WorldWideScience

Sample records for stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae

  1. Hydrogen-Poor Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Elena; Mazzali, Paolo A.

    Hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae (SNe) signal the explosive death of stars more massive than the progenitors of hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae, i.e., approximately in the range 15-50 M⊙ in main sequence. Since hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae include those that accompany gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were all rigorously identified with type Ic supernovae, their explosion energies cover almost two decades. The light curves and spectra are consequently very heterogeneous and often bear the signature of an asymmetric, i.e., aspherical, explosion. Asphericity is best traced by early-time (within days of the explosion) optical spectropolarimetry and by late-epoch (more than ˜ 100 days after explosion) low-resolution spectroscopy. While the relationship between hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae to hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae is not understood, a known case of association between an ultra-long gamma-ray burst and a very luminous hydrogen-poor supernova may help unraveling the connection. This is tantalizingly pointing to a magnetar powering source for both phenomena, although this scenario is still highly speculative. Host galaxies of hydrogen-poor supernovae are always star forming; in those of completely stripped supernovae and gamma-ray burst supernovae, the spatial distribution of the explosions follows the blue/ultraviolet light, with a correlation that is more than linear.

  2. The Carnegie Supernova Project I. Photometry data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Anderson, J. P.; Contreras, C.; Heinrich-Josties, E.; Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M.; Anais, J.; Boldt, L.; Busta, L.; Burns, C. R.; Campillay, A.; Corco, C.; Castellon, S.; Folatelli, G.; González, C.; Holmbo, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Krzeminski, W.; Salgado, F.; Serón, J.; Torres-Robledo, S.; Freedman, W. L.; Hamuy, M.; Krisciunas, K.; Madore, B. F.; Persson, S. E.; Roth, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Taddia, F.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample. The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of 150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper. Based on observations collected at Las Campanas Observatory.Tables 2-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/609/A134

  3. Core-Collapse Supernovae -- the Outliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, Stan

    2011-04-01

    After a brief review of current efforts to model the explosion mechanism for "ordinary," core collapse supernovae and the neutrino signal expected from them, some of the outliers predicted by current theory will be discussed. Chief among these are the pulsational-pair instability supernovae, which can occur for stars as light as 80 solar masses or as heavy as 140 solar masses, or more. These explosions, which would have been common in the early universe and persist today, can make supernovae that do or do not recur, and that can be either exceptionally faint or bright or both. They leave behind black holes with masses near 40 solar masses, and produce an abundance pattern that is rich in CNO, much like that seen in the ultra-iron poor stars. Other models for unusual supernovae, including magnetar-powered supernovae and 8 - 10 solar mass supernovae will be mentioned as time allows.

  4. Toward a Standard Model of Core Collapse Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzacappa, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the current status of core collapse supernova models and the future developments needed to achieve significant advances in understanding the supernova mechanism and supernova phenomenology, i.e., in developing a supernova standard model.

  5. Constraining high-energy neutrino emission from choked jets in stripped-envelope supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2018-01-01

    There are indications that γ-ray dark objects such as supernovae (SNe) with choked jets, and the cores of active galactic nuclei may contribute to the diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos measured by the IceCube observatory. In particular, stripped-envelope SNe have received much attention since they are capable of producing relativistic jets and could explain the diversity in observations of collapsar explosions (e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), low-luminosity GRBs, and Type Ibc SNe). We use an unbinned maximum likelihood method to search for spatial and temporal coincidences between Type Ibc core-collapse SNe, which may harbor a choked jet, and muon neutrinos from a sample of IceCube up-going track-like events measured from May 2011–May 2012. In this stacking analysis, we find no significant deviation from a background-only hypothesis using one year of data, and are able to place upper limits on the total amount of isotropic equivalent energy that choked jet core-collapse SNe deposit in cosmic rays Script Ecr and the fraction of core-collapse SNe which have a jet pointed towards Earth fjet. This analysis can be extended with yet to be made public IceCube data, and the increased amount of optically detected core-collapse SNe discovered by wide field-of-view surveys such as the Palomar Transient Factory and All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae. The choked jet SNe/high-energy cosmic neutrino connection can be more tightly constrained in the near future.

  6. Magnetorotational Explosions of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Core-collapse supernovae are accompanied by formation of neutron stars. The gravitation energy is transformed into the energy of the explosion, observed as SN II, SN Ib,c type supernovae. We present results of 2-D MHD simulations, where the source of energy is rotation, and magnetic eld serves as a "transition belt" for the transformation of the rotation energy into the energy of the explosion. The toroidal part of the magnetic energy initially grows linearly with time due to dierential rotation. When the twisted toroidal component strongly exceeds the poloidal eld, magneto-rotational instability develops, leading to a drastic acceleration in the growth of magnetic energy. Finally, a fast MHD shock is formed, producing a supernova explosion. Mildly collimated jet is produced for dipole-like type of the initial field. At very high initial magnetic field no MRI development was found.

  7. Nucleosynthesis in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Taylor Shannon; Viktoria Ohstrom, Eva; Harris, James Austin; Hix, William R.

    2018-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis which occurs in core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) is one of the most important sources of elements in the universe. Elements from Oxygen through Iron come predominantly from supernovae, and contributions of heavier elements are also possible through processes like the weak r-process, the gamma process and the light element primary process. The composition of the ejecta depends on the mechanism of the explosion, thus simulations of high physical fidelity are needed to explore what elements and isotopes CCSN can contribute to Galactic Chemical Evolution. We will analyze the nucleosynthesis results from self-consistent CCSN simulations performed with CHIMERA, a multi-dimensional neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics code. Much of our understanding of CCSN nucleosynthesis comes from parameterized models, but unlike CHIMERA these fail to address essential physics, including turbulent flow/instability and neutrino-matter interaction. We will present nucleosynthesis predictions for the explosion of a 9.6 solar mass first generation star, relying both on results of the 160 species nuclear reaction network used in CHIMERA within this model and on post-processing with a more extensive network. The lowest mass iron core-collapse supernovae, like this model, are distinct from their more massive brethren, with their explosion mechanism and nucleosynthesis being more like electron capture supernovae resulting from Oxygen-Neon white dwarves. We will highlight the differences between the nucleosynthesis in this model and more massive supernovae. The inline 160 species network is a feature unique to CHIMERA, making this the most sophisticated model to date for a star of this type. We will discuss the need and mechanism to extrapolate the post-processing to times post-simulation and analyze the uncertainties this introduces for supernova nucleosynthesis. We will also compare the results from the inline 160 species network to the post-processing results to study further

  8. Asymmetric explosion of core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazeroni, Remi

    2016-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova represents the ultimate stage of the evolution of massive stars.The iron core contraction may be followed by a gigantic explosion which gives birth to a neutron star.The multidimensional dynamics of the innermost region, during the first hundreds milliseconds, plays a decisive role on the explosion success because hydrodynamical instabilities are able to break the spherical symmetry of the collapse. Large scale transverse motions generated by two instabilities, the neutrino-driven convection and the Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI),increase the heating efficiency up to the point of launching an asymmetric explosion and influencing the birth properties of the neutron star. In this thesis, hydrodynamical instabilities are studied using numerical simulations of simplified models. These models enable a wide exploration of the parameter space and a better physical understanding of the instabilities, generally inaccessible to realistic models.The non-linear regime of SASI is analysed to characterize the conditions under which a spiral mode prevails and to assess its ability to redistribute angular momentum radially.The influence of rotation on the shock dynamics is also addressed. For fast enough rotation rates, a corotation instability overlaps with SASI and greatly impacts the dynamics. The simulations enable to better constrain the effect of non-axisymmetric modes on the angular momentum budget of the iron core collapsing into a neutron star. SASI may under specific conditions spin up or down the pulsar born during the explosion. Finally, an idealised model of the heating region is studied to characterize the non-linear onset of convection by perturbations such as those produced by SASI or pre-collapse combustion inhomogeneities. The dimensionality issue is examined to stress the beneficial consequences of the three-dimensional dynamics on the onset of the explosion. (author) [fr

  9. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D

    2017-10-28

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from

  10. A physically motivated classification of stripped-envelope supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, S. J.; Mazzali, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    The classification of stripped-envelope supernovae (SE-SNe) is revisited using modern data sets. Spectra are analysed using an empirical method to 'blindly' categorize SNe according to spectral feature strength and appearance. This method makes a clear distinction between SNe that are He-rich (IIb/Ib) and He-poor (Ic), and further analysis is performed on each subgroup. For He-rich SNe, the presence of H becomes the focus. The strength, velocity, and ratio between absorption and emission of H α are measured, along with additional analysis of He I lines, in order to categorize the SNe. The He-poor SNe are ordered according to the number of absorption features N present in the spectra, which is a measure of the degree of line blending. The kinetic energy per unit mass Ek/Mej is strongly affected by mass at high velocity, and such situations principally occur when the outer density profile of the ejecta is shallow, leading to the blending of lines. Using the results, the existing SE-SN taxonomic scheme is adapted. He-rich SNe are split into four groups, IIb, IIb(I), Ib(II) and Ib, which represent H-rich to H-poor SNe. The SNe Ic category of broad-lined Ic (Ic-BL) is abandoned in favour of quantifying the line blending via 〈N〉 before peak. To better reflect the physical parameters of the explosions, the velocity of Si Uii at peak and the half-luminosity decay time t+1/2 are included to give SNe Ic a designation of Ic-〈N〉(vp, SiII/t+1/2).

  11. The Carnegie Supernova Project I. Analysis of stripped-envelope supernova light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Bersten, M.; Baron, E.; Burns, C.; Contreras, C.; Holmbo, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M.; Sollerman, J.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2018-02-01

    Stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe) include H-poor (Type IIb), H-free (Type Ib), and He-free (Type Ic) events thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars. The exact nature of their progenitors is a matter of debate with several lines of evidence pointing towards intermediate mass (Minithttp://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/609/A136

  12. Core-Collapse Supernovae, Neutrinos, and Gravitational Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, C.D.; O'Connor, E.P.; Gossan, S.; Abdikamalov, E.; Gamma, U.C.T.; Drasco, S.

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most energetic cosmic cataclysms. They are prodigious emitters of neutrinos and quite likely strong galactic sources of gravitational waves. Observation of both neutrinos and gravitational waves from the next galactic or near extragalactic core-collapse supernova will yield a wealth of information on the explosion mechanism, but also on the structure and angular momentum of the progenitor star, and on aspects of fundamental physics such as the equation of state of nuclear matter at high densities and low entropies. In this contribution to the proceedings of the Neutrino 2012 conference, we summarize recent progress made in the theoretical understanding and modeling of core-collapse supernovae. In this, our emphasis is on multi-dimensional processes involved in the explosion mechanism such as neutrino-driven convection and the standing accretion shock instability. As an example of how supernova neutrinos can be used to probe fundamental physics, we discuss how the rise time of the electron antineutrino flux observed in detectors can be used to probe the neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we lay out aspects of the neutrino and gravitational-wave signature of core-collapse supernovae and discuss the power of combined analysis of neutrino and gravitational wave data from the next galactic core-collapse supernova

  13. The Carnegie Supernova Project I: analysis of stripped-envelope supernova light curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Bersten, M.

    2018-01-01

    Stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe) include H-poor (Type IIb), H-free (Type Ib) and He-free (Type Ic) events thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars. The exact nature of their progenitors is a matter of debate. Here we present the analysis of the light curves of 34 SE SNe...... published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I), which are unparalleled in terms of photometric accuracy and wavelength range. Light-curve parameters are estimated through the fits of an analytical function and trends are searched for among the resulting fit parameters. We found a tentative correlation...

  14. The interest in neutrinos from core collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, M.L. [Universita dell' Aquila, I-67010 (Italy); Ianni, A. [Universita dell' Aquila, I-67010 (Italy); Vissani, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    The understanding of core collapse supernovae (SN) is an important open problem. These objects are intense sources of neutrinos, that can be observed with several types of terrestrial detectors. These two simple considerations, already, motivate close attention toward neutrino interactions in the region from few to 200 MeV. In this work, we offer a selection of results and expectations, and discuss important goals still to be reached.

  15. Neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.H.; Haxton, W.C.; Hoffman, R.D.; Woosley, S.E.; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA

    1990-01-01

    Almost all of the 3·10 53 ergs liberated in a core collapse supernova is radiated as neutrinos by the cooling neutron star. The neutrinos can excite nuclei in the mantle of the star by their neutral and charged current reactions. The resulting spallation reactions are an important nuleosynthesis mechanism that may be responsible for the galactic abundances of 7 Li, 11 B, 19 F, 138 La, 180 Ta, and number of other nuclei. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardall, Christian Y [ORNL; Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Budiardja, R. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Marronetti, Pedro [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrohysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observale by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes by collapse and explosion.

  17. Colloquium: Perspectives on core-collapse supernova theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse theory brings together many facets of high-energy and nuclear astrophysics and the numerical arts to present theorists with one of the most important, yet frustrating, astronomical questions: “What is the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions?” A review of all the physics and the 50-year history involved would soon bury the reader in minutiae that could easily obscure the essential elements of the phenomenon, as we understand it today. Moreover, much remains to be discovered and explained, and a complicated review of an unresolved subject in flux could grow stale fast. Therefore, this paper describes various important facts and perspectives that may have escaped the attention of those interested in this puzzle. Furthermore, an attempt to describe the modern theory’s physical underpinnings and a brief summary of the current state of play are given. In the process, a few myths that have crept into modern discourse are identified. However, there is much more to do and humility in the face of this age-old challenge is clearly the most prudent stance as its eventual resolution is sought.

  18. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. II. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Joggerst, Candace C.; Fryer, Chris L.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Heger, Alexander; Holz, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars is prerequisite to elucidating the nature of primeval galaxies, the chemical enrichment and reionization of the early intergalactic medium, and the origin of supermassive black holes. While the primordial initial mass function (IMF) remains unknown, recent evidence from numerical simulations and stellar archaeology suggests that some Pop III stars may have had lower masses than previously thought, 15-50 M ☉ in addition to 50-500 M ☉ . The detection of Pop III supernovae (SNe) by JWST, WFIRST, or the TMT could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time. We present numerical simulations of 15-40 M ☉ Pop III core-collapse SNe performed with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that they will be visible in the earliest galaxies out to z ∼ 10-15, tracing their star formation rates and in some cases revealing their positions on the sky. Since the central engines of Pop III and solar-metallicity core-collapse SNe are quite similar, future detection of any Type II SNe by next-generation NIR instruments will in general be limited to this epoch.

  19. Impact of Neutrino Opacities on Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Fischer, Tobias; Nakamura, Ko; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    The accurate description of neutrino opacities is central to both the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) phenomenon and the validity of the explosion mechanism itself. In this work, we study in a systematic fashion the role of a variety of well-selected neutrino opacities in CCSN simulations where the multi-energy, three-flavor neutrino transport is solved using the isotropic diffusion source approximation (IDSA) scheme. To verify our code, we first present results from one-dimensional (1D) simulations following the core collapse, bounce, and ∼250 ms postbounce of a 15 {M}ȯ star using a standard set of neutrino opacities by Bruenn. A detailed comparison with published results supports the reliability of our three-flavor IDSA scheme using the standard opacity set. We then investigate in 1D simulations how individual opacity updates lead to differences with the baseline run with the standard opacity set. Through detailed comparisons with previous work, we check the validity of our implementation of each update in a step-by-step manner. Individual neutrino opacities with the largest impact on the overall evolution in 1D simulations are selected for systematic comparisons in our two-dimensional (2D) simulations. Special attention is given to the criterion of explodability in the 2D models. We discuss the implications of these results as well as its limitations and the requirements for future, more elaborate CCSN modeling.

  20. Supernova seismology: gravitational wave signatures of rapidly rotating core collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim; Klion, Hannah; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-06-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce, and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with non-linear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early post-bounce GW signal is produced by the fundamental quadrupolar oscillation mode of the PNS, at a frequency 0.70 ≲ f ≲ 0.80 kHz, whose energy is largely trapped within the PNS and leaks out on a ˜10-ms time-scale. Quasi-radial oscillations are not trapped within the PNS and quickly propagate outwards until they steepen into shocks. Both the PNS structure and Coriolis/centrifugal forces have a strong impact on the GW spectrum, and a detection of the GW signal can therefore be used to constrain progenitor properties.

  1. Uncertainty in Explosive Yields of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sydney; Fryer, Chris; Even, Wesley P.; Jones, Samuel; Pignatari, Marco; NuGrid Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The chemical composition of the ejecta from the violent explosions of massive stars has been vital for probing the nature of the explosions and their effect on galactic chemical evolution and universal chemical composition. The sensitivity of numerical explosive nucleosynthetic yields in core-collapse supernovae to several key parameters is examined in one dimension. This uncertainty study is applied to 15, 20, and 25 solar mass stars with different energy prescriptions for shock revival. The effects of the resolution of the temperature and density profiles run through the NuGrid nuclear network are explored, as well as the differences between large and small isotope networks for the initial conditions of the explosion calculations.

  2. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-01-01

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables

  3. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  4. iPTF Discoveries of Recent Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, F.; Ferretti, R.; Papadogiannakis, S.; Petrushevska, T.; Fremling, C.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Nyholm, A.; Roy, R.; Hangard, L.; Horesh, A.; Khazov, D.; Knezevic, S.; Johansson, J.; Leloudas, G.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Soumagnac, M.; Vreeswijk, P.; Yaron, O.; Bar, I.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S.; Blagorodnova, N.

    2016-05-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (ATel #4807) reports the discovery and classification of the following core-collapse SNe. Our automated candidate vetting to distinguish a real astrophysical source (1.0) from bogus artifacts (0.0) is powered by three generations of machine learning algorithms: RB2 (Brink et al. 2013MNRAS.435.1047B), RB4 (Rebbapragada et al. 2015AAS...22543402R) and RB5 (Wozniak et al. 2013AAS...22143105W).

  5. A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF MID-INFRARED EMISSION FROM CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE WITH SPIRITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lau, Ryan; Jencson, Jacob; Prince, Thomas [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fox, Ori D.; Williams, Robert [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Perley, Daniel [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 København Ø (Denmark); Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, S. E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Johansson, Joel [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Masci, Frank [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cody, Ann Marie, E-mail: st@astro.caltech.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We present a systematic study of mid-infrared emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with Spitzer /IRAC as part of the ongoing SPIRITS survey. We detect 8 Type Ia and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type Ia/Ibc SNe become undetectable within three years of explosion, whereas 22 ± 11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected. Five Type II SNe are detected even two decades after discovery (SN 1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J). Warm dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower limit on mass are obtained by fitting the two IRAC bands, assuming an optically thin dust shell. We derive warm dust masses between 10{sup −6} and 10{sup −2} M {sub ⊙} and dust color temperatures between 200 and 1280 K. This observed warm dust could be pre-existing or newly created, but in either case represents a lower limit to the dust mass because cooler dust may be present. We present three case studies of extreme SNe. SN 2011ja (II-P) was over-luminous ([4.5] = −15.6 mag) at 900 days post explosion with increasing hot dust mass, suggesting either an episode of dust formation or intensifying circumstellar material (CSM) interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi (II-P) showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month, suggesting either dust destruction or reduced dust heating. The IR luminosity of SN 2014C (Ib) stayed constant over 800 days, possibly due to strong CSM interaction with an H-rich shell, which is rare among stripped-envelope SNe. The observations suggest that this CSM shell originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years pre-explosion. The observed diversity demonstrates the power of mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe.

  6. Delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae with late events resulting from binary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapartas, E.; de Mink, S. E.; Izzard, R. G.; Yoon, S.-C.; Badenes, C.; Götberg, Y.; de Koter, A.; Neijssel, C. J.; Renzo, M.; Schootemeijer, A.; Shrotriya, T. S.

    2017-05-01

    Most massive stars, the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, are in close binary systems and may interact with their companion through mass transfer or merging. We undertake a population synthesis study to compute the delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae, that is, the supernova rate versus time following a starburst, taking into account binary interactions. We test the systematic robustness of our results by running various simulations to account for the uncertainties in our standard assumptions. We find that a significant fraction, %, of core-collapse supernovae are "late", that is, they occur 50-200 Myr after birth, when all massive single stars have already exploded. These late events originate predominantly from binary systems with at least one, or, in most cases, with both stars initially being of intermediate mass (4-8 M⊙). The main evolutionary channels that contribute often involve either the merging of the initially more massive primary star with its companion or the engulfment of the remaining core of the primary by the expanding secondary that has accreted mass at an earlier evolutionary stage. Also, the total number of core-collapse supernovae increases by % because of binarity for the same initial stellar mass. The high rate implies that we should have already observed such late core-collapse supernovae, but have not recognized them as such. We argue that φ Persei is a likely progenitor and that eccentric neutron star - white dwarf systems are likely descendants. Late events can help explain the discrepancy in the delay-time distributions derived from supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds and extragalactic type Ia events, lowering the contribution of prompt Ia events. We discuss ways to test these predictions and speculate on the implications for supernova feedback in simulations of galaxy evolution.

  7. Towards asteroseismology of core-collapse supernovae with gravitational-wave observations - I. Cowling approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Passamonti, Andrea; Font, José A.

    2018-03-01

    Gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae are produced by the excitation of different oscillation modes in the protoneutron star (PNS) and its surroundings, including the shock. In this work we study the relationship between the post-bounce oscillation spectrum of the PNS-shock system and the characteristic frequencies observed in gravitational-wave signals from core-collapse simulations. This is a fundamental first step in order to develop a procedure to infer astrophysical parameters of the PNS formed in core-collapse supernovae. Our method combines information from the oscillation spectrum of the PNS, obtained through linear perturbation analysis in general relativity of a background physical system, with information from the gravitational-wave spectrum of the corresponding non-linear, core-collapse simulation. Using results from the simulation of the collapse of a 35 M⊙ pre-supernova progenitor we show that both types of spectra are indeed related and we are able to identify the modes of oscillation of the PNS, namely g-modes, p-modes, hybrid modes, and standing accretion shock instability (SASI) modes, obtaining a remarkably close correspondence with the time-frequency distribution of the gravitational-wave modes. The analysis presented in this paper provides a proof of concept that asteroseismology is indeed possible in the core-collapse scenario, and it may serve as a basis for future work on PNS parameter inference based on gravitational-wave observations.

  8. The Carnegie Supernova Project I. Methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Taddia, F.; Burns, C. R.; Phillips, M. M.; Bersten, M.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Holmbo, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Hoeflich, P.; Leloudas, G.; Morrell, N.; Sollerman, J.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2018-02-01

    We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SN photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-type (i.e., SNe IIb, SNe Ib, SNe Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0 d to +20 d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening (i.e., E(B-V)host 0.20 mag) objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999, PASP, 111, 63) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction AVhost and RVhost. In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of RVhost is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of AVhost through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence that SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger RVhost values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. The later finding is consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation. Based on observations collected at Las Campanas Observatory.

  9. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts in TMT Era SB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Core-Collapse Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts in TMT Era. S. B. Pandey. Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak,. Nainital 263 129, India. e-mail: shashi@aries.res.in. Received 8 May 2013; accepted 25 June 2013. Abstract. Study of energetic cosmic explosions as a part of time domain.

  10. Diffuse supernova neutrino background from extensive core-collapse simulations of 8-100 M⊙ progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Nakamura, Ko; Fischer, Tobias; Summa, Alexander; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Kotake, Kei

    2018-03-01

    We revisit the diffuse supernova neutrino background in light of recent systematic studies of stellar core collapse that reveal the quantitative impacts of the progenitor conditions on the collapse process. In general, the dependence of the core-collapse neutrino emission on the progenitor is not monotonic in progenitor initial mass, but we show that it can, at first order, be characterized by the core compactness. For the first time, we incorporate the detailed variations in the neutrino emission over the entire mass range 8-100 M⊙, based on (i) a long-term simulation of the core collapse of an 8.8 M⊙ ONeMg core progenitor, (ii) over 100 simulations of iron core collapse to neutron stars, and (iii) half a dozen simulations of core collapse to black holes (the `failed channel'). The fraction of massive stars that undergo the failed channel remains uncertain, but in view of recent simulations which reveal high compactness to be conducive to collapse to black holes, we characterize the failed fraction by considering a threshold compactness above which massive stars collapse to black holes and below which the final remnant is a neutron star. We predict that future detections of the diffuse supernova neutrino background may have the power to reveal this threshold compactness, if its value is relatively small as suggested by interpretations of several recent astronomical observations.

  11. Numerical models of collisions between core-collapse supernovae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marle, A. -J; Smith, N.; Owocki, S.P.; van Veelen, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326820361

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations of luminous Type IIn supernovae (SNe) provide compelling evidence that massive circumstellar shells surround their progenitors. In this paper we investigate how the properties of such shells influence the SN light curve by conducting numerical simulations of the interaction

  12. Neutrino nucleosynthesis in core-collapse Supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverding, A.; Huther, L.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Langanke, K.; Heger, A.

    2018-01-01

    The neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis (v process) in supernova explosions of massive stars of solar metallicity with initial main sequence masses between 15 and 40 M⨀ has been studied. A new extensive set of neutrino-nucleus cross-sections for all the nuclei included in the reaction network is used and the average neutrino energies are reduced to agree with modern supernova simulations. Despite these changes the v process is found to contribute still significantly to the production of the nuclei 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La and 180Ta, even though the total yields for those nuclei are reduced. Furthermore we study in detail contributions of the v process to the production of radioactive isotopes 26Al, 22Na and confirm the production of 92Nb and 98Tc.

  13. Neutrino nucleosynthesis in core-collapse Supernova explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverding A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis (ν process in supernova explosions of massive stars of solar metallicity with initial main sequence masses between 15 and 40 M⊙ has been studied. A new extensive set of neutrino-nucleus cross-sections for all the nuclei included in the reaction network is used and the average neutrino energies are reduced to agree with modern supernova simulations. Despite these changes the ν process is found to contribute still significantly to the production of the nuclei 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La and 180Ta, even though the total yields for those nuclei are reduced. Furthermore we study in detail contributions of the ν process to the production of radioactive isotopes 26Al, 22Na and confirm the production of 92Nb and 98Tc.

  14. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Explosions Aided by General Relativity with Multidimensional Neutrino Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Evan P.; Couch, Sean M.

    2018-02-01

    We present results from simulations of core-collapse supernovae in FLASH using a newly implemented multidimensional neutrino transport scheme and a newly implemented general relativistic (GR) treatment of gravity. We use a two-moment method with an analytic closure (so-called M1 transport) for the neutrino transport. This transport is multienergy, multispecies, velocity dependent, and truly multidimensional, i.e., we do not assume the commonly used “ray-by-ray” approximation. Our GR gravity is implemented in our Newtonian hydrodynamics simulations via an effective relativistic potential that closely reproduces the GR structure of neutron stars and has been shown to match GR simulations of core collapse quite well. In axisymmetry, we simulate core-collapse supernovae with four different progenitor models in both Newtonian and GR gravity. We find that the more compact proto–neutron star structure realized in simulations with GR gravity gives higher neutrino luminosities and higher neutrino energies. These differences in turn give higher neutrino heating rates (upward of ∼20%–30% over the corresponding Newtonian gravity simulations) that increase the efficacy of the neutrino mechanism. Three of the four models successfully explode in the simulations assuming GREP gravity. In our Newtonian gravity simulations, two of the four models explode, but at times much later than observed in our GR gravity simulations. Our results, in both Newtonian and GR gravity, compare well with several other studies in the literature. These results conclusively show that the approximation of Newtonian gravity for simulating the core-collapse supernova central engine is not acceptable. We also simulate four additional models in GR gravity to highlight the growing disparity between parameterized 1D models of core-collapse supernovae and the current generation of 2D models.

  15. Supernovae. The bubble-like interior of the core-collapse supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A

    2015-01-30

    The death of massive stars is believed to involve aspheric explosions initiated by the collapse of an iron core. The specifics of these catastrophic explosions remain uncertain, due partly to limited observational constraints on asymmetries deep inside the star. Here we present near-infrared observations of the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, descendant of a type IIb core-collapse explosion, and a three-dimensional map of its interior unshocked ejecta. The remnant's interior has a bubble-like morphology that smoothly connects to and helps explain the multiringed structures seen in the remnant's bright reverse-shocked main shell of expanding debris. This internal structure may originate from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive (56)Ni-rich ejecta. If this is true, substantial amounts of its decay product, (56)Fe, may still reside in these interior cavities. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Observational studies of core-collapse supernova progenitors and their environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Tuomas

    2017-04-01

    In this doctoral thesis, core-collapse supernova progenitor stars are studied. Different ways to gain information on the progenitor stars of core-collapse supernovae are explored, with an emphasis on using the environments of supernovae. In the articles included in the thesis, various such methods are demonstrated and utilized to constrain the progenitor stars of different types of supernovae. The results have implications for the theory of stellar evolution, especially the relatively poorly understood evolution of stars massive enough to explode as core-collapse supernovae and, in particular, the role of mass loss in such stars. In Paper I, the associations between different types of core-collapse supernovae and the emission of their strongly star-forming host galaxies at different wavelengths are studied statistically. The radial distributions of these supernova types are also examined and compared to those in normal galaxies. In Paper II, the associations between different types of massive stars and star-forming regions in nearby galaxies are compared to studies using supernovae in an effort to approach the method quantitatively. The connection between type II-P supernovae and red supergiants, as well as results from massive main-sequence stars, are used to verify the validity of the method, and systematic effects are investigated. In Paper III, the results of a detailed follow-up programme of the interacting type II-L supernova SN 2013fc are presented. The supernova is found to be similar to the well-studied event SN 1998S. The environment of the event is compared to stellar population models, and the progenitor of SN 2013fc is found to be consistent with a massive red supergiant star. Paper IV describes the follow-up of the type Ic superluminous supernova Gaia16apd. Magnetar fits to the light curve are performed. The event is consistent with being powered by the spin-down of a newborn magnetar, and its spectroscopic and photometric evolution intermediate

  17. Systematic thermal reduction of neutronization in core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantina, A.F.; Donati, P.; Pizzochero, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate to what extent the temperature dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy can affect the neutronization of the stellar core prior to neutrino trapping during gravitational collapse. To this end, we implement a one-zone simulation to follow the collapse until β-equilibrium is reached and the lepton fraction remains constant. Since the strength of electron capture on the neutron-rich nuclei associated to the supernova scenario is still an open issue, we keep it as a free parameter. We find that the temperature dependence of the symmetry energy consistently yields a small reduction of deleptonization, which corresponds to a systematic effect on the shock wave energetics: the gain in dissociation energy of the shock has a small yet non-negligible value of about 0.4 foe (1 foe=10 51 erg) and this result is almost independent from the strength of nuclear electron capture. The presence of such a systematic effect and its robustness under changes of the parameters of the one-zone model are significant enough to justify further investigations with detailed numerical simulations of supernova explosions.

  18. Asymmetries in Core Collapse Supernovae Revealed by Maps of Radioactive Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Reynolds, S. P.; Fryer, C. L.; Madsen, K. K.; Wik, D. R.; Zoglauer, A.; Ellinger, C. I.; Alexander, D. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core collapse explosions, however the nature differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive Ti-44, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing core and that ejected into the surrounding medium, directly probes the explosion1asymmetries. Cassiopeia A is a young, nearby, core-collapse remnant from which Ti-44 emission has previously been detected, but not imaged. Asymmetries in the explosion have been indirectly inferred from a high ratio of observed Ti-44 emission to that estimated from (56)Ni9, from optical light echoes, and by jet-like features seen in the X-ray and optical ejecta. Here we report on the spatial maps and spectral properties of Ti-44 in Cassiopeia A. We find the Ti-44 to be distributed non-uniformly in the un-shocked interior of the remnant. This may explain the unexpected lack of correlation between the Ti-44 and iron X-ray emission, the latter only being visible in shock heated material. The observed spatial distribution rules out symmetric explosions even with a high level of convective mixing, as well as highly asymmetric bipolar explosions resulting from a fast rotating progenitor. Instead, these observations provide strong evidence for the development of low-mode convective instabilities in core-collapse supernovae.

  19. THE EXTENDED HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SUPERNOVA SURVEY: THE RATE OF CORE COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE TO z {approx} 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Riess, Adam G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Mattila, Seppo; Kankare, Erkki [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Mobasher, Bahram, E-mail: dahlen@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We use a sample of 45 core collapse supernovae detected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope to derive the core collapse supernova rate in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 1.3. In redshift bins centered on (z) = 0.39, (z) = 0.73, and (z) = 1.11, we find rates of 3.00{sup +1.28}{sub -0.94} {sup +1.04}{sub -0.57}, 7.39{sup +1.86}{sub -1.52} {sup +3.20}{sub -1.60}, and 9.57{sup +3.76}{sub -2.80} {sup +4.96}{sub -2.80}, respectively, given in units of yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} 10{sup -4} h {sup 3}{sub 70}. The rates have been corrected for host galaxy extinction, including supernovae missed in highly dust-enshrouded environments in infrared bright galaxies. The first errors are statistical while the second ones are the estimated systematic errors. We perform a detailed discussion of possible sources of systematic errors and note that these start to dominate over statistical errors at z > 0.5, emphasizing the need to better control the systematic effects. For example, a better understanding of the amount of dust extinction in the host galaxies and knowledge of the supernova luminosity function, in particular the fraction of faint M {approx}> -15 supernovae, is needed to better constrain the rates. When comparing our results with the core collapse supernova rate based on the star formation rate, we find a good agreement, consistent with the supernova rate following the star formation rate, as expected.

  20. Exploring the nuclear pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Helena; Stone, Jirina R

    2012-10-12

    The core-collapse supernova phenomenon, one of the most explosive events in the Universe, presents a challenge to theoretical astrophysics. Of the large variety of forms of matter present in core-collapse supernova, we focus on the transitional region between homogeneous (uniform) and inhomogeneous (pasta) phases. A three-dimensional, finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (3D-SHF)+BCS calculation yields, for the first time fully self-consistently, the critical density and temperature of both the onset of the pasta in inhomogeneous matter, consisting of neutron-rich heavy nuclei and a free neutron and electron gas, and its dissolution to a homogeneous neutron, proton, and electron liquid. We also identify density regions for different pasta formations between the two limits. We employ four different forms of the Skyrme interaction, SkM*, SLy4, NRAPR, and SQMC700 and find subtle variations in the low density and high density transitions into and out of the pasta phase. One new stable pasta shape has been identified, in addition to the classic ones, on the grid of densities and temperatures used in this work. Our results are critically compared to recent calculations of pasta formation in the quantum molecular dynamics approach and Thomas-Fermi and coexisting phase approximations to relativistic mean-field models.

  1. Multi-dimensional relativistic simulations of core-collapse supernovae with energy-dependent neutrino transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2009-05-07

    In this thesis, we have presented the first multi-dimensional models of core-collapse supernovae that combine a detailed, up-to-date treatment of neutrino transport, the equation of state, and - in particular - general relativistic gravity. Building on the well-tested neutrino transport code VERTEX and the GR hydrodynamics code CoCoNuT, we developed and implemented a relativistic generalization of a ray-by-ray-plus method for energy-dependent neutrino transport. The result of these effort, the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, also incorporates a number of improved numerical techniques that have not been used in the code components VERTEX and CoCoNuT before. In order to validate the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, we conducted several test simulations in spherical symmetry, most notably a comparison with the one-dimensional relativistic supernova code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN and the Newtonian PROMETHEUSVERTEX code. (orig.)

  2. Flavor-dependent neutrino angular distribution in core-collapse supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborra, Irene; Huedepohl, Lorenz; Raffelt, Georg

    2017-01-01

    According to recent studies, the collective flavor evolution of neutrinos in core-collapse supernovae depends strongly on the flavor-dependent angular distribution of the local neutrino radiation field, notably on the angular intensity of the electron-lepton number carried by neutrinos....... To facilitate further investigations of this subject, we study the energy and angle distributions of the neutrino radiation field computed with the Vertex neutrino-transport code for several spherically symmetric (1D) supernova simulations (of progenitor masses 11.2, 15 and 25 M_sun) and explain how to extract...... this information from additional models of the Garching group. Beginning in the decoupling region ("neutrino sphere"), the distributions are more and more forward peaked in the radial direction with an angular spread that is largest for $\

  3. Multi-dimensional relativistic simulations of core-collapse supernovae with energy-dependent neutrino transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we have presented the first multi-dimensional models of core-collapse supernovae that combine a detailed, up-to-date treatment of neutrino transport, the equation of state, and - in particular - general relativistic gravity. Building on the well-tested neutrino transport code VERTEX and the GR hydrodynamics code CoCoNuT, we developed and implemented a relativistic generalization of a ray-by-ray-plus method for energy-dependent neutrino transport. The result of these effort, the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, also incorporates a number of improved numerical techniques that have not been used in the code components VERTEX and CoCoNuT before. In order to validate the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, we conducted several test simulations in spherical symmetry, most notably a comparison with the one-dimensional relativistic supernova code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN and the Newtonian PROMETHEUSVERTEX code. (orig.)

  4. Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors In The Era Of Untargeted Transient Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nathan Edward

    2014-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are the highly energetic explosions of massive stars (≳ 8 M⊙) that are pervasive in their influence throughout astrophysics. They are the phenomenon with primary responsibility for enriching the universe with many of the heavy elements (like carbon and oxygen) that are needed for life, provide a critical feedback pressure which helps to shape the galaxies that host them, and are the likely formation mechanism for stellar mass black holes. In the past decade, the study of these explosions has been revolutionized by the advent of wide field, untargeted transient searches like Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). These new searches permit the discovery of SNe at unprecedented rates, and absent of many of the selection effects that have enforced biases on past, targeted transient searches. This thesis presents a broad survey of core-collapse SN phenomenology exhibited in the discoveries of untargeted searches, and statistically quantifies population properties of these explosions that link them to distinct classes of progenitor stars. Through studies of the host galaxy and explosion properties of extreme PS1-discovered events, and controlled samples of specific classes of core-collapse objects, we constrain the effect of progenitor star chemical composition (metallicity) on their eventual death states. We provide a new observational, photometric tool which lowers the cost of precisely and accurately measuring the metallicities of distant galaxies and supernova host environments. Moreover, we develop and apply a novel, multi-level Bayesian model for optical transient light curves which we apply to simultaneously interpret more than 20,000 PS1 images. This study illustrates how population-level modeling of data from large photometric surveys can yield improved physical inference on their progenitor stars through comparison to physical models. In the coming era, as next-generation facilities like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope come online, the

  5. Exploring the physics of core-collapse supernovae with multidimensional simulations: from axisymmetry to three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Hanke, Florian; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    Multidimensional effects are essential for the success of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. Although astrophysical phenomena in nature involve three spatial dimensions, the huge computational demands still allow only for a few self-consistent, three-dimensional (3D) simulations focusing on specific aspects of the explosion physics, whereas systematic studies of larger sets of progenitor models or detailed investigations of different explosion parameters are restricted to the axisymmetric (2D) modeling approach at the moment. Employing state-of-the-art neutrino physics, we present the results of self-consistent core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code in 2D and 3D. The 2D study of 18 successfully exploding pre-supernova models in the range of 11 to 28 solar masses shows the progenitor dependence of the explosion dynamics: if the progenitor exhibits a pronounced decline of the density at the Si/Si-O composition shell interface, the rapid drop of the mass-accretion rate at the time the interface arrives at the shock induces a steep reduction of the accretion ram pressure. This causes a strong shock expansion supported by neutrino heating and thus favors an early explosion. In case of a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. By considering the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We show that this concept can also be extended to describe the effects of rotation as well as the behavior of recent 3D simulations and that the conditions necessary for the onset of explosion can be defined in a similar way.

  6. Anisotropic emission of neutrino and gravitational-wave signals from rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2018-03-01

    We present analysis on neutrino and GW signals based on three-dimensional (3D) core-collapse supernova simulations of a rapidly rotating 27 M⊙ star. We find a new neutrino signature that is produced by a lighthouse effect where the spinning of strong neutrino emission regions around the rotational axis leads to quasi-periodic modulation in the neutrino signal. Depending on the observer's viewing angle, the time modulation will be clearly detectable in IceCube and the future Hyper-Kamiokande. The GW emission is also anisotropic where the GW signal is emitted, as previously identified, most strongly towards the equator at rotating core-collapse and bounce, and the non-axisymmetric instabilities in the postbounce phase lead to stronger GW emission towards the spin axis. We show that these GW signals can be a target of LIGO-class detectors for a Galactic event. The origin of the postbounce GW emission naturally explains why the peak GW frequency is about twice of the neutrino modulation frequency. We point out that the simultaneous detection of the rotation-induced neutrino and GW signatures could provide a smoking-gun signature of a rapidly rotating proto-neutron star at the birth.

  7. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  8. Circular Polarizations of Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae: A Clear Indication of Rapid Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Takami; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-04-15

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores just prior to collapse. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that nonaxisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the postbounce cores. It is not surprising, then, that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show, in this Letter, that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of the Galaxy as long as the rotation period of the core is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  9. Core collapse supernovae from blue supergiant progenitors : The evolutionary history of SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Athira

    2015-08-01

    SN 1987A is historically one of the most remarkable supernova explosions to be seen from Earth. Due to the proximity of its location in the LMC, it remains the most well-studied object outside the solar system. It was also the only supernova whose progenitor was observed prior to its explosion.SN 1987A however, was a unique and enigmatic core collapse supernova. It was the first Type II supernova to have been observed to have exploded while its progenitor was a blue supergiant (BSG). Until then Type II supernovae were expected to originate from explosions of red supergiants (RSGs). A spectacular triple-ring nebula structure, rich in helium and nitrogen, was observed around the remnant, indicating a recent RSG phase before becoming a BSG. Even today it is not entirely understood what the evolutionary history may have been to cause a BSG to explode. The most commonly accepted hypothesis for its origin is the merger of a massive binary star system.An evolutionary scenario for such a binary system, was proposed by Podsiadlowski (1992) (P92). Through SPH simulations of the merger and the stellar evolution of the post-merger remnant, Ivanova & Podsiadlowski (2002) and (2003) (I&M) could successfully obtain the RSG to BSG transition of the progenitor.The aim of the present work is to produce the evolutionary history of the progenitor of SN 1987A and its explosion. We construct our models based on the results of P92 and I&M. Here, the secondary (less massive) star is accreted on the primary, while being simultaneously mixed in its envelope over a period of 100 years. The merged star is evolved until the onset of core collapse. For this work we use the 1-dimensional, implicit, hydrodynamical stellar evolution code, KEPLER. A large parameter space is explored, consisting of primary (16-20 Ms) and secondary masses (5-8 Ms), mixing boundaries, and accreting timescales. Those models whose end states match the observed properties of the progenitor of SN 1987A are exploded. The

  10. Core-collapse supernovae and the Younger Dryas/terminal Rancholabrean extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakenridge, G. Robert

    2011-09-01

    Early predictions that some supernovae release large quantities of prompt high energy photons are now corroborated by optical identification of core-collapse supernovae associated with extragalactic GRBS (beamed γ-ray bursts) and XRFS (beamed or un-beamed X-ray flashes). Given the in-galaxy supernova frequency and GRB and XRF recurrence statistics, significant Earth-incident events during the past several million years very likely occurred and nearby events should have affected the Earth and other planetary atmospheres, including terrestrial surface solar UV, the Earth's climate, and its ecology. The Younger Dryas Stadial (˜12,900 to 11,550 calendar yr BP) began with sharply cooler temperatures in the Earth's northern hemisphere, regional drought, paleoecological evidence compatible with increased UV, and abrupt increases in cosmogenic 14C and 10Be in ice and marine cores and tree rings. In North America, stratigraphic and faunal sequences indicate that a major pulse of mammalian extinctions (at least 23-31 genera) began very close to 12,830 calendar yr BP and was sudden: deposits one century younger are devoid of diverse extinct fauna remains. A 10 s beamed GRB within 2 kpc of the Earth delivers 100 kJ m -2 fluence to the Earth's atmosphere, where it causes spallation and catalytic reactions depleting 35-50% O 3, and producing excess NO x species (which favor cooling, drought, and surface fertility), 14C, and 10Be. An un-beamed, 10 50 erg hard photon impulse at ˜250 pc produces similar terrestrial atmospheric effects. A well-characterized massive star supernova, the unusually close Vela event ( d = 250 ± 30 pc; total energy of 1-2 × 10 51 erg; age constrained from remnant nebula shock velocities considerations at 13,000-16,000 yr and from the pulsar characteristic age at ˜11,400 yr) may have initiated the Younger Dryas climate change, and caused the extinction of the terminal Rancholabrean fauna.

  11. Analysis of Gravitational Signals from Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) using MatLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frere, Noah; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Yakunin, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    When a massive star runs out of fuel, it collapses under its own weight and rebounds in a powerful supernova explosion, sending, among other things, ripples through space-time, known as gravitational waves (GWs). GWs can be detected by earth-based observatories, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Observers must compare the data from GW detectors with theoretical waveforms in order to confirm that the detection of a GW signal from a particular source has occurred. GW predictions for core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) rely on computer simulations. The UTK/ORNL astrophysics group has performed such simulations. Here, I analyze the resulting waveforms, using Matlab, to generate their Fourier transforms, short-time Fourier transforms, energy spectra, evolution of frequencies, and frequency maxima. One product will be a Matlab interface for analyzing and comparing GW predictions based on data from future simulations. This interface will make it easier to analyze waveforms and to share the results with the GW astrophysics community. Funding provided by Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200, USA.

  12. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  13. The Impact of Nuclear Reaction Rate Uncertainties on the Evolution of Core-collapse Supernova Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, C. E.; Timmes, F. X.; Farmer, R.; Petermann, I.; Wolf, William M.; Couch, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    We explore properties of core-collapse supernova progenitors with respect to the composite uncertainties in the thermonuclear reaction rates by coupling the probability density functions of the reaction rates provided by the STARLIB reaction rate library with MESA stellar models. We evolve 1000 models of 15{M}ȯ from the pre-main sequence to core O-depletion at solar and subsolar metallicities for a total of 2000 Monte Carlo stellar models. For each stellar model, we independently and simultaneously sample 665 thermonuclear reaction rates and use them in a MESA in situ reaction network that follows 127 isotopes from 1H to 64Zn. With this framework we survey the core mass, burning lifetime, composition, and structural properties at five different evolutionary epochs. At each epoch we measure the probability distribution function of the variations of each property and calculate Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients for each sampled reaction rate to identify which reaction rate has the largest impact on the variations on each property. We find that uncertainties in the reaction rates of {}14{{N}}{({{p}},γ )}15{{O}}, triple-α, {}12{{C}}{(α ,γ )}16{{O}}, 12C(12C,p)23Na, 12C(16O, p)27Al, 16O(16O,n)31S, 16O(16O, p)31P, and 16O(16O,α)28Si dominate the variations of the properties surveyed. We find that variations induced by uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates grow with each passing phase of evolution, and at core H-, He-depletion they are of comparable magnitude to the variations induced by choices of mass resolution and network resolution. However, at core C-, Ne-, and O-depletion, the reaction rate uncertainties can dominate the variation, causing uncertainty in various properties of the stellar model in the evolution toward iron core-collapse.

  14. Dynamics of an Alfvén Surface in Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilet, Jérôme; Foglizzo, Thierry; Fromang, Sébastien

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an Alfvén surface (where the Alfvén speed equals the advection velocity) in the context of core collapse supernovae during the phase of accretion on the proto-neutron star. Such a surface should exist even for weak magnetic fields because the advection velocity decreases to zero at the center of the collapsing core. In this decelerated flow, Alfvén waves created by the standing accretion shock instability or convection accumulate and amplify while approaching the Alfvén surface. We study this amplification using one-dimensional MHD simulations with explicit physical dissipation (resistivity and viscosity). In the linear regime, the amplification continues until the Alfvén wavelength becomes as small as the dissipative scale. A pressure feedback that increases the pressure in the upstream flow is created via a nonlinear coupling. We derive analytic formulae for the maximum amplification and the nonlinear coupling and check them with numerical simulations to very good accuracy. Interestingly, these quantities diverge if the dissipation is decreased to zero, scaling as the square root of the Reynolds number, suggesting large effects in weakly dissipative flows. We also characterize the nonlinear saturation of this amplification when compression effects become important, leading to either a change of the velocity gradient, or a steepening of the Alfvén wave. Applying these results to core collapse supernovae shows that the amplification can be fast enough to affect the dynamics if the magnetic field is strong enough for the Alfvén surface to lie in the region of strong velocity gradient just above the neutrinosphere. This requires the presence of a strong magnetic field in the progenitor star, which would correspond to the formation of a magnetar under the assumption of magnetic flux conservation. An extrapolation of our analytic formula (taking into account the nonlinear saturation) suggests that the Alfvén wave could reach an

  15. Neutrino-Induced Nucleosynthesis in Helium Shells of Early Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Projjwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our studies on neutrino-driven nucleosynthesis in He shells of early core-collapse supernovae with metallicities of Z ≲ 10−3 Z⊙. We find that for progenitors of ∼ 11–15 M⊙, the neutrons released by 4He(ν¯ee, e+n3H in He shells can be captured to produce nuclei with mass numbers up to A ∼ 200. This mechanism is sensitive to neutrino emission spectra and flavor oscillations. In addition, we find two new primary mechanisms for neutrino-induced production of 9Be in He shells. The first mechanism produces 9Be via 7Li(n,γ8Li(n,γ9Li(e− ν¯ee9Be and relies on a low explosion energy for its survival. The second mechanism operates in progenitors of ∼ 8 M⊙, where 9Be can be produced directly via 7Li(3H, n09Be during the rapid expansion of the shocked Heshell material. The light nuclei 7Li and 3H involved in these mechanisms are produced by neutrino interactions with 4He. We discuss the implications of neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in He shells for interpreting the elemental abundances in metal-poor stars.

  16. Implications for Post-processing Nucleosynthesis of Core-collapse Supernova Models with Lagrangian Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. Austin; Hix, W. Raphael; Chertkow, Merek A.; Lee, C. T.; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson

    2017-07-01

    We investigate core-collapse supernova (CCSN) nucleosynthesis with self-consistent, axisymmetric (2D) simulations performed using the neutrino hydrodynamics code Chimera. Computational costs have traditionally constrained the evolution of the nuclear composition within multidimensional CCSN models to, at best, a 14-species α-network capable of tracking only (α ,γ ) reactions from 4He to 60Zn. Such a simplified network limits the ability to accurately evolve detailed composition and neutronization or calculate the nuclear energy generation rate. Lagrangian tracer particles are commonly used to extend the nuclear network evolution by incorporating more realistic networks into post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. However, limitations such as poor spatial resolution of the tracer particles inconsistent thermodynamic evolution, including misestimation of expansion timescales and uncertain determination of the multidimensional mass cut at the end of the simulation impose uncertainties inherent to this approach. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of such uncertainties for four self-consistent axisymmetric CCSN models initiated from solar-metallicity, nonrotating progenitors of 12, 15, 20, and 25 {M}⊙ and evolved with the smaller α-network to more than 1 s after the launch of an explosion.

  17. A Parametric Study of the Acoustic Mechanism for Core-collapse Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, A. [Physics Department, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nagakura, H. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institue for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Iwakami, W.; Yamada, S., E-mail: harada@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-04-10

    We investigate the criterion for the acoustic mechanism to work successfully in core-collapse supernovae. The acoustic mechanism is an alternative to the neutrino-heating mechanism. It was proposed by Burrows et al., who claimed that acoustic waves emitted by g -mode oscillations in proto-neutron stars (PNS) energize a stalled shock wave and eventually induce an explosion. Previous works mainly studied to which extent the g -modes are excited in the PNS. In this paper, on the other hand, we investigate how strong the acoustic wave needs to be if it were to revive a stalled shock wave. By adding the acoustic power as a new axis, we draw a critical surface, which is an extension of the critical curve commonly employed in the context of neutrino heating. We perform both 1D and 2D parametrized simulations, in which we inject acoustic waves from the inner boundary. In order to quantify the power of acoustic waves, we use the extended Myers theory to take neutrino reactions into proper account. We find for the 1D simulations that rather large acoustic powers are required to relaunch the shock wave, since the additional heating provided by the secondary shocks developed from acoustic waves is partially canceled by the neutrino cooling that is also enhanced. In 2D, the required acoustic powers are consistent with those of Burrows et al. Our results seem to imply, however, that it is the sum of neutrino heating and acoustic powers that matters for shock revival.

  18. Constraints for the progenitor masses of 17 historic core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Peterson, Skyler; Gilbert, Karoline; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Jennings, Zachary G., E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: peters8@uw.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jeremiah@physics.fsu.edu, E-mail: kgilbert@stsci.edu, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: zgjennin@ucsc.edu [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    Using resolved stellar photometry measured from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we generate color-magnitude diagrams of the stars within 50 pc of the locations of historic core-collapse supernovae (SNe) that took place in galaxies within 8 Mpc. We fit these color-magnitude distributions with stellar evolution models to determine the best-fit age distribution of the young population. We then translate these age distributions into probability distributions for the progenitor mass of each SN. The measurements are anchored by the main-sequence stars surrounding the event, making them less sensitive to assumptions about binarity, post-main-sequence evolution, or circumstellar dust. We demonstrate that, in cases where the literature contains masses that have been measured from direct imaging, our measurements are consistent with (but less precise than) these measurements. Using this technique, we constrain the progenitor masses of 17 historic SNe, 11 of which have no previous estimates from direct imaging. Our measurements still allow the possibility that all SN progenitor masses are <20 M {sub ☉}. However, the large uncertainties for the highest-mass progenitors also allow the possibility of no upper-mass cutoff.

  19. Constraints for the progenitor masses of 17 historic core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Peterson, Skyler; Gilbert, Karoline; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Murphy, Jeremiah; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Jennings, Zachary G.

    2014-01-01

    Using resolved stellar photometry measured from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we generate color-magnitude diagrams of the stars within 50 pc of the locations of historic core-collapse supernovae (SNe) that took place in galaxies within 8 Mpc. We fit these color-magnitude distributions with stellar evolution models to determine the best-fit age distribution of the young population. We then translate these age distributions into probability distributions for the progenitor mass of each SN. The measurements are anchored by the main-sequence stars surrounding the event, making them less sensitive to assumptions about binarity, post-main-sequence evolution, or circumstellar dust. We demonstrate that, in cases where the literature contains masses that have been measured from direct imaging, our measurements are consistent with (but less precise than) these measurements. Using this technique, we constrain the progenitor masses of 17 historic SNe, 11 of which have no previous estimates from direct imaging. Our measurements still allow the possibility that all SN progenitor masses are <20 M ☉ . However, the large uncertainties for the highest-mass progenitors also allow the possibility of no upper-mass cutoff.

  20. Nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernova simulations with realistic nuclear forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togashi, H., E-mail: hajime.togashi@riken.jp [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nakazato, K. [Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takehara, Y.; Yamamuro, S.; Suzuki, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Takano, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    A new table of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) based on realistic nuclear potentials is constructed for core-collapse supernova numerical simulations. Adopting the EOS of uniform nuclear matter constructed by two of the present authors with the cluster variational method starting from the Argonne v18 and Urbana IX nuclear potentials, the Thomas–Fermi calculation is performed to obtain the minimized free energy of a Wigner–Seitz cell in non-uniform nuclear matter. As a preparation for the Thomas–Fermi calculation, the EOS of uniform nuclear matter is modified so as to remove the effects of deuteron cluster formation in uniform matter at low densities. Mixing of alpha particles is also taken into account following the procedure used by Shen et al. (1998, 2011). The critical densities with respect to the phase transition from non-uniform to uniform phase with the present EOS are slightly higher than those with the Shen EOS at small proton fractions. The critical temperature with respect to the liquid–gas phase transition decreases with the proton fraction in a more gradual manner than in the Shen EOS. Furthermore, the mass and proton numbers of nuclides appearing in non-uniform nuclear matter with small proton fractions are larger than those of the Shen EOS. These results are consequences of the fact that the density derivative coefficient of the symmetry energy of our EOS is smaller than that of the Shen EOS.

  1. The impact of vorticity waves on the shock dynamics in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete, César; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Radice, David

    2018-04-01

    Convective perturbations arising from nuclear shell burning can play an important role in propelling neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions. In this work, we analyse the impact of vorticity waves on the shock dynamics, and subsequently on the post-shock flow, using the solution of the linear hydrodynamics equations. As a result of the interaction with the shock wave, vorticity waves increase their kinetic energy, and a new set of entropic and acoustic waves is deposited in the post-shock region. These perturbations interact with the neutrino-driven turbulent convection that develops in that region. Although both vorticity and acoustic waves inject non-radial motion into the gain region, the contribution of the acoustic waves is found to be negligibly small in comparison to that of the vorticity waves. On the other hand, entropy waves become buoyant and trigger more convection. Using the concept of critical neutrino luminosity, we assess the impact of these modes on the explosion conditions. While the direct injection of non-radial motion reduces the critical neutrino luminosity by ˜ 12 per cent for typical problem parameters, the buoyancy-driven convection triggered by entropy waves reduces the critical luminosity by ˜ 17-24 per cent, which approximately agrees with the results of three-dimensional neutrino-hydrodynamics simulations. Finally, we discuss the limits of validity of the assumptions employed.

  2. Graphite grain-size spectrum and molecules from core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2018-01-01

    Our goal is to compute the abundances of carbon atomic complexes that emerge from the C + O cores of core-collapse supernovae. We utilize our chemical reaction network in which every atomic step of growth employs a quantum-mechanically guided reaction rate. This tool follows step-by-step the growth of linear carbon chain molecules from C atoms in the oxygen-rich C + O cores. We postulate that once linear chain molecules reach a sufficiently large size, they isomerize to ringed molecules, which serve as seeds for graphite grain growth. We demonstrate our technique for merging the molecular reaction network with a parallel program that can follow 1017 steps of C addition onto the rare seed species. Due to radioactivity within the C + O core, abundant ambient oxygen is unable to convert C to CO, except to a limited degree that actually facilitates carbon molecular ejecta. But oxygen severely minimizes the linear-carbon-chain abundances. Despite the tiny abundances of these linear-carbon-chain molecules, they can give rise to a small abundance of ringed-carbon molecules that serve as the nucleations on which graphite grain growth builds. We expand the C + O-core gas adiabatically from 6000 K for 109 s when reactions have essentially stopped. These adiabatic tracks emulate the actual expansions of the supernova cores. Using a standard model of 1056 atoms of C + O core ejecta having O/C = 3, we calculate standard ejection yields of graphite grains of all sizes produced, of the CO molecular abundance, of the abundances of linear-carbon molecules, and of Buckminsterfullerene. None of these except CO was expected from the C + O cores just a few years past.

  3. FREEZE-OUT YIELDS OF RADIOACTIVITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magkotsios, Georgios; Wiescher, Michael; Timmes, F. X.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the nucleosynthesis trends from two mechanisms during freeze-out expansions in core-collapse supernovae. The first mechanism is related to the convection and instabilities within homogeneous stellar progenitor matter that is accreted through the supernova shock. The second mechanism is related to the impact of the supersonic wind termination shock (reverse shock) within the tumultuous inner regions of the ejecta above the proto-neutron star. Our results suggest that isotopes in the mass range 12 ≤ A ≤ 122 that are produced during the freeze-out expansions may be classified in two families. The isotopes of the first family manifest a common mass fraction evolutionary profile, whose specific shape per isotope depends on the characteristic transition between two equilibrium states (equilibrium state transition) during each type of freeze-out expansion. The first family includes the majority of isotopes in this mass range. The second family is limited to magic nuclei and isotopes in their locality, which do not sustain any transition, become nuclear flow hubs, and dominate the final composition. We use exponential and power-law adiabatic profiles to identify dynamic large-scale and small-scale equilibrium patterns among nuclear reactions. A reaction rate sensitivity study identifies those reactions that are crucial to the synthesis of radioactivities in the mass range of interest. In addition, we introduce non-monotonic parameterized profiles to probe the impact of the reverse shock and multi-dimensional explosion asymmetries on nucleosynthesis. Cases are shown in which the non-monotonic profiles favor the production of radioactivities. Non-monotonic freeze-out profiles involve longer non-equilibrium nucleosynthesis intervals compared with the exponential and power-law profiles, resulting in mass fraction trends and yield distributions that may not be achieved by the monotonic freeze-out profiles.

  4. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaria, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.

  5. The development of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae: 2D vs 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeroni, R.; Krueger, B. K.; Guilet, J.; Foglizzo, T.

    2017-12-01

    A toy model is used to study the non-linear conditions for the development of neutrino-driven convection in the post-shock region of core-collapse supernovae. Our numerical simulations show that a buoyant non-linear perturbation is able to trigger self-sustained convection only in cases where convection is not linearly stabilized by advection. Several arguments proposed to interpret the impact of the dimensionality on global core-collapse supernova simulations are discussed in the light of our model. The influence of the numerical resolution is also addressed. In 3D a strong mixing to small scales induces an increase of the neutrino heating efficiency in a runaway process. This phenomenon is absent in 2D and this may indicate that the tridimensional nature of the hydrodynamics could foster explosions.

  6. Simulations of Core-collapse Supernovae in Spatial Axisymmetry with Full Boltzmann Neutrino Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Iwakami, Wakana; Furusawa, Shun; Okawa, Hirotada; Harada, Akira; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Matsufuru, Hideo; Imakura, Akira

    2018-02-01

    We present the first results of our spatially axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations with full Boltzmann neutrino transport, which amount to a time-dependent five-dimensional (two in space and three in momentum space) problem. Special relativistic effects are fully taken into account with a two-energy-grid technique. We performed two simulations for a progenitor of 11.2 M ⊙, employing different nuclear equations of state (EOSs): Lattimer and Swesty’s EOS with the incompressibility of K = 220 MeV (LS EOS) and Furusawa’s EOS based on the relativistic mean field theory with the TM1 parameter set (FS EOS). In the LS EOS, the shock wave reaches ∼700 km at 300 ms after bounce and is still expanding, whereas in the FS EOS it stalled at ∼200 km and has started to recede by the same time. This seems to be due to more vigorous turbulent motions in the former during the entire postbounce phase, which leads to higher neutrino-heating efficiency in the neutrino-driven convection. We also look into the neutrino distributions in momentum space, which is the advantage of the Boltzmann transport over other approximate methods. We find nonaxisymmetric angular distributions with respect to the local radial direction, which also generate off-diagonal components of the Eddington tensor. We find that the rθ component reaches ∼10% of the dominant rr component and, more importantly, it dictates the evolution of lateral neutrino fluxes, dominating over the θθ component, in the semitransparent region. These data will be useful to further test and possibly improve the prescriptions used in the approximate methods.

  7. Shock Revival in Core-collapse Supernovae: A Phase-diagram Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Daniel; Balberg, Shmuel; Keshet, Uri

    2015-12-01

    We examine the conditions for the revival of the stalled accretion shock in core-collapse supernovae, in the context of the neutrino heating mechanism. We combine one-dimensional simulations of the shock revival process with a derivation of a quasi-stationary approximation, which is both accurate and efficient in predicting the flow. In particular, this approach is used to explore how the evolution of the accretion shock depends on the shock radius, RS, and velocity, VS (in addition to other global properties of the system). We do so through a phase-space analysis of the shock acceleration, aS, in the {R}S{--}{V}S plane, shown to provide quantitative insights into the initiation and nature of runaway expansion. In the particular case of an initially stationary ({V}S=0, {a}S=0) profile, the prospects for an explosion can be assessed by the initial signs of the partial derivatives of the shock acceleration, in analogy to a linear damped/anti-damped oscillator. If \\partial {a}S/\\partial {R}S\\lt 0 and \\partial {a}S/\\partial {V}S\\gt 0, runaway will likely occur after several oscillations, while if \\partial {a}S/\\partial {R}S\\gt 0, runaway expansion will commence in a non-oscillatory fashion. These two modes of runaway correspond to low and high mass accretion rates, respectively. We also use the quasi-stationary approximation to assess the advection-to-heating timescale ratio in the gain region, often used as an explosion proxy. Indeed, this ratio does tend to ∼1 in conjunction with runaway conditions, but neither this unit value nor the specific choice of the gain region as a point of reference appear to be unique in this regard.

  8. A Detailed Comparison of Multidimensional Boltzmann Neutrino Transport Methods in Core-collapse Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richers, Sherwood; Nagakura, Hiroki; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mail code 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dolence, Joshua [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: srichers@tapir.caltech.edu [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism driving core-collapse supernovae is sensitive to the interplay between matter and neutrino radiation. However, neutrino radiation transport is very difficult to simulate, and several radiation transport methods of varying levels of approximation are available. We carefully compare for the first time in multiple spatial dimensions the discrete ordinates (DO) code of Nagakura, Yamada, and Sumiyoshi and the Monte Carlo (MC) code Sedonu, under the assumptions of a static fluid background, flat spacetime, elastic scattering, and full special relativity. We find remarkably good agreement in all spectral, angular, and fluid interaction quantities, lending confidence to both methods. The DO method excels in determining the heating and cooling rates in the optically thick region. The MC method predicts sharper angular features due to the effectively infinite angular resolution, but struggles to drive down noise in quantities where subtractive cancellation is prevalent, such as the net gain in the protoneutron star and off-diagonal components of the Eddington tensor. We also find that errors in the angular moments of the distribution functions induced by neglecting velocity dependence are subdominant to those from limited momentum-space resolution. We briefly compare directly computed second angular moments to those predicted by popular algebraic two-moment closures, and we find that the errors from the approximate closures are comparable to the difference between the DO and MC methods. Included in this work is an improved Sedonu code, which now implements a fully special relativistic, time-independent version of the grid-agnostic MC random walk approximation.

  9. Long-rising Type II supernovae from Palomar Transient Factory and Caltech Core-Collapse Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Migotto, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Armen, S.; Duggan, G.; Ergon, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Leloudas, G.; Leonard, D. C.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Silverman, J. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar hydrogen-rich event with a long-rising (~84 d) light curve, stemming from the explosion of a compact blue supergiant star. Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature in recent decades. Aims: We present new data for a sample of six long-rising Type II SNe (SNe II), three of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge this small family of long-rising SNe II, characterizing their differences in terms of progenitor and explosion parameters. We also study the metallicity of their environments. Methods: Optical light curves, spectra, and host-galaxy properties of these SNe are presented and analyzed. Detailed comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events in the literature are shown, with particular emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and host-galaxy metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband light curves. By modeling the early-time emission with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these transients. The modeling of the bolometric light curves also allows us to estimate other progenitor and explosion parameters, such as the ejected 56Ni mass, the explosion energy, and the ejecta mass. Results: We present PTF12kso, a long-rising SN II that is estimated to have the largest amount of ejected 56Ni mass measured for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest host metallicities observed for this SN group. The variety of early light-curve luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii of these SNe, from a few tens of R⊙ (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with some intermediate cases between 100 R⊙ (PTF09gpn) and 300 R⊙ (SN 2004em). Conclusions: We confirm that long-rising SNe II with light-curve shapes closely

  10. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.P.; Allen, Bruce; Aufmuth, Peter; Bisht, A.; Danzmann, Karsten; Denker, T.; Heurs, M.; Kaufer, S.; Krueger, C.; Lough, J.D.; Lück, Harald; Sawadsky, A.; Schütte, D.; Steinmeyer, D.; Vahlbruch, H.

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core co...

  11. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B P; Davies, G S; LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO?600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core co...

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae: from shock revival to shock breakout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Müller, E.; Janka, H.-Th.

    2015-05-01

    We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SN) from blast-wave initiation by the neutrino-driven mechanism to shock breakout from the stellar surface, using an axis-free Yin-Yang grid and considering two 15 M⊙ red supergiants (RSG) and two blue supergiants (BSG) of 15 M⊙ and 20 M⊙. We demonstrate that the metal-rich ejecta in homologous expansion still carry fingerprints of asymmetries at the beginning of the explosion, but the final metal distribution is massively affected by the detailed progenitor structure. The most extended and fastest metal fingers and clumps are correlated with the biggest and fastest-rising plumes of neutrino-heated matter, because these plumes most effectively seed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the C+O/He and He/H composition-shell interfaces after the passage of the SN shock. The extent of radial mixing, global asymmetry of the metal-rich ejecta, RT-induced fragmentation of initial plumes to smaller-scale fingers, and maximum Ni and minimum H velocities depend not only on the initial asphericity and explosion energy (which determine the shock and initial Ni velocities), but also on the density profiles and widths of C+O core and He shell and on the density gradient at the He/H transition, which leads to unsteady shock propagation and the formation of reverse shocks. Both RSG explosions retain a large global metal asymmetry with pronounced clumpiness and substructure, deep penetration of Ni fingers into the H-envelope (with maximum velocities of 4000-5000 km s-1 for an explosion energy around 1.5 bethe) and efficient inward H-mixing. While the 15 M⊙ BSG shares these properties (maximum Ni speeds up to ~3500 km s-1), the 20 M⊙ BSG develops a much more roundish geometry without pronounced metal fingers (maximum Ni velocities only ~2200 km s-1) because of reverse-shock deceleration and insufficient time for strong RT growth and fragmentation at the He

  13. Asymmetries in core-collapse supernovae from maps of radioactive 44Ti in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, B W; Harrison, F A; Boggs, S E

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse explosions, but the form it takes differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive (44)Ti, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing...... core and that ejected into the surrounding medium, directly probes the explosion asymmetries. Cassiopeia A is a young, nearby, core-collapse remnant from which (44)Ti emission has previously been detected but not imaged. Asymmetries in the explosion have been indirectly inferred from a high ratio...

  14. Study of the $^{44}$Ti$(\\alpha,p)^{47}$V47 reaction and implications for core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Margerin, V; Davinson, T; Dressler, R; Fallis, J; Kankainen, A; Laird, A M; Lotay, G; Mountford, D J; Murphy, C D; Seiffert, C; Schumann, D; Stowasser, T; Stora, T; Wang, C H -T; Woods, P J

    2014-01-01

    The underlying physics triggering core collapse supernovae is not fully understood but observations of material ejected during such events helps to solve this puzzle. In particular, several satellite based γ -ray observations of the isotope 44 Ti have been reported recently. Conveniently, the amount of this isotope in stellar ejecta is thought to depend critically on the explosion mechanism. The most influential reaction to the amount of 44 Ti in supernovae is 44 Ti ( α , p ) 47 V. Here we report on a direct study of this reaction conducted at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN. The experiment was performed with a 44 Ti beam at E lab = 2 . 16 MeV / u, corresponding to an energy distribution, for reacting α -particles, centred on E cm = 4 . 15 with a 1 σ width of 0.23 MeV. This is, for the first time, well within the Gamow window for core collapse supernovae. The material from which the 44 Ti beam was extracted originates from highly irradiated components of the SINQ spallation neutron source of the Paul Scherr...

  15. MEASURING DUST PRODUCTION IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT 1E 0102.2-7219

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstrom, Karin M.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Smith, J. D. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present mid-infrared spectral mapping observations of the core-collapse supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The remnant shows emission from fine structure transitions of neon and oxygen as well as continuum emission from dust. Comparison of the mid-IR dust emission with observations at X-ray, radio, and optical wavelengths shows that the dust is associated with the supernova ejecta and is thus newly formed in the remnant. The spectrum of the newly formed dust is well reproduced by a model that includes 3 x 10 -3 M sun of amorphous carbon dust at 70 K and 2 x 10 -5 M sun of Mg 2 SiO 4 (forsterite) at 145 K. Our observations place a lower limit on the amount of dust in the remnant since we are not sensitive to the cold dust in the unshocked ejecta. We compare our results to observations of other core-collapse supernovae and remnants, particularly Cas A where very similar spectral mapping observations have been carried out. We observe a factor of ∼10 less dust in E 0102 than seen in Cas A, although the amounts of amorphous carbon and forsterite are comparable. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the grain size distribution of the newly formed dust in E 0102 has been altered by the hot plasma behind the reverse shock.

  16. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  17. Implication on the core collapse supernova rate from 21 years of data of the Large Volume Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N Y; Antonioli, P; Ashikhmin, V V; Badino, G.; Bari, G; Bertoni, R; Bressan, E; Bruno, G; Dadykin, V L; Dobrynina, E A; Enikeev, R I; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Garbini, M; Ghia, P L; Giusti, P; Gomez, F; Kemp, E; Malgin, A S; Molinario, A; Persiani, R; Pless, I A; Porta, A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya, O G; Saavedra, O; Sartorelli, G; Shakiryanova, I R; Selvi, M; Trinchero, G C; Vigorito, C; Yakushev, V F; Zichichi, A

    2015-01-01

    The Large Volume Detector (LVD) has been continuously taking data since 1992 at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory. LVD is sensitive to neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapses with full detection probability over the Galaxy. We have searched for neutrino bursts in LVD data taken in 7335 days of operation. No evidence of neutrino signals has been found between June 1992 and December 2013. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the rate of core-collapse and failed supernova explosions out to distances of 25 kpc is found to be 0.114/y.

  18. Numerical Methods for 3D Magneto-Rotational Core-Collapse Supernova Simulation with Jet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käppeli, R. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The work presented in this thesis is devoted to the development of a numerical model for the three dimensional simulation of magneto-rotational core-collapse supernovae (MHD-CCSNe) with jet formation. The numerical model then suggests that MHD-CCSNe naturally provide a possible site for the strong rapid neutron capture process in agreement with observations of the early Galactic chemical evolution. In the first part of this thesis, we develop several numerical methods and describe thoroughly their efficient implementations on current high-performance computer architectures. We develop a fast and simple computer code texttt{FISH} that solves the equations of magnetohydrodynamics. The code is parallelized with an optimal combination of shared and distributed memory paradigms and scales to several thousands processes on high-performance computer clusters. We develop a novel well-balanced numerical scheme for the Euler equations with gravitational source terms to preserve a discrete hydrostatic equilibrium exactly. Being able to accurately represent hydrostatic equilibria is of particular interest for the simulation of CCSN, because a large part of the newly forming neutron star evolves in a quasi-hydrostatic manner. We include an approximate and computationally efficient treatment of neutrino physics in the form of a spectral leakage scheme. It enables us to capture approximately the most important neutrino cooling effects, which are responsible for the shock stall and for the neutronisation of matter behind the shock. The latter is crucial for the nucleosynthesis yields. To fit into our multidimensional MHD-CCSN model, the spectral leakage scheme is implemented in a ray-by-ray approach. In the second part of this thesis, we apply our three-dimensional numerical model to the study of the MHD-CCSN explosion mechanism. We investigate a series of models with poloidal magnetic field and varying initial angular momentum distribution through the collapse, bounce and jet

  19. Weak-interaction processes in stars: applications to core-collapse supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2003-01-01

    The role of weak-interaction processes in core collapse and neutrino nucleosynthesis is reviewed. Recent calculations of the electron capture rates for nuclei with mass numbers A=65-112 show that, contrarily to previous assumptions, during core collapse electron capture is dominated by captures on heavy nuclei. Astrophysical simulations demonstrate that these rates have an important impact on the collapse. Neutrinos emitted by the collapsing core can interact with the overlying shells of the star producing substantial nuclear transmutations. This process known as ν-process seems to be responsible for the production of 138 La by charged current neutrino interactions with 138 Ba. The ν-process is then sensitive to the spectra of different neutrino species and to neutrino oscillations. (orig.)

  20. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B.; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sand, David J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kiewe, Michael; Scheps, Raphael; Birenbaum, Gali; Chamudot, Daniel; Zhou, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  1. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaria, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600

  2. Impact of electron-captures on nuclei near N = 50 on core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, R.; Sullivan, C.; Zegers, R. G. T.; Brown, B. A.; Gao, B.

    2018-01-01

    The sensitivity of the late stages of stellar core collapse to electron-capture rates on nuclei is investigated, with a focus on electron-capture rates on 74 nuclei with neutron number close to 50, just above doubly magic 78Ni. It is demonstrated that variations in key characteristics of the evolution, such as the lepton fraction, electron fraction, entropy, stellar density, and in-fall velocity are about 50% due to uncertainties in the electron-capture rates on nuclei in this region, although thousands of nuclei are included in the simulations. The present electron-capture rate estimates used for the nuclei in this high-sensitivity region of the chart of isotopes are primarily based on a simple approximation, and it is shown that the estimated rates are likely too high, by an order of magnitude or more. Electron-capture rates based on Gamow–Teller strength distributions calculated in microscopic theoretical models will be required to obtain better estimates. Gamow–Teller distributions extracted from charge-exchange experiments performed at intermediate energies serve to guide the development and benchmark the models. A previously compiled weak-rate library that is used in the astrophysical simulations was updated as part of the work presented here, by adding additional rate tables for nuclei near stability for mass numbers between 60 and 110.

  3. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Dewey, Daniel [MIT Kavli Institute, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Mori, Koji [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Lee, Jae-Joon, E-mail: jayant.bhalerao@mavs.uta.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-10

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of –2300 ≲ v{sub r}  ≲ 1400 km s{sup –1}. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ∼90'' (corresponding to ∼3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ∼4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10{sup 51} erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be ≲8 M {sub ☉}, and we propose an upper limit of ≲35 M {sub ☉} on the progenitor's mass.

  4. Effects of Rotation on Stochasticity of Gravitational Waves in the Nonlinear Phase of Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Kei; Iwakami-Nakano, Wakana; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-08-01

    By performing three-dimensional (3D) simulations that demonstrate the neutrino-driven core-collapse supernovae aided by the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), we study how the spiral modes of the SASI can impact the properties of the gravitational-wave (GW) emission. To see the effects of rotation in the nonlinear postbounce phase, we give a uniform rotation on the flow advecting from the outer boundary of the iron core, the specific angular momentum of which is assumed to agree with recent stellar evolution models. We compute fifteen 3D models in which the initial angular momentum and the input neutrino luminosities from the protoneutron star are changed in a systematic manner. By performing a ray-tracing analysis, we accurately estimate the GW amplitudes generated by anisotropic neutrino emission. Our results show that the gravitational waveforms from neutrinos in models that include rotation exhibit a common feature; otherwise, they vary much more stochastically in the absence of rotation. The breaking of the stochasticity stems from the excess of the neutrino emission parallel to the spin axis. This is because the compression of matter is more enhanced in the vicinity of the equatorial plane due to the growth of the spiral SASI modes, leading to the formation of the spiral flows circulating around the spin axis with higher temperatures. We point out that recently proposed future space interferometers like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these signals for a Galactic supernova.

  5. Exploring the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melson, Tobias; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Summa, Alexander; Bollig, Robert; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    We present the first successful simulations of neutrino-driven supernova explosions in three dimensions (3D) using the Vertex-Prometheus code including sophisticated energy-dependent neutrino transport. The simulated models of 9.6 and 20 solar-mass iron-core stars demonstrate that successful explosions can be obtained in self-consistent 3D simulations, where previous models have failed. New insights into the supernova mechanism can be gained from these explosions. The first 3D model (Melson et al. 2015a) explodes at the same time but more energetically than its axially symmetric (2D) counterpart. Turbulent energy cascading reduces the kinetic energy dissipation in the cooling layer and therefore suppresses neutrino cooling. The consequent inward shift of the gain radius increases the gain layer mass, whose recombination energy provides the surplus for the explosion energy. The second explosion (Melson et al. 2015b) is obtained through a moderate reduction of the neutral-current neutrino opacity motivated by strange-quark contributions to the nucleon spin. A corresponding reference model without these corrections failed, which demonstrates how close current 3D models are to explosion. The strangeness adjustment is meant as a prototype for remaining neutrino opacity uncertainties.

  6. The core collapse supernova rate from 24 years of data of the Large Volume Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, G.; Fulgione, W.; Molinario, A.; Vigorito, C.; LVD Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Large Volume Detector (LVD) at INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy is a 1 kt liquid scintillator neutrino observatory mainly designed to study low energy neutrinos from Gravitational Stellar Collapses (GSC) with 100% efficiency over the entire Galaxy. Here we summarize the results of the search for supernova neutrino bursts over the full data set lasting from June 1992 to May 2016 for a total live time of 8211 days. In the lack of a positive observation, either in standalone mode or in coincidence with other experiments, we establish the upper limit to the rate of GSC event in the Milky Way: 0.1 year-1 at 90% c.l..

  7. Searching for Soft Relativistic Jets in Core-Collapse Supernovae with the IceCube Optical Follow-up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods. If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results. No statistically significant excess in the rate of neutrino multiplets has been observed and furthermore no coincidence with an optical counterpart was found. Conclusions. The search allows, for the first time, to set stringent limits on current models predicting a high-energy neutrino flux from soft relativistic hadronic jets in core-collapse SNe. We conclude that a sub-population of SNe with typical Lorentz boost factor and jet energy of 10 and 3 x 10(exp 51) erg, respectively, does not exceed 4:2% at 90% confidence.

  8. The joint search for gravitational wave and low energy neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae: methodology and status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, M. B.; Casentini, C.

    2017-09-01

    The detection of gravitational waves opens a new era in physics. Now it's possible to observe the Universe using a fundamentally new way. Gravitational waves potentially permit getting insight into the physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe). However, due to significant uncertainties on the theoretical models of gravitational wave emission associated with CCSNe, benefits may come from multi-messenger observations of CCSNe. Such benefits include increased confidence in detection, extending the astrophysical reach of the detectors and allowing deeper understanding of the nature of the phenomenon. Fortunately, CCSNe have a neutrino signature confirmed by the observation of SN1987A. The gravitational and neutrino signals propagate with the speed of light and without significant interaction with interstellar matter. So that they must reach an observer on the Earth almost simultaneously. These facts open a way to search for the correlation between the signals. However, this method is limited by the sensitivity of modern neutrino detectors that allow to observe CCSNe only in the Local Group of galaxies. The methodology and status of a proposed joint search for the correlation signals are presented here.

  9. PROGENITOR-DEPENDENT EXPLOSION DYNAMICS IN SELF-CONSISTENT, AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summa, Alexander; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marek, Andreas [Max Planck Computing and Data Facility (MPCDF), Gießenbachstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, Bernhard, E-mail: asumma@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11–28 M {sub ⊙}, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si–O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si–O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage through their maxima, our models exhibit short advection timescales, which favor the efficient growth of the standing accretion-shock instability. The latter plays a supportive role at least for the initiation of the re-expansion of the stalled shock before runaway. Taking into account the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We validate the robustness of our findings by testing the influence of stochasticity, numerical resolution, and approximations in some aspects of the microphysics.

  10. r-Process Nucleosynthesis from Three-dimensional Jet-driven Core-Collapse Supernovae with Magnetic Misalignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevi, Goni; Mösta, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    We investigate r-process nucleosynthesis in three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet-driven supernovae resulting from rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized core-collapse. We explore the effect of misaligning the pre-collapse magnetic field with respect to the rotation axis by performing four simulations: one aligned model and models with 15°, 30°, and 45° misalignments. The simulations we present employ a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to post-bounce neutrino emission and absorption. We track the thermodynamic properties of the ejected material with Lagrangian tracer particles and analyse its composition with the nuclear reaction network SKYNET. By using different neutrino luminosities in post-processing the tracer data with SKYNET, we constrain the impact of uncertainties in neutrino luminosities. We find that, for the aligned model considered here, the use of an approximate leakage scheme results in neutrino luminosity uncertainties corresponding to a factor of 100-1000 uncertainty in the abundance of third peak r-process elements. Our results show that for misalignments of 30° or less, r-process elements are robustly produced as long as neutrino luminosities are reasonably low (≲ 5 × 1052 erg s-1). For a more extreme misalignment of 45°, we find the production of r-process elements beyond the second peak significantly reduced. We conclude that robust r-process nucleosynthesis in magnetorotational supernovae requires a progenitor stellar core with a large poloidal magnetic field component that is at least moderately (within ˜30°) aligned with the rotation axis.

  11. A systematic study of the explosion energy issue in core collapse supernova theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Massive stars with main sequence masses greater than 8 solar mass (Msun) the main target of CCSNe researches. According to initial mass function (IMF) they occupy about 15As a matter of fact, supernova theorists have failed to reproduce this energetic stellar explosion for about a half century because micro and macro physics are highly complex and are mutual influenced. The theoretical investigation of the explosion mechanism is based on numerical simulations, which will ultimately require computational sources of exsa scales. With recent remarkable developments both in hardware and software, however, more realistic physics are incorporated and research group are beginning to overcome the difficulties, reporting successful explosions in their numerical models. The successful is still partial, unfortunately, since in the most of the cases the explosion energy hardly reaches the typical value (10^51erg). What is worse other groups found no explosion for almost same setups. The robust explosion mechanism has not yet been ascertained and is still a remaining issue. The purpose of this paper is to study how far our understanding of "neutrino heating mechanism", the current paradigm, has reached, or put another way, to expose what kind of physics are still missing to explain observations , such as explosion energy and nickel mass. As already remarked the physics in CCSNe are quite complicated with extremely high Reynolds number, highly uncertain equation of state (EOS) at supra-nuclear densities, copious neutrinos not in thermal nor chemical equilibrium with matter normally. I believe that it is justified to devote a somewhat large number of pages to the introduction. It will be also helpful for understanding the motivation of this paper. Starting with evidence from supernova light curves I will then move to the basics idea of neutrino heating mechanism and summarize some recent developments in various micro and macro physics. Key factors in the theory of massive

  12. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of the low-luminosity, broad-lined Ic supernova iPTF15dld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pian, E.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse stripped-envelope supernova (SN) explosions reflect the diversity of physical parameters and evolutionary paths of their massive star progenitors. We have observed the Type Ic SN iPTF15dld (z = 0.047), reported by the Palomar Transient Factory. Spectra were taken starting 20 rest-fr...

  13. Revealing the Detailed Structure of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8 with X-Ray Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Schenck, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our results on the adaptive-mesh mapping of the chemical composition and thermodynamic parameters of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8 using our deep Chandra observation. Our maps cover the entire supernova remnant and show the detailed spatial distributions of the metal-rich ejecta, circumstellar medium, and the X-ray pulsar wind nebula-dominated regions. Our results suggest radial and azimuthal variations in the ejecta composition and the thermodynamic parameters, underscoring the rich and complex nature of this text book type supernova remnant. Combining our results from this study and our previous work on the ejecta radial velocity distribution (derived from our Chandra HETG data), we discuss the three dimensional structure of the remnant. Some implications on the nature of the progenitor star and explosion scenarios are discussed.

  14. The r-Process in the Neutrino Winds of Core-Collapse Supernovae and U-Th Cosmochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanajo, Shinya; Itoh, Naoki; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Nozawa, Satoshi; Beers, Timothy C.

    2002-10-01

    The discovery of the second highly r-process-enhanced, extremely metal poor star, CS 31082-001 ([Fe/H]=-2.9) has provided a powerful new tool for age determination by virtue of the detection and measurement of the radioactive species uranium and thorium. Because the half-life of 238U is one-third that of 232Th, the U-Th pair can, in principle, provide a far more precise cosmochronometer than the Th-Eu pair that has been used in previous investigations. In the application of this chronometer, the age of (the progenitor of) CS 31082-001 can be regarded as the minimum age of the Galaxy, and hence of the universe. One of the serious limitations of this approach, however, is that predictions of the production ratio of U and Th have not been made in the context of a realistic astrophysical model of the r-process. We have endeavored to produce such a model, based on the ``neutrino winds'' that are expected to arise from the nascent neutron star of a core-collapse supernova. In this model, the proto-neutron star mass and the (asymptotic) neutrino sphere radius are assumed to be 2.0 Msolar and 10 km, respectively. Recent hydrodynamic studies indicate that there may exist difficulties in obtaining such a compact (massive and/or small in radius) remnant. Nevertheless, we utilize this set of parameter choices since previous work suggests that the third r-process peak (and thus U and Th) is hardly reached when one adopts a less compact proto-neutron star in the framework of the neutrino-wind scenario. The temperature and density histories of the material involved in the neutron-capture processes are obtained with the assumption of a steady flow of the neutrino-powered winds, with general relativistic effects taken into account. The electron fraction is taken to be a free parameter, constant with time. The r-process nucleosynthesis in these trajectories is calculated with a nuclear reaction network code including actinides up to Z=100. The mass-integrated r-process yields

  15. The neutron capture process in the He shell in core-collapse supernovae: Presolar silicon carbide grains as a diagnostic tool for nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatari, Marco; Hoppe, Peter; Trappitsch, Reto; Fryer, Chris; Timmes, F. X.; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-rich presolar grains are found in primitive meteorites, with isotopic measurements to date suggesting a core-collapse supernovae origin site for some of them. This holds for about 1-2% of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains, so-called Type X and C grains, and about 30% of presolar graphite grains. Presolar SiC grains of Type X show anomalous isotopic signatures for several elements heavier than iron compared to the solar abundances: most notably for strontium, zirconium, molybdenum, ruthenium and barium. We study the nucleosynthesis of zirconium and molybdenum isotopes in the He-shell of three core-collapse supernovae models of 15, 20 and 25 M⊙ with solar metallicity, and compare the results to measurements of presolar grains. We find the stellar models show a large scatter of isotopic abundances for zirconium and molybdenum, but the mass averaged abundances are qualitatively similar to the measurements. We find all models show an excess of 96Zr relative to the measurements, but the model abundances are affected by the fractionation between Sr and Zr since a large contribution to 90Zr is due to the radiogenic decay of 90Sr. Some supernova models show excesses of 95,97Mo and depletion of 96Mo relative to solar. The mass averaged distribution from these models shows an excess of 100Mo, but this may be alleviated by very recent neutron-capture cross section measurements. We encourage future explorations to assess the impact of the uncertainties in key neutron-capture reaction rates that lie along the n-process path.

  16. Measurement of the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p)$^{47}$V reaction cross section, of relevance to $\\gamma$-ray observation of core collapse supernovae, using reclaimed $^{44}$Ti

    CERN Multimedia

    Despite decades of research, fundamental uncertainties remain in the underlying explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. One of the most direct methods that might help resolve this problem is a comparison of the predicted to the observed flux of $\\gamma$-rays due to decay of $^{44}$Ti produced in the explosion, as it is believed this could reveal the location of the mass cut, a key hydrodynamical property of the explosion. Such a study is at present limited by the uncertainty in the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p)$^{47}$V reaction rate. In this experiment we propose to measure the cross section for this reaction at astrophysically relevant energies. The single previous measurement of this reaction was limited to higher energies due to low beam intensities. Here, a more intense beam will be employed, generated from $^{44}$Ti reclaimed as part of the ERAWAST project at PSI.

  17. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-00ER41149 ''Nuclear Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Zhong Qian

    2004-01-01

    During the funding period from August 15, 2000 to August 14, 2004, the main foci of my research have been implications of abundances in metal-poor stars for nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae and chemical evolution of the universe, effects of neutrino oscillations and neutrino-nucleus interactions on r-process nucleosynthesis, physical conditions in neutrino-driven winds from proto-neutron stars, neutrino driven mechanism of supernova explosion, supernova neutrino signals in terrestrial detectors, and constraints on variations of fundamental couplings and astrophysical conditions from properties of nuclear reactions. Personnel (three graduate students and a postdoctoral research associate) involved in my research are listed in section 2. Completed research projects are discussed in section 3. Publications during the funding period are listed in section 4 and oral presentations in section 5. Remarks about the budget are given in section 6

  18. The Progenitor Dependence of Core-collapse Supernovae from Three-dimensional Simulations with Progenitor Models of 12–40 M ⊙

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke F.; da Silva Schneider, André; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Haas, Roland; Schnetter, Erik

    2018-03-01

    We present a first study of the progenitor star dependence of the three-dimensional (3D) neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. We employ full 3D general-relativistic multi-group neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics and simulate the postbounce evolutions of progenitors with zero-age main sequence masses of 12, 15, 20, 27, and 40 M ⊙. All progenitors, with the exception of the 12 M ⊙ star, experience shock runaway by the end of their simulations. In most cases, a strongly asymmetric explosion will result. We find three qualitatively distinct evolutions that suggest a complex dependence of explosion dynamics on progenitor density structure, neutrino heating, and 3D flow. (1) Progenitors with massive cores, shallow density profiles, and high post-core-bounce accretion rates experience very strong neutrino heating and neutrino-driven turbulent convection, leading to early shock runaway. Accretion continues at a high rate, likely leading to black hole formation. (2) Intermediate progenitors experience neutrino-driven, turbulence-aided explosions triggered by the arrival of density discontinuities at the shock. These occur typically at the silicon/silicon–oxygen shell boundary. (3) Progenitors with small cores and density profiles without strong discontinuities experience shock recession and develop the 3D standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). Shock runaway ensues late, once declining accretion rate, SASI, and neutrino-driven convection create favorable conditions. These differences in explosion times and dynamics result in a non-monotonic relationship between progenitor and compact remnant mass.

  19. Emission line models for the lowest mass core-collapse supernovae - I. Case study of a 9 M⊙ one-dimensional neutrino-driven explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Ertl, T.; Janka, H.-T.; Müller, E.; Sukhbold, T.; Woosley, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    A large fraction of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), 30-50 per cent, are expected to originate from the low-mass end of progenitors with MZAMS = 8-12 M⊙. However, degeneracy effects make stellar evolution modelling of such stars challenging, and few predictions for their supernova light curves and spectra have been presented. Here, we calculate synthetic nebular spectra of a 9 M⊙ Fe CCSN model exploded with the neutrino mechanism. The model predicts emission lines with FWHM ˜ 1000 km s-1, including signatures from each deep layer in the metal core. We compare this model to the observations of the three subluminous IIP SNe with published nebular spectra; SN 1997D, SN 2005cs and SN 2008bk. The predictions of both line profiles and luminosities are in good agreement with SN 1997D and SN 2008bk. The close fit of a model with no tuning parameters provides strong evidence for an association of these objects with low-mass Fe CCSNe. For SN 2005cs, the interpretation is less clear, as the observational coverage ended before key diagnostic lines from the core had emerged. We perform a parametrized study of the amount of explosively made stable nickel, and find that none of these three SNe show the high 58Ni/56Ni ratio predicted by current models of electron capture SNe (ECSNe) and ECSN-like explosions. Combined with clear detection of lines from O and He shell material, these SNe rather originate from Fe core progenitors. We argue that the outcome of self-consistent explosion simulations of low-mass stars, which gives fits to many key observables, strongly suggests that the class of subluminous Type IIP SNe is the observational counterpart of the lowest mass CCSNe.

  20. Current status of relativistic core collapse simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, Jose A [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad de Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    With the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave laser interferometers already taking data, the availability of reliable waveform templates from astrophysical sources, which may help extract the signal from the anticipated noisy data, is urgently required. Gravitational stellar core collapse supernova has traditionally been considered among the most important astrophysical sources of potentially detectable gravitational radiation. Only very recently the first multidimensional simulations of relativistic rotational core collapse have been possible (albeit for models with simplified input physics), thanks to the use of conservative formulations of the hydrodynamics equations and advanced numerical methodology, as well as stable formulations of Einstein's equations. In this paper, the current status of relativistic core collapse simulations is discussed, with the emphasis given to the modelling of the collapse dynamics and to the computation of the gravitational radiation in the existing numerical approaches. Work employing the conformally-flat approximation (CFC) of the 3+1 Einstein's equations is reported, as well as extensions of this approximation (CFC+) and investigations within the framework of the so-called BSSN formulation of the 3+1 gravitational field equations (with no approximation for the spacetime dynamics). On the other hand, the incorporation of magnetic fields and the MHD equations in numerical codes to improve the realism of core collapse simulations in general relativity, is currently an emerging field where significant progress is bound to be soon achieved. The paper also contains a brief discussion of magneto-rotational simulations of core collapse, aiming at addressing the effects of magnetic fields on the collapse dynamics and on the gravitational waveforms.

  1. Current status of relativistic core collapse simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, Jose A

    2007-01-01

    With the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave laser interferometers already taking data, the availability of reliable waveform templates from astrophysical sources, which may help extract the signal from the anticipated noisy data, is urgently required. Gravitational stellar core collapse supernova has traditionally been considered among the most important astrophysical sources of potentially detectable gravitational radiation. Only very recently the first multidimensional simulations of relativistic rotational core collapse have been possible (albeit for models with simplified input physics), thanks to the use of conservative formulations of the hydrodynamics equations and advanced numerical methodology, as well as stable formulations of Einstein's equations. In this paper, the current status of relativistic core collapse simulations is discussed, with the emphasis given to the modelling of the collapse dynamics and to the computation of the gravitational radiation in the existing numerical approaches. Work employing the conformally-flat approximation (CFC) of the 3+1 Einstein's equations is reported, as well as extensions of this approximation (CFC+) and investigations within the framework of the so-called BSSN formulation of the 3+1 gravitational field equations (with no approximation for the spacetime dynamics). On the other hand, the incorporation of magnetic fields and the MHD equations in numerical codes to improve the realism of core collapse simulations in general relativity, is currently an emerging field where significant progress is bound to be soon achieved. The paper also contains a brief discussion of magneto-rotational simulations of core collapse, aiming at addressing the effects of magnetic fields on the collapse dynamics and on the gravitational waveforms

  2. Asymmetric core collapse of rapidly rotating massive star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2018-02-01

    Non-axisymmetric features are found in the core collapse of a rapidly rotating massive star, which might have important implications for magnetic field amplification and production of a bipolar outflow that can explode the star, as well as for r-process nucleosynthesis and natal kicks. The collapse of an evolved rapidly rotating MZAMS = 54 M⊙ star is followed in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code with neutrino leakage. A rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) forms with a non-zero linear velocity. This can contribute to the natal kick of the remnant compact object. The PNS is surrounded by a turbulent medium, where high shearing is likely to amplify magnetic fields, which in turn can drive a bipolar outflow. Neutron-rich material in the PNS vicinity might induce strong r-process nucleosynthesis. The rapidly rotating PNS possesses a rotational energy of E_rot ≳ 10^{52} erg. Magnetar formation proceeding in a similar fashion will be able to deposit a portion of this energy later on in the supernova ejecta through a spin-down mechanism. These processes can be important for rare supernovae generated by rapidly rotating progenitors, even though a complete explosion is not simulated in the present study.

  3. Kinematic fingerprint of core-collapsed globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Webb, J. J.; Sills, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-03-01

    Dynamical evolution drives globular clusters towards core collapse, which strongly shapes their internal properties. Diagnostics of core collapse have so far been based on photometry only, namely on the study of the concentration of the density profiles. Here, we present a new method to robustly identify core-collapsed clusters based on the study of their stellar kinematics. We introduce the kinematic concentration parameter, ck, the ratio between the global and local degree of energy equipartition reached by a cluster, and show through extensive direct N-body simulations that clusters approaching core collapse and in the post-core collapse phase are strictly characterized by ck > 1. The kinematic concentration provides a suitable diagnostic to identify core-collapsed clusters, independent from any other previous methods based on photometry. We also explore the effects of incomplete radial and stellar mass coverage on the calculation of ck and find that our method can be applied to state-of-art kinematic data sets.

  4. Kinematic fingerprint of core-collapsed globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Webb, J. J.; Sills, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamical evolution drives globular clusters toward core collapse, which strongly shapes their internal properties. Diagnostics of core collapse have so far been based on photometry only, namely on the study of the concentration of the density profiles. Here we present a new method to robustly identify core-collapsed clusters based on the study of their stellar kinematics. We introduce the kinematic concentration parameter, ck, the ratio between the global and local degree of energy equipartition reached by a cluster, and show through extensive direct N-body simulations that clusters approaching core collapse and in the post-core collapse phase are strictly characterized by ck > 1. The kinematic concentration provides a suitable diagnostic to identify core-collapsed clusters, independent from any other previous methods based on photometry. We also explore the effects of incomplete radial and stellar mass coverage on the calculation of ck and find that our method can be applied to state-of-art kinematic datasets.

  5. Core-collapse astrophysics with a five-megaton neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Matthew D.; Yüksel, Hasan; Ando, Shin'Ichiro; Beacom, John F.; Suzuki, Yoichiro

    2011-06-01

    The legacy of solar neutrinos suggests that large neutrino detectors should be sited underground. However, to instead go underwater bypasses the need to move mountains, allowing much larger water Čerenkov detectors. We show that reaching a detector mass scale of ˜5 Megatons, the size of the proposed Deep-TITAND, would permit observations of neutrino “mini-bursts” from supernovae in nearby galaxies on a roughly yearly basis, and we develop the immediate qualitative and quantitative consequences. Importantly, these mini-bursts would be detected over backgrounds without the need for optical evidence of the supernova, guaranteeing the beginning of time-domain MeV neutrino astronomy. The ability to identify, to the second, every core collapse in the local Universe would allow a continuous “death watch” of all stars within ˜5Mpc, making practical many previously-impossible tasks in probing rare outcomes and refining coordination of multiwavelength/multiparticle observations and analysis. These include the abilities to promptly detect otherwise-invisible prompt black hole formation, provide advance warning for supernova shock-breakout searches, define tight time windows for gravitational-wave searches, and identify “supernova impostors” by the nondetection of neutrinos. Observations of many supernovae, even with low numbers of detected neutrinos, will help answer questions about supernovae that cannot be resolved with a single high-statistics event in the Milky Way.

  6. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE: INSIGHT INTO THEIR GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inserra, C.; Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Smartt, S. J., E-mail: c.inserra@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of a hydrogen-free superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.1136, namely SN 2015bn. The transient shows significant polarization at both of the observed epochs: one 24 days before maximum light in the rest-frame, and the other at 27 days after peak luminosity. Analysis of the Q – U plane suggests the presence of a dominant axis and no physical departure from the main axis at either epoch. The polarization spectrum along the dominant axis is characterized by a strong wavelength dependence and an increase in the signal from the first to the second epoch. We use a Monte Carlo code to demonstrate that these properties are consistent with a simple toy model that adopts an axisymmetric ellipsoidal configuration for the ejecta. We find that the wavelength dependence of the polarization is possibly due to a strong wavelength dependence in the line opacity, while the higher level of polarization at the second epoch is a consequence of the increase in the asphericity of the inner layers of the ejecta or the fact that the photosphere recedes into less spherical layers. The geometry of the SLSN is similar to that of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe connected to GRB, while the overall evolution of the ejecta shape could be consistent with a central engine.

  7. More Supernova Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    SEP 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Supernova Surprises 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...PERSPECTIVES More Supernova Surprises ASTRONOMY J. Martin Laming Spectroscopic observations of the supernova SN1987A are providing a new window into high...a core-collapse supernova ) have stretched and motivated research that has expanded our knowledge of astrophysics. The brightest such event in

  8. Axisymmetric core collapse simulations using characteristic numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebel, Florian; Mueller, Ewald; Font, Jose A.; Papadopoulos, Philippos

    2003-01-01

    We present results from nonrotating axisymmetric stellar core collapse simulations in general relativity. Our hydrodynamics code has proved robust and accurate enough to allow for a detailed analysis of the global dynamics of the collapse. Contrary to traditional approaches based on the 3+1 formulation of the gravitational field equations, our framework uses a foliation based on a family of outgoing light cones, emanating from a regular center, and terminating at future null infinity. Such a coordinate system is well adapted to the study of interesting dynamical spacetimes in relativistic astrophysics such as stellar core collapse and neutron star formation. Perhaps most importantly this procedure allows for the extraction of gravitational waves at future null infinity, along with the commonly used quadrupole formalism for the gravitational wave extraction. Our results concerning the gravitational wave signals show noticeable disagreement when those are extracted by computing the Bondi news at future null infinity on the one hand and by using the quadrupole formula on the other hand. We have a strong indication that for our setup the quadrupole formula on the null cone does not lead to physical gravitational wave signals. The Bondi gravitational wave signals extracted at infinity show typical oscillation frequencies of about 0.5 kHz

  9. Supernova Neutrino Detection With Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.ianni@lngs.infn.it [I.N.F.N. Gran Sasso Laboratory, S.S. 17bis, 67100, Assergi (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    Core collapse supernovae are a remarkable source of neutrinos. These neutrinos can also be detected by means of massive liquid scintillators located underground. Observations of supernova neutrinos can shed light on the explosion mechanism and on neutrino properties. In this paper we review the detection channels for neutrinos in liquid scintillators. We consider present and future experiments for supernova neutrino searches.

  10. Supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardall, C.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism and supernova nucleosynthesis, and as a potential probe of the supernova environment and of some of the neutrino mixing parameters that remain unknown; hence a variety of approximate transport schemes have been used to obtain results with reduced dimensionality. However, none of these approximate schemes have addressed a recent challenge to the conventional wisdom that neutrino flavor mixing cannot impact the explosion mechanism or r-process nucleosynthesis

  11. PISCO: The PMAS/PPak Integral-field Supernova Hosts Compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Sánchez, S. F.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Pedraz, S.; González-Gaitán, S.; Stanishev, V.; Domínguez, I.; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Mourão, A. M.; Ponder, K. A.; Badenes, C.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Vílchez, J. M.; García-Benito, R.; Marino, R. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present the PMAS/PPak Integral-field Supernova hosts COmpilation (PISCO), which comprises integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of 232 supernova (SN) host galaxies that hosted 272 SNe, observed over several semesters with the 3.5 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA). PISCO is the largest collection of SN host galaxies observed with wide-field IFS, totaling 466,347 individual spectra covering a typical spatial resolution of ∼380 pc. Focused studies regarding specific SN Ia-related topics will be published elsewhere; this paper aims to present the properties of the SN environments, using stellar population (SP) synthesis, and the gas-phase interstellar medium, providing additional results separating stripped-envelope SNe into their subtypes. With 11,270 H II regions detected in all galaxies, we present for the first time a statistical analysis of H II regions, which puts H II regions that have hosted SNe in context with all other star-forming clumps within their galaxies. SNe Ic are associated with environments that are more metal-rich and have higher EW(Hα) and higher star formation rate within their host galaxies than the mean of all H II regions detected within each host. This in contrast to SNe IIb, which occur in environments that are very different compared to other core-collapse SNe types. We find two clear components of young and old SPs at SNe IIn locations. We find that SNe II fast decliners tend to explode at locations where the ΣSFR is more intense. Finally, we outline how a future dedicated IFS survey of galaxies in parallel to an untargeted SN search would overcome the biases in current environmental studies.

  12. The Carnegie Supernova Project I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Taddia, F.; Burns, C. R.

    2018-01-01

    We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub......-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum...

  13. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  14. Analyzing the Largest Spectroscopic Data Set of Hydrogen-poor Super-luminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Qian; Modjaz, Maryam; Bianco, Federica B.

    2017-08-01

    Super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe) are tremendously luminous explosions whose power sources and progenitors are highly debated. Broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) are the only type of SNe that are connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Studying the spectral similarity and difference between the populations of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe Ic) and of hydrogen-poor stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe, in particular SNe Ic and SNe Ic-bl, can provide crucial observations to test predictions of theories based on various power source models and progenitor models. In this paper, we collected all of the published optical spectra of 32 SLSNe Ic, 21 SNe Ic-bl, as well as 17 SNe Ic, quantified their spectral features, constructed average spectra, and compared them in a systematic way using new tools we have developed. We find that SLSNe Ic and SNe Ic-bl, including those connected with GRBs, have comparable widths for their spectral features and average absorption velocities at all phases. Thus, our findings strengthen the connection between SLSNe Ic and GRBs. In particular, SLSNe Ic have average Fe II λ5169 absorption velocities of -15,000 ± 2600 km s-1 at 10 days after peak, which are higher than those of SNe Ic by ˜7000 km s-1 on average. SLSNe Ic also have significantly broader Fe II λ5169 lines than SNe Ic. Moreover, we find that such high absorption and width velocities of SLSNe Ic may be hard to explain with the interaction model, and none of the 13 SLSNe Ic with measured absorption velocities spanning over 10 days has a convincing flat velocity evolution, which is inconsistent with the magnetar model in one dimension. Lastly, we compare SN 2011kl, the first SN connected with an ultra-long GRB, with the mean spectrum of SLSNe Ic and of SNe Ic-bl.

  15. Analyzing the Largest Spectroscopic Data Set of Hydrogen-poor Super-luminous Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Qian; Modjaz, Maryam; Bianco, Federica B., E-mail: YL1260@nyu.edu, E-mail: mmodjaz@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    Super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe) are tremendously luminous explosions whose power sources and progenitors are highly debated. Broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) are the only type of SNe that are connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Studying the spectral similarity and difference between the populations of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe Ic) and of hydrogen-poor stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe, in particular SNe Ic and SNe Ic-bl, can provide crucial observations to test predictions of theories based on various power source models and progenitor models. In this paper, we collected all of the published optical spectra of 32 SLSNe Ic, 21 SNe Ic-bl, as well as 17 SNe Ic, quantified their spectral features, constructed average spectra, and compared them in a systematic way using new tools we have developed. We find that SLSNe Ic and SNe Ic-bl, including those connected with GRBs, have comparable widths for their spectral features and average absorption velocities at all phases. Thus, our findings strengthen the connection between SLSNe Ic and GRBs. In particular, SLSNe Ic have average Fe ii λ 5169 absorption velocities of −15,000 ± 2600 km s{sup −1} at 10 days after peak, which are higher than those of SNe Ic by ∼7000 km s{sup −1} on average. SLSNe Ic also have significantly broader Fe ii λ 5169 lines than SNe Ic. Moreover, we find that such high absorption and width velocities of SLSNe Ic may be hard to explain with the interaction model, and none of the 13 SLSNe Ic with measured absorption velocities spanning over 10 days has a convincing flat velocity evolution, which is inconsistent with the magnetar model in one dimension. Lastly, we compare SN 2011kl, the first SN connected with an ultra-long GRB, with the mean spectrum of SLSNe Ic and of SNe Ic-bl.

  16. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts in TMT Era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Study of energetic cosmic explosions as a part of time domain astronomy is one of the key areas that could be pursued with upcoming Giant segmented optical-IR telescopes with a very large photon collecting area applying cutting edge technology. Existing 8–10 m class telescopes have been helpful to ...

  17. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts in TMT Era SB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    near-infrared instrument with parallel imaging and integral-field-spectroscopy sup- port ... 2003a, b; Sahu et al. 2006; Roy et al. 2011; Kumar et al. 2013) and afterglows of GRBs (e.g. Sagar et al. 1999; Bhattacharya 2003;. Pandey et al. 2003a, b .... Massive Wolf-Rayet stars (>25–30M⊙) are supposed to be the potential pro-.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Long-term core-collapse supernova simulations (Nakamura+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Tanaka, M.; Hayama, K.; Takiwaki, T.; Kotake, K.

    2017-11-01

    In Table 2, we compiled a list of nearby RSGs from the literature. RSGs associated with OB associations and other RSGs. Our final RSG list consists of 212 RSG candidates. To estimate the CCSN rate of each galaxy, we adopt a subset of the Karachentsev catalogue for which the star formation rate can be observationally estimated. The resulting CCSN rates are summarized in the final column of Table 3. (2 data files).

  19. Neutrino astronomy with supernova neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Lindner, Manfred; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2018-04-01

    Modern neutrino facilities will be able to detect a large number of neutrinos from the next Galactic supernova. We investigate the viability of the triangulation method to locate a core-collapse supernova by employing the neutrino arrival time differences at various detectors. We perform detailed numerical fits in order to determine the uncertainties of these time differences for the cases when the core collapses into a neutron star or a black hole. We provide a global picture by combining all the relevant current and future neutrino detectors. Our findings indicate that in the scenario of a neutron star formation, supernova can be located with precision of 1.5 and 3.5 degrees in declination and right ascension, respectively. For the black hole scenario, sub-degree precision can be reached.

  20. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  1. Exploring Cosmology with Supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xue

    distribution of strong gravitational lensing is developed. For Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia), the rate is lower than core-collapse supernovae (CC SNe). The rate of SNe Ia declines beyond z 1:5. Based on these reasons, we investigate a potential candidate to measure cosmological distance: GRB......-SNe. They are a subclass of CC SNe. Light curves of GRB-SNe are obtained and their properties are studied. We ascertain that the properties of GRB-SNe make them another candidate for standardizable candles in measuring the cosmic distance. Cosmological parameters M and are constrained with the help of GRB-SNe. The first...

  2. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30--100 km s − 1 . The runaway stars ...

  3. Long-Lived Inverse Chirp Signals from Core-Collapse in Massive Scalar-Tensor Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Moore, Christopher J; Rosca, Roxana; Agathos, Michalis; Gerosa, Davide; Ott, Christian D

    2017-11-17

    This Letter considers stellar core collapse in massive scalar-tensor theories of gravity. The presence of a mass term for the scalar field allows for dramatic increases in the radiated gravitational wave signal. There are several potential smoking gun signatures of a departure from general relativity associated with this process. These signatures could show up within existing LIGO-Virgo searches.

  4. The SuperNova Early Warning System

    OpenAIRE

    Scholberg, K.

    2008-01-01

    A core collapse in the Milky Way will produce an enormous burst of neutrinos in detectors world-wide. Such a burst has the potential to provide an early warning of a supernova's appearance. I will describe the nature of the signal, the sensitivity of current detectors, and SNEWS, the SuperNova Early Warning System, a network designed to alert astronomers as soon as possible after the detected neutrino signal.

  5. Evolution of Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbutina, B.

    2017-12-01

    This book, both a monograph and a graduate textbook, is based on my original research and partly on the materials prepared earlier for the 2007 and 2008 IARS Astrophysics Summer School in Istanbul, AstroMundus course 'Supernovae and Their Remnants' that was held for the first time in 2011 at the Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, and a graduate course 'Evolution of Supernova Remnants' that I teach at the aforementioned university. The first part Supernovae (introduction, thermonuclear supernovae, core-collapse supernovae) provides introductory information and explains the classification and physics of supernova explosions, while the second part Supernova remnants (introduction, shock waves, cosmic rays and particle acceleration, magnetic fields, synchrotron radiation, hydrodynamic and radio evolution of supernova remnants), which is the field I work in, is more detailed in scope i.e. technical/mathematical. Special attention is paid to details of mathematical derivations that often cannot be found in original works or available literature. Therefore, I believe it can be useful to both, graduate students and researchers interested in the field.

  6. Neutrino emission from nearby supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinos have an important role for energy loss process during advanced evolution of massive stars. Although the luminosity and average energy of neutrinos during the Si burning are much smaller than those of supernova neutrinos, these neutrinos are expected to be detected by the liquid scintillation neutrino detector KamLAND if a supernova explosion occurs at the distance of ~100 parsec. We investigate the neutrino emission from massive stars during advanced evolution. We calculate the evolution of the energy spectra of neutrinos produced through electron-positron pair-annihilation in the supernova progenitors with the initial mass of 12, 15, and 20 M ⊙ during the Si burning and core-collapse stages. The neutrino emission rate increases from ~ 1050 s-1 to ~ 1052 s-1. The average energy of electron-antineutrinos is about 1.25 MeV during the Si burning and gradually increases until the core-collapse. For one week before the supernova explosion, the KamLAND detector is expected to observe 12-24 and 6-13 v¯e events in the normal and inverted mass hierarchies, respectively, if a supernova explosion of a 12-20 M ⊙ star occurs at the distance of 200 parsec, corresponding to the distance to Betelgeuse. Observations of neutrinos from SN progenitors have a possibility to constrain the core structure and the evolution just before the core collapse of massive stars.

  7. A new approach to mixing length theory of convection for spherically symmetric supernova simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mackenzie; Couch, Sean

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a new approach to the mixing length theory of convection for use in spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova simulations. This approach is based on the results of multidimensional simulations with the goal of more accurately reproducing successful explosions, the composition and thermodynamic variables in regions where nucleosynthesis occurs, and observed quantities such as neutrino luminosities and energies. We compare this approach with standard mixing length theory and the results of multidimensional supernova simulations and discuss prospects for systematic studies of the nuclear equation of state and heavy element nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae.

  8. Runaway stars as progenitors of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eldridge, J.J.; Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498; Tout, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    When a core-collapse supernova occurs in a binary system, the surviving star as well as the compact remnant emerging from the supernova may reach a substantial space velocity. With binary population synthesis modelling at solar and one-fifth of solar metallicity, we predict the velocities of such

  9. Neutrinos from supernovae as a trigger for gravitational wave search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaroli, G; Vissani, F; Coccia, E; Fulgione, W

    2009-07-17

    Exploiting an improved analysis of the nue signal from the explosion of a galactic core collapse supernova, we show that it is possible to identify within about 10 ms the time of the bounce, which is strongly correlated to the time of the maximum amplitude of the gravitational signal. This allows us to precisely identify the gravitational wave burst timing.

  10. CORE-COLLAPSE MODEL OF BROADBAND EMISSION FROM SNR RX J1713.7–3946 WITH THERMAL X-RAYS AND GAMMA RAYS FROM ESCAPING COSMIC RAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Slane, Patrick; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a spherically symmetric, core-collapse model of SNR RX J1713.7–3946 that includes a hydrodynamic simulation of the remnant evolution coupled to the efficient production of cosmic rays (CRs) by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration. High-energy CRs that escape from the forward shock (FS) are propagated in surrounding dense material that simulates either a swept-up, pre-supernova shell or a nearby molecular cloud. The continuum emission from trapped and escaping CRs, along with the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked heated interstellar medium behind the FS, integrated over the remnant, is compared against broadband observations. Our results show conclusively that, overall, the GeV-TeV emission is dominated by inverse-Compton from CR electrons if the supernova is isolated regardless of its type, i.e., not interacting with a >>100 M ☉ shell or cloud. If the supernova remnant is interacting with a much larger mass ∼> 10 4 M ☉ , pion decay from the escaping CRs may dominate the TeV emission, although a precise fit at high energy will depend on the still uncertain details of how the highest energy CRs are accelerated by, and escape from, the FS. Based on morphological and other constraints, we consider the 10 4 M ☉ pion-decay scenario highly unlikely for SNR RX J1713.7–3946 regardless of the details of CR escape. Importantly, even though CR electrons dominate the GeV-TeV emission, the efficient production of CR ions is an essential part of our leptonic model.

  11. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  12. Autopsy of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting ejecta in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) are discussed. The reconstructions encompass the remnant's faint outlying ejecta knots, including the exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of debris often referred to as `jets'. The bulk of Cas A's ejecta are arranged in several circular rings with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). We suggest that similar large-scale ejecta rings may be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may explain lumpy emission line profile substructure sometimes observed in spectra of extragalactic core-collapse supernovae years after explosion. A likely origin for these large ejecta rings is post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material to form bubble-like structures.

  13. Nucleosynthesis in Type II Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Carrie; Hix, W. Raphael; Harris, A.; Manneschmidt, A.

    2016-09-01

    Type II are the most common class of the ``core collapse'' supernova, involving the destruction of a high mass star (> 8M⊙). Their death is a result of a self-gravitational force becoming unbalanced as fusion ceases in the stellar core, leading to the collapse of the core to form a neutron star. The propagation of the shock ignites fusion into heavier elements as it progress through the star. This process is the origin of most elements present in the universe. In recent years, the complex nature of the explosion (its hydrodynamics, transport of energy, and the created isotopes) have been studied with increasing physical fidelity. Detailed nucleosynthesis from models of these core collapse supernovae is calculated in a post-processing step, using thermodynamic trajectories. My work on the project has been to develop the tools to visualize the results of post-processing calculations in the 2D grid. National Science Foundation (NSF).

  14. COSMIC-LAB: Double BSS sequences as signatures of the Core Collapse phenomenon in star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    Globular Clusters {GCs} are old stellar systems tracing key stages of the star formation and chemical enrichment history of the early Universe and the galaxy assembly phase. As part of a project {COSMIC-LAB} aimed at using GCs as natural laboratories to study the complex interplay between dynamics and stellar evolution, here we present a proposal dealing with the role of Blue Straggler Stars {BSS}.BSS are core-hydrogen burning stars more massive than the main-sequence turnoff population. The canonical scenarios for BSS formation are either the mass transfer between binary companions, or stellar mergers induced by collisions. We have recently discovered two distinct and parallel sequences of BSS in the core of M30 {Ferraro et al. 2009, Nature 462, 1082}. We suggested that each of the two sequences is populated by BSS formed by one of the two processes, both triggered by the cluster core collapse, that, based on the observed BSS properties, must have occurred 1-2 Gyr ago. Following this scenario, we have identified a powerful "clock" to date the occurrence of this key event in the GC history.Here we propose to secure WFC3 images of 4 post-core collapse GCs, reaching S/N=200 at the BSS magnitude level, in order to determine the ubiquity of the BSS double sequence and calibrate the "dynamical clock". This requires very high spatial resolution and very high precision photometry capabilities that are unique to the HST. The modest amount of requested time will have a deep impact on the current and future generations of dynamical evolutionary models of collisional stellar systems.

  15. Three-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro Code for Core-collapse in Massive Stars. II. The Implementation of Moving-mesh for Neutron Star Kicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagakura, Hiroki [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Iwakami, Wakana [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Furusawa, Shun [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronimical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Matsufuru, Hideo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 308-0801 (Japan); Imakura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    We present a newly developed moving-mesh technique for the multi-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro code for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). What makes this technique different from others is the fact that it treats not only hydrodynamics but also neutrino transfer in the language of the 3 + 1 formalism of general relativity (GR), making use of the shift vector to specify the time evolution of the coordinate system. This means that the transport part of our code is essentially general relativistic, although in this paper it is applied only to the moving curvilinear coordinates in the flat Minknowski spacetime, since the gravity part is still Newtonian. The numerical aspect of the implementation is also described in detail. Employing the axisymmetric two-dimensional version of the code, we conduct two test computations: oscillations and runaways of proto-neutron star (PNS). We show that our new method works fine, tracking the motions of PNS correctly. We believe that this is a major advancement toward the realistic simulation of CCSNe.

  16. Three-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro Code for Core-collapse in Massive Stars. II. The Implementation of Moving-mesh for Neutron Star Kicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Iwakami, Wakana; Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Matsufuru, Hideo; Imakura, Akira

    2017-04-01

    We present a newly developed moving-mesh technique for the multi-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro code for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). What makes this technique different from others is the fact that it treats not only hydrodynamics but also neutrino transfer in the language of the 3 + 1 formalism of general relativity (GR), making use of the shift vector to specify the time evolution of the coordinate system. This means that the transport part of our code is essentially general relativistic, although in this paper it is applied only to the moving curvilinear coordinates in the flat Minknowski spacetime, since the gravity part is still Newtonian. The numerical aspect of the implementation is also described in detail. Employing the axisymmetric two-dimensional version of the code, we conduct two test computations: oscillations and runaways of proto-neutron star (PNS). We show that our new method works fine, tracking the motions of PNS correctly. We believe that this is a major advancement toward the realistic simulation of CCSNe.

  17. Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Isern, Jordi; Perego, Albino; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2018-04-01

    We present the status and open problems of nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions of both types, responsible for the production of the intermediate mass, Fe-group and heavier elements (with the exception of the main s-process). Constraints from observations can be provided through individual supernovae (SNe) or their remnants (e.g. via spectra and gamma-rays of decaying unstable isotopes) and through surface abundances of stars which witness the composition of the interstellar gas at their formation. With a changing fraction of elements heavier than He in these stars (known as metallicity) the evolution of the nucleosynthesis in galaxies over time can be determined. A complementary way, related to gamma-rays from radioactive decays, is the observation of positrons released in β+-decays, as e.g. from ^{26}Al, ^{44}Ti, ^{56,57}Ni and possibly further isotopes of their decay chains (in competition with the production of e+e- pairs in acceleration shocks from SN remnants, pulsars, magnetars or even of particle physics origin). We discuss (a) the role of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism for the composition of intermediate mass, Fe-group (and heavier?) ejecta, (b) the transition from neutron stars to black holes as the final result of the collapse of massive stars, and the relation of the latter to supernovae, faint supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts/hypernovae, (c) Type Ia supernovae and their nucleosynthesis (e.g. addressing the ^{55}Mn puzzle), plus (d) further constraints from galactic evolution, γ-ray and positron observations. This is complemented by the role of rare magneto-rotational supernovae (related to magnetars) in comparison with the nucleosynthesis of compact binary mergers, especially with respect to forming the heaviest r-process elements in galactic evolution.

  18. The $^{59}$Cu(p,$\\alpha$) cross section and its implications for nucleosynthesis in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Multimedia

    The $^{59}$Cu(p,$\\alpha$) reaction is key for heavy element synthesis in the vp-process, since it may hinder the reaction flow to higher masses by recycling material back to $^{56}$Ni and it has a strong influence on the production of the cosmic X-ray sources $^{55}$Fe and $^{59}$Ni. The intense and highly energetic $^{59}$Cu beams provided by the new HIE-ISOLDE facility will for the first time allow a direct measurement of this reaction at astrophysical energies, making it one of only few cases where a direct study is possible with a radioactive beam. We propose to measure the $^{59}$Cu(p,$\\alpha$) reaction for the first time using $^{59}$Cu beams from the HIE-ISOLDE facility.

  19. Theoretical models for supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the γ-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of 4 He and 14 N prior to their collapse on the pair instability

  20. The Rise and Fall of the Type Ib Supernova iPTF13bvn Not a Massive Wolf-Rayet Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Context. We investigate iPTF13bvn, a core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5806. This object was discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) very close to the estimated explosion date and was classified as a stripped-envelope CC SN, likely of Type Ib. Furthermore, a possible progenitor detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images was reported, making this the only SN Ib with such an identification. Based on the luminosity and color of the progenitor candidate, as well as on early-time spectra and photometry of the SN, it was argued that the progenitor candidate is consistent with a single, massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Aims. We aim to confirm the progenitor detection, to robustly classify the SN using additional spectroscopy, and to investigate if our follow-up photometric and spectroscopic data on iPTF13bvn are consistent with a single-star WR progenitor scenario. Methods. We present a large set of observational data, consisting of multi-band light curves (UBVRI, g'r'i'z') and optical spectra. We perform standard spectral line analysis to track the evolution of the SN ejecta. We also construct a bolometric light curve and perform hydrodynamical calculations to model this light curve to constrain the synthesized radioactive nickel mass and the total ejecta mass of the SN. Late-time photometry is analyzed to constrain the amount of oxygen. Furthermore, image registration of pre- and post-explosion HST images is performed. Results. Our HST astrometry confirms the location of the progenitor candidate of iPTF13bvn, and follow-up spectra securely classify this as a SN Ib. We use our hydrodynamical model to fit the observed bolometric light curve, estimating the total ejecta mass to be 1.9 solar mass and the radioactive nickel mass to be 0.05 solar mass. The model fit requires the nickel synthesized in the explosion to be highly mixed out in the ejecta. We also find that the late-time nebular r

  1. THE BLUE STRAGGLER STAR POPULATION IN NGC 1261: EVIDENCE FOR A POST-CORE-COLLAPSE BOUNCE STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunovic, Mirko; Puzia, Thomas H. [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Sills, Alison, E-mail: msimunov@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: tpuzia@astro.puc.cl, E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    We present a multi-passband photometric study of the Blue Straggler Star (BSS) population in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 1261, using available space- and ground-based survey data. The inner BSS population is found to have two distinct sequences in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD), similar to double BSS sequences detected in other GCs. These well defined sequences are presumably linked to single short-lived events such as core collapse, which are expected to boost the formation of BSSs. In agreement with this, we find a BSS sequence in NGC 1261 which can be well reproduced individually by a theoretical model prediction of a 2 Gyr old population of stellar collision products, which are expected to form in the denser inner regions during short-lived core contraction phases. Additionally, we report the occurrence of a group of BSSs with unusually blue colors in the CMD, which are consistent with a corresponding model of a 200 Myr old population of stellar collision products. The properties of the NGC 1261 BSS populations, including their spatial distributions, suggest an advanced dynamical evolutionary state of the cluster, but the core of this GC does not show the classical signatures of core collapse. We argue that these apparent contradictions provide evidence for a post-core-collapse bounce state seen in dynamical simulations of old GCs.

  2. Fast-time Variations of Supernova Neutrino Fluxes and Detection Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborra, I.; Hanke, F.; Müller, B.; Janka, H.T.; Raffelt, G.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the delayed explosion scenario of a core-collapse supernova, the accretion phase shows pronounced convective over-turns and a low-multipole hydrodynamic instability, the so-called standing accretion shock instability (SASI). Neutrino signal variations from the first full-scale three-dimensional

  3. Supernova Explosions Stay In Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    remnants. This type of supernova is thought to be caused by a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf, and is often used by astronomers as "standard candles" for measuring cosmic distances. On the other hand, the remnants tied to the "core-collapse" supernova explosions were distinctly more asymmetric. This type of supernova occurs when a very massive, young star collapses onto itself and then explodes. "If we can link supernova remnants with the type of explosion", said co-author Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, also of University of California, Santa Cruz, "then we can use that information in theoretical models to really help us nail down the details of how the supernovas went off." Models of core-collapse supernovas must include a way to reproduce the asymmetries measured in this work and models of Type Ia supernovas must produce the symmetric, circular remnants that have been observed. Out of the 17 supernova remnants sampled, ten were classified as the core-collapse variety, while the remaining seven of them were classified as Type Ia. One of these, a remnant known as SNR 0548-70.4, was a bit of an "oddball". This one was considered a Type Ia based on its chemical abundances, but Lopez finds it has the asymmetry of a core-collapse remnant. "We do have one mysterious object, but we think that is probably a Type Ia with an unusual orientation to our line of sight," said Lopez. "But we'll definitely be looking at that one again." While the supernova remnants in the Lopez sample were taken from the Milky Way and its close neighbor, it is possible this technique could be extended to remnants at even greater distances. For example, large, bright supernova remnants in the galaxy M33 could be included in future studies to determine the types of supernova that generated them. The paper describing these results appeared in the November 20 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science

  4. A unified model of supernova driven by magnetic monopoles

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Qiu-He; Liu, Jing-Jing; Chou, Chih-Kang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we first discuss a series of important but puzzling physical mechanisms concerning the energy source, various kinds of core collapsed supernovae explosion mechanisms during central gravitational collapse in astrophysics. We also discuss the puzzle of possible association of $\\gamma$-ray burst with gravitational wave perturbation, the heat source for the molten interior of the core of the earth and finally the puzzling problem of the cooling of white dwarfs. We then make use of ...

  5. A unified model of supernova driven by magnetic monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiu-He; Liu, Jing-Jing; Chou, Chih-Kang

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we first discuss a series of important but puzzling physical mechanisms concerning the energy source, various kinds of core collapsed supernovae explosion mechanisms during central gravitational collapse in astrophysics. We also discuss the puzzle of possible association of γ -ray burst with gravitational wave perturbation, the heat source for the molten interior of the core of the Earth and finally the puzzling problem of the cooling of white dwarfs. We then make use of the estimations for the space flux of magnetic monopoles (hereafter MMs) and nucleon decay induced by MMs (called the Rubakov-Callen (RC) effect) to obtain the luminosity due to the RC effect. In terms of the formula for this RC luminosity, we present a unified treatment for the heat source of the Earth's core, the energy source for the white dwarf interior, various kinds of core collapsed supernovae (Type II Supernova (SNII), Type Ib Supernova (SNIb), Type Ic Supernova (SNIc), Super luminous supernova (SLSN)), and the production mechanism for γ -ray burst. This unified model can also be used to reasonably explain the possible association of the short γ -ray burst detected by the Fermi γ -ray Burst Monitoring Satellite (GBM) with the LIGO gravitational wave event GW150914 in September 2015.

  6. Electron capture in carbon dwarf supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, T. J.; Truran, J. W.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1974-01-01

    The rates of electron capture on heavier elements under the extreme conditions predicted for dwarf star supernovae have been computed, incorporating modifications that seem to be indicated by present experimental results. An estimate of the maximum possible value of such rates is also given. The distribution of nuclei in nuclear statistical equilibrium has been calculated for the range of expected supernovae conditions, including the effects of the temperature dependence of nuclear partition functions. These nuclide abundance distributions are then used to compute nuclear equilibrium thermodynamic properties. The effects of the electron capture on such equilibrium matter are discussed. In the context of the 'carbon detonation' supernova model, the dwarf central density required to ensure core collapse to a neutron star configuration is found to be slightly higher than that obtained by Bruenn (1972) with the electron capture rates of Hansen (1966).-

  7. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  8. Parameterizing the Supernova Engine and Its Effect on Remnants and Basic Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Andrews, Sydney; Even, Wesley; Heger, Alex; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2018-03-01

    Core-collapse supernova science is now entering an era in which engine models are beginning to make both qualitative and, in some cases, quantitative predictions. Although the evidence in support of the convective engine for core-collapse supernova continues to grow, it is difficult to place quantitative constraints on this engine. Some studies have made specific predictions for the remnant distribution from the convective engine, but the results differ between different groups. Here we use a broad parameterization for the supernova engine to understand the differences between distinct studies. With this broader set of models, we place error bars on the remnant mass and basic yields from the uncertainties in the explosive engine. We find that, even with only three progenitors and a narrow range of explosion energies, we can produce a wide range of remnant masses and nucleosynthetic yields.

  9. Methodological studies on the search for Gravitational Waves and Neutrinos from Type II Supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casentini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Type II SNe, also called Core-collapse SuperNovae have a neutrino (v) emission, as confirmed by SN 1987A, and are also potential sources of gravitational waves. Neutrinos and gravitational waves from these sources reach Earth almost contemporaneously and without relevant interaction with stellar matter and interstellar medium. The upcoming advanced gravitational interferometers would be sensitive enough to detect gravitational waves signals from close galactic Core-collapse SuperNovae events. Nevertheless, significant uncertainties on theoretical models of emission remain. A joint search of coincident low energy neutrinos and gravitational waves events from these sources would bring valuable information from the inner core of the collapsing star and would enhance the detection of the so-called Silent SuperNovae. Recently a project for a joint search involving gravitational wave interferometers and neutrino detectors has started. We discuss the benefits of a joint search and the status of the search project. (paper)

  10. Supernova neutrino detection in LZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitan, D.

    2018-02-01

    In the first 10 seconds of a core-collapse supernova, almost all of its progenitor's gravitational potential, O(1053 ergs), is carried away in the form of neutrinos. These neutrinos, with O(10 MeV) kinetic energy, can interact via coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS) depositing O(1 keV) in detectors. In this work we describe the performances of low-background dark matter detectors, such as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ), optimized for detecting low-energy depositions, in detecting these neutrino interactions. For instance, a 27 Msolar supernova at 10 kpc is expected to produce ~350 neutrino interactions in the 7-tonne liquid xenon active volume of LZ. Based on the LS220 EoS neutrino flux model for a SN, the Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST), and predicted CEνNS cross-sections for xenon, to study energy deposition and detection of SN neutrinos in LZ. We simulate the response of the LZ data acquisition system (DAQ) and demonstrate its capability and limitations in handling this interaction rate. We present an overview of the LZ detector, focusing on the benefits of liquid xenon for supernova neutrino detection. We discuss energy deposition and detector response simulations and their results. We present an analysis technique to reconstruct the total number of neutrinos and the time of the supernova core bounce.

  11. TeraScale Supernova Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, A.; TeraScale Supernova Initiative Collaboration

    2002-05-01

    The TeraScale Supernova Initiative is a national collaboration centered at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and involves eight universities. TSI has as its central focus to ascertain the explosion mechanism(s) for core collapse supernovae and to understand and predict their associated phenomenology, including neutrino signatures, gravitational radiation emission, and nucleosynthesis. TSI is an interdisciplinary effort of astrophysicists, nuclear physicists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists. Multidimensional hydrodynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, and radiation hydrodynamics simulations that implement state of the art nuclear and weak interaction physics are planned in order to understand the roles of neutrino transport, stellar convection and rotation, and magnetic fields in the supernova mechanism. Scalable algorithms for the solution of the large sparse linear systems of equations that arise in radiation transport applications and a customized collaborative visualization environment will be developed also. TSI's latest results and future efforts will be discussed. The TeraScale Supernova Initiative is funded by grants from the DoE (1) High Energy and Nuclear Physics and (2) Mathematics, Information, and Computational Sciences SciDAC Programs.

  12. Light Element Synthesis Constraints on Supernova Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, D. H.; Yoshida, T.; Kajino, T.

    2004-12-01

    We constrain the energy spectra of neutrinos from core collapse supernovae through the abundances of 11B and 7Li in the context of galactic chemical evolution. We show that the temperatures of mu- and tau-neutrinos are constrained to the range (4.8,6.6)MeV for zero chemical potential. These temperatures decrease by about 10 percent for realistic non- zero chemical potentials. This work was supported in part by grants 12047233, 13640313, 15740160, 13002001, and 22160028 of the Japan Society for Promotion of Science and the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture of Japan.

  13. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM SUPERNOVAE AND LONG GRBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice H.P.M. van Putten

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on evidence for black hole spindown in the light curves of the BATSE catalogue of 1491 long GRBs by application of matched filtering. This observation points to a strong interaction of the black hole with surrounding high density matter at the ISCO, inducing non-axisymmetric instabilities sustained by cooling in gravitational wave emission. Opportunities for LIGO-Virgo and the recently funded KAGRA experiments are highlighted, for long GRBs with and without supernovae and for hyper-energetic core-collapse supernovae within a distance of about 35Mpc in the Local Universe.

  14. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, H B; Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P A; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D-S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2010-05-20

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The 'old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass ( approximately 0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive (44)Ti.

  15. Probing Dark Energy via Neutrino and Supernova Observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Lawrence; Hall, Lawrence J.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Papucci, Michele; Perez, Gilad

    2006-07-10

    A novel method for extracting cosmological evolution parameters is proposed, using a probe other than light: future observations of the diffuse anti-neutrino flux emitted from core-collapse supernovae (SNe), combined with the SN rate extracted from future SN surveys. The relic SN neutrino differential flux can be extracted by using future neutrino detectors such as Gadolinium-enriched, megaton, water detectors or 100-kiloton detectors of liquid Argon or liquid scintillator. The core-collapse SN rate can be reconstructed from direct observation of SN explosions using future precision observatories. Our method, by itself, cannot compete with the accuracy of the optical-based measurements but may serve as an important consistency check as well as a source of complementary information. The proposal does not require construction of a dedicated experiment, but rather relies on future experiments proposed for other purposes.

  16. Accelerating Our Understanding of Supernova Explosion Mechanism via Simulations and Visualizations with GenASiS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budiardja, R. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cardall, Christian Y [ORNL; Endeve, Eirik [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most powerful explosions in the Universe, releasing about 1053 erg of energy on timescales of a few tens of seconds. These explosion events are also responsible for the production and dissemination of most of the heavy elements, making life as we know it possible. Yet exactly how they work is still unresolved. One reason for this is the sheer complexity and cost of a self-consistent, multi-physics, and multi-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulation, which is impractical, and often impossible, even on the largest supercomputers we have available today. To advance our understanding we instead must often use simplified models, teasing out the most important ingredients for successful explosions, while helping us to interpret results from higher fidelity multi-physics models. In this paper we investigate the role of instabilities in the core-collapse supernova environment. We present here simulation and visualization results produced by our code GenASiS.

  17. Radio and X-ray observations of supernovae in dense environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poonam

    2017-02-01

    Here we discuss the observational properties of supernovae exploding in extremely dense environments, namely Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn). In SNe IIn, the surrounding environments play significant role in the supernovae energetics and evolution. Thus they are different than other classes of core collapse supernovae, whose energetics are not significantly altered by their environments. Though high density of medium is a prerequisite for radio and X-ray emission, less than 10% on SNe IIn are bright in these bands. This has important implications for their progenitor models. I will discuss the radio and X-ray observations of SNe IIn, which are crucial to unravel their complex environments. We also discuss some individual supernovae belonging to this class and discuss as to how they have refined our understanding of SNe IIn. Finally the importance of well sampled long term light curves in radio and X-ray bands cannot be stressed enough.

  18. SUPERNOVA 2003ie WAS LIKELY A FAINT TYPE IIP EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sergeev, Sergey G., E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We present new photometric observations of supernova (SN) 2003ie starting one month before discovery, obtained serendipitously while observing its host galaxy. With only a weak upper limit derived on the mass of its progenitor (<25 M{sub Sun }) from previous pre-explosion studies, this event could be a potential exception to the ''red supergiant (RSG) problem'' (the lack of high-mass RSGs exploding as Type IIP SNe). However, this is true only if SN2003ie was a Type IIP event, something which has never been determined. Using recently derived core-collapse SN light-curve templates, as well as by comparison to other known SNe, we find that SN2003ie was indeed a likely Type IIP event. However, with a plateau magnitude of {approx} - 15.5 mag, it is found to be a member of the faint Type IIP class. Previous members of this class have been shown to arise from relatively low-mass progenitors (<12 M{sub Sun }). It therefore seems unlikely that this SN had a massive RSG progenitor. The use of core-collapse SN light-curve templates is shown to be helpful in classifying SNe with sparse coverage. These templates are likely to become more robust as large homogeneous samples of core-collapse events are collected.

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I.; Kuranz, C. C.; Arnett, D.; Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order

  20. Neutrinos, supernovae, and the origin of the heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, YongZhong

    2018-04-01

    Stars of 8-100 M ⊙ end their lives as core-collapse supernovae (SNe). In the process they emit a powerful burst of neutrinos, produce a variety of elements, and leave behind either a neutron star or a black hole. The wide mass range for SN progenitors results in diverse neutrino signals, explosion energies, and nucleosynthesis products. A major mechanism to produce nuclei heavier than iron is rapid neutron capture, or the r process. This process may be connected to SNe in several ways. A brief review is presented on current understanding of neutrino emission, explosion, and nucleosynthesis of SNe.

  1. Can we scan the supernova model space for collective oscillations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlivan, Y.; Subaşı, A. L.; Birol, S.; Ghazanfari, N.; Yuksel, H.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Collective neutrino oscillations in a core collapse supernova is a many-body phenomenon which can transform the neutrino energy spectra through emergent effects. One example of this behavior is the neutrino spectral swaps in which neutrinos of different flavors partially or completely exchange their spectra. In this talk, we address the question of how model dependent this behavior is. In particular, we demonstrate that these swaps may be independent of the mean field approximation that is typically employed in numerical treatments by showing an example of a spectral swap in the exact many-body picture.

  2. The Rise-Time of type IIP supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan, Santiago Gonzalez

    2013-06-01

    Plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are believed to come from the core-collapse of massive stars that retain their hydrogen envelopes at time of explosion. However, the progenitor mass range as well as its size, RSG or BSG, are heavily under debate. A key ingredient to estimate the radius and other properties in the progenitor models is the early light-curve behaviour including explosion and rise times. We investigate here the rise-times and explosion dates of several SNe IIP with enough photometry prior to explosion in order to constrain their progenitors.

  3. High-redshift supernova rates measured with the gravitational telescope A 1689

    OpenAIRE

    Petrushevska, T.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Fabbro, S.; Johansson, J.; Kjellsson, T.; Lidman, C.; Paech, K.; Richard, J.; Dahle, Håkon; Ferretti, R.; Kneib, J.-P.; Limousin, M.; Nordin, J.; Stanishev, V.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We present a ground-based, near-infrared search for lensed supernovae behind the massive cluster Abell 1689 at z = 0.18, which is one of the most powerful gravitational telescopes that nature provides. Methods. Our survey was based on multi-epoch J-band observations with the HAWK-I instrument on VLT, with supporting optical data from the Nordic Optical Telescope. Results. Our search resulted in the discovery of five photometrically classified, core-collapse supernovae with high re...

  4. Expected impact from weak reactions with light nuclei in corecollapse supernova simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the role of light nuclear clusters in simulations of core-collapse supernovae. Expressions for the reaction rates are developed for a large selection of charged current absorption and scattering processes with light clusters. Medium modifications are taken into account at the mean-field level. We explore the possible impact on the supernova dynamics and the neutrino signal during the mass accretion phase prior to the possible explosion onset as well as during the subsequent protoneutron star deleptnoization after the explosion onset has been launched.

  5. Supernova relic electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos in future large-scale observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, C.; Welzel, J. [Institut de Physique Nuclueaire, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the signal from supernova relic neutrinos in future large scale observatories, such as MEMPHYS (UNO, Hyper-K), LENA and GLACIER, at present under study. We discuss that complementary information might be gained from the observation of supernova relic electron antineutrinos and neutrinos using the scattering on protons on one hand, and on nuclei such as oxygen, carbon or argon on the other hand. When determining the relic neutrino fluxes we also include, for the first time, the coupling of the neutrino magnetic moment to magnetic fields within the core collapse supernova. We present numerical results on both the relic {nu}{sub e} and {nu}-bar{sub e} fluxes and on the number of events for {nu}{sub e} + C{sup 12}, {nu}{sub e} + O{sup 16}, {nu}{sub e} + Ar{sup 40} and {nu}-bar{sub e} + p for various oscillation scenarios. The observation of supernova relic neutrinos might provide us with unique information on core-collapse supernova explosions, on the star formation history and on neutrino properties, that still remain unknown. (authors)

  6. Theoretical light curves of Type II-P supernovae and applications to cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffi, A.; Domínguez, I.; Höflich, P.; Limongi, M.; Straniero, O.

    2003-10-01

    Based on an extensive grid of stellar models between 13 and 25 Msolar and a wide range of metallicities, we have studied the light curves of core collapse supernovae, their application to cosmology and their evolutionary effects with redshift. The direct link between the hydrodynamics and radiation transport allows us to calculate monochromatic light curves. With decreasing metallicity, Z, and increasing mass, progenitors tend to explode as compact blue supergiants (BSG) and produce subluminous supernovae that are approximately 1.5 mag dimmer than normal Type II supernovae (SNe II) with red supergiant (RSG) progenitors. Progenitors with small masses tend to explode as RSGs even at low Z. The consequence for testing the chemical evolution is obvious, namely a strong bias when using the statistics of core collapse supernovae to determine the history of star formation. Our study is limited in scope with respect to the explosion energies and the production of radioactive Ni. Within the class of extreme SNe II-P supernovae, the light curves are rather insensitive with respect to the progenitor mass and explosion energy compared with analytic models based on parametrized stellar structures. We expect a wider range of brightness due to variations in 56Ni because radioactive energy is a significant source of luminosity. However, the overall insensitivity of light curves may allow their use as quasi-standard candles for distance determination.

  7. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  8. Neutrino flavor instabilities in a time-dependent supernova model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Abbar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A dense neutrino medium such as that inside a core-collapse supernova can experience collective flavor conversion or oscillations because of the neutral-current weak interaction among the neutrinos. This phenomenon has been studied in a restricted, stationary supernova model which possesses the (spatial spherical symmetry about the center of the supernova and the (directional axial symmetry around the radial direction. Recently it has been shown that these spatial and directional symmetries can be broken spontaneously by collective neutrino oscillations. In this letter we analyze the neutrino flavor instabilities in a time-dependent supernova model. Our results show that collective neutrino oscillations start at approximately the same radius in both the stationary and time-dependent supernova models unless there exist very rapid variations in local physical conditions on timescales of a few microseconds or shorter. Our results also suggest that collective neutrino oscillations can vary rapidly with time in the regimes where they do occur which need to be studied in time-dependent supernova models.

  9. Supernova signatures of neutrino mass ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2018-01-01

    A suite of detectors around the world is poised to measure the flavor-energy-time evolution of the ten-second burst of neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova occurring in the Milky Way or nearby. Next-generation detectors to be built in the next decade will have enhanced flavor sensitivity and statistics. Not only will the observation of this burst allow us to peer inside the dense matter of the extreme event and learn about the collapse processes and the birth of the remnant, but the neutrinos will bring information about neutrino properties themselves. This review surveys some of the physical signatures that the currently-unknown neutrino mass pattern will imprint on the observed neutrino events at Earth, emphasizing the most robust and least model-dependent signatures of mass ordering.

  10. Evidence from stable isotopes and10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-11-22

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10 Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  11. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  12. Supernovae, neutrinos and the chirality of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Richard N; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the (14)N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's proteinaceous amino acids.

  13. Supernova Neutrinos - MeV Messengers of the Extreme

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova is a nearly perfect neutrino bomb. While capable of outshining its entire host galaxy, this stunning light show represents just a small portion of the explosion.  Indeed, each such cataclysmic event typically radiates two orders of magnitude more energy as low-energy neutrinos than it does as electromagnetic radiation or as kinetic shockwaves. Consequently, MeV-scale neutrinos are made in huge numbers as the star is dying, and because these ghostly subatomic particles interact so rarely with normal matter they easily escape the fireball, providing a window into one of the most violent and interesting volumes in space: the heart of a stellar collapse. This talk will cover some of the history of neutrinos and supernovas, as well as how we are preparing new technology and partnerships to observe the next spectacular explosion in all its multimessenger glory.

  14. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Richard N.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  15. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitaka Kajino

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids.

  16. Supernova 1987A: 18 Months later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the significance for physics of the closest visual supernova in almost 400 years is presented. The supernova occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), /approximately/50 kpc away. The supernova star was a massive star of /approximately/15--20M. Observations now show that it was once a red-giant but lost its outer envelope. The lower than standard luminosity and higher observed velocities are a natural consequence of the pre-supernova star being a blue rather than a red [supergiant]. Of particular importance to physicists is the detection of neutrinos from the event by detectors in the United States and Japan. Not only did this establish extra-solar system neutrino astronomy, but it also constrained the properties of neutrino. It is shown that the well established Kamioka-IMB neutrino burst experimentally implies an event with about 2--4 /times/ 10/sup 53/ergs emitted in neutrinos and a temperature, T/sub /bar /nu/e//, of between 4 and 4.5 MeV. This event is in excellent agreement with what one would expect from the gravitational core collapse of a massive star. A neutrino detection, such as that reported earlier in Mt. Blanc, would require more than the rest mass energy of a neutron star to be converted to neutrinos, if it were to have its origin in the LMC. Thus it is probably unrelated to the supernova. The anticipated frequency of collapse events in our Galaxy, will also be discussed with a rate as high as 1/10 year shown to be not unreasonable. 61 refs

  17. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  18. A massive star origin for an unusual helium-rich supernova in an elliptical galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, K S; Maeda, K; Nomoto, K; Taubenberger, S; Tanaka, M; Deng, J; Pian, E; Hattori, T; Itagaki, K

    2010-05-20

    The unusual helium-rich (type Ib) supernova SN 2005E is distinguished from all supernovae hitherto observed by its faint and rapidly fading light curve, prominent calcium lines in late-phase spectra and lack of any mark of recent star formation near the supernova location. These properties are claimed to be explained by a helium detonation in a thin surface layer of an accreting white dwarf. Here we report that the observed properties of SN 2005cz, which appeared in an elliptical galaxy, resemble those of SN 2005E. We argue that these properties are best explained by a core-collapse supernova at the low-mass end (8-12 solar masses) of the range of massive stars that explode. Such a low-mass progenitor lost its hydrogen-rich envelope through binary interaction, had very thin oxygen-rich and silicon-rich layers above the collapsing core, and accordingly ejected a very small amount of radioactive (56)Ni and oxygen. Although the host galaxy NGC 4589 is an elliptical, some studies have revealed evidence of recent star-formation activity, consistent with the core-collapse model.

  19. Observing the Next Galactic Supernova with the NOvA Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasel, Justin A. [Indiana U.; Sheshukov, Andrey [Dubna, JINR; Habig, Alec [Minnesota U., Duluth

    2017-10-02

    The next galactic core-collapse supernova will deliver a wealth of neutrinos which for the first time we are well-situated to measure. These explosions produce neutrinos with energies between 10 and 100 MeV over a period of tens of seconds. Galactic supernovae are relatively rare events, occurring with a frequency of just a few per century. It is therefore essential that all neutrino detectors capable of detecting these neutrinos are ready to trigger on this signal when it occurs. This poster describes a data-driven trigger which is designed to detect the neutrino signal from a galactic core-collapse supernova with the NOvA detectors. The trigger analyzes 5ms blocks of detector activity and applies background rejection algorithms to detect the signal time structure over the background. This background reduction is an essential part of the process, as the NOvA detectors are designed to detect neutrinos from Fermilab's NuMI beam which have an average energy of 2GeV--well above the average energy of supernova neutrinos.

  20. supernovae: Photometric classification of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Tom; Moss, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Supernovae classifies supernovae using their light curves directly as inputs to a deep recurrent neural network, which learns information from the sequence of observations. Observational time and filter fluxes are used as inputs; since the inputs are agnostic, additional data such as host galaxy information can also be included.

  1. Supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the 56 Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed

  2. Nebular phase observations of the Type-Ib supernova iPTF13bvn favour a binary progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncarayakti, H.; Maeda, K.; Bersten, M. C.; Folatelli, G.; Morrell, N.; Hsiao, E. Y.; González-Gaitán, S.; Anderson, J. P.; Hamuy, M.; de Jaeger, T.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kawabata, K. S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We present and analyse late-time observations of the Type-Ib supernova with possible pre-supernova progenitor detection, iPTF13bvn, which were done ~300 days after the explosion. We discuss them in the context of constraints on the supernova's progenitor. Previous studies have proposed two possible natures for the progenitor of the supernova, i.e. a massive Wolf-Rayet star or a lower-mass star in a close binary system. Methods: Our observations show that the supernova has entered the nebular phase, with the spectrum dominated by Mg I]λλ4571, [O I]λλ6300, 6364, and [Ca II]λλ7291, 7324 emission lines. We measured the emission line fluxes to estimate the core oxygen mass and compared the [O I]/[Ca II] line ratio with other supernovae. Results.The core oxygen mass of the supernova progenitor was estimated to be ≲0.7 M⊙, which implies initial progenitor mass that does not exceed ~15-17 M⊙.Since the derived mass is too low for a single star to become a Wolf-Rayet star, this result lends more support to the binary nature of the progenitor star of iPTF13bvn. The comparison of [O I]/[Ca II] line ratio with other supernovae also shows that iPTF13bvn appears to be in close association with the lower mass progenitors of stripped-envelope and Type-II supernovae. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU); Chilean Telescope Time Allocation Committee proposal CN2014A-91.

  3. Supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In the first part of his in-depth article on the 1987 supernova, David Schramm of the University of Chicago and the NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Centre reviewed the background to supernovae, the composition of massive stars and the optical history of SN 1987A, and speculated on what the 1987 remnant might be. In such a Type II supernova, gravitational pressure crushes the atoms of the star's interior producing neutron matter, or even a black hole, and releasing an intense burst of neutrinos. 1987 was the first time that physicists were equipped (but not entirely ready!) to intercept these particles, and in the second part of his article, David Schramm covers the remarkable new insights from the science of supernova neutrino astronomy, born on 23 February 1987

  4. The Nearby Galaxies Supernova Search project: The rate of supernovae in the local universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strolger, Louis-Gregory

    2003-08-01

    Over 2200 supernova events have been discovered in the past millenium—nearly half of which have been found in only the last decade. The rise in interest in these events has been sparked, in large part, by the sample of distant Type Ia supernovae which are giving unprecedented information about the cosmological parameters of our Universe. However, when one considers that very little is known about several SN Types including the Type Ia events, it is clear that there remains much to be understood in the detailed analysis of supernovae. Currently, this analysis is best done through relatively low redshift supernova surveys. Here I present the results from the Nearby Galaxies Supernova Search project (NGSS), a three-year survey for SNe in equatorial field galaxies. Through the bulk analysis of these SNe, I have determined the local SN rates in field galaxies (in Supernova Units [SNu]; Supernovae per century per 1010 LB⊙ ) to be 0.192 ± 0.045 (Poisson) ± 0.094 (systematic) for Type Ia SNe, 0.678 ± 0.164 ± 0.278 to 1.242 ± 0.301 ± 0.514 for Type II SNe, and 1.166 ± 0.178 ± 0.498 to 1.924 ± 0.293 ± 0.887 for all supernova types (depending on assumed intrinsic extinction distributions for core-collapse events). A small number of SNe from this survey were also attributed to Abell galaxy clusters. Although there was not a sufficient sample in which to draw conclusive rates, through simple assumptions about galaxy cluster mass, size, and luminosity parameters, I estimate the supernova rate to be 0.46 ± 0.14 (Poisson) to 0.84 ± 0.26 SNu in these environments (also dependent on extinction distributions). In the course of this survey, we discovered a number of rare SN types, including SN 1999aw, a SN 1999aa-like Type Ia in a very low-luminosity host galaxy. We have completed a very thorough analysis of this luminous and peculiar event, which I include in this dissertation. The NGSS project has successfully discovered one of the largest samples of SNe from a

  5. The Type II supernovae 2006V and 2006au: two SN 1987A-like events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Sollerman, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Supernova 1987A revealed that a blue supergiant (BSG) star can end its life as a core-collapse supernova (SN). SN 1987A and other similar objects exhibit properties that distinguish them from ordinary Type II Plateau (IIP) SNe, whose progenitors are believed to be red supergiants (RSGs......). Similarities among 1987A-like events include a long rise to maximum, early luminosity fainter than that of normal Type IIP SNe, and radioactivity acting as the primary source powering the light curves. Aims. We present and analyze two SNe monitored by the Carnegie Supernova Project that are reminiscent of SN...... 1987A. Methods. Optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves, and optical spectroscopy of SNe 2006V and 2006au are presented. These observations are compared to those of SN 1987A, and are used to estimate properties of their progenitors. Results. Both objects exhibit a slow rise to maximum and light...

  6. Supernovae. Rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdin, P.; Murdin, L.

    1985-01-01

    The book reviews supernovae in astronomy. The history of supernovae is described, along with the Crab, supernovae in galaxies, supernova remnants, types of supernova, and supernovae in binary stars. Pulsars, neutron stars, creation of the elements, cosmic rays and black holes, are also discussed. (U.K.)

  7. 26Al and 60Fe from supernova explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmes, F.X.; Woosley, S.E.; Hartmann, D.H.; Hoffman, R.D.; Weaver, T.A.; Matteucci, F.

    1995-01-01

    Using recently calculated yields for Type II supernovae, along with models for chemical evolution and the distribution of mass in the interstellar medium, the current abundances and spatial distributions of two key gamma-ray radioactivities, 26 Al and 60 Fe, are determined. The estimated steady state production rates are 2.0±1.0 M circle-dot Myr -1 for 26 Al and 0.75±0.4 M circle-dot Myr -1 for 60 Fe. This corresponds to 2.2±1.1 M circle-dot of 26 Al and 1.7±0.9 M circle-dot of 60 Fe in the present interstellar medium. Sources of uncertainty are discussed, one of the more important being the current rate of core collapse supernovae in the Galaxy. Our simple model gives three per century, but reasonable changes in the star formation rate could easily accommodate a core collapse rate one-half as large, and thus one-half the yields. When these stellar and chemical evolution results are mapped into a three-dimensional model of the Galaxy, the calculated 1809 keV gamma-ray flux map is consistent with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory observations of a steep decline in the flux outside a longitude of ±50 degree from the Galactic center, and the slight flux enhancements observed in the vicinity of spiral arms. Other potential stellar sources of 26 Al and 60 Fe are mentioned, especially the possibility of 60 Fe synthesis in Type Ia supernovae. Predictions for the 60 Fe mass distribution, total mass, and flux map are given. copyright 1995 The American Astronomical Society

  8. Predicting the nature of supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Jose H

    2017-10-28

    Stars more massive than about 8 solar masses end their lives as a supernova (SN), an event of fundamental importance Universe-wide. The physical properties of massive stars before the SN event are very uncertain, both from theoretical and observational perspectives. In this article, I briefly review recent efforts to predict the nature of stars before death, in particular, by performing coupled stellar evolution and atmosphere modelling of single stars in the pre-SN stage. These models are able to predict the high-resolution spectrum and broadband photometry, which can then be directly compared with the observations of core-collapse SN progenitors. The predictions for the spectral types of massive stars before death can be surprising. Depending on the initial mass and rotation, single star models indicate that massive stars die as red supergiants, yellow hypergiants, luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN and WO subtypes. I finish by assessing the detectability of SN Ibc progenitors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. A mildly relativistic radio jet from the otherwise normal type Ic supernova 2007gr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragi, Z; Taylor, G B; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Bietenholz, M; van der Horst, A J; Pidopryhora, Y; van Langevelde, H J; Garrett, M A; Szomoru, A; Argo, M K; Bourke, S; Paczyński, B

    2010-01-28

    The class of type Ic supernovae have drawn increasing attention since 1998 owing to their sparse association (only four so far) with long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although both phenomena originate from the core collapse of a massive star, supernovae emit mostly at optical wavelengths, whereas GRBs emit mostly in soft gamma-rays or hard X-rays. Though the GRB central engine generates ultra-relativistic jets, which beam the early emission into a narrow cone, no relativistic outflows have hitherto been found in type Ib/c supernovae explosions, despite theoretical expectations and searches. Here we report radio (interferometric) observations that reveal a mildly relativistic expansion in a nearby type Ic supernova, SN 2007gr. Using two observational epochs 60 days apart, we detect expansion of the source and establish a conservative lower limit for the average apparent expansion velocity of 0.6c. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported. Contrary to the radio data, optical observations of SN 2007gr indicate a typical type Ic supernova with ejecta velocities approximately 6,000 km s(-1), much lower than in GRB-associated supernovae. We conclude that in SN 2007gr a small fraction of the ejecta produced a low-energy mildly relativistic bipolar radio jet, while the bulk of the ejecta were slower and, as shown by optical spectropolarimetry, mildly aspherical.

  10. On the Submergence and Reemergence of Magnetic Fields in Young Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Cristian G.

    In this work I present numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the early dynamics around newly born neutrons stars using the AMR Flash method. When the core-collapse supernovae occurs a reverse shock is formed allowing strong accretion onto the neutron star surface (hypercritical phase). In such regime large amounts of matter are deposited on the neutron star surface, submerging the magnetic field in the new crust. When the hypercritical regime is over, the magnetic field can suffer a reemergence episode due to magnetic diffusion processes, allowing the delayed switch-on of pulsars.

  11. Self-refraction of supernova neutrinos: mixed spectra and three-flavor instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Alexander

    2010-05-14

    Neutrinos in a core-collapse supernova undergo coherent flavor transformations in their own background. We explore this phenomenon during the cooling stage of the explosion. Our three-flavor calculations reveal qualitatively new effects compared to a two-flavor analysis. These effects are especially clearly seen for the inverted mass hierarchy: we find a different pattern of spectral "swaps" in the neutrino spectrum and a novel "mixed" spectrum for the antineutrinos. A brief discussion of the relevant physics is presented, including the instability of the two-flavor evolution trajectory, the three-flavor pattern of spectral "swaps," and partial nonadiabaticity of the evolution.

  12. Observing the Next Galactic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Vagins, Mark R.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (sime 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (sime 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (~3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2^{+7.3}_{-2.6} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4^{+1.4}_{-0.8} per century for a

  13. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  14. Shedding New Light on Exploding Stars: Tera-Scale Simulation of Neutrino-Driven Supernovae and their Nucleosynthesis. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Goals: I took seriously the charge to SciDAC P.I.'s to go after outstanding and key physics problems with cutting-edge numerical science. I proposed solving a key problem in core collapse supernova physics: the evolution of neutrino flavors in the supernova environment. A great deal may be riding on the solution to this problem. First, laboratory physics outstripped the supernova theorists, providing us with neutrino mass-squared differences and two of the three vacuum mixing angles. This data had not been incorporated into core collapse supernova models before, but it clearly pointed to the possibility of major changes to our existing supernova neutrino paradigm. Second, knowing how the neutrino and antineutrino energy spectra and fluxes evolved through flavor inter-conversion could be crucial for determining and understanding the supernova neutrino signal, light p-process, and r-process nucleosynthesis, and possibly even the shock re-heating problem. Moreover, much about fundamental neutrino properties remains unresolved by terrestrial experiment (e.g., the neutrino mass hierarchy, θ 13 , etc.). Unraveling the supernova neutrino flavor evolution problem coupled with a future Galactic supernova signal could allow determination of these unknown neutrino properties. Results and Findings: We solved the problem of coherent neutrino flavor evolution (both 2 x 2 and 3 x 3) in the supernova environment, for the first time incorporating self-consistently the nonlinear geometric and quantum trajectory coupling outlined above. The results were unexpected and surprising. These results hold out the possibility that a future Galactic supernova neutrino signal could give us significant insights into both fundamental neutrino physics, otherwise inacces- sible in the lab (e.g., the neutrino mass hierarchy, θ 13 ), and key issues in supernova physics (e.g., distinguishing between Fe core collapse and O-Ne-Mg core collapse events). First, the numerical solution to this problem

  15. Radio observations reveal a smooth circumstellar environment around the extraordinary type Ib supernova 2012au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Chakraborti, Sayan; Dittmann, Jason; Drout, Maria; Sanders, Nathan; Chomiuk, Laura; Medvedev, Mikhail; Chevalier, Roger; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2012au, an energetic, radio-luminous supernova of Type Ib that exhibits multi-wavelength properties bridging subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae, hypernovae, and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from a shock-heated circumburst medium that has a wind density profile (ρ∝r –2 ). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave v ≈ 0.2 c and a radius of r ≈ 1.4 × 10 16 cm at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a wind velocity of 1000 km s –1 , we determine the mass-loss rate of the progenitor to be M-dot =3.6×10 −6 M ⊙ yr −1 , consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio-emitting material to be E ≈ 10 47 erg, which is intermediate to SN 1998bw and SN 2002ap. The evolution of the radio light curve of SN 2012au is in agreement with its interaction with a smoothly distributed circumburst medium and the absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to r ≈ 10 17 cm from the supernova site. We conclude that the bright radio emission from SN 2012au was not dissimilar from other core-collapse supernovae despite its extraordinary optical properties, and that the evolution of the SN 2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet, marked with a steady mass loss, during the final years preceding explosion.

  16. Probing Late-Stage Stellar Evolution through Robotic Follow-Up of Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin

    2018-01-01

    Many of the remaining uncertainties in stellar evolution can be addressed through immediate and long-term photometry and spectroscopy of supernovae. The early light curves of thermonuclear supernovae can contain information about the nature of the binary companion to the exploding white dwarf. Spectra of core-collapse supernovae can reveal material lost by massive stars in their final months to years. Thanks to a revolution in technology—robotic telescopes, high-speed internet, machine learning—we can now routinely discover supernovae within days of explosion and obtain well-sampled follow-up data for months and years. Here I present three major results from the Global Supernova Project at Las Cumbres Observatory that take advantage of these technological advances. (1) SN 2017cbv is a Type Ia supernova discovered within a day of explosion. Early photometry shows a bump in the U-band relative to previously observed Type Ia light curves, possibly indicating the presence of a nondegenerate binary companion. (2) SN 2016bkv is a low-luminosity Type IIP supernova also caught very young. Narrow emission lines in the earliest spectra indicate interaction between the ejecta and a dense shell of circumstellar material, previously observed only in the brightest Type IIP supernovae. (3) Type Ibn supernovae are a rare class that interact with hydrogen-free circumstellar material. An analysis of the largest-yet sample of this class has found that their light curves are much more homogeneous and faster-evolving than their hydrogen-rich counterparts, Type IIn supernovae, but that their maximum-light spectra are more diverse.

  17. Neutrino-induced Neucleosynthesis in Supernova Helium Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal

    We re-examine a neutrino-driven r-process mechanism in the helium shell of a core-collapse supernova. We analyze the pre-shock evolution in detail using recent stellar models. In addition we perform full hydrodynamic simulations including the effect of shock, finding that the outer helium shells can be the site for an r-process. We find that this mechanism could succeed in early stars of metallicity ≲ 10-3 the solar value, at relatively low temperatures and neutron densities, producing A ˜ 130 and 195 abundance peaks over ˜ 50--60 s. The mechanism is extremely sensitive to the neutrino emission model and to neutrino oscillations. While this mechanism is not very sensitive to the explosion energy, mixing of the ejecta can be different for different explosion energies. We discuss the implications of an r-process that could alter interpretations of abundance data from metal-poor stars.

  18. Stardust, Supernovae and the Chirality of the Amino Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2011-03-09

    A mechanism for creating enantiomerism in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one chirality by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is described. The selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's amino acids.

  19. Stardust, Supernovae and the Chirality of the Amino Acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.; Kajino, T.; Onaka, T.

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating enantiomerism in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one chirality by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is described. The selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's amino acids.

  20. Research Performance Progress Report: Diverging Supernova Explosion Experiments on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewa, Tomasz [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2016-10-25

    The aim of this project was to design a series of blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments of this kind are relevant to mixing in core-collapse supernovae (ccSNe) and have the potential to address previously unanswered questions in high-energy density physics (HEDP) and astrophysics. The unmatched laser power of the NIF laser offers a unique chance to observe and study “new physics” like the mass extensions observed in HEDP RT experiments performed on the Omega laser [1], which might be linked to self-generated magnetic fields [2] and so far could not be reproduced by numerical simulations. Moreover, NIF is currently the only facility that offers the possibility to execute a diverging RT experiment, which would allow to observe processes such as inter-shell penetration via turbulent mixing and shock-proximity effects (distortion of the shock by RT spikes).

  1. Neutrinos from Choked Jets Accompanied by Type-II Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao-Ning; Kusenko, Alexander; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2018-04-01

    The origin of the IceCube neutrinos is still an open question. Upper limits from diffuse gamma-ray observations suggest that the neutrino sources are either distant or hidden from gamma-ray observations. It is possible that the neutrinos are produced in jets that are formed in core-collapsing massive stars and fail to break out, the so-called choked jets. We study neutrinos from the jets choked in the hydrogen envelopes of red supergiant stars. Fast photo-meson cooling softens the neutrino spectrum, making it hard to explain the PeV neutrinos observed by IceCube in a one-component scenario, but a two-component model can explain the spectrum. Furthermore, we predict that a newly born jet-driven type-II supernova may be observed to be associated with a neutrino burst detected by IceCube.

  2. Neutrino signature of supernova hydrodynamical instabilities in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborra, Irene; Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Raffelt, Georg

    2013-09-20

    The first full-scale three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (SN) simulations with sophisticated neutrino transport show pronounced effects of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) for two high-mass progenitors (20 and 27 M([Symbol: see text])). In a low-mass progenitor (11.2 M([Symbol: see text])), large-scale convection is the dominant nonradial hydrodynamic instability in the postshock accretion layer. The SASI-associated modulation of the neutrino signal (80 Hz in our two examples) will be clearly detectable in IceCube or the future Hyper-Kamiokande detector, depending on progenitor properties, distance, and observer location relative to the main SASI sloshing direction. The neutrino signal from the next galactic SN can, therefore, diagnose the nature of the hydrodynamic instability.

  3. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-01-01

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10 -13 s s -1 . Its characteristic age of 10 4 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars

  4. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  5. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  6. Supernova neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Cardall, Christian Y.

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collap...

  7. NEAR-EXTREMAL BLACK HOLES AS INITIAL CONDITIONS OF LONG GRB SUPERNOVAE AND PROBES OF THEIR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M. [Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong Gwangin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae and short GRBs with extended emission (SGRBEE) from mergers are probably powered by black holes as a common inner engine, as their prompt GRB emission satisfies the same Amati correlation in the E{sub p,i}–E{sub iso} plane. We introduce modified Bardeen equations to identify hyper-accretion driving newly formed black holes in core-collapse supernovae to near-extremal spin as a precursor to prompt GRB emission. Subsequent spin-down is observed in the BATSE catalog of long GRBs. Spin-down provides a natural unification of long durations associated with the lifetime of black hole spin for normal long GRBs and SGRBEEs, given the absence of major fallback matter in mergers. The results point to major emissions unseen in high frequency gravitational waves. A novel matched filtering method is described for LIGO–Virgo and KAGRA broadband probes of nearby core-collapse supernovae at essentially maximal sensitivity.

  8. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES ESCAPING A SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of gamma-ray emission from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) originating from the explosions of massive young stars. The fast forward shock of the supernova remnant (SNR) can accelerate particles by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in a cavern blown by a strong, pre-SN stellar wind. As a fundamental part of nonlinear DSA, some fraction of the accelerated particles escape the shock and interact with a surrounding massive dense shell producing hard photon emission. To calculate this emission, we have developed a new Monte Carlo technique for propagating the cosmic rays (CRs) produced by the forward shock of the SNR, into the dense, external material. This technique is incorporated in a hydrodynamic model of an evolving SNR which includes the nonlinear feedback of CRs on the SNR evolution, the production of escaping CRs along with those that remain trapped within the remnant, and the broadband emission of radiation from trapped and escaping CRs. While our combined CR-hydro-escape model is quite general and applies to both core collapse and thermonuclear SNe, the parameters we choose for our discussion here are more typical of SNRs from very massive stars whose emission spectra differ somewhat from those produced by lower mass progenitors directly interacting with a molecular cloud.

  9. Explaining the Most Energetic Supernovae with an Inefficient Jet-feedback Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkis, Avishai; Soker, Noam; Papish, Oded

    2016-08-01

    We suggest that the energetic radiation from core-collapse super-energetic supernovae (SESNe) is due to a long-lasting accretion process onto the newly born neutron star (NS), resulting from an inefficient operation of the jet-feedback mechanism (JFM). The jets that are launched by the accreting NS or black hole maintain their axis due to a rapidly rotating pre-collapse core and do not manage to eject core material from near the equatorial plane. The jets are able to eject material from the core along the polar directions and reduce the gravity near the equatorial plane. The equatorial gas expands, and part of it falls back over a timescale of minutes to days to prolong the jet-launching episode. According to the model for SESNe proposed in the present paper, the principal parameter that distinguishes between the different cases of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions, such as between normal CCSNe and SESNe, is the efficiency of the JFM. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the pre-collapse core mass, envelope mass, core convection, and, most of all, the angular momentum profile in the core. One prediction of the inefficient JFM for SESNe is the formation of a slow equatorial outflow in the explosion. The typical velocity and mass of this outflow are estimated to be v eq ≈ 1000 km s-1 and M eq ≳ 1 M ⊙, respectively, though quantitative values will have to be checked in future hydrodynamic simulations.

  10. THE STELLAR ANCESTRY OF SUPERNOVAE IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS. I. THE MOST RECENT SUPERNOVAE IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badenes, Carles; Harris, Jason; Zaritsky, Dennis; Prieto, Jose L.

    2009-01-01

    We use the star formation history (SFH) map of the Large Magellanic Cloud recently published by Harris and Zaritsky to study the sites of the eight smallest (and presumably youngest) supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Cloud: SN 1987A, N158A, N49, and N63A (core collapse remnants), 0509 - 67.5, 0519 - 69.0, N103B, and DEM L71 (Type Ia remnants). The local SFHs provide unique insights into the nature of the supernova (SN) progenitors, which we compare with the properties of the SN explosions derived from the remnants themselves and from SN light echoes. We find that all the core collapse SNe that we have studied are associated with vigorous star formation (SF) in the recent past. In the case of SN 1987A, the time of the last peak of SF (12 Myr) matches the lifetime of a star with the known mass of its blue supergiant progenitor (∼20 M sun ). More recent peaks of SF can lead to SNe with more massive progenitors, which opens the possibility of a Type Ib/c origin for SNRs N158A and N63A. Stars more massive than 21.5 M sun are very scarce around SNR N49, implying that the magnetar SGR 0526 - 66 in this SNR was either formed elsewhere or came from a progenitor with a mass well below the 30M sun threshold suggested in the literature. Three of our four Ia SNRs are associated with old, metal-poor stellar populations. This includes SNR 0509 - 67.5, which is known to have been originated by an extremely bright Type Ia event, and yet is located very far away from any sites of recent SF, in a population with a mean age of 7.9 Gyr. The Type Ia SNR N103B, on the other hand, is associated with recent SF, and might have had a relatively younger and more massive progenitor with substantial mass loss before the explosion. We discuss these results in the context of our present understanding of core collapse and Type Ia SN progenitors.

  11. Long Gamma-Ray Bursts without Visible Supernovae A Case Study of Redshift Estimators and Alleged Novel Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A; Plaga, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    It has been argued that the observational limits on a supernova (SN) associated with GRB 060614 convincingly exclude a SN akin to SN 1998bw as its originator and provide evidence for a new class of long-duration GRBs. We discuss this issue in the contexts of indirect "redshift estimators" and of the fireball and cannonball models of GRBs. The latter explains the unusual properties of GRB 060614: at its debated but favored low redshift (0.125), they are predicted, as opposed to exceptional, if the associated core-collapse SN is of a recently discovered, very faint type. We take the occasion to discuss the association between GRBs and SNe.

  12. SN 2010jl in UGC 5189: Yet another luminous type IIn supernova in a metal-poor galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.; Pogge, R. W.; Szczygiel, D. M.; Pojmanski, G.; Antognini, J.; Yan, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present ASAS data starting 25 days before the discovery of the recent type IIn SN 2010jl, and we compare its light curve to other luminous IIn SNe, showing that it is a luminous (M_I ~ -20.5) event. Its host galaxy, UGC 5189, has a low gas-phase oxygen abundance (12 + log(O/H) = 8.2), which reinforces the emerging trend that over-luminous core-collapse supernovae are found in the low-metallicity tail of the galaxy distribution, similar to the known trend for the hosts of long GRBs. We comp...

  13. Peculiar Type II supernovae from blue supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, Io K. W.; Poznanski, Dovi; Kasen, Daniel; Young, Timothy R.; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Challis, Peter; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Kirshner, Robert P.; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Nugent, Peter E.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.

    2011-07-01

    The vast majority of Type II supernovae (SNeII) are produced by red supergiants, but SN 1987A revealed that blue supergiants (BSGs) can produce members of this class as well, albeit with some peculiar properties. This best-studied event revolutionized our understanding of SNe and linking it to the bulk of Type II events is essential. We present here the optical photometry and spectroscopy gathered for SN 2000cb, which is clearly not a standard SNII and yet is not a SN 1987A analogue. The light curve of SN 2000cb is reminiscent of that of SN 1987A in shape, with a slow rise to a late optical peak, but on substantially different time-scales. Spectroscopically, SN 2000cb resembles a normal SNII, but with ejecta velocities that far exceed those measured for SN 1987A or normal SNeII, above 18 000 km s-1 for Hα at early times. The red colours, high velocities, late photometric peak and our modelling of this object all point towards a scenario involving the high-energy explosion of a small-radius star, most likely a BSG, producing 0.1 M⊙ of 56Ni. Adding a similar object to the sample, SN 2005ci, we derive a rate of ˜2 per cent of the core-collapse rate for this loosely defined class of BSG explosions.

  14. SN2005da: A Spectroscopic and Photometric Analysis of a Peculiar Type Ic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jacob

    2017-12-01

    Core collapse supernovae are an important class of objects in stellar evolution research as they are the final life stage of high mass stars. Supernovae in general are classified into several spectral types; this paper explores SN 2005da, classified as a Type Ic, meaning it lacks hydrogen and helium lines. The supernova was originally classified as a broad-lined Type Ic (Type Ic-BL), with expansion velocities near maximum light greater than or approximately equal to 15000 km/s. However, some of the elements present in the spectrum, namely carbon and oxygen, have narrower lines (FWHM approximately equal to 2300 km/s) than other elements, indicating an interaction with a previously ejected envelope. The supernova is also found to have a decay time, with a change in magnitude over 15 days following maximum light of about 1.4 magnitudes, that is significantly faster than typical Type Ic or Ic-BL. This is more akin to a rarer object type known as a Type Ibn, although it lacks the characteristic narrow helium lines of this type. Therefore, SN 2005da appears to be unlike known examples of Type Ic supernovae.

  15. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T., E-mail: vincent.fischer@cea.fr, E-mail: tchirac@gmail.fr, E-mail: thierry.lasserre@cea.fr [Commissariat a l' énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  16. Two populations of X-ray pulsars produced by two types of supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Christian; Coe, Malcolm J; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2011-11-09

    Two types of supernova are thought to produce the overwhelming majority of neutron stars in the Universe. The first type, iron-core-collapse supernovae, occurs when a high-mass star develops a degenerate iron core that exceeds the Chandrasekhar limit. The second type, electron-capture supernovae, is associated with the collapse of a lower-mass oxygen-neon-magnesium core as it loses pressure support owing to the sudden capture of electrons by neon and/or magnesium nuclei. It has hitherto been impossible to identify the two distinct families of neutron stars produced in these formation channels. Here we report that a large, well-known class of neutron-star-hosting X-ray pulsars is actually composed of two distinct subpopulations with different characteristic spin periods, orbital periods and orbital eccentricities. This class, the Be/X-ray binaries, contains neutron stars that accrete material from a more massive companion star. The two subpopulations are most probably associated with the two distinct types of neutron-star-forming supernova, with electron-capture supernovae preferentially producing systems with short spin periods, short orbital periods and low eccentricities. Intriguingly, the split between the two subpopulations is clearest in the distribution of the logarithm of spin period, a result that had not been predicted and which still remains to be explained. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  17. 3D Simulations of the Emission from Young Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar; Decourchelle, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the “knee” (~1 PeV). The detection of non-thermal radiation from these objects, in X-rays over the past two decades, and finally in gamma-rays over the past decade, has proved the presence of energetic particles. However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components as well as the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We will show how such questions can be addressed by means of 3D numerical simulations of SNRs that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations of SNRs allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra, that can be compared with observations (in X-rays for the thermal emission and multi-wavelength for the non-thermal emission). In particular, we will show how the presence of energetic protons can be inferred from the broadband emission of the remnant. We will contrast the properties of the remnants from the two different kinds of supernovae: thermonuclear supernovae (like Tycho) that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium, and core-collapse supernovae (like Cas A) that occur in a more complex medium bearing the imprint of the winds of the progenitor star.

  18. Supernova hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The explosion of a star supernova occurs at the end of its evolution when the nuclear fuel in its core is almost, or completely, consumed. The star may explode due to a small residual thermonuclear detonation, type I SN or it may collapse, type I and type II SN leaving a neutron star remnant. The type I progenitor should be thought to be an old accreting white dwarf, 1.4 M/sub theta/, with a close companion star. A type II SN is thought to be a massive young star 6 to 10 M/sub theta/. The mechanism of explosion is still a challenge to our ability to model the most extreme conditions of matter and hydrodynamics that occur presently and excessively in the universe. 39 references

  19. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Seattle, Box 351580, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zachjenn@uw.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  20. Masses of supernova progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinsley, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    The possible nature and masses of supernovae progenitors, and the bearing of empirical results on some unsolved theoretical problems concerning the origin of supernovae, are discussed. The author concentrates on two main questions: what is the lower mass limit for stars to die explosively and what stars initiate type I supernovae. The evidence considered includes local supernova rates, empirical estimates of msub(w) (the upper mass limit for death as a white dwarf), the distributions of supernovae among stellar populations in galaxies and the colors of supernova producing galaxies. (B.D.)

  1. Statistics of extragalactic supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maza, J.; van den Bergh, S.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that supernovae of Type II are concentrated in spiral arms whereas those of Type I show no preference for spiral-arm regions. Rediscussion of available supernova statistics suggests that Tammann may have overestimated the dependence of supernova frequency on galaxy inclination. A study of the distribution of supernovae in elliptical galaxies indicates that the supernova rate per unit luminosity may be highest among (metal-poor) stars in the halos of E galaxies. All galaxies in which supernovae are known to have occurred have been classified on the DDO system

  2. A Physical Model of Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    During the core collapse of massive stars, the formation of the protoneutron star is accompanied by the emission of a significant amount of mass-energy (˜0.3 M⊙) in the form of neutrinos. This mass-energy loss generates an outward-propagating pressure wave that steepens into a shock near the stellar surface, potentially powering a weak transient associated with an otherwise-failed supernova. We analytically investigate this mass-loss-induced wave generation and propagation. Heuristic arguments provide an accurate estimate of the amount of energy contained in the outgoing sound pulse. We then develop a general formalism for analyzing the response of the star to centrally concentrated mass loss in linear perturbation theory. To build intuition, we apply this formalism to polytropic stellar models, finding qualitative and quantitative agreement with simulations and heuristic arguments. We also apply our results to realistic pre-collapse massive star progenitors (both giants and compact stars). Our analytic results for the sound pulse energy, excitation radius, and steepening in the stellar envelope are in good agreement with full time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations. We show that prior to the sound pulses arrival at the stellar photosphere, the photosphere has already reached velocities ˜20 - 100% of the local sound speed, thus likely modestly decreasing the stellar effective temperature prior to the star disappearing. Our results provide important constraints on the physical properties and observational appearance of failed supernovae.

  3. Time evolution of gamma rays from supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Daniele; Zandanel, Fabio; Cristofari, Pierre; Gabici, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    We present a systematic phenomenological study focused on the time evolution of the non-thermal radiation - from radio waves to gamma rays - emitted by typical supernova remnants via hadronic and leptonic mechanisms, for two classes of progenitors: thermonuclear and core-collapse. To this aim, we develop a numerical tool designed to model the evolution of the cosmic ray spectrum inside a supernova remnant, and compute the associated multi-wavelength emission. We demonstrate the potential of this tool in the context of future population studies based on large collection of high-energy gamma-ray data. We discuss and explore the relevant parameter space involved in the problem, and focus in particular on their impact on the maximum energy of accelerated particles, in order to study the effectiveness and duration of the PeVatron phase. We outline the crucial role of the ambient medium through which the shock propagates during the remnant evolution. In particular, we point out the role of dense clumps in creating a significant hardening in the hadronic gamma-ray spectrum.

  4. The Nickel Mass Distribution of Normal Type II Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Tomás; Prieto, José L.; Pejcha, Ondřej; Clocchiatti, Alejandro

    2017-06-01

    Core-collapse supernova (SN) explosions expose the structure and environment of massive stars at the moment of their death. We use the global fitting technique of Pejcha & Prieto to estimate a set of physical parameters of 19 normal SNe II, such as their distance moduli, reddenings, 56Ni masses {M}{Ni}, and explosion energies {E}\\exp from multicolor light curves and photospheric velocity curves. We confirm and characterize known correlations between {M}{Ni} and bolometric luminosity at 50 days after the explosion, and between {M}{Ni} and {E}\\exp . We pay special attention to the observed distribution of {M}{Ni} coming from a joint sample of 38 SNe II, which can be described as a skewed-Gaussian-like distribution between 0.005 {M}⊙ and 0.280 {M}⊙ , with a median of 0.031 {M}⊙ , mean of 0.046 {M}⊙ , standard deviation of 0.048 {M}⊙ , and skewness of 3.050. We use a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and two-sample Anderson-Darling test to compare the observed distribution of {M}{Ni} to results from theoretical hydrodynamical codes of core-collapse explosions with the neutrino mechanism presented in the literature. Our results show that the theoretical distributions obtained from the codes tested in this work, KEPLER and Prometheus Hot Bubble, are compatible with the observations irrespective of different pre-SN calibrations and different maximum mass of the progenitors.

  5. Prompt effects of supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    Conflicting theories on the mechanisms of supernova production are examined. Supernova as sources of other phenomena such as comic rays, gamma rays, x-rays, and electromagnetic pulses are considered. 32 references

  6. Towards generating a new supernova equation of state: A systematic analysis of cold hybrid stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinimann, Oliver; Hempel, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-11-01

    The hadron-quark phase transition in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has the potential to trigger explosions in otherwise nonexploding models. However, those hybrid supernova equations of state (EOS) shown to trigger an explosion do not support the observational 2 M⊙ neutron star maximum mass constraint. In this work, we analyze cold hybrid stars by the means of a systematic parameter scan for the phase transition properties, with the aim to develop a new hybrid supernova EOS. The hadronic phase is described with the state-of-the-art supernova EOS HS(DD2), and quark matter by an EOS with a constant speed of sound (CSS) of cQM2=1 /3 . We find promising cases which meet the 2 M⊙ criterion and are interesting for CCSN explosions. We show that the very simple CSS EOS is transferable into the well-known thermodynamic bag model, important for future application in CCSN simulations. In the second part, the occurrence of reconfinement and multiple phase transitions is discussed. In the last part, the influence of hyperons in our parameter scan is studied. Including hyperons no change in the general behavior is found, except for overall lower maximum masses. In both cases (with and without hyperons) we find that quark matter with cQM2=1 /3 can increase the maximum mass only if reconfinement is suppressed or if quark matter is absolutely stable.

  7. Scattered-Light Echoes from the Historical Galactic Supernovae Cassiopeia A and Tycho (SN 1572)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A; Welch, D L; Suntzeff, N B; Oaster, L; Lanning, H; Olsen, K; Smith, R C; Becker, A C; Bergmann, M; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Cook, K H; Damke, G; Garg, A; Huber, M E; Matheson, T; Minniti, D; Prieto, J L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2008-05-06

    We report the discovery of an extensive system of scattered light echo arclets associated with the recent supernovae in the local neighborhood of the Milky Way: Tycho (SN 1572) and Cassiopeia A. Existing work suggests that the Tycho SN was a thermonuclear explosion while the Cas A supernova was a core collapse explosion. Precise classifications according to modern nomenclature require spectra of the outburst light. In the case of ancient SNe, this can only be done with spectroscopy of their light echo, where the discovery of the light echoes from the outburst light is the first step. Adjacent light echo positions suggest that Cas A and Tycho may share common scattering dust structures. If so, it is possible to measure precise distances between historical Galactic supernovae. On-going surveys that alert on the development of bright scattered-light echo features have the potential to reveal detailed spectroscopic information for many recent Galactic supernovae, both directly visible and obscured by dust in the Galactic plane.

  8. The Global Supernova Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Global Supernova Project

    2017-06-01

    The Global Supernova Project is worldwide collaboration to study 600 supernovae of all types between May 2017 and July 2020. It is a Key Project at Las Cumbres Observatory, whose global robotic telescope network will provide lightcurves and spectra. Follow-up observations will be obtained on many other facilities, including Swift, VLA, K2, the NTT, IRTF, Keck, and Gemini. Observations are managed by the Supernova Exchange, a combination observatin database and telescope control system run by LCO. Here we report on results from the previous Supernova Key Project, and first results from the Global Supernova Project.

  9. Impact of Stellar Convection Criteria on the Nucleosynthetic Yields of Population III Supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teffs, Jacob; Young, Tim; Lawlor, Tim

    2018-01-01

    A grid of 15-80 solar mass Z=0 stellar models are evolved to pre-core collapse using the stellar evolution code BRAHAMA. Each initial zero-age main sequence mass model star is evolved with two different convection criteria, Ledoux and Schwarzchild. The choice of convection produces significant changes in the evolutionary model tracks on the HR diagram, mass loss, and interior core and envelope structures. At onset of core collapse, a SNe explosion is initiated using a one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code and followed for 400 days. The explosion energy is varied between 1-10 foes depending on the model as there are no observationally determined energies for population III supernovae. Due to structure differences, the Schwarzchild models resemble Type II-P SNe in their lightcurve while the Ledoux models resemble SN1987a, a Type IIpec. The nucleosynthesis is calculated using TORCH, a 3,208 isotope network, in a post process method using the hydrodynamic history. The Ledoux models have, on average, higher yields for elements above Fe compared to the Schwarzchild. Using a Salpeter IMF and other recently published population III IMF’s, the net integrated yields per solar mass are calculated and compared to published theoretical results and to published observations of extremely metal poor halo stars of [Fe/H] < -3. Preliminary results show the lower mass models of both criteria show similar trends to the extremely metal poor halo stars but more work and analysis is required.

  10. Point-source and diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from Type IIn supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, M.; Coenders, S.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Kamble, A.; Sironi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe), a rare subclass of core collapse SNe, explode in dense circumstellar media that have been modified by the SNe progenitors at their last evolutionary stages. The interaction of the freely expanding SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium gives rise to a shock wave propagating in the dense SN environment, which may accelerate protons to multi-PeV energies. Inelastic proton-proton collisions between the shock-accelerated protons and those of the circumstellar medium lead to multimessenger signatures. Here, we evaluate the possible neutrino signal of Type IIn SNe and compare with IceCube observations. We employ a Monte Carlo method for the calculation of the diffuse neutrino emission from the SN IIn class to account for the spread in their properties. The cumulative neutrino emission is found to be ˜10 per cent of the observed IceCube neutrino flux above 60 TeV. Type IIn SNe would be the dominant component of the diffuse astrophysical flux, only if 4 per cent of all core collapse SNe were of this type and 20-30 per cent of the shock energy was channeled to accelerated protons. Lower values of the acceleration efficiency are accessible by the observation of a single Type IIn SN as a neutrino point source with IceCube using up-going muon neutrinos. Such an identification is possible in the first year following the SN shock breakout for sources within 20 Mpc.

  11. Robust measurement of supernova νe spectra with future neutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikrant, Alex; Laha, Ranjan; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2018-01-01

    Measuring precise all-flavor neutrino information from a supernova is crucial for understanding the core-collapse process as well as neutrino properties. We apply a chi-squared analysis for different detector setups to explore determination of νe spectral parameters. Using a long-term two-dimensional core-collapse simulation with three time-varying spectral parameters, we generate mock data to examine the capabilities of the current Super-Kamiokande detector and compare the relative improvements that gadolinium, Hyper-Kamiokande, and DUNE would have. We show that in a realistic three spectral parameter framework, the addition of gadolinium to Super-Kamiokande allows for a qualitative improvement in νe determination. Efficient neutron tagging will allow Hyper-Kamiokande to constrain spectral information more strongly in both the accretion and cooling phases. Overall, significant improvements will be made by Hyper-Kamiokande and DUNE, allowing for much more precise determination of νe spectral parameters.

  12. Handbook of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Murdin, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This reference work gathers all of the latest research in the supernova field areas to create a definitive source book on supernovae, their remnants and related topics. It includes each distinct subdiscipline, including stellar types, progenitors, stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis of elements, supernova types, neutron stars and pulsars, black holes, swept up interstellar matter, cosmic rays, neutrinos from supernovae, supernova observations in different wavelengths, interstellar molecules and dust. While there is a great deal of primary and specialist literature on supernovae, with a great many scientific groups around the world focusing on the phenomenon and related subdisciplines, nothing else presents an overall survey. This handbook closes that gap at last. As a comprehensive and balanced collection that presents the current state of knowledge in the broad field of supernovae, this is to be used as a basis for further work and study by graduate students, astronomers and astrophysicists working in close/r...

  13. LOSS Revisited. I. Unraveling Correlations between Supernova Rates and Galaxy Properties, as Measured in a Reanalysis of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graur, Or [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bianco, Federica B.; Huang, Shan; Modjaz, Maryam [CCPP, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Eldridge, J. J., E-mail: or.graur@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2017-03-10

    Most types of supernovae (SNe) have yet to be connected with their progenitor stellar systems. Here, we reanalyze the 10-year SN sample collected during 1998–2008 by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to constrain the progenitors of SNe Ia and stripped-envelope SNe (SE SNe, i.e., SNe IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic). We matched the LOSS galaxy sample with spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and measured SN rates as a function of galaxy stellar mass, specific star formation rate, and oxygen abundance (metallicity). We find significant correlations between the SN rates and all three galaxy properties. The SN Ia correlations are consistent with other measurements, as well as with our previous explanation of these measurements in the form of a combination of the SN Ia delay-time distribution and the correlation between galaxy mass and age. The ratio between the SE SN and SN II rates declines significantly in low-mass galaxies. This rules out single stars as SE SN progenitors, and is consistent with predictions from binary-system progenitor models. Using well-known galaxy scaling relations, any correlation between the rates and one of the galaxy properties examined here can be expressed as a correlation with the other two. These redundant correlations preclude us from establishing causality—that is, from ascertaining which of the galaxy properties (or their combination) is the physical driver for the difference between the SE SN and SN II rates. We outline several methods that have the potential to overcome this problem in future works.

  14. Transition Elements in Supernova Presolar Grains: Condensation versus Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhas, Kuljeet K.; Sharda, Piyush

    2018-01-01

    We compute the concentrations of five transition elements (Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Zn) via condensation and implantation in supernova presolar grains (Silicon Carbide Type X) from the time they condense until the end of the free expansion (or pre-Sedov) phase. We consider relative velocities of these elements with respect to grains as they condense and evolve at temperatures ≲2000 K; use zonal nucleosynthesis yields for three core collapse supernovae models ‑15 M ⊙, 20 M ⊙, and 25 M ⊙ and use an ion target simulator SDTrimSP to model their implantation onto the grains. Simulations from SDTrimSP show that maximal implantation in the core of the grain is possible, contrary to previous studies. Among the available models, we find that the 15 M ⊙ model best explains the measured concentrations of SiC X grains obtained from the Murchison meteorite. For grains where measured concentrations of Fe and Ni are ≳300 ppm, we find the implantation fraction to be ≲0.25 for most probable differential zonal velocities in this phase, which implies that condensation is more dominant than implantation. We show that radioactive corrections and mixing from the innermost Ni and Si zones are required to explain the excess Ni (condensed as well as implanted) in these grains. This mixing also explains the relative abundances of Co and Ni with respect to Fe simultaneously. The model developed can be used to predict concentrations of all other elements in various presolar grains condensed in supernova ejecta and compared with measured concentrations in grains found in meteorites.

  15. HOW TO FIND GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Nugent, Peter E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that are multiply imaged by gravitational lensing can extend the SN Ia Hubble diagram to very high redshifts ( z ≳ 2), probe potential SN Ia evolution, and deliver high-precision constraints on H {sub 0}, w , and Ω{sub m} via time delays. However, only one, iPTF16geu, has been found to date, and many more are needed to achieve these goals. To increase the multiply imaged SN Ia discovery rate, we present a simple algorithm for identifying gravitationally lensed SN Ia candidates in cadenced, wide-field optical imaging surveys. The technique is to look for supernovae that appear to be hosted by elliptical galaxies, but that have absolute magnitudes implied by the apparent hosts’ photometric redshifts that are far brighter than the absolute magnitudes of normal SNe Ia (the brightest type of supernovae found in elliptical galaxies). Importantly, this purely photometric method does not require the ability to resolve the lensed images for discovery. Active galactic nuclei, the primary sources of contamination that affect the method, can be controlled using catalog cross-matches and color cuts. Highly magnified core-collapse SNe will also be discovered as a byproduct of the method. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, we forecast that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope can discover up to 500 multiply imaged SNe Ia using this technique in a 10 year z -band search, more than an order of magnitude improvement over previous estimates. We also predict that the Zwicky Transient Facility should find up to 10 multiply imaged SNe Ia using this technique in a 3 year R -band search—despite the fact that this survey will not resolve a single system.

  16. Mapping the Supernova-Rich Fireworks Galaxy NGC 6946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Locke; Levesque, Emily

    2018-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) are the spectacularly violent deaths of evolved young massive stars, which expel a shock wave into the intergalactic medium that in turn can spark star formation and disperse heavy elements into their host galaxy. While a SN event can be classified by its spectral signature, determining the nature of a SN progenitor depends upon chance photometry taken prior to the event. By turning to the study of SN host environments and their surrounding interstellar medium within the unique and rare population of galaxies that have hosted three or more SN events within the last century, we are granted the opportunity to study the locations and environmental properties of stellar populations prone to supernova progenitor production. Using moderate-resolution optical slit spectra taken with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m DIS spectrograph, our goal is to map metallicity, ionization parameter, and star formation rates using emission line diagnostic ratios across each SN-rich galaxy. Dubbed the “Fireworks Galaxy” at a distance of 5.6 ± 1.5 Mpc, NGC 6946 is of particular interest as it has uniquely produced ten core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and several other massive star transients within the last century. We present spatially-resolved metallicity and star formation rate (SFR) maps of NGC 6946, tracing fifty-five slit orientations which span the face of the galaxy and cover all CCSN host sites. Future work will include both stellar population synthesis modelling to determine stellar populations, ages, and SFR histories in NGC 6946 and a further expansion of this analysis to the other SN-rich host galaxies in our sample.

  17. IceCube Sensitivity for Low-Energy Neutrinos from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatikos, M.; Abbasi, R.; Berghaus, P.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Eisch, J.; Feintzeig, J.; Hanson, K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the response of the IceCube neutrino telescope located at the geographic South Pole to outbursts of MeV neutrinos from the core collapse of nearby massive stars. IceCube was completed in December 2010 forming a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes that monitor a volume of approx. 1 cu km in the deep Antarctic ice for particle induced photons. The telescope was designed to detect neutrinos with energies greater than 100 GeV. Owing to subfreezing ice temperatures, the photomultiplier dark noise rates are particularly low. Hence IceCube can also detect large numbers of MeV neutrinos by observing a collective rise in all photomultiplier rates on top of the dark noise. With 2 ms timing resolution, IceCube can detect subtle features in the temporal development of the supernova neutrino burst. For a supernova at the galactic center, its sensitivity matches that of a background-free megaton-scale supernova search experiment. The sensitivity decreases to 20 standard deviations at the galactic edge (30 kpc) and 6 standard deviations at the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc). IceCube is sending triggers from potential supernovae to the Supernova Early Warning System. The sensitivity to neutrino properties such as the neutrino hierarchy is discussed, as well as the possibility to detect the neutronization burst, a short outbreak's released by electron capture on protons soon after collapse. Tantalizing signatures, such as the formation of a quark star or a black hole as well as the characteristics of shock waves, are investigated to illustrate IceCube's capability for supernova detection.

  18. The youngest known X-ray binary: Circinus X-1 and its natal supernova remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Fender, R. P. [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Jonker, P. G. [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, 3584-CA, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Calvelo-Santos, D. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Tzioumis, A. K. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wijnands, R.; Van der Klis, M., E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-20

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  19. Observational Investigations of the Progenitors of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    Supernovae (SNe) are the spectacular deaths of stars and have shaped the universe we see today. Their far-reaching influence affects the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies, star formation, neutron star and black hole formation, and they are largely responsible for most of the heavy elements that make up the universe, including around 90 per cent of the reader. They also provide laboratories of nuclear and particle physics far beyond what we can construct on Earth and act as probes of extreme density and energy. This thesis presents new research into understanding the nature of the progenitor systems of various types of SNe, as well as presenting results that will allow their study to be more productive in the future, through use of automated pipelines and methods to increase the science value of discovered SNe. An environmental study of two peculiar types of transients ('Calcium-rich' and '2002cx-like'), which may not be true SNe, reveals extremely different ages of the exploding systems that will constrain the current theoretical effort into discovering the progenitor systems. The GRB-SN 120422A/2012bz is investigated and found to be an extremely luminous and energetic SN, even amongst the infamously bright GRB-SNe. A method is presented that allows an accurate reconstruction of the bolometric light curve of a core-collapse SN, which relies on only two optical filter observations - this will hugely reduce the observational cost of constructing bolometric light curves, a tool of great importance when hoping to constrain the nature of a SN explosion and hence its progenitor. Finally, this method is utilised to construct the largest bolometric CCSN bolometric light curve sample to date, and these are analytically modelled to reveal population statistics of the explosions, thus informing on the nature of the progenitors.

  20. Type Ia Supernova Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibundgut, B.; Sullivan, M.

    2018-03-01

    The primary agent for Type Ia supernova cosmology is the uniformity of their appearance. We present the current status, achievements and uncertainties. The Hubble constant and the expansion history of the universe are key measurements provided by Type Ia supernovae. They were also instrumental in showing time dilation, which is a direct observational signature of expansion. Connections to explosion physics are made in the context of potential improvements of the quality of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators. The coming years will see large efforts to use Type Ia supernovae to characterise dark energy.

  1. The historical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, David H

    1977-01-01

    The Historical Supernovae is an interdisciplinary study of the historical records of supernova. This book is composed of 12 chapters that particularly highlight the history of the Far East. The opening chapter briefly describes the features of nova and supernova, stars which spontaneously explode with a spectacular and rapid increase in brightness. The succeeding chapter deals with the search for the historical records of supernova from Medieval European monastic chronicles, Arabic chronicles, astrological works etc., post renaissance European scientific writings, and Far Eastern histories and

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) revisited (Graur+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, O.; Bianco, F. B.; Huang, S.; Modjaz, M.; Shivvers, I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    Most types of supernovae (SNe) have yet to be connected with their progenitor stellar systems. Here, we reanalyze the 10-year SN sample collected during 1998-2008 by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS; see Leaman+, 2011, J/MNRAS/412/1419) in order to constrain the progenitors of SNe Ia and stripped-envelope SNe (SE SNe, i.e., SNe IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic). We matched the LOSS galaxy sample with spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and measured SN rates as a function of galaxy stellar mass, specific star formation rate, and oxygen abundance (metallicity). We find significant correlations between the SN rates and all three galaxy properties. The SN Ia correlations are consistent with other measurements, as well as with our previous explanation of these measurements in the form of a combination of the SN Ia delay-time distribution and the correlation between galaxy mass and age. The ratio between the SE SN and SN II rates declines significantly in low-mass galaxies. This rules out single stars as SE SN progenitors, and is consistent with predictions from binary-system progenitor models. Using well-known galaxy scaling relations, any correlation between the rates and one of the galaxy properties examined here can be expressed as a correlation with the other two. These redundant correlations preclude us from establishing causality-that is, from ascertaining which of the galaxy properties (or their combination) is the physical driver for the difference between the SE SN and SN II rates. We outline several methods that have the potential to overcome this problem in future works. (7 data files).

  3. Dance into the fire: dust survival inside supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing 1 M_{⊙}) of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our goal is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. To do so, we have developed analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, and the simultaneous processing of the dust inside the cavity of the supernova remnant. We have applied our models to the special case of the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), assuming that the dust (silicates and carbon grains) resides in cool oxygen-rich ejecta clumps which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta). The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps, or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. We find that 12 and 16 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the center of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will

  4. KM3NeT sensitivity to neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanidze, Rezo [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Street 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: shanidze@physik.uni-erlangen.de

    2009-04-11

    A very large volume Mediterranean neutrino telescope (KM3NeT), designed and optimised for detection of Cherenkov light from interactions of neutrinos with energies above about 100 GeV, could be sensitive to an intense neutrino burst from the core collapse of a massive star in our Galaxy. In a short time interval during the burst ({approx}10s) the total amount of Cherenkov photons produced by low-energy ({approx}10MeV) neutrino interactions in the sea water rises well above the usual background level. The main source of these photons are positrons from interactions of electron anti-neutrinos with the free protons in water. The KM3NeT detector could be considered as a potential member of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS), an international network of neutrino experiments with the goal of providing an early warning in case of a Galactic supernova. The possibilities for the detection of a supernova signal with KM3NeT will be discussed in this paper.

  5. KM3NeT sensitivity to neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanidze, Rezo; KM3NeT Consortium

    2009-04-01

    A very large volume Mediterranean neutrino telescope (KM3NeT), designed and optimised for detection of Cherenkov light from interactions of neutrinos with energies above about 100 GeV, could be sensitive to an intense neutrino burst from the core collapse of a massive star in our Galaxy. In a short time interval during the burst (˜10s) the total amount of Cherenkov photons produced by low-energy (˜10MeV) neutrino interactions in the sea water rises well above the usual background level. The main source of these photons are positrons from interactions of electron anti-neutrinos with the free protons in water. The KM3NeT detector could be considered as a potential member of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS), an international network of neutrino experiments with the goal of providing an early warning in case of a Galactic supernova. The possibilities for the detection of a supernova signal with KM3NeT will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Explaining the morphology of supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A with the jittering jets explosion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Ealeal; Soker, Noam

    2018-04-01

    We find that the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A shares some morphological features with four supernova remnants (SNRs) that have signatures of shaping by jets, and from that we strengthen the claim that jets played a crucial role in the explosion of SN 1987A. Some of the morphological features appear also in planetary nebulae (PNe) where jets are observed. The clumpy ejecta bring us to support the claim that the jittering jets explosion mechanism can account for the structure of the remnant of SN 1987A, i.e., SNR 1987A. We conduct a preliminary attempt to quantify the fluctuations in the angular momentum of the mass that is accreted on to the newly born neutron star via an accretion disk or belt. The accretion disk/belt launches the jets that explode core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The relaxation time of the accretion disk/belt is comparable to the duration of a typical jet-launching episode in the jittering jets explosion mechanism, and hence the disk/belt has no time to relax. We suggest that this might explain two unequal opposite jets that later lead to unequal sides of the elongated structures in some SNRs of CCSNe. We reiterate our earlier call for a paradigm shift from neutrino-driven explosion to a jet-driven explosion of CCSNe.

  7. Models of bright nickel-free supernovae from stripped massive stars with circumstellar shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, Io K. W.; Kasen, Daniel; Duffell, Paul C.

    2018-04-01

    The nature of an emerging class of rapidly fading supernovae (RFSNe) - characterized by their short-lived light-curve duration, but varying widely in peak brightness - remains puzzling. Whether the RFSNe arise from low-mass thermonuclear eruptions on white dwarfs or from the core collapse of massive stars is still a matter of dispute. We explore the possibility that the explosion of hydrogen-free massive stars could produce bright but rapidly fading transients if the effective pre-supernova radii are large and if little or no radioactive nickel is ejected. The source of radiation is then purely due to shock cooling. We study this model of RFSNe using spherically symmetric hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations of the explosion of stripped stars embedded in helium-dominated winds or shells of various masses and extent. We present a parameter study showing how the properties of the circumstellar envelopes affect the dynamics of the explosion and can lead to a diversity of light curves. We also explore the dynamics of the fallback of the innermost stellar layers, which might be able to remove radioactive nickel from the ejecta, making the rapid decline in the late-time light curve possible. We provide scaling relations that describe how the duration and luminosity of these events depend on the supernova kinetic energy and the mass and radius of the circumstellar material.

  8. Matching Supernovae to Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    One of the major challenges for modern supernova surveys is identifying the galaxy that hosted each explosion. Is there an accurate and efficient way to do this that avoids investing significant human resources?Why Identify Hosts?One problem in host galaxy identification. Here, the supernova lies between two galaxies but though the centroid of the galaxy on the right is closer in angular separation, this may be a distant background galaxy that is not actually near the supernova. [Gupta et al. 2016]Supernovae are a critical tool for making cosmological predictions that help us to understand our universe. But supernova cosmology relies on accurately identifying the properties of the supernovae including their redshifts. Since spectroscopic followup of supernova detections often isnt possible, we rely on observations of the supernova host galaxies to obtain redshifts.But how do we identify which galaxy hosted a supernova? This seems like a simple problem, but there are many complicating factors a seemingly nearby galaxy could be a distant background galaxy, for instance, or a supernovas host could be too faint to spot.The authors algorithm takes into account confusion, a measure of how likely the supernova is to be mismatched. In these illustrations of low (left) and high (right) confusion, the supernova is represented by a blue star, and the green circles represent possible host galaxies. [Gupta et al. 2016]Turning to AutomationBefore the era of large supernovae surveys, searching for host galaxies was done primarily by visual inspection. But current projects like the Dark Energy Surveys Supernova Program is finding supernovae by the thousands, and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will likely discover hundreds of thousands. Visual inspection will not be possible in the face of this volume of data so an accurate and efficient automated method is clearly needed!To this end, a team of scientists led by Ravi Gupta (Argonne National Laboratory) has recently

  9. Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenev, S A; Lutovinov, A A; Tsygankov, S S; Winkler, C

    2012-10-18

    It is assumed that the radioactive decay of (44)Ti powers the infrared, optical and ultraviolet emission of supernova remnants after the complete decay of (56)Co and (57)Co (the isotopes that dominated the energy balance during the first three to four years after the explosion) until the beginning of active interaction of the ejecta with the surrounding matter. Simulations show that the initial mass of (44)Ti synthesized in core-collapse supernovae is (0.02-2.5) × 10(-4) solar masses (M circled dot). Hard X-rays and γ-rays from the decay of this (44)Ti have been unambiguously observed from Cassiopeia A only, leading to the suggestion that values of the initial mass of (44)Ti near the upper bound of the predictions occur only in exceptional cases. For the remnant of supernova 1987A, an upper limit to the initial mass of (44)Ti of supernova 1987A in the narrow band containing two direct-escape lines of (44)Ti at 67.9 and 78.4 keV. The measured line fluxes imply that this decay provided sufficient energy to power the remnant at late times. We estimate that the initial mass of (44)Ti was (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10(-4), which is near the upper bound of theoretical predictions.

  10. Supernova 2008J

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadddia, F.; Stritzinger, Maximilian David; Phillips, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We provide additional observational evidence that some Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show signatures of circumstellar interaction (CSI) with hydrogen-rich material. Methods: Early phase optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and spectroscopy of SN 2008J obtained by the Carnegie Supernova...

  11. Gravitational collapse and supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattimer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The collapse of the core of a massive star and the subsequent birth of a neutron star in a supernova explosion are discussed, and a model of the supernova mechanism is developed. The basic theory is then compared with the particular case of SN1987A, whose emitted neutrinos permitted the first direct test of the model. (author)

  12. Supernova 1604, Kepler’s Supernova, and Its Remnant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Alsabti, A.W.; Murdin, P.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova 1604 is the last galactic supernova for which historical records exist. Johannes Kepler’s name is attached to it, as he published a detailed account of the observations made by himself and European colleagues. Supernova 1604 was very likely a type Ia supernova, which exploded 350–750 pc

  13. Supernovae and their host galaxies - V. The vertical distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Barkhudaryan, L. V.; Karapetyan, A. G.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Adibekyan, V.; Aramyan, L. S.; Petrosian, A. R.; Turatto, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of the height distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) from the plane of their host galaxies. We use a well-defined sample of 102 nearby SNe appearing inside high-inclined (I ≥ 85°), morphologically non-disturbed S0-Sd host galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we show that in all the subsamples of spirals, the vertical distribution of core-collapse (CC) SNe is about twice closer to the plane of the host disc than the distribution of SNe Ia. In Sb-Sc hosts, the exponential scale height of CC SNe is consistent with those of the younger stellar population in the Milky Way (MW) thin disc, while the scale height of SNe Ia is consistent with those of the old population in the MW thick disc. We show that the ratio of scale lengths to scale heights of the distribution of CC SNe is consistent with those of the resolved young stars with ages from ˜10 up to ˜100 Myr in nearby edge-on galaxies and the unresolved stellar population of extragalactic thin discs. The corresponding ratio for SNe Ia is consistent with the same ratios of the two populations of resolved stars with ages from a few 100 Myr up to a few Gyr and from a few Gyr up to ˜10 Gyr, as well as with the unresolved population of the thick disc. These results can be explained considering the age-scale height relation of the distribution of stellar population and the mean age difference between Type Ia and CC SNe progenitors.

  14. Gamma-Ray Burst Associated Supernovae: Outliers Become Mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Masetti, N.; Ferrero, P.; Klose, S.; Palazzi, E.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Woosley, S. E.; Kouveliotou, C.; Deng, J.

    2006-01-01

    During the last eight years a clear connection has been established-between the two most powerful explosions in our Universe: core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and long gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Theory suggests4 that every GRB is simultaneously accompanied by a SN, but in only a few nearby cases have these two phenomena been observed together. We report the discovery and daily monitoring of SN 2006aj associated with the GRB 060218. Because the event was the second closest GRB, both explosions could be examined in detail. GRB 060218 had an unusually soft spectrum, long duration, and a total energy 100 to 1000 times less than most other GRBs. Yet SN 2006aj was similar to those in other GRBs, aside from rising more rapidly and being approximately 40% fainter. Taken together, these observations suggest that GRBs have two components: a broad, energetic, but only mildly relativistic outflow that makes a SN, and a more narrowly focused, highly relativistic jet responsible for the GRB. The properties of the GRB jet apparently vary greatly from event to event, while the broad SN outflow varies much less. Low energy transients like GRB 060218 may be the most common events in the Universe.

  15. Extending Supernova Spectral Templates for Next Generation Space Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Pierel, Justin; Rodney, Steven A.; Steven Rodney

    2018-01-01

    Widely used empirical supernova (SN) Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) have not historically extended meaningfully into the ultraviolet (UV), or the infrared (IR). However, both are critical for current and future aspects of SN research including UV spectra as probes of poorly understood SN Ia physical properties, and expanding our view of the universe with high-redshift James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) IR observations. We therefore present a comprehensive set of SN SED templates that have been extended into the UV and IR, as well as an open-source software package written in Python that enables a user to generate their own extrapolated SEDs. We have taken a sampling of core-collapse (CC) and Type Ia SNe to get a time-dependent distribution of UV and IR colors (U-B,r’-[JHK]), and then generated color curves are used to extrapolate SEDs into the UV and IR. The SED extrapolation process is now easily duplicated using a user’s own data and parameters via our open-source Python package: SNSEDextend. This work develops the tools necessary to explore the JWST’s ability to discriminate between CC and Type Ia SNe, as well as provides a repository of SN SEDs that will be invaluable to future JWST and WFIRST SN studies.

  16. QCD matter in white dwarfs and supernova collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, Grant J.; Meixner, M.; Lan, N.Q.; Suh, I.-S.

    2010-01-01

    The search for astrophysical evidence for a transition to QCD matter is an important goal. Although much effort has gone into searching for neutron star candidates, here we describe the exploration of two other possible signatures. One is the search for strange dwarfs. Masses and radii for a large number of white dwarfs have been deduced from a combination of proper motion studies, Hipparcos parallax distances, effective temperatures, and binary or spectroscopic masses. Some stars appear to have radii which are significantly smaller than that expected for a standard electron-degenerate white-dwarf equation of state. We argue that there is marginal evidence for bimodality in the radius distribution. We show that the data exhibit several features consistent with the expected mass-radius relation of strange dwarfs. We identify eight nearby white dwarfs that are possible candidates for strange matter cores and suggest observational tests of this hypothesis. We also review the current status of core-collapse supernova research, and in particular, the effects on the explosion of a QCD phase transition in the proto-neutron-star core. We describe how a first order transition could enhance the explosion and lead to observable effects in the emergent neutrino light curve. (author)

  17. Chaos and turbulent nucleosynthesis prior to a supernova explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, W. D.; Meakin, C.; Viallet, M.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D), time dependent numerical simulations of flow of matter in stars, now have sufficient resolution to be fully turbulent. The late stages of the evolution of massive stars, leading up to core collapse to a neutron star (or black hole), and often to supernova explosion and nucleosynthesis, are strongly convective because of vigorous neutrino cooling and nuclear heating. Unlike models based on current stellar evolutionary practice, these simulations show a chaotic dynamics characteristic of highly turbulent flow. Theoretical analysis of this flow, both in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) framework and by simple dynamic models, show an encouraging consistency with the numerical results. It may now be possible to develop physically realistic and robust procedures for convection and mixing which (unlike 3D numerical simulation) may be applied throughout the long life times of stars. In addition, a new picture of the presupernova stages is emerging which is more dynamic and interesting (i.e., predictive of new and newly observed phenomena) than our previous one

  18. Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae: Variation with Stellar Progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Quataert, Eliot; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Coughlin, Eric R.

    2018-02-01

    We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically-symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several M⊙ for red supergiants to ˜0.1M⊙ for blue supergiants and ˜10-3M⊙ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is ≲ 1047 - 1048 erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.

  19. Detection of supernova neutrinos in the liquid-scintillator experiment LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Jurgen Michael Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The LENA project (Low-Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a planned large-volume liquid-scintillator detector. The good energy resolution, low-energy threshold, and its large mass allow to perform real-time spectroscopy of low-energy neutrinos with high statistics. This is especially beneficial for the observation of rare events such as a galactic core-collapse supernova. In a liquid scintillator, interactions by different particle types cause different scintillation light pulse shapes. They can be used to identify proton recoils induced by neutrino-proton scattering from supernova neutrinos or by cosmogenic knock-out neutrons. In order to evaluate the performance of the detector, a precise characterization of the liquid scintillator is necessary. In the course of this work, an experiment has been set up at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching in order to determine the pulse shape of proton and electron recoils in different liquid-scintillator mixtures. Neutrons produced via 11 B(p,n) 11 C or an americiumberyllium source were used to induce proton recoils. Compton scattering of simultaneously emitted γs provided information on the electron recoils. A time-of-flight measurement allows for an easy identification of neutron and γ induced events and thus effective background reduction. The tail-to-total and the Gatti method are used in order to determine the energy-dependent discrimination power of proton and electron recoils in liquid scintillator. Combining both methods, a proton recoil identification efficiency of (99.70±0.05)% can be achieved between 1-1.5 MeV, while suppressing 99% of the γ induced recoils for the probable liquid scintillator mixture for LENA, linear alkylbenzene (LAB) as solvent and 3 g/l 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 20mg/l 1,4-bis-(o-methylstyryl)-benzole (bisMSB) as fluors. Moreover, the decay constants τ i and the respective amplitudes n i are determined for various liquid scintillator mixtures. It can be observed that the decay times

  20. Cosmic evolution and metal aversion in superluminous supernova host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, S.; Krühler, T.; Leloudas, G.; Gorosabel, J.; Mehner, A.; Buchner, J.; Kim, S.; Ibar, E.; Amorín, R.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Anderson, J. P.; Bauer, F. E.; Christensen, L.; de Pasquale, M.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gallazzi, A.; Hjorth, J.; Morrell, N.; Malesani, D.; Sparre, M.; Stalder, B.; Stark, A. A.; Thöne, C. C.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    The SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES survey aims to provide strong new constraints on the progenitors of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) by understanding the relationship to their host galaxies. We present the photometric properties of 53 H-poor and 16 H-rich SLSN host galaxies out to z ∼ 4. We model their spectral energy distributions to derive physical properties, which we compare with other galaxy populations. At low redshift, H-poor SLSNe are preferentially found in very blue, low-mass galaxies with high average specific star formation rates. As redshift increases, the host population follows the general evolution of star-forming galaxies towards more luminous galaxies. After accounting for secular evolution, we find evidence for differential evolution in galaxy mass, but not in the B band and the far-ultraviolet luminosity (3σ confidence). Most remarkable is the scarcity of hosts with stellar masses above 1010 M⊙ for both classes of SLSNe. In case of H-poor SLSNe, we attribute this to a stifled production efficiency above ∼0.4 solar metallicity. However, we argue that, in addition to low metallicity, a short-lived stellar population is also required to regulate the SLSN production. H-rich SLSNe are found in a very diverse population of star-forming galaxies. Still, the scarcity of massive hosts suggests a stifled production efficiency above ∼0.8 solar metallicity. The large dispersion of the H-rich SLSNe host properties is in stark contrast to those of gamma-ray burst, regular core-collapse SN, and H-poor SLSNe host galaxies. We propose that multiple progenitor channels give rise to this subclass.

  1. SUPERLUMINOUS X-RAYS FROM A SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levan, A. J.; Wheatley, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Read, A. M.; Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Metzger, B. D., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, 704 Pupin Hall, MC 5255, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-07-10

    The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of {approx}100 brighter than normal supernovae (SNe; typically SLSNe have M{sub V} < -21), has shown an unexpected diversity in core-collapse SN properties. Numerous models have been postulated for the nature of these events, including a strong interaction of the shockwave with a dense circumstellar environment, a re-energizing of the outflow via a central engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability SNe). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift, and show that at least one SLSN-I is likely the brightest X-ray SN ever observed, with L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, {approx}150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity three orders of magnitude higher than seen in other X-ray SNe powered via circumstellar interactions. Such high X-ray luminosities are sufficient to ionize the ejecta and markedly reduce the optical depth, making it possible to see deep into the ejecta and any source of emission that resides there. Alternatively, an engine could have powered a moderately relativistic jet external to the ejecta, similar to those seen in gamma-ray bursts. If the detection of X-rays does require an engine it implies that these SNe do create compact objects, and that the stars are not completely destroyed in a pair instability event. Future observations will determine which, if any, of these mechanisms are at play in SLSNe.

  2. Young supernova remnants and INTEGRAL: 44Ti lines and non-thermal emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, M.

    2006-10-01

    This thesis deals with the search for and the study of young galactic supernova remnants using the observations performed by IBIS/ISGRI, one of the two main coded-mask instruments onboard the european gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL. This research is based on i) the study of gamma-ray lines coming from the radioactive decay of 44 Ti, a short-lived nucleus (τ∼ 86 y) exclusively produced during the first stages of stellar explosions, and ii) the study of the nonthermal continuum mechanisms which take place inside the young supernova remnants. I separate the manuscript in four main parts. The first one presents an overview of supernovae from an observational and theoretical point of view. The second part describes the INTEGRAL satellite with its instruments, the techniques used for analyzing the data collected by IBIS/ISGRI, and my personal investigations concerning different developments such as: the spectral calibration of the IBIS/ISGRI instrument, the correction of noisy pixels on the camera, the creation of background maps, and the development of an alternative pipeline useful for dealing with a large amount of data. I also present a method for imaging extended sources with a coded-mask instrument such as IBIS/ISGRI, and its first application on the Coma Cluster. The results obtained on historical supernova remnants like Cas A, Tycho, RXJ0852-4622 (Vela Junior) are presented in the third part. The first chapter of the last part is devoted to the study of the detectability of supernovae in the optical domain with a model of the interstellar extinction. The second chapter reports on the search for missing and hidden young supernova remnants in the Milky Way with the IBIS/ISGRI galactic plane survey through the 44 Sc gamma-ray lines as well as with a multi-wavelength approach, from the radio domain (VLA) to the new observational window at TeV energies (HESS). I also discuss the constraints on the supernova rate and the 44 Ti production in core-collapse supernovae

  3. Automated search for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  4. Berkeley automated supernova search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  5. Berkeley automated supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982

  6. Automated search for supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion

  7. SN 2010jl IN UGC 5189: YET ANOTHER LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA IN A METAL-POOR GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; Pogge, R. W.; Szczygiel, D. M.; Antognini, J.; Prieto, J. L.; Pojmanski, G.; Yan, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present All-Sky Automated Survey data starting 25 days before the discovery of the recent type IIn SN 2010jl, and we compare its light curve to other luminous IIn supernovae (SNe), showing that it is a luminous (M I ∼ -20.5) event. Its host galaxy, UGC 5189, has a low gas-phase oxygen abundance (12 + log(O/H) = 8.2 ± 0.1), which reinforces the emerging trend that overluminous core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are found in the low-metallicity tail of the galaxy distribution, similar to the known trend for the hosts of long GRBs. We compile oxygen abundances from the literature and from our own observations of UGC 5189, and we present an unpublished spectrum of the luminous type Ic SN 2010gx that we use to estimate its host metallicity. We discuss these in the context of host metallicity trends for different classes of core-collapse objects. The earliest generations of stars are known to be enhanced in [O/Fe] relative to the solar mixture; it is therefore likely that the stellar progenitors of these overluminous SNe are even more iron-poor than they are oxygen-poor. A number of mechanisms and massive star progenitor systems have been proposed to explain the most luminous CCSNe. Any successful theory that tries to explain these very luminous events will need to include the emerging trend that points toward low metallicity for the massive progenitor stars. This trend for very luminous SNe to strongly prefer low-metallicity galaxies should be taken into account when considering various aspects of the evolution of the metal-poor early universe, such as enrichment and reionization.

  8. Blue supergiant progenitors from binary mergers for SN 1987A and other Type II-peculiar supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Athira; Heger, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    We present results of a systematic and detailed stellar evolution study of binary mergers for blue supergiant (BSG) progenitors of Type II supernovae, particularly for SN 1987A. We are able to reproduce nearly all observational aspects of the progenitor of SN 1987A, Sk -69 °202, such as its position in the HR diagram, the enrichment of helium and nitrogen in the triple-ring nebula and its lifetime before its explosion. We build our evolutionary model based on the merger model of Podsiadlowski et al. (1992), Podsiadlowski et al. (2007) and empirically explore an initial parameter consisting of primary masses, secondary masses and different depths up to which the secondary penetrates the He core during the merger. The evolution of the post-merger star is continued until just before iron-core collapse. Of the 84 pre-supernova models (16 M⊙ - 23 M⊙) computed, the majority of the pre-supernova models are compact, hot BSGs with effective temperature >12 kK and 30 R⊙ - 70 R⊙ of which six match nearly all the observational properties of Sk -69 °202.

  9. Evolution of r-process elements in the hot supernova bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Woosley, S.E.

    1993-02-01

    We review some of the recent arguments as to why the r-process is thought to be associated with supernovae and how the high-temperature, high-entropy inner region of a core-collapse supernova is an ideal r-process site. We present preliminary extensions of our earlier work on the formation of the high-entropy ''bubble'' that describe more accurately its late-time evolution and the ejection of the neutrino-energized wind from the surface of the nascent neutron star. This site leads naturally to a distribution of temperature, density, neutron excess, and entropy for material ejected at different times in the wind as required by Solar abundances. We present simple analytic expressions which approximate these distributions. This site also predicts an amount of reprocess material ejected per event in agreement with simple galactic evolution arguments. However, it is not yet clear whether the entropy in this model is high enough (or the electron fraction is low enough) to produce an optimum fit to the Solar r-process abundance curve and additional mechanisms may be required to increase the entropy per baryon. We conclude with a discussion of nuclear measurements which would help to probe this r-process environment

  10. Rotation-supported Neutrino-driven Supernova Explosions in Three Dimensions and the Critical Luminosity Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    We present the first self-consistent, 3D core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code for a rotating progenitor star. Besides using the angular momentum of the 15 M ⊙ model as obtained in the stellar evolution calculation with an angular frequency of ∼10‑3 rad s‑1 (spin period of more than 6000 s) at the Si/Si–O interface, we also computed 2D and 3D cases with no rotation and with a ∼300 times shorter rotation period and different angular resolutions. In 2D, only the nonrotating and slowly rotating models explode, while rapid rotation prevents an explosion within 500 ms after bounce because of lower radiated neutrino luminosities and mean energies and thus reduced neutrino heating. In contrast, only the fast-rotating model develops an explosion in 3D when the Si/Si–O interface collapses through the shock. The explosion becomes possible by the support of a powerful standing accretion shock instability spiral mode, which compensates for the reduced neutrino heating and pushes strong shock expansion in the equatorial plane. Fast rotation in 3D leads to a “two-dimensionalization” of the turbulent energy spectrum (yielding roughly a ‑3 instead of a ‑5/3 power-law slope at intermediate wavelengths) with enhanced kinetic energy on the largest spatial scales. We also introduce a generalization of the “universal critical luminosity condition” of Summa et al. to account for the effects of rotation, and we demonstrate its viability for a set of more than 40 core-collapse simulations, including 9 and 20 M ⊙ progenitors, as well as black-hole-forming cases of 40 and 75 M ⊙ stars to be discussed in forthcoming papers.

  11. Cosmic Supernova Rate History and Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2001-01-01

    Adopting a single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernova progenitors with the metallicity effect, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies, and compare with the recent observational data up to z ~ 0.55.

  12. Nearby supernova factory announces 34 supernovae in one year'; best Rookie year ever for supernova search

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), an international collaboration based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, announced that it had discovered 34 supernovae during the first year of the prototype system's operation (2 pages).

  13. Nurseries of Supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Teddy

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) have long been the gold standard for precision cosmology and after several decades of intense research the supernova (SN) community was in 2011 honored by giving the Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of Dark Energy to the leaders of the two big SN collaborations...... to be smaller then the systematic errors. The down side to this is that we can not improve the SNe further as cosmological probes before we know the source of the systematic dispersions. On the other hand the systematic offsets might actually be the measurements that will lead to new information on the detailed...

  14. Neutrinos from Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborra, Irene; Murase, Kohta

    2018-02-01

    Neutrinos are fundamental particles in the collapse of massive stars. Because of their weakly interacting nature, neutrinos can travel undisturbed through the stellar core and be direct probes of the still uncertain and fascinating supernova mechanism. Intriguing recent developments on the role of neutrinos during the stellar collapse are reviewed, as well as our current understanding of the flavor conversions in the stellar envelope. The detection perspectives of the next burst and of the diffuse supernova background will be also outlined. High-energy neutrinos in the GeV-PeV range can follow the MeV neutrino emission. Various scenarios concerning the production of high-energy neutrinos are discussed.

  15. Cosmology with Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Lapuente, P.

    2003-01-01

    This review gives an update of the cosmological use of SNe Ia and the progress made in testing their properties from the local universe to high-z. The cosmological road from high-z supernovae down to Galactic SNe Ia is followed in search of the answer to standing questions on their nature and their validity as cosmological indicators.

  16. Progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2018-01-01

    The progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are believed to be red supergiant (RSG) stars, but there is much disparity in the literature concerning their mass at core collapse and therefore on the main sequence. Here, we model the SN radiation arising from the low-energy explosion of RSG stars of 12, 25 and 27 M⊙ on the main sequence and formed through single star evolution. Despite the narrow range in ejecta kinetic energy (2.5-4.2 × 1050 erg) in our model set, the SN observables from our three models are significantly distinct, reflecting the differences in progenitor structure (e.g. surface radius, H-rich envelope mass and He-core mass). Our higher mass RSG stars give rise to Type II SNe that tend to have bluer colours at early times, a shorter photospheric phase, and a faster declining V-band light curve (LC) more typical of Type II-linear SNe, in conflict with the LC plateau observed for low-luminosity SNe II. The complete fallback of the CO core in the low-energy explosions of our high-mass RSG stars prevents the ejection of any 56Ni (nor any core O or Si), in contrast to low-luminosity SNe II-P, which eject at least 0.001 M⊙ of 56Ni. In contrast to observations, Type II SN models from higher mass RSGs tend to show an H α absorption that remains broad at late times (due to a larger velocity at the base of the H-rich envelope). In agreement with the analyses of pre-explosion photometry, we conclude that low-luminosity SNe II-P likely arise from low-mass rather than high-mass RSG stars.

  17. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Scolnic, Daniel; Riess, Adam; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert; Berger, Edo; Kessler, Rick; Pan, Yen-Chen; Foley, Ryan; Chornock, Ryan; Ortega, Carolyn; Challis, Peter; Burgett, William; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter; Flewelling, Heather; Huber, Mark; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Chris; Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, Rubina; McCrum, Matt; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken

    2018-01-01

    We use nearly 1,200 supernovae (SNe) from Pan-STARRS and ~200 low-z (z Ia to measure cosmological parameters. Though most of these SNe lack spectroscopic classifications, in a previous paper we demonstrated that photometrically classified SNe can still be used to infer unbiased cosmological parameters by using a Bayesian methodology that marginalizes over core-collapse (CC) SN contamination. Our sample contains nearly twice as many SNe as the largest previous compilation of SNe Ia. Combining SNe with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) constraints from the Planck satellite, we measure the dark energy equation of state parameter w to be -0.986±0.058 (stat+sys). If we allow w to evolve with redshift as w(a) = w0 + wa(1-a), we find w0 = -0.923±0.148 and wa = -0.404±0.797. These results are consistent with measurements of cosmological parameters from the JLA and from a new analysis of 1049 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (Scolnic et al. 2017). We try four different photometric classification priors for Pan-STARRS SNe and two alternate ways of modeling the CC SN contamination, finding that none of these variants gives a w that differs by more than 1% from the baseline measurement. The systematic uncertainty on w due to marginalizing over the CC SN contamination, σwCC = 0.019, is approximately equal to the photometric calibration uncertainty and is lower than the systematic uncertainty in the SN\\,Ia dispersion model (σwdisp = 0.024). Our data provide one of the best current constraints on w, demonstrating that samples with ~5% CC SN contamination can give competitive cosmological constraints when the contaminating distribution is marginalized over in a Bayesian framework.

  18. IMPACT OF SUPERNOVA DYNAMICS ON THE νp-PROCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcones, A.; Fröhlich, C.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2012-01-01

    We study the impact of the late-time dynamical evolution of ejecta from core-collapse supernovae on νp-process nucleosynthesis. Our results are based on hydrodynamical simulations of neutrino-driven wind ejecta. Motivated by recent two-dimensional wind simulations, we vary the dynamical evolution during the νp-process and show that final abundances strongly depend on the temperature evolution. When the expansion is very fast, there is not enough time for antineutrino absorption on protons to produce enough neutrons to overcome the β + -decay waiting points and no heavy elements beyond A = 64 are produced. The wind termination shock or reverse shock dramatically reduces the expansion speed of the ejecta. This extends the period during which matter remains at relatively high temperatures and is exposed to high neutrino fluxes, thus allowing for further (p, γ) and (n, p) reactions to occur and to synthesize elements beyond iron. We find that the νp-process starts to efficiently produce heavy elements only when the temperature drops below ∼3 GK. At higher temperatures, due to the low alpha separation energy of 60 Zn (S α = 2.7 MeV) the reaction 59 Cu(p, α) 56 Ni is faster than the reaction 59 Cu(p, γ) 60 Zn. This results in the closed NiCu cycle that we identify and discuss here for the first time. We also investigate the late phase of the νp-process when the temperatures become too low to maintain proton captures. Depending on the late neutron density, the evolution to stability is dominated by β + decays or by (n, γ) reactions. In the latter case, the matter flow can even reach the neutron-rich side of stability and the isotopic composition of a given element is then dominated by neutron-rich isotopes.

  19. Supernova Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  20. DES14X3taz: A TYPE I SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA SHOWING A LUMINOUS, RAPIDLY COOLING INITIAL PRE-PEAK BUMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Castander, F. J.; Casas, R.; Prajs, S.; Papadopoulos, A.; Nichol, R. C.; Karpenka, N. V.; Bernard, S. R.; Brown, P.; Cartier, R.; Cooke, J.; Curtin, C.; Davis, T. M.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Goldstein, D. A.; González-Gaitán, S.; Gupta, R. R.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Kessler, R.; Lidman, C.; Marriner, J.; Nugent, P.; Pritchard, T. A.; Sako, M.; Smartt, S.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Thomas, R. C.; Wolf, R. C.; Zenteno, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; Costa, L. N. da; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2016-02-03

    We present DES14X3taz, a new hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN-I) discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova program, with additional photometric data provided by the Survey Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae. Spectra obtained using Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy on the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS show DES14X3taz is an SLSN-I at z = 0.608. Multi-color photometry reveals a double-peaked light curve: a blue and relatively bright initial peak that fades rapidly prior to the slower rise of the main light curve. Our multi-color photometry allows us, for the first time, to show that the initial peak cools from 22,000 to 8000 K over 15 rest-frame days, and is faster and brighter than any published core-collapse supernova, reaching 30% of the bolometric luminosity of the main peak. No physical Ni-56-powered model can fit this initial peak. We show that a shock-cooling model followed by a magnetar driving the second phase of the light curve can adequately explain the entire light curve of DES14X3taz. Models involving the shock-cooling of extended circumstellar material at a distance of similar or equal to 400 R-circle dot are preferred over the cooling of shock-heated surface layers of a stellar envelope. We compare DES14X3taz to the few double-peaked SLSN-I events in the literature. Although the rise. times and characteristics of these initial peaks differ, there exists the tantalizing possibility that they can be explained by one physical interpretation

  1. Searching for Failed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Jill; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the deaths of massive stars is key to understanding both stellar evolution and the chemical enrichment of the universe. Only by monitoring all the massive stars in a large sample over years are we able to take a statistical approach to the deaths of massive stars and possibly observe the rare phenomenon of a failed supernova, a massive star that collapses to form a black hole without a SN explosion. To this end, we have been monitoring 25 galaxies within 10 Mpc with the Large Binocular Telescope for the past 4 years. Analyzing the data using image subtraction, we monitor the fate of all ~106 evolved supergiants in these galaxies to obtain limits on the rate of failed supernovae. We search for stars that have "vanished'' over the course of our survey, by examining all stars showing a decrease in luminosity of ΔνLν ≥ 104L⊙ from the first to the last observation. If we can detect the variable source in our last observation, it is not considered a vanished supergiant or failed supernova. We also identify sources that have increased in luminosity by this same amount, allowing us to estimate our false-positive rates. In addition to the search that does not require a particular signature, we also search for the low luminosity, long period transients predicted by Lovegrove & Woosley (2013) for failed explosions of red supergiants. Among many other applications, the survey also provides photometry of SN progenitors and the first light curves of these stars. Here I present the first results of the survey and provide the first direct limits on the rate of failed supernovae.

  2. Supernova olivine from cometary dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-07-29

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  3. Supernova Cosmology Without Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Rick; Rykoff, Eli; Rozo, Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Present and future supernovae (SN) surveys face several challenges: the ability to acquire redshifts of either the SN or its host galaxy, the ability to classify a SN without a spectrum, and unknown relations between SN luminosity and host galaxy type. We present here a new approach that addresses these challenges. From the large sample of SNe discovered and measured by the Dark Energy Survey (DES), we cull the sample to only supernovae (SNe) located in luminous red galaxies (LRGs). For these galaxies, photometric redshift estimates are expected to be accurate to a standard deviation of 0.02x(1+z). In addition, only Type Ia Supernovae are expected to exist in these galaxies, thereby providing a pure SNIa sample. Furthermore, we can combine this high-redshift sample with a low-redshift SN sample of only SNe located in LRGs, thereby producing a sample that is less sensitive to host galaxy relations because the host galaxy demographic is consistent across the redshift range. We find that the current DES sample has ~250 SNe in LRGs, a similar amount to current SNIa samples used to measure cosmological parameters. We present our method to produce a photometric-only Hubble diagram and measure cosmological parameters. Finally, we discuss systematic uncertainties from this approach, and forecast constraints from this method for LSST, which should have a sample roughly 200 times as large.

  4. Supernovae theory: study of electro-weak processes during gravitational collapse of massive stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantina, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The physics of supernova requires the understanding of both the complex hydrodynamical phenomena (such as transfer of energy, neutrino transport, shock) as well as the microphysics related to the dense and hot matter. In the framework of type II Supernovae theory, currently most of numerical simulations that simulate the supernova core collapse up to the formation and propagation of the shock wave fail to reproduce the observed explosion of the outer layers of massive stars. The reason for that could be due both to hydrodynamical phenomena such as rotation, convection, and general relativity, and to some micro-physical processes involved in the picture and not yet completely understood. The aim of this work is to investigate some of these micro-physical inputs, namely the electro-weak processes, that play a crucial role during the gravitational collapse and to analyse their effects by means of hydrodynamical simulations. Among nuclear processes which occur in core-collapse supernova, the most important electro-weak process taking place during the collapse is the electron capture; it occurs both on free protons and on protons bound in nuclei. This capture is essential to determine the evolution of the lepton fraction of the core during the neutronization phase. It affects the efficiency of the bounce and, as a consequence, the strength of the shock wave. Moreover, both the equation of state of supernova matter and electron capture rates in nuclei are modified by the effective mass of nucleons in nuclei, induced by many-body correlations in the dense medium, and its temperature dependence. In the first part of the thesis, a nuclear model aimed at studying the nuclear effective mass is presented. We show how we have included in a energy density functional (EDF) approach a surface-peaked nucleon effective mass to mimic some effects beyond Hartree-Fock. We have added a term to the Skyrme functional, in order to reproduce the enhancement of the effective mass at the

  5. AGAINST THE WIND: RADIO LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE INTERACTING WITH LOW-DENSITY CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Chelsea E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasen, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    For decades a wide variety of observations spanning the radio through optical and on to the X-ray have attempted to uncover signs of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). The goal of these studies is to constrain the nature of the hypothesized SN Ia mass-donor companion. A continuous CSM is typically assumed when interpreting observations of interaction. However, while such models have been successfully applied to core-collapse SNe, the assumption of continuity may not be accurate for SNe Ia, because shells of CSM could be formed by pre-supernova eruptions (novae). In this work, we model the interaction of SNe with a spherical, low-density, finite-extent CSM and create a suite of synthetic radio synchrotron light curves. We find that CSM shells produce sharply peaked light curves. We also identify a fiducial set of models that obey a common evolution and can be used to generate radio light curves for an interaction with an arbitrary shell. The relations obeyed by the fiducial models can be used to deduce CSM properties from radio observations; we demonstrate this by applying them to the nondetections of SN 2011fe and SN 2014J. Finally, we explore a multiple shell CSM configuration and describe its more complicated dynamics and the resultant radio light curves.

  6. AGAINST THE WIND: RADIO LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE INTERACTING WITH LOW-DENSITY CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Chelsea E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasen, Daniel N., E-mail: chelseaharris@berkeley.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    For decades a wide variety of observations spanning the radio through optical and on to the X-ray have attempted to uncover signs of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). The goal of these studies is to constrain the nature of the hypothesized SN Ia mass-donor companion. A continuous CSM is typically assumed when interpreting observations of interaction. However, while such models have been successfully applied to core-collapse SNe, the assumption of continuity may not be accurate for SNe Ia, because shells of CSM could be formed by pre-supernova eruptions (novae). In this work, we model the interaction of SNe with a spherical, low-density, finite-extent CSM and create a suite of synthetic radio synchrotron light curves. We find that CSM shells produce sharply peaked light curves. We also identify a fiducial set of models that obey a common evolution and can be used to generate radio light curves for an interaction with an arbitrary shell. The relations obeyed by the fiducial models can be used to deduce CSM properties from radio observations; we demonstrate this by applying them to the nondetections of SN 2011fe and SN 2014J. Finally, we explore a multiple shell CSM configuration and describe its more complicated dynamics and the resultant radio light curves.

  7. Time-resolved 2-million-year-old supernova activity discovered in Earth’s microfossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Peter; Bishop, Shawn; Egli, Ramon; Chernenko, Valentyna; Deneva, Boyana; Faestermann, Thomas; Famulok, Nicolai; Fimiani, Leticia; Gómez-Guzmán, José Manuel; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther; Hanzlik, Marianne; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars (M≳10 M⊙), which terminate their evolution as core-collapse supernovae, are theoretically predicted to eject >10−5M⊙ of the radioisotope 60Fe (half-life 2.61 Ma). If such an event occurs sufficiently close to our solar system, traces of the supernova debris could be deposited on Earth. Herein, we report a time-resolved 60Fe signal residing, at least partially, in a biogenic reservoir. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, this signal was found through the direct detection of live 60Fe atoms contained within secondary iron oxides, among which are magnetofossils, the fossilized chains of magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacteria. The magnetofossils were chemically extracted from two Pacific Ocean sediment drill cores. Our results show that the 60Fe signal onset occurs around 2.6 Ma to 2.8 Ma, near the lower Pleistocene boundary, terminates around 1.7 Ma, and peaks at about 2.2 Ma. PMID:27503888

  8. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab /Rome U.; Mocioiu, Irina; /Penn State U.; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  9. Disturbance Ecology from nearby Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, D. H.; Kretschmer, K.; Diehl, R.

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of Galactic Supernovae are carried out to study the rate of nearby events, which may have a direct effect on Earth's ecology though ionizing radiation and cosmic ray bombardment. A nearby supernova may have left a radioactive imprint (60Fe) in recent galactic history.

  10. Cosmic Ray Production in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. M.; Ellison, D. C.; Marcowith, A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    We give a brief review of the origin and acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs), emphasizing the production of CRs at different stages of supernova evolution by the first-order Fermi shock acceleration mechanism. We suggest that supernovae with trans-relativistic outflows, despite being rather rare, may accelerate CRs to energies above 10^{18} eV over the first year of their evolution. Supernovae in young compact clusters of massive stars, and interaction powered superluminous supernovae, may accelerate CRs well above the PeV regime. We discuss the acceleration of the bulk of the galactic CRs in isolated supernova remnants and re-acceleration of escaped CRs by the multiple shocks present in superbubbles produced by associations of OB stars. The effects of magnetic field amplification by CR driven instabilities, as well as superdiffusive CR transport, are discussed for nonthermal radiation produced by nonlinear shocks of all speeds including trans-relativistic ones.

  11. Nuclear astrophysics of supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, I'll give a general introduction to Supernova Theory, beginning with the presupernova evolution and ending with the later stages of the explosion. This will be distilled from a colloquium type of talk. It is necessary to have the whole supernova picture in one's mind's eye when diving into some of its nooks and crannies, as it is quite a mess of contradictory ingredients. We will have some discussion of supernova 1987a, but will keep our discussion more general. Second, we'll look at the infall and bounce of the star, seeing why it goes unstable, what dynamics it follows as it collapses, and how and why it bounces back. From there, we will go on to look at the equation of state (EOS) in more detail. We'll consider the cases T = 0 and T > 0. We'll focus on /rho/ 0 , and then /rho/ > /rho/ 0 and the EOS of neutron stars, and whether or not they contain cores of strange matter. There are many things we could discuss here and not enough time. If I had more lectures, the remaining time would focus on two more questions of special interest to nuclear physicists: the electron capture reactions and neutrino transport. If time permitted, we'd have some discussion of the nucleosynthetic reactions in the explosion's debris as well. However, we cannot cover such material adequately, and I have chosen these topics because they are analytically tractable, pedagogically useful, and rather important. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Supernovae Discovery Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Colin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract:We present supernovae (SN) search efficiency measurements for recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) surveys. Efficiency is a key component to any search, and is important parameter as a correction factor for SN rates. To achieve an accurate value for efficiency, many supernovae need to be discoverable in surveys. This cannot be achieved from real SN only, due to their scarcity, so fake SN are planted. These fake supernovae—with a goal of realism in mind—yield an understanding of efficiency based on position related to other celestial objects, and brightness. To improve realism, we built a more accurate model of supernovae using a point-spread function. The next improvement to realism is planting these objects close to galaxies and of various parameters of brightness, magnitude, local galactic brightness and redshift. Once these are planted, a very accurate SN is visible and discoverable by the searcher. It is very important to find factors that affect this discovery efficiency. Exploring the factors that effect detection yields a more accurate correction factor. Further inquires into efficiency give us a better understanding of image processing, searching techniques and survey strategies, and result in an overall higher likelihood to find these events in future surveys with Hubble, James Webb, and WFIRST telescopes. After efficiency is discovered and refined with many unique surveys, it factors into measurements of SN rates versus redshift. By comparing SN rates vs redshift against the star formation rate we can test models to determine how long star systems take from the point of inception to explosion (delay time distribution). This delay time distribution is compared to SN progenitors models to get an accurate idea of what these stars were like before their deaths.

  13. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  14. Dust in Supernovae and Supernova Remnants I: Formation Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, A.; Matsuura, M.; Micelotta, E. R.

    2018-04-01

    Supernovae are considered as prime sources of dust in space. Observations of local supernovae over the past couple of decades have detected the presence of dust in supernova ejecta. The reddening of the high redshift quasars also indicate the presence of large masses of dust in early galaxies. Considering the top heavy IMF in the early galaxies, supernovae are assumed to be the major contributor to these large amounts of dust. However, the composition and morphology of dust grains formed in a supernova ejecta is yet to be understood with clarity. Moreover, the dust masses inferred from observations in mid-infrared and submillimeter wavelength regimes differ by two orders of magnitude or more. Therefore, the mechanism responsible for the synthesis of molecules and dust in such environments plays a crucial role in studying the evolution of cosmic dust in galaxies. This review summarises our current knowledge of dust formation in supernova ejecta and tries to quantify the role of supernovae as dust producers in a galaxy.

  15. Dusty supernovae running the thermodynamics of the matter reinserted within young and massive super stellar clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Martínez-González, Sergio; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Palouš, Jan; Wünsch, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Following the observational and theoretical evidence that points at core-collapse supernovae (SNe) as major producers of dust, here we calculate the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted within young and massive super stellar clusters under the assumption of gas and dust radiative cooling. The large SN rate expected in massive clusters allows for a continuous replenishment of dust immersed in the high temperature thermalized reinserted matter and warrants a stationary presence of dust within the cluster volume during the type II SN era. We first show that such a balance determines the range of the dust-to-gas-mass ratio, and thus the dust cooling law. We then search for the critical line that separates stationary cluster winds from the bimodal cases in the cluster mechanical luminosity (or cluster mass) versus cluster size parameter space. In the latter, strong radiative cooling reduces considerably the cluster wind mechanical energy output and affects particularly the cluster central regions, leading to frequent thermal instabilities that diminish the pressure and inhibit the exit of the reinserted matter. Instead, matter accumulates there and is expected to eventually lead to gravitational instabilities and to further stellar formation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. The main outcome of the calculations is that the critical line is almost two orders of magnitude or more, depending on the assumed value of V A∞ , lower than when only gas radiative cooling is applied. And thus, many massive clusters are predicted to enter the bimodal regime.

  16. THE DISCOVERY OF THE MOST DISTANT KNOWN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT REDSHIFT 1.914

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, David O.; Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Mobasher, Bahram; Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Koekemoer, Anton; McCully, Curtis; Keeton, Charles R.; Patel, Brandon; Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hjorth, Jens; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wiklind, Tommy G.; Challis, Peter; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian; Garnavich, Peter; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift z = 1.914 from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify this object as a SN Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse SNe. Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the ΛCDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of z > 1.5 SNe Ia using HST grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe II, but distinguishing between SNe Ia and SNe Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic classification methods can aid the determination of SN rates and cosmological parameters from the full high-redshift CANDELS SN sample.

  17. Nonstandard neutrino self-interactions in a supernova and fast flavor conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighe, Amol; Sen, Manibrata

    2018-02-01

    We study the effects of nonstandard self-interactions (NSSI) of neutrinos streaming out of a core-collapse supernova. We show that with NSSI, the standard linear stability analysis gives rise to linearly as well as exponentially growing solutions. For a two-box spectrum, we demonstrate analytically that flavor-preserving NSSI lead to a suppression of bipolar collective oscillations. In the intersecting four-beam model, we show that flavor-violating NSSI can lead to fast oscillations even when the angle between the neutrino and antineutrino beams is obtuse, which is forbidden in the standard model. This leads to the new possibility of fast oscillations in a two-beam system with opposing neutrino-antineutrino fluxes, even in the absence of any spatial inhomogeneities. Finally, we solve the full nonlinear equations of motion in the four-beam model numerically, and explore the interplay of fast and slow flavor conversions in the long-time behavior, in the presence of NSSI.

  18. The discovery of the most distant known type Ia supernova at redshift 1.914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Dennis; Rodney, S.A.; Riess, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift z = 1.914 from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify...... this object as a SN Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse SNe. Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the ¿CDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of z > 1.5 SNe Ia using HST...... grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe II, but distinguishing between SNe Ia and SNe Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic...

  19. The Search for Supernova Signatures in an Ice Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, A.L.; Boyd, R.N.; Davis, M.E.; Thompson, L.G.; Davis, A.M.; Lewis, R.S.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that ice cores may preserve detectable enhancements of some terrestrially rare radioisotopes, 10 Be, 26 Al, 36 Cl, resulting from a near-Earth core-collapse supernova(SN) [J. Ellis, B.D. Fields and D.N. Schramm, Astrophys. J. 470 (1996) 1227]. Both 10 Be and 36 Cl are also produced by atmospheric cosmic ray spallation and hence are influenced by processes that modulate the Earth's cosmic ray flux. Previous studies [G.M. Raisbeck, F. Yiou, D. Bourles, C. Lorius, J. Jouzel and N. I. Barkov, Nature 326 (1987) 273], [L.G. Thompson, T. Yao, M.E. Davis, K.A. Henderson, E. Mosley-Thompson, P.-N. Lin, J. Beer, H.-A. Synal, J. Cole-Dai and J.F. Bolzan, Science 276 (1997) 1821] have suggested that enhancements occurred in the 10 Be and 36 Cl fluxes at ∼35 ky and at ∼60 ky for 10 Be. Thus we have searched for potential SN condensates with 26 Al amongst grains filtered from the 308.6m Guliya ice core recovered from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau in China [L.G. Thompson, T. Yao, M.E. Davis, K.A. Henderson, E. Mosley-Thompson, P.-N. Lin, J. Beer, H.-A. Synal, J. Cole-Dai and J.F. Bolzan, Science 276 (1997) 1821]. We searched for potential core-collapse SN condensate grains corundum (Al 2 O 3 ), hibonite (CaAl 12 O 19 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) (see [D.S. Ebel and L. Grossman, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 65 (2001) 469]) in Guliya grain samples from the following time periods: ∼2-10 ky, ∼25-27 ky, ∼34-36 ky, ∼53-57 ky, ∼59-62 ky and ∼68-72 ky. These minerals are rare among terrestrial rocks and fine-grained atmospheric dust of terrestrial origin. Furthermore, they are insoluble in the acids employed in the sample preparation process and therefore separable from other minerals, such as silicates, that have high terrestrial abundances. Candidate SN condensate grains were identified among their terrestrial diluents employing a procedure developed at the University of Chicago for detecting presolar grains in meteoritic samples [S. Amari, R.S. Lewis and

  20. The nearby supernova factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Aldering, G.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Siegrist, J.; Wang, L.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Copin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Gangler, E.; Castera, A.; Adam, G.; Bacon, R.; Lemonnier, J.-P.; Pecontal, A.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.08. This program will provide an exceptional data set of well-studied SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to ∼12 SNe/month in 2003

  1. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  2. A Massive Shell of Supernova-formed Dust in SNR G54.1+0.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temim, Tea [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Slane, Patrick; Raymond, John C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gelfand, Joseph D. [New York University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2017-02-10

    While theoretical models of dust condensation predict that most refractory elements produced in core-collapse supernovae (SNe) efficiently condense into dust, a large quantity of dust has so far only been observed in SN 1987A. We present an analysis of observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope , Herschel Space Observatory , Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and AKARI of the infrared shell surrounding the pulsar wind nebula in the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. We attribute a distinctive spectral feature at 21 μ m to a magnesium silicate grain species that has been invoked in modeling the ejecta-condensed dust in Cas A, which exhibits the same spectral signature. If this species is responsible for producing the observed spectral feature and accounts for a significant fraction of the observed infrared continuum, we find that it would be the dominant constituent of the dust in G54.1+0.3, with possible secondary contributions from other compositions, such as carbon, silicate, or alumina grains. The total mass of SN-formed dust required by this model is at least 0.3 M {sub ⊙}. We discuss how these results may be affected by varying dust grain properties and self-consistent grain heating models. The spatial distribution of the dust mass and temperature in G54.1+0.3 confirms the scenario in which the SN-formed dust has not yet been processed by the SN reverse shock and is being heated by stars belonging to a cluster in which the SN progenitor exploded. The dust mass and composition suggest a progenitor mass of 16–27 M {sub ⊙} and imply a high dust condensation efficiency, similar to that found for Cas A and SN 1987A. The study provides another example of significant dust formation in a Type IIP SN explosion and sheds light on the properties of pristine SN-condensed dust.

  3. Dust destruction by the reverse shock in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, which are potentially capable of producing 1 M⊙ of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift Universe. Aims: We identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. Methods: We use analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock with special application to the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). We assume that the dust resides in cool oxygen-rich clumps, which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta), and that the dust consists of silicates (MgSiO3) and amorphous carbon grains. The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. Results: We find that 11.8 and 15.9 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the centre of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will therefore differ for different types of supernovae.

  4. Nucleosynthesis in pair creation supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Eid, M.F.

    1986-07-01

    The investigation of the possibility that some of the oxygen-rich supernova remnants may have been produced by exploding Wolf-Rayet stars via electron-positron pair creation supernovae, requires detailed informations about the heavy element production in such events. This problem is discussed in this contribution, and it is in particular emphasized that for an exploding Wolf-Rayet star of about 50 Solar mass the synthesis of radioactive species (especially 56 Ni) is probably negligible; hence radioactive decay is unlikely to power the optical luminosity of the supernova

  5. Supernova 1987A: The Supernova of a Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Supernova 1987A, the brightest supernova since Kepler's in 1604, was detected 30 years ago at a distance of 160 000 light years in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. Visible with the naked eye and detected with the full range of technology constructed since Kepler's time, SN 1987A has continued to be a rich source of empirical information to help understand supernova explosions and their evolution into supernova remnants. While the light output has faded by a factor of 10 000 000 over those 30 years, instrumentation, like the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array has continued to improve so that this supernova continues to be visible in X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light and in radio emission. In this review, I will sketch what has been learned from these observations about the pre-supernova star and its final stages of evolution, the explosion physics, the energy sources for emission, and the shock physics as the expanding debris encounters the circumstellar ring that was created about 20 000 years before the explosion. Today, SN 1987A is making the transition to a supernova remnant- the energetics are no longer dominated by the radioactive elements produced in the explosion, but by the interaction of the expanding debris with the surrounding gas. While we are confident that the supernova explosion had its origin in gravitational collapse, careful searches for a compact object at the center of the remnant place upper limits of a few solar luminosities on that relic. Support for HST GO programs 13401 and 13405 was provided by NASA through grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, U [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM). Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); D' Olivo, J C [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM). Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cabral-Rosetti, L G [Departamento de Posgrado, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigacion y Docencia en Educacion Tecnica (CIIDET), Av. Universidad 282 Pte., Col. Centro, A. Postal 752, C.P. 76000, Santiago de Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2006-05-15

    The type II supernova is considered as a candidate site for the production of heavy elements. The nucleosynthesis occurs in an intense neutrino flux, we calculate the electron fraction in this environment.

  7. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, U; D'Olivo, J C; Cabral-Rosetti, L G

    2006-01-01

    The type II supernova is considered as a candidate site for the production of heavy elements. The nucleosynthesis occurs in an intense neutrino flux, we calculate the electron fraction in this environment

  8. Multi-frequency study of the newly confirmed supernova remnant MCSNR J0512-6707 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Points, S. D.; Filipović, M. D.; Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Crawford, E. J.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We present a multi-frequency study of the supernova remnant MCSNR J0512-6707 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: We used new data from XMM-Newton to characterise the X-ray emission and data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array, the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey, and Spitzer to gain a picture of the environment into which the remnant is expanding. We performed a morphological study, determined radio polarisation and magnetic field orientation, and performed an X-ray spectral analysis. Results: We estimated the remnant's size to be 24.9 ( ± 1.5) × 21.9 ( ± 1.5) pc, with the major axis rotated ~29° east of north. Radio polarisation images at 3 cm and 6 cm indicate a higher degree of polarisation in the northwest and southeast tangentially oriented to the SNR shock front, indicative of an SNR compressing the magnetic field threading the interstellar medium. The X-ray spectrum is unusual as it requires a soft (~0.2 keV) collisional ionisation equilibrium thermal plasma of interstellar medium abundance, in addition to a harder component. Using our fit results and the Sedov dynamical model, we showed that the thermal emission is not consistent with a Sedov remnant. We suggested that the thermal X-rays can be explained by MCSNR J0512-6707 having initially evolved into a wind-blown cavity and is now interacting with the surrounding dense shell. The origin of the hard component remains unclear. We could not determine the supernova type from the X-ray spectrum. Indirect evidence for the type is found in the study of the local stellar population and star formation history in the literature, which suggests a core-collapse origin. Conclusions: MCSNR J0512-6707 likely resulted from the core-collapse of high mass progenitor which carved a low density cavity into its surrounding medium, with the soft X-rays resulting from the impact of the blast wave with the surrounding shell. The unusual hard X-ray component requires deeper and higher spatial

  9. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  10. Supernova 1998bw In ESO 184-G82. Repr. from Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams, no. 6969,10 Jul. 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, L. E.; Halpern, Jules P.; Leighly, K. M.; Heathcote, S.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the wavelength range 390-750 nm, we measure intrinsic linear polarization of 0.53 +/- 0.08 percent at position angle 49 +/- 3 deg, after correcting for Galactic interstellar polarization using the star HD 184100, which has polarization of 0.75 +/- 0.01 percent at p.a. 176.5 +/- 2.5 deg. This measured interstellar polarization is consistent with the Galactic extinction in this direction, estimated to be E(B-V) = 0.059 from IRAS maps, or E(B-V) = 0.079 from 21-cm H I. Interstellar polarization in the host galaxy ESO 184-G82 is expected to be negligible based on the relative absence of Na I D absorption at z = 0.00841 +/- 0.00005, the redshift of the environment of the supernova from narrow H II region emission lines in its spectrum. Polarization appears highest in between emission features in the total flux spectrum, which strengthens the interpretation of the polarization as intrinsic to the supernova. This modest polarization is less than that of some type-II supernovae, but greater than that of type-Ia supernovae, which are generally unpolarized. This supports the interpretation of SN 1998bw, a peculiar type-Ic supernova, as a core-collapse event in which the observed polarization is due to moderate asymmetry in either the photosphere of the ejecta or an overlying scattering envelope. However, this result does not strongly constrain arguments about whether some supernovae emit gamma-ray bursts, since such emission may come from a mildly relativistic shock associated with the radio emission and above the optical photosphere, without any requirements on beaming or orientation." A. V. Filippenko, University of California at Berkeley, comments on the total flux spectrum obtained above: "The spectrum most closely resembles those of the peculiar SN 1997ef, but perhaps evolving more slowly. It is not typical of type-Ic supernovae; indeed, the spectrum does not match any of the known spectral classes, but perhaps 'peculiar type Ic' is the best choice at this time

  11. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Baghram, Shant [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Habibi, Farhang, E-mail: h.ghodsi@mehr.sharif.ir, E-mail: baghram@sharif.edu, E-mail: habibi@lal.in2p3.fr [LAL-IN2P3/CNRS, BP 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2017-10-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Using the Union2.1 data set at all redshifts, we compare the spectrum of the residuals of the observed distance moduli to that expected from an isotropic universe affected by the Union2.1 observational uncertainties at low multipoles. Through this comparison we find a dipolar anisotropy with tension of less that 2σ towards l = 171° ± 21° and b = −26° ± 28° which is mainly induced by anisotropic spatial distribution of the SNe with z > 0.2 rather than being a cosmic effect. Furthermore, we find a tension of ∼ 4σ at ℓ = 4 between the two spectra. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming surveys like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipolar anisotropy that would be detectable by future SNe Ia surveys.

  12. Supernovae. Old supernova dust factory revealed at the Galactic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R M; Herter, T L; Morris, M R; Li, Z; Adams, J D

    2015-04-24

    Dust formation in supernova ejecta is currently the leading candidate to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the distant, early universe. However, it is unclear whether the ejecta-formed dust can survive the hot interior of the supernova remnant (SNR). We present infrared observations of ~0.02 solar masses of warm (~100 kelvin) dust seen near the center of the ~10,000-year-old Sagittarius A East SNR at the Galactic center. Our findings indicate the detection of dust within an older SNR that is expanding into a relatively dense surrounding medium (electron density ~10(3) centimeters(-3)) and has survived the passage of the reverse shock. The results suggest that supernovae may be the dominant dust-production mechanism in the dense environment of galaxies of the early universe. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. A New Method to Constrain Supernova Fractions Using X-ray Observations of Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Loewenstein, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions enrich the intracluster medium (ICM) both by creating and dispersing metals. We introduce a method to measure the number of SNe and relative contribution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and core-collapse supernovae (SNe cc) by directly fitting X-ray spectral observations. The method has been implemented as an XSPEC model called snapec. snapec utilizes a single-temperature thermal plasma code (apec) to model the spectral emission based on metal abundances calculated using the latest SN yields from SN Ia and SN cc explosion models. This approach provides a self-consistent single set of uncertainties on the total number of SN explosions and relative fraction of SN types in the ICM over the cluster lifetime by directly allowing these parameters to be determined by SN yields provided by simulations. We apply our approach to XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC), Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS), and 200 ks simulated Astro-H observations of a cooling flow cluster, A3112.We find that various sets of SN yields present in the literature produce an acceptable fit to the EPIC and RGS spectra of A3112. We infer that 30.3% plus or minus 5.4% to 37.1% plus or minus 7.1% of the total SN explosions are SNe Ia, and the total number of SN explosions required to create the observed metals is in the range of (1.06 plus or minus 0.34) x 10(exp 9), to (1.28 plus or minus 0.43) x 10(exp 9), fromsnapec fits to RGS spectra. These values may be compared to the enrichment expected based on well-established empirically measured SN rates per star formed. The proportions of SNe Ia and SNe cc inferred to have enriched the ICM in the inner 52 kiloparsecs of A3112 is consistent with these specific rates, if one applies a correction for the metals locked up in stars. At the same time, the inferred level of SN enrichment corresponds to a star-to-gas mass ratio that is several times greater than the 10% estimated globally for clusters in the A3112 mass range.

  14. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-10-28

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Educational Resources on Supernovae for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, James T.

    The National Science Education Standards (1996, National Academy Press) suggest mention of objects like the ``sun, moon, stars" in grades K-4 and element formation in grades 9-12. Children's librarians and some astronomy librarians should know about some of the resources for children on supernovae not only because supernovae are critical to higher element formation, but also to educate others about the universe's expansion and stars. In addition, basic bibliometrics on these resources yields lessons on the importance of using many indexes, the pattern of literature for children on supernovae, the types of resources on supernovae, and the scattering of resources/information for children on supernovae.

  16. The r-process and neutrino-heated supernova ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, S. E.; Wilson, J. R.; Mathews, G. J.; Hoffman, R. D.; Meyer, B. S.

    1994-01-01

    As a neutron star is formed by the collapse of the iron core of a massive star, its Kelvin-Helmholtz evolution is characterized by the release of gravitational binding energy as neutrinos. The interaction of these neutrinos with heated material above the neutron star generates a hot bubble in an atmosphere that is nearly in hydrostatic equilibrium and heated, after approximately 10 s, to an entropy of S/N(sub AS)k greater than or approximately = 400. The neutron-to-proton ratio for material moving outward through this bubble is set by the balance between neutrino and antineutrino capture on nucleons. Because the electron antineutrino spectrum at this time is hotter than the electron neutrino spectrum, the bubble is neutron-rich (0.38 less than or approximately = Y(sub e) less than or approximately = 0.47). Previous work using a schematic model has shown that these conditions are well suited to the production of heavy elements by the r-process. In this paper we have advanced the numerical modeling of a 20 solar mass 'delayed' supernova explosion to the point that we can follow the detailed evolution of material moving through the bubble at the late times appropiate to r-process nucleosynthesis. The supernova model predicts a final kinetic energy for the ejecta of 1.5 x 10(exp 51) ergs and leaves behind a remnant with a baryon mass of 1.50 solar mass (and a gravitational mass of 1.445 solar mass). We follow the thermodynamic and compositional evolution of 40 trajectories in rho(t), T(t), Y(sub e)(t) for a logarithmic grid of mass elements for the last approximately = 0.03 solar mass to be ejected by the proto-neutron star down to the last less than 10(exp -6) solar mass of material expelled at up to approximately = 18 s after core collapse. We find that an excellent fit to the solar r-process abundance distribution is obtained with no adjustable parameters in the nucleosynthesis calculations. Moreover, the abundances are produced in the quantities required to account

  17. Systematic Blueshift of Line Profiles in the Type IIn Supernova 2010jl: Evidence for Post-shock Dust Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cooper, Michael C.; Matheson, Thomas; Bian, Fuyan; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Comerford, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe) show spectral evidence for strong interaction between their blast wave and dense circumstellar material (CSM) around the progenitor star. SN 2010jl was the brightest core-collapse supernova in 2010, and it was a Type IIn explosion with strong CSM interaction. Andrews et al. recently reported evidence for an infrared (IR) excess in SN 2010jl, indicating either new dust formation or the heating of CSM dust in an IR echo. Here we report multi-epoch spectra of SN 2010jl that reveal the tell-tale signature of new dust formation: emission-line profiles becoming systematically more blueshifted as the red side of the line is blocked by increasing extinction. The effect is seen clearly in the intermediate-width (400-4000 km s-1) component of Hα beginning roughly 30 days after explosion. Moreover, we present near-IR spectra demonstrating that the asymmetry in the hydrogen-line profiles is wavelength dependent, appearing more pronounced at shorter wavelengths. This evidence suggests that new dust grains had formed quickly in the post-shock shell of SN 2010jl arising from CSM interaction. Since the observed dust temperature has been attributed to an IR echo and not to new dust, either (1) IR excess emission at λ sensitive tracer of new dust formation in SNe, or (2) some assumptions about expected dust temperatures might require further study. Lastly, we discuss one possible mechanism other than dust that might lead to increasingly blueshifted line profiles in SNe IIn, although the wavelength dependence of the asymmetry argues against this hypothesis in the case of SN 2010jl.

  18. The supernova remnant W49B as seen with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Katsuta, J.

    2018-04-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) W49B originated from a core-collapse supernova that occurred between one and four thousand years ago, and subsequently evolved into a mixed-morphology remnant, which is interacting with molecular clouds (MC). Gamma-ray observations of SNR-MC associations are a powerful tool to constrain the origin of Galactic cosmic rays, as they can probe the acceleration of hadrons through their interaction with the surrounding medium and subsequent emission of non-thermal photons. We report the detection of a γ-ray source coincident with W49B at very high energies (VHE; E > 100 GeV) with the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes together with a study of the source with five years of Fermi-LAT high-energy γ-ray (0.06-300 GeV) data. The smoothly connected, combined source spectrum, measured from 60 MeV to multi-TeV energies, shows two significant spectral breaks at 304 ± 20 MeV and 8.4-2.5+2.2 GeV; the latter is constrained by the joint fit from the two instruments. The detected spectral features are similar to those observed in several other SNR-MC associations and are found to be indicative of γ-ray emission produced through neutral-pion decay. The H.E.S.S. gamma-ray excess map (see Fig. 1, in FITS format) of the W49 region is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A5

  19. ASPHERICITY, INTERACTION, AND DUST IN THE TYPE II-P/II-L SUPERNOVA 2013EJ IN MESSIER 74

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shivvers, Isaac [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Johansson, Joel [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl St., Rehovot (Israel); Hu, Maokai; Wang, Lifan [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Fox, Ori D., E-mail: mauerhan@astro.berkeley.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multiepoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ∼800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstellar dust. We suggest that interaction with an equatorial distribution of CSM, perhaps the result of binary evolution, is responsible for generating the photospheric asphericity. Relatedly, our late-time optical imaging and spectroscopy show that asymmetric CSM interaction is ongoing, and the morphology of broad H α emission from shock-excited ejecta provides additional evidence that the geometry of the interaction region is ellipsoidal. Alternatively, a prolate ellipsoidal geometry from an intrinsically bipolar explosion is also a plausible interpretation of the data but would probably require a ballistic jet of radioactive material capable of penetrating the hydrogen envelope early in the recombination phase. Finally, our latest space-based optical imaging confirms that the late interaction-powered light curve dropped below the stellar progenitor level, confirming the RSG star’s association with the explosion.

  20. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  1. The great supernova of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Despite their apparently very different objectives, astrophysics - the study of the largest structures in the Universe - and particle physics - the study of the smallest - have always had common ground. On 23 February 1987 a supernova explosion provided additional impetus to reinforce these links. In this article, David Schramm of the University of Chicago and the NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, explains why

  2. Physical processes in young supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransson, C.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis consists of four papers on the physical processes in expanding type II supernova envelopes and their environment. Recent observations have shown that type II supernovae are surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas, and most of the thesis discusses the interaction of the expanding supernova envelope with this gas. It is found that the resulting shock wave will emit most of its energy as Comptonized EUV radiation plus soft X-rays. This radiation ionizes and heats the circumstellar gas as well as the supernova envelope. The conversion of the Comptonized EUV emission to line emission as a function of time provides an important test of the model. To compare with the UV observations, the line profiles from the various regions are calculated. The X-ray emission and its absorption by the circumstellar gas are shown to give important information on both the shock wave and the environment. Paper I deals with the structure of the shockwave, its emission and absorption of the X-rays by the circumstellar gas. In Paper II the line profiles are calculated and are compared with the observations. Paper III discussed the UV observations, and a simplified analysis of the physical conditions in the gas is given. Finally in paper IV the X-ray emission from the shock, the structure of the envelope and the strengths of the UV emission lines as a function of time are studied. (Author)

  3. Molecular clouds near supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootten, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The physical properties of molecular clouds near supernova remnants were investigated. Various properties of the structure and kinematics of these clouds are used to establish their physical association with well-known remmnants. An infrared survey of the most massive clouds revealed embedded objects, probably stars whose formation was induced by the supernova blast wave. In order to understand the relationship between these and other molecular clouds, a control group of clouds was also observed. Excitation models for dense regions of all the clouds are constructed to evaluate molecular abundances in these regions. Those clouds that have embedded stars have lower molecular abundances than the clouds that do not. A cloud near the W28 supernova remnant also has low abundances. Molecular abundances are used to measure an important parameter, the electron density, which is not directly observable. In some clouds extensive deuterium fractionation is observed which confirms electron density measurements in those clouds. Where large deuterium fractionation is observed, the ionization rate in the cloud interior can also be measured. The electron density and ionization rate in the cloud near W28 are higher than in most clouds. The molecular abundances and electron densities are functions of the chemical and dynamical state of evolution of the cloud. Those clouds with lowest abundances are probably the youngest clouds. As low-abundance clouds, some clouds near supernova remnants may have been recently swept from the local interstellar material. Supernova remnants provide sites for star formation in ambient clouds by compressing them, and they sweep new clouds from more diffuse local matter

  4. The initial masses of the red supergiant progenitors to Type II supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben; Beasor, Emma R.

    2018-02-01

    There are a growing number of nearby supernovae (SNe) for which the progenitor star is detected in archival pre-explosion imaging. From these images it is possible to measure the progenitor's brightness a few years before explosion, and ultimately estimate its initial mass. Previous work has shown that II-P and II-L SNe have red supergiant (RSG) progenitors, and that the range of initial masses for these progenitors seems to be limited to ≲ 17 M⊙. This is in contrast with the cut-off of 25-30 M⊙ predicted by evolutionary models, a result that is termed the `red supergiant problem'. Here we investigate one particular source of systematic error present in converting pre-explosion photometry into an initial mass, which of the bolometric correction (BC) used to convert a single-band flux into a bolometric luminosity. We show, using star clusters, that RSGs evolve to later spectral types as they approach SN, which in turn causes the BC to become larger. Failure to account for this results in a systematic underestimate of a star's luminosity, and hence its initial mass. Using our empirically motivated BCs we reappraise the II-P and II-L SNe that have their progenitors detected in pre-explosion imaging. Fitting an initial mass function to these updated masses results in an increased upper mass cut-off of Mhi = 19.0^{+2.5}_{-1.3} M⊙, with a 95 per cent upper confidence limit of <27 M⊙. Accounting for finite sample size effects and systematic uncertainties in the mass-luminosity relationship raises the cut-off to Mhi = 25 M⊙ (<33 M⊙, 95 per cent confidence). We therefore conclude that there is currently no strong evidence for `missing' high-mass progenitors to core-collapse SNe.

  5. A survey of infrared supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Ji Yeon [Academia Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Koo, Bon-Chul [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Onaka, Takashi, E-mail: jyseok@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-12-20

    We present a comprehensive infrared study of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using near- to mid-infrared images taken by Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm) and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS; 24 and 70 μm) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Among the 47 bona fide LMC SNRs, 29 were detected in infrared, giving a high detection rate of 62%. All 29 SNRs show emission at 24 μm, and 20 out of 29 show emission in one or several IRAC bands. We present their 4.5, 8, 24, and 70 μm images and a table summarizing their Spitzer fluxes. We find that the LMC SNRs are considerably fainter than the Galactic SNRs, and that, among the LMC SNRs, Type Ia SNRs are significantly fainter than core-collapse SNRs. We conclude that the MIPS emission of essentially all SNRs originates from dust emission, whereas their IRAC emissions originate from ionic/molecular lines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission, or synchrotron emission. The infrared fluxes show correlation with radio and X-ray fluxes. For SNRs that have similar morphology in infrared and X-rays, the ratios of 24 to 70 μm fluxes have good correlation with the electron density of hot plasma. The overall correlation is explained well by the emission from collisionally heated silicate grains of 0.1 μm size, but for mature SNRs with relatively low gas temperatures, the smaller-sized grain population is favored more. For those that appear different between infrared and X-rays, the emission in the MIPS bands is probably from dust heated by shock radiation.

  6. A study of the low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernova 2008bk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisakov, S. M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2017-04-01

    Supernova (SN) 2008bk is a well-observed low-luminosity Type II event visually associated with a low-mass red-supergiant progenitor. To model SN 2008bk, we evolve a 12 M⊙ star from the main sequence until core collapse, when it has a total mass of 9.88 M⊙, a He-core mass of 3.22 M⊙ and a radius of 502 R⊙. We then artificially trigger an explosion that produces 8.29 M⊙ of ejecta with a total energy of 2.5 × 1050 erg and ˜0.009 M⊙ of 56Ni. We model the subsequent evolution of the ejecta with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer. Although somewhat too luminous and energetic, this model reproduces satisfactorily the multiband light curves and multi-epoch spectra of SN 2008bk, confirming the suitability of a low-mass massive star progenitor. As in other low-luminosity SNe II, the structured Hα profile at the end of the plateau phase is probably caused by Ba II 6496.9 Å rather than asphericity. We discuss the sensitivity of our results to changes in progenitor radius and mass, as well as chemical mixing. A 15 per cent increase in progenitor radius causes a 15 per cent increase in luminosity and a 0.2 mag V-band brightening of the plateau but leaves its length unaffected. An increase in ejecta mass by 10 per cent lengthens the plateau by ˜10 d. Chemical mixing introduces slight changes to the bolometric light curve, limited to the end of the plateau, but has a large impact on colours and spectra at nebular times.

  7. Type Ibn Supernovae Show Photometric Homogeneity and Spectral Diversity at Maximum Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; McCully, Curtis; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory, 6740 Cortona Dr Ste 102, Goleta, CA 93117-5575 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616-5270 (United States); Johansson, Joel [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sollerman, Jesper; Fremling, Christoffer; Karamehmetoglu, Emir [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Pastorello, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano; Elias-Rosa, Nancy [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Cao, Yi; Duggan, Gina; Horesh, Assaf [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Fox, Ori D., E-mail: griffin@lco.global [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects in the literature to 22. We also report new data, including a near-infrared spectrum, on the Type Ibn SN 2015U. In order to characterize the class as a whole, we analyze the photometric and spectroscopic properties of the full Type Ibn sample. We find that, despite the expectation that CSM interaction would generate a heterogeneous set of light curves, as seen in SNe IIn, most Type Ibn light curves are quite similar in shape, declining at rates around 0.1 mag day{sup −1} during the first month after maximum light, with a few significant exceptions. Early spectra of SNe Ibn come in at least two varieties, one that shows narrow P Cygni lines and another dominated by broader emission lines, both around maximum light, which may be an indication of differences in the state of the progenitor system at the time of explosion. Alternatively, the spectral diversity could arise from viewing-angle effects or merely from a lack of early spectroscopic coverage. Together, the relative light curve homogeneity and narrow spectral features suggest that the CSM consists of a spatially confined shell of helium surrounded by a less dense extended wind.

  8. A common central engine for long gamma-ray bursts and Type Ib/c supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobacchi, E.; Granot, J.; Bromberg, O.; Sormani, M. C.

    2017-11-01

    Long-duration, spectrally soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with Type Ic core collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe), and thus arise from the death of massive stars. In the collapsar model, the jet launched by the central engine must bore its way out of the progenitor star before it can produce a GRB. Most of these jets do not break out, and are instead 'choked' inside the star, as the central engine activity time, te, is not long enough. Modelling the long-soft GRB duration distribution assuming a power-law distribution for their central engine activity times, ∝ t_e^{-α } for te > tb, we find a steep distribution (α ∼ 4) and a typical GRB jet breakout time of tb ∼ 60s in the star's frame. The latter suggests the presence of a low-density, extended envelope surrounding the progenitor star, similar to that previously inferred for low-luminosity GRBs. Extrapolating the range of validity of this power law below what is directly observable, to te < tb, by only a factor of ∼4-5 produces enough events to account for all Type Ib/c SNe. Such extrapolation is necessary to avoid fine-tuning the distribution of central engine activity times with the breakout time, which are presumably unrelated. We speculate that central engines launching relativistic jets may operate in all Type Ib/c SNe. In this case, the existence of a common central engine would imply that (i) the jet may significantly contribute to the energy of the SN; (ii) various observational signatures, like the asphericity of the explosion, could be directly related to jet's interaction with the star.

  9. Investigating the diversity of supernovae type Iax: a MUSE and NOT spectroscopic study of their environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, J. D.; Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Galbany, L.; Leloudas, G.; Anderson, J. P.; Eldridge, J. J.; James, P. A.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Pignata, G.; Stanway, E. R.

    2018-01-01

    SN 2002cx-like Type Ia supernovae (also known as SNe Iax) represent one of the most numerous peculiar SN classes. They differ from normal SNe Ia by having fainter peak magnitudes, faster decline rates and lower photospheric velocities, displaying a wide diversity in these properties. We present both integral-field and long-slit visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the host galaxies and explosion sites of SNe Iax to provide constraints on their progenitor formation scenarios. The SN Iax explosion-site metallicity distribution is similar to that of core-collapse SNe and metal poor compared to either normal SNe Ia or SN 1991T-like events. Fainter members, speculated to form distinctly from brighter SN Iax, are found at a range of metallicities, extending to very metal poor environments. Although the SN Iax explosion-sites' ages and star formation rates are comparatively older and less intense than the distribution of star-forming regions across their host galaxies, we confirm the presence of young stellar populations (SPs) at explosion environments for most SNe Iax, expanded here to a larger sample. Ages of the young SPs (several × 107 to 108 yr) are consistent with predictions for young thermonuclear and electron-capture SN progenitors. The lack of extremely young SPs at the explosion sites disfavours very massive progenitors such as Wolf-Rayet explosions with significant fallback. We find weak ionized gas in the only SN Iax host without obvious signs of star formation. The source of the ionization remains ambiguous but appears unlikely to be mainly due to young, massive stars.

  10. Pan-STARRS1 DISCOVERY OF TWO ULTRALUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE AT z ≈ 0.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomiuk, L.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Berger, E.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Czekala, I.; Chevalier, R. A.; Huber, M. E.; Gezari, S.; Riess, A.; Rodney, S. A.; Narayan, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Rest, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of two ultraluminous supernovae (SNe) at z ≈ 0.9 with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. These SNe, PS1-10ky and PS1-10awh, are among the most luminous SNe ever discovered, comparable to the unusual transients SN 2005ap and SCP 06F6. Like SN 2005ap and SCP 06F6, they show characteristic high luminosities (M bol ≈ –22.5 mag), blue spectra with a few broad absorption lines, and no evidence for H or He. We have constructed a full multi-color light curve sensitive to the peak of the spectral energy distribution in the rest-frame ultraviolet, and we have obtained time series spectroscopy for these SNe. Given the similarities between the SNe, we combine their light curves to estimate a total radiated energy over the course of explosion of (0.9-1.4) × 10 51 erg. We find photospheric velocities of 12,000-19,000 km s –1 with no evidence for deceleration measured across ∼3 rest-frame weeks around light curve peak, consistent with the expansion of an optically thick massive shell of material. We show that, consistent with findings for other ultraluminous SNe in this class, radioactive decay is not sufficient to power PS1-10ky, and we discuss two plausible origins for these events: the initial spin-down of a newborn magnetar in a core-collapse SN, or SN shock breakout from the dense circumstellar wind surrounding a Wolf-Rayet star.

  11. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-Cooling Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cia, Annalisa De; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with greater than 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 13 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of EM = (0.2-20) x 10(exp 51) erg/(10 M stellar mass), and have a mean energy per unit mass of E/ M = 0.85 x 10(exp 51) erg(10 stellar mass), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of Ni-56 produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate (Delta m(sub15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  12. Gamma-ray line diagnostics of supernova explosions - SN2014J and Cas A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Gamma-rays from nuclear de-excitation of newly procuced isotopes during supernovae (SNe) provide a unique window to the explosion mechanisms. SNe interiors are accessible only by γ-rays as they are energetic enough to penetrate the SN cloud. Both thermonuclear explosions (type Ia) and core-collapse SNe (CCSN, type II) are key producers of heavy elements in the Universe. In SNe Ia, a white dwarf (WD) is disrupted by ignition from inside or by triggering the explosive event from outside, producing major amounts of 56Ni. Type II SNe are powered by the gravitational collapse of a massive star, having burnt all its nuclear fuel. In this work, we present a diagnostic study of γ-ray lines from SN2014J and Cassiopeia A (Cas A). INTEGRAL observed SN2014J for several months and for the first time, it was possible to measure the characteristic lines from the 56Ni-decay chain in a SN Ia event. Surprisingly, 56Ni was seen only 20 days after the explosion which indicates that some 56Ni must be located outside the WD and not deeply embedded. We provide a 56Co γ-ray line light curve and estimate a visible 56Ni mass of 0.5 M⨀ from a comparison to 1D model light curves. Cas A observations have been revisited and we detect both, the characteristic hard X-ray line from the decay of 44Ti at 78 keV, and the subsequent γ-ray line from the decay of 44Sc at 1157 keV in one coherent data set. Expansion velocities in the range of 2000 ‑ 5000 km s‑1 and an initially synthesised 44Ti mass of 1.37 × 10‑4 M⨀ are found.

  13. Improvements to type Ia supernova models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Clare M.

    Type Ia Supernovae provided the first strong evidence of dark energy and are still an important tool for measuring the accelerated expansion of the universe. However, future improvements will be limited by systematic uncertainties in our use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles. Using Type Ia supernovae for cosmology relies on our ability to standardize their absolute magnitudes, but this relies on imperfect models of supernova spectra time series. This thesis is focused on using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory both to understand current sources of uncertainty in standardizing Type Ia supernovae and to develop techniques that can be used to limit uncertainty in future analyses. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  14. Supernova origin of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, C. L.; Houston, B. P.

    Evidence has recently been presented from gamma-ray observations for the acceleration of cosmic rays in the Loop I supernova remnant. The cosmic ray intensity thus inferred is in agreement with the predictions of the shock acceleration model of Blandford and Cowie (1980). Here, this model is examined further, specifically by comparing its predictions with the presently available information on the cosmic-ray pre-history as well as with the cosmic ray anisotropy measurements in the energy range 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 15th eV. A cosmic ray conversion efficiency of 10-20 percent is found sufficient to exlain the observations. The present study leads also to the interesting suggestion that the bump observed in the primary energy spectrum at 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 15th eV may be due to an excess contribution from local supernovae.

  15. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  16. Sins: the Supernova Intensive Study - SN1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert

    1991-07-01

    Supernovae are stars at the end of stellar evolution. They mark the moment of stellar destruction, act as the key process in the chemical evolution of the universe, serve as agitators and probes of the interstellar medium, and provide sharp and useful tools for cosmological investigations. As SN 1987A demonstrated, the best progress in this field comes from detailed study of the brightest objects. Many central problems of supernova research can be attacked by intensive and extensive observations of a handful of moderately bright supernovae using the HST cameras and spectrographs. SN 1987A provides a unique opportunity to connect the evolution of a supernova with the development of a supernova remnant and will be intensively studied in this program. Because supernovae touch on so many fields of astronomy, the results of this Supernova Intensive Study (SINS) will affect a broad range of areas from stellar interiors to cosmology so a diverse team of investigators has been assembled which includes experts on all these aspects of astronomy. While the first cycle observations concentrate on SN 1987A and on a fresh supernova to be studied at intermediate age, the second and third cycle will include target-of-opportunity observations of freshly-discovered supernovae which will strive for good UV coverage at early phases of the outburst.

  17. OT2_mmeixner_4: Atomic and Molecular Gas Observations of Supernova Remnants in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, M.

    2011-09-01

    We propose PACs and SPIRE spectroscopy of three core-collapse supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC): 1E0102-7219, N132D and N49. They are chosen to have a range of ages and degrees of interaction with nearby molecular clouds. We will use the spectroscopy to 1) constrain shock models, 2) judge the line contamination of broadband fluxes used to measure dust mass, 3) determine carbon and oxygen abundances and gas masses and 4) understand the CO ladder in cases where SNe shocks interact with molecular clouds. SNRs play a fundamental role in the evolution of galaxies: their ejecta drives the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium (ISM), and the energy liberated in their explosion drives the shock waves that generate bulk motions in the ISM, accelerate cosmic rays, regulate the star formation rate, and alters the size and properties of interstellar dust. In order to understand the life cycle of dust, which is the overarching science goal of the HERITAGE key program on the LMC and SMC, we must investigate SNR shocks in both the supernova ejecta and the ISM. SNRs radiate from radio to X-ray wavelengths, but far-infrared (FIR)/submm observations are crucial both because shock heated dust is visible in these bands and because the FIR lines in many cases dominate the cooling in SNRs. For the first time, Herschel provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to map LMC and SMC SNRs in several critical cooling lines in SNR shocks: [O I] 63um, [C II] 158 um and [O III] 88 um with PACS spectroscopy, and CO rotational lines with SPIRE/FTS. The atomic fine-structure transition lines in the FIR are important shock diagnostics particularly for the lower densities ( 50-500 cm^{-3}). The submm molecular lines will provide critical information on the interaction of SNRs with neighboring molecular clouds. Comparison of our results with Herschel studies of Galactic SNRs will reveal potential dependencies of SNR evolution on

  18. GRB 161219B/SN 2016jca: A low-redshift gamma-ray burst supernova powered by radioactive heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Z.; Izzo, L.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thöne, C. C.; Krühler, T.; Heintz, K. E.; Malesani, D.; Geier, S.; Fuentes, C.; Chen, T.-W.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Goldoni, P.; Gomboc, A.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kann, D. A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Pugliese, G.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Schulze, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.

    2017-09-01

    Since the first discovery of a broad-lined type Ic supernova (SN) with a long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) in 1998, fewer than fifty GRB-supernovae (SNe) have been discovered. The intermediate-luminosity Swift GRB 161219B and its associated supernova SN 2016jca, which occurred at a redshift of z = 0.1475, represents only the seventh GRB-SN to have been discovered within 1 Gpc, and hence provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the observational and physical properties of these very elusive and rare type of SN. As such, we present optical to near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of GRB 161219B and SN 2016jca, spanning the first three months since its discovery. GRB 161219B exploded in the disk of an edge-on spiral galaxy at a projected distance of 3.4 kpc from the galactic centre. GRB 161219B itself is an outlier in the Ep,I - Eγ,iso plane, while SN 2016jca had a rest-frame, peak absolute V-band magnitude of MV = - 19.0 ± 0.1, which it reached after 12.3 ± 0.7 rest-frame days. We find that the bolometric properties of SN 2016jca are inconsistent with being powered solely by a magnetar central engine, and demonstrate that it was likely powered exclusively by energy deposited by the radioactive decay of nickel and cobalt into their daughter products, which were nucleosynthesised when its progenitor underwent core collapse. We find that 0.22 ± 0.08M⊙ of nickel is required to reproducethe peak luminosity of SN 2016jca, and we constrain an ejecta mass of 5.8 ± 0.3M⊙ and a kinetic energy of 5.1 ± 0.8 × 1052 erg. Finally, we report on a chromatic, pre-maximum bump in the g-band light curve, and discuss its possible origin.

  19. Supernova remnants: the X-ray perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants are beautiful astronomical objects that are also of high scientific interest, because they provide insights into supernova explosion mechanisms, and because they are the likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. X-ray observations are an important means to study these objects. And

  20. The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamuy, M.; Pignata, G.; Maza, J.

    2012-01-01

    The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch (CHASE) project began in 2007 with the goal to discover young, nearby southern supernovae in order to (1) better understand the physics of exploding stars and their progenitors, and (2) refine the methods to derive extragalactic distances. During the first...

  1. Observation and interpretation of type IIb supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) explosions represent the final demise of massive stars. Among the various types, there is a group of relatively infrequent CC-SNe termed type IIb, which appear to be hybrids between normal type II SNe (those characterised by H emission) and type Ib (those that lack H features in their spectra but exhibit prominent HeI lines). The nature of the stellar progenitors leading to type IIb SNe is currently unknown, although two channels are contemplated: single massive stars that have lost part of their outer envelope as a consequence of stellar winds, and massive stars that shed mass by Roche-Lobe overflow to a companion. The latter is in fact the favoured scenario for most of the objects observed up to now. In the majority of cases, when there are no direct progenitor detections, some hints about type IIb SN progenitors (e.g., initial mass) can be derived indirectly from the objects' light curves (LCs) and spectra. Motivated by the relatively few well-sampled observational datasets that exist up to date for type IIb SNe and the unknowns on their progenitors, we carried out extensive observations (mainly in the optical domain) for the young type IIb SNe 2011fu and 2013df. Both these SNe are particularly interesting because they show a first LC peak caused by shock breakout, followed by a secondary 56Ni-decay-powered maximum. The analysis of the data for SNe 2011fu and 2013df points to precursors that seem to have been stars with large radii (of the order of 100 RSun), with low mass hydrogen envelopes (tenths of MSun), and relatively low initial masses (12-18 MSun), which could have formed part of interacting binary systems. The nature of a third SN IIb candidate, OGLE-2013-SN-100, proved to be enigmatic. OGLE-2013-SN-100, shows a first peak in the LC, and other characteristics somewhat similar to those of type IIb SNe. However, after a deeper analysis, we conclude OGLE-2013-SN-100 is likely not a SN of type IIb. We provide an alternative

  2. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  3. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  4. Fluid Instabilities of Magnetar-Powered Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2017-05-01

    Magnetar-powered supernova explosions are competitive models for explaining very luminous optical transits. Until recently, these explosion models were mainly calculated in 1D. Radiation emitted from the magnetar snowplows into the previous supernovae ejecta and causes a nonphysical dense shell (spike) found in previous 1D studies. This suggests that strong fluid instabilities may have developed within the magnetar-powered supernovae. Such fluid instabilities emerge at the region where luminous transits later occur, so they can affect the consequent observational signatures. We examine the magnetar-powered supernovae with 2D hydrodynamics simulations and find that the 1D dense shell transforms into the development of Rayleigh-Taylor and thin shell instabilities in 2D. The resulting mixing is able to fragment the entire shell and break the spherical symmetry of supernovae ejecta.

  5. Supernovae and cosmology with future European facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, I M

    2013-06-13

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the European Space Agency's Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2 m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned, general-purpose ground-based, 40-m-class optical-infrared telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programmes such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST.

  6. Dark matter triggers of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Rajendran, Surjeet; Varela, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to 1.25 M⊙ rules out primordial black holes with masses ˜1019- 1020 gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as 1024 gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar Collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range 1020- 1022 gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large spacetime volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  7. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova - Superluminous Supernova Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Wolf, William M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A.; Svirski, Gilad; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t(sub rise) approximately equals 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M(sub peak) approximately equals -20) - one discovered and followed by the PalomarTransient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad H alpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity H alpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a Type 1.5 SN scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  8. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - III. 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holoien, T. W. -S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-01-01

    This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (m(peak)d......This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (m(peak)d...

  9. Progress on multi-waveband observations of supernova remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xuejuan; Lu, Fangjun; Tian, Wenwu

    2008-01-01

    The development of observational techniques has inriched our knowledge of supernova remnants. In this paper, we review the main progresses in the last decade, including new discoveries of supernova remnants and the associated (rare type of) pulsars, nucleosynthesis, the interaction between supernova remnants and molecular clouds, dust in the supernova remnants, shock physics, and cosmic ray accelerations.

  10. Exploring the Efficacy and Limitations of Shock-cooling Models: New Analysis of Type II Supernovae Observed by the Kepler Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2017-10-01

    Modern transient surveys have begun discovering and following supernovae (SNe) shortly after first light—providing systematic measurements of the rise of Type II SNe. We explore how analytic models of early shock-cooling emission from core-collapse SNe can constrain the progenitor’s radius, explosion velocity, and local host extinction. We simulate synthetic photometry in several realistic observing scenarios; assuming the models describe the typical explosions well, we find that ultraviolet observations can constrain the progenitor’s radius to a statistical uncertainty of ±10%-15%, with a systematic uncertainty of ±20%. With these observations the local host extinction (A V ) can be constrained to a factor of two and the shock velocity to ±5% with a systematic uncertainty of ±10%. We also reanalyze the SN light curves presented by Garnavich et al. (2016) and find that KSN 2011a can be fit by a blue supergiant model with a progenitor radius of {R}sred supergiant model with a progenitor radius of {R}s={111}-21({stat)-1({sys})}+89({stat)+49({sys})} {R}⊙ . Our results do not agree with those of Garnavich et al. Moreover, we re-evaluate their claims and find that there is no statistically significant evidence for a shock-breakout flare in the light curve of KSN 2011d.

  11. A Chandra Study of Supernova Remnants in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Andrew Corey

    2017-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis we measure the interstellar abundances for the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), based on the observational data of sixteen supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC as available in the public archive of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra). We find lower abundances than previous measurements based on a similar method using data obtained with the Advanced Satellite for Astrophysics and Cosmology (ASCA). We discuss the origins of the discrepancy between our Chandra and the previous ASCA measurements. We conclude that our measurements are generally more reliable than the ASCA results thanks to the high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with our Chandra data, although there remain some systematic uncertainties due to the use of different spectral modelings between the previous work and ours. We also discuss our results in comparison with the LMC abundance measurements based on optical observations of stars. The second part of this thesis is a detailed study of a core-collapse SNR B0049-73.6 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Based on our deep Chandra observation, we detect metal-rich ejecta features extending out to the outermost boundary of B0049-73.6, which were not seen in the previous data. We find that the central nebula is dominated by emission from reverse-shocked ejecta material enriched in O, Ne, Mg, and Si. O-rich ejecta distribution is relatively smooth throughout the central nebula. In contrast the Si-rich material is highly structured. These results suggest that B0049-73.6 was produced by an asymmetric core-collapse explosion of a massive star. The estimated abundance ratios among these ejecta elements are in plausible agreement with the nucleosynthesis products from the explosion of a 13-15M. progenitor. We reveal that the central ring-like (in projection) ejecta nebula extends to ˜9 pc from the SNR center. This suggests that the contact discontinuity (CD) may be located at a further

  12. Luminous blue variables and the fates of very massive stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan

    2017-10-28

    Luminous blue variables (LBVs) had long been considered massive stars in transition to the Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase, so their identification as progenitors of some peculiar supernovae (SNe) was surprising. More recently, environment statistics of LBVs show that most of them cannot be in transition to the WR phase after all, because LBVs are more isolated than allowed in this scenario. Additionally, the high-mass H shells around luminous SNe IIn require that some very massive stars above 40  M ⊙ die without shedding their H envelopes, and the precursor outbursts are a challenge for understanding the final burning sequences leading to core collapse. Recent evidence suggests a clear continuum in pre-SN mass loss from super-luminous SNe IIn, to regular SNe IIn, to SNe II-L and II-P, whereas most stripped-envelope SNe seem to arise from a separate channel of lower-mass binary stars rather than massive WR stars.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. WIDE INTEGRAL-FIELD INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRIGHT [Fe II] SHELL IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G11.2-0.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho-Gyu; Onaka, Takashi [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Moon, Dae-Sik; Rahman, Mubdi [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Chun, Won-Seok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Gruel, Nicolas; Raines, S. Nicholas; Guzman, Rafael [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Raymond, John, E-mail: hglee@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: onaka@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: moon@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: hjkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mubdi@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: eiken@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: raines@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We present the results of wide integral-field near-infrared (1.0-1.8 {mu}m) spectroscopic observations of the southeastern shell of the young core-collapse supernova remnant (SNR) G11.2-0.3. We first construct [Fe II] 1.644 {mu}m line images of three bright clumps from the obtained spectral image cubes and compare them with those of other transitions such as [Fe II] 1.257, [Fe II] 1.534, and He I 1.083 {mu}m line images. This allows us to estimate the electron density ({approx}4700-9400 cm{sup -3}) and extinction (A{sub V} {approx} 16-20 mag) of the shell, including a detailed two-dimensional distribution of the properties in the brightest clump, as well as the discovery of a faint high-velocity ({approx} - 440 km s{sup -1}) component in the clump. Our SNR shock model calculations estimate the pre-shock number density of {approx}250-500 cm{sup -3} and shock speed of {approx}80-250 km s{sup -1} in the [Fe II]-emitting region of the SNR. The comparison between the observed and modeled radial profiles of the line intensities and their ratios reveals that the shell is composed of multiple thin filaments which have been likely formed in episodic mass-loss processes of a progenitor star. The discovery of the faint high-velocity component supports the interpretation that the southeastern shell of G11.2-0.3 is mainly composed of circumstellar material with contamination by supernova ejecta and also that its ejected material was expelled primarily in the southeast-northwest direction.

  14. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog , an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  15. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  16. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Margutti, Raffaella, E-mail: jguillochon@cfa.harvard.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog , an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  17. Supernova rates, galaxy emission, and Hubble type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1991-01-01

    Supernova discovery frequency is found to correlate with emission-line (H-alpha + forbidden N II line) equivalent width, except for the most active galaxies in which some supernovae might be hidden by dust. SNII occur preferentially in active galaxies with emission-line EW not less than 20 A, whereas SNIa favor less active galaxies with EW less than 20 A. The intrinsic frequency of supernovae is found to be an order of magnitude higher in Sc galaxies than it is in early type spirals. The relatively high frequency of SNIa in late-type galaxies suggests that not all such objects have old progenitors. 13 refs

  18. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  19. Observational data on galactic supernova remnants: I. The supernova remnants within l = 0◦ - 90◦

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guseinov O.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have collected all the available data on Galactic supernova remnants given in the literature. The data on Galactic supernova remnants located in the Galactic longitude interval l=0◦-90◦ in all the spectral bands are presented in this work. We have established values of distance for the SNRs by examining these data. The data on various kinds on neutron stars connected to these supernova remnants are given. Not only the data, but also the comments to some of the authors and ourselves on the data and on some properties of both the supernova remnants and the point sources are given.

  20. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research.

  1. Observational data on Galactic supernova remnants: II. The supernova remnants within l = 90°-270°

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guseinov O.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have collected all the available data on Galactic supernova remnants given in the literature. The data of Galactic supernova remnants located in the Galactic longitude interval l=90° - 270° in all spectral bands are represented in this work. We have adopted distance values for the SNRs by examining these data. The data of various types on neutron stars connected to these supernova remnants are also represented. Remarks of some authors and by ourselves regarding the data and some properties of both the supernova remnants and the point sources are given.

  2. Radio Supernovae: Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-24

    ar X iv :0 90 2. 40 59 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 2 4 Fe b 20 09 Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor...FEB 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I...of Supernova Progenitor Stars 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  3. Light-curve Analysis of Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae Based on Neutrino-driven Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2017-09-01

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most numerous subclass of core-collapse SNe originating from massive stars. In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the properties of the SN outburst for a red supergiant progenitor model and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of the ordinary Type IIP SN 1999em. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of (parametrically triggered) neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the (explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics) code Prometheus, using a presupernova model of a 15 M ⊙ star as initial data. On approaching homologous expansion, the hydrodynamic and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the (implicit, Lagrangian, radiation hydrodynamics) code Crab to follow the evolution of the blast wave during the SN outburst. Our 3D neutrino-driven explosion model with an explosion energy of about 0.5× {10}51 erg produces 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail of SN 1999em. The considered presupernova model, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1999em, except for those connected to the presupernova structure of the outer stellar layers. Our 3D simulations show that the distribution of 56Ni-rich matter in velocity space is asymmetric with a strong dipole component that is consistent with the observations of SN 1999em. The monotonic decline in luminosity from the plateau to the radioactive tail in ordinary SNe IIP is a manifestation of the intense turbulent mixing at the He/H composition interface.

  4. Production and Distribution of 44Ti and 56Ni in a Three-dimensional Supernova Model Resembling Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Ewald; Pllumbi, Else; Wanajo, Shinya

    2017-06-01

    The spatial and velocity distributions of nuclear species synthesized in the innermost regions of core-collapse supernovae can yield important clues about explosion asymmetries and the operation of the still disputed explosion mechanism. Recent observations of radioactive 44Ti with high-energy satellite telescopes (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array [NuSTAR], INTEGRAL) have measured gamma-ray line details, which provide direct evidence of large-scale explosion asymmetries in SN 1987A and in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) even by mapping of the spatial brightness distribution (NuSTAR). Here we discuss a 3D simulation of a neutrino-driven explosion, using a parameterized neutrino engine, whose 44Ti distribution is mostly concentrated in one hemisphere pointing opposite to the neutron star (NS) kick velocity. Both exhibit intriguing resemblance to the observed morphology of the Cas A remnant, although neither the progenitor nor the explosion was fine-tuned for a perfect match. Our results demonstrate that the asymmetries observed in this remnant can, in principle, be accounted for by a neutrino-driven explosion, and that the high 44Ti abundance in Cas A may be explained without invoking rapid rotation or a jet-driven explosion, because neutrino-driven explosions generically eject large amounts of high-entropy matter. The recoil acceleration of the NS is connected to mass ejection asymmetries and is opposite to the direction of the stronger explosion, fully compatible with the gravitational tugboat mechanism. Our results also imply that Cas A and SN 1987A could possess similarly "one-sided" Ti and Fe asymmetries, with the difference that Cas A is viewed from a direction with large inclination angle to the NS motion, whereas the NS in SN 1987A should have a dominant velocity component pointing toward us.

  5. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA CARBON FOOTPRINTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Loken, S.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Paech, K.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of five Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 days relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II λ6580 absorption 'notches' in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the five SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibit high-velocity (v > 20, 000 km s –1 ) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broadband light curve/color behavior: three of the five have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal to noise and phase, we estimate that 22 +10 –6% of SNe Ia exhibit spectroscopic C II signatures as late as –5 days with respect to maximum. We place these new objects in the context of previously recognized carbon-positive SNe Ia and consider reasonable scenarios seeking to explain a physical connection between light curve properties and the presence of photospheric carbon. We also examine the detailed evolution of the detected carbon signatures and the surrounding wavelength regions to shed light on the distribution of carbon in the ejecta. Our ability to reconstruct the C II λ6580 feature in detail under the assumption of purely spherical symmetry casts doubt on a 'carbon blobs' hypothesis, but does not rule out all asymmetric models. A low volume filling factor for carbon, combined with line-of-sight effects, seems unlikely to explain the scarcity of detected carbon in SNe Ia by itself.

  6. Supernovae, dark energy and the accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    Perlmutter, Saul

    1999-01-01

    Based on an analysis of 42 high-redshift supernovae discovered by the supernovae cosmology project, we have found evidence for a positive cosmological constant, Lambda, and hence an accelerating universe. In particular, the data are strongly inconsistent with a Lambda=0 flat cosmology, the simplest inflationary universe model. The size of our supernova sample allows us to perform a variety of statistical tests to check for possible systematic errors and biases. We will discuss results of these and other studies and the ongoing hunt for further loopholes to evade the apparent consequences of the measurements. We will present further work that begins to constrain the alternative physics theories of "dark energy" that have been proposed to explain these results. Finally, we propose a new concept for a definitive supernova measurement of the cosmological parameters.

  7. Toward an efficient Photometric Supernova Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Bradley

    2018-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Survey (SDSS) discovered more than 1,000 Type Ia Supernovae, yet less than half of these have spectroscopic measurements. As wide-field imaging telescopes such as The Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) discover more supernovae, the need for accurate and computationally cheap photometric classifiers increases. My goal is to use a photometric classification algorithm based on Sncosmo, a python library for supernova cosmology analysis, to reclassify previously identified Hubble SN and other non-spectroscopically confirmed surveys. My results will be compared to other photometric classifiers such as PSNID and STARDUST. In the near future, I expect to have the algorithm validated with simulated data, optimized for efficiency, and applied with high performance computing to real data.

  8. Supernova brightening from chameleon-photon mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, C.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of standard candles and measurements of standard rulers give an inconsistent picture of the history of the universe. This discrepancy can be explained if photon number is not conserved as computations of the luminosity distance must be modified. I show that photon number is not conserved when photons mix with chameleons in the presence of a magnetic field. The strong magnetic fields in a supernova mean that the probability of a photon converting into a chameleon in the interior of the supernova is high, this results in a large flux of chameleons at the surface of the supernova. Chameleons and photons also mix as a result of the intergalactic magnetic field. These two effects combined cause the image of the supernova to be brightened resulting in a model which fits both observations of standard candles and observations of standard rulers

  9. Physical processes in collapse driven supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayle, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A model of the supernova explosion is discussed. The method of neutrino transport is discussed, since the explosive mechanism depends on neutrino heating of the material behind the accretion shock. The core region of these exploding stars becomes unstable to convective motions during the supernova evolution. Convective mixing allows more neutrinos to escape from under the neutrinosphere, and thus increases the amount of heating by neutrinos. An approximate method of incorporating convection is described, and some results of including convection in a computer model is presented. Another phenomena is seen in computer simulations of supernova, oscillations in the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate onto the protoneutron star. The last topic discussed in this thesis describes the attempt to understand this oscillation by perturbation of the steady state solution to equations approximating the complex physical processes occurring in the late time supernova. 42 refs., 31 figs.

  10. Supernova Classification Using Swift UVOT Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Madison; Brown, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    With the great influx of supernova discoveries over the past few years, the observation time needed to acquire the spectroscopic data needed to classify supernova by type has become unobtainable. Instead, using the photometry of supernovae could greatly reduce the amount of time between discovery and classification. For this project we looked at the relationship between colors and supernova types through machine learning packages in Python. Using data from the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT), each photometric point was assigned values corresponding to colors, absolute magnitudes, and the relative times from the peak brightness in several filters. These values were fed into three classifying methods, the nearest neighbors, decision tree, and random forest methods. We will discuss the success of these classification systems, the optimal filters for photometric classification, and ways to improve the classification.

  11. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter “smog” inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail

  12. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yue [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-11-27

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter “smog” inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail.

  13. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yue, E-mail: yuezhang@theory.caltech.edu [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter ''smog'' inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail.

  14. Astrophysical and terrestrial neutrinos in Supernova detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.

    1985-09-01

    Supernova (SN) explosions are the place of very fundamental phenomena, whose privileged messengers are neutrinos. But such events are very rare. Then, SN detection has to be combined with other purposes. The recent developments of SN detectors have been associated with developments of underground particle physics (proton decay, monopoles ...). But here, I will restrict myself to discuss the possibilities for a supernova detector to be sensitive to other sources of neutrinos, astrophysical or terrestrial

  15. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae -- Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippenko, Alexei Vladimir [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-09

    led to the identification of subsamples of SNe Ia that can be used to provide the most reliable cosmological distances, and we developed ways to deal with the dust that makes SNe Ia appear fainter than they really are. Using the KAIT/LOSS sample, we produced an excellent Hubble diagram (galaxy recession speed vs. distance), accurately showing the expansion of the Universe. Even smaller scatter was achieved when spectroscopic characteristics were taken into account. Another high-quality Hubble diagram was constructed with SNe Ia from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These Hubble diagrams provide useful new constraints on the nature of the dark energy that is accelerating the expansion of the Universe. As an added bonus of our research, we also studied core-collapse SNe, which differ fundamentally from SNe Ia.

  16. The Distant Type Ia Supernova Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R. S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S. E.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Kim, A. G.; Kim, M. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Lee, J. C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N. A.

    2002-05-28

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample, which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  17. Pulsar Wind Bubble Blowout from a Supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, John M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Chevalier, Roger A., E-mail: blondin@ncsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    For pulsars born in supernovae, the expansion of the shocked pulsar wind nebula is initially in the freely expanding ejecta of the supernova. While the nebula is in the inner flat part of the ejecta density profile, the swept-up, accelerating shell is subject to the Rayleigh–Taylor instability. We carried out two- and three-dimensional simulations showing that the instability gives rise to filamentary structure during this initial phase but does not greatly change the dynamics of the expanding shell. The flow is effectively self-similar. If the shell is powered into the outer steep part of the density profile, the shell is subject to a robust Rayleigh–Taylor instability in which the shell is fragmented and the shocked pulsar wind breaks out through the shell. The flow is not self-similar in this phase. For a wind nebula to reach this phase requires that the deposited pulsar energy be greater than the supernova energy, or that the initial pulsar period be in the ms range for a typical 10{sup 51} erg supernova. These conditions are satisfied by some magnetar models for Type I superluminous supernovae. We also consider the Crab Nebula, which may be associated with a low energy supernova for which this scenario applies.

  18. Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ­0.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanc ...[et al], G.; Andersen, J.

    2004-01-01

    stars: supernovae: general; galaxies: evolution; cosmology: miscellaneous; methods: observational......stars: supernovae: general; galaxies: evolution; cosmology: miscellaneous; methods: observational...

  19. Are the models for type Ia supernova progenitors consistent with the properties of supernova remnants?,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badenes, C.; Hughes, J.P.; Bravo, E.; Langer, N.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the relationship between the models for progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae and the properties of the supernova remnants that evolve after the explosion. Most models for Type Ia progenitors in the single-degenerate scenario predict substantial outflows during the presupernova

  20. Neutrinos from type-II supernovae and the neutrino-driven supernova mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, H.T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Supernova 1987A has confirmed fundamental aspects of our theoretical view of type-II supernovae: Type-II supernovae are a consequence of the collapse of the iron core of a massive evolved star and lead to the formation of a neutron star or black hole. This picture is most strongly supported by the detection of electron antineutrinos in the IMB and Kamiokande II experiments in connection with SN 1987A. However, the mechanism causing the supernova explosion is not yet satisfactorily understood. In this paper the properties of the neutrino emission from supernovae and protoneutron stars will be reviewed; analytical estimates will be derived and results of numerical simulations will be shown. It will be demonstrated that the spectral distributions of the emitted neutrinos show clear and systematic discrepancies compared with thermal (black body-type) emission. This must be taken into account when neutrino observations from supernovae are to be interpreted, or when implications of the neutrino emission on nucleosynthesis processes in mantle and envelope of the progenitor star are to be investigated. Furthermore, the influence of neutrinos on the supernova dynamics will be discussed, in particular their crucial role in causing the explosion by Wilson`s neutrino-driven delayed mechanism. Possible implications of convection inside the newly born neutron star and between surface and the supernova shock will be addressed and results of multi-dimensional simulations will be presented. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  1. Nearby supernova host galaxies from the CALIFA survey. II. Supernova environmental metallicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galbany, L.; Stanishev, V.; Mourão, A. M.; Rodrigues, M.; Flores, H.; Walcher, C. J.; Sánchez, S. F.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Badenes, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Kehrig, C.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Mollá, M.; Meidt, S.; Pérez, E.; van de Ven, G.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The metallicity of a supernova progenitor, together with its mass, is one of the main parameters that can rule the progenitor's fate. We present the second study of nearby supernova (SN) host galaxies (0.005 ⊙) > 10 dex) by targeted searches. We neither found evidence that the metallicity at the SN

  2. Modelling the interaction of thermonuclear supernova remnants with circumstellar structures: the case of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K.M.; Vink, J.; Kaastra, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The well-established Type Ia remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572) reveals discrepant ambient medium-density estimates based on either the measured dynamics or the X-ray emission properties. This discrepancy can potentially be solved by assuming that the supernova remnant (SNR) shock initially

  3. HUBBLE SPIES MOST DISTANT SUPERNOVA EVER SEEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers pinpointed a blaze of light from the farthest supernova ever seen, a dying star that exploded 10 billion years ago. The detection and analysis of this supernova, called 1997ff, is greatly bolstering the case for the existence of a mysterious form of dark energy pervading the cosmos, making galaxies hurl ever faster away from each other. The supernova also offers the first glimpse of the universe slowing down soon after the Big Bang, before it began speeding up. This panel of images, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, shows the supernova's cosmic neighborhood; its home galaxy; and the dying star itself. Astronomers found this supernova in 1997 during a second look at the northern Hubble Deep Field [top panel], a tiny region of sky first explored by the Hubble telescope in 1995. The image shows the myriad of galaxies Hubble spied when it peered across more than 10 billion years of time and space. The white box marks the area where the supernova dwells. The photo at bottom left is a close-up view of that region. The white arrow points to the exploding star's home galaxy, a faint elliptical. Its redness is due to the billions of old stars residing there. The picture at bottom right shows the supernova itself, distinguished by the white dot in the center. Although this stellar explosion is among the brightest beacons in the universe, it could not be seen directly in the Hubble images. The stellar blast is so distant from Earth that its light is buried in the glow of its host galaxy. To find the supernova, astronomers compared two pictures of the 'deep field' taken two years apart. One image was of the original Hubble Deep Field; the other, the follow-up deep-field picture taken in 1997. Using special computer software, astronomers then measured the light from the galaxies in both images. Noting any changes in light output between the two pictures, the computer identified a blob of light in the 1997 picture

  4. Type Ia Supernovae as Sites of the p-process: Two-dimensional Models Coupled to Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglio, C.; Röpke, F. K.; Gallino, R.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-10-01

    Beyond Fe, there is a class of 35 proton-rich nuclides, between 74Se and 196Hg, called p-nuclei. They are bypassed by the s and r neutron capture processes and are typically 10-1000 times less abundant than the s- and/or r-isotopes in the solar system. The bulk of p-isotopes is created in the "gamma processes" by sequences of photodisintegrations and beta decays in explosive conditions in both core collapse supernovae (SNe II) and in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). SNe II contribute to the production of p-nuclei through explosive neon and oxygen burning. However, the major problem in SN II ejecta is a general underproduction of the light p-nuclei for A explosive nucleosynthesis with a detailed nuclear reaction network for all isotopes up to 209Bi. We select tracers within the typical temperature range for p-process production, (1.5-3.7) × 109 K, and analyze in detail their behavior, exploring the influence of different s-process distributions on the p-process nucleosynthesis. In addition, we discuss the sensitivity of p-process production to parameters of the explosion mechanism, taking into account the consequences on Fe and alpha elements. We find that SNe Ia can produce a large amount of p-nuclei, both the light p-nuclei below A = 120 and the heavy-p nuclei, at quite flat average production factors, tightly related to the s-process seed distribution. For the first time, we find a stellar source able to produce both light and heavy p-nuclei almost at the same level as 56Fe, including the debated neutron magic 92, 94Mo and 96, 98Ru. We also find that there is an important contribution from the p-process nucleosynthesis to the s-only nuclei 80Kr, 86Sr, to the neutron magic 90Zr, and to the neutron-rich 96Zr. Finally, we investigate the metallicity effect on p-process production in our models. Starting with different s-process seed distributions for two metallicities Z = 0.02 and Z = 0.001, running two-dimensional SN Ia models with different initial composition, we

  5. Neutrino signal from pair-instability supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Warren P.; Gilmer, Matthew S.; Fröhlich, Carla; Kneller, James P.

    2017-11-01

    A very massive star with a carbon-oxygen core in the range of 64M ⊙radioactive elements they create. While the basic mechanism for the explosion is understood, how a star reaches a state is not, and thus observations of a nearby pair-instability supernova would allow us to test current models of stellar evolution at the extreme of stellar masses. Much will be sought within the electromagnetic radiation we detect from such a supernova but we should not forget that the neutrinos from a pair-instability supernova contain unique signatures of the event that unambiguously identify this type of explosion. We calculate the expected neutrino flux at Earth from two, one-dimensional pair-instability supernova simulations which bracket the mass range of stars which explode by this mechanism taking into account the full time and energy dependence of the neutrino emission and the flavor evolution through the outer layers of the star. We calculate the neutrino signals in five different detectors chosen to represent present or near future designs. We find the more massive progenitors explode as pair-instability supernova which can easily be detected in multiple different neutrino detectors at the "standard" supernova distance of 10 kpc producing several events in DUNE, JUNO, and Super-Kamiokande, while the lightest progenitors produce only a handful of events (if any) in the same detectors. The proposed Hyper-Kamiokande detector would detect neutrinos from a large pair-instability supernova as far as ˜50 kpc allowing it to reach the Megallanic Clouds and the several very high mass stars known to exist there.

  6. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays. Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images. To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer wavelengths. Since the amount

  7. Gravitational lensing of the SNLS supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronborg, T.

    2011-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae have become an essential tool of modern observational cosmology. By studying the distance-redshift relation of a large number of supernovae, the nature of dark energy can be unveiled. Distances to Type Ia SNe are however affected by gravitational lensing which can induce systematic effects in the measurement of cosmology. The majority of the supernovae is slightly de-magnified whereas a small fraction is significantly magnified due to the mass distribution along the line of sight. This causes naturally an additional dispersion in the observed magnitudes. There are two different ways to estimate the magnification of a supernova. A first method consists in comparing the supernova luminosity, which is measured to about 15% precision, to the mean SN luminosity at the same redshift. Another estimate can be obtained from predicting the magnification induced by the foreground matter density modeled from the measurements of the luminosity of the galaxies with an initial prior on the mass-luminosity relation of the galaxies. A correlation between these 2 estimates will make it possible to tune the initially used mass-luminosity relation resulting in an independent measurement of the dark matter clustering based on the luminosity of SNe Ia. Evidently, this measurement depends crucially on the detection of this correlation also referred to as the lensing signal. This thesis is dedicated to the measurement of the lensing signal in the SNLS 3-year sample. (author)

  8. Eta Carinae and the Supernova Impostors

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    In 1965 Fritz Zwicky proposed a class of supernovae that he called "Type V", described as "excessively faint at maximum." There were only two members, SN1961v and eta Carinae. We now know that eta Carinae was not a true supernova, but if it were observed today in a distant galaxy we would call it a "supernova impostor." 170 years ago it experienced a "great eruption" lasting 20 years, expelling 10 solar masses or more, and survived. Eta Carinae is now acknowledged as the most massive, most luminous star in our region of the Galaxy, and it may be our only accessible example of a very massive star in a pre-supernova state. In this book the editors and contributing authors review its remarkable history, physical state of the star and its ejecta, and its continuing instability. Chapters also include its relation to other massive, unstable stars, the massive star progenitors of supernovae, and the "first" stars in the Universe.

  9. Important current issues in supernova theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, Adam

    2001-01-01

    With a kinetic energy of ∼10 51 ergs, supernova explosions influence the birth of stars, are the source of the energetic cosmic-rays that irradiate us on Earth, and collectively, by their prodigious energy and momentum input during the birth of galaxies in the infant universe, may have helped shape the galaxies themselves. The neutrinos produced in great numbers during the supernova event are implicated as the source of their explosive power and their study has exercised supernova modelers for forty years, some of them productive. In this contribution, I summarize various new ideas and speculations concerning supernova physics and the role of neutrinos. In particular, I review possible systematics of nickel yields and explosion energies with progenitor mass, evidence for asymmetries in the explosion itself, evidence for kicks to neutron stars in their supernova cradle, and an example of an important (but hitherto neglected) neutrino production process. I also summarize the expected and dramatic signature in underground neutrino detectors of a galactic stellar collapse and explosion

  10. GALACTIC AND EXTRAGALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AS SITES OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Sasaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernova remnants, owing to their strong shock waves, are likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Studies of supernova remnants in X-rays and gamma rays provide us with new insights into the acceleration of particles to high energies. This paper reviews the basic physics of supernova remnant shocks and associated particle acceleration and radiation processes. In addition, the study of supernova remnant populations in nearby galaxies and the implications for Galactic cosmic ray distribution are discussed.

  11. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry (SNSPOL) Project; Probing the Geometry of Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George Grant; Leonard, Douglas; Smith, Nathan; Smith, Paul; Milne, Peter; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Bilinski, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has grown that most supernovae exhibit departures from spherical symmetry. These results, together with full three-dimensional modeling, are exposing the possibility that asymmetries are not simply an observable feature of some supernovae, but may, in fact, be a necessity of the explosion mechanism itself. However, with the exception of SN 1987A, a supernova photosphere cannot be resolved through direct imaging from ground or space. Only the powerful technique of polarimetry can directly probe asymmetries on those spatial scales. Spectropolarimetry enhances the power of this technique by revealing wavelength-dependent variations that may result from differences in the geometrical distributions of the various ionic species. Multi-epoch observations over several months can be used to follow the evolution of these asymmetries as a supernova evolves and its photosphere recedes through the ejecta. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry (SNSPOL) Project aims to study the predominance and characteristics of asymmetries in all types of supernovae by decoding their complex, time-dependent polarimetric behavior. This is accomplished through multi-epoch observations using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) on the 61” Kuiper, the 90” Bok, and the 6.5-m MMT telescopes. During the past six years, the SNSPOL Project has observed more than 95 supernovae, approximately 2/3 of which have been observed at multiple epochs. Here we present a summary of the project, its current status, and a few selected results.

  12. The interaction of Type Ia supernovae with their circumstellar medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiotellis, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the study of a specific class of supernovae, named Type Ia (or thermonuclear) supernovae. In particular, we attempt to gain information about their origin through the study of the interaction of these supernovae with circumstellar structures that have been shaped by their

  13. Supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae and their interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaluw, E. van der

    2001-01-01

    A supernova explosion marks the end of the evolution of a massive star. What remains of the exploded star is a high density neutron star or a black hole. The material which has been ejected by the supernova explosion will manifest itself as a supernova remnant: a hot bubble of gas expanding in the

  14. Rapid Neutron Capture Process in Supernovae and Chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approximation, i.e., (n, γ) ↔ (γ, n) equilibrium could be applied. The dependence on nuclear masses enters via Qn. We choose supernova as the site for r-process because the supernova light curves show the presence of 98Cf254. We have considered the r-process in supernovae for the production of heavy elements, ...

  15. THE HOST GALAXY OF THE SUPER-LUMINOUS SN 2010gx AND LIMITS ON EXPLOSIVE {sup 56}Ni PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ting-Wan; Smartt, Stephen J.; Kotak, Rubina; McCrum, Matt; Fraser, Morgan [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Pastorello, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Super-luminous supernovae have a tendency to occur in faint host galaxies which are likely to have low mass and low metallicity. While these extremely luminous explosions have been observed from z = 0.1 to 1.55, the closest explosions allow more detailed investigations of their host galaxies. We present a detailed analysis of the host galaxy of SN 2010gx (z = 0.23), one of the best studied super-luminous type Ic supernovae. The host is a dwarf galaxy (M{sub g} = -17.42 {+-} 0.17) with a high specific star formation rate. It has a remarkably low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.5 {+-} 0.1 dex as determined from the detection of the [O III] {lambda}4363 line. This is the first reliable metallicity determination of a super-luminous stripped-envelope supernova host. We collected deep multi-epoch imaging with Gemini + GMOS between 240 and 560 days after explosion to search for any sign of radioactive {sup 56}Ni, which might provide further insights on the explosion mechanism and the progenitor's nature. We reach griz magnitudes of m{sub AB} {approx} 26, but do not detect SN 2010gx at these epochs. The limit implies that any {sup 56}Ni production was similar to or below that of SN 1998bw (a luminous type Ic SN that produced around 0.4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni). The low volumetric rates of these supernovae ({approx}10{sup -4} of the core-collapse population) could be qualitatively matched if the explosion mechanism requires a combination of low-metallicity (below 0.2 Z{sub Sun }), high progenitor mass (>60 M{sub Sun }) and high rotation rate (fastest 10% of rotators).

  16. THE HOST GALAXY OF THE SUPER-LUMINOUS SN 2010gx AND LIMITS ON EXPLOSIVE 56Ni PRODUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ting-Wan; Smartt, Stephen J.; Kotak, Rubina; McCrum, Matt; Fraser, Morgan; Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Pastorello, Andrea; Valenti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Super-luminous supernovae have a tendency to occur in faint host galaxies which are likely to have low mass and low metallicity. While these extremely luminous explosions have been observed from z = 0.1 to 1.55, the closest explosions allow more detailed investigations of their host galaxies. We present a detailed analysis of the host galaxy of SN 2010gx (z = 0.23), one of the best studied super-luminous type Ic supernovae. The host is a dwarf galaxy (M g = –17.42 ± 0.17) with a high specific star formation rate. It has a remarkably low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.5 ± 0.1 dex as determined from the detection of the [O III] λ4363 line. This is the first reliable metallicity determination of a super-luminous stripped-envelope supernova host. We collected deep multi-epoch imaging with Gemini + GMOS between 240 and 560 days after explosion to search for any sign of radioactive 56 Ni, which might provide further insights on the explosion mechanism and the progenitor's nature. We reach griz magnitudes of m AB ∼ 26, but do not detect SN 2010gx at these epochs. The limit implies that any 56 Ni production was similar to or below that of SN 1998bw (a luminous type Ic SN that produced around 0.4 M ☉ of 56 Ni). The low volumetric rates of these supernovae (∼10 –4 of the core-collapse population) could be qualitatively matched if the explosion mechanism requires a combination of low-metallicity (below 0.2 Z ☉ ), high progenitor mass (>60 M ☉ ) and high rotation rate (fastest 10% of rotators).

  17. Supernovae effects on the terrestrial atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikin, A.C.; Chandra, S.; Stecher, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    The first effects of a nearby (approximately10 parsec) supernova on the Earth's atmosphere will be caused by ultraviolet radiation dissociating molecular oxygen. The event will be of about one month's duration. Several months later nuclear gamma radiation may arrive, causing a decrease in atmospheric ozone. Cosmic radiation from the supernova remnant will not intercept the Earth for at least 1000 years at which time ozone will be seriously depleted. Supernova ultraviolet radiation increases column ozone and atomic oxygen. Atmospheric thermal structure is modified with a large temperature increase in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere and a decrease at higher altitudes caused by enhanced heat loss due to atomic oxygen radiation and conduction. (author)

  18. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for Supernovae Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, Tom; Moss, Adam

    2017-03-01

    We apply deep recurrent neural networks, which are capable of learning complex sequential information, to classify supernovae (code available at https://github.com/adammoss/supernovae). The observational time and filter fluxes are used as inputs to the network, but since the inputs are agnostic, additional data such as host galaxy information can also be included. Using the Supernovae Photometric Classification Challenge (SPCC) data, we find that deep networks are capable of learning about light curves, however the performance of the network is highly sensitive to the amount of training data. For a training size of 50% of the representational SPCC data set (around 104 supernovae) we obtain a type-Ia versus non-type-Ia classification accuracy of 94.7%, an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve AUC of 0.986 and an SPCC figure-of-merit F 1 = 0.64. When using only the data for the early-epoch challenge defined by the SPCC, we achieve a classification accuracy of 93.1%, AUC of 0.977, and F 1 = 0.58, results almost as good as with the whole light curve. By employing bidirectional neural networks, we can acquire impressive classification results between supernovae types I, II and III at an accuracy of 90.4% and AUC of 0.974. We also apply a pre-trained model to obtain classification probabilities as a function of time and show that it can give early indications of supernovae type. Our method is competitive with existing algorithms and has applications for future large-scale photometric surveys.

  19. The Stellar Origins of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schulyer

    2017-08-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have a profound effect on galaxies and have been used as precise cosmological probes, resulting in the Nobel-distinguished discovery of the accelerating Universe. They are clearly very important events deserving of intense study. Yet, even with over 10000 classified SNe, we know relatively little about the stars which give rise to these powerful explosions. The main limitation has been the lack of spatial resolution in pre-SN imaging data. However, since 1999 our team has been at the vanguard of directly identifying SN progenitor stars in HST images. From this exciting line of study, the trends from 15 detections for Type II-Plateau SNe appear to be red supergiant progenitors of relatively low mass (8 to 17 Msun) - although this upper mass limit still requires testing - and warmer, envelope-stripped supergiant progenitors for 5 Type IIb SNe. Additionally, evidence is accumulating that some Type II-narrow SNe may arise from exploding stars in a luminous blue variable phase. However, the nature of the progenitors of Type Ib/c SNe, a subset of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, still remains ambiguous. Furthermore, we continue in the embarrassing situation that we still do not yet know which progenitor systems explode as Type Ia SNe, which are being used for precision cosmology. In Cycles 16, 17, and 20 through 24 we have had great success with our approved ToO programs. As of this proposal deadline, we have already triggered on SN 2016jbu with our Cycle 24 program. We therefore propose to continue this project in Cycles 25 and 26, to determine the identities of the progenitors of 8 SNe within about 20 Mpc through ToO observations using WFC3/UVIS.

  20. Detecting First Supernovae with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regos, Eniko; FLARE

    2018-01-01

    We have applied for a JWST ERS First Transients Survey, FLARE to answer empirically how the Universe made its first stars. To quest the epoch of reionization we target what happened to these first stars by observing the most luminous events, supernovae. These transients provide direct constraints on star formation rates and the initial mass function.These very rare events can be reached by JWST at 27 mag AB in 2 micron and 4.4 micron over a field of 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year.The survey may detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts up to 10, pinpointing the redshift of first stars, a key scientific goal of JWST.We explore all models of star formation history (derived from UV luminosity densities and IR data), DTD, top heavy IMF of early, low metallicity stars, and normalizations to data of SN Ia, II rates (SNLS, CLASH, CANDELS, SDSS, SVISS), as well as SLSN (ROTSE, SNLS) to estimate the expected SN rates as function of redshift.Population synthesis of double degenerate and single degenerate scenarios of SN Ia shows that the shape of the DTD is rather insensitive to the assumptions (common envelope prescription and metallicities, or retention efficiency of accreted H to white dwarf core and mass transfer rate).Indeed GOODS High z SN Ia rates imply substantial delay in their progenitor model, and Hubble Higher z SN search constrains delay time distribution models as well.SLSN (I, II /H/ and extreme rare pulsational pair instability) are magnetars (ULGRB) in high local star formation rate, faint, low metallicity galaxies.

  1. Muon Creation in Supernova Matter Facilitates Neutrino-Driven Explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, R; Janka, H-T; Lohs, A; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Horowitz, C J; Melson, T

    2017-12-15

    Muons can be created in nascent neutron stars (NSs) due to the high electron chemical potentials and the high temperatures. Because of their relatively lower abundance compared to electrons, their role has so far been ignored in numerical simulations of stellar core collapse and NS formation. However, the appearance of muons softens the NS equation of state, triggers faster NS contraction, and thus leads to higher luminosities and mean energies of the emitted neutrinos. This strengthens the postshock heating by neutrinos and can facilitate explosions by the neutrino-driven mechanism.

  2. SNEWS - The Supernova Early Warning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SuperNova Early Warning System is a cooperative project involving many experimenters coming from several, past and present, neutrino detectors. The primary goal of the collaboration is to provide the astronomical community with a prompt alert at the time of next galactic supernova. Requiring the online coincidence among neutrino detectors, world-wide distributed and with different detection techniques, SNEWS will generate a reliable, prompt and automated alert by eliminating the potential local false triggers. In this paper I will give a concise overview on the project motivations, network implementation, working procedures and current status.

  3. OGLE-2014-SN-073 as a fallback accretion powered supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Terreran, Giacomo; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the possibility that the energetic Type II supernova OGLE-2014-SN-073 is powered by a fallback accretion following the failed explosion of a massive star. Taking massive hydrogen-rich supernova progenitor models, we estimate the fallback accretion rate and calculate the light-curve evolution of supernovae powered by the fallback accretion. We find that such fallback accretion powered models can reproduce the overall observational properties of OGLE-2014-SN-073. It may imply that some failed explosions could be observed as energetic supernovae like OGLE-2014-SN-073 instead of faint supernovae as previously proposed.

  4. The death of massive stars - I. Observational constraints on the progenitors of Type II-P supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, S. J.; Eldridge, J. J.; Crockett, R. M.; Maund, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results of a 10.5-yr, volume-limited (28-Mpc) search for supernova (SN) progenitor stars. In doing so we compile all SNe discovered within this volume (132, of which 27 per cent are Type Ia) and determine the relative rates of each subtype from literature studies. The core-collapse SNe break down into 59 per cent II-P and 29 per cent Ib/c, with the remainder being IIb (5 per cent), IIn (4 per cent) and II-L (3 per cent). There have been 20 II-P SNe with high-quality optical or near-infrared pre-explosion images that allow a meaningful search for the progenitor stars. In five cases they are clearly red supergiants, one case is unconstrained, two fall on compact coeval star clusters and the other twelve have no progenitor detected. We review and update all the available data for the host galaxies and SN environments (distance, metallicity and extinction) and determine masses and upper mass estimates for these 20 progenitor stars using the STARS stellar evolutionary code and a single consistent homogeneous method. A maximum likelihood calculation suggests that the minimum stellar mass for a Type II-P to form is mmin = 8.5+1-1.5Msolar and the maximum mass for II-P progenitors is mmax = 16.5 +/- 1.5Msolar, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function holds for the progenitor population (in the range Γ = -1.35+0.3-0.7). The minimum mass is consistent with current estimates for the upper limit to white dwarf progenitor masses, but the maximum mass does not appear consistent with massive star populations in Local Group galaxies. Red supergiants in the Local Group have masses up to 25Msolar and the minimum mass to produce a Wolf-Rayet star in single star evolution (between solar and LMC metallicity) is similarly 25-30Msolar. The reason we have not detected any high-mass red supergiant progenitors above 17Msolar is unclear, but we estimate that it is statistically significant at 2.4σ confidence. Two simple reasons for this could be that we have systematically

  5. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  6. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  7. First Confirmed Supernova with the SkyMapper/Zooniverse Supernova Sighting Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B. E.; Moller, A.; Armstrong, P.; Mould, J.; Uddin, S.; Muthukrishna, D.; Panther, F. H.; Ruiter, A.; Ridden-Harper, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Sommer, N. E.; Zhang, B.; Seitenzahl, I.; Baeten, E.; Craggs, A.

    2017-05-01

    We report the classification of a type Ia supernova, SN 2017dxh, discovered in the SkyMapper Transient (SMT) Survey (Scalzo et al. 2017) which utilizes the 268-Mpix camera on the SkyMapper 1.3-m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory near Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia (Keller et al., 2007, PASA, 24, 1). The object was photometrically discovered by citizen scientists as part of the Zooniverse Supernova Sighting Project.

  8. X-Ray Studies of Supernova Remnants: A Different View of Supernova Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints o...

  9. The likelihood for supernova neutrino analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Ianni, A; Strumia, A; Torres, F R; Villante, F L; Vissani, F

    2009-01-01

    We derive the event-by-event likelihood that allows to extract the complete information contained in the energy, time and direction of supernova neutrinos, and specify it in the case of SN1987A data. We resolve discrepancies in the previous literature, numerically relevant already in the concrete case of SN1987A data.

  10. Supernovae and high density nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in producing prompt supernova explosions is examined. Results of calculations of Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana incorporating general relativity and a new high density EOS are presented, and the relevance of these calculations to laboratory experiments with heavy ions considered. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Discovery of Ten ASAS-SN Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, B.; Brimacombe, J.; Kiyota, S.; Stone, G.; Cruz, I.; Trappett, D.; Vallely, P.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Stritzinger, M.; Holmbo, S.

    2018-03-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, the "Leavitt" telescope in Fort Davis, Texas, the "Payne-Gaposchkin" telescope in Sutherland, South Africa, and the "Cassius" and "Paczynski" telescopes in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered several new transient sources.

  12. Evolution of Dust Extinction and Supernova Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani; Kobayashi

    1999-12-01

    We have made a quantitative calculation for the systematic evolution of the average extinction by interstellar dust in host galaxies of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae by using a realistic model of photometric and chemical evolution of galaxies and supernova rate histories in various galaxy types. We find that the average B-band extinction at z approximately 0.5 is typically 0.1-0.2 mag larger than the present value, under a natural assumption that dust optical depth is proportional to gas column density and gas metallicity. This systematic evolution causes average reddening with E(B-V&parr0; approximately 0.025-0.05 mag with the standard extinction curve, and this is comparable with the observational uncertainty of the reddening of high-redshift supernovae. Therefore, our result does not contradict the observations that show no significant reddening in high-z supernovae. However, the difference in apparent magnitude between an open universe and a Lambda-dominated flat universe is only approximately 0.2 mag at z approximately 0.5, and hence this systematic evolution of extinction should be taken into account in a reliable measurement of cosmological parameters. Considering this uncertainty, we show that it is difficult to discriminate between open and Lambda-dominated flat cosmologies from the current data.

  13. Cosmology with type-Ia supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Miquel, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    I review the use of type-Ia supernovae (SNe) for cosmological studies. After briefly recalling the main features of type-Ia SNe that lead to their use as cosmological probes, I briefly describe current and planned type-Ia SNe surveys, with special emphasis on their physics reach in the presence of systematic uncertainties, which will be dominant in nearly all cases.

  14. Simulating Supernovae Driven Outflows in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jaimee-Ian

    2018-01-01

    Galactic outflows, or winds, prove to be a necessary input for galactic simulations to produce results comparable to observation, for it solves issues caused by what previous literature dubbed the “angular momentum catastrophe.” While it is known that the nature of outflows depends on the nature of the Interstellar Medium (ISM), the mechanisms behind outflows are still not completely understood. We investigate the driving force behind galactic outflows and the factors that influence their behavior, hypothesizing that supernovae within the galaxy drive these winds. We study isolated, high-resolution, smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations, focusing specifically on dwarf galaxies due to their shallow potential wells, which allow for more significant outflows. We find that outflows follow star formation (and associated supernovae) suggesting the causal relationship between the two. Furthermore, simulations with higher diffusivity differ little in star formation rate, but show significantly lower outflow rates, suggesting that environmental factors that have little effect on regulating star formation can greatly influence outflows, and so efficient outflows can be driven by a constant rate of supernovae, depending on ISM behavior. We are currently analyzing disk morphology and ambient density in order to comprehend the effect of supernovae on the immediate interstellar gas. By attaining greater understanding of the origin of galactic outflows, we will be able to not only improve the accuracy of simulations, we will also be able to gain greater insight into galactic formation and evolution, as outflows and resultant inflows may be vital to the regulation of galaxies throughout their lifetimes.

  15. Investigating the diversity of supernovae type Iax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyman, J. D.; Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.

    2018-01-01

    SN 2002cx-like Type Ia supernovae (also known as SNe Iax) represent one of the most numerous peculiar SN classes. They differ from normal SNe Ia by having fainter peak magnitudes, faster decline rates and lower photospheric velocities, displaying a wide diversity in these properties. We present b...

  16. Supernova constraints on neutrino mass and mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article I review the constraints on neutrino mass and mixing coming from type-II supernovae. The bounds obtained on these parameters from shock reheating, -process nucleosynthesis and from SN1987A are discussed. Given the current constraints on neutrino mass and mixing the effect of oscillations of neutrinos ...

  17. Chandra Observations of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We present a new Chandra observation of Tycho's supernova remnant with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Multicolor X-ray imaging reveals new details of the outer shock and ejecta. At energies between 4 and 6 keV, the outline of the outer shock is clearly revealed in X-rays for the first time.

  18. Supernova constraints on neutrino mass and mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the effect of oscillations of neutrinos from a nearby supernova explosion in future detectors will also be discussed. Keywords. Neutrino ... the Chandrasekhar limiting mass the pressure of the relativistic electron gas alone can no longer counterbalance the .... Considering the limiting case of Ц × ^. К, (9) implies К — О . Also,.

  19. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R.P.; Fryxell, B.A.; Teyssier, R.; Moore, K.

    1999-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al. [Astrophys. J. 478, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10 - 15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer - Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh - Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10 3 s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. 51, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482 - 497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. 54, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A

  20. Production and Distribution of {sup 44}Ti and {sup 56}Ni in a Three-dimensional Supernova Model Resembling Cassiopeia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongwathanarat, Annop [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Ewald; Pllumbi, Else [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wanajo, Shinya, E-mail: annop.wongwathanarat@riken.jp [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2017-06-10

    The spatial and velocity distributions of nuclear species synthesized in the innermost regions of core-collapse supernovae can yield important clues about explosion asymmetries and the operation of the still disputed explosion mechanism. Recent observations of radioactive {sup 44}Ti with high-energy satellite telescopes ( Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array [ NuSTAR ], INTEGRAL ) have measured gamma-ray line details, which provide direct evidence of large-scale explosion asymmetries in SN 1987A and in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) even by mapping of the spatial brightness distribution ( NuSTAR ). Here we discuss a 3D simulation of a neutrino-driven explosion, using a parameterized neutrino engine, whose {sup 44}Ti distribution is mostly concentrated in one hemisphere pointing opposite to the neutron star (NS) kick velocity. Both exhibit intriguing resemblance to the observed morphology of the Cas A remnant, although neither the progenitor nor the explosion was fine-tuned for a perfect match. Our results demonstrate that the asymmetries observed in this remnant can, in principle, be accounted for by a neutrino-driven explosion, and that the high {sup 44}Ti abundance in Cas A may be explained without invoking rapid rotation or a jet-driven explosion, because neutrino-driven explosions generically eject large amounts of high-entropy matter. The recoil acceleration of the NS is connected to mass ejection asymmetries and is opposite to the direction of the stronger explosion, fully compatible with the gravitational tugboat mechanism. Our results also imply that Cas A and SN 1987A could possess similarly “one-sided” Ti and Fe asymmetries, with the difference that Cas A is viewed from a direction with large inclination angle to the NS motion, whereas the NS in SN 1987A should have a dominant velocity component pointing toward us.

  1. Supernova Search Charts and Handbook, Pack/set ICL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gregg D.; Bryan, James T., Jr.

    This unique atlas contains 248 charts of more than 300 of the brightest galaxies, each specially prepared to facilitate the discovery of supernovae. The comparison of these charts with the field seen in a telescope enables any extragalactic supernova to be spotted immediately. The charts include 345 galaxies printed on translucent paper for use on a light-box, each one carrying an explanation of the constellation in which the galaxy lies, special characteristics of the galaxy, observing instructions, expected maximum brightness for the supernovae in each galaxy, and the reference for the sequence. A handbook accompanies the charts advising on their use, on how to make and record supernova discoveries, and reviewing the present understanding of supernovae. Published for an international market, these charts carry real potential for numerous discoveries of supernovae. The Supernovea Search Charts are a must for both serious observers and the growing number of deep sky enthusiasts around the world. '...these charts and the handbook will eventually increase the detection rate of supernovae.' New Scientist'...a much needed addition to the library of the active observer who wishes to hunt for these most important objects.' Observatory'...a mine of useful information and contains many hints on observing supernovae, as well as appendices on current supernova research.' Contemporary Physics'..they are a valuable asset to the field of supernovae searching' Journal of the British Astronomical Association

  2. Cosmological Parameter Constraints from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program Three Year Spectroscopic Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brout, Dillon

    2018-01-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints from 251 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia Supernovae (0.02 Supernova Program (DESSN). The photometric calibration, scene modeling photometric pipeline, additional low-z supernovae samples (zcosmological results and systematics analysis are discussed.

  3. Impacto ambiental de los remanentes de supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  4. Spectroscopy of superluminous supernova host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloudas, G.; Kruehler, T.; Schulze, S

    2015-01-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both...... uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen......-poor) often (~50% in our sample) occur in a class of galaxies that is known as Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs). The probability of this happening by chance is negligible and we therefore conclude that the extreme environmental conditions and the SLSN phenomenon are related. In contrast, SLSNe...

  5. Novae, supernovae, and the island universe hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1988-01-01

    Arguments in Curtis's (1917) paper related to the island universe hypothesis and the existence of novae in spiral nebulae are considered. It is noted that the maximum magnitude versus rate-of-decline relation for novae may be the best tool presently available for the calibration of the extragalactic distance scale. Light curve observations of six novae are used to determine a distance of 18.6 + or - 3.5 MPc to the Virgo cluster. Results suggest that Type Ia supernovae cannot easily be used as standard candles, and that Type II supernovae are unsuitable as distance indicators. Factors other than precursor mass are probably responsible for determining the ultimate fate of evolving stars. 83 references

  6. THE AGES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Aubourg, Eric; Strauss, Michael A.; Tojeiro, Rita; Heavens, Alan; Jimenez, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Using light curves and host galaxy spectra of 101 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with redshift z ∼ 2.4 Gyr. We find that each channel contributes roughly half of the Type Ia rate in our reference sample. We also construct the average spectra of high-stretch and low-stretch SN Ia host galaxies, and find that the difference of these spectra looks like a main-sequence B star with nebular emission lines indicative of star formation. This supports our finding that there are two populations of SNe Ia, and indicates that the progenitors of high-stretch supernovae are at the least associated with very recent star formation in the last few tens of Myr. Our results provide valuable constraints for models of Type Ia progenitors and may help improve the calibration of SNe Ia as standard candles.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  8. HUBBLE CAPTURES VIEW OF SUPERNOVA BLAST IN REMOTE GALAXY CLUSTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In March 1996, the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 just happened to be pointed at the faraway galaxy cluster MS1054-0321 when it captured the light from an exploding star, called supernova 1996CL. The cluster is 8 billion light-years from Earth. The Hubble telescope can clearly distinguish the supernova light from the glow of its parent galaxy. The larger image on the left shows the entire cluster of galaxies. The galaxy where the supernova was discovered is located in the boxed area. The bright knot of light from the supernova and the fainter glow from the parent galaxy are shown in the inset image on the right. The arrow points to the light from the supernova explosion. The supernova was discovered by members of the Supernova Cosmology Project, led by Saul Perlmutter of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in California. Perlmutter and his team made this discovery using images from the Hubble telescope and ground-based observatories. The Hubble data were furnished by Megan Donahue of the Space Telescope Science Institute. Donahue was using the Hubble telescope to study galaxy cluster MS1054-0321. Members of the Supernova Project use ground-based telescopes to search for distant supernovae, such as 1996CL, by comparing multiple, wide-field images of galaxies and clusters of galaxies taken at different times. Supernovae are named for the year and the order in which they are found. Supernova 1996CL is a Type Ia supernova. Exploding stars of this type are particularly useful for cosmology because they share a standard maximum brightness. By measuring this brightness, astronomers can determine a Type Ia's distance from Earth. Astronomers use this information to measure the expansion rate of the universe.

  9. Photon Dispersion in a Supernova Core

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, A.; Raffelt, G.

    1997-01-01

    While the photon forward-scattering amplitude on free magnetic dipoles (e.g. free neutrons) vanishes, the nucleon magnetic moments still contribute significantly to the photon dispersion relation in a supernova (SN) core where the nucleon spins are not free due to their interaction. We study the frequency dependence of the relevant spin susceptibility in a toy model with only neutrons which interact by one-pion exchange. Our approach amounts to calculating the photon absorption rate from the ...

  10. Discovery of 7 ASAS-SN Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, J.; Nicholls, B.; Trappett, D.; Vallely, P.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Stritzinger, M.; Holmbo, S.; Stone, G.; Kiyota, S.

    2018-03-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, the quadruple 14-cm "Leavitt" telescope in Fort Davis, Texas, the quadruple 14-cm "Payne-Gaposchkin" telescope in Sutherland, South Africa, and the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" and "Paczynski" telescopes in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered several new transient sources.

  11. Supernova Neutrinos: Production, Oscillations and Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Tamborra, Irene; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Saviano, Ninetta; Scholberg, Kate; Bollig, Robert; Hudepohl, Lorenz; Chakraborty, Sovan

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in the collapse and explosion of massive stars, governing the infall dynamics of the stellar core, triggering and fueling the explosion and driving the cooling and deleptonization of the newly formed neutron star. Due to their role neutrinos carry information from the heart of the explosion and, due to their weakly interacting nature, offer the only direct probe of the dynamics and thermodynamics at the center of a supernova. In this paper, we review the present ...

  12. Supernova Neutrinos: Production, Oscillations and Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro MirizziBari Univ. & INFN, Bari; Irene Tamborra(GRAPPA Inst., Amsterdam); Hans-Thomas Janka(Max Planck Inst. for Astrophysics, Garching); Ninetta Saviano(IPPP, Durham); Kate Scholberg(Department of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham); Robert Bollig(TUM, Munich); Lorenz Hudepohl(MPCDF, Garching); Sovan Chakraborty(MPI, Munich)

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in the collapse and explosion of massive stars, governing the infall dynamics of the stellar core, triggering and fueling the explosion and driving the cooling and deleptonization of the newly formed neutron star. Due to their role neutrinos carry information from the heart of the explosion and, due to their weakly interacting nature, offer the only direct probe of the dynamics and thermodynamics at the center of a supernova. In this paper, we r...

  13. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  14. Sins: the Supernova Intensive Study - 87A Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert

    1991-07-01

    Supernovae are stars at the end of stellar evolution. They mark the moment of stellar destruction, act as the key process in the chemical evolution of the universe, serve as agitators and probes of the interstellar medium, and provide sharp and useful tools for cosmological investigations. As SN 1987A demonstrated, the best progress in this field comes from detailed study of the brightest objects. Many central problems of supernova research can be attacked by intensive and extensive observations of a handful of moderately bright supernovae using the HST cameras and spectrographs. SN 1987A provides a unique opportunity to connect the evolution of a supernova with the development of a supernova remnant and will be intensively studied in this program. Because supernovae touch on so many fields of astronomy, the results of this Supernova Intensive Study (SINS) will affect a broad range of areas from stellar interiors to cosmology so a diverse team of investigators has been assembled which includes experts on all these aspects of astronomy. While the first cycle observations concentrate on SN 1987A and on a fresh supernova to be studied at intermediate age, the second and third cycle will include target-of-opportunity observations of freshly-discovered supernovae which will strive for good UV coverage at early phases of the outburst.

  15. Explosion of red-supergiant stars: Influence of the atmospheric structure on shock breakout and early-time supernova radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; John Hillier, D.; Audit, Edouard

    2017-09-01

    therefore be the norm, not the exception, and a puzzling super-wind phase prior to core collapse may be superfluous.

  16. Supernova 2009kf: An Ultraviolet Bright Type IIP Supernova Discovered With Pan-Starrs 1 and Galex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. SUPERNOVA 2009kf: AN ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHT TYPE IIP SUPERNOVA DISCOVERED WITH PAN-STARRS 1 AND GALEX M. T. Botticella1, C...January 29; accepted 2010 May 12; published 2010 June 16 ABSTRACT We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of a luminous Type IIP Supernova ...magnitude MNUV = −21.5 ± 0.5 mag suggests such SNe could be discovered out to z ∼ 2.5 in the PS1 survey. Key words: stars: evolution – supernovae

  17. Improved Position and Additional Photometry for ASASSN-18bt, Bright Supernova in a Kepler Supernova Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornect, R.; Brimacombe, J.; Stone, G.; Post, R. S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Vallely, P.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Stritzinger, M.; Holmbo, S.; Bock, G.; Kiyota, S.

    2018-02-01

    We have obtained additional follow-up imaging, using several telescopes, of the nearby type Ia supernova ASASSN-18bt (ATEL #11253). This figure shows the archival SDSS g-band image of the host (left) and the R. Post confirmation image (right).

  18. Type Ia Supernova Modeling with Spectrophotometric Data from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers Saunders, Clare; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2018-01-01

    We present a set of empirical models for Type Ia Supernovae constructed using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory. Starting with the spectrophotometric data from this survey, Gaussian Processes and Expectation Maximization Factor Analysis were used to build a series of spectral time series templates that are combined linearly to form a model that can be fit to the lightcurves or spectra of a Type Ia supernova. We present a less-complex model that is tuned to minimize dispersion in the supernova corrected magnitudes and a more-complex model that maximizes the amount of SNIa spectral diversity captured. We show methods for lowering the amount of dispersion in corrected magnitudes using these models, thus increasing the precision of SNe Ia as a cosmological tool and decreasing the possibility for systematic uncertainties. The models are compared with other current methods of using SNe Ia for cosmology. We demonstrate their performance on photometric data, or combinations of spectral and photometric data, and their predicted utility for upcoming surveys such as LSST and WFIRST.

  19. Pair production of helicity-flipped neutrinos in supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Armando; Gandhi, Raj

    1989-01-01

    The emissivity was calculated for the pair production of helicity-flipped neutrinos, in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. Also presented are simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy-loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core, and this fact is used to extract neutrino mass limits from SN 1987A neutrino observations.

  20. Observational Signatures of Particle Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, E.A.; Vink, J.; Bykov, A.M.; Ohira, Y.; Raymond, J.C.; Terrier, R.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the current status of supernova remnants as the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. We summarize observations of supernova remnants, covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum and describe what these observations tell us about the acceleration processes by high Mach number shock fronts. We

  1. What have we learned from Supernova 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper after a brief review on the supernova explosions, the authors describe the observations of neutrinos and the submillisecond optical pulsar from Supernova 1987A, and summarize recent works on the implications of the neutrino detections to the physics and properties of neutrinos, invisible axions and other exotic particles

  2. Classification of ASASSN-18dl as a type Ia supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessi, P.; Quirola, J.; Navarro, G.; Dennefeld, M.; Ferrero, L.; Sani, E.; Schmidtobreick, L.

    2018-02-01

    We report the classification of the supernova candidate ASASSN-18dl which was discovered as a V 17.6mag transient by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014) on 2018-02-21.25 UT. The discovery is reported in ATel #11343 (Stone et al. 2018).

  3. Tycho's Star and the supernovae of Uranographia Britannica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Kevin J.

    2001-04-01

    Kevin J Kilburn describes how a recently discovered 18th century star atlas can shed new light on old supernovae. The discovery in the library of Manchester Astronomical Society of a first impression of John Bevis's Uranographia Britannica has led to a reappraisal of these early observations. In particular, his observations of Tycho's Star suggest a new interpretation of the supernovae responsible.

  4. Supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Supernova remnants have long been considered to be the dominant sources of Galactic cosmic rays. For a long time the prime evidence consisted of radio synchrotron radiation from supernova remnants, indicating the presence of electrons with energies of several GeV. However, in order to explain the

  5. Rapid Neutron Capture Process in Supernovae and Chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We have studied the r-process in supernovae for the production of heavy elements beyond = 40 with the newest mass values available. The supernova envelopes at a temperature ≻ 109 K and neutron density of 1024 cm-3 are considered to be one of the most potential sites for the r-process. The primary ...

  6. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate

  7. Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, Justyn R; Crowther, Paul A; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Langer, Norbert

    2017-10-28

    Almost since the beginning, massive stars and their resultant supernovae have played a crucial role in the Universe. These objects produce tremendous amounts of energy and new, heavy elements that enrich galaxies, encourage new stars to form and sculpt the shapes of galaxies that we see today. The end of millions of years of massive star evolution and the beginning of hundreds or thousands of years of supernova evolution are separated by a matter of a few seconds, in which some of the most extreme physics found in the Universe causes the explosive and terminal disruption of the star. Key questions remain unanswered in both the studies of how massive stars evolve and the behaviour of supernovae, and it appears the solutions may not lie on just one side of the explosion or the other or in just the domain of the stellar evolution or the supernova astrophysics communities. The need to view massive star evolution and supernovae as continuous phases in a single narrative motivated the Theo Murphy international scientific meeting 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae' at Chicheley Hall, UK, in June 2016, with the specific purpose of simultaneously addressing the scientific connections between theoretical and observational studies of massive stars and their supernovae, through engaging astronomers from both communities.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. An integral view of fast shocks around supernova 1006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolic, S.; Heng, K.; Kupko, D.; Husemann, B.; Raymond, J.C.; Hughes, J.P.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Ven, G. van de

    2013-01-01

    Supernova remnants are among the most spectacular examples of astrophysical pistons in our cosmic neighborhood. The gas expelled by the supernova explosion is launched with velocities ~1000 kilometers per second into the ambient, tenuous interstellar medium, producing shocks that excite hydrogen

  9. A metallicity study of 1987A-like supernova host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Razza, A.; Gafton, E.; Pastorello, A.; Fransson, C.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Leloudas, G.; Ergon, M.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The origin of the blue supergiant (BSG) progenitor of Supernova (SN) 1987A has long been debated, along with the role that its sub-solar metallicity played. We now have a sample of SN 1987A-like events that arise from the rare core collapse (CC) of massive (~20 M⊙) and compact (≲100 R⊙) BSGs. Aims: The metallicity of the explosion sites of the known BSG SNe is investigated, as well as the association of BSG SNe to star-forming regions. Methods: Both indirect and direct metallicity measurements of 13 BSG SN host galaxies are presented, and compared to those of other CC SN types. Indirect measurements are based on the known luminosity-metallicity relation and on published metallicity gradients of spiral galaxies. In order to provide direct metallicity measurements based on strong line diagnostics, we obtained spectra of each BSG SN host galaxy both at the exact SN explosion sites and at the positions of other H ii regions. We also observed these hosts with narrow Hα and broad R-band filters in order to produce continuum-subtracted Hα images. This allows us to measure the degree of association between BSG SNe and star-forming regions, and to compare it to that of other SN types. Results: BSG SNe are found to explode either in low-luminosity galaxies or at large distances from the nuclei of luminous hosts. Therefore, their indirectly measured metallicities are typically lower than those of SNe IIP and Ibc. This result is confirmed by the direct metallicity estimates, which show slightly sub-solar oxygen abundances (12 + log (O/H) ~ 8.3-8.4 dex) for the local environments of BSG SNe, similar to that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), where SN 1987A exploded. However, we also note that two objects of our sample (SNe 1998A and 2004em) were found at near solar metallicity. SNe IIb have a metallicity distribution similar to that of our BSG SNe. Finally, we find that the degree of association to star-forming regions is similar among BSG SNe, SNe IIP and

  10. Distant Supernovae Indicate Ever-Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    ESO Astronomers Contribute towards Resolution of Cosmic Puzzle Since the discovery of the expansion of the Universe by American astronomer Edwin Hubble in the 1920's, by measurement of galaxy velocities, astronomers have tried to learn how this expansion changes with time. Until now, most scientists have been considering two possibilities: the expansion rate is slowing down and will ultimately either come to a halt - whereafter the Universe would start to contract, or it will continue to expand forever. However, new studies by two independent research teams, based on observations of exploding stars ( supernovae ) by ESO astronomers [1] with astronomical telescopes at the La Silla Observatory as well as those of their colleagues at other institutions, appear to show that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating . The results take the discovery of the cosmological expansion one step further and challenge recent models of the Universe. If the new measurements are indeed correct, they show that the elusive "cosmological constant" , as proposed by Albert Einstein , contributes significantly to the evolution of the Universe. The existence of a non-zero cosmological constant implies that a repulsive force, counter-acting gravity, currently dominates the universal expansion , and consequently leads to an ever-expanding Universe. This new research is being named as the "Breakthrough of the Year" by the renowned US science journal Science in the December 18, 1998, issue. A Press Release is published by the journal on this occasion. "Fundamental Parameters" of the Universe Three fundamental parameters govern all cosmological models based on the theory of General Relativity. They are 1. the current expansion rate as described by Hubble's constant , i.e. the proportionality factor between expansion velocity and distance 2. the average matter density in the Universe, and 3. the amount of "other energy" present in space. From the measured values of these fundamental

  11. Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, S. [Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France); Aldering, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Antilogus, P. [Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France); Aragon, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Baltay, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bongard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buton, C [Inst. of Nuclear Physics of Lyon (France); Childress, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Copin, Y. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics of Lyon (France); Gangler, E. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics of Lyon (France); Loken, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nugent, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pain, R. [Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France); Pecontal, E. [Center of Research Astrophysics of Lyon (CRAL) (France); Pereira, R. [Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France); Perlmutter, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rabinowitz, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Rigaudier, G. [Center of Research Astrophysics of Lyon (CRAL) (France); Ripoche, P. [Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France); Runge, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Scalzo, R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Smadja, G. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics of Lyon (France); Tao, C. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics of Lyon (France); Thomas, R. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, C. [Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France)

    2017-07-06

    The use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe a decade ago. Now that large second generation surveys have significantly increased the size and quality of the high-redshift sample, the cosmological constraints are limited by the currently available sample of ~50 cosmologically useful nearby supernovae. The Nearby Supernova Factory addresses this problem by discovering nearby supernovae and observing their spectrophotometric time development. Our data sample includes over 2400 spectra from spectral timeseries of 185 supernovae. This talk presents results from a portion of this sample including a Hubble diagram (relative distance vs. redshift) and a description of some analyses using this rich dataset.

  12. Radioactive Iron Rain: Evidence of a Nearby Supernova Explosion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A very close supernova explosion could have caused a mass extinction of life in Earth. In 1996, Brian Fields, the late Dave Schramm and the speaker proposed looking for unstable isotopes such as Iron 60 that could have been deposited by a recent nearby supernova explosion. A group from the Technical University of Munich has discovered Iron 60 in deep-ocean sediments and ferromanganese crusts due to one or more supernovae that exploded O(100) parsecs away about 2.5 million years ago. These results have recently been confirmed by a group from the Australian National University, and the Munich group has also discovered supernova Iron 60 in lunar rock samples. This talk will discuss the interpretation of these results in terms of supernova models, and the possible implications for life on Earth.

  13. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; Krisciunas, Kevin; Krzeminski, Wojtek; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values

  14. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 60, La Serena (Chile); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, Wojtek [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); McCarthy, Patrick [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: lgalbany@das.uchile.cl [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP, CONICET) (Argentina); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  15. The Cassiopeia A supernova was of type IIb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Oliver; Birkmann, Stephan M; Usuda, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Goto, Miwa; Rieke, George H; Misselt, Karl A

    2008-05-30

    Cassiopeia A is the youngest supernova remnant known in the Milky Way and a unique laboratory for supernova physics. We present an optical spectrum of the Cassiopeia A supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from observations of a scattered light echo more than three centuries after the direct light of the explosion swept past Earth. The spectrum shows that Cassiopeia A was a type IIb supernova and originated from the collapse of the helium core of a red supergiant that had lost most of its hydrogen envelope before exploding. Our finding concludes a long-standing debate on the Cassiopeia A progenitor and provides new insight into supernova physics by linking the properties of the explosion to the wealth of knowledge about its remnant.

  16. Late formation of silicon carbide in type II supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O’D.; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    We have found that individual presolar silicon carbide (SiC) dust grains from supernovae show a positive correlation between 49Ti and 28Si excesses, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of the short-lived (t½ = 330 days) 49V to 49Ti in the inner highly 28Si-rich Si/S zone. The 49V-49Ti chronometer shows that these supernova SiC dust grains formed at least 2 years after their parent stars exploded. This result supports recent dust condensation calculations that predict a delayed formation of carbonaceous and SiC grains in supernovae. The astronomical observation of continuous buildup of dust in supernovae over several years can, therefore, be interpreted as a growing addition of C-rich dust to the dust reservoir in supernovae. PMID:29376119

  17. SN 1987A: The Supernova of the Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborne, George

    2012-01-01

    Supernova 1987 A in the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of the most intensively studied objects in the universe and a Rosetta Stone for understanding the explosions of massive stars. Approaching its 25th anniversary, SN 1987 A is a very young supernova remnant, a phase previously unobserved in any other supernova. The supernova of the 20th Century is now the supernova remnant of the 21st Century. In this talk I will discuss recent observations from the far-ultraviolet to the far-infrared with HST, the VLT, Spitzer, and the Herschel Space Observatory. These data reveal new insights into the composition, geometry, and heating of the explosion debris, the shock interaction with circumstellar material, and dust in the SN 1987 A system.

  18. Contribution of infrared observations to the study of supernovae remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douvion, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of dust in young supernovae remnants observed in middle infrared, mainly by means of the ISOCAM instrument installed on the ISO satellite. The author first presents the supernovae physics and the studied young remnants, describes dusts and the main sites of formation and destruction, and outlines the difficulties and benefits of observations performed in the middle infrared. Then, the author reports acquired evidences related to the formation of dusts in supernovae, and the search for a millimetre emission by cold dust contained in regions which are not yet excited by the shock, in order to better assess the overall quantities created by supernovae. He reports the use of observations of dust and neon in Cassiopeia A to perform a diagnosis on the mixture of elements during the supernovae explosion [fr

  19. Deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charignon, Camille

    2013-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are an important tool to determine the expansion history of our Universe. Thus, considerable attention has been given to both observations and models of these events. The most popular explosion model is the central ignition of a deflagration in the dense C+O interior of a Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf, followed by a transition to a detonation (TDD). We study in this thesis a new mechanism for this transition. The most robust and studied progenitor model and the postulated mechanism for the TDD, the so called 'Zel'dovich gradient mechanism', are presented. State of the art 3D simulations of such a delayed detonation, at the price of some adjustments, can indeed reproduce observables. But due to largely unresolved physical scales, such simulations cannot explain the TDD by themselves, and especially, the physical mechanism which triggers this transition - which is not yet understood, even on Earth, for unconfined media. It is then discussed why the current Zel'dovich mechanism might be too constraining for a SN Ia model, pointing to a new approach, which is the core result of this thesis.In the final part, our alternative model for DDT in supernovae, the acoustic heating of the pre-supernova envelope, is presented. A planar model first proves that small amplitude acoustic perturbations (generated by a turbulent flame) are actually amplified in a steep density gradient, up to a point where they turn into shocks able to trigger a detonation. Then, this mechanism is applied to more realistic models, taking into account, in spherical geometry, the expanding envelope. A parametric study demonstrates the validity of the model for a reasonable range of acoustic wave amplitudes and frequencies.To conclude, some exploratory 2D and 3D MHD simulations, seeking for realistic acoustic source compatible with our mechanism, are presented. (author) [fr

  20. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA CLASSIFICATION WITH MACHINE LEARNING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochner, Michelle; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.; McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k -nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  1. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. II. PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Wide-field surveys will soon be discovering Type Ia supernovae (SNe) at rates of several thousand per year. Spectroscopic follow-up can only scratch the surface for such enormous samples, so these extensive data sets will only be useful to the extent that they can be characterized by the survey photometry alone. In a companion paper we introduced the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method for analyzing SNe using direct comparison to template light curves, and demonstrated its application for photometric SN classification. In this work we extend the SOFT method to derive estimates of redshift and luminosity distance for Type Ia SNe, using light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) as a validation set. Redshifts determined by SOFT using light curves alone are consistent with spectroscopic redshifts, showing an rms scatter in the residuals of rms z = 0.051. SOFT can also derive simultaneous redshift and distance estimates, yielding results that are consistent with the currently favored ΛCDM cosmological model. When SOFT is given spectroscopic information for SN classification and redshift priors, the rms scatter in Hubble diagram residuals is 0.18 mag for the SDSS data and 0.28 mag for the SNLS objects. Without access to any spectroscopic information, and even without any redshift priors from host galaxy photometry, SOFT can still measure reliable redshifts and distances, with an increase in the Hubble residuals to 0.37 mag for the combined SDSS and SNLS data set. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we predict that SOFT will be able to improve constraints on time-variable dark energy models by a factor of 2-3 with each new generation of large-scale SN surveys.

  2. Constraining inverse-curvature gravity with supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, José; Weller, Jochen

    2006-02-03

    We show that models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature, can explain the current accelerated expansion of the Universe without resorting to dark energy and without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedmann equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe and performed a detailed analysis of supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. If we further include constraints on the current expansion of the Universe and on its age, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07baryonic matter component.

  3. Sensitivity studies for supernovae type Ia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thien Tam; Goebel, Kathrin; Reifarth, Rene [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Calder, Alan [SUNY - Department of Physics and Astronomy, New York (United States); Pignatari, Marco [Konkoly Observatory of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Townsley, Dean [The University of Alabama (United States); Travaglio, Claudia [INAF - Astrophysical Observatory, Turin (Italy); Collaboration: NuGrid collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The NuGrid research platform provides a simulation framework to study the nucleosynthesis in multi-dimensional Supernovae Type Ia models. We use a large network of over 5,000 isotopes and more than 60,000 reactions. The nucleosynthesis is investigated in post-processing simulations with temperature and density profiles, initial abundance distributions and a set of reaction rates as input. The sensitivity of the isotopic abundances to α-, proton-, and neutron-capture reaction, their inverse reactions, as well as fusion reactions were investigated. First results have been achieved for different mass coordinates of the exploding star.

  4. Adiabatic supernova expansion into the circumstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, D.L.; Liang, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    We perform one dimensional numerical simulations with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code of the adiabatic expansion of a supernova into the surrounding medium. The early expansion follows Chevalier's analytic self-similar solution until the reverse shock reaches the ejecta core. We follow the expansion as it evolves towards the adiabatic blast wave phase. Some memory of the earlier phases of expansion is retained in the interior even when the outer regions expand as a blast wave. We find the results are sensitive to the initial configuration of the ejecta and to the placement of gridpoints. 6 refs., 2 figs

  5. Neutral currents, supernovae neutrinos, and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The inelastic interactions of neutrinos during stellar collapse and neutron star cooling are discussed. The primary mechanism for dissipative neutrino reactions is nuclear excitation by neutral current scattering, a process not included in standard descriptions of supernovae. Charge-current and neutral current ''preheating'' of iron lying outside the shock front appears to be significant in the few milliseconds near shock breakout. This could help produce a more energetic shock. During the cooling phase, the neutral current interactions of muon and taon neutrinos appear to be responsible for some interesting nucleosynthesis. I discuss two examples the production of fluorine and neutrino-induced r-process nucleosynthesis. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  6. NASA's Chandra Sees Brightest Supernova Ever

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    WASHINGTON - The brightest stellar explosion ever recorded may be a long-sought new type of supernova, according to observations by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ground-based optical telescopes. This discovery indicates that violent explosions of extremely massive stars were relatively common in the early universe, and that a similar explosion may be ready to go off in our own galaxy. "This was a truly monstrous explosion, a hundred times more energetic than a typical supernova," said Nathan Smith of the University of California at Berkeley, who led a team of astronomers from California and the University of Texas in Austin. "That means the star that exploded might have been as massive as a star can get, about 150 times that of our sun. We've never seen that before." Chandra X-ray Image of SN 2006gy Chandra X-ray Image of SN 2006gy Astronomers think many of the first generation of stars were this massive, and this new supernova may thus provide a rare glimpse of how the first stars died. It is unprecedented, however, to find such a massive star and witness its death. The discovery of the supernova, known as SN 2006gy, provides evidence that the death of such massive stars is fundamentally different from theoretical predictions. "Of all exploding stars ever observed, this was the king," said Alex Filippenko, leader of the ground-based observations at the Lick Observatory at Mt. Hamilton, Calif., and the Keck Observatory in Mauna Kea, Hawaii. "We were astonished to see how bright it got, and how long it lasted." The Chandra observation allowed the team to rule out the most likely alternative explanation for the supernova: that a white dwarf star with a mass only slightly higher than the sun exploded into a dense, hydrogen-rich environment. In that event, SN 2006gy should have been 1,000 times brighter in X-rays than what Chandra detected. Animation of SN 2006gy Animation of SN 2006gy "This provides strong evidence that SN 2006gy was, in fact, the death of an

  7. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  8. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caragiulo M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Large Area Telescope (LAT, on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  9. Decoherence and oscillations of supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, Joern [University of Bergen, Institute for Physics and Technology (Norway); Smirnov, Alexei Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); The Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Supernova neutrinos have several exceptional features which can lead to interesting physical consequences. At the production point their wave packets have an extremely small size σ{sub x} ∝ 10{sup -11} cm; hence the energy uncertainty can be as large as the energy itself, σ{sub E} ∝ E, and the coherence length is short. On the way to the Earth the wave packets of mass eigenstates spread to macroscopic sizes and separate. Inside the Earth the mass eigenstates split into eigenstates in matter and oscillate again. The coherence length in the Earth is comparable with the radius of the Earth. We explore these features and their consequences. (1) We present new estimates of the wave packet size. (2) We consider the decoherence condition for the case of wave packets with spatial spread and show that it is not modified by the spread. (3) We study the coherence of neutrinos propagating in a multi-layer medium with density jumps at the borders of layers. In this case coherence can be partially restored due to a ''catch-up effect'', increasing the coherence length beyond the usual estimate. This catch-up effect can occur for supernova neutrinos as they cross the shock wave fronts in the exploding star or the core of the Earth. (orig.)

  10. Apparent cosmic acceleration from Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Lawrence H.; Heinesen, Asta; Wiltshire, David L.

    2017-11-01

    Parameters that quantify the acceleration of cosmic expansion are conventionally determined within the standard Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model, which fixes spatial curvature to be homogeneous. Generic averages of Einstein's equations in inhomogeneous cosmology lead to models with non-rigidly evolving average spatial curvature, and different parametrizations of apparent cosmic acceleration. The timescape cosmology is a viable example of such a model without dark energy. Using the largest available supernova data set, the JLA catalogue, we find that the timescape model fits the luminosity distance-redshift data with a likelihood that is statistically indistinguishable from the standard spatially flat Λ cold dark matter cosmology by Bayesian comparison. In the timescape case cosmic acceleration is non-zero but has a marginal amplitude, with best-fitting apparent deceleration parameter, q_{0}=-0.043^{+0.004}_{-0.000}. Systematic issues regarding standardization of supernova light curves are analysed. Cuts of data at the statistical homogeneity scale affect light-curve parameter fits independent of cosmology. A cosmological model dependence of empirical changes to the mean colour parameter is also found. Irrespective of which model ultimately fits better, we argue that as a competitive model with a non-FLRW expansion history, the timescape model may prove a useful diagnostic tool for disentangling selection effects and astrophysical systematics from the underlying expansion history.

  11. Constraints on the masses of supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    1984-02-01

    Star formation rates (SFR) for 175 nearby galaxies, derived from H-alpha emission data, are combined with the mean SN II rate to estimate the critical initial mass for a SN II progenitor. The best fitting SFR models, when combined with the observed SN II rate in face-on Sc galaxies, yield a lower limit mass for SN II progenitors of about 8 plus or minus 1 solar masses. A systematic underestimation of either the supernova rate or the Hubble constant used may lower this limit to 5-6 solar mases, but it is unlikely that the critical mass is lower than 5 or higher than 12 solar masses. The distribution of SN II in spiral arms of galaxies, and the low Galactic supernova rate, also suggest a mass limit of 8 plus or minus 3 solar masses. These limits are generally consistent with the recently determined progenitor masses of white dwarfs (Anthony-Twarog, 1982) and pulsars (Shipman and Green, 1980).

  12. A more direct measure of supernova rates in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, Dave; Greenhouse, Matthew A.

    1994-01-01

    We determine ages for young supernova remnants in the starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253 by applying Chevalier's model for radio emission from supernova blast waves expanding into the ejecta of their precursor stars. Absolute ages are determined by calibrating the model with radio observations of Cas A. We derive supernova rates of 0.10 and 0.08/yr for M82 and NGC 253, respectively. Assuming L (sub FIR) to be proportional to the supernova rate, we find r(sub SN) approximately equal 2 x 10(exp -12) x L(sub FIR), solar yr(exp -1) for these archetypal starburst galaxies. This approach is unique in that the supernova rate is derived from direct observation of supernova remnants rather than from star formation rates and an assumed initial mass function (IMF). We suggest that the approach presented here can be used to derive star-formation rates that are more directly related to observable quantities than those derived by other methods. We find that the supernova rate, far infrared (FIR) luminosity, and dynamical mass of the M82 starburst place few constraints on the initial mass function (IMF) slope and mass limits.

  13. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. D.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.

    2000-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short enough times that many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extinction is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micrometer emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and half after th explosion. Since dust extinction is much less at 6.63 micrometers than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the [NiII] line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micrometers using ISOCAM to search for the [NiII] emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any [NiII] line emission brighter than a 5-sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled ot the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a [NiII] line with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a [NiII] line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  14. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; Rank, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short times. Many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extintion is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in the active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micron emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and a half after the explosion. Since dust extintion is much less at 6.63 pm than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the NiII line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micron using ISOCAM to search for the NiII emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any NiII line emission brighter than a 5sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled to the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a NiII with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a NiII line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  15. See Change: Cosmology Analysis Update for the Supernova Cosmology Project High-z Cluster Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brian; Aldering, Gregory; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle; Bohringer, Hans; Boone, Kyle Robert; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos; Currie, Miles; Deustua, Susana; Dixon, Samantha; Eisenhardt, Peter; Fassbender, Rene; Fruchter, Andrew; Gladders, Michael; Gonzalez, Anthony; Goobar, Ariel; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hilton, Matt; Hoekstra, Henk; Hook, Isobel; Huang, Xiaosheng; Huterer, Dragan; Jee, Myungkook James; Kim, Alex; Kowalski, Marek; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Luther, Kyle; Meyers, Joshua; Muzzin, Adam; Nordin, Jakob; Pain, Reynald; Perlmutter, Saul; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Rozo, Eduardo; Rubin, David; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Rykoff, Eli; Santos, Joana; Myers Saunders, Clare; Sofiatti, Caroline; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Stanford, Spencer; Stern, Daniel; Suzuki, Nao; Webb, Tracy; Wechsler, Risa; Williams, Steven; Willis, Jon; Wilson, Gillian; Yen, Mike

    2018-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. We present the status of the ongoing blinded cosmology analysis, demonstrating substantial improvement to the uncertainty on the Dark Energy density above z~1. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.8, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  16. A cosmogonical analogy between the Big Bang and a supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    The Big Bang may be discussed most easily in analogy with an expanding spherical shell. An expanding spherical shell, in turn, is quite similar to an ejected supernova shell. In both the Big Bang and the supernova, fragmentation is postulated to occur, where each fragment of the universe becomes a galaxy, and each fragment of supernova shell becomes a solar system. By supporting the presence of shearing flow at the time of fragmentation, a model has been constructed to examine the results in both cases. It has been shown that the model produces a good description of reality on both the galactic and solar system scales. (Auth.)

  17. Generation of Cosmic rays in Historical Supernova Remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinitsyna V.Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of observations of two types of Galactic supernova remnants with the SHALON mirror Cherenkov telescope of Tien-Shan high-mountain Observatory: the shell-type supernova remnants Tycho, Cas A and IC 443; plerions Crab Nebula, 3c58(SN1181 and Geminga (probably plerion. The experimental data have confirmed the prediction of the theory about the hadronic generation mechanism of very high energy (800 GeV - 100 TeV gamma-rays in Tycho's supernova remnant. The data obtainedsuggest that the very high energy gamma-ray emission in the objects being discussedis different in origin.

  18. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  19. Dust in a Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: Spitzer Spectroscopy of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 micron IR spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 micron, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks (> 1000 km/s) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are approx 80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km/s) into moderate density material (n(sub o) approx 50-100 / cubic cm) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  20. Preparatory studies for the WFIRST supernova cosmology measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    In the context of the WFIRST-AFTA Science Definition Team we developed a first version of a supernova program, described in the WFIRST-AFTA SDT report. This program uses the imager to discover supernova candidates and an Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) to obtain spectrophotometric light curves and higher signal to noise spectra of the supernovae near peak to better characterize the supernovae and thus minimize systematic errors. While this program was judged a robust one, and the estimates of the sensitivity to the cosmological parameters were felt to be reliable, due to limitation of time the analysis was clearly limited in depth on a number of issues. The goal of this proposal is to further develop this program and refine the estimates of the sensitivities to the cosmological parameters using more sophisticated systematic uncertainty models and covariance error matrices that fold in more realistic data concerning observed populations of SNe Ia as well as more realistic instrument models. We propose to develop analysis algorithms and approaches that are needed to build, optimize, and refine the WFIRST instrument and program requirements to accomplish the best supernova cosmology measurements possible. We plan to address the following: a) Use realistic Supernova populations, subclasses and population drift. One bothersome uncertainty with the supernova technique is the possibility of population drift with redshift. We are in a unique position to characterize and mitigate such effects using the spectrophotometric time series of real Type Ia supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory). Each supernova in this sample has global galaxy measurements as well as additional local environment information derived from the IFS spectroscopy. We plan to develop methods of coping with this issue, e.g., by selecting similar subsamples of supernovae and allowing additional model flexibility, in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. These studies will allow us to

  1. The supernova - supernova remnant connection through multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Petruk, O.; Ono, M.

    2017-10-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are diffuse extended sources often characterized by a rather complex morphology and a highly non-uniform distribution of ejecta. General consensus is that such a morphology reflects, on one hand, pristine structures and features of the progenitor supernova (SN) explosion and, on the other hand, the early interaction of the SN blast wave with the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium (CSM) formed in the latest stages of the progenitor star's evolution. Deciphering X-ray observations of SNRs, therefore, might open the possibility to reconstruct the ejecta structure as it was soon after the SN explosion and the structure and geometry of the medium immediately surrounding the progenitor star. This requires accurate and detailed models which describe the evolution from the on-set of the SN to the full remnant development and which connect the X-ray emission properties of the remnants to the progenitor SNe. Here we show how multi-dimensional SN-SNR magnetohydrodynamic models have been very effective in deciphering X-ray observations of SNR Cassiopeia A and SN 1987A. This has allowed us to unveil the average structure of ejecta in the immediate aftermath of the SN explosion and to constrain the 3D pre-supernova structure and geometry of the environment surrounding the progenitor SN.

  2. Magnetar-powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. II. Broad-line Supernovae Ic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Moriya, Takashi J.; Woosley, Stan; Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Whalen, Daniel J.; Suwa, Yudai; Bromm, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Nascent neutron stars (NSs) with millisecond periods and magnetic fields in excess of 1016 Gauss can drive highly energetic and asymmetric explosions known as magnetar-powered supernovae. These exotic explosions are one theoretical interpretation for supernovae Ic-BL, which are sometimes associated with long gamma-ray bursts. Twisted magnetic field lines extract the rotational energy of the NS and release it as a disk wind or a jet with energies greater than 1052 erg over ˜20 s. What fraction of the energy of the central engine go into the wind and the jet remain unclear. We have performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of magnetar-powered supernovae (SNe) driven by disk winds and jets with the CASTRO code to investigate the effect of the central engine on nucleosynthetic yields, mixing, and light curves. We find that these explosions synthesize less than 0.05 {M}⊙ of {}56{Ni} and that this mass is not very sensitive to central engine type. The morphology of the explosion can provide a powerful diagnostic of the properties of the central engine. In the absence of a circumstellar medium, these events are not very luminous, with peak bolometric magnitudes of {M}b˜ -16.5 due to low {}56{Ni} production.

  3. A Python Calculator for Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, D. A.; Williams, J. E.

    2017-05-01

    A freely available Python code for modeling supernova remnant (SNR) evolution has been created. This software is intended for two purposes: to understand SNR evolution and to use in modeling observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs. In addition, alternate evolutionary models are available, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy-loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity versus time, as well as SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum. Some interesting properties of SNR evolution are demonstrated using the program.

  4. Multiple spectral splits of supernova neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Raffelt, Georg G; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2009-07-31

    Collective oscillations of supernova neutrinos swap the spectra f(nu(e))(E) and f(nu[over ](e))(E) with those of another flavor in certain energy intervals bounded by sharp spectral splits. This phenomenon is far more general than previously appreciated: typically one finds one or more swaps and accompanying splits in the nu and nu[over ] channels for both inverted and normal neutrino mass hierarchies. Depending on an instability condition, swaps develop around spectral crossings (energies where f(nu(e))=f(nu(x)), f(nu[over ](e))=f(nu[over ](x)) as well as E-->infinity where all fluxes vanish), and the widths of swaps are determined by the spectra and fluxes. Washout by multiangle decoherence varies across the spectrum and splits can survive as sharp spectral features.

  5. Light curve of type I supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.; Kriese, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of the intermediate and late time luminosity of type I supernovae based on 100% efficiency for optical emission of energy deposited by the Ni 56 decay chain give good agreement with observations provided M/sub ej/ v -2 = (2.2 +- 0.5) x 10 17 M. s 2 cm -2 where M/sub ej/ is the ejected mass an v is the expansion velocity. Account must be taken of the escape of both gamma rays and positrons. These two escape processes as well as the early luminosity peak as calculated by Colgate and McKee are all consistent with the same value of M/sub ej//v 2

  6. DARK MATTER ADMIXED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, S.-C.; Chu, M.-C.; Lin, L.-M.

    2015-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the thermonuclear explosion of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs with dark matter (DM) cores in Newtonian gravity. We include a 19-isotope nuclear reaction network and make use of the pure turbulent deflagration model as the explosion mechanism in our simulations. Our numerical results show that the general properties of the explosion depend quite sensitively on the mass of the DM core M DM : a larger M DM generally leads to a weaker explosion and a lower mass of synthesized iron-peaked elements. In particular, the total mass of produced can drop from about 0.3 to 0.03 M ⊙ as M DM increases from 0.01 to 0.03 M ⊙ . We have also constructed the bolometric light curves obtained from our simulations and found that our results match well with the observational data of sub-luminous Type Ia supernovae

  7. Electron Acceleration in Supernovae and Millimeter Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Maeda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernovae launch a strong shock wave by the interaction of the expanding ejecta and surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM. At the shock, electrons are accelerated to relativistic speed, creating observed synchrotron emissions in radio wavelengths. In this paper, I suggest that SNe (i.e., < 1 year since the explosion provide a unique site to study the electron acceleration mechanism. I argue that the eciency of the acceleration at the young SN shock is much lower than conventionally assumed, and that the electrons emitting in the cm wavelengths are not fully in the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA regime. Thus radio emissions from young SNe record information on the yet-unresolved 'injection' mechanism. I also present perspectives of millimeter (mm observations of SNe - this will provide opportunities to uniquely determine the shock physics and the acceleration efficiency, to test the non-linear DSA mechanism and provide a characteristic electron energy scale with which the DSA start dominating the electron acceleration.

  8. Cosmological Results from High-z Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, John L.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Barris, Brian; Candia, Pablo; Challis, Peter; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Coil, Alison L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Hogan, Craig; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Kirshner, Robert P.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Phillips, Mark M.; Riess, Adam G.; Schommer, Robert; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2003-09-01

    The High-z Supernova Search Team has discovered and observed eight new supernovae in the redshift interval z=0.3-1.2. These independent observations, analyzed by similar but distinct methods, confirm the results of Riess and Perlmutter and coworkers that supernova luminosity distances imply an accelerating universe. More importantly, they extend the redshift range of consistently observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to z~1, where the signature of cosmological effects has the opposite sign of some plausible systematic effects. Consequently, these measurements not only provide another quantitative confirmation of the importance of dark energy, but also constitute a powerful qualitative test for the cosmological origin of cosmic acceleration. We find a rate for SN Ia of (1.4+/-0.5)×10-4h3Mpc-3yr-1 at a mean redshift of 0.5. We present distances and host extinctions for 230 SN Ia. These place the following constraints on cosmological quantities: if the equation of state parameter of the dark energy is w=-1, then H0t0=0.96+/-0.04, and ΩΛ-1.4ΩM=0.35+/-0.14. Including the constraint of a flat universe, we find ΩM=0.28+/-0.05, independent of any large-scale structure measurements. Adopting a prior based on the Two Degree Field (2dF) Redshift Survey constraint on ΩM and assuming a flat universe, we find that the equation of state parameter of the dark energy lies in the range -1.48-1, we obtain wconstraints are similar in precision and in value to recent results reported using the WMAP satellite, also in combination with the 2dF Redshift Survey. Based in part on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. This research is primarily associated with proposal GO-8177, but also uses and reports results from proposals GO-7505, 7588, 8641, and 9118. Based in part on observations taken with

  9. Exosat observations of the Kepler supernova remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Peacock, A.; Arnaud, M.; Ballet, J.; Rothenflug, R.

    1989-01-01

    The medium-energy experiment on board Exosat was used to measure the X-ray spectrum of the Kepler supernova remnant over the range 1.5-10 keV. An Fe emission line was clearly resolved with an energy of about 6.5 keV and equivalent width of about 1.8 keV. This was superposed on a continuum with a temperature of 5.0(+3.8, -1.9) keV. The medium-energy spectrum is shown to be consistent with a model in which the Kepler SNR is presently in a Sedov phase of evolution, the 5 keV continuum arises from the shocked interstellar/circumstellar medium, and thermal (but not ionization) equilibrium exists between electrons and ions behind the primary shock front. However, in this case, an overabundance of iron by more than 6 times cosmic is required. 28 refs

  10. Nuclear gamma ray lines from supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, J.O.D.

    1980-01-01

    From theoretical considerations of the behaviour of gamma ray line fluxes occurring after a supernova explosion, the 1.156 and 0.847 MeV lines are seen to be the most likely to be observed. The 1.156 MeV line has been previously observed by other investigators. Observations of the 0.847 MeV line, and 1.332, 1.173 and 0.059 MeV lines using a Ge(Li) telescope aboard a stratospheric balloon which was flown in Brazil in 1977 are reported. The observation using a NaI(Tl) detector of a line in the energy interval 1.5 - 1.6 MeV, which may be due to 0 18 (p,p') 0 18 sup (*) reaction is also reported. (Author) [pt

  11. Nonparametric dark energy reconstruction from supernova data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsclaw, Tracy; Alam, Ujjaini; Sansó, Bruno; Lee, Herbert; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-12-10

    Understanding the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe poses one of the greatest challenges in physics today. Lacking a compelling fundamental theory to test, observational efforts are targeted at a better characterization of the underlying cause. If a new form of mass-energy, dark energy, is driving the acceleration, the redshift evolution of the equation of state parameter w(z) will hold essential clues as to its origin. To best exploit data from observations it is necessary to develop a robust and accurate reconstruction approach, with controlled errors, for w(z). We introduce a new, nonparametric method for solving the associated statistical inverse problem based on Gaussian process modeling and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. Applying this method to recent supernova measurements, we reconstruct the continuous history of w out to redshift z=1.5.

  12. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jessica; Blondin, John; Borkowski, Kazik; Reynolds, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Kepler’s supernova remnant contains unusual features that strongly suggest an origin in a single-degenerate Type Ia explosion, including anisotropic circumstellar medium (CSM), a strong brightness gradient, and spatially varying expansion proper motions. We present 3Dhydrodynamic simulations to test a picture in which Kepler's progenitor binary emitted a strong asymmetric wind, densest in the orbital plane, while the system moved at high velocity through the ISM. We simulate the creation of the presupernova environment as well as the supernova blast wave, using the VH-1 grid-based hydrodynamics code. We first modeled an anisotropic wind to create an asymmetric bowshock around the progenitor, then the blast wave from thesupernova. The final simulation places both previous model pieces onto a single grid and allows the blast wave to expand into the bowshock. Models were completed on a Yin-Yang grids with matching angular resolutions. By manipulating parameters that control the asymmetry of the system, we attempted to find conditions that recreated the current state of Kepler. We analyzed these models by comparing images of Kepler from the Chandra X-ray Observatory to line-of-sight projections from the model results. We also present comparisons of simulated expansion velocities with recent observations of X-ray proper motions from Chandra images. We were able to produce models that contained similar features to those seen in Kepler. We find the greatest resemblance to Kepler images with a presupernova wind with an equator-to-pole density contrast of 3 and a moderately disk-like CSM at a 5° angle between equatorial plane and system motion.

  13. Type Ia supernovae as speed sensors at intermediate redshifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengjie; Chen Xuelei

    2008-01-01

    Large scale peculiar velocity (LSPV) is a crucial probe of dark matter, dark energy, and gravity at cosmological scales. However, its application is severely limited by measurement obstacles. We show that fluctuations in type Ia supernovae fluxes induced by LSPV offer a promising approach to measure LSPV at intermediate redshifts. In the 3D Fourier space, gravitational lensing, the dominant systematical error, is well suppressed, localized, and can be further corrected effectively. Advances in supernova observations can further significantly reduce shot noise induced by supernova intrinsic fluctuations, which is the dominant statistical error. Robust mapping on the motion of the dark universe through type Ia supernovae is thus feasible to z∼0.5.

  14. A problem with the analysis of type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, David F.

    2017-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae have light curves that have widths and magnitudes that can be used for testing cosmologies and they provide one of the few direct measurements of time dilation. It is shown that the standard analysis that calibrates the light curve against a rest-frame average (such as SALT2) removes all the cosmological information from the calibrated light curves. Consequently type Ia supernovae calibrated with these methods cannot be used to investigate cosmology. The major evidence that supports the hypothesis of a static universe is that the measurements of the widths of the rawlight curves of type Ia supernovae do not show any time dilation. The intrinsicwavelength dependence shown by the SALT2 calibration templates is also consistent with no time dilation. Using a static cosmological model the peak absolute magnitudes of raw type Ia supernovae observations are also independent of redshift. These results support the hypothesis of a static universe.

  15. The expansion of the universe observed with supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Over the last 20 years, supernovae have become a key tool to constrain the expansion history of the Universe through the construction of Hubble diagrams, using luminosity distances to supernovae belonging to the 'Ia' subtype. This technique was key for the discovery that the expansion of the Universe is now accelerating. We review the principle and difficulties of the measurements, the classification and diversity of supernovae, and the physics of explosion. We discuss the systematic uncertainties affecting the cosmological conclusions with some emphasis on photometric calibration. We describe the major supernova cosmology surveys, the presented analyses and their conclusions, together with the present status of the field. We conclude on the expectations for the near future.

  16. Three-dimensional Modeling of Type Ia Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, Alexei

    2001-06-01

    A deflagration explosion of a Type Ia Supernova (SNIa) is studied using three-dimensional, high-resolution, adaptive mesh refinement fluid dynamic calculations. Deflagration speed in an exploding Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf (WD) grows exponentially, reaches approximately 30the speed of sound, and then declines due to a WD expansion. Outermost layers of the WD remain unburned. The explosion energy is comparable to that of a Type Ia supernova. The freezing of turbulent motions by expansion appears to be a crucial physical mechanism regulating the strength of a supernova explosion. In contrast to one-dimensional models, three-dimensional calculations predict the formation of Si-group elements and pockets of unburned CO in the middle and in central regions of a supernova ejecta. This, and the presence of unburned outer layer of carbon-oxygen may pose problems for SNIa spectra. Explosion sensitivity to initial conditions and its relation to a diversity of SNIa is discussed.

  17. An earlier explosion date for the Crab Nebula supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.; Fountain, John W.

    2018-04-01

    The Chinese first reported the Crab Nebula supernova on 1054 July 5. Ecclesiastical documents from the near east reported it in April and May of 1054. More than 33 petroglyphs made by Native Americans in the US and Mexico are consistent with sightings both before and after conjunction with the Sun on 1054 May 27. We found a petroglyph showing the new star close to Venus and the Moon, which occurred on 1054 April 12 and April 13, respectively. Collins et al., using the four historical dates, derived a light curve that is like that of a Type Ia supernova. The only remaining problem with this identification is that this supernova was near maximum light for 85 d, which is unlike the behavior of any known supernova.

  18. The ν process in the innermost supernova ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieverding, Andre [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany; Langanke, Karlheinz [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Harris, James Austin [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL

    2017-12-01

    The neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis (ν process) in supernova explosions of massive stars of solar metallicity with initial main sequence masses between 13 and 30 M⊙ has been studied with an analytic explosion model using a new extensive set of neutrino-nucleus cross-sections and spectral properties that agree with modern supernova simulations. The production factors for the nuclei 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La and 180Ta, are still significantly enhanced but do not reproduce the full solar abundances. We study the possible contribution of the innermost supernova eject to the production of the light elements 7Li and 11B with tracer particles based on a 2D supernova simulation of a 12 M⊙ progenitor and conclude, that a contribution exists but is negligible for the total yield for this explosion model.

  19. Circumstellar material in type Ia supernovae via sodium absorption features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, A; Gal-Yam, A; Simon, J D; Leonard, D C; Quimby, R M; Phillips, M M; Morrell, N; Thompson, I B; Ivans, I; Marshall, J L; Filippenko, A V; Marcy, G W; Bloom, J S; Patat, F; Foley, R J; Yong, D; Penprase, B E; Beeler, D J; Allende Prieto, C; Stringfellow, G S

    2011-08-12

    Type Ia supernovae are key tools for measuring distances on a cosmic scale. They are generally thought to be the thermonuclear explosion of an accreting white dwarf in a close binary system. The nature of the mass donor is still uncertain. In the single-degenerate model it is a main-sequence star or an evolved star, whereas in the double-degenerate model it is another white dwarf. We show that the velocity structure of absorbing material along the line of sight to 35 type Ia supernovae tends to be blueshifted. These structures are likely signatures of gas outflows from the supernova progenitor systems. Thus, many type Ia supernovae in nearby spiral galaxies may originate in single-degenerate systems.

  20. Detection of the gravitational lens magnifying a type Ia supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Robert M; Oguri, Masamune; More, Anupreeta; More, Surhud; Moriya, Takashi J; Werner, Marcus C; Tanaka, Masayuki; Folatelli, Gaston; Bersten, Melina C; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-04-25

    Objects of known brightness, like type Ia supernovae (SNIa), can be used to measure distances. If a massive object warps spacetime to form multiple images of a background SNIa, a direct test of cosmic expansion is also possible. However, these lensing events must first be distinguished from other rare phenomena. Recently, a supernova was found to shine much brighter than normal for its distance, which resulted in a debate: Was it a new type of superluminous supernova or a normal SNIa magnified by a hidden gravitational lens? Here, we report that a spectrum obtained after the supernova faded away shows the presence of a foreground galaxy-the first found to strongly magnify a SNIa. We discuss how more lensed SNIa can be found than previously predicted.