-1.6, p = 0.002) were independently associated with a decrease of neuroserpin levels <70 ng/mL at 24 h after adjusting for confounding factors. These findings suggest that neuroprotective properties of neuroserpin may be related to the inhibition of excitotoxicity, inflammation, as well as blood brain barrier disruption that occur after acute ischemic stroke.

  8. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  9. American Medical Association sponsors press conference in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C G

    1996-01-01

    On September 12, 1996, the American Medical Association, with an educational grant from Hoffmann-La Roche, sponsored a National Press Conference in New York City at the Millenium Broadway Hotel on Times Square. Attended by more than 40 of the nation's top health care correspondents from the leading magazine and newspapers in the country, this conference was designed to promote "The Revolution in Home and Outpatient Care." With an emphasis on new sites and new technologies, speakers from the Academy of Homecare Physicians presented a number of related subjects.

  10. Workup for Perinatal Stroke Does Not Predict Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Laura L; Beaute, Jeanette; Kapur, Kush; Danehy, Amy R; Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Malkin, Hayley; Rivkin, Michael J; Trenor, Cameron C

    2017-08-01

    Perinatal stroke, including neonatal and presumed perinatal presentation, represents the age in childhood in which stroke occurs most frequently. The roles of thrombophilia, arteriopathy, and cardiac anomalies in perinatal ischemic stroke are currently unclear. We took a uniform approach to perinatal ischemic stroke evaluation to study these risk factors and their association with recurrent stroke. We reviewed records of perinatal stroke patients evaluated from August 2008 to February 2016 at a single referral center. Demographics, echocardiography, arterial imaging, and thrombophilia testing were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher exact test. Across 215 cases, the median follow-up was 3.17 years (1.49, 6.46). Females comprised 42.8% of cases. Age of presentation was neonatal (110, 51.2%) or presumed perinatal (105, 48.8%). The median age at diagnosis was 2.9 days (interquartile range, 2.0-9.9) for neonatal stroke and 12.9 months (interquartile range, 8.7-32.8) for presumed perinatal stroke. Strokes were classified as arterial (149, 69.3%), venous (60, 27.9%), both (4, 1.9%), or uncertain (2, 0.9%) by consensus imaging review. Of the 215 cases, there were 6 (2.8%) recurrent ischemic cerebrovascular events. Abnormal thrombophilia testing was not associated with recurrent stroke, except for a single patient with combined antithrombin deficiency and protein C deficiency. After excluding venous events, 155 patients were evaluated for arteriopathy and cardioembolic risk factors; neither was associated with recurrent stroke. Positive family history of thrombosis was not predictive of abnormal thrombophilia testing. Thrombophilia, arteriopathy, or cardioembolic risk factors were not predictive of recurrent events after perinatal stroke. Thrombophilia evaluation in perinatal stroke should only rarely be considered. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Adiposity is inversely associated with hippocampal volume in African Americans and European Americans with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Yuan, Mingxia; Bowden, Donald W; Xu, Jianzhao; Smith, S Carrie; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Langefeld, Carl D; Divers, Jasmin; Register, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Williamson, Jeff D; Sink, Kaycee M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Freedman, Barry I

    To assess associations between body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and computed tomography-determined volumes of pericardial, visceral, and subcutaneous adipose tissue with magnetic resonance imaging-(MRI) based cerebral structure and cognitive performance in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study was performed in 348 African Americans (AAs) and 256 European Americans (EAs) with T2D. Associations between adiposity measures with cerebral volumes of white matter (WMV), gray matter (GMV), white matter lesions, hippocampal GMV, and hippocampal WMV, cognitive performance and depression were examined using marginal models incorporating generalized estimating equations. All models were adjusted for age, sex, education, smoking, HbA1c, hypertension, statins, cardiovascular disease, MRI scanner (MRI outcomes only), and time between scans; some neuroimaging measures were additionally adjusted for intracranial volume. Participants were 59.9% female with mean (SD) age 57.7(9.3)years, diabetes duration 9.6(6.8)years, and HbA1c 7.8(1.9)%. In AAs, inverse associations were detected between hippocampal GMV and both BMI (β [95% CI]-0.18 [-0.30, -0.07], P=0.0018) and WC (-0.23 [-0.35, -0.12], P=0.0001). In the full bi-ethnic sample, inverse associations were detected between hippocampal WMV and WC (P≤0.0001). Positive relationships were observed between BMI (P=0.0007) and WC (P<0.0001) with depression in EAs. In patients with T2D, adiposity is inversely associated with hippocampal gray and white matter volumes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Elevated levels of hemoglobin A1c are associated with cerebral white matter disease in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Michal; Richter, Tobias B; Grittner, Ulrike; Endres, Matthias; Fiebach, Jochen B; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the association of cerebral white matter disease (WMD) on MRI with vascular risk factors and laboratory findings in consecutive first acute ischemic stroke patients. Acute ischemic stroke patients underwent MRI ≤24 hours after stroke onset and follow-up on day 2. WMD was scored on fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI according to the Wahlund score. Vascular risk factors and laboratory parameters were assessed during hospital stay. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. We included 512 patients with first acute ischemic stroke (mean age, 68.5 [SD, 13.2] years; 192 women (37.5%); median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission, 3 [interquartile range, 1-6]; and median Wahlund score, 4 [interquartile range, 2-9]). WMD was present in 460 (89.8%) patients. In univariate analysis, age, arterial hypertension, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, diabetes mellitus, and female sex were associated with the presence of WMD (Pstroke patients. This may suggest that chronic disturbance of glycemia measured by HbA1c plays a role in the pathophysiology of WMD. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00715533.

  13. Positive caregiving experiences are associated with life satisfaction in spouses of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruithof, Willeke J; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Post, Marcel W M

    2012-11-01

    Studies into caregivers usually have been focused on negative caregiving experiences. This study is based on the hypotheses that positive caregiving experiences (i.e., self-esteem derived from caregiving) of spouses of stroke patients also need to be taken into account, and that these are related to life satisfaction in 2 ways: first, by a direct association with life satisfaction, and second, indirectly by way of a buffer effect (i.e., by compensating for the impact of negative caregiving experiences on life satisfaction). In this cross-sectional study (n = 121) 3 years poststroke, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment was used to assess caregiver burden (Burden) and self-esteem derived from caregiving (Self-esteem scale). Life satisfaction was measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-9). Spearman correlations and regression analyses were performed. Both Self-esteem and Burden scores were associated with life satisfaction (correlation coefficients 0.35 and -0.74, respectively). An interaction effect was also found (P = .006); spouses who perceived both high Burden and high Self-esteem reported significantly higher life satisfaction scores (mean 4.2, standard deviation [SD] 0.5) than spouses who perceived high Burden but low Self-esteem (mean 3.6, SD 0.7). Positive caregiving experiences are related to spouses' life satisfaction 3 years poststroke and mediate the impact of burden on life satisfaction. Positive caregiving experiences should get more attention in rehabilitation research and practice. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene A1298C polymorphism with stroke risk based on a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Q; Lu, J; Wu, W; Sun, H; Zhang, J

    2013-12-19

    Several independent studies have reported the role of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) A1298C polymorphism in strokes, but the results are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed in the present study. In this meta-analysis, a total of 13 studies, including 1974 cases and 2660 controls, were selected to evaluate the possible association. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the strength of the association in additive, dominant, and recessive models. The overall analysis showed that MTHFR A1298C was associated with a significant increase in the risk of stroke in the heterozygote comparison (AC vs AA: OR = 1.17; 95%CI = 1.03-1.34) and in the dominant model (AC/CC vs AA: OR = 1.22; 95%CI = 1.01-1.49). Stratified analysis showed a significantly strong association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and stroke risk in Asian populations (OR = 1.32 for AC vs AA; OR = 1.94 for CC vs AA; OR = 1.37 for AC/CC vs AA; OR = 1.33 for C vs A allele), but not in Caucasian populations. Additionally, the MTHFR 1298C allele was found to be a risk factor for developing ischemic strokes. However, no statistically significant increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke was found in any of the genetic models. In conclusion, this meta-analysis supported that the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism could be capable of increasing stroke susceptibility in Asian, but not in Caucasian, populations.

  15. Promoter polymorphisms in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene are associated with ischemic stroke susceptibility in young black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Timothy D; Giles, Wayne H; Xu, Jianfeng; Wozniak, Marcella A; Malarcher, Ann M; Lange, Leslie A; Macko, Richard F; Basehore, Monica J; Meyers, Deborah A; Cole, John W; Kittner, Steven J

    2005-09-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide exerts a variety of protective effects on endothelial cells and blood vessels, and therefore the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene (NOS3) is a logical candidate gene for stroke susceptibility. We used the population-based Stroke Prevention in Young Women case-control study to assess the association of five NOS3 polymorphisms in 110 cases (46% black) with ischemic stroke and 206 controls (38% black), 15 to 44 years of age. Polymorphisms included 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region (-1468 T>A, -922 G>A, -786 T>C), 1 SNP in exon 7 (G894T), and 1 insertion/deletion polymorphism within intron 4. Significant associations with both the -922 G>A and -786 T>C SNPs with ischemic stroke were observed in the black, but not the white, population. This association was attributable to an increased prevalence of the -922 A allele (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.3 to 6.8; P=0.005) and the -786 T allele (OR=2.9, 95% CI=1.3 to 6.4; P=0.005) in cases versus controls. These 2 SNPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium (D'=1.0), making it impossible to determine, within the confines of this genetic study, whether 1 or both of these polymorphisms are functionally related to NOS3 expression. Two sets of haplotypes were also identified, 1 of which may confer an increased susceptibility to stroke in blacks, whereas the other appears to be protective. Promoter variants in NOS3 may be associated with ischemic stroke susceptibility among young black women.

  16. Severe cerebral white matter lesions in ischemic stroke patients are associated with less time spent at home and early institutionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibolt, Gerli; Curtze, Sami; Melkas, Susanna; Pohjasvaara, Tarja; Kaste, Markku; Karhunen, Pekka J; Oksala, Niku K J; Erkinjuntti, Timo

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral white matter lesions are one imaging surrogate for cerebral small vessel disease. These white matter lesions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in both the general population and ischemic stroke patients. To investigate whether severe white matter lesions in a cohort of ischemic stroke patients are associated with fewer days spent at home and earlier permanent institutionalization. We included 391 consecutive patients aged 55-85 years with ischemic stroke admitted to the Helsinki University Central Hospital (the Stroke Aging Memory cohort) with a 21-year follow-up. Hospitalization and nursing home admissions were reviewed from national registers.white matter lesions were rated using magnetic resonance imaging performed three-months poststroke, dichotomized as none-to-moderate and severe. Kaplan-Meier plots log-rank and binary logistic regression (odds ratio) and Cox multivariable proportional hazards model were used to study the association of white matter lesions with days spent at home and the time of permanent institutionalization. Hazards and odds ratio with their 95% confidence intervals are reported. Severe white matter lesions were associated with fewer days spent at home, and more frequent, and earlier permanent institutionalization (1487 vs. 2354 days; log-rank P institutionalization within five-years (odds ratio 2·29; confidence interval 1·23-4·29), and increased hazards ratio of permanent institutionalization during 21 years of follow-up (1·64; confidence interval 1·119-2·26). After ischemic stroke, patients with severe white matter lesions spend fewer days at home and become permanently institutionalized earlier, especially within the first five-years. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Relevance of the Updated Food and Drug Administration Alteplase Label for Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Estimated Impact and Current Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Harn J; Albright, Karen C; Sands, Kara A

    2018-04-01

    In 2015, the Food and Drug Administration updated the contraindications for the use of alteplase in acute ischemic stroke (AIS), potentially creating a greater impact on treatment. A history of intracranial hemorrhage and recent stroke within 3 months were removed as contraindications, increasing the number of patients eligible for alteplase. The aim of this commentary is to call attention to the updates and discuss them relative to current American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines. Additionally, we estimate the clinical impact of the updates by analyzing AIS admissions to a large-volume Comprehensive Stroke Center.

  18. Mechanical dyssynchrony of the left atrium during sinus rhythm is associated with history of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffo, Luisa; Inoue, Yuko Y; Tao, Susumu; Gucuk Ipek, Esra; Balouch, Muhammad; Lima, Joao A C; Nazarian, Saman; Spragg, David D; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Ashikaga, Hiroshi

    2018-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between left atrial (LA) mechanical dyssynchrony and history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We hypothesized that mechanical dyssynchrony of the LA is associated with history of stroke/TIA independent of LA function and Cardiac failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes, Stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA), VAscular disease, and Sex category (CHA2DS2-VASc) score in patients with AF. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 246 patients with a history of AF (59 ± 10 years, 29% female, 26% non-paroxysmal AF) referred for catheter ablation to treat drug-refractory AF who underwent preablation cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in sinus rhythm. Using tissue-tracking CMR, we measured the LA longitudinal strain and strain rate in each of 12 equal-length segments in two- and four-chamber views. We defined indices of LA mechanical dyssynchrony, including the standard deviation of the time to the peak longitudinal strain (SD-TPS). Patients with a prior history of stroke or TIA (n = 23) had significantly higher SD-TPS than those without (n = 223) (39.9 vs. 23.4 ms, P stroke/TIA after adjusting for the CHA2DS2-VASc score, LA minimum index volume, and the peak LA longitudinal strain (P stroke/TIA more accurately than CHA2DS2-VASc score alone (c-statistics: 0.82 vs. 0.75, P stroke/TIA in patients with AF.

  19. Recurrent Stroke: The Value of the CHA2DS2VASc Score and the Essen Stroke Risk Score in a Nationwide Stroke Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Lip, Gregory Y H; Bach, Flemming W; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    2015-09-01

    The CHA2DS2VASc score and the Essen Stroke Risk Score are respectively used for risk stratification in patients with atrial fibrillation and in patients with cerebrovascular incidents. We aimed to test the ability of the 2 scores to predict stroke recurrence, death, and cardiovascular events (stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or arterial thromboembolism) in a nationwide Danish cohort study, among patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation. We conducted a registry-based study in patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation. Patients were stratified according to the CHA2DS2VASc score and the Essen Stroke Risk Score and were followed up until stroke recurrence or death. We estimated stratified incidence rates and hazard ratios and calculated the cumulative risks. 42 182 patients with incident ischemic stroke with median age 70.1 years were included. The overall 1-year incidence rates of recurrent stroke, death, and cardiovascular events were 3.6%, 10.5%, and 6.7%, respectively. The incidence rates, the hazard ratios, and the cumulative risk of all outcomes increased with increasing risk scores. C-statistics for both risk scores were around 0.55 for 1-year stroke recurrence and cardiovascular events and correspondingly for death around 0.67 for both scores. In this cohort of non-atrial fibrillation patients with incident ischemic stroke, increasing CHA2DS2VASc score and Essen Stroke Risk Score was associated with increasing risk of recurrent stroke, death, and cardiovascular events. Their discriminatory performance was modest and further refinements are required for clinical application. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Association of Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism with Ischemic Stroke Subtypes in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Lian Lai

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to clarify whether the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE is related to ischemic stroke subtypes in Taiwan's Chinese population. Using the classification of Cerebrovascular Diseases III, 143 patients with lacunar infarction, 114 patients with atherothrombotic infarction, and 112 healthy controls were enrolled. APOE genotype was determined using polymerase chain reaction. Regarding the distribution of APOE genotypes, the frequency of ϵ3/ϵ4 genotypes in lacunar patients was significantly different from that in control subjects, by logistic regression, using ϵ3/ϵ3 as a reference group. There was no significant difference between atherothrombotic patients and the control group in the distribution of APOE genotypes or alleles. The present finding suggests that there is a probable association between ϵ3/ϵ4 genotype and lacunar infarcts, but not atherothrombotic infarcts. This indicates that genetic factors may play a role, at least partially, in lacunar infarction in Taiwan's Chinese population.

  1. Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke: The Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Hamidreza; Himali, Jayandra J; Beiser, Alexa S; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Pikula, Aleksandra; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Romero, Jose R; Kase, Carlos S; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis and atrial fibrillation in cross-sectional studies. Yet, prospective data linking IGF-1 levels to the development of ischemic stroke remain inconclusive. We examined prospectively the association between serum IGF-1 levels and incident ischemic stroke. We measured serum IGF-1 levels in 757 elderly individuals (mean age 79±5, 62% women), free of prevalent stroke, from the Framingham original cohort participants at the 22nd examination cycle (1990-1994) and were followed up for the development of ischemic stroke. Cox models were used to relate IGF-1 levels to the risk for incident ischemic stroke, adjusted for potential confounders. During a mean follow-up of 10.2 years, 99 individuals developed ischemic stroke. After adjustment for age, sex, and potential confounders, higher IGF-1 levels were associated with a lower risk of incident ischemic stroke, with subjects in the lowest quintile of IGF-1 levels having a 2.3-fold higher risk of incident ischemic stroke (95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.06; P =0.03) as compared with those in the top quintile. We observed an effect modification by diabetes mellitus and waist-hip ratio for the association between IGF-1 and ischemic stroke ( P risk of incident ischemic stroke, respectively. IGF-1 levels were inversely associated with ischemic stroke, especially among persons with insulin resistance. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. The American Urological Association Symptom Index for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Michael J; Fowler, Floyd J; O'leary, Michael P; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Holtgrewe, H Logan; Mebust, Winston K; Cockett, Abraham T K

    2017-02-01

    A symptom index for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) was developed and validated by a multidisciplinary measurement committee of the American Urological Association (AUA). Validation studies were conducted involving a total of 210 BPH patients and 108 control subjects. The final AUA symptom index includes 7 questions covering frequency, nocturia, weak urinary stream, hesitancy, intermittence, incomplete emptying and urgency. On revalidation, the index was internally consistent (Cronbach's α = 0.86) and the score generated had excellent test-retest reliability (r = 0.92). Scores were highly correlated with subjects' global ratings of the magnitude of their urinary problem (r = 0.65 to 0.72) and powerfully discriminated between BPH and control subjects (receiver operating characteristic area 0.85). Finally, the index was sensitive to change, with preoperative scores decreasing from a mean of 17.6 to 7.1 by 4 weeks after prostatectomy (p index is clinically sensible, reliable, valid and responsive. It is practical for use in practice and for inclusion in research protocols. Copyright © 1992 American Urological Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. American woodcock (Scolopax minor) mortality associated with a reovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, D.E.; Converse, K.A.; Hansen, W.R.; Norman, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    A virus isolate associated with a 1989-90 die-off in American woodcock (Scolopax minor) was identified as a reovirus. Emaciation was a consistent necropsy finding in the woodcock involved in this die-off. This reovirus infection appeared to be systemic, had the potential for fecal-oral virus transmission, and was associated with deterioration of body condition. To our knowledge this is the first report of a virus isolate from wild American woodcock. A survey conducted in 1990-92 indicated that this virus was not present at detectable levels in the woodcock breeding and wintering population. /// Un virus asociado con la mortalidad de becadas o perdices americanas (Scolopax minor) en 1989-1990-fue identificado como reovirus. La emaciaci??n fue un resultado com??n a la necropsia de las aves que murieron. Esta infecci??n por reovirus pareci?? ser sist??mica, ten?-a el potencial de transmisi??n fecal-oral y estuvo asociada con el deterioro del ave. Creemos que este sea el primer reporte de aislamiento viral a partir de becadas americanas. Una encuesta hecha entre 1990 y 1992 indic?? que este virus no estaba presente en los niveles detectables en los reproductores y en las aves invernales.

  4. Restless legs syndrome after high-risk TIA and minor stroke: association with reduced quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Mark I; Wan, Anthony; Black, Sandra E; Lim, Andrew S; Swartz, Richard H; Murray, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a movement disorder that is associated with poor quality of life and depressive symptoms in the general population. Emerging evidence suggests that RLS is closely associated with cerebrovascular disease. We assessed the effect of RLS on quality of life after stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). In this single-center prospective study, we recruited patients within 14 days of high-risk TIA or minor stroke. Patients were diagnosed with RLS using a questionnaire based on the 2003 International RLS Study Group criteria, and diagnoses were confirmed by a sleep neurologist. Follow-up assessments were conducted within 2-6 months of recruitment. The outcome of quality of life was measured using the Stroke-specific Quality of Life (SS-QoL). Of the 94 patients recruited into the study, 23 (24.4%) were diagnosed with RLS: 11 were newly diagnosed with RLS and 12 had RLS preceding the index stroke/TIA. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between those with or without RLS. Median SS-QoL in patients with RLS was lower at baseline (p = 0.008) and at follow-up (p = 0.002). RLS patients had more depressive symptoms at follow-up (p = 0.007). Ordinal logistic regression demonstrated that RLS was negatively associated with quality of life at baseline (OR = 0.28; p = 0.010) and at follow-up (OR = 0.14; p = 0.029), independent of functional outcome and depressive symptoms. RLS is common after stroke or TIA and negatively affects the quality of life. Screening for RLS after cerebrovascular events may be warranted, and future research should assess whether treatment of RLS can improve post-stroke quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Snoring Is Not Associated With All-Cause Mortality, Incident Cardiovascular Disease, or Stroke in the Busselton Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nathaniel S.; Wong, Keith K.H.; Cullen, Stewart R.J.; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To ascertain whether objectively measured snoring increases mortality, cardiovascular disease, or stroke risk over the effects of obstructive sleep apnea and other established risk factors. Design: Community-based cohort. Participants: 400 residents of the Western Australian town of Busselton. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea were quantified via the percentage of the night spent snoring and the respiratory disturbance index as measured by a single night recording in November-December 1990 by a home sleep apnea monitoring device (MESAM IV), along with a range of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Follow-up for deaths and cardiovascular hospitalizations was ascertained via record linkage until the end of 2007. Results: Our analytical sample of 380 people was made up of the 397 people for whom the authors had follow-up data, minus 17 people who reported a previous stroke or heart attack at baseline (n = 380/400 = 95% of cohort). Snoring was observed for a mean/median of 32.0/27.4% of the night (standard deviation = 23.9%; range = 0-97.2%). There were 46 deaths, 68 cardiovascular events, and 24 strokes during 17 yr of follow-up. Snoring as either a categoric or continuous variable was not significantly associated with death, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in both unadjusted Cox regression models and in models that adjusted for obstructive sleep apnea and other risk factors. Conclusions: No measure of snoring was associated with all-cause mortality, or incident cardiovascular disease or stroke over 17 yr in this community-based sample. Citation: Marshall NS; Wong KKH; Cullen SRJ; Knuiman MW; Grunstein RR. Snoring is not associated with all-cause mortality, incident cardiovascular disease, or stroke in the Busselton Health Study. SLEEP 2012;35(9):1235–1240. PMID:22942501

  6. CDKN2B methylation is associated with carotid artery calcification in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B (CDKN2A/2B near chromosome 9p21 have been associated with both atherosclerosis and artery calcification, but the underlying mechanisms remained largely unknown. Considering that CDKN2A/2B is a frequently reported site for DNA methylation, this study aimed to evaluate whether carotid artery calcification (CarAC is related to methylation levels of CDKN2A/2B in patients with ischemic stroke. Methods DNA methylation levels of CDKN2A/2B were measured in 322 ischemic stroke patients using peripheral blood leukocytes. Methylation levels of 36 CpG sites around promoter regions of CDKN2A/2B were examined with BiSulfite Amplicon Sequencing. CarAC was quantified with Agatston score based on results of computed tomography angiography. Generalized liner model was performed to explore the association between methylation levels and CarAC. Results Of the 322 analyzed patients, 187 (58.1% were classified as with and 135 (41.9% without evident CarAC. The average methylation levels of CDKN2B were higher in patents with CarAC than those without (5.7 vs 5.4, p = 0.001. After adjustment for potential confounders, methylation levels of CDKN2B were positively correlated with cube root transformed calcification scores (β = 0.591 ± 0.172, p = 0.001 in generalized liner model. A positive correlation was also detected between average methylation levels of CDKN2B and cube root transformed calcium volumes (β = 0.533 ± 0.160, p = 0.001. Conclusions DNA methylation of CDKN2B may play a potential role in artery calcification.

  7. Differential white matter involvement associated with distinct visuospatial deficits after right hemisphere stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alex R; McAvoy, Mark P; Siegel, Joshua S; Hong, Xin; Astafiev, Serguei V; Rengachary, Jennifer; Zinn, Kristi; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2017-03-01

    Visuospatial attention depends on the integration of multiple processes, and people with right hemisphere lesions after a stroke may exhibit severe or no visuospatial deficits. The anatomy of core components of visuospatial attention is an area of intense interest. Here we examine the relationship between the disruption of core components of attention and lesion distribution in a heterogeneous group (N = 70) of patients with right hemisphere strokes regardless of the presence of clinical neglect. Deficits of lateralized spatial orienting, measured as the difference in reaction times for responding to visual targets in the contralesional or ipsilesional visual field, and deficits in re-orienting attention, as measured by the difference in reaction times for invalidly versus validly cued targets, were measured using a computerized spatial orienting task. Both measures were related through logistic regression and a novel ridge regression method to anatomical damage measured with magnetic resonance imaging. While many regions were common to both deficit maps, a deficit in lateralized spatial orienting was more associated with lesions in the white matter underlying the posterior parietal cortex, and middle and inferior frontal gyri. A deficit in re-orienting of attention toward unattended locations was associated with lesions in the white matter of the posterior parietal cortex, insular cortex and less so with white matter involvement of the anterior frontal lobe. An hodological analysis also supports this partial dissociation between the white matter tracts that are damaged in lateralized spatial biases versus impaired re-orienting. Our results underscore that the integrity of fronto-parietal white matter tracts is crucial for visuospatial attention and that different attention components are mediated by partially distinct neuronal substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Presents the 2015 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association. In his introduction, President Barry Anton describes how 2015 was among APA's most challenging. Although 2015 ushered in an era of greater transparency within the association and enhanced communications to members and the public, it also required painful self-reflection stemming from the revelations of an independent review by an outside law firm. The review examined the question of whether APA played any role related to the Bush administration's use of abusive interrogation techniques during the war on terror. Anton's introduction also discusses (1) the APA convention, (2) representing APA at a White House meeting with health care providers and insurance companies, (3) APA's effort to increase the number of APA-accredited internships, (4) international activities, and (5) the global summit on psychology and integrated care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The quality of prehospital ischemic stroke care: compliance with guidelines and impact on in-hospital stroke response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostema, John Adam; Nasiri, Mojdeh; Chassee, Todd; Reeves, Mathew J

    2014-01-01

    A number of emergency medical services (EMSs) performance measures for stroke have been proposed to promote early stroke recognition and rapid transportation to definitive care. This study examined performance measure compliance among EMS-transported stroke patients and the relationship between compliance and in-hospital stroke response. Eight quality indicators were derived from American Stroke Association guidelines. A prospective cohort of consecutive, EMS-transported patients discharged from 2 large Midwestern stroke centers with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke was identified. Data were abstracted from hospital and EMS records. Compliance with 8 prehospital quality indicators was calculated. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis were performed to measure the association between prehospital compliance and a binary outcome of door-to-computed tomography (CT) time less than or equal to 25 minutes. Over the 12 month study period, 186 EMS-transported ischemic stroke patients were identified. Compliance was highest for prehospital documentation of a glucose level (86.0%) and stroke screen (78.5%) and lowest for on-scene time less than or equal to 15 minutes (46.8%), hospital prenotification (56.5%), and transportation at highest priority (55.4%). After adjustment for age, time from symptom onset, and stroke severity, transportation at highest priority (odds ratio [OR], 13.45) and hospital prenotification (OR, 3.75) were both associated with significantly faster door-to-CT time. No prehospital quality metric was associated with tissue-plasminogen activator delivery. EMS transportation at highest priority and hospital prenotification were associated with faster in-hospital stroke response and represent logical targets for EMS quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ischaemic strokes in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: associations with iron deficiency and platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Shovlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary first pass filtration of particles marginally exceeding ∼7 µm (the size of a red blood cell is used routinely in diagnostics, and allows cellular aggregates forming or entering the circulation in the preceding cardiac cycle to lodge safely in pulmonary capillaries/arterioles. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations compromise capillary bed filtration, and are commonly associated with ischaemic stroke. Cohorts with CT-scan evident malformations associated with the highest contrast echocardiographic shunt grades are known to be at higher stroke risk. Our goal was to identify within this broad grouping, which patients were at higher risk of stroke. METHODOLOGY: 497 consecutive patients with CT-proven pulmonary arteriovenous malformations due to hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia were studied. Relationships with radiologically-confirmed clinical ischaemic stroke were examined using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic analyses, and platelet studies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-one individuals (12.3% had acute, non-iatrogenic ischaemic clinical strokes at a median age of 52 (IQR 41-63 years. In crude and age-adjusted logistic regression, stroke risk was associated not with venous thromboemboli or conventional neurovascular risk factors, but with low serum iron (adjusted odds ratio 0.96 [95% confidence intervals 0.92, 1.00], and more weakly with low oxygen saturations reflecting a larger right-to-left shunt (adjusted OR 0.96 [0.92, 1.01]. For the same pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, the stroke risk would approximately double with serum iron 6 µmol/L compared to mid-normal range (7-27 µmol/L. Platelet studies confirmed overlooked data that iron deficiency is associated with exuberant platelet aggregation to serotonin (5HT, correcting following iron treatment. By MANOVA, adjusting for participant and 5HT, iron or ferritin explained 14% of the variance in log-transformed aggregation-rate (p = 0

  11. Reduced response to activated protein C is associated with risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, J.G. van der; Bots, M.L.; Haverkate, F.; Slagboom, P.E.; Meijer, P.; Hofman, A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Kluft, C.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of activated protein C (APC) response and of the factor V Leiden mutation with myocardial infarction, stroke and transient ischémie attack. Design: Population-based case control study. Setting: A district of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Participants: From the

  12. Fatty Acid binding protein 4 is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sverre; Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Tuva B

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) has been shown to play an important role in macrophage cholesterol trafficking and associated inflammation. To further elucidate the role of FABP4 in atherogenesis in humans, we examined the regulation of FABP4 in carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke....

  13. Associations of Circulating Growth Differentiation Factor-15 and ST2 Concentrations With Subclinical Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Preis, Sarah R; Beiser, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and soluble (s)ST2 are markers of cardiac and vascular stress. We investigated the associations between circulating concentrations of these biomarkers and incident stroke and subclinical vascular brain injury in a sample from the F...

  14. The Quality of Discharge Care Planning in Acute Stroke Care: Influencing Factors and Association with Postdischarge Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nadine E; Busingye, Doreen; Lannin, Natasha A; Kilkenny, Monique F; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2018-03-01

    Comprehensive discharge planning is important for successful transitions from hospital to home after stroke. The aim of this study was to describe the quality of discharge planning received by patients discharged home from acute care, identify factors associated with a positive discharge experience, and assess the influence of discharge quality on outcomes. Patients discharged to the community and registered in the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry in 2014 were invited to participate. Patient-perceived discharge quality was evaluated using the Prescriptions, Ready to re-enter community, Education, Placement, Assurance of safety, Realistic expectations, Empowerment, Directed to appropriate services questionnaire (recall at 3-9 months). Factors associated with higher discharge quality scores were identified and associations between quality scores of more than 80% and outcomes were investigated using multivariable, multilevel regression analyses. There were 200 of 434 eligible registrants who responded; responders and nonresponders were similar with respect to age, sex, and type of stroke. The average overall quality score was 73% (standard deviation: 21). However, only 18% received all aspects of discharge care planning. Quality scores of more than 80% were independently associated with receiving hospital specific information (odds ratio: 5.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.7, 12.4), and referral to a local support group (odds ratio: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.9). Discharge quality scores of more than 80% were associated with higher European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions EQ-5D scores (coefficient: .1, 95% CI: .04, .2) and a reduction in the rate of unmet needs reported at 3-9 months postdischarge (incidence rate ratio: .5, 95% CI: .3, .7). We provide new information on the quality of discharge planning from acute care after stroke. Aspects of discharge planning that correlate with quality of care may reduce unmet needs and improve quality of life outcomes. Copyright

  15. Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Moss, Kevin; Morelli, Thiago; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ 2 trend P stroke/1000-person years was 1.29 for PPC-A (health), 2.82 for PPC-B, 4.80 for PPC-C, 3.81 for PPC-D, 3.50 for PPC-E, 4.78 for PPC-F, and 5.03 for PPC-G (severe periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Recommended dietary pattern to achieve adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2013, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology published the "Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk," which was based on a systematic review originally initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The guideline supports the America...

  17. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. African American race but not genome-wide ancestry is negatively associated with atrial fibrillation among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Marco V; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Tang, Hua; Thornton, Timothy; Stefanick, Marcia L; Larson, Joseph C; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alex P; Caan, Bette; Iribarren, Carlos; Risch, Neil

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in women and is associated with higher rates of stroke and death. Rates of AF are lower in African American subjects compared with European Americans, suggesting European ancestry could contribute to AF risk. The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study (OS) followed up 93,676 women since the mid 1990s for various cardiovascular outcomes including AF. Multivariate Cox hazard regression analysis was used to measure the association between African American race and incident AF. A total of 8,119 African American women from the WHI randomized clinical trials and OS were genotyped on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0. Genome-wide ancestry and previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in European cohorts were tested for association with AF using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Self-reported African American race was associated with lower rates of AF (hazard ratio 0.43, 95% CI 0.32-0.60) in the OS, independent of demographic and clinical risk factors. In the genotyped cohort, there were 558 women with AF. By contrast, genome-wide European ancestry was not associated with AF. None of the single nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with AF in European populations, including rs2200733, were associated with AF in the WHI African American cohort. African American race is significantly and inversely correlated with AF in postmenopausal women. The etiology of this association remains unclear and may be related to unidentified environmental differences. Larger studies are necessary to identify genetic determinants of AF in African Americans. © 2013.

  19. Sex Differences in Outcomes and Associated Risk Factors After Acute Ischemic Stroke in Elderly Patients: A Prospective Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Tao; Lou, Yongzhong; Guo, Xiaofei; Gu, Hongfei; Zhu, Yanxia; Ning, Xianjia; Wang, Jinghua; Tu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women. However, sex differences in outcome and factors associated with outcome among elderly patients are unknown. From January 2009 to December 2011, 810 patients with acute ischemic stroke aged 75 years or older were recruited in China. Clinical profile and risk factors were recorded. Outcomes and associated risk factors at 12 and 36 months after stroke were assessed by sex. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemias, and obesity prevalence rates were higher in women than in men; opposite trends were found for smoking and alcohol consumption. The mortality rate at 12 months after stroke was significantly greater in men than in women (23.3% versus 16.6%, P = .015). Large-artery atherothrombotic and cardioembolic stroke subtypes were risk factors for mortality, recurrence, and dependency in both sexes. In men, atrial fibrillation was a risk factor of mortality at 12 months after stroke (relative ratio [RR], 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-3.27), but obesity was a protective factor of mortality at 36 months after stroke (RR, .30; 95% CI, .10-.94). However, in women, atrial fibrillation was a risk factor of recurrence at 12 months (RR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.31-4.12) and dependency at 36 months after stroke (RR, 7.68; 95% CI, 1.60-36.82). We assessed sex differences in stroke outcomes and associated risk factors at 12 and 36 months after stroke in a large hospital-based stroke registry of elderly patients from Northern China. Thus, it is crucial to emphasize risk management to elderly patients to reduce mortality, recurrence, and dependency after stroke. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Association of Cytomegalovirus End-Organ Disease with Stroke in People Living with HIV/AIDS: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Feng Yen

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection might increase the risk of cardiovascular event. However, data on the link between incident stroke and co-infections of CMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are limited and inconsistent. This nationwide population-based cohort study analyzed the association of CMV end-organ disease and stroke among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA.From January 1, 1998, this study identified adult HIV individuals with and without CMV end-organ disease in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All patients were observed for incident stroke and were followed until December 31, 2012. Time-dependent analysis was used to evaluate associations of CMV end-organ disease with stroke.Of the 22,581 PLWHA identified (439 with CMV end-organ disease and 22,142 without CMV end-organ disease, 228 (1.01% had all-cause stroke during a mean follow-up period of 4.85 years, including 169 (0.75% with ischemic stroke and 59 (0.26% with hemorrhagic stroke. After adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, opportunistic infections after HIV diagnosis, and antiretroviral treatment, CMV end-organ disease was found to be an independent risk factor for incident all-cause stroke (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70 to 5.55. When stroke type was considered, CMV end-organ disease was significantly positively associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (AHR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.49 to 6.62 but not hemorrhagic stroke (AHR, 2.52; 95% CI, 0.64 to 9.91.This study suggested that CMV end-organ disease was an independent predictor of ischemic stroke among PLWHA.

  1. Searching for factors associated with resistance to acetylsalicylic acid used for secondary prevention of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuz-Roszak, Beata; Pierzchała, Krystyna; Niewiadomska, Ewa; Skrzypek, Michał; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka

    2015-03-16

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), used for secondary prevention of stroke, including the assessment of risk factors associated with the lack of ASA anti-aggregatory action. Patients after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or ischaemic stroke in the acute (n = 111) and chronic phase (n = 87) were enrolled in the study. The assessment of platelet function was performed by whole blood impedance aggregometry using a multi-channel platelet function analyser (Multiplate). A proper response to ASA was found in 121 patients (61.1%) (ASA responders), a partial response to ASA in 59 patients (29.8%) (ASA partial responders), and ASA resistance in 18 patients (9.1%) (ASA non-responders). Acetylsalicylic acid resistance was observed more frequently in the chronic phase. The mean low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration was higher in ASA non-responders (p = 0.02). The mean heart rate (p = 0.03) and the mean haematocrit (p = 0.03) were higher in the group of ASA partial responders and ASA non-responders. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists were more often used in the group of ASA partial responders and ASA non-responders (p = 0.04). Diuretics were more rarely used by ASA non-responders, whereas fibrates were more rarely used by ASA partial responders. The method enabled the detection of ASA resistance in some patients with cerebrovascular disease. The study revealed some possible risk factors of ASA resistance: long ASA therapy, increased heart rate, higher LDL concentration, and higher haematocrit value. The relationship between the effect of ASA and other medications (angiotensin II receptor blockers, fibrates, diuretics) requires further study. Platelet function monitoring should be considered in patients at a greater risk of ASA resistance.

  2. Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Acute Stroke Care in the Florida-Puerto Rico Collaboration to Reduce Stroke Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Ralph L; Gardener, Hannah; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Ciliberti-Vargas, Maria A; Gutierrez, Carolina M; Asdaghi, Negar; Burgin, W Scott; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Garcia-Rivera, Enid J; Nobo, Ulises; Oluwole, Sofia; Rose, David Z; Waters, Michael F; Zevallos, Juan Carlos; Robichaux, Mary; Waddy, Salina P; Romano, Jose G; Rundek, Tatjana

    2017-02-14

    Racial-ethnic disparities in acute stroke care can contribute to inequality in stroke outcomes. We examined race-ethnic disparities in acute stroke performance metrics in a voluntary stroke registry among Florida and Puerto Rico Get With the Guidelines-Stroke hospitals. Seventy-five sites in the Florida Puerto Rico Stroke Registry (66 Florida and 9 Puerto Rico) recorded 58 864 ischemic stroke cases (2010-2014). Logistic regression models examined racial-ethnic differences in acute stroke performance measures and defect-free care (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment, in-hospital antithrombotic therapy, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, discharge antithrombotic therapy, appropriate anticoagulation therapy, statin use, smoking cessation counseling) and temporal trends. Among ischemic stroke cases, 63% were non-Hispanic white (NHW), 18% were non-Hispanic black (NHB), 14% were Hispanic living in Florida, and 6% were Hispanic living in Puerto Rico. NHW patients were the oldest, followed by Hispanics, and NHBs. Defect-free care was greatest among NHBs (81%), followed by NHWs (79%) and Florida Hispanics (79%), then Puerto Rico Hispanics (57%) ( P disparity in Puerto Rico persisted (2010: NHWs=63%, NHBs=65%, Florida Hispanics=59%, Puerto Rico Hispanics=31%; 2014: NHWs=93%, NHBs=94%, Florida Hispanics=94%, Puerto Rico Hispanics=63%). Racial-ethnic/geographic disparities were observed for acute stroke care performance metrics. Adoption of a quality improvement program improved stroke care from 2010 to 2014 in Puerto Rico and all Florida racial-ethnic groups. However, stroke care quality delivered in Puerto Rico is lower than in Florida. Sustained support of evidence-based acute stroke quality improvement programs is required to improve stroke care and minimize racial-ethnic disparities, particularly in resource-strained Puerto Rico. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Temporal Trends in Sex Differences With Regard to Stroke Incidence: The Dijon Stroke Registry (1987-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Marie; Delpont, Benoit; Daubail, Benoit; Blanc, Christelle; Durier, Jérôme; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated temporal trends in stroke incidence between men and women to determine whether changes in the distribution of vascular risk factors have influenced sex differences in stroke epidemiology. Patients with first-ever stroke including ischemic stroke, spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and undetermined stroke between 1987 and 2012 were identified through the population-based registry of Dijon, France. Incidence rates were calculated for age groups, sex, and stroke subtypes. Sex differences and temporal trends (according to 5-year time periods) were evaluated by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with Poisson regression. Four thousand six hundred and fourteen patients with a first-ever stroke (53.1% women) were recorded. Incidence was lower in women than in men (112 versus 166 per 100 000/y; IRR, 0.68; P stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage. From 1987 to 2012, the lower incidence of overall stroke in women was stable (IRR ranging between 0.63 and 0.72 according to study periods). When considering stroke subtype, a slight increase in the incidence of ischemic stroke was observed in both men (IRR, 1.011; 95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.016; P =0.001) and women (IRR, 1.013; 95% confidence interval, 1.007-1.018; P =0.001). The sex gap in incidence remained unchanged in ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage. Conversely, the lower subarachnoid hemorrhage incidence in women vanished with time because of an increasing incidence. The sex gap in stroke incidence did not change with time except for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Despite lower rates, more women than men experience an incident stroke each year because of a longer life expectancy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Characteristics of American Psychological Association Division 40 (clinical neuropsychology) Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Greene, Doug; Collins, K C

    2011-11-01

    Fellow status is an honor bestowed on American Psychological Association (APA) members who have made unusual and outstanding contributions to the field of psychology that have had a national impact. Thus far no studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have received this honor. This study examined publicly available data for 157 Division 40 Fellows. Fellows comprise 3.7% of the 4273 members of the division compared to 5.7% of the entire APA membership. Fellows are predominantly male (73%). All but two fellows had earned a Ph.D. with the average time since granting of the doctoral degree of 17.1 ± 6 years (median=16 years) with a range of 7-40 years post-degree. Slightly over half of the fellows hold board certification (53%) in the American Board of Professional Psychology. The largest group of fellows reports their primary employment currently as a university-affiliated medical setting (48%). These data serve to characterize current Division 40 Fellows for the field of neuropsychology and may provide useful information to assist prospective fellow applicants.

  5. Genomewide Association Study for Maximum Number of Alcoholic Drinks in European Americans and African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Kranzler, Henry R; Sherva, Richard; Sartor, Carolyn E; Almasy, Laura; Koesterer, Ryan; Zhao, Hongyu; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a genomewide association study (GWAS) for maximum number of alcoholic drinks consumed in a 24-hour period ("MaxDrinks"), in 2 independent samples comprised of over 9,500 subjects, following up on our GWAS for alcohol dependence (AD) in European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). The samples included our GWAS samples (Yale-UPenn) recruited for studies of the genetics of drug or AD, and a publicly available sample: the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE). Genomewide association analysis was performed for ~890,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using linear association random effects models. EAs and AAs were separately analyzed. The results confirmed significant associations of the well-known functional loci at ADH1B with MaxDrinks in EAs (rs1229984 Arg48His p = 5.96 × 10(-15) ) and AAs (rs2066702 Arg370Cys, p = 2.50 × 10(-10) ). The region of significant association on chromosome 4 was extended to LOC100507053 in AAs but not EAs. We also identified potentially novel significant common SNPs for MaxDrinks in EAs in the Yale-UPenn sample: rs1799876 at SERPINC1 on chromosome 1 (4.00 × 10(-8) ) and rs2309169 close to ANKRD36 on chromosome 2 (p = 5.58 × 10(-9) ). After adjusting for the peak SNP rs1229984 on ADH1B, rs1799876 was nearly significant (p = 1.99 × 10(-7) ) and rs2309169 remained highly significant (2.12 × 10(-9) ). The results provide further support that ADH1B modulates alcohol consumption. Future replications of potential novel loci are warranted. This is the largest MaxDrinks GWAS to date, the first in AAs. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. Similarities and differences between coronary heart disease and stroke in the associations with cardiovascular risk factors: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masaaki; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Kentaro; Li, Yuanying; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Tanabe, Naohito; Wada, Yasuhiko; Wang, Chaochen; Ota, Atsuhiko; Tamakoshi, Koji; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2017-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke have common risk factors, but some of these differ in the magnitude or direction of associations between CHD and stroke. We assessed whether the impact of each risk factor differed between CHD and stroke mortality in Asians. In total, 104 910 subjects aged 40-79 years without histories of cancer, CHD and stroke at baseline were followed between 1988 and 2009. Competing-risks analysis was used to test for differences in the associations of each risk factor with two endpoints (CHD and stroke). Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were also calculated for these endpoints to estimate the population impact of each risk factor. During a median 19.1-year follow-up, 1554 died from CHD and 3163 from stroke. The association of hypertension with CHD was similar to that with stroke in terms of the magnitude and direction (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for CHD: 1.63 vs. stroke: 1.73 in men and 1.70 vs. 1.66 in women). Conversely, the magnitude of these associations differed for smoking (CHD: 1.95 vs. stroke: 1.23 in men and 2.45 vs. 1.35 in women) and diabetes (1.49 vs. 1.09 in men and 2.08 vs. 1.39 in women). The highest PAF for CHD was caused by smoking in men and by hypertension in women; that for stroke was caused by hypertension in both sexes. Hypertension associations and PAFs were consistent between CHD and stroke, but not for other risk factors. These findings may be useful to optimize public health intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Psychological factors are associated with subjective cognitive complaints 2 months post-stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, Britta; van Heugten, Caroline M.; van Mierlo, Marloes; Post, Marcel W M; de Kort, Paul L M; Visser-Meily, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which psychological factors are related to post-stroke subjective cognitive complaints, taking into account the influence of demographic and stroke-related characteristics, cognitive deficits and emotional problems. In this cross-sectional study, 350 patients

  8. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke. High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke four to six times. Heart disease, especially a condition ... leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability. Four million Americans are living with the effects of stroke. The length of time to recover from a ...

  9. Utility of Nontraditional Risk Markers in Individuals Ineligible for Statin Therapy According to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Joseph; Polonsky, Tamar S; Young, Rebekah; McClelland, Robyn L; Delaney, Joseph C; Dawood, Farah; Blaha, Michael J; Miedema, Michael D; Sibley, Christopher T; Carr, J Jeffrey; Burke, Gregory L; Goff, David C; Psaty, Bruce M; Greenland, Philip; Herrington, David M

    2015-09-08

    In the general population, the majority of cardiovascular events occur in people at the low to moderate end of population risk distribution. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends consideration of statin therapy for adults with an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk ≥7.5% based on traditional risk factors. Whether use of nontraditional risk markers can improve risk assessment in those below this threshold for statin therapy is unclear. Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population sample free of clinical CVD at baseline, we calibrated the Pooled Cohort Equations (cPCE). ASCVD was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke. Adults with an initial cPCE statin eligible: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥160 mg/dL; family history of ASCVD; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥2 mg/dL; coronary artery calcium score ≥300 Agatston units or ≥75th percentile for age, sex, and ethnicity; and ankle-brachial index statin eligible. Of 5185 participants not taking statins with complete data (age, 45-84 years), 4185 had a cPCE risk statin eligible) by at least 1 of the additional risk marker criteria. In this generally low-risk population sample, a large proportion of ASCVD events occurred among adults with a 10-year cPCE risk 7.5% who may warrant statin therapy considerations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Faculty application of the American Psychological Association style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Gwen Goetz

    2009-10-01

    This article explores current faculty methods with the application and evaluation of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Specific aims were to determine concerns related to APA style, review faculty grading practices, identify institutional resources, and report potential solutions for improving application of APA style. A survey with an exploratory descriptive research design was developed and distributed online to academic chairs and deans, requesting their support in distributing the survey to their faculty. Responses (N = 704) were grouped into five categories: departmental and personal concerns; faculty grading practices; institutional resources; format, writing style, and grammar; and suggestions and potential solutions. Sixty percent reported that application and evaluation of APA style is a concern in their department. Content analysis identified four categories as proposed solutions: consistency, education, resources, and dialogue. On the basis of the feedback of the participants, the CRED program is proposed for the issues that were identified. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. The American Medical Student Association's contributions to advancing primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecock, Joan; Steyer, Terrence E

    2008-11-01

    The American Medical Student Association (AMSA) Foundation is the programming arm of AMSA. The AMSA Foundation has administered several Title VII contracts designed to enhance the primary care education, leadership development, and cultural competence of the next generation of physicians, dentists, and other graduate-level health professionals. The authors discuss several AMSA programs developed with Title VII funding: Generalist Physicians in Training; Promoting, Reinforcing, and Improving Medical Education; National Primary Care Week; Leadership Seminar Series; and Achieving Diversity in Dentistry and Medicine. This article summarizes the work of these programs and discusses the impact that decreased funding has had on the training of our nation's future health professionals.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  13. A systematic review of the impact of stroke on social support and social networks: associated factors and patterns of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Sarah; Moss, Becky; Harrison, Kirsty; Hilari, Katerina

    2016-08-01

    Identify what factors are associated with functional social support and social network post stroke; explore stroke survivors' perspectives on what changes occur and how they are perceived. The following electronic databases were systematically searched up to May 2015: Academic Search Complete; CINAHL Plus; E-journals; Health Policy Reference Centre; MEDLINE; PsycARTICLES; PsycINFO; and SocINDEX. PRISMA guidelines were followed in the conduct and reporting of this review. All included studies were critically appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program tools. Meta-ethnographic techniques were used to integrate findings from the qualitative studies. Given the heterogeneous nature of the quantitative studies, data synthesis was narrative. Seventy research reports met the eligibility criteria: 22 qualitative and 48 quantitative reporting on 4,816 stroke survivors. The qualitative studies described a contraction of the social network, with non-kin contact being vulnerable. Although family were more robust network members, significant strain was observed within the family unit. In the quantitative studies, poor functional social support was associated with depression (13/14 studies), reduced quality of life (6/6 studies) and worse physical recovery (2/2 studies). Reduced social network was associated with depression (7/8 studies), severity of disability (2/2 studies) and aphasia (2/2 studies). Although most indicators of social network reduced post stroke (for example, contact with friends, 5/5 studies), the perception of feeling supported remained relatively stable (4/4 studies). Following a stroke non-kin contact is vulnerable, strain is observed within the family unit, and poor social support is associated with depressive symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The association between high on-treatment platelet reactivity and early recurrence of ischemic events after minor stroke or TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zilong; Zheng, Huaguang; Wang, Fei; Wang, Anxin; Liu, Liping; Dong, Kehui; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yilong; Cao, Yibin

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of HTPR in predicting early recurrence of ischemic events in patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. From January 2014 to September 2014, a single center continuously enrolled patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA and gave them antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin with clopidogrel. HTPR was assessed by TEG after 7 days of antiplatelet therapy and detected CYP2C19 genotype. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was assessed 3 months after onset. The incidence of recurrent ischemic events was compared between the HTPR and NTPR groups with the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk factors associated with recurrent ischemic events. We enrolled 278 eligible patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA. Through TEG testing, patients with HTPR were 22.7%, and carriers were not associated with HTPR to ADP by TEG-ADP(%) (p = 0.193). A total of 265 patients completed 3 months of follow-up, and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with HTPR had a higher percentage of recurrent ischemic events compared with patients with NTPR (p = 0.002). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, history of ischemic stroke or TIA (HR 4.45, 95% CI 1.77-11.16, p = 0.001) and HTPR (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.41-7.91, p = 0.006) was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events. In patients with minor stroke or TIA, the prevalence of HTPR was 22.7%, and HTPR was independently associated with recurrent ischemic events.

  15. Strong complement activation after acute ischemic stroke is associated with unfavorable outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Széplaki, Gábor; Szegedi, Róbert; Hirschberg, Kristóf

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: According to data from animal models, complement activation plays a major role in the brain injury after acute ischemic stroke. Scarce findings are, however, available on the detection of complement activation products in stroke patients. METHODS: We have measured plasma levels...... of the five complement activation products (C1rC1sC1inh, C4d, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9) in samples of 26 patients with ischemic stroke upon admission. Twenty-six patients with severe carotid atherosclerosis served as patient controls. RESULTS: Levels of two activation products (SC5b-9 and C4d)) were significantly...... elevated in the plasma of stroke patients, SC5b-9 levels, exhibited significant positive correlation with the clinical severity of stroke, the severity of neurological deficit, as well as with the level of functional disability. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that complement activation plays an active...

  16. Position of the American Dietetic Association: oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touger-Decker, Riva; Mobley, Connie C

    2007-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition is an integral component of oral health. The American Dietetic Association supports the integration of oral health with nutrition services, education, and research. Collaboration between dietetics and dental professionals is recommended for oral health promotion and disease prevention and intervention. Scientific and epidemiological data suggest a lifelong synergy between nutrition and the integrity of the oral cavity in health and disease. Oral health and nutrition have a synergistic bidirectional relationship. Oral infectious diseases, as well as acute, chronic, and terminal systemic diseases with oral manifestations, impact the functional ability to eat as well as diet and nutrition status. Likewise, nutrition and diet may affect the development and integrity of the oral cavity as well as the progression of oral diseases. As we advance in our discoveries of the links between oral and nutrition health, practitioners of both disciplines must learn to provide screening, baseline education, and referral to each other as part of comprehensive client/patient care. Dietetics practice requires registered dietitians to provide medical nutrition therapy that incorporates a person's total health needs, including oral health. Inclusion of both didactic and clinical practice concepts that illustrate the role of nutrition in oral health is essential in both dental and dietetic education programs. Collaborative endeavors between dietetics and dentistry in research, education, and delineation of health provider practice roles are needed to ensure comprehensive health care. The multifaceted interactions between diet, nutrition, and oral health in practice, education, and research in both dietetics and dentistry merit continued, detailed delineation.

  17. MicroRNA-410 regulated lipoprotein lipase variant rs13702 is associated with stroke incidence and modulated by diet in the randomized controlled PREDIMED trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Dolores; Sorlí, Jose V; Estruch, Ramon; Coltell, Oscar; Ortega-Azorín, Carolina; Portolés, Olga; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Bulló, Mónica; Fitó, Montserrat; Arós, Fernando; Lapetra, José; Asensio, Eva M; Sáez, Guillermo T; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Fiol, Miquel; Vinyoles, Ernest; Pintó, Xavier; Richardson, Kris; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, Jose M

    2014-08-01

    association between a microRNA target site variant and stroke incidence, which is modulated by diet in terms of decreasing triglycerides and possibly stroke risk in rs13702 C allele carriers after a high-unsaturated fat MedDiet intervention. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Spasticity and its association with functioning and health-related quality of life 18 months after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; von Arbin, Magnus; Widén Holmqvist, Lotta; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2006-01-01

    There is no consensus concerning the presence of spasticity or the relationship between spasticity and functioning and spasticity and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in the stable phase after stroke. The aim of the present study was to describe, 18 months after stroke, the frequency of spasticity and its association with functioning and HRQL. In a cohort of 66 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, studied prospectively, the following parameters were assessed 18 months after stroke: spasticity, by the Modified Ashworth Scale (0-4 points with 1+ as the modification), muscle stiffness, by self-report, abnormal tendon reflexes, by physical examination, motor performance, by the Lindmark Motor Assessment Scale, mobility, by the Rivermead Mobility Index, activities of daily living, by the Barthel Index, and HRQL, by the Swedish Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36). Of 66 patients studied, 38 were hemiparetic; of these, 13 displayed spasticity, 12 had increased tendon reflexes, and 7 reported muscle stiffness 18 months after stroke. Weak (r < 0.5) to moderate (r = 0.5-0.75) correlations were seen between spasticity and functioning scores. Correlations between spasticity and HRQL were generally weak (r < 0.5). Hemiparetic patients without spasticity had significantly better functioning scores and significantly better HRQL on 1 of the 8 SF-36 health scales (physical functioning) than patients with spasticity. Few patients displayed spasticity 18 months after stroke. Spasticity might contribute to impairment of movement function and to limitation of activity, but seems to have a less pronounced effect on HRQL.

  19. Social network, social support, and risk of incident stroke: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Iso, Hiroyasu; Mosley, Thomas H; Rose, Kathryn M; Lutsey, Pamela L

    2014-10-01

    Having a small social network and lack of social support have been associated with incident coronary heart disease; however, epidemiological evidence for incident stroke is limited. We assessed the longitudinal association of a small social network and lack of social support with risk of incident stroke and evaluated whether the association was partly mediated by vital exhaustion and inflammation. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study measured social network and social support in 13 686 men and women (mean, 57 years; 56% women; 24% black; 76% white) without a history of stroke. Social network was assessed by the 10-item Lubben Social Network Scale and social support by a 16-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-Short Form. During a median follow-up of 18.6 years, 905 incident strokes occurred. Relative to participants with a large social network, those with a small social network had a higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.44 [1.02-2.04]) after adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic variables, marital status, behavioral risk factors, and major stroke risk factors. Vital exhaustion, but not inflammation, partly mediated the association between a small social network and incident stroke. Social support was unrelated to incident stroke. In this sample of US community-dwelling men and women, having a small social network was associated with excess risk of incident stroke. As with other cardiovascular conditions, having a small social network may be associated with a modestly increased risk of incident stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Association of early National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improvement with vessel recanalization and functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharitonova, Tatiana; Mikulik, Robert; Roine, Risto O; Soinne, Lauri; Ahmed, Niaz; Wahlgren, Nils

    2011-06-01

    Early neurological improvement (ENI) after thrombolytic therapy of acute stroke has been linked with recanalization and favorable outcome, although its definition shows considerable variation. We tested the ability of ENI, as defined in previous publications, to predict vessel recanalization and 3-month functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis recorded in an extensive patient cohort in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register (SITS-ISTR). Of 21,534 patients registered between December 2002 and December 2008, 798 patients (3.7%) had CT- or MR angiography-documented baseline vessel occlusion and also angiography data at 22 to 36 hours post-treatment. ENI definitions assessed at 2 hours and 24 hours post-treatment were (1) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score improvement ≥4 points from baseline; (2) NIHSS 0, 1, or improvement ≥8; (3) NIHSS ≤3 or improvement ≥10; (4) improvement by 20%; (5) 40% from baseline; or (6) NIHSS score 0 to 1. Receiver operating curve analysis and multiple logistic regression were performed to evaluate the association of ENI with vessel recanalization and favorable functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 2 at 3 months). ENI at 2 hours had fair accuracy to diagnose recanalization as derived from receiver operating curve analysis. Definitions of improvement based on percent of NIHSS score change from baseline demonstrate better accuracy to diagnose recanalization at 2 hours and 24 hours than the definitions based on NIHSS cutoffs (the best performance at 2 hours was area under the curve 0.633, sensitivity 58%, specificity 69%, positive predictive value 68%, and negative predictive value 59% for 20% improvement; and area under the curve 0.692, sensitivity 69%, specificity 70%, positive pr