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Sample records for stringent substrate specificity

  1. The rapidly evolving centromere-specific histone has stringent functional requirements in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Kwong, Pak N; Menorca, Ron M G; Valencia, Joel T; Ramahi, Joseph S; Stewart, Jodi L; Tran, Robert K; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W-L

    2010-10-01

    Centromeres control chromosome inheritance in eukaryotes, yet their DNA structure and primary sequence are hypervariable. Most animals and plants have megabases of tandem repeats at their centromeres, unlike yeast with unique centromere sequences. Centromere function requires the centromere-specific histone CENH3 (CENP-A in human), which replaces histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes. CENH3 evolves rapidly, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. A portion of the CENH3 histone-fold domain, the CENP-A targeting domain (CATD), has been previously shown to confer kinetochore localization and centromere function when swapped into human H3. Furthermore, CENP-A in human cells can be functionally replaced by CENH3 from distantly related organisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used cenh3-1 (a null mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana) to replace endogenous CENH3 with GFP-tagged variants. A H3.3 tail domain-CENH3 histone-fold domain chimera rescued viability of cenh3-1, but CENH3's lacking a tail domain were nonfunctional. In contrast to human results, H3 containing the A. thaliana CATD cannot complement cenh3-1. GFP-CENH3 from the sister species A. arenosa functionally replaces A. thaliana CENH3. GFP-CENH3 from the close relative Brassica rapa was targeted to centromeres, but did not complement cenh3-1, indicating that kinetochore localization and centromere function can be uncoupled. We conclude that CENH3 function in A. thaliana, an organism with large tandem repeat centromeres, has stringent requirements for functional complementation in mitosis.

  2. Designing specificity of protein-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coluzza, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the key properties of biological molecules is that they can bind strongly to certain substrates yet interact only weakly with the very large number of other molecules that they encounter. Using a simple lattice model, we test several methods to design molecule-substrate binding specificity.

  3. Stringent and reproducible tetracycline-regulated transgene expression by site-specific insertion at chromosomal loci with pre-characterised induction characteristics

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    Papanastasiou Antigoni M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to regulate transgene expression has many applications, mostly concerning the analysis of gene function. Desirable induction characteristics, such as low un-induced expression, high induced expression and limited cellular heterogeneity, can be seriously impaired by chromosomal position effects at the site of transgene integration. Many clones may therefore need to be screened before one with optimal induction characteristics is identified. Furthermore, such screens must be repeated for each new transgene investigated, and comparisons between clones with different transgenes is complicated by their different integration sites. Results To circumvent these problems we have developed a "screen and insert" strategy in which clones carrying a transgene for a fluorescent reporter are first screened for those with optimal induction characteristics. Site-specific recombination (SSR is then be used repeatedly to insert any new transgene at the reporter transgene locus of such clones so that optimal induction characteristics are conferred upon it. Here we have tested in a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080 two of many possible implementations of this approach. Clones (e.g. Rht14-10 in which a GFP reporter gene is very stringently regulated by the tetracycline (tet transactivator (tTA protein were first identified flow-cytometrically. Transgenes encoding luciferase, I-SceI endonuclease or Rad52 were then inserted by SSR at a LoxP site adjacent to the GFP gene resulting stringent tet-regulated transgene expression. In clone Rht14-10, increases in expression from essentially background levels (+tet to more than 104-fold above background (-tet were reproducibly detected after Cre-mediated insertion of either the luciferase or the I-SceI transgenes. Conclusion Although previous methods have made use of SSR to integrate transgenes at defined sites, none has effectively combined this with a pre-selection step to identify

  4. Tuning biphenyl dioxygenase for extended substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruehlmann, F.; Chen, W. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1999-06-05

    Highly substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to be very resistant to aerobic biodegradation, particularly the initial attack by biphenyl dioxygenase. Functional evolution of the substrate specificity of biphenyl dioxygenase was demonstrated by DNA shuffling and staggered extension process (StEP) of the bphA gene coding for the large subunit of biphenyl dioxygenase. Several variants with an extended substrate range for PCBs were selected. In contrast to the parental biphenyl dioxygenases from Burkholderia cepacia LB400 and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707, which preferentially recognize either ortho-(LB400) or para-(KF707) substituted PCBs, several variants degraded both congeners to about the same extent. These variants also exhibited superior degradation capabilities toward several tetra- and pentachlorinated PCBs as well as commercial PCB mixtures, such as Aroclor 1242 or Aroclor 1254. Sequence analysis confirmed that most variants contained at least four to six template switches. All desired variants contained the Thr335Ala and Phe336lle substitutions confirming the importance of this critical region in substrate specificity. These results suggest that the block-exchange nature of gene shuffling between a diverse class of dioxygenases may be the most useful approach for breeding novel dioxygenases for PCB degradation in the desired direction.

  5. The substrate specificity of phospholipase A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, L.L.M. van; Haas, Gerard H. de

    1963-01-01

    Investigations on variously modified analogues of phospholipids elucidated the following substrate characteristics for phospholipase A (Crotalus adamanteus). 1. 1. Within the class of α-phosphoglycerides -isomers are readily hydrolysed, while -α-phospholipids appeared not to be attacked. 2.

  6. Surprisingly high substrate specificities observed in complex biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Kragelund, Caroline

    by selection for different specialized species. We hypothesized that bacteria growing in natural environment express strongly conserved substrate specificity which is independent on short-term (few hours) variations in growth conditions. In this study, biofilm from Aalborg wastewater treatment plant was used...... to investigate the cell-specific in situ substrate uptake pattern of different bacteria. Different substrates were tested by combination of Microautoradiography and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Conditions applied (different substrate concentrations, starvation, induction with specific substrates, multiple...... that bacteria living in natural environment, represented here by wastewater treatment plant microbial community, are strongly specialized in the uptake of organic substrates; fluctuating conditions, often encountered in natural environment, do not influence the profile of substrate uptake of these specialized...

  7. Determinants for Substrate Specificity of Protein Phosphatase 2A

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    Andrew M. Slupe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A- (PP2A- catalyzed dephosphorylation of target substrate proteins is widespread and critical for cellular function. PP2A is predominantly found as a heterotrimeric complex of a catalytic subunit (C, a scaffolding subunit (A, and one member of 4 families of regulatory subunits (B. Substrate specificity of the holoenzyme complex is determined by the subcellular locale the complex is confined to, selective incorporation of the B subunit, interactions with endogenous inhibitory proteins, and specific intermolecular interactions between PP2A and target substrates. Here, we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of the molecular determinants for PP2A substrate specificity.

  8. Global Identification of Peptidase Specificity by Multiplex Substrate Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Eroy-Reveles, A. Alegra; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Ingram, Jessica; Zhou, Min; Statnekov, Jacob B.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Hostetter, Daniel R.; Qu, Gang; Maltby, David A.; Anderson, Marc O.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; McKerrow, James H.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and rapid multiplex substrate profiling method has been developed to reveal the substrate specificity of any endo- or exo-peptidase using LC-MS/MS sequencing. A physicochemically diverse library of peptides was generated by incorporating all combinations of neighbor and near-neighbor amino acid pairs into decapeptide sequences that are flanked by unique dipeptides at each terminus. Addition of a panel of evolutionarily diverse peptidases to a mixture of these tetradecapeptides generated prime and non-prime site information and substrate specificity matched or expanded upon previous substrate motifs. This method biochemically confirmed the activity of the klassevirus 3C gene responsible for polypeptide processing and allowed Granzyme B substrates to be ranked by enzymatic turnover efficiency using label-free quantitation of precursor ion abundance. Furthermore, the proteolytic secretions from a parasitic flatworm larvae and a pancreatic cancer cell line were deconvoluted in a subtractive strategy using class-specific peptidase inhibitors. PMID:23023596

  9. [RNAse substrate specificity in Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianchinova, Z Ia; Grama, D P; Skripal', I G

    1992-01-01

    A substrate specificity of RNAses of A. laidlawii PG-8 to polynucleotides - poly (C), poly (U), poly (A) has been studied. Due to the data obtained both intracellular and extracellular RNAses of A. laidlawii possess similar specificity to different polynucleotides. Both RNAses preferentially break cytidine-bonds. Specificity of the studied enzymes in respect to polyuridylic and polyadenylic acids was less expressed.

  10. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

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    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  11. Substrate Specificity of Na+,Cl-(HCO3-)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkiv, V A; Melikhov, V I; Shubin, V S

    2016-09-01

    We studied substrate specificity of Na + ,Cl - (HCO 3 - )-ATPase. In most cases, replacement of ATP for other phosphate-containing substances resulted in not only pronounced suppression of phosphohydrolase reactions, but also dramatic changes of their responsiveness to the stimulating effect of monovalent ions. The data showed that Na + ,Cl - (HCO 3 - )-ATPase is a highly specific enzyme for ATP.

  12. Enzyme Substrate Specificity Conferred by Distinct Conformational Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Florencia; Saltzberg, Daniel; Allen, Karen N; Tolan, Dean R

    2015-11-04

    Substrate recognition is one of the hallmarks of enzyme catalysis. Enzyme conformational changes have been linked to selectivity between substrates with little direct evidence. Aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme, must distinguish between two physiologically important substrates, fructose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and provides an excellent model system for the study of this question. Previous work has shown that isozyme specific residues (ISRs) distant from the active site are responsible for kinetic distinction between these substrates. Notably, most of the ISRs reside in a cluster of five surface α-helices, and the carboxyl-terminal region (CTR), and cooperative interactions among these helices have been demonstrated. To test the hypothesis that conformational changes are at the root of these changes, single surface-cysteine variants were created with the cysteine located on helices of the cluster and CTR. This allowed for site-specific labeling with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, and subsequent monitoring of conformational changes by fluorescence emission spectrophotometry. These labeled variants revealed different spectra in the presence of saturating amounts of each substrate, which suggested the occurrence of different conformations. Emission spectra collected at various substrate concentrations showed a concentration dependence of the fluorescence spectra, consistent with binding events. Lastly, stopped-flow fluorescence spectrophotometry showed that the rate of these fluorescence changes was on the same time-scale as catalysis, thus suggesting a link between the different fluorescence changes and events during catalysis. On the basis of these results, we propose that different conformational changes may be a common mechanism for dictating substrate specificity in other enzymes with multiple substrates.

  13. Probing ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity using Phage Display

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    Desch, Karl C.; Kretz, Colin; Yee, Andrew; Gildersleeve, Robert; Metzger, Kristin; Agrawal, Nidhi; Cheng, Jane; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2’ and P11’, for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13–VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73. PMID:25849793

  14. Probing ADAMTS13 substrate specificity using phage display.

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    Karl C Desch

    Full Text Available Von Willebrand factor (VWF is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2' and P11', for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13-VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73.

  15. Substrate specificity of Arabidopsis 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacklock, Brenda J.; Jaworski, Jan G.

    2006-01-01

    The very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) incorporated into plant lipids are derived from the iterative addition of C2 units provided by malonyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA by the 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS) component of a fatty acid elongase (FAE) complex. Mining of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database revealed 20 genes with homology to seed-specific FAE1 KCS. Eight of the 20 putative KCSs were cloned, expressed in yeast, and isolated as (His) 6 fusion proteins. Five of the eight (At1g71160, At1g19440, At1g07720, At5g04530, and At4g34250) had little or no activity with C16 to C20 substrates while three demonstrated activity with C16, C18, and C20 saturated acyl-CoA substrates. At1g01120 KCS (KCS1) and At2g26640 KCS had broad substrate specificities when assayed with saturated and mono-unsaturated C16 to C24 acyl-CoAs while At4g34510 KCS was specific for saturated fatty acyl-CoA substrates

  16. Substrate specificity within a family of outer membrane carboxylate channels.

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    Elif Eren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  17. Substrate specificity of an aflatoxin-metabolizing aldehyde reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme from rat liver that reduces aflatoxin B1-dialdehyde exhibits a unique catalytic specificity distinct from that of other aldo-keto reductases. This enzyme, designated AFAR, displays high activity towards dicarbonyl-containing compounds with ketone groups on adjacent carbon atoms; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, acenaphthenequinone and camphorquinone were found to be good substrates. Although AFAR can also reduce aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes such as succinic semialdehyde, it is inactiv...

  18. A loop of coagulation factor VIIa influencing macromolecular substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelke, Jais R; Persson, Egon; Rasmussen, Hanne B

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) belongs to a family of proteases being part of the stepwise, self-amplifying blood coagulation cascade. To investigate the impact of the mutation Met(298{156})Lys in FVIIa, we replaced the Gly(283{140})-Met(298{156}) loop with the corresponding loop of factor Xa....../Met(298{156})Lys-FVIIa with almost the same activity and specificity profile. We conclude that a lysine residue in position 298{156} of FVIIa requires a hydrophilic environment to be fully accommodated. This position appears critical for substrate specificity among the proteases of the blood coagulation...

  19. Determination of substrate specificity of polyamine transporters in roseobacter species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuri, S.; Mou, X.

    2012-12-01

    Polyamines, such as cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine and norspermine are a class of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) that is ubiquitously found in marine environments. Intracellular polyamines are important in a variety of biological reactions, such as nucleic acid synthesis and protein synthesis. Free polyamines in seawater can be transported into bacterial cells by ABC transporter systems, each of which consists of four components including one substrate binding protein, one ATPase and two permeases. In silico analysis of marine bacterial genomes has revealed that roseobacter, a numerically and ecologically important taxa of marine bacteria, have at least two sets of polyamine transporter genes. This study was to examine the potential preference of roseobacter to different polyamine compounds and the substrate specificity of different polyamine transporters. Eleven roseobacter species, which genomes have been sequenced, were grown in defined media supplied with single polyamine compound as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Growth assay showed a small number of roseobacter isolates to be generalist showing no preference among the tested polyamines (Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, Roseovarius sp. TM1035, Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM, Jannaschia sp. CCS1 and Sagittula stellata E-37), whereas other isolates were specilists and were specific on polyamine compounds (Roseobacter sp. CCS2 and Roseobacter denitrificans OCh 114). Primers that probe poly-1 and pot-D genes, the two genes that encode common polyamine-binding genes of polyamine transporter systems were designed using net primer and primer design program. The specificity of the primers was validated by PCR followed by amplicon sequencing. Single step reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCR) was performed to investigate substrate specificity of poly-1 and pot-D genes. Key-words Roseobacter, polyamine, polyamine transporter, dissolved organic nitrogen

  20. Substrate specificity of glucokinase and fructokinase of several conifer species

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    Fritz Bergmanni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annual plant species were found to have several distinct classes of hexokinases which are specific for different hexoses, such as glucose, fructose and mannose. In conifers one isozyme of hexokinase could be found in genetic studies if only glucose was employed as substrate. If fructose was substituted for glucose, another isozyme zone different from the common hexokinase could be observed in zymograms of extracts from seed tissues of Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver fir. Hence these three conifer species possess at least two different hexokinases, glucokinase and fructokinase.

  1. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    No studies have investigated the mitochondrial function in permeabilized muscle fiber from cats. The aim of this study was to investigate tissue-specific and substrate-specific characteristics of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in feline permeabilized oxidative muscle fi...

  2. Development of Specific Substrates for Hypocrea jecorina Cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tina Secher

      During the last decades a considerable amount of interest has focused on transformation of cellulosic biomass to renewable energy sources such as ethanol.1,2 Cellulases, secreted by different microorganisms, are key enzymes in this process. However, the degradation of cellulose is a difficult...... is needed. In order to develop suitable reagents to specifically identify and quantify individual cellulases in a mixture it is necessary to construct specific substrates for assay of each enzyme individually. Although all cellulases catalyze the cleavage of b-1,4-glycosidic bonds, it is likely...... of the three-dimensional (X-ray) structures of different cellulases indicated that modifications at other positions would occlude binding, while, typically some space is available around the 4' and 6' position. The substituents were chosen so that further modifications would be possible either by click...

  3. Versatile peroxidase of Bjerkandera fumosa: substrate and inhibitor specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Makarov, Oleg; Chernyshova, Marina; Turkovskaya, Olga; Jarosz-Wilkolazka, Anna

    2013-01-10

    The inhibitor and substrate specificities of versatile peroxidase from Bjerkandera fumosa (VPBF) were studied. Two different effects were found: NaN(3), Tween-80, anthracene, and fluorene decreased the activity of VPBF, but p-aminobenzoic acid increased it. A mixed mechanism of effector influence on the activity of this enzyme was shown. The catalytic properties of VPBF in the oxidation of mono- and polycyclic aromatic compounds were studied also. 2,7-Diaminofluorene, ABTS, veratryl alcohol, and syringaldazine can be oxidized by VPBF in two ways: either directly by the enzyme or by diffusible chelated Mn(3+) as an oxidizing agent. During VPBF oxidation of 2,7-diaminofluorene, both with and without Mn(2+), biphasic kinetics with apparent saturation in both micromolar and millimolar ranges were obtained. In the case of ABTS, inhibition of VPBF activity by an excess of substrate was observed. Direct oxidation of p-aminobenzoic acid by versatile peroxidase was found for the first time. The oxidation of three- and four-ring PAHs by VPBF was investigated, and the oxidation of anthracene, phenanthrene, fluorene, pyrene, chrysene, and fluoranthene was shown. The products of PAH oxidation (9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and 9-fluorenone) catalyzed by VPBF were identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Recycling Using Chitosan Immobilized Laccase

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    Everton Skoronski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of laccase (Aspergillus sp. on chitosan by cross-linking and its application in bioconversion of phenolic compounds in batch reactors were studied. Investigation was performed using laccase immobilized via chemical cross-linking due to the higher enzymatic operational stability of this method as compared to immobilization via physical adsorption. To assess the influence of different substrate functional groups on the enzyme’s catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity was investigated using chitosan-immobilized laccase and eighteen different phenol derivatives. It was observed that 4-nitrophenol was not oxidized, while 2,5-xylenol, 2,6-xylenol, 2,3,5-trimethylphenol, syringaldazine, 2,6-dimetoxyphenol and ethylphenol showed reaction yields up 90% at 40 °C. The kinetic of process, enzyme recyclability and operational stability were studied. In batch reactors, it was not possible to reuse the enzyme when it was applied to syringaldazne bioconversion. However, when the enzyme was applied to bioconversion of 2,6-DMP, the activity was stable for eight reaction batches.

  5. Molecular basis for the substrate specificity of quorum signal synthases.

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    Dong, Shi-Hui; Frane, Nicole D; Christensen, Quin H; Greenberg, E Peter; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Nair, Satish K

    2017-08-22

    In several Proteobacteria , LuxI-type enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) signals using S -adenosyl-l-methionine and either cellular acyl carrier protein (ACP)-coupled fatty acids or CoA-aryl/acyl moieties as progenitors. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of signal biosynthesis, the basis for substrate specificity, or the rationale for donor specificity for any LuxI member. Here, we present several cocrystal structures of BjaI, a CoA-dependent LuxI homolog that represent views of enzyme complexes that exist along the reaction coordinate of signal synthesis. Complementary biophysical, structure-function, and kinetic analysis define the features that facilitate the unusual acyl conjugation with S -adenosylmethionine (SAM). We also identify the determinant that establishes specificity for the acyl donor and identify residues that are critical for acyl/aryl specificity. These results highlight how a prevalent scaffold has evolved to catalyze quorum signal synthesis and provide a framework for the design of small-molecule antagonists of quorum signaling.

  6. Substrate specificity of an aflatoxin-metabolizing aldehyde reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme from rat liver that reduces aflatoxin B1-dialdehyde exhibits a unique catalytic specificity distinct from that of other aldo-keto reductases. This enzyme, designated AFAR, displays high activity towards dicarbonyl-containing compounds with ketone groups on adjacent carbon atoms; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, acenaphthenequinone and camphorquinone were found to be good substrates. Although AFAR can also reduce aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes such as succinic semialdehyde, it is inactive with glucose, galactose and xylose. The enzyme also exhibits low activity towards alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds. Determination of the apparent Km reveals that AFAR has highest affinity for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and succinic semialdehyde, and low affinity for glyoxal and DL-glyceraldehyde. PMID:8526867

  7. Detailed characterization of the substrate specificity of mouse wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Kawiński, Adam; Banaś, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Wax synthases are membrane-associated enzymes catalysing the esterification reaction between fatty acyl-CoA and a long chain fatty alcohol. In living organisms, wax esters function as storage materials or provide protection against harmful environmental influences. In industry, they are used as ingredients for the production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Currently the biological sources of wax esters are limited to jojoba oil. In order to establish a large-scale production of desired wax esters in transgenic high-yielding oilseed plants, enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis from different biological resources should be characterized in detail taking into consideration their substrate specificity. Therefore, this study aims at determining the substrate specificity of one of such enzymes -- the mouse wax synthase. The gene encoding this enzyme was expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the in vitro assays (using microsomal fraction from transgenic yeast), we evaluated the preferences of mouse wax synthase towards a set of combinations of 11 acyl-CoAs with 17 fatty alcohols. The highest activity was observed for 14:0-CoA, 12:0-CoA, and 16:0-CoA in combination with medium chain alcohols (up to 5.2, 3.4, and 3.3 nmol wax esters/min/mg microsomal protein, respectively). Unsaturated alcohols longer than 18°C were better utilized by the enzyme in comparison to the saturated ones. Combinations of all tested alcohols with 20:0-CoA, 22:1-CoA, or Ric-CoA were poorly utilized by the enzyme, and conjugated acyl-CoAs were not utilized at all. Apart from the wax synthase activity, mouse wax synthase also exhibited a very low acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. However, it displayed neither acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase, nor acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferase activity.

  8. Bacillus subtilis 5'-nucleotidases with various functions and substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Ayako; Natsume, Ayane; Okada, Atsushi; Nishihata, Shogo; Kuse, Junko; Tanaka, Kosei; Takenaka, Shinji; Ishikawa, Shu; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2016-10-26

    In Escherichia coli, nagD, yrfG, yjjG, yieH, yigL, surE, and yfbR encode 5'-nucleotidases that hydrolyze the phosphate group of 5'-nucleotides. In Bacillus subtilis, genes encoding 5'-nucleotidase have remained to be identified. We found that B. subtilis ycsE, araL, yutF, ysaA, and yqeG show suggestive similarities to nagD. Here, we expressed them in E. coli to purify the respective His 6 -tagged proteins. YcsE exhibited significant 5'-nucleotidase activity with a broader specificity, whereas the other four enzymes had rather weak but suggestive activities with various capacities and substrate specificities. In contrast, B. subtilis yktC shares high similarity with E. coli suhB encoding an inositol monophosphatase. YktC exhibited inositol monophosphatase activity as well as 5'-nucleotidase activity preferential for GMP and IMP. The ycsE, yktC, and yqeG genes are induced by oxidative stress and were dispensable, although yqeG was required to maintain normal growth on solid medium. In the presence of diamide, only mutants lacking yktC exhibited enhanced growth defects, whereas the other mutants without ycsE or yqeG did not. Accordingly, in B. subtilis, at least YcsE and YktC acted as major 5'-nucleotidases and the four minor enzymes might function when the intracellular concentrations of substrates are sufficiently high. In addition, YktC is involved in resistance to oxidative stress caused by diamide, while YqeG is necessary for normal colony formation on solid medium.

  9. Substrate specificity determinants of class III nucleotidyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharambe, Nikhil G; Barathy, Deivanayaga V; Syed, Wajeed; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Colaςo, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-10-01

    The two second messengers in signalling, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, are produced by adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases respectively. Recognition and discrimination of the substrates ATP and GTP by the nucleotidyl cyclases are vital in these reactions. Various apo-, substrate- or inhibitor-bound forms of adenylyl cyclase (AC) structures from transmembrane and soluble ACs have revealed the catalytic mechanism of ATP cyclization reaction. Previously reported structures of guanylyl cyclases represent ligand-free forms and inactive open states of the enzymes and thus do not provide information regarding the exact mode of substrate binding. The structures we present here of the cyclase homology domain of a class III AC from Mycobacterium avium (Ma1120) and its mutant in complex with ATP and GTP in the presence of calcium ion, provide the structural basis for substrate selection by the nucleotidyl cyclases at the atomic level. Precise nature of the enzyme-substrate interactions, novel modes of substrate binding and the ability of the binding pocket to accommodate diverse conformations of the substrates have been revealed by the present crystallographic analysis. This is the first report to provide structures of both the nucleotide substrates bound to a nucleotidyl cyclase. Coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank with accession numbers: 5D15 (Ma1120 CHD +ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0E (Ma1120 CHD +GTP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0H (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0G (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+GTP.Ca 2+ ). Adenylyl cyclase (EC number: 4.6.1.1). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. MTH1 Substrate Recognition--An Example of Specific Promiscuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Willem M Nissink

    Full Text Available MTH1 (NUDT1 is an oncologic target involved in the prevention of DNA damage. We investigate the way MTH1 recognises its substrates and present substrate-bound structures of MTH1 for 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxo-rATP as examples of novel strong and weak binding substrate motifs. Investigation of a small set of purine-like fragments using 2D NMR resulted in identification of a fragment with weak potency. The protein-ligand X-Ray structure of this fragment provides insight into the role of water molecules in substrate selectivity. Wider fragment screening by NMR resulted in three new protein structures exhibiting alternative binding configurations to the key Asp-Asp recognition element of the protein. These inhibitor binding modes demonstrate that MTH1 employs an intricate yet promiscuous mechanism of substrate anchoring through its Asp-Asp pharmacophore. The structures suggest that water-mediated interactions convey selectivity towards oxidized substrates over their non-oxidised counterparts, in particular by stabilization of a water molecule in a hydrophobic environment through hydrogen bonding. These findings may be useful in the design of inhibitors of MTH1.

  11. Structural And Biochemical Studies of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype C1 Light Chain Protease: Implications for Dual Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R.; Sikorra, S.; Stegmann, C.M.; Pich, A.; Binz, T.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote a-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the a-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity.

  12. Substrate specificities of tyrosine-specific protein kinases toward cytoskeletal proteins in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, T.; Kadowaki, T.; Nishida, E.; Kadooka, T.; Ogawara, H.; Fukami, Y.; Sakai, H.; Takaku, F.; Kasuga, M.

    1986-11-05

    The authors have previously reported that fodrin (..beta.. subunit), tubulin (..cap alpha.. subunit) and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs; MAP2 and tau) are good substrates for the purified insulin receptor kinase. In this study, to investigate the substrate specificities of tyrosine kinases, they have examined the actions of the purified epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase and Rous sarcoma virus src kinase on purified microfilament- and microtubule-related proteins. Among microfilament-related proteins examined, the purified EGF receptor kinase phosphorylated the ..beta.. subunit, but not the ..cap alpha.. subunit, of fodrin on tyrosine residues with a K/sub m/ below the micromolar range. The fodrin phosphorylation by the EGF receptor kinase was markedly inhibited by F-actin. In contrast, the purified src kinase preferentially phosphorylated the ..cap alpha.. subunit of fodrin on tyrosine residues. Fodrin phosphorylation by the src kinase was not inhibited by F-actin. Among microtubule proteins examined, MAP-2 was the best substrate for the EGF receptor kinase. The peptide mapping of MAP2 phosphorylated by the EGF receptor kinase and by the insulin receptor kinase produced very similar patterns of phosphopeptides, while that of MAP2 phosphorylated by the src kinase gave a distinctly different pattern. When the phosphorylation of the tubulin subunits was examined, the EGF receptor kinase preferred ..beta.. subunit to ..cap alpha.. subunit, but the src kinase phosphorylated both ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits to a similar extent. These results, together with our previous results, indicate that the substrate specificities of the EGF receptor kinase and the insulin receptor kinase are very similar, but not identical, while that of the src kinase is distinctly different from that of these growth factor receptor kinases.

  13. Substrate Specificity via Ternary Complex Formation with Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Henk; Robillard, George T.

    1977-01-01

    Very little discrimination is observed in the binary binding of dicarboxylic acid substrate analogues to glutamate dehydrogenase as monitored by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. Variation in length, charge, bulkiness and conformational rigidity resulted in only a factor of five variation in KD and

  14. Understanding the Specificity and Random Collision of Enzyme-Substrate Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kin, Ng Hong; Ling, Tan Aik

    2016-01-01

    The concept of specificity of enzyme action can potentially be abstract for some students as they fail to appreciate how the three-dimensional configuration of enzymes and the active sites confer perfect fit for specific substrates. In science text books, the specificity of enzyme-substrate binding is typically likened to the action of a lock and…

  15. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Peters, Günther H; Harris, Pernille; Stensgaard, Eva; Christensen, Hans E M

    2017-11-21

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH 4 ) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been identified; i.e., only TPH1 displays substrate tryptophan inhibition. This study demonstrates that the difference can be traced to an active site loop which displays different properties in the TPH isoforms. Steady-state kinetic results of the isoforms, and variants with point mutations in a loop lining the active site, show that the kinetic parameters of only TPH1 are significantly changed upon mutations. Mutations in the active site loop of TPH1 result in an increase in the substrate inhibition constant, K i , and therefore turnover rate. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this substrate inhibition mechanism occurs through a closure of the cosubstrate, BH 4 , binding pocket, which is induced by Trp binding.

  16. Structure of human aspartyl aminopeptidase complexed with substrate analogue: insight into catalytic mechanism, substrate specificity and M18 peptidase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaikuad Apirat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Aspartyl aminopeptidase (DNPEP, with specificity towards an acidic amino acid at the N-terminus, is the only mammalian member among the poorly understood M18 peptidases. DNPEP has implicated roles in protein and peptide metabolism, as well as the renin-angiotensin system in blood pressure regulation. Despite previous enzyme and substrate characterization, structural details of DNPEP regarding ligand recognition and catalytic mechanism remain to be delineated. Results The crystal structure of human DNPEP complexed with zinc and a substrate analogue aspartate-β-hydroxamate reveals a dodecameric machinery built by domain-swapped dimers, in agreement with electron microscopy data. A structural comparison with bacterial homologues identifies unifying catalytic features among the poorly understood M18 enzymes. The bound ligands in the active site also reveal the coordination mode of the binuclear zinc centre and a substrate specificity pocket for acidic amino acids. Conclusions The DNPEP structure provides a molecular framework to understand its catalysis that is mediated by active site loop swapping, a mechanism likely adopted in other M18 and M42 metallopeptidases that form dodecameric complexes as a self-compartmentalization strategy. Small differences in the substrate binding pocket such as shape and positive charges, the latter conferred by a basic lysine residue, further provide the key to distinguishing substrate preference. Together, the structural knowledge will aid in the development of enzyme-/family-specific aminopeptidase inhibitors.

  17. Calcium-dependent protein kinases from Arabidopsis show substrate specificity differences in an analysis of 103 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Amy; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chang, Chia-Lun; Garg, Shilpi; Miguel, Rodriguez Milla; Barron, Yoshimi D; Li, Ying; Romanowsky, Shawn; Cushman, John C; Gribskov, Michael; Harmon, Alice C; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2011-01-01

    The identification of substrates represents a critical challenge for understanding any protein kinase-based signal transduction pathway. In Arabidopsis, there are more than 1000 different protein kinases, 34 of which belong to a family of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CPKs). While CPKs are implicated in regulating diverse aspects of plant biology, from ion transport to transcription, relatively little is known about isoform-specific differences in substrate specificity, or the number of phosphorylation targets. Here, in vitro kinase assays were used to compare phosphorylation targets of four CPKs from Arabidopsis (CPK1, 10, 16, and 34). Significant differences in substrate specificity for each kinase were revealed by assays using 103 different substrates. For example CPK16 phosphorylated Serine 109 in a peptide from the stress-regulated protein, Di19-2 with K(M) ∼70 μM, but this site was not phosphorylated significantly by CPKs 1, 10, or 34. In contrast, CPKs 1, 10, and 34 phosphorylated 93 other peptide substrates not recognized by CPK16. Examples of substrate specificity differences among all four CPKs were verified by kinetic analyses. To test the correlation between in vivo phosphorylation events and in vitro kinase activities, assays were performed with 274 synthetic peptides that contained phosphorylation sites previously mapped in proteins isolated from plants (in vivo-mapped sites). Of these, 74 (27%) were found to be phosphorylated by at least one of the four CPKs tested. This 27% success rate validates a robust strategy for linking the activities of specific kinases, such as CPKs, to the thousands of in planta phosphorylation sites that are being uncovered by emerging technologies.

  18. Effects of substrate binding site residue substitutions of xynA from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Anil S; Pawar, Vishakha A; Panchal, Ketankumar J; Sudhir, Ankit P; Dave, Bhaumik R; Patel, Darshan H; Subramanian, R B

    2018-02-13

    The aromatic residues of xylanase enzyme, W187, Y124, W144, Y128 and W63 of substrate binding pocket from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were investigated for their role in substrate binding by homology modelling and sequence analysis. These residues are highly conserved and play an important role in substrate binding through steric hindrance. The substitution of these residues with alanine allows the enzyme to accommodate nonspecific substrates. Wild type and mutated genes were cloned and overexpressed in BL21. Optimum pH and temperature of rBAxn exhibited pH 9.0 and 50 °C respectively and it was stable up to 215 h. Along with the physical properties of rBAxn, kinetic parameters (K m 19.34 ± 0.72 mg/ml; k cat 6449.12 ± 155.37 min - 1 and k cat /K m 333.83 ± 6.78 ml min - 1  mg - 1 ) were also compared with engineered enzymes. Out of five mutations, W63A, Y128A and W144A lost almost 90% activity and Y124A and W187A retained almost 40-45% xylanase activity. The site-specific single mutation, led to alteration in substrate specificity from xylan to CMC while in case of double mutant the substrate specificity was altered from xylan to CMC, FP and avicel, indicating the role of aromatic residues on substrate binding, catalytic process and overall catalytic efficiency.

  19. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate-peptide complex structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Stříšovský, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 20 (2014), s. 2408-2421 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/1886; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11206; GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : intramembrane protease * rhomboid family * rhomboid protease * structure * substrate recognition Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 10.434, year: 2014

  20. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of D-Galactose-6-Phosphate Isomerase Complexed with Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays. PMID:24015281

  1. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  2. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  3. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Peters, Günther H.J.; Harris, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis...... of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism...... in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been...

  4. CROSS-STREAM COMPARISON OF SUBSTRATE-SPECIFIC DENITRIFICATION POTENTIAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, Stuart [Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Bernot, Melody [Ball State University; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University

    2011-01-01

    Headwater streams have a demonstrated ability to denitrify a portion of their nitrate (NO(3) (-)) load but there has not been an extensive consideration of where in a stream this process is occurring and how various habitats contribute to total denitrification capability. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II (LINX II) we measured denitrification potential in 65 streams spanning eight regions of the US and draining three land-use types. In each stream, potential denitrification rates were measured in common substrate types found across many streams as well as locations unique to particular streams. Overall, habitats from streams draining urban and agricultural land-uses showed higher potential rates of denitrification than reference streams draining native vegetation. This difference among streams was probably driven by higher ambient nitrate concentrations found in urban or agricultural streams. Within streams, sandy habitats and accumulations of fine benthic organic matter contributed more than half of the total denitrification capacity (mg N removed m(-2) h(-1)). A particular rate of potential denitrification per unit area could be achieved either by high activity per unit organic matter or lower activities associated with larger standing stocks of organic matter. We found that both small patches with high rates (hot spots) or more widespread but less active areas (cool matrix) contributed significantly to whole stream denitrification capacity. Denitrification estimated from scaled-up denitrification enzyme assay (DEA) potentials were not always dramatically higher than in situ rates of denitrification measured as (15)N gas generation following 24-h (15)N-NO(3) tracer additions. In general, headwater streams draining varying land-use types have significant potential to remove nitrate via denitrification and some appear to be functioning near their maximal capacity.

  5. Two nucleoside transporters in Lactococcus lactis with different substrate specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Sørensen, Claus; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2010-01-01

    , and the utilization of nucleotides is dependent on exogenous phosphatases. The composition of transporters with specificity for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleobases is subject to variation. The ability of Lactococcus lactis to transport different nucleosides across the cell membrane was characterized...

  6. Reengineering substrate specificity of E. coli glutamate dehydrogenase using a position-based prediction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Feng; Ma, Cheng-Wei; Zeng, An-Ping

    2017-04-01

    To re-engineer the active site of proteins for non-natural substrates using a position-based prediction method (PBPM). The approach has been applied to re-engineer the E. coli glutamate dehydrogenase to alter its substrate from glutamate to homoserine for a de novo 1,3-propanediol biosynthetic pathway. After identification of key residues that determine the substrate specificity, residue K92 was selected as a candidate site for mutation. Among the three mutations (K92V, K92C, and K92M) suggested by PBPM, the specific activity of the best mutant (K92 V) was increased from 171 ± 35 to 1328 ± 71 μU mg -1 . The PBPM approach has a high efficiency for re-engineering the substrate specificity of natural enzymes for new substrates.

  7. Tryptophan Synthase Uses an Atypical Mechanism To Achieve Substrate Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Andrew R; van Roye, Paul; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H

    2016-12-27

    Tryptophan synthase (TrpS) catalyzes the final steps in the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine (Ser) and indole-3-glycerol phosphate (IGP). We report that native TrpS can also catalyze a productive reaction with l-threonine (Thr), leading to (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan. Surprisingly, β-substitution occurs in vitro with a 3.4-fold higher catalytic efficiency for Ser over Thr using saturating indole, despite a >82000-fold preference for Ser in direct competition using IGP. Structural data identify a novel product binding site, and kinetic experiments clarify the atypical mechanism of specificity: Thr binds efficiently but decreases the affinity for indole and disrupts the allosteric signaling that regulates the catalytic cycle.

  8. The substrate-binding protein in bacterial ABC transporters: dissecting roles in the evolution of substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Horler, Richard S P; Muller, Axel; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, although being ubiquitous in biology, often feature a subunit that is limited primarily to bacteria and archaea. This subunit, the substrate-binding protein (SBP), is a key determinant of the substrate specificity and high affinity of ABC uptake systems in these organisms. Most prokaryotes have many SBP-dependent ABC transporters that recognize a broad range of ligands from metal ions to amino acids, sugars and peptides. Herein, we review the structure and function of a number of more unusual SBPs, including an ABC transporter involved in the transport of rare furanose forms of sugars and an SBP that has evolved to specifically recognize the bacterial cell wall-derived murein tripeptide (Mtp). Both these examples illustrate that subtle changes in binding-site architecture, including changes in side chains not directly involved in ligand co-ordination, can result in significant alteration of substrate range in novel and unpredictable ways. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  9. Fingerprinting the substrate specificity of M1 and M17 aminopeptidases of human malaria, Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; McGowan, Sheena; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Trenholme, Katharine R; Gardiner, Donald L; Whisstock, James C; To, Joyce; Salvesen, Guy S; Dalton, John P; Drag, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of human malaria, expresses two aminopeptidases, PfM1AAP and PfM17LAP, critical to generating a free amino acid pool used by the intraerythrocytic stage of the parasite for proteins synthesis, growth and development. These exopeptidases are potential targets for the development of a new class of anti-malaria drugs. To define the substrate specificity of recombinant forms of these two malaria aminopeptidases we used a new library consisting of 61 fluorogenic substrates derived both from natural and unnatural amino acids. We obtained a detailed substrate fingerprint for recombinant forms of the enzymes revealing that PfM1AAP exhibits a very broad substrate tolerance, capable of efficiently hydrolyzing neutral and basic amino acids, while PfM17LAP has narrower substrate specificity and preferentially cleaves bulky, hydrophobic amino acids. The substrate library was also exploited to profile the activity of the native aminopeptidases in soluble cell lysates of P. falciparum malaria. This data showed that PfM1AAP and PfM17LAP are responsible for majority of the aminopeptidase activity in these extracts. These studies provide specific substrate and mechanistic information important for understanding the function of these aminopeptidases and could be exploited in the design of new inhibitors to specifically target these for anti-malaria treatment.

  10. Fingerprinting the substrate specificity of M1 and M17 aminopeptidases of human malaria, Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Poreba

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of human malaria, expresses two aminopeptidases, PfM1AAP and PfM17LAP, critical to generating a free amino acid pool used by the intraerythrocytic stage of the parasite for proteins synthesis, growth and development. These exopeptidases are potential targets for the development of a new class of anti-malaria drugs.To define the substrate specificity of recombinant forms of these two malaria aminopeptidases we used a new library consisting of 61 fluorogenic substrates derived both from natural and unnatural amino acids. We obtained a detailed substrate fingerprint for recombinant forms of the enzymes revealing that PfM1AAP exhibits a very broad substrate tolerance, capable of efficiently hydrolyzing neutral and basic amino acids, while PfM17LAP has narrower substrate specificity and preferentially cleaves bulky, hydrophobic amino acids. The substrate library was also exploited to profile the activity of the native aminopeptidases in soluble cell lysates of P. falciparum malaria.This data showed that PfM1AAP and PfM17LAP are responsible for majority of the aminopeptidase activity in these extracts. These studies provide specific substrate and mechanistic information important for understanding the function of these aminopeptidases and could be exploited in the design of new inhibitors to specifically target these for anti-malaria treatment.

  11. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  12. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nitish K; Chang, Junil; Zhao, Patrick X

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task. Support vector machine (SVM)-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM), were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset. Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM) and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions for the

  13. Evolution-guided adaptation of an adenylation domain substrate specificity to an unusual amino acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Vobruba

    Full Text Available Adenylation domains CcbC and LmbC control the specific incorporation of amino acid precursors in the biosynthesis of lincosamide antibiotics celesticetin and lincomycin. Both proteins originate from a common L-proline-specific ancestor, but LmbC was evolutionary adapted to use an unusual substrate, (2S,4R-4-propyl-proline (PPL. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the LmbC substrate binding pocket and an ATP-[32P]PPi exchange assay, three residues, G308, A207 and L246, were identified as crucial for the PPL activation, presumably forming together a channel of a proper size, shape and hydrophobicity to accommodate the propyl side chain of PPL. Subsequently, we experimentally simulated the molecular evolution leading from L-proline-specific substrate binding pocket to the PPL-specific LmbC. The mere change of three amino acid residues in originally strictly L-proline-specific CcbC switched its substrate specificity to prefer PPL and even synthetic alkyl-L-proline derivatives with prolonged side chain. This is the first time that such a comparative study provided an evidence of the evolutionary relevant adaptation of the adenylation domain substrate binding pocket to a new sterically different substrate by a few point mutations. The herein experimentally simulated rearrangement of the substrate binding pocket seems to be the general principle of the de novo genesis of adenylation domains' unusual substrate specificities. However, to keep the overall natural catalytic efficiency of the enzyme, a more comprehensive rearrangement of the whole protein would probably be employed within natural evolution process.

  14. Insight into the role of substrate-binding residues in conferring substrate specificity for the multifunctional polysaccharide lyase Smlt1473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Logan C; Berger, Bryan W

    2014-06-27

    Anionic polysaccharides are of growing interest in the biotechnology industry due to their potential pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery and wound treatment. Chemical composition and polymer length strongly influence the physical and biological properties of the polysaccharide and thus its potential industrial and medical applications. One promising approach to determining monomer composition and controlling the degree of polymerization involves the use of polysaccharide lyases, which catalyze the depolymerization of anionic polysaccharides via a β-elimination mechanism. Utilization of these enzymes for the production of custom-made oligosaccharides requires a high degree of control over substrate specificity. Previously, we characterized a polysaccharide lyase (Smlt1473) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia k279a, which exhibited significant activity against hyaluronan (HA), poly-β-d-glucuronic acid (poly-GlcUA), and poly-β-d-mannuronic acid (poly-ManA) in a pH-regulated manner. Here, we utilize a sequence structure guided approach based on a homology model of Smlt1473 to identify nine putative substrate-binding residues and examine their effect on substrate specificity via site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, single point mutations H221F and R312L resulted in increased activity and specificity toward poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA, respectively. Furthermore, a W171A mutant nearly eliminated HA activity, while increasing poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA activity by at least 35%. The effect of these mutations was analyzed by comparison with the high resolution structure of Sphingomonas sp. A1-III alginate lyase in complex with poly-ManA tetrasaccharide and by taking into account the structural differences between HA, poly-GlcUA, and poly-ManA. Overall, our results demonstrate that even minor changes in active site architecture have a significant effect on the substrate specificity of Smlt1473, whose structural plasticity could be applied to the design of highly

  15. Engineering the substrate and inhibitor specificities of human coagulation Factor VIIa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Katrine S; Østergaard, Henrik; Bjelke, Jais R

    2007-01-01

    The remarkably high specificity of the coagulation proteases towards macromolecular substrates is provided by numerous interactions involving the catalytic groove and remote exosites. For FVIIa [activated FVII (Factor VII)], the principal initiator of coagulation via the extrinsic pathway, several...... exosites have been identified, whereas only little is known about the specificity dictated by the active-site architecture. In the present study, we have profiled the primary P4-P1 substrate specificity of FVIIa using positional scanning substrate combinatorial libraries and evaluated the role....... To evaluate the role of the active-site residues in defining specificity, a series of mutants of FVIIa were prepared at position 239 (position 99 in chymotrypsin), which is considered to be one of the most important residues for determining P2 specificity of the trypsin family members. This was confirmed...

  16. Broad Substrate Specificity of the Loading Didomain of the Lipomycin Polyketide Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzawa, S; Eng, CH; Katz, L; Keasling, JD

    2013-06-04

    LipPks1, a polyketide synthase subunit of the lipomycin synthase, is believed to catalyze the polyketide chain initiation reaction using isobutyryl-CoA as a substrate, followed by an elongation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to start the biosynthesis of antibiotic alpha-lipomycin in Streptomyces aureofaciens Tu117. Recombinant LipPks1, containing the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its substrate specificity was investigated in vitro. Surprisingly, several different acyl-CoAs, including isobutyryl-CoA, were accepted as the starter substrates, while no product was observed with acetyl-CoA. These results demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LipPks1 and may be applied to producing new antibiotics.

  17. Substrate specificity of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, D.C.; Groeneveld, E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that plasminogen activators not only hydrolyse a specific arginine-valine bond in plasminogen, but may also cleave other proteins such as fibronectin. We studied the substrate specificity, particularly the preference for arginyl over lysyl peptide bonds, of tissue-type

  18. A fluorescence assay for elucidating the substrate specificities of deubiquitinating enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Si-Tao; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Song, Ai-Xin; Hong, Fa-Shui; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► A deubiquitinating enzyme has its unique substrate specificity for deubiquitination. ► We have established an activity assay for ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases. ► This assay can be applicable to other deubiquitinating enzymes. -- Abstract: Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are a representative family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which specifically cleave ubiquitin (Ub) chains or extensions. Here we present a convenient method for characterizing the substrate specificities of various UCHs by fluorescently mutated Ub-fusion proteins (Ub F45W -Xaa) and di-ubiquitin chains (Ub F45W -diUb). After removal of the intact substrate by Ni 2+ -NTA affinity, the enzymatic activities of UCHs were quantitatively determined by recording fluorescence of the Ub F45W product. The results show that three UCHs, i.e. UCH-L1, UCH-L3 and UCH37/UCH-L5, are distinct in their substrate specificities for the Ub-fusions and diUb chains. This assay method may also be applied to study the enzymatic activities and substrate specificities of other DUBs.

  19. Substrate specificity changes for human reticulocyte and epithelial 15-lipoxygenases reveal allosteric product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecksler, Aaron T; Kenyon, Victor; Deschamps, Joshua D; Holman, Theodore R

    2008-07-15

    Human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase (15-hLO-1) and epithelial 15-lipoxygenase (15-hLO-2) have been implicated in a number of human diseases, with differences in their substrate specificity potentially playing a central role. In this paper, we present a novel method for accurately measuring the substrate specificity of the two 15-hLO isozymes and demonstrate that both cholate and specific LO products affect substrate specificity. The linoleic acid (LA) product, 13-hydroperoxyoctadienoic acid (13-HPODE), changes the ( k cat/ K m) (AA)/( k cat/ K m) (LA) ratio more than 5-fold for 15-hLO-1 and 3-fold for 15-hLO-2, while the arachidonic acid (AA) product, 12-( S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HPETE), affects only the ratio of 15-hLO-1 (more than 5-fold). In addition, the reduced products, 13-( S)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE) and 12-( S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), also affect substrate specificity, indicating that iron oxidation is not responsible for the change in the ( k cat/ K m) (AA)/( k cat/ K m) (LA) ratio. These results, coupled with the dependence of the 15-hLO-1 k cat/ K m kinetic isotope effect ( (D) k cat/ K m) on the presence of 12-HPETE and 12-HETE, indicate that the allosteric site, previously identified in 15-hLO-1 [Mogul, R., Johansen, E., and Holman, T. R. (1999) Biochemistry 39, 4801-4807], is responsible for the change in substrate specificity. The ability of LO products to regulate substrate specificity may be relevant with respect to cancer progression and warrants further investigation into the role of this product-feedback loop in the cell.

  20. Catalytic turnover-based phage selection for engineering the substrate specificity of Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbul, Murat; Marshall, Norman J; Zou, Yekui; Zhang, Keya; Yin, Jun

    2009-04-10

    We report a high-throughput phage selection method to identify mutants of Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase with altered substrate specificities from a large library of the Sfp enzyme. In this method, Sfp and its peptide substrates are co-displayed on the M13 phage surface as fusions to the phage capsid protein pIII. Phage-displayed Sfp mutants that are active with biotin-conjugated coenzyme A (CoA) analogues would covalently transfer biotin to the peptide substrates anchored on the same phage particle. Affinity selection for biotin-labeled phages would enrich Sfp mutants that recognize CoA analogues for carrier protein modification. We used this method to successfully change the substrate specificity of Sfp and identified mutant enzymes with more than 300-fold increase in catalytic efficiency with 3'-dephospho CoA as the substrate. The method we developed in this study provides a useful platform to display enzymes and their peptide substrates on the phage surface and directly couples phage selection with enzyme catalysis. We envision this method to be applied to engineering the catalytic activities of other protein posttranslational modification enzymes.

  1. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.

    2013-06-06

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5\\' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5\\' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5\\' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5\\' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5\\' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5\\' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  2. Mammalian folylpoly-γ-glutamate synthetase. 2. Substrate specificity and kinetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of hog liver folylpolyglutamate synthetase for folate substrates and for nucleotide and L-[ 14 C]glutamate substrates and analogues has been investigated. The kinetic mechanism, determined by using aminopterin as the folate substrate, is ordered Ter-Ter with MgATP binding first, folate second, and glutamate last. This mechanism precludes the sequential addition of glutamate moieties to enzyme-bound folate. Folate, dihydrofolate, and tetrahydrofolate possess the optimal configurations for catalysis while 5- and 10-position substitutions of the folate molecule impair catalysis. k/sub cat/ values decrease with increasing glutamate chain length, and the rate of decrease varies depending on the state of reduction and substitution of the folate molecule. Folate binding, as assessed by on rates, is slow. Dihydrofolate exhibits the fastest rate, and the rates are slightly reduced for tetrahydrofolate and 10-formyltetrahydrofolate and greatly reduced for 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and folic acid. Tetrahydrofolate polyglutamates are the only long glutamate chain length folates with detectable substrate activity. The specificity of the L-glutamate binding site is very narrow. L-Homocysteate and 4-threo-fluoroglutamate are alternate substrates and act as chain termination inhibitors in that their addition to the folate molecule prevents or severely retards the further addition of glutamate moieties. The K/sub m/ for glutamate is dependent on the folate substrate used. MgATP is the preferred nucleotide substrate, and β,γ-methylene-ATP, β,γ-imido-ATP, adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), P 1 ,P 5 -di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate, and free ATP 4- are potent inhibitors of the reaction

  3. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  4. Biotinylated fluorescent peptide substrates for the sensitive and specific determination of cathepsin D activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechle, D; Cansier, A; Fischer, R; Brandenburg, J; Burster, T; Driessen, C; Kalbacher, H

    2005-03-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a member of the mammalian aspartic protease family and is involved in cellular protein degradation and in several pathological processes. A sensitive and specific assay for the determination of CatD activity in biological samples was developed. The peptide amide substrates Amca-EDKPILF downward arrowFRLGK(biotin)-CONH2 (I), Amca-EEKPIC(Acm)F downward arrowFRLGK(biotin)-CONH2 (II) and Amca-EEKPISF downward arrowFRLGK(biotin)-CONH2 (III) contain a CatD cleavage site (F downward arrowF) flanked by a N-terminal Amca-fluorophore (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid) and a C-terminal biotin moiety. Substrates II and III proved to be specific substrates containing only one cleavage site for CatD. After cleavage of the Phe-Phe bond by CatD all biotin conjugated peptides were removed with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. The remaining fluorescent peptides in solution represent the amount of digested substrate. The versatility of this CatD digest and pull down assay was demonstrated by measuring the activity of CatD in different subcellular fractions of human EBV-transformed B cells and human monocytes. The described method based on the designed CatD substrates represents a valuable tool for routine assays. Copyright (c) 2004 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Structure-oriented substrate specificity engineering of aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase towards aldehydes carbon chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Luyao; Li, Jian-Jun; Jia, Chenjun; Li, Mei; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (ADO) is an important enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of fatty alk(a/e)nes in cyanobacteria. However, ADO exhibits quite low chain-length specificity with respect to the substrates ranging from C4 to C18 aldehydes, which is not suitable for producing fuels with different properties or different chain lengths. Based on the crystal structures of cADOs (cyanobacterial ADO) with substrate analogs bound, some amino acids affecting the substrate specificity of cADO were identified, including the amino acids close to the aldehyde group and the hydrophobic tail of the substrate and those along the substrate channel. Using site-directed mutagenesis, selected amino acids were replaced with bulky ones introducing steric hindrance to the binding pocket via large functional groups. All mutants were overexpressed, purified and kinetically characterized. All mutants, except F87Y, displayed dramatically reduced activity towards C14,16,18 aldehydes. Notably, the substrate preferences of some mutants towards different chain-length substrates were enhanced: I24Y for n-heptanal, I27F for n-decanal and n-dodecanal, V28F for n-dodecanal, F87Y for n-decanal, C70F for n-hexanal, A118F for n-butanal, A121F for C4,6,7 aldehydes, V184F for n-dodecanal and n-decanal, M193Y for C6-10 aldehydes and L198F for C7-10 aldehydes. The impact of the engineered cADO mutants on the change of the hydrocarbon profile was demonstrated by co-expressing acyl-ACP thioesterase BTE, fadD and V184F in E. coli, showing that n-undecane was the main fatty alkane. Some amino acids, which can control the chain-length selectivity of substrates of cADO, were identified. The substrate specificities of cADO were successfully changed through structure-guided protein engineering, and some mutants displayed different chain-length preference. The in vivo experiments of V184F in genetically engineered E. coli proved the importance of engineered cADOs on the distribution of the

  6. Animal deoxyribonucleoside kinases: 'forward' and 'retrograde' evolution of their substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Sandrini, Michael; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    specificity. Recent studies suggest that in the animal lineage one of the brogenitor kinases, the so-called dCK/dGK/TK2-like gene, was duplicated prior to separation of the insect and mammalian lineages. Thereafter, insects lost all but one kinase, dNK (EC 2.7.1.145), which subsequently, through remodelling...... of a limited number of amino acid residues, gained a broad substrate specificity....

  7. Animal deoxyribonucleoside kinases: 'forward' and 'retrograde' evolution of their substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Sandrini, Michael P; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    specificity. Recent studies suggest that in the animal lineage one of the progenitor kinases, the so-called dCK/dGK/TK2-like gene, was duplicated prior to separation of the insect and mammalian lineages. Thereafter, insects lost all but one kinase, dNK (EC 2.7.1.145), which subsequently, through remodelling...... of a limited number of amino acid residues, gained a broad substrate specificity....

  8. Alteration of substrate specificity of leucine dehydrogenase by site-directed mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    片岡, 邦重; Kataoka, Kunishige; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki

    2003-01-01

    The residues L40, A113, V291, and V294, in leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH), predicted to be involved in recognition of the substrate side chain, have been mutated on the basis of the molecular modeling to mimic the substrate specificities of phenylalanine (PheDH), glutamate (GluDH), and lysine dehydrogenases (LysDH). The A113G and A113G/V291L mutants, imitating the PheDH active site, displayed activities toward -phenylalanine and phenylpyruvate with 1.6 and 7.8% of kcat values of the wild-type ...

  9. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Peptidyl-Lys Metallopeptidase of Armillaria mellea by FRET Based Peptide Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødum, Anders S R; Olesen, Kjeld; Østergaard, Søren; Thim, Lars; Nørby, Inga; Meldal, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Determining the substrate specificity of a protease is essential for developing assays, inhibitors and understanding the mechanisms of the enzyme. In this work, we have profiled the specificity of Peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase, (LysN), of Armillaria mellea, by a synthetic fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) positional-scanning library. The library was based on a reference sequence K(Abz)-S-A-Q-K-M-V-S-K(Dnp), where the fluorescent donor is 2-aminobenzamide and the quencher is N-2,4-dinitrophenyl. Each position was varied between 19 different amino acids one by one, to reveal the specificity of the protease. LysN exhibits strict specificity for lysine in S1', and has less specificity moving further away from the scissile bond. Additivity between the subsites was observed and the best substrate identified was K(Abz)-M-R-F-K-R-R-R-K(Dnp) with a kcat/KM of 42.6 µM/s. Based on a homology structure model the reference substrate was fitted into the active site using molecular dynamics to propose peptide-enzyme interactions.

  10. Using directed evolution to probe the substrate specificity of mandelamide hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan-Fen; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L; McLeish, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    Mandelamide hydrolase (MAH), a member of the amidase signature family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of mandelamide to mandelate and ammonia. X-ray structures of several members of this family, but not that of MAH, have been reported. These reveal nearly superimposable conformations of the unusual Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad. Conversely, the residues involved in substrate recognition are not conserved, implying that the binding pocket could be modified to change the substrate specificity, perhaps by directed evolution. Here we show that MAH is able to hydrolyze small aliphatic substrates such as lactamide, albeit with low efficiency. A selection method to monitor changes in mandelamide/lactamide preference was developed and used to identify several mutations affecting substrate binding. A homology model places some of these mutations close to the catalytic triad, presumably in the MAH active site. In particular, Gly202 appears to control the preference for aromatic substrates as the G202A variant showed three orders of magnitude decrease in k(cat)/K(m) for (R)- and (S)-mandelamide. This reduction in activity increased to six orders of magnitude for the G202V variant.

  11. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of small subunit residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Drevland, Randy [University of Texas, Austin; Gayathri, Dasara [University of Madras; Velmurugan, Devadasan [University of Madras; Shinkai, Akeo [SPring8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo and RIKEN, Japan; Kuramitsu, Seiki [SPring8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo and RIKEN, Japan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of -hydroxyacids to -hydroxyacids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of , -dicarboxylates with hydrophobic -chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length -carboxylate groups. These enzymes stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins leads to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between 2 and 3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence, but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These structural and kinetic results will

  12. Comparison of two metal-dependent pyruvate aldolases related by convergent evolution: substrate specificity, kinetic mechanism, and substrate channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijun; Baker, Perrin; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2010-05-04

    HpaI and BphI are two pyruvate class II aldolases found in aromatic meta-cleavage degradation pathways that catalyze similar reactions but are not related in sequence. Steady-state kinetic analysis of the aldol addition reactions and product inhibition assays showed that HpaI exhibits a rapid equilibrium random order mechanism while BphI exhibits a compulsory order mechanism, with pyruvate binding first. Both aldolases are able to utilize aldehyde acceptors two to five carbons in length; however, HpaI showed broader specificity and had a preference for aldehydes containing longer linear alkyl chains or C2-OH substitutions. Both enzymes were able to bind 2-keto acids larger than pyruvate, but only HpaI was able to utilize both pyruvate and 2-ketobutanoate as carbonyl donors in the aldol addition reaction. HpaI lacks stereospecific control producing racemic mixtures of 4-hydroxy-2-oxopentanoate (HOPA) from pyruvate and acetaldehyde while BphI synthesizes only (4S)-HOPA. BphI is also able to utilize acetaldehyde produced by the reduction of acetyl-CoA catalyzed by the associated aldehyde dehydrogenase, BphJ. This aldehyde was directly channeled from the dehydrogenase to the aldolase active sites, with an efficiency of 84%. Furthermore, the BphJ reductive deacylation reaction increased 4-fold when BphI was catalyzing the aldol addition reaction. Therefore, the BphI-BphJ enzyme complex exhibits unique bidirectionality in substrate channeling and allosteric activation.

  13. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Three commercial cellulase preparations, Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, Dupont Accellerase® 1500, and DSM Cytolase CL, were evaluated for their hydrolytic activity using a set of reference biomass substrates with controlled substrate characteristics. It was found that lignin remains a significant recalcitrance factor to all the preparations, although different enzyme preparations respond to the inhibitory effect of lignin differently. Also, different types of biomass lignin can inhibit cellulose enzymes in different manners. Enhancing enzyme activity toward biomass fiber swelling is an area significantly contributing to potential improvement in cellulose performance. While the degree of polymerization of cellulose in the reference substrates did not present a major recalcitrance factor to Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, cellulose crystallite has been shown to have a significant lower reactivity toward all enzyme mixtures. The presence of polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) in Novozymes Ctec2 appears to enhance enzyme activity toward decrystallization of cellulose. This study demonstrated that reference substrates with controlled chemical and physical characteristics of structural features can be applied as an effective and practical strategy to identify cellulosic enzyme activities toward specific biomass recalcitrance factor(s) and provide specific targets for enzyme improvement.

  14. A single amino acid substitution affects substrate specificity in cysteine proteinases from Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smooker, P. M.; Whisstock, J. C.; Irving, J. A.; Siyaguna, S.; Spithill, T. W.; Pike, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica secretes a number of cathepsin L-like proteases that are proposed to be involved in feeding, migration, and immune evasion by the parasite. To date, six full cDNA sequences encoding cathepsin L preproproteins have been identified. Previous studies have demonstrated that one of these cathepsins (L2) is unusual in that it is able to cleave substrates with a proline in the P2 position, translating into an unusual ability (for a cysteine proteinase) to clot fibrinogen. In this study, we report the sequence of a novel cathepsin (L5) and compare the substrate specificity of a recombinant enzyme with that of recombinant cathepsin L2. Despite sharing 80% sequence identity with cathepsin L2, cathepsin L5 does not exhibit substantial catalytic activity against substrates containing proline in the P2 position. Molecular modeling studies suggested that a single amino acid change (L69Y) in the mature proteinases may account for the difference in specificity at the S2 subsite. Recombinant cathepsin L5/L69Y was expressed in yeast and a substantial increase in the ability of this variant to accommodate substrates with a proline residue in the P2 position was observed. Thus, we have identified a single amino acid substitution that can substantially influence the architecture of the S2 subsite of F. hepatica cathepsin L proteases. PMID:11206078

  15. Protein-engineering of chitosanase from Bacillus sp. MN to alter its substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Eva K; Weikert, Tobias; Niehues, Anna; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Singh, Ratna

    2018-04-01

    Partially acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (paCOS) have various potential applications in agriculture, biomedicine, and pharmaceutics due to their suitable bioactivities. One method to produce paCOS is partial chemical hydrolysis of chitosan polymers, but that leads to poorly defined mixtures of oligosaccharides. However, the effective production of defined paCOS is crucial for fundamental research and for developing applications. A more promising approach is enzymatic depolymerization of chitosan using chitinases or chitosanases, as the substrate specificity of the enzyme determines the composition of the oligomeric products. Protein-engineering of these enzymes to alter their substrate specificity can overcome the limitations associated with naturally occurring enzymes and expand the spectrum of specific paCOS that can be produced. Here, engineering the substrate specificity of Bacillus sp. MN chitosanase is described for the first time. Two muteins with active site substitutions can accept N-acetyl-D-glucosamine units at their subsite (-2), which is impossible for the wildtype enzyme. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Substrate specificity of platypus venom L-to-D-peptide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Paramjit S; Torres, Allan M; Crossett, Ben; Wong, Karen K Y; Koh, Jennifer M S; Geraghty, Dominic P; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Kuchel, Philip W

    2008-04-04

    The L-to-D-peptide isomerase from the venom of the platypus (Ornithorhyncus anatinus) is the first such enzyme to be reported for a mammal. In delineating its catalytic mechanism and broader roles in the animal, its substrate specificity was explored. We used N-terminal segments of defensin-like peptides DLP-2 and DLP-4 and natriuretic peptide OvCNP from the venom as substrates. The DLP analogues IMFsrs and ImFsrs (srs is a solubilizing chain; lowercase letters denote D-amino acid) were effective substrates for the isomerase; it appears to recognize the N-terminal tripeptide sequence Ile-Xaa-Phe-. A suite of 26 mutants of these hexapeptides was synthesized by replacing the second residue (Met) with another amino acid, viz. Ala, alpha-aminobutyric acid, Ile, Leu, Lys, norleucine, Phe, Tyr, and Val. It was shown that mutant peptides incorporating norleucine and Phe are substrates and exhibit L- or D-amino acid isomerization, but mutant peptides that contain residues with shorter, beta-branched or long side chains with polar terminal groups, viz. Ala, alpha-aminobutyric acid, Ile, Val, Leu, Lys, and Tyr, respectively, are not substrates. It was demonstrated that at least three N-terminal amino acid residues are absolutely essential for L-to-D-isomerization; furthermore, the third amino acid must be a Phe residue. None of the hexapeptides based on LLH, the first three residues of OvCNP, were substrates. A consistent 2-base mechanism is proposed for the isomerization; abstraction of a proton by 1 base is concomitant with delivery of a proton by the conjugate acid of a second base.

  17. Species-specific serine-threonine protein kinase Pkb2 of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum: Genetic environment and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezametdinova, V Z; Mavletova, D A; Alekseeva, M G; Chekalina, M S; Zakharevich, N V; Danilenko, V N

    2018-03-10

    The objective of this study was to determine for phosphorylated substrates of the species-specific serine-threonine protein kinase (STPK) Pkb2 from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum GT15. Two approaches were employed: analyses of phosphorylated membrane vesicles protein spectra following kinase reactions and analyses of the genes surrounding pkb2. A bioinformatics analysis of the genes surrounding pkb2 found a species-specific gene cluster PFNA in the genomes of 34 different bifidobacterial species. The identified cluster consisted of 5-8 genes depending on the species. The first five genes are characteristic for all considered species. These are the following genes encoding serine-threonine protein kinase (pkb2), fibronectin type III domain-containing protein (fn3), AAA-ATPase (aaa-atp), hypothetical protein with DUF58 domain (duf58) and transglutaminase (tgm). The sixth (protein phosphatase, prpC), seventh (hypothetical protein, BLGT_RS02790), and eighth (FHA domain-containing protein, fha) genes are included in this cluster, but they are not found in all species. The operon organization of the PFNA gene cluster was confirmed with transcriptional analysis. AAA-ATPase, which is encoded by a gene of the PFNA gene cluster, was found to be a substrate of the STPK Pkb2. Fourteen AAA-ATPase sites (seven serine, six threonine, and one tyrosine) phosphorylated by STPK Pkb2 were revealed. Analysis of the spectra of phosphorylated membrane vesicles proteins allowed us to identify eleven proteins that were considered as possible Pkb2 substrates. They belong to several functional classes: proteins involved in transcription and translation; proteins of the F1-domain of the FoF1-ATPase; ABC-transporters; molecular chaperone GroEL; and glutamine synthase, GlnA1. All identified proteins were considered moonlighting proteins. Three out of 11 proteins (glutamine synthetase GlnA1 and FoF1-ATPase alpha and beta subunits) were selected for further in vitro phosphorylation assays

  18. Mutations affecting substrate specificity of the Bacillus subtilis multidrug transporter Bmr.

    OpenAIRE

    Klyachko, K A; Schuldiner, S; Neyfakh, A A

    1997-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis multidrug transporter Bmr, a member of the major facilitator superfamily of transporters, causes the efflux of a number of structurally unrelated toxic compounds from cells. We have shown previously that the activity of Bmr can be inhibited by the plant alkaloid reserpine. Here we demonstrate that various substitutions of residues Phe143 and Phe306 of Bmr not only reduce its sensitivity to reserpine inhibition but also significantly change its substrate specificity. Cros...

  19. Identification of crucial amino acids in mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 that determine substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mahro

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate factors that determine substrate specificity and activity of mammalian molybdo-flavoproteins we performed site directed mutagenesis of mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 (mAOX3. The sequence alignment of different aldehyde oxidase (AOX isoforms identified variations in the active site of mAOX3 in comparison to other AOX proteins and xanthine oxidoreductases (XOR. Based on the structural alignment of mAOX3 and bovine XOR, differences in amino acid residues involved in substrate binding in XORs in comparison to AOXs were identified. We exchanged several residues in the active site to the ones found in other AOX homologues in mouse or to residues present in bovine XOR in order to examine their influence on substrate selectivity and catalytic activity. Additionally we analyzed the influence of the [2Fe-2S] domains of mAOX3 on its kinetic properties and cofactor saturation. We applied UV-VIS and EPR monitored redox-titrations to determine the redox potentials of wild type mAOX3 and mAOX3 variants containing the iron-sulfur centers of mAOX1. In addition, a combination of molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations (MD was used to investigate factors that modulate the substrate specificity and activity of wild type and AOX variants. The successful conversion of an AOX enzyme to an XOR enzyme was achieved exchanging eight residues in the active site of mAOX3. It was observed that the absence of the K889H exchange substantially decreased the activity of the enzyme towards all substrates analyzed, revealing that this residue has an important role in catalysis.

  20. GSHSite: exploiting an iteratively statistical method to identify s-glutathionylation sites with substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available S-glutathionylation, the covalent attachment of a glutathione (GSH to the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-glutathionylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 1783 experimentally identified S-glutathionylation sites from mouse macrophages, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-glutathionylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition and the accessible surface area (ASA. TwoSampleLogo presents that positively charged amino acids flanking the S-glutathionylated cysteine may influence the formation of S-glutathionylation in closed three-dimensional environment. A statistical method is further applied to iteratively detect the conserved substrate motifs with statistical significance. Support vector machine (SVM is then applied to generate predictive model considering the substrate motifs. According to five-fold cross-validation, the SVMs trained with substrate motifs could achieve an enhanced sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by the correct identification of previously reported S-glutathionylation sites of mouse thioredoxin (TXN and human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (PTP1B. Finally, the constructed models are adopted to implement an effective web-based tool, named GSHSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/GSHSite/, for identifying uncharacterized GSH substrate sites on the protein sequences.

  1. NMR-based screening method for transglutaminases: rapid analysis of their substrate specificities and reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimba, Nobuhisa; Yokoyama, Kei-ichi; Suzuki, Ei-ichiro

    2002-03-13

    Incorporation of inter- or intramolecular covalent cross-links into food proteins with microbial transglutaminase (MTG) improves the physical and textural properties of many food proteins such as tofu, boiled fish paste, and sausage. Other transglutaminases (TGases) are expected to be used in the same way, and also to extend the scope of industrial applications to materials, drugs, and so on. The TGases have great diversity, not only in amino acid sequence and size, but also in their substrate specificities and catalytic activities, and therefore, it is quite difficult to estimate their reactivity. We have developed an NMR-based method using the enzymatic labeling technique (ELT) for simultaneous analysis of the substrate specificities and reaction rates of TGases. It is quite useful for comparing the existing TGases and for screening new TGases or TGases variants. This method has shown that MTG is superior for industrial use because of its lower substrate specificity compared with those of guinea pig liver transglutaminase (GTG) and red sea bream liver transglutaminase (FTG). We have also found that an MTG variant lacking an N-terminal aspartic acid residue has higher activity than that of the native enzyme.

  2. The substrate specificities of sunflower and soybean phospholipases D using transphosphatidylation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkafi Slim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipase D (PLD belongs to a lipolytic enzyme subclass which catalyzes the hydrolysis and transesterification of glycerophospholipids at the terminal phosphodiester bond. Results In this work, we have studied the substrate specificity of PLDs from germinating sunflower seeds and cultured-soybean cells, using their capacity of transphosphatidylation. In the presence of a nucleophilic acceptor, such as [14C]ethanol, PLD catalyzes the production of phosphatidyl-[14C]-ethanol. The resulting product is easily identified since it is well separated from the other lipids by thin-layer chromatography. The main advantage of this assay is that the phospholipid used as substrate does not need to be radiolabelled and thus allow us a large choice of polar heads and fatty acids. In vitro, we observed that sunflower and soybean cell PLD show the following decreasing order of specificity: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol; while phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol are utilized much less efficiently. Conclusions The substrate specificity is modulated by the fatty acid composition of the phosphatidylcholine used as well as by the presence of other charged phospholipids.

  3. Alteration of the substrate specificity of benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingen, Bettina; Kolter-Jung, Doris; Dünkelmann, Pascal; Feldmann, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Pohl, Martina; Müller, Michael

    2003-08-04

    Alteration of the substrate specificity of thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFD) by error-prone PCR is described. Two mutant enzymes, L476Q and M365L-L461S, were identified that accept ortho-substituted benzaldehyde derivatives as donor substrates, which leads to the formation of 2-hydroxy ketones. Both variants, L476Q and M365L-L461S, selectively catalyze the formation of enantiopure (S)-2-hydroxy-1-(2-methylphenyl)propan-1-one with excellent yields, a reaction which is only poorly catalyzed by the wild-type enzyme. Different ortho-substituted benzaldehyde derivatives, such as 2-chloro-, 2-methoxy-, or 2-bromobenzaldehyde are accepted as donor substrates by both BFD variants as well and conversion with acetaldehyde resulted in the corresponding (S)-2-hydroxy-1-phenylpropan-1-one derivatives. As deduced from modeling studies based on the 3D structure of wild-type BFD, reduction of the side chain size at position L461 probably results in an enlarged substrate binding site and facilitates the initial binding of ortho-substituted benzaldehyde derivatives to the cofactor ThDP.

  4. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  5. The multi-protein family of sulfotransferases in plants: composition, occurrence, substrate specificity, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Felix; Krause, Florian; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    All members of the sulfotransferase (SOT, EC 2.8.2.-) protein family transfer a sulfuryl group from the donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to an appropriate hydroxyl group of several classes of substrates. The primary structure of these enzymes is characterized by a histidine residue in the active site, defined PAPS binding sites and a longer SOT domain. Proteins with this SOT domain occur in all organisms from all three domains, usually as a multi-protein family. Arabidopsis thaliana SOTs, the best characterized SOT multi-protein family, contains 21 members. The substrates for several plant enzymes have already been identified, such as glucosinolates, brassinosteroids, jasmonates, flavonoids, and salicylic acid. Much information has been gathered on desulfo-glucosinolate (dsGl) SOTs in A. thaliana. The three cytosolic dsGl SOTs show slightly different expression patterns. The recombinant proteins reveal differences in their affinity to indolic and aliphatic dsGls. Also the respective recombinant dsGl SOTs from different A. thaliana ecotypes differ in their kinetic properties. However, determinants of substrate specificity and the exact reaction mechanism still need to be clarified. Probably, the three-dimensional structures of more plant proteins need to be solved to analyze the mode of action and the responsible amino acids for substrate binding. In addition to A. thaliana, more plant species from several families need to be investigated to fully elucidate the diversity of sulfated molecules and the way of biosynthesis catalyzed by SOT enzymes.

  6. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Heidi A [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  7. Probing polypeptide GalNAc-transferase isoform substrate specificities by in vitro analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Yun; Joshi, Hiren J; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram

    2015-01-01

    and possibly Tyr residues. These GalNAc residues are then further elongated by a large set of glycosyltransferases to build a variety of complex O-glycan structures. What determines O-glycan site occupancy is still poorly understood, although it is clear that the substrate specificities of individual...... isoenzymes and the repertoire of GalNAc-Ts in cells are key parameters. The GalNAc-T isoenzymes are differentially expressed in cells and tissues in principle allowing cells to produce unique O-glycoproteomes dependent on the specific subset of isoforms present. In vitro analysis of acceptor peptide...

  8. Phylogenetic and Functional Substrate Specificity for Endolithic Microbial Communities in hyper-arid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eCrits-Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Under extreme water deficit, endolithic (inside rock microbial ecosystems are considered environmental refuges for life in cold and hot deserts, yet their diversity and functional adaptations remain vastly unexplored. The metagenomic analyses of the communities from two rock substrates, calcite and ignimbrite, revealed that they were dominated by Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi. The relative distribution of major phyla was significantly different between the two substrates and biodiversity estimates, from 16S rRNA gene sequences and from the metagenomic data, all pointed to a higher taxonomic diversity in the calcite community. While both endolithic communities showed adaptations to extreme aridity and to the rock habitat, their functional capabilities revealed significant differences. ABC transporters and pathways for osmoregulation were more diverse in the calcite chasmoendolithic community. In contrast, the ignimbrite cryptoendolithic community was enriched in pathways for secondary metabolites, such as non-ribosomal peptides (NRP and polyketides (PK. Assemblies of the metagenome data produced population genomes for the major phyla found in both communities and revealed a greater diversity of Cyanobacteria population genomes for the calcite substrate. Draft genomes of the dominant Cyanobacteria in each community were constructed with more than 93% estimated completeness. The two annotated proteomes shared 64% amino acid identity and a significantly higher number of genes involved in iron update, and NRPS gene clusters, were found in the draft genomes from the ignimbrite. Both the community-wide and genome-specific differences may be related to higher water availability and the colonization of large fissures and cracks in the calcite in contrast to a harsh competition for colonization space and nutrient resources in the narrow pores of the ignimbrite. Together, these results indicated that the habitable architecture of both

  9. Allosteric Control of Substrate Specificity of the Escherichia coli ADP-glucose Pyrophosphorylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrecht, Ana C.; Solamen, Ligin; Hill, Benjamin L.; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Olsen, Kenneth W.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2017-06-01

    The substrate specificity of enzymes is crucial to control the fate of metabolites to different pathways. However, there is growing evidence that many enzymes can catalyze alternative reactions. This promiscuous behavior has important implications in protein evolution and the acquisition of new functions. The question is how the undesirable outcomes of in vivo promiscuity can be prevented. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Escherichia coli is an example of an enzyme that needs to select the correct substrate from a broad spectrum of alternatives. This selection will guide the flow of carbohydrate metabolism towards the synthesis of reserve polysaccharides. Here, we show that the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate plays a role in such selection by increasing the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme towards the use of ATP rather than other nucleotides. In the presence of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, the kcat/S0.5 for ATP was near 600-fold higher that other nucleotides, whereas in the absence of activator was only 3-fold higher. We propose that the allosteric regulation of certain enzymes is an evolutionary mechanism of adaptation for the selection of specific substrates.

  10. Malassezia globosa MgMDL2 lipase: Crystal structure and rational modification of substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Dongming; Xu, Huan; Xu, Jinxin; Dubin, Grzegorz; Liu, Jinsong; Iqbal Khan, Faez; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-06-24

    Lipases play an important role in physiological metabolism and diseases, and also have multiple industrial applications. Rational modification of lipase specificity may increase the commercial utility of this group of enzymes, but is hindered by insufficient mechanistic understanding. Here, we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of a mono- and di-acylglycerols lipase from Malassezia globosa (MgMDL2). Interestingly, residues Phe278 and Glu282 were found to involve in substrate recognition because mutation on each residue led to convert MgMDL2 to a triacylglycerol (TAG) lipase. The Phe278Ala and Glu282Ala mutants also acquired ability to synthesize TAGs by esterification of glycerol and fatty acids. By in silicon analysis, steric hindrance of these residues seemed to be key factors for the altered substrate specificity. Our work may shed light on understanding the unique substrate selectivity mechanism of mono- and di-acylglycerols lipases, and provide a new insight for engineering biocatalysts with desired catalytic behaviors for biotechnological application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal structure of inulosucrase from Lactobacillus: insights into the substrate specificity and product specificity of GH68 fructansucrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijning, Tjaard; Anwar, Munir A; Böger, Markus; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Leemhuis, Hans; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2011-09-09

    Fructansucrases (FSs) catalyze a transfructosylation reaction with sucrose as substrate to produce fructo-oligosaccharides and fructan polymers that contain either β-2,1 glycosidic linkages (inulin) or β-2,6 linkages (levan). Levan-synthesizing FSs (levansucrases) have been most extensively investigated, while detailed information on inulosucrases is limited. Importantly, the molecular basis of the different product specificities of levansucrases and inulosucrases is poorly understood. We have elucidated the three-dimensional structure of a truncated active bacterial GH68 inulosucrase, InuJ of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (residues 145-708), in its apo form, with a bound substrate (sucrose), and with a transfructosylation product. The sucrose binding pocket and the sucrose binding mode are virtually identical with those of GH68 levansucrases, confirming that both enzyme types use the same fully conserved structural framework for the binding and cleavage of the donor substrate sucrose in the active site. The binding mode of the first transfructosylation product 1-kestose (Fru-β(2-1)-Fru-α(2-1)-Glc, where Fru=fructose and Glc=glucose) in subsites -1 to +2 shows for the first time how inulin-type fructo-oligosaccharide bind in GH68 FS and how an inulin-type linkage can be formed. Surprisingly, observed interactions with the sugar in subsites +1 and +2 are provided by residues that are also present in levansucrases. The binding mode of 1-kestose and the presence of a more distant sucrose binding site suggest that residues beyond the +2 subsite, in particular residues from the nonconserved 1B-1C loop, determine product linkage type specificity in GH68 FSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Substrate Specificity and Inhibitor Sensitivity of Plant UDP-Sugar Producing Pyrophosphorylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Decker

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available UDP-sugars are essential precursors for glycosylation reactions producing cell wall polysaccharides, sucrose, glycoproteins, glycolipids, etc. Primary mechanisms of UDP sugar formation involve the action of at least three distinct pyrophosphorylases using UTP and sugar-1-P as substrates. Here, substrate specificities of barley and Arabidopsis (two isozymes UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (UGPase, Arabidopsis UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase (USPase and Arabidopsis UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine pyrophosphorylase2 (UAGPase2 were investigated using a range of sugar-1-phosphates and nucleoside-triphosphates as substrates. Whereas all the enzymes preferentially used UTP as nucleotide donor, they differed in their specificity for sugar-1-P. UGPases had high activity with D-Glc-1-P, but could also react with Fru-1-P and Fru-2-P (Km values over 10 mM. Contrary to an earlier report, their activity with Gal-1-P was extremely low. USPase reacted with a range of sugar-1-phosphates, including D-Glc-1-P, D-Gal-1-P, D-GalA-1-P (Km of 1.3 mM, β-L-Ara-1-P and α-D-Fuc-1-P (Km of 3.4 mM, but not β-L-Fuc-1-P. In contrast, UAGPase2 reacted only with D-GlcNAc-1-P, D-GalNAc-1-P (Km of 1 mM and, to some extent, D-Glc-1-P (Km of 3.2 mM. Generally, different conformations/substituents at C2, C4, and C5 of the pyranose ring of a sugar were crucial determinants of substrate specificity of a given pyrophosphorylase. Homology models of UDP-sugar binding to UGPase, USPase and UAGPase2 revealed more common amino acids for UDP binding than for sugar binding, reflecting differences in substrate specificity of these proteins. UAGPase2 was inhibited by a salicylate derivative that was earlier shown to affect UGPase and USPase activities, consistent with a common structural architecture of the three pyrophosphorylases. The results are discussed with respect to the role of the pyrophosphorylases in sugar activation for glycosylated end-products.

  13. Substrate specificity and some properties of phenol sulfotransferase from human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranczyk-Kuzma, A.; Garren, J.A.; Hidalgo, I.J.; Borchardt, R.T. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The phase 2 metabolic reactions, sulfation and glucuronidation, were studied in a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2), which has been developed as a model of intestinal enterocytes. Phenol sulfotransferase was isolated from Caco-2 cells cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days. The enzyme catalyzed the sulfation of both p-nitrophenol and catecholamines as well as most catecholamine metabolites. The affinity (K{sub m}) of PST for dopamine was much higher than for p-nitrophenol, and the specific activity of PST with both substrates increased with the age of the cells. The thermal stability of Caco-2 PST increased with cell age and was not dependent on the acceptor substrate used. The thermolabile PST from 7-day old cells was more sensitive to NEM than was the thermostable enzyme from 21-day old cells. No UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity was detected in 7-, 14- and 21-day old Caco-2 cells with any of the methods used.

  14. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  15. Molecular dynamics investigations of BioH protein substrate specificity for biotin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiao; Cui, Ying-Lu; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2016-05-01

    BioH, an enzyme of biotin synthesis, plays an important role in fatty acid synthesis which assembles the pimelate moiety. Pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester, which is long known to be a biotin precursor, is the physiological substrate of BioH. Azelayl methyl ester, which has a longer chain than pimeloyl methyl ester, conjugated to ACP is also indeed accepted by BioH with very low rate of hydrolysis. To date, the substrate specificity for BioH and the molecular origin for the experimentally observed rate changes of hydrolysis by the chain elongation have remained elusive. To this end, we have investigated chain elongation effects on the structures by using the fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with binding free energy calculations. The results indicate that the substrate specificity is determined by BioH together with ACP. The added two methylenes would increase the structural flexibility by protein motions at the interface of ACP and BioH, instead of making steric clashes with the side chains of the BioH hydrophobic cavity. On the other hand, the slower hydrolysis of azelayl substrate is suggested to be associated with the loose of contacts between BioH and ACP, and with the lost electrostatic interactions of two ionic/hydrogen bonding networks at the interface of the two proteins. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of the complex of BioH with pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester, which could contribute to further understanding about the mechanism of the biotin synthetic pathway, including the catalytic role of BioH.

  16. Molecular mechanism of substrate specificity in the bacterial neutral amino acid transporter LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Sergei Y

    2008-12-01

    The recently published X-ray structure of LeuT, a Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter, has provided fresh impetus to efforts directed at understanding the molecular principles governing specific neurotransmitter transport. The combination of the LeuT crystal structure with the results of molecular simulations enables the functional data on specific binding and transport to be related to molecular structure. All-atom FEP and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of LeuT embedded in an explicit membrane were performed alongside a decomposition analysis to dissect the molecular determinants of the substrate specificity of LeuT. It was found that the ligand must be in a zwitterionic (ZW) form to bind tightly to the transporter. The theoretical results on the absolute binding-free energies for leucine, alanine, and glycine show that alanine can be a potent substrate for LeuT, although leucine is preferred, which is consistent with the recent experimental data (Singh et al., Nature 2007;448:952-956). Furthermore, LeuT displays robust specificity for leucine over glycine. Interestingly, the ability of LeuT to discriminate between substrates relies on the dynamics of residues that form its binding pocket (e.g., F253 and Q250) and the charged side chains (R30-D404) from a second coordination shell. The water-mediated R30-D404 salt bridge is thought to be part of the extracellular (EC) gate of LeuT. The introduction of a polar ligand such as glycine to the water-depleted binding pocket of LeuT gives rise to structural rearrangements of the R30-D404-Q250 hydrogen-bonding network and leads to increased hydration of the binding pocket. Conformational changes associated with the broken hydrogen bond between Q250 and R30 are shown to be important for tight and selective ligand binding to LeuT.

  17. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Università di Sassari, (Italy); Zhang, Yang [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Allegrini, Simone [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Tozzi, Maria Grazia [Università di Pisa, (Italy); Sgarrella, Francesco [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  18. Molecular mechanism of strict substrate specificity of an extradiol dioxygenase, DesB, derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sugimoto

    Full Text Available DesB, which is derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6, is a type II extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes a ring opening reaction of gallate. While typical extradiol dioxygenases show broad substrate specificity, DesB has strict substrate specificity for gallate. The substrate specificity of DesB seems to be required for the efficient growth of S. sp. SYK-6 using lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Since direct coordination of hydroxyl groups of the substrate to the non-heme iron in the active site is a critical step for the catalytic reaction of the extradiol dioxygenases, the mechanism of the substrate recognition and coordination of DesB was analyzed by biochemical and crystallographic methods. Our study demonstrated that the direct coordination between the non-heme iron and hydroxyl groups of the substrate requires a large shift of the Fe (II ion in the active site. Mutational analysis revealed that His124 and His192 in the active site are essential to the catalytic reaction of DesB. His124, which interacts with OH (4 of the bound gallate, seems to contribute to proper positioning of the substrate in the active site. His192, which is located close to OH (3 of the gallate, is likely to serve as the catalytic base. Glu377' interacts with OH (5 of the gallate and seems to play a critical role in the substrate specificity. Our biochemical and structural study showed the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanisms of DesB.

  19. A new nitrilase-producing strain named Rhodobacter sphaeroides LHS-305: biocatalytic characterization and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunsheng; Wang, Xuedong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2011-12-01

    The characteristics of the new nitrilase-producing strain Rhodobacter sphaeroides LHS-305 were investigated. By investigating several parameters influencing nitrilase production, the specific cell activity was ultimately increased from 24.5 to 75.0 μmol g(-1) min(-1), and hereinto, the choice of inducer proved the most important factor. The aromatic nitriles (such as 3-cyanopyridine and benzonitrile) were found to be the most favorable substrates of the nitrilase by analyzing the substrate spectrum. It was speculated that the unsaturated carbon atom attached to the cyano group was crucial for this type of nitrilase. The value of apparent K (m), substrate inhibition constant, and product inhibition constant of the nitrilase against 3-cyanopyridine were 4.5 × 10(-2), 29.2, and 8.6 × 10(-3) mol L(-1), respectively. When applied in nicotinic acid preparation, the nitrilase is able to hydrolyze 200 mmol L(-1) 3-cyanopyridine with 93% conversion rate in 13 h by 6.1 g L(-1) cells (dry cell weight).

  20. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome : substrate specificities and their switch.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Tesar, C.; Wilton, R.; Keigher, L.; Babnigg, G.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a large number of microbes forming a complex microbial community that greatly affects the physiology and pathology of the host. In the human gut microbiome, the enrichment in certain protein gene families appears to be widespread. They include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as glucoside hydrolases of dietary polysaccharides and glycoconjugates. We report the crystal structures (wild type, 2 mutants, and a mutant/substrate complex) and the enzymatic activity of a recombinant {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut bacterium Ruminococcus obeum. The first ever protein structures from this bacterium reveal a structural homologue to human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase with a highly conserved catalytic domain and reduced auxiliary domains. The {alpha}-glucosidase, a member of GH31 family, shows substrate preference for {alpha}(1-6) over {alpha}(1-4) glycosidic linkages and produces glucose from isomaltose as well as maltose. The preference can be switched by a single mutation at its active site, suggestive of widespread adaptation to utilization of a variety of polysaccharides by intestinal micro-organisms as energy resources. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome: substrate specificities and their switch.

  1. Purification, characterization and substrate specificity of a trypsin from the Amazonian fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuschi, Marina; Espósito, Talita S; Machado, Maurício F M; Hirata, Izaura Y; Machado, Marcelo F M; Silva, Márcia V; Carvalho, Luiz B; Oliveira, Vitor; Bezerra, Ranilson S

    2010-06-04

    An enzyme was purified from the pyloric caecum of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) through heat treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 and p-aminobenzamidine-agarose affinity chromatography. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 23.9 kDa, NH(2)-terminal amino acid sequence of IVGGYECKAHSQPHVSLNI and substrate specificity for arginine at P1, efficiently hydrolizing substrates with leucine and lysine at P2 and serine and arginine at P1'. Using the substrate z-FR-MCA, the enzyme exhibited greatest activity at pH 9.0 and 50 degrees C, whereas, with BAPNA activity was higher in a pH range of 7.5-11.5 and at 70 degrees C. Moreover, the enzyme maintained ca. 60% of its activity after incubated for 3h at 60 degrees C. The enzymatic activity significantly decreased in the presence of TLCK, benzamidine (trypsin inhibitors) and PMSF (serine protease inhibitor). This source of trypsin may be an attractive alternative for the detergent and food industry. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural features, substrate specificity, kinetic properties of insect α-amylase and specificity of plant α-amylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Kaur, Narinder; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2014-11-01

    α-Amylase is an important digestive enzyme required for the optimal growth and development of insects. Several insect α-amylases had been purified and their physical and chemical properties were characterized. Insect α-amylases of different orders display variability in structure, properties and substrate specificity. Such diverse properties of amylases could be due to different feeding habits and gut environment of insects. In this review, structural features and properties of several insect α-amylases were compared. This could be helpful in exploring the diversity in characteristics of α-amylase between the members of the same class (insecta). Properties like pH optima are reflected in enzyme structural features. In plants, α-amylase inhibitors (α-AIs) occur as part of natural defense mechanisms against pests by interfering in their digestion process and thus could also provide access to new pest management strategies. AIs are quite specific in their action; therefore, these could be employed according to their effectiveness against target amylases. Potential of transgenics with α-AIs has also been discussed for insect resistance and controlling infestation. The differences in structural features of insect α-amylases provided reasons for their efficient functioning at different pH and the specificity towards various substrates. Various proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous inhibitors discussed could be helpful in controlling pest infestation. In depth detailed studies are required on proteinaceous α-AI-α-amylase interaction at different pH's as well as the insect proteinase action on these inhibitors before selecting the α-AI for making transgenics resistant to particular insect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. On the substrate specificity of the rice strigolactone biosynthesis enzyme DWARF27

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2016-03-05

    Main conclusion: The β-carotene isomerase OsDWARF27 is stereo- and double bond-specific. It converts bicyclic carotenoids with at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. OsDWARF27 may contribute to the formation of α-carotene-based strigolactone-like compounds.Strigolactones (SLs) are synthesized from all-trans-β-carotene via a pathway involving the β-carotene isomerase DWARF27, the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 and 8 (CCD7, CCD8), and cytochrome P450 enzymes from the 711 clade (MAX1 in Arabidopsis). The rice enzyme DWARF27 was shown to catalyze the reversible isomerization of all-trans- into 9-cis-β-carotene in vitro. β-carotene occurs in different cis-isomeric forms, and plants accumulate other carotenoids, which may be substrates of DWARF27. Here, we investigated the stereo and substrate specificity of the rice enzyme DWARF27 in carotenoid-accumulating E. coli strains and in in vitro assays performed with heterologously expressed and purified enzyme. Our results suggest that OsDWARF27 is strictly double bond-specific, solely targeting the C9–C10 double bond. OsDWARF27 did not introduce a 9-cis-double bond in 13-cis- or 15-cis-β-carotene. Substrates isomerized by OsDWARF27 are bicyclic carotenoids, including β-, α-carotene and β,β-cryptoxanthin, that contain at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. Accordingly, OsDWARF27 did not produce the abscisic acid precursors 9-cis-violaxanthin or -neoxanthin from the corresponding all-trans-isomers, excluding a direct role in the formation of this carotenoid derived hormone. The conversion of all-trans-α-carotene yielded two different isomers, including 9′-cis-α-carotene that might be the precursor of strigolactones with an ε-ionone ring, such as the recently identified heliolactone. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  4. Substrate specificity of Pasteurella multocida toxin for α subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Joachim H C; Fester, Ines; Siegert, Peter; Weise, Markus; Lanner, Ulrike; Kamitani, Shigeki; Tachibana, Taro; Wilson, Brenda A; Schlosser, Andreas; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Aktories, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of epizootic and zoonotic diseases. Its major virulence factor associated with atrophic rhinitis in animals and dermonecrosis in bite wounds is P. multocida toxin (PMT). PMT stimulates signal transduction pathways downstream of heterotrimeric G proteins, leading to effects such as mitogenicity, blockade of apoptosis, or inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. On the basis of Gα(i2), it was demonstrated that the toxin deamidates an essential glutamine residue of the Gα(i2) subunit, leading to constitutive activation of the G protein. Here, we studied the specificity of PMT for its G-protein targets by mass spectrometric analyses and by utilizing a monoclonal antibody, which recognizes specifically G proteins deamidated by PMT. The studies revealed deamidation of 3 of 4 families of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα(q/11), Gα(i1,2,3), and Gα(12/13) of mouse or human origin) by PMT but not by a catalytic inactive toxin mutant. With the use of G-protein fragments and chimeras of responsive or unresponsive G proteins, the structural basis for the discrimination of heterotrimeric G proteins was studied. Our results elucidate substrate specificity of PMT on the molecular level and provide evidence for the underlying structural reasons of substrate discrimination.

  5. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Sassari); (Pisa)

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  6. Molecular model of the specificity pocket of the hepatitis C virus protease: implications for substrate recognition.

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzi, E; Tramontano, A; Tomei, L; La Monica, N; Failla, C; Sardana, M; Wood, T; De Francesco, R

    1994-01-01

    We have built a model of the specificity pocket of the protease of hepatitis C virus on the basis of the known structures of trypsin-like serine proteases and of the conservation pattern of the protease sequences among various hepatitis C strains. The model allowed us to predict that the substrate of this protease should have a cysteine residue in position P1. This hypothesis was subsequently proved by N-terminal sequencing of two products of the protease. The success of this "blind" test inc...

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of proteins involved in the stringent response in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Doshun; Ihara, Yuta; Nishihara, Hidenori; Masuda, Shinji

    2017-07-01

    The nucleotide (p)ppGpp is a second messenger that controls the stringent response in bacteria. The stringent response modifies expression of a large number of genes and metabolic processes and allows bacteria to survive under fluctuating environmental conditions. Recent genome sequencing analyses have revealed that genes responsible for the stringent response are also found in plants. These include (p)ppGpp synthases and hydrolases, RelA/SpoT homologs (RSHs), and the pppGpp-specific phosphatase GppA/Ppx. However, phylogenetic relationship between enzymes involved in bacterial and plant stringent responses is as yet generally unclear. Here, we investigated the origin and evolution of genes involved in the stringent response in plants. Phylogenetic analysis and primary structures of RSH homologs from different plant phyla (including Embryophyta, Charophyta, Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta and Glaucophyta) indicate that RSH gene families were introduced into plant cells by at least two independent lateral gene transfers from the bacterial Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and an unidentified bacterial phylum; alternatively, they were introduced into a proto-plant cell by a lateral gene transfer from the endosymbiotic cyanobacterium followed by gene loss of an ancestral RSH gene in the cyanobacterial linage. Phylogenetic analysis of gppA/ppx families indicated that plant gppA/ppx homologs form an individual cluster in the phylogenetic tree, and show a sister relationship with some bacterial gppA/ppx homologs. Although RSHs contain a plastidial transit peptide at the N terminus, GppA/Ppx homologs do not, suggesting that plant GppA/Ppx homologs function in the cytosol. These results reveal that a proto-plant cell obtained genes for the stringent response by lateral gene transfer events from different bacterial phyla and have utilized them to control metabolism in plastids and the cytosol.

  8. The ATP/ADP substrate specificity switch between Toxoplasma gondii NTPDase1 and NTPDase3 is caused by an altered mode of binding of the substrate base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Ulrike; Totzauer, Robert; Zebisch, Matthias; Sträter, Norbert

    2013-11-25

    Two nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase isoforms (NTPDase1 and NTPDase3) are responsible for the hydrolysis of nucleotides by the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. They constitute about 3 % of the total parasite protein. Despite sharing 97 % sequence identity they exhibit opposite ATP versus ADP substrate discrimination ratios. Here we show by mutagenesis that the residues G492/G493 in NTPDase3 and R492/E493 in NTPDase1 are predominantly responsible for the differences in substrate specificity. Crystal structures of NTPDase1 in complexation with analogues of ATP and ADP reveal that the inverted substrate specificity of NTPDase1 relative to NTPDase3 is achieved by switching from the canonical substrate binding mode to a very different alternative one. Instead of being stacked on top of a helix of the C-terminal domain the nucleotide base is positioned in the interdomain space between the side chains of R108 and R492, recruited from both domains. Furthermore, we show that the NTPDase1 substrate specificity is mainly dependent on the presence of the side chain of E493, which causes repositioning of the ribose component of the nucleotide. All in all, binding by the flexible side chains in the alternative binding mode in NTPDase1 allows for equally good positioning of ATP and ADP with increased activity toward ADP relative to what is seen in the case of NTPDase3. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A Xylenol Orange-Based Screening Assay for the Substrate Specificity of Flavin-Dependent para-Phenol Oxidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A. Ewing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO and eugenol oxidase (EUGO are flavin-dependent enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of para-substituted phenols. This makes them potentially interesting biocatalysts for the conversion of lignin-derived aromatic monomers to value-added compounds. To facilitate their biocatalytic exploitation, it is important to develop methods by which variants of the enzymes can be rapidly screened for increased activity towards substrates of interest. Here, we present the development of a screening assay for the substrate specificity of para-phenol oxidases based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide using the ferric-xylenol orange complex method. The assay was used to screen the activity of VAO and EUGO towards a set of twenty-four potential substrates. This led to the identification of 4-cyclopentylphenol as a new substrate of VAO and EUGO and 4-cyclohexylphenol as a new substrate of VAO. Screening of a small library of VAO and EUGO active-site variants for alterations in their substrate specificity led to the identification of a VAO variant (T457Q with increased activity towards vanillyl alcohol (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl alcohol and a EUGO variant (V436I with increased activity towards chavicol (4-allylphenol and 4-cyclopentylphenol. This assay provides a quick and efficient method to screen the substrate specificity of para-phenol oxidases, facilitating the enzyme engineering of known para-phenol oxidases and the evaluation of the substrate specificity of novel para-phenol oxidases.

  10. A Xylenol Orange-Based Screening Assay for the Substrate Specificity of Flavin-Dependent para-Phenol Oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Tom A; van Noord, Aster; Paul, Caroline E; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2018-01-14

    Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO) and eugenol oxidase (EUGO) are flavin-dependent enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of para -substituted phenols. This makes them potentially interesting biocatalysts for the conversion of lignin-derived aromatic monomers to value-added compounds. To facilitate their biocatalytic exploitation, it is important to develop methods by which variants of the enzymes can be rapidly screened for increased activity towards substrates of interest. Here, we present the development of a screening assay for the substrate specificity of para -phenol oxidases based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide using the ferric-xylenol orange complex method. The assay was used to screen the activity of VAO and EUGO towards a set of twenty-four potential substrates. This led to the identification of 4-cyclopentylphenol as a new substrate of VAO and EUGO and 4-cyclohexylphenol as a new substrate of VAO. Screening of a small library of VAO and EUGO active-site variants for alterations in their substrate specificity led to the identification of a VAO variant (T457Q) with increased activity towards vanillyl alcohol (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl alcohol) and a EUGO variant (V436I) with increased activity towards chavicol (4-allylphenol) and 4-cyclopentylphenol. This assay provides a quick and efficient method to screen the substrate specificity of para -phenol oxidases, facilitating the enzyme engineering of known para- phenol oxidases and the evaluation of the substrate specificity of novel para -phenol oxidases.

  11. AcrB drug-binding pocket substitution confers clinically relevant resistance and altered substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Ricci, Vito; Modi, Niraj; Cacciotto, Pierpaolo; Kleinekathӧfer, Ulrich; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V; Baylay, Alison J; Smith, Helen E; Brandon, Yvonne; Galloway, David; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-03-17

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections is increasing globally and the need to understand the underlying mechanisms is paramount to discover new therapeutics. The efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria have a broad substrate range and transport antibiotics out of the bacterium, conferring intrinsic multidrug resistance (MDR). The genomes of pre- and posttherapy MDR clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium from a patient that failed antibacterial therapy and died were sequenced. In the posttherapy isolate we identified a novel G288D substitution in AcrB, the resistance-nodulation division transporter in the AcrAB-TolC tripartite MDR efflux pump system. Computational structural analysis suggested that G288D in AcrB heavily affects the structure, dynamics, and hydration properties of the distal binding pocket altering specificity for antibacterial drugs. Consistent with this hypothesis, recreation of the mutation in standard Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains showed that G288D AcrB altered substrate specificity, conferring decreased susceptibility to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin by increased efflux. At the same time, the substitution increased susceptibility to other drugs by decreased efflux. Information about drug transport is vital for the discovery of new antibacterials; the finding that one amino acid change can cause resistance to some drugs, while conferring increased susceptibility to others, could provide a basis for new drug development and treatment strategies.

  12. Substrate specificity of E. coli uridine phosphorylase. Further evidences of high-syn conformation of the substrate in uridine phosphorolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, C S; Sivets, G G; Safonova, T N; Mikhailov, S N

    2017-02-01

    Twenty five uridine analogues have been tested and compared with uridine with respect to their potency to bind to E. coli uridine phosphorylase. The kinetic constants of the phosphorolysis reaction of uridine derivatives modified at 2'-, 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety and 2-, 4-, 5- and 6-positions of the heterocyclic base were determined. The absence of the 2'- or 5'-hydroxyl group is not crucial for the successful binding and phosphorolysis. On the other hand, the absence of both the 2'- and 5'-hydroxyl groups leads to the loss of substrate binding to the enzyme. The same effect was observed when the 3'-hydroxyl group is absent, thus underlining the key role of this group. Our data shed some light on the mechanism of ribo- and 2'-deoxyribonucleoside discrimination by E. coli uridine phosphorylase and E. coli thymidine phosphorylase. A comparison of the kinetic results obtained in the present study with the available X-ray structures and analysis of hydrogen bonding in the enzyme-substrate complex demonstrates that uridine adopts an unusual high-syn conformation in the active site of uridine phosphorylase.

  13. The effect of increasingly stringent diagnostic criteria on sex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sex differences in premorbid function and symptomatology were examined as increasingly stringent criteria for schizophrenia were applied to 182 male and 139 female . psychotic patients. The male/female ratio rose from 1.6 among those meeting the CATEGO 'broad' criteria for schizophrenia to 3.7 among those satisfying ...

  14. Switch of substrate specificity of hyperthermophilic acylaminoacyl peptidase by combination of protein and solvent engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Lie; Tian, Guohe; Zhang, Zuoming; Feng, Yan

    2011-06-01

    The inherent evolvability of promiscuous enzymes endows them with great potential to be artificially evolved for novel functions. Previously, we succeeded in transforming a promiscuous acylaminoacyl peptidase (apAAP) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 into a specific carboxylesterase by making a single mutation. In order to fulfill the urgent requirement of thermostable lipolytic enzymes, in this paper we describe how the substrate preference of apAAP can be further changed from p-nitrophenyl caprylate (pNP-C8) to p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNP-C12) by protein and solvent engineering. After one round of directed evolution and subsequent saturation mutagenesis at selected residues in the active site, three variants with enhanced activity towards pNP-C12 were identified. Additionally, a combined mutant W474V/F488G/R526V/T560W was generated, which had the highest catalytic efficiency (k (cat)/K (m)) for pNP-C12, about 71-fold higher than the wild type. Its activity was further increased by solvent engineering, resulting in an activity enhancement of 280-fold compared with the wild type in the presence of 30% DMSO. The structural basis for the improved activity was studied by substrate docking and molecular dynamics simulation. It was revealed that W474V and F488G mutations caused a significant change in the geometry of the active center, which may facilitate binding and subsequent hydrolysis of bulky substrates. In conclusion, the combination of protein and solvent engineering may be an effective approach to improve the activities of promiscuous enzymes and could be used to create naturally rare hyperthermophilic enzymes.

  15. Similar arrhythmicity in hypertrophic and fibrotic cardiac cultures caused by distinct substrate-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Saïd F A; Bingen, Brian O; Schalij, Martin J; Swildens, Jim; Atsma, Douwe E; Schutte, Cindy I; de Vries, Antoine A F; Zeppenfeld, Katja; Ypey, Dirk L; Pijnappels, Daniël A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are associated with potentially lethal arrhythmias. As these substrates often occur simultaneously in one patient, distinguishing between pro-arrhythmic mechanisms is difficult. This hampers understanding of underlying pro-arrhythmic mechanisms and optimal treatment. This study investigates and compares arrhythmogeneity and underlying pro-arrhythmic mechanisms of either cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis in in vitro models. Fibrosis was mimicked by free myofibroblast (MFB) proliferation in neonatal rat ventricular monolayers. Cultures with inhibited MFB proliferation were used as control or exposed to phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy. At Day 9, cultures were studied with patch-clamp and optical-mapping techniques and assessed for protein expression. In hypertrophic (n = 111) and fibrotic cultures (n = 107), conduction and repolarization were slowed. Triggered activity was commonly found in these substrates and led to high incidences of spontaneous re-entrant arrhythmias [67.5% hypertrophic, 78.5% fibrotic vs. 2.9% in controls (n = 102)] or focal arrhythmias (39.1, 51.7 vs. 8.8%, respectively). Kv4.3 and Cx43 protein expression levels were decreased in hypertrophy but unaffected in fibrosis. Depolarization of cardiomyocytes (CMCs) was only found in fibrotic cultures (-48 ± 7 vs. -66 ± 7 mV in control, P arrhythmias in hypertrophy, but caused conduction block in fibrosis. Targeting heterocellular coupling by low doses of gap-junction uncouplers prevented arrhythmias by accelerating repolarization only in fibrotic cultures. Cultured hypertrophic or fibrotic myocardial tissues generated similar focal and re-entrant arrhythmias. These models revealed electrical remodelling of CMCs as a pro-arrhythmic mechanism of hypertrophy and MFB-induced depolarization of CMCs as a pro-arrhythmic mechanism of fibrosis. These findings provide novel mechanistic insight into substrate-specific arrhythmicity.

  16. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Circuitry linking the Csr and stringent response global regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Patterson-Fortin, Laura M; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Vinella, Daniel; Camacho, Martha I; Fields, Joshua A; Thompson, Stuart A; Georgellis, Dimitris; Cashel, Michael; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2011-06-01

    CsrA protein regulates important cellular processes by binding to target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or stability. In Escherichia coli, CsrA binds to sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which sequester CsrA and antagonize its activity. Here, mRNAs for relA, spoT and dksA of the stringent response system were found among 721 different transcripts that copurified with CsrA. Many of the transcripts that copurified with CsrA were previously determined to respond to ppGpp and/or DksA. We examined multiple regulatory interactions between the Csr and stringent response systems. Most importantly, DksA and ppGpp robustly activated csrB/C transcription (10-fold), while they modestly activated csrA expression. We propose that CsrA-mediated regulation is relieved during the stringent response. Gel shift assays confirmed high affinity binding of CsrA to relA mRNA leader and weaker interactions with dksA and spoT. Reporter fusions, qRT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that CsrA repressed relA expression, and (p)ppGpp accumulation during stringent response was enhanced in a csrA mutant. CsrA had modest to negligible effects on dksA and spoT expression. Transcription of dksA was negatively autoregulated via a feedback loop that tended to mask CsrA effects. We propose that the Csr system fine-tunes the stringent response and discuss biological implications of the composite circuitry. © Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Substrate specificity of the lanthipeptide peptidase ElxP and the oxidoreductase ElxO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Manuel A; Velásquez, Juan E; Garg, Neha; Zhang, Qi; Joyce, Rachel E; Nair, Satish K; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2014-08-15

    The final step in lanthipeptide biosynthesis involves the proteolytic removal of an N-terminal leader peptide. In the class I lanthipeptide epilancin 15X, this step is performed by the subtilisin-like serine peptidase ElxP. Bioinformatic, kinetic, and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that ElxP recognizes the stretch of amino acids DLNPQS located near the proteolytic cleavage site of its substrate, ElxA. When the ElxP recognition motif was inserted into the noncognate lanthipeptide precursor NisA, ElxP was able to proteolytically remove the leader peptide from NisA. Proteolytic removal of the leader peptide by ElxP during the biosynthesis of epilancin 15X exposes an N-terminal dehydroalanine on the core peptide of ElxA that hydrolyzes to a pyruvyl group. The short-chain dehydrogenase ElxO reduces the pyruvyl group to a lactyl moiety in the final step of epilancin 15X maturation. Using synthetic peptides, we also investigated the substrate specificity of ElxO and determined the 1.85 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme.

  19. Substrate specificity of the acyl transferase domains of EpoC from the epothilone polyketide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Hrvoje; Sandmann, Axel; Challis, Iain R; Hecht, Hans-Jürgen; Silakowski, Barbara; Low, Lindsey; Beeston, Nicola; Kuscer, Enej; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Leadlay, Peter F; Kendrew, Steven G; Wilkinson, Barrie; Müller, Rolf

    2008-02-07

    The production of epothilone mixtures is a direct consequence of the substrate tolerance of the module 3 acyltransferase (AT) domain of the epothilone polyketide synthase (PKS) which utilises both malonyl- and methylmalonyl-CoA extender units. Particular amino acid motifs in the active site of AT domains influence substrate selection for methylmalonyl-CoA (YASH) or malonyl-CoA (HAFH). This motif appears in hybrid form (HASH) in epoAT3 and may represent the molecular basis for the relaxed specificity of the domain. To investigate this possibility the AT domains from modules 2 and 3 of the epothilone PKS were examined in the heterologous DEBS1-TE model PKS. Substitution of AT1 of DEBS1-TE by epoAT2 and epoAT3 both resulted in functional PKSs, although lower yields of total products were observed when compared to DEBS1-TE (2% and 11.5% respectively). As expected, epoAT3 was significantly more promiscuous in keeping with its nature during epothilone biosynthesis. When the mixed motif (HASH) of epoAT3 within the hybrid PKS was mutated to HAFH (indicative of malonyl-CoA selection) it resulted in a non-productive PKS. When this mixed motif was converted to YASH (indicative of methylmalonyl-CoA selection) the selectivity of the hybrid PKS for methylmalonyl-CoA showed no statistically significant increase, and was associated with a loss of productivity.

  20. Substrate specificity of a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from Pyrococcus furiosus for monosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ran-Young; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Park, Chang-Su; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2009-05-01

    We purified recombinant glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from Pyrococcus furiosus using heat treatment and Hi-Trap anion-exchange chromatography with a final specific activity of 0.39 U mg(-1). The activity of the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase for L: -talose isomerization was optimal at pH 7.0, 95 degrees C, and 1.5 mM Co(2+). The half-lives of the enzyme at 65 degrees C, 75 degrees C, 85 degrees C, and 95 degrees C were 170, 41, 19, and 7.9 h, respectively. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase catalyzed the interconversion between two different aldoses and ketose for all pentoses and hexoses via two isomerization reactions. This enzyme has a unique activity order as follows: aldose substrates with hydroxyl groups oriented in the same direction at C2, C3, and C4 > C2 and C4 > C2 and C3 > C3 and C4. L: -Talose and D: -ribulose exhibited the most preferred substrates among the aldoses and ketoses, respectively. L: -Talose was converted to L: -tagatose and L: -galactose by glucose-6-phosphate isomerase with 80% and 5% conversion yields after about 420 min, respectively, whereas D: -ribulose was converted to D: -ribose and D: -arabinose with 53% and 8% conversion yields after about 240 min, respectively.

  1. Bioanalysis for biocatalysis: multiplexed capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry assay for aminotransferase substrate discovery and specificity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Gleb G; St-Jacques, Antony D; Mungham, Alexander; Eason, Matthew G; Chica, Roberto A; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2013-09-18

    In this work, we introduce an entirely automated enzyme assay based on capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry termed MINISEP-MS for multiple interfluent nanoinjections-incubation-separation-enzyme profiling using mass spectrometry. MINISEP-MS requires only nanoliters of reagent solutions and uses the separation capillary as a microreactor, allowing multiple substrates to be assayed simultaneously. The method can be used to rapidly profile the substrate specificity of any enzyme and to measure steady-state kinetics in an automated fashion. We used the MINISEP-MS assay to profile the substrate specificity of three aminotransferases (E. coli aspartate aminotransferase, E. coli branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase, and Bacillus sp. YM-1 D-amino acid aminotransferase) for 33 potential amino acid substrates and to measure steady-state kinetics. Using MINISEP-MS, we were able to recapitulate the known substrate specificities and to discover new amino acid substrates for these industrially relevant enzymes. Additionally, we were able to measure the apparent K(M) and k(cat) parameters for amino acid donor substrates of these aminotransferases. Because of its many advantages, the MINISEP-MS assay has the potential of becoming a useful tool for researchers aiming to identify or create novel enzymes for specific biocatalytic applications.

  2. Imbalanced substrate specificity of mutant beta-galactosidase in patients with Morquio B disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Toshika; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Kase, Ryoichi; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2003-01-01

    G(M1)-gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease are distinct in clinical and biochemical features, but both disorders are caused by genetic defects of the same enzyme, acid beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal). We analyzed the kinetic properties of mutant beta-Gals from patients with G(M1)-gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease to examine the clinical and biochemical differences between both disorders. Five skin fibroblast lines from patients with G(M1)-gangliosidosis (2 cases; R201C/R201C and I51T/I51T), Morquio B disease (2 cases; W273L/W273L and Y83H/R482C), and galactosialidosis (1 case; Y395C/S90L) were used as enzyme sources. Residual enzyme activity in the cells was subjected to kinetic analysis. Substrate analogs including Galbeta1-3GalNAc, as an analog for G(M1)-ganglioside, and Galbeta1-4GlcNAc, as an analog for keratan sulfate, were used to determine IC(50) and K(i) for beta-Gals with an artificial substrate (4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-galactopyranoside). Enzymatic assay method was established to examine the hydrolytic activity with the mutant beta-Gal for the substrate analogs. The mutant beta-Gal activities were inhibited by Galbeta1-3GalNAc and Galbeta1-4GlcNAc in a concentration-dependent manner. Remarkable increase in IC(50) ratio and K(i) ratio (Galbeta1-4GlcNAc/Galbeta1-3GalNAc) was observed in Morquio B disease. Relative hydrolytic activity (Galbeta1-4GlcNAc/Galbeta1-3GalNAc) was markedly decreased in Morquio B disease as compared with other subjects; controls (means+/-SD, n=4), 1.00+/-0.02; galactosialidosis, 1.03; G(M1)-gangliosidosis, 1.15 and 1.00; and Morquio B disease, 0.27 and 0.32. The mutant beta-Gals from the patients with Morquio B disease exhibited lower affinity and lower hydrolytic activity toward Galbeta1-4GlcNAc rather than Galbeta1-3GalNAc. These findings suggest that imbalanced substrate specificity of the mutant beta-Gals induces predominant accumulation of keratan sulfate and a rationale for performing differential diagnostic analysis for

  3. Efficient production of l-lactic acid by an engineered Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense with broad substrate specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to optically pure lactic acid is a key challenge for the economical production of biodegradable poly-lactic acid. A recently isolated strain, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is promising as an efficient lactic acid production bacterium from biomass due to its broad substrate specificity. Additionally, its strictly anaerobic and thermophilic characteristics suppress contamination from other microoragnisms. Herein, we report the significant improvements of concentration and yield in lactic acid production from various lignocellulosic derived sugars, achieved by the carbon flux redirection through homologous recombination in T. aotearoense SCUT27. Results T. aotearoense SCUT27 was engineered to block the acetic acid formation pathway to improve the lactic acid production. The genetic manipulation resulted in 1.8 and 2.1 fold increase of the lactic acid yield using 10 g/L of glucose or 10 g/L of xylose as substrate, respectively. The maximum l-lactic acid yield of 0.93 g/g glucose with an optical purity of 99.3% was obtained by the engineered strain, designated as LA1002, from 50 g/L of substrate, which is very close to the theoretical value (1.0 g/g of glucose). In particular, LA1002 produced lactic acid at an unprecedented concentration up to 3.20 g/L using 10 g/L xylan as the single substrate without any pretreatment after 48 h fermentation. The non-sterilized fermentative production of l-lactic acid was also carried out, achieving values of 44.89 g/L and 0.89 g/g mixed sugar for lactic acid concentration and yield, respectively. Conclusions Blocking acetic acid formation pathway in T. aotearoense SCUT27 increased l-lactic acid production and yield dramatically. To our best knowledge, this is the best performance of fermentation on lactic acid production using xylan as the sole carbon source, considering the final concentration, yield and fermentation time. In addition, it should be

  4. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Mattsson

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3 exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  5. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johanna M; Ravela, Suvi; Hekim, Can; Jonsson, Magnus; Malm, Johan; Närvänen, Ale; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3) exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  6. Proteolytic Activity of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) towards Protein Substrates and Effect of Peptides Stimulating PSA Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johanna M.; Ravela, Suvi; Hekim, Can; Jonsson, Magnus; Malm, Johan; Närvänen, Ale; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3) exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA. PMID:25237904

  7. Molecular model of the specificity pocket of the hepatitis C virus protease: implications for substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, E; Tramontano, A; Tomei, L; La Monica, N; Failla, C; Sardana, M; Wood, T; De Francesco, R

    1994-02-01

    We have built a model of the specificity pocket of the protease of hepatitis C virus on the basis of the known structures of trypsin-like serine proteases and of the conservation pattern of the protease sequences among various hepatitis C strains. The model allowed us to predict that the substrate of this protease should have a cysteine residue in position P1. This hypothesis was subsequently proved by N-terminal sequencing of two products of the protease. The success of this "blind" test increases our confidence in the overall correctness of our proposed alignment of the enzyme sequence with those of other proteases of known structure and constitutes a first step in the construction of a complete model of the viral protease domain.

  8. Enzymatic reduction of levulinic acid by engineering the substrate specificity of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Young Joo; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Yoo, Young Je

    2013-04-01

    Enzymatic reduction of levulinic acid (LA) was performed for the synthesis of 4-hydroxyvaleric acid (4HV)--a monomer of bio-polyester and a precursor of bio-fuels--using 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (3HBDH) from Alcaligenes faecalis. Due to the catalytic inactivity of the wild-type enzyme toward LA, engineering of the substrate specificity of the enzyme was performed. A rational design approach with molecular docking simulation was applied, and a double mutant, His144Leu/Trp187Phe, which has catalytic activity (kcat/Km=578.0 min(-1) M(-1)) toward LA was generated. Approximately 57% conversion of LA to 4HV was achieved with this double mutant in 24 h, while no conversion was achieved with the wild-type enzyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspAT and ArAT reveal structural basis of their distinct substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Nazia; Anant, Avishek; Vyas, Rajan; Biswal, Bichitra Kumar

    2016-01-07

    Aminotransferases of subfamily Iβ, which include histidinol phosphate aminotransferases (HspATs) and aromatic amino acid aminotransferases (ArATs), are structurally similar but possess distinct substrate specificities. This study, encompassing structural and biochemical characterisation of HspAT and ArAT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis demonstrates that the residues lining the substrate binding pocket and N-terminal lid are the primary determinants of their substrate specificities. In mHspAT, hydrophilic residues in the substrate binding pocket and N-terminal lid allow the entry and binding of its preferential substrate, Hsp. On the other hand, the hydrophobic nature of both the substrate binding pocket and the N-terminal lid of mArAT is responsible for the discrimination of a polar substrate such as Hsp, while facilitating the binding of Phe and other aromatic residues such as Tyr and Trp. In addition, the present study delineates the ligand induced conformational rearrangements, providing insights into the plasticity of aminotransferases. Furthermore, the study also demonstrates that the adventitiously bound ligand 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) is indeed a specific inhibitor of HspAT. These results suggest that previously untapped morpholine-ring scaffold compounds could be explored for the design of new anti-TB agents.

  10. Analysis of substrate specificity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 alkylpurine DNA glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Suraj; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    DNA glycosylases specialized for the repair of alkylation damage must identify, with fine specificity, a diverse array of subtle modifications within DNA. The current mechanism involves damage sensing through interrogation of the DNA duplex, followed by more specific recognition of the target base inside the active site pocket. To better understand the physical basis for alkylpurine detection, we determined the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 (spMag1) in complex with DNA and performed a mutational analysis of spMag1 and the close homologue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (scMag). Despite strong homology, spMag1 and scMag differ in substrate specificity and cellular alkylation sensitivity, although the enzymological basis for their functional differences is unknown. We show that Mag preference for 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A) is influenced by a minor groove-interrogating residue more than the composition of the nucleobase-binding pocket. Exchanging this residue between Mag proteins swapped their {var_epsilon}A activities, providing evidence that residues outside the extrahelical base-binding pocket have a role in identification of a particular modification in addition to sensing damage.

  11. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease Npro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-01-01

    Pestivirus N pro is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N pro blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N pro' s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N pro -GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N pro proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N pro' s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N pro does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N pro' s autoproteolysis is studied using N pro -GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N pro prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position

  12. Is ionizing radiation regulated more stringently than chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.; Pack, S.R.; Hattemer-Frey, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    It is widely believed that United States government agencies regulate exposure to ionizing radiation more stringently than exposure to chemical carcinogens. It is difficult to verify this perception, however, because chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation are regulated using vastly different strategies. Chemical carcinogens are generally regulated individually. Regulators consider the risk of exposure to one chemical rather than the cumulative radiation exposure from all sources. Moreover, standards for chemical carcinogens are generally set in terms of quantities released or resultant environmental concentrations, while standards for ionizing radiation are set in terms of dose to the human body. Since chemicals and ionizing radiation cannot be compared on the basis of equal dose to the exposed individual, standards regulating chemicals and ionizing radiation cannot be compared directly. It is feasible, however, to compare the two sets of standards on the basis of equal risk to the exposed individual, assuming that standards for chemicals and ionizing radiation are equivalent if estimated risk levels are equitable. This paper compares risk levels associated with current standards for ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens. The authors do not attempt to determine whether either type of risk is regulated too stringently or not stringently enough but endeavor only to ascertain if ionizing radiation is actually regulated more strictly than chemical carcinogens

  13. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease Npro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H

    2014-03-01

    Pestivirus N(pro) is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N(pro) blocks the host׳s interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N(pro׳)s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N(pro)-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N(pro) proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N(pro׳)s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N(pro) does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Substrate specificity in enzymatic fluorination. The fluorinase from Streptomyces cattleya accepts 2′-deoxyadenosine substrates†

    OpenAIRE

    Cobb, Steven L.; Deng, Hai; McEwan, Andrew R.; Naismith, James H.; O’Hagan, David; Robinson, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The fluorinase enzyme from Streptomyces cattleya displays an unusual ability in biocatalysis in that it forms a C–F bond. We now report that the enzyme will accept 2′-deoxyadenosine in place of adenosine substrates, and structural evidence reveals a reorganisation in hydrogen bonding to accommodate this substrate series. It emerges from this study that the enzyme does not require a planar ribose conformation of the substrate to catalyse C–F bond formation.

  15. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  16. Substrate Specificity of Lymphoid-specific Tyrosine Phosphatase (Lyp) and Identification of Src Kinase-associated Protein of 55 kDa Homolog (SKAP-HOM) as a Lyp Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiao; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Sheng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Jin-Peng; Wang, Lina; Liu, Sijiu; Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Yuichiro; Zhang, Zhong-Yin (Indiana-Med)

    2012-02-08

    A missense single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding the lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) has been identified as a causal factor in a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the autoimmune-predisposing variant of Lyp appears to represent a gain-of-function mutation, implicating Lyp as an attractive target for the development of effective strategies for the treatment of many autoimmune disorders. Unfortunately, the precise biological functions of Lyp in signaling cascades and cellular physiology are poorly understood. Identification and characterization of Lyp substrates will help define the chain of molecular events coupling Lyp dysfunction to diseases. In the current study, we identified consensus sequence motifs for Lyp substrate recognition using an 'inverse alanine scanning' combinatorial library approach. The intrinsic sequence specificity data led to the discovery and characterization of SKAP-HOM, a cytosolic adaptor protein required for proper activation of the immune system, as a bona fide Lyp substrate. To determine the molecular basis for Lyp substrate recognition, we solved crystal structures of Lyp in complex with the consensus peptide as well as the phosphopeptide derived from SKAP-HOM. Together with the biochemical data, the structures define the molecular determinants for Lyp substrate specificity and provide a solid foundation upon which novel therapeutics targeting Lyp can be developed for multiple autoimmune diseases.

  17. The fungal cultivar of leaf-cutter ants produces specific enzymes in response to different plant substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadempour, Lily [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; White, Richard A. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Monroe, Matthew E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Huang, Eric L. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Currie, Cameron R. [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA

    2016-10-26

    Herbivores use symbiotic microbes to help gain access to energy and nutrients from plant material. Leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example, having tremendous impact on their ecosystems as dominant generalist herbivores through cultivation of a fungus, Leucoagaricus gongylophorous. Here we examine how this mutualism could facilitate the flexible substrate incorporation of the ants by providing leaf-cutter ant subcolonies four substrate types: leaves, flowers, oats, and a mixture of all three. Through metaproteomic analysis of the fungus gardens, we were able to identify and quantify 1766 different fungal proteins, including 161 biomass-degrading enzymes. This analysis revealed that fungal protein profiles were significantly different between subcolonies fed different substrates with the highest abundance of cellulolytic enzymes observed in the leaf and flower treatments. When the fungus garden is provided with leaves and flowers, which contain the majority of their energy in recalcitrant material, it increases its production of proteins that break down cellulose: endoglucanases, exoglucanase and β-glucosidase. Further, the complete metaproteomes for the leaves and flowers treatments were very similar, the mixed treatment closely resembled the treatment with oats alone. This suggests that when provided a mixture of substrates, the fungus garden preferentially produces enzymes necessary for breakdown of simpler, more digestible substrates. This flexible, substrate-specific response of the fungal cultivar allows the leaf-cutter ants to derive energy from a wide range of substrates, which may contribute to their ability to be dominant generalist herbivores.

  18. Substrate-specific gene expression in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the chytrid pathogen of amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Bree Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Determining the mechanisms of host-pathogen interaction is critical for understanding and mitigating infectious disease. Mechanisms of fungal pathogenicity are of particular interest given the recent outbreaks of fungal diseases in wildlife populations. Our study focuses on Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, the chytrid pathogen responsible for amphibian declines around the world. Previous studies have hypothesized a role for several specific families of secreted proteases as pathogenicity factors in Bd, but the expression of these genes has only been evaluated in laboratory growth conditions. Here we conduct a genome-wide study of Bd gene expression under two different nutrient conditions. We compare Bd gene expression profiles in standard laboratory growth media and in pulverized host tissue (i.e., frog skin. A large proportion of genes in the Bd genome show increased expression when grown in host tissue, indicating the importance of studying pathogens on host substrate. A number of gene classes show particularly high levels of expression in host tissue, including three families of secreted proteases (metallo-, serine- and aspartyl-proteases, adhesion genes, lipase-3 encoding genes, and a group of phylogenetically unusual crinkler-like effectors. We discuss the roles of these different genes as putative pathogenicity factors and discuss what they can teach us about Bd's metabolic targets, host invasion, and pathogenesis.

  19. Substrate specificity and kinetics of Candida rugosa lipase in organic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A E; Vaidya, A M; Halling, P J

    1996-04-01

    The fatty acid specificity of lipase from Candida rugosa during the esterification of saturated fatty acids and sulcatol in toluene has been studied. The true kinetic parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental data to a Ping-Pong kinetic model that includes alcohol inhibition. The fitted parameter values are compared with apparent values that would be obtained from restricted data sets in which one of the substrate concentrations was kept constant. It has been found that in reactions inhibited by alcohol the true Ping-Pong parameters can be significantly different from the apparent ones. Corrections for solvation are made by using activities instead of concentrations to fit the kinetic parameters. Though activity coefficients, estimated using the UNIFAC group contribution method, vary by over 25% for changing concentrations in the same solvent, their use did not improve the fit to the data. This contrasts with what has been found in comparisons of different solvents, where the differences in activity coefficients are much larger.

  20. Kinetic characterization of Vibrio cholerae ApbE: Substrate specificity and regulatory mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xuan; Liang, Pingdong; Raba, Daniel Alexander; Rosas-Lemus, Mónica; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Tuz, Karina; Juárez, Oscar; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2017-10-24

    ApbE is a member of a novel family of flavin transferases that incorporates flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to subunits of diverse respiratory complexes, which fulfill important homeostatic functions. In this work a detailed characterization of Vibrio cholerae ApbE physiologic activity, substrate specificity and pH dependency was carried out. The data obtained show novel characteristics of the regulation and function of this family. For instance, our experiments indicate that divalent cations are essential for ApbE function, and that the selectivity depends largely on size and the coordination sphere of the cation. Our data also show that ApbE regulation by pH, ADP and potassium is an important mechanism that enhances the adaptation, survival and colonization of V. cholerae in the small intestine. Moreover, studies of the pH-dependency of the activity show that the reaction is favored under alkaline conditions, with a pKa of 8.4. These studies, together with sequence and structure analysis allowed us to identify His257, which is absolutely conserved in the family, as a candidate for the residue whose deprotonation controls the activity. Remarkably, the mutant H257G abolished the flavin transfer activity, strongly indicating that this residue plays an important role in the catalytic mechanism of ApbE.

  1. A new nitrilase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110. Gene cloning, biochemical characterization and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dunming; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Yang, Yan; Rios, Beatriz E; Gallagher, D Travis; Smith, N Natasha; Biehl, Edward R; Hua, Ling

    2008-02-01

    A nitrilase gene blr3397 from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein was purified to give a nitrilase with a single band of about 34.5kD on SDS-PAGE. The molecular weight of the holoenzyme was about 340kD as determined by light scattering analysis, suggesting that nitrilase blr3397 self-aggregated to an active form with the native structure being a decamer. The V(max) and K(m) for phenylacetonitrile were 3.15U/mg and 4.36mM, respectively. The catalytic constant k(cat) and specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) were 111min(-1) and 2.6x10(4)min(-1)M(-1). This nitrilase is most active toward the hydrolysis of hydrocinnamonitrile among the tested substrates (4.3 times that of phenylacetonitrile). The nitrilase blr3397 shows higher activity towards the hydrolysis of aliphatic nitriles than that for the aromatic counterparts, and can be characterized as an aliphatic nitrilase in terms of activity. This nitrilase also possesses distinct features from the nitrilase bll6402 of the same microbe.

  2. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  3. Complexes of Thermotoga maritima S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase provide insights into substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bale, Shridhar; Baba, Kavita; McCloskey, Diane E.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-25

    The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine are ubiquitous aliphatic cations and are essential for cellular growth and differentiation. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) is a critical pyruvoyl-dependent enzyme in the polyamine-biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structures of AdoMetDC from humans and plants and of the AdoMetDC proenzyme from Thermotoga maritima have been obtained previously. Here, the crystal structures of activated T. maritima AdoMetDC (TmAdoMetDC) and of its complexes with S-adenosylmethionine methyl ester and 5{prime}-deoxy-5{prime}-dimethylthioadenosine are reported. The results demonstrate for the first time that TmAdoMetDC autoprocesses without the need for additional factors and that the enzyme contains two complete active sites, both of which use residues from both chains of the homodimer. The complexes provide insights into the substrate specificity and ligand binding of AdoMetDC in prokaryotes. The conservation of the ligand-binding mode and the active-site residues between human and T. maritima AdoMetDC provides insight into the evolution of AdoMetDC.

  4. Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, Stephanie A; Joshua, Chijioke; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities that deconstruct plant biomass have broad relevance in biofuel production and global carbon cycling. Biomass pretreatments reduce plant biomass recalcitrance for increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. We exploited these chemical pretreatments to study how thermophilic bacterial consortia adapt to deconstruct switchgrass (SG) biomass of various compositions. Microbial communities were adapted to untreated, ammonium fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated, and ionic-liquid (IL)-pretreated SG under aerobic, thermophilic conditions using green waste compost as the inoculum to study biomass deconstruction by microbial consortia. After microbial cultivation, gravimetric analysis of the residual biomass demonstrated that both AFEX and IL pretreatment enhanced the deconstruction of the SG biomass approximately 2-fold. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) experiments and acetyl bromide-reactive-lignin analysis indicated that polysaccharide hydrolysis was the dominant process occurring during microbial biomass deconstruction, and lignin remaining in the residual biomass was largely unmodified. Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene amplicon libraries revealed that although the dominant taxa across these chemical pretreatments were consistently represented by members of the Firmicutes, the Bacteroidetes, and Deinococcus-Thermus, the abundance of selected operational taxonomic units (OTUs) varied, suggesting adaptations to the different substrates. Combining the observations of differences in the community structure and the chemical and physical structure of the biomass, we hypothesize specific roles for individual community members in biomass deconstruction. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The role of herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase alanine 168 in substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candice L, Willmon; Django, Sussman; Margaret E, Black

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) has been widely used in suicide gene therapy for the treatment of cancer due to its broad substrate specificity and the inability of the endogenous human TK to phosphorylate guanosine analogs such as ganciclovir (GCV). The basis of suicide gene therapy is the introduction of a gene that encodes a prodrug-activating enzyme into tumor cells. After administration, the prodrug is selectively converted to a toxic drug by the suicide gene product thereby bringing about the eradication of the cancer cells. A major drawback to this therapy is the low activity the enzyme displays towards the prodrugs, requiring high prodrug doses that result in adverse side effects. Earlier studies revealed two HSV TK variants (SR39 and mutant 30) derived by random mutagenesis with enhanced activities towards GCV in vitro and in vivo. While these mutants contain multiple amino acid substitutions, molecular modeling suggests that substitutions at alanine 168 (A168) may be responsible for the observed increase in prodrug sensitivity. To evaluate this, site-directed mutagenesis was used to individually substitute A168 with phenylalanine or tyrosine to reflect the mutations found in SR39 and mutant 30, respectively. Additionally, kinetic parameters and the ability of these mutants to sensitize tumor cells to GCV in comparison to wild-type thymidine kinase were determined.

  6. Structure of putrescine aminotransferase from Escherichia coli provides insights into the substrate specificity among class III aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Rojviriya, Catleya; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    YgjG is a putrescine aminotransferase enzyme that transfers amino groups from compounds with terminal primary amines to compounds with an aldehyde group using pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Previous biochemical data show that the enzyme prefers primary diamines, such as putrescine, over ornithine as a substrate. To better understand the enzyme's substrate specificity, crystal structures of YgjG from Escherichia coli were determined at 2.3 and 2.1 Å resolutions for the free and putrescine-bound enzymes, respectively. Sequence and structural analyses revealed that YgjG forms a dimer that adopts a class III PLP-dependent aminotransferase fold. A structural comparison between YgjG and other class III aminotransferases revealed that their structures are similar. However, YgjG has an additional N-terminal helical structure that partially contributes to a dimeric interaction with the other subunit via a helix-helix interaction. Interestingly, the YgjG substrate-binding site entrance size and charge distribution are smaller and more hydrophobic than other class III aminotransferases, which suggest that YgjG has a unique substrate binding site that could accommodate primary aliphatic diamine substrates, including putrescine. The YgjG crystal structures provide structural clues to putrescine aminotransferase substrate specificity and binding.

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative substrate recognition sites in cytochrome P450 2B11: importance of amino acid residues 114, 290, and 363 for substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, J A; Harlow, G R; Szklarz, G D; John, G H; Kedzie, K M; Burnett, V L; He, Y A; Kaminsky, L S; Halpert, J R

    1994-08-01

    Eleven amino acid residues unique to dog cytochrome P450 (P450) 2B11, compared with rat 2B1 and 2B2, rabbit 2B4 and 2B5, and mouse 2B10, in the putative substrate recognition sites [J. Biol. Chem. 267:83-90 (1992)] were mutated to the residues found in 2B1 or 2B5. The mutants were expressed initially in COS cells and screened for activity toward androstenedione and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (245-HCB). P450 2B11 mutants V107I, M199L-N200E-V204R, V234I, A292L, Q473R, and I475S showed no differences from wild-type P450 2B11 in metabolite profiles with either substrate. Mutants V114I, D290I, and L363V exhibited altered androstenedione metabolite profiles and were expressed in Escherichia coli for further study with androstenedione, testosterone, 7-ethoxycoumarin, (R)- and (S)-warfarin, and 245-HCB. With V114I, hydroxylation of steroids and warfarin and 2-hydroxylation of 245-HCB were decreased, whereas 7-ethoxycoumarin O-dealkylation and 3-hydroxylation of 245-HCB were unaltered. For D290I, activities toward all substrates were decreased, except for 16 beta-hydroxylation of testosterone. The activity of L363V was increased 5-6-fold for 16 alpha-hydroxylation of androstenedione and testosterone but was decreased to 40-50% of wild-type activity with 7-ethoxycoumarin and warfarin and to 6-8% of control for 2-hydroxylation of 245-HCB. Alignment of P450 2B11 with P450 101 and super-imposition of the 11 mutated 2B11 residues on a P450 101 three-dimensional model suggest that only residues 114, 290, and 363 represent substrate contact residues, in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The data indicate the importance of the three residues 114, 290, and 363 in substrate specificity and regio- and stereoselectivity of P450 2B11 and also demonstrate that the effects of the mutations vary considerably with different substrates.

  8. Structure based protein engineering of Bacillus stearothermophilus {alpha}-amylase: toward a new substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasera, Ana Claudia [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas; Iulek, Jorge [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Delboni, Luis Fernando; Barbosa, Valma Martins Barbosa [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica

    1997-12-31

    {alpha}-amylase (using Bacillus licheniformis crystal structure as initial model) it seems that Bacillus stearothermophilus {alpha}-amylase binding site is more complex with and insertion of 40 residues. Therefore the three dimensional structure is crucial to understand the specificity of the substrate of this enzyme which will be used to drive the design of mutation to introduce new properties for industrial purpose. (author)

  9. Structure based protein engineering of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase: toward a new substrate specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasera, Ana Claudia; Iulek, Jorge; Delboni, Luis Fernando; Barbosa, Valma Martins Barbosa

    1997-01-01

    licheniformis crystal structure as initial model) it seems that Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase binding site is more complex with and insertion of 40 residues. Therefore the three dimensional structure is crucial to understand the specificity of the substrate of this enzyme which will be used to drive the design of mutation to introduce new properties for industrial purpose. (author)

  10. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Neil D

    2016-03-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase

  11. Substrate and/or substrate-driven changes in the abundance of methanogenic archaea cause seasonal variation of methane production potential in species-specific freshwater wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Yuan, Junji; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2014-05-01

    There are large temporal and spatial variations of methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetlands. To understand temporal changes of CH4 production potential (MPP), soil samples were collected from a permanently inundated Carex lasiocarpa marsh and a summer inundated Calamagrostis angustifolia marsh over the period from June to October of 2011. MPP, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, abundance and community structure of methanogenic archaea were assessed. In the C. lasiocarpa marsh, DOC concentration, MPP and the methanogen population showed similar seasonal variations and maximal values in September. MPP and DOC in the C. angustifolia marsh exhibited seasonal variations and values peaked during August, while the methanogen population decreased with plant growth. Methanogen abundance correlated significantly (P = 0.02) with DOC only for the C. lasiocarpa marsh. During the sampling period, the dominant methanogens were the Methanosaetaceae and Zoige cluster I (ZC-Ι) in the C. angustifolia marsh, and Methanomicrobiales and ZC-Ι in the C. lasiocarpa marsh. MPP correlated significantly (P = 0.04) with DOC and methanogen population in the C. lasiocarpa marsh but only with DOC in the C. angustifolia marsh. Addition of C. lasiocarpa litter enhanced MPP more effectively than addition of C. angustifolia litter, indicating that temporal variation of substrates is controlled by litter deposition in the C. lasiocarpa marsh while living plant matter is more important in the C. angustifolia marsh. This study indicated that there was no apparent shift in the dominant types of methanogen during the growth season in the species-specific freshwater wetlands. Temporal variation of MPP is controlled by substrates and substrate-driven changes in the abundance of methanogenic archaea in the C. lasiocarpa marsh, while MPP depends only on substrate availability derived from root exudates or soil organic matter in the C. angustifolia marsh.

  12. Expanding the Substrate Specificity of Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase by a Dual Site Mutation

    KAUST Repository

    Musa, Musa M.

    2017-12-14

    Here, we report the asymmetric reduction of selected phenyl-ring-containing ketones by various single and dual site mutants of Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (TeSADH). Further expanding the size of the substrate binding pocket in the mutant W110A/I86A not only allowed substrates of the single mutants W110A and I86A to be accommodated within the expanded active site, but also expanded the enzyme\\'s substrate range to ketones bearing two sterically demanding groups (bulky-bulky ketones), which are not substrates for TeSADH single mutants. We also report the regio- and enantioselective reduction of diketones using W110A/I86A TeSADH and single TeSADH mutants. The double mutant exhibited dual stereopreference generating the Prelog products most of the time and the anti-Prelog products in a few cases.

  13. Animal deoxyribonucleoside kinases: 'forward' and 'retrograde' evolution of their substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Sandrini, Michael P; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases, which catalyse the phosphorylation of deoxyribonucleosides, are present in several copies in most multicellular organisms and therefore represent an excellent model to study gene duplication and specialisation of the duplicated copies through partitioning of substrate...

  14. Purification and substrate specificities of a fructanase from Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from the fermentation process of Mezcal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2011-02-01

    A fructanase, produced by a Kluyveromyces marxianus strain isolated during the fermentation step of the elaboration process of "Mezcal de Guerrero" was purified and biochemically characterized. The active protein was a glycosylated dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 250 kDa. The specific enzymatic activity of the protein was determined for different substrates: sucrose, inulin, Agave tequilana fructan, levan and Actilight® and compared with the activity of Fructozyme®. The hydrolysis profile of the different substrates analyzed by HPAEC-PAD showed that the enzyme has different affinities over the substrates tested with a sucrose/inulin enzymatic activity ratio (S/I) of 125. For the hydrolysis of Agave tequilana fructans, the enzyme also showed a higher enzymatic activity and specificity than Fructozyme®, which is important for its potential application in the tequila industry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of the substrate specificity of the proton coupled peptide transporter PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Hald, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian proton coupled transporter (POT) hPepT1 has been studied intensively due to its role in nutrient and drug absorption in the small intestine. In the absence of a crystal structure of hPepT1, the available structures of bacterial POTs, among which PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis has...... a strikingly high sequence identity, can be used to rationalize its mechanism and substrate preference. However, very little is known about the substrate specificity of PepTSo. To elaborate on this, the natural peptide specificity of PepTSo was investigated. Di and tri-peptides were found to be substrates...... for PepTSo in contrast to mono- and tetrapeptides as was indicated by previous competition studies. Interestingly, a negatively charged side chain was better accommodated on the dipeptide N- than the C-terminus position. Inversely, a positive charged side chain appeared to be tolerated better...

  16. Substrate specificity of microbial transglutaminase as revealed by three-dimensional docking simulation and mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tagami, Uno; Shimba, Nobuhisa; Nakamura, Mina; Yokoyama, Kei-ichi; Suzuki, Ei-ichiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2009-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) are used in fields such as food and pharmaceuticals. Unlike other TGases, microbial transglutaminase (MTG) activity is Ca2+-independent, broadening its application. Here, a three-dimensional docking model of MTG binding to a peptide substrate, CBZ-Gln-Gly, was simulated. The data reveal CBZ-Gln-Gly to be stretched along the MTG active site cleft with hydrophobic and/or aromatic residues interacting directly with the substrate. Moreover, an oxyanion binding site for ...

  17. SNOSite: exploiting maximal dependence decomposition to identify cysteine S-nitrosylation with substrate site specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation, the covalent attachment of a nitric oxide to (NO the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-nitrosylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 586 experimentally identified S-nitrosylation sites from SNAP/L-cysteine-stimulated mouse endothelial cells, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-nitrosylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition, the accessible surface area (ASA and physicochemical properties, i.e. positive charge and side chain interaction parameter. Due to the difficulty to obtain the conserved motifs by conventional motif analysis, maximal dependence decomposition (MDD has been applied to obtain statistically significant conserved motifs. Support vector machine (SVM is applied to generate predictive model for each MDD-clustered motif. According to five-fold cross-validation, the MDD-clustered SVMs could achieve an accuracy of 0.902, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the model was demonstrated on the correct identification of previously reported S-nitrosylation sites of Bos taurus dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1 and human hemoglobin subunit beta (HBB. Finally, the MDD-clustered model was adopted to construct an effective web-based tool, named SNOSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/SNOSite/, for identifying S-nitrosylation sites on the uncharacterized protein sequences.

  18. The fungal cultivar of leaf-cutter ants produces specific enzymes in response to different plant substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadempour, Lily; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Baker, Erin S; Nicora, Carrie D; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; White, Richard A; Monroe, Matthew E; Huang, Eric L; Smith, Richard D; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-11-01

    Herbivores use symbiotic microbes to help derive energy and nutrients from plant material. Leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example, cultivating their mutualistic fungus Leucoagaricus gongylophorus on plant biomass that workers forage from a diverse collection of plant species. Here, we investigate the metabolic flexibility of the ants' fungal cultivar for utilizing different plant biomass. Using feeding experiments and a novel approach in metaproteomics, we examine the enzymatic response of L. gongylophorus to leaves, flowers, oats or a mixture of all three. Across all treatments, our analysis identified and quantified 1766 different fungal proteins, including 161 putative biomass-degrading enzymes. We found significant differences in the protein profiles in the fungus gardens of subcolonies fed different plant substrates. When provided with leaves or flowers, which contain the majority of their energy as recalcitrant plant polymers, the fungus gardens produced more proteins predicted to break down cellulose: endoglucanase, exoglucanase and β-glucosidase. Further, the complete metaproteomes for the leaves and flowers treatments were very similar, while the mixed substrate treatment closely resembled the treatment with oats alone. This indicates that when provided a mixture of plant substrates, fungus gardens preferentially break down the simpler, more digestible substrates. This flexible, substrate-specific enzymatic response of the fungal cultivar allows leaf-cutter ants to derive energy from a wide range of substrates, which likely contributes to their ability to be dominant generalist herbivores. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Combining substrate specificity analysis with support vector classifiers reveals feruloyl esterase as a phylogenetically informative protein group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares Hernandez, Roberto; Sunner, Hampus; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2010-01-01

    to hydrolyze the ester bonds linking ferulic acid to plant cell wall polysaccharides. The diversity of substrate specificities found in the FAE family shows that this family is old enough to have experienced the emergence and loss of many activities. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we evaluate...

  20. The role of Ala231 and Trp227 in the substrate specificities of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and trihydroxynaphthalene reductase: Steroids versus smaller substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svegelj, Mojca Brunskole; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2012-03-01

    17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from the fungus Curvularia lunata (teleomorph: Cochliobolus lunatus; 17β-HSDcl and 3HNR, respectively) are two homologous short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase proteins that are 58% identical and have 86% similar amino acids. The minor differences in their substrate-binding regions are believed to be crucial for their substrate specificities. 3HNR shows high affinity for substrates with two rings, like trihydroxynaphthalene and 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-4H-benzopyran-4-one (DDBO), while 17β-HSDcl can accommodate ligands with four rings, like steroids. In the present study, we examined the role of Ala231 in 17β-HSDcl and Trp227 in 3HNR, as the potential key amino acids in the determination of substrate recognition based on size. We constructed Ala231Trp 17β-HSDcl and Trp227Ala 3HNR mutant proteins and used spectrophotometric analyses to compare their catalytic activities with those of the wild-type enzymes, for oxidation of 4-estrene-17β-ol-3-one and DDBO and for reduction of 4-estrene-3,17-dione and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ). The Ala231Trp side-chain substitution in 17β-HSDcl abolished and decreased (by 14.6-fold) the initial rates for steroid oxidation and reduction, respectively, while the initial rate for PQ reduction was increased 5.6-fold. The bulky Trp227Ala side-chain substitution in 3HNR enabled oxidation of 4-estrene-17β-ol-3-one, increased the initial rates for reduction of 4-estrene-3,17-dione and PQ by 4.5-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, while the initial rate for DDBO oxidation was decreased 4.1-fold. Our TLC analysis and docking simulations also support these findings. Our study thus confirms the important roles of Ala231 in 17β-HSDcl and Trp227 in 3HNR, for the selection between larger and smaller substrates. Article from a special issue on steroids and microorganisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct comparison of the four aldehyde oxidase enzymes present in mouse gives insight into their substrate specificities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Kücükgöze

    Full Text Available Mammalian aldehyde oxidases (AOXs are molybdo-flavoenzymes which are present in many tissues in various mammalian species, including humans and rodents. Different species contain a different number of AOX isoforms. In particular, the reasons why mammals other than humans express a multiplicity of tissue-specific AOX enzymes is unknown. In mouse, the isoforms mAOX1, mAOX3, mAOX4 and mAOX2 are present. We previously established a codon-optimized heterologous expression systems for the mAOX1-4 isoforms in Escherichia coli that gives yield to sufficient amounts of active protein for kinetic characterizations and sets the basis in this study for site-directed mutagenesis and structure-function studies. A direct and simultaneous comparison of the enzymatic properties and characteristics of the four enzymes on a larger number of substrates has never been performed. Here, thirty different structurally related aromatic, aliphatic and N-heterocyclic compounds were used as substrates, and the kinetic parameters of all four mAOX enzymes were directly compared. The results show that especially mAOX4 displays a higher substrate selectivity, while no major differences between mAOX1, mAOX2 and mAOX3 were identified. Generally, mAOX1 was the enzyme with the highest catalytic turnover for most substrates. To understand the factors that contribute to the substrate specificity of mAOX4, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to substitute amino acids in the substrate-binding funnel by the ones present in mAOX1, mAOX3, and mAOX2. An increase in activity was obtained by the amino acid exchange M1088V in the active site identified to be specific for mAOX4, to the amino acid identified in mAOX3.

  2. Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Substrate Specificity of Aedes Kynurenine Aminotransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han,Q.; Gao, Y.; Robinson, H.; Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aedes aegypti kynurenine aminotransferase (AeKAT) is a multifunctional aminotransferase. It catalyzes the transamination of a number of amino acids and uses many biologically relevant a-keto acids as amino group acceptors. AeKAT also is a cysteine S-conjugate {beta}-lyase. The most important function of AeKAT is the biosynthesis of kynurenic acid, a natural antagonist of NMDA and {alpha}7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the crystal structures of AeKAT in complex with its best amino acid substrates, glutamine and cysteine. Glutamine is found in both subunits of the biological dimer, and cysteine is found in one of the two subunits. Both substrates form external aldemines with pyridoxal 5-phosphate in the structures. This is the first instance in which one pyridoxal 5-phosphate enzyme has been crystallized with cysteine or glutamine forming external aldimine complexes, cysteinyl aldimine and glutaminyl aldimine. All the units with substrate are in the closed conformation form, and the unit without substrate is in the open form, which suggests that the binding of substrate induces the conformation change of AeKAT. By comparing the active site residues of the AeKAT-cysteine structure with those of the human KAT I-phenylalanine structure, we determined that Tyr286 in AeKAT is changed to Phe278 in human KAT I, which may explain why AeKAT transaminates hydrophilic amino acids more efficiently than human KAT I does.

  3. Ferrochelatase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: substrate specificity and role of sulfhydryl and arginyl residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailey, H.A.; Fleming, J.E.; Harbin, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Purified ferrochelatase from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides was examined to determine the roles of cationic and sulfhydryl residues in substrate binding. Reaction of the enzyme sulfhydryl residues with N-ethylmaleimide or monobromobimane resulted in a rapid loss of enzyme activity. Ferrous iron, but not porphyrin substrate, had a protective effect against inactivation by these two reagents. Quantitation with 3 H-labeled N-ethylmaleimide revealed that inactivation required one to two sulfhydryl groups to be modified. Modification of arginyl residues with either 2,3-butanedione or camphorquinone 10-sulfonate resulted in a loss of ferrochelatase activity. A kinetic analysis of the modified enzyme showed that the K/sub m/ for ferrous iron was not altered but that the K/sub m/ for the prophyrin substrate was increased. These data suggested that arginyl residues may be involved in porphyrin binding, possibly via charge pair interactions between the arginyl residue and the anionic porphyrin propionate side chain. Modification of lysyl residues had no effect on enzyme activity. The authors also examined the ability of bacterial ferrochelatase to use various 2,4-disubstituted porphyrins as substrates. The authors found that 2,4-bis-acetal- and 2,4-disulfonate deuteroporphyrins were effective substrates for the purified bacterial enzyme and that N-methylprotoporphyrin was an effective inhibitor of the enzyme. Data for the ferrochelatase of R. sphaeroides are compared with previously published data for the eucaryotic enzyme

  4. Distinct substrate specificities of three glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidases from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Katayama, Takane; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 42 (GH42) includes β-galactosidases catalyzing the release of galactose (Gal) from the non-reducing end of different β-d-galactosides. Health-promoting probiotic bifidobacteria, which are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota, produce GH42...... enzymes enabling utilization of β-galactosides exerting prebiotic effects. However, insight into the specificity of individual GH42 enzymes with respect to substrate monosaccharide composition, glycosidic linkage and degree of polymerization is lagging. Kinetic analysis of natural and synthetic substrates...

  5. Flight Hardware Packaging Design for Stringent EMC Radiated Emission Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortz, Charlene L.; Huang, Chi-Chien N.; Ravich, Joshua A.; Steiner, Carl N.

    2013-01-01

    This packaging design approach can help heritage hardware meet a flight project's stringent EMC radiated emissions requirement. The approach requires only minor modifications to a hardware's chassis and mainly concentrates on its connector interfaces. The solution is to raise the surface area where the connector is mounted by a few millimeters using a pedestal, and then wrapping with conductive tape from the cable backshell down to the surface-mounted connector. This design approach has been applied to JPL flight project subsystems. The EMC radiated emissions requirements for flight projects can vary from benign to mission critical. If the project's EMC requirements are stringent, the best approach to meet EMC requirements would be to design an EMC control program for the project early on and implement EMC design techniques starting with the circuit board layout. This is the ideal scenario for hardware that is built from scratch. Implementation of EMC radiated emissions mitigation techniques can mature as the design progresses, with minimal impact to the design cycle. The real challenge exists for hardware that is planned to be flown following a built-to-print approach, in which heritage hardware from a past project with a different set of requirements is expected to perform satisfactorily for a new project. With acceptance of heritage, the design would already be established (circuit board layout and components have already been pre-determined), and hence any radiated emissions mitigation techniques would only be applicable at the packaging level. The key is to take a heritage design with its known radiated emissions spectrum and repackage, or modify its chassis design so that it would have a better chance of meeting the new project s radiated emissions requirements.

  6. Biochemical Characterization and Substrate Specificity of Autophagin-2 from the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajković, Jelena; Poreba, Marcin; Caglič, Dejan; Vidmar, Robert; Wilk, Aleksandra; Borowik, Agata; Salvesen, Guy; Turk, Vito; Drag, Marcin; Turk, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi encodes two copies of autophagy-related cysteine proteases, Atg4.1 and Atg4.2. T. cruzi autophagin-2 (TcAtg4.2) carries the majority of proteolytic activity and is responsible for processing Atg8 proteins near the carboxyl terminus, exposing a conserved glycine. This enables progression of autophagy and differentiation of the parasite, which is required for successful colonization of humans. The mechanism of substrate hydrolysis by Atg4 was found to be highly conserved among the species as critical mutations in the TcAtg4.2, including mutation of the conserved Gly-244 residue in the hinge region enabling flexibility of the regulatory loop, and deletion of the regulatory loop, completely abolished processing capacity of the mutants. Using the positional scanning-substrate combinatorial library (PS-SCL) we determined that TcAtg4.2 tolerates a broad spectrum of amino acids in the P4 and P3 positions, similar to the human orthologue autophagin-1 (HsAtg4B). In contrast, both human and trypanosome Atg4 orthologues exhibited exclusive preference for aromatic amino acid residues in the P2 position, and for Gly in the P1 position, which is absolutely conserved in the natural Atg8 substrates. Using an extended P2 substrate library, which also included the unnatural amino acid cyclohexylalanine (Cha) derivative of Phe, we generated highly selective tetrapeptide substrates acetyl-Lys-Lys-Cha-Gly-AFC (Ac-KKChaG-AFC) and acetyl-Lys-Thr-Cha-Gly-AFC (Ac-KTChaG-AFC). Althoughthese substrates were cleaved by cathepsins, making them unsuitable for analysis of complex cellular systems, they were recognized exclusively by TcAtg4.2, but not by HsAtg4B nor by the structurally related human proteases SENP1, SENP2, and UCH-L3. PMID:26446788

  7. Biochemical Characterization and Substrate Specificity of Autophagin-2 from the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajković, Jelena; Poreba, Marcin; Caglič, Dejan; Vidmar, Robert; Wilk, Aleksandra; Borowik, Agata; Salvesen, Guy; Turk, Vito; Drag, Marcin; Turk, Boris

    2015-11-20

    The genome of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi encodes two copies of autophagy-related cysteine proteases, Atg4.1 and Atg4.2. T. cruzi autophagin-2 (TcAtg4.2) carries the majority of proteolytic activity and is responsible for processing Atg8 proteins near the carboxyl terminus, exposing a conserved glycine. This enables progression of autophagy and differentiation of the parasite, which is required for successful colonization of humans. The mechanism of substrate hydrolysis by Atg4 was found to be highly conserved among the species as critical mutations in the TcAtg4.2, including mutation of the conserved Gly-244 residue in the hinge region enabling flexibility of the regulatory loop, and deletion of the regulatory loop, completely abolished processing capacity of the mutants. Using the positional scanning-substrate combinatorial library (PS-SCL) we determined that TcAtg4.2 tolerates a broad spectrum of amino acids in the P4 and P3 positions, similar to the human orthologue autophagin-1 (HsAtg4B). In contrast, both human and trypanosome Atg4 orthologues exhibited exclusive preference for aromatic amino acid residues in the P2 position, and for Gly in the P1 position, which is absolutely conserved in the natural Atg8 substrates. Using an extended P2 substrate library, which also included the unnatural amino acid cyclohexylalanine (Cha) derivative of Phe, we generated highly selective tetrapeptide substrates acetyl-Lys-Lys-Cha-Gly-AFC (Ac-KKChaG-AFC) and acetyl-Lys-Thr-Cha-Gly-AFC (Ac-KTChaG-AFC). Althoughthese substrates were cleaved by cathepsins, making them unsuitable for analysis of complex cellular systems, they were recognized exclusively by TcAtg4.2, but not by HsAtg4B nor by the structurally related human proteases SENP1, SENP2, and UCH-L3. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  9. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  10. Substrate specificities and efflux efficiencies of RND efflux pumps of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leus, Inga V; Weeks, Jon W; Bonifay, Vincent; Smith, Lauren; Richardson, Sophie; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2018-04-16

    Antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii causes infections that are extremely difficult to treat. A significant role in these resistance profiles is attributed to multidrug efflux pumps, especially those belonging to Resistance-Nodulation-cell Division (RND) superfamily of transporters. In this study, we analyzed functions and properties of RND efflux pumps in A. baumannii ATCC 17978. This strain is susceptible to antibiotics and does not contain mutations that are commonly selected upon exposure to high concentrations of antibiotics. We constructed derivatives of ATCC 17978 lacking chromosomally encoded RND pumps and complemented these strains by the plasmid-borne genes. We analyzed the substrate selectivities and efficiencies of the individual pumps in the context of native outer membranes and their hyperporinated variants. Our results show that inactivation of AdeIJK provides the strongest potentiation of antibiotic activities, whereas inactivation of AdeFGH triggers the overexpression of AdeAB. The plasmid-borne overproduction complements the hypersusceptible phenotypes of the efflux deletion mutants to the levels of the parental ATCC 17978. Only a few antibiotics strongly benefitted from the overproduction of efflux pumps and antibacterial activities of some of those depended on the synergistic interaction with the low permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Either overproduction or inactivation of efflux pumps change dramatically the lipidome of ATCC 17978. We conclude that efflux pumps of A. baumannii are tightly integrated into physiology of this bacterium and that clinical levels of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates are unlikely to be reached solely due to overproduction of RND efflux pumps. Importance RND-type efflux pumps are important contributors in development of clinical antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii However, their specific roles and the extent of contribution to antibiotic resistance remain unclear. We analyzed

  11. Comparison of urine iodine/creatinine ratio between patients following stringent and less stringent low iodine diet for radioiodine remnant ablation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Jee Ho; Kim, Byung Il; Ha, Ji Su; Chang, Sei Joong; Shin, Hye Young; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Do Min; Kim, Chong Soon

    2006-01-01

    A low iodine diet (LID) for 1 ∼ 2 weeks is recommended for patients who undergoing radioiodine remnant ablation. However, the LID educations for patients are different among centers because there is no concrete recommendation for protocol of LID. In this investigation, we compared two representative types of LID protocols performed in several centers in Korea using urine iodine to creatinine tatio (urine I/Cr). From 2006, April to June, patients referred to our center for radioiodine remnant ablation of thyroid cancer from several local hospitals which had different LID protocols were included. We divided into two groups, stringent LID for 1 week and less stringent LID for 2 weeks, then measured their urine I/Cr ratio with spot urine when patients were admitted to the hospital. Total 27 patients were included in this investigation (M:F = 1:26; 13 in one-week stringent LID; 14 in two-week less stringent LID). Average of urine I/Cr ratio was 127.87 ± 78.52 μ g/g in stringent LID for 1 week, and 289.75 ± 188.24 μ g/g in less stringent LID for 2 weeks. It was significantly lower in stringent LID for 1 week group (ρ = 0.008). The number of patients whose urine I/Cr ratios were below 100 μ g/g was 6 of 13 in stringent LID for 1 week group, and 3 of 14 in less stringent LID for 2 weeks group. Stringent LID for 1 week resulted in better urinary I/Cr ratio in our investigation compared with the other protocol. However it still resulted in plenty of inadequate range of I/Cr ratio, so more stringent protocol such as stringent LID for 2 weeks is expected more desirable

  12. Identity and Substrate Specificity of Reductive Dehalogenases Expressed in Dehalococcoides-Containing Enrichment Cultures Maintained on Different Chlorinated Ethenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoming; Molenda, Olivia; Tang, Shuiquan; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2015-07-01

    Many reductive dehalogenases (RDases) have been identified in organohalide-respiring microorganisms, and yet their substrates, specific activities, and conditions for expression are not well understood. We tested whether RDase expression varied depending on the substrate-exposure history of reductive dechlorinating communities. For this purpose, we used the enrichment culture KB-1 maintained on trichloroethene (TCE), as well as subcultures maintained on the intermediates cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). KB-1 contains a TCE-to-cDCE dechlorinating Geobacter and several Dehalococcoides strains that together harbor many of the known chloroethene reductases. Expressed RDases were identified using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, enzyme assays in gel slices, and peptide sequencing. As anticipated but never previously quantified, the RDase from Geobacter was only detected transiently at the beginning of TCE dechlorination. The Dehalococcoides RDase VcrA and smaller amounts of TceA were expressed in the parent KB-1 culture during complete dechlorination of TCE to ethene regardless of time point or amended substrate. The Dehalococcoides RDase BvcA was only detected in enrichments maintained on cDCE as growth substrates, in roughly equal abundance to VcrA. Only VcrA was detected in subcultures enriched on VC. Enzyme assays revealed that 1,1-DCE, a substrate not used for culture enrichment, afforded the highest specific activity. trans-DCE was substantially dechlorinated only by extracts from cDCE enrichments expressing BvcA. RDase gene distribution indicated enrichment of different strains of Dehalococcoides as a function of electron acceptor TCE, cDCE, or VC. Each chloroethene reductase has distinct substrate preferences leading to strain selection in mixed communities. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. A specific and potent inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase for substrate inhibition therapy of Gaucher disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McEachern, Kerry Anne; Fung, John; Komarnitsky, Svetlana; Siegel, Craig S.; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Hutto, Elizabeth; Shayman, James A.; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Cheng, Seng H.; Copeland, Diane P.; Marshall, John

    2007-01-01

    An approach to treating Gaucher disease is substrate inhibition therapy which seeks to abate the aberrant lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide. We have identified a novel inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase (Genz-112638) and assessed its activity in a murine model of Gaucher disease

  14. Structural basis for the changed substrate specificity of Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase mutant N64D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welin, M.; Skovgaard, T.; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) double mutant N45D/N64D was identified during a previous directed evolution study. This mutant enzyme had a decreased activity towards the natural substrates and decreased feedback inhibition with dTTP, whereas the activity with 3...

  15. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  16. Substrate specificity of microbial transglutaminase as revealed by three-dimensional docking simulation and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Uno; Shimba, Nobuhisa; Nakamura, Mina; Yokoyama, Kei-Ichi; Suzuki, Ei-Ichiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2009-12-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) are used in fields such as food and pharmaceuticals. Unlike other TGases, microbial transglutaminase (MTG) activity is Ca(2+)-independent, broadening its application. Here, a three-dimensional docking model of MTG binding to a peptide substrate, CBZ-Gln-Gly, was simulated. The data reveal CBZ-Gln-Gly to be stretched along the MTG active site cleft with hydrophobic and/or aromatic residues interacting directly with the substrate. Moreover, an oxyanion binding site for TGase activity may be constructed from the amide groups of Cys64 and/or Val65. Alanine mutagenesis verified the simulated binding region and indicated that large molecules can be widely recognized on the MTG cleft.

  17. Altering the Substrate Specificity of Organophosphorus Hydrolase for Enhanced Hydrolysis of Chlorpyrifos

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Catherine Mee-Hie; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2004-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is one of the most popular pesticides used for agriculture crop protection, and widespread contamination is a potential concern. However, chlorpyrifos is hydrolyzed almost 1,000-fold slower than the preferred substrate, paraoxon, by organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), an enzyme that can degrade a broad range of organophosphate pesticides. We have recently demonstrated that directed evolution can be used to generate OPH variants with up to 25-fold improvement in hydrolysis of methyl...

  18. beta-D-Glucosidase from seeds of Japanese cycad, Cycas revoluta Thunb.: properties and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, F; Hatanaka, M; Tadera, K; Kobayashi, A

    1985-01-01

    beta-D-Glucosidase was purified from seeds of Japanese cycad by dialysis, chromatography on CM-Sepharose CL-6B, gel filtration on Biogel P-200, and chromatofocusing. By chromatofocusing, beta-D-glucosidase was separated into four components whose isoelectric points were in a very narrow range (7.43-7.68). All these components were glycoproteins. The main component (pI = 7.59) was homogeneous on gel isoelectric focusing, and was crystallized from ammonium sulfate solution. The molecular weight of the crystalline preparation was determined to be 137,000 by gel filtration, and 67,000 by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating the main component was composed of two subunits with the same molecular weight. The amino acid composition and sugar content of the main component were also determined. All four components hydrolyzed not only o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside but also o-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactopyranoside, o-nitrophenyl beta-D-fucopyranoside, and o-nitrophenyl beta-D-xylopyranoside. Hydrolysis rates of each substrate by the four components were quite similar. Mixed substrate experiments using crystalline preparation proved that a single active site was responsible for the hydrolysis of these substrates.

  19. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D. (Case Western)

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  20. Phosphorylation-Dependent PIH1D1 Interactions Define Substrate Specificity of the R2TP Cochaperone Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hořejší

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The R2TP cochaperone complex plays a critical role in the assembly of multisubunit machines, including small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, RNA polymerase II, and the mTORC1 and SMG1 kinase complexes, but the molecular basis of substrate recognition remains unclear. Here, we describe a phosphopeptide binding domain (PIH-N in the PIH1D1 subunit of the R2TP complex that preferentially binds to highly acidic phosphorylated proteins. A cocrystal structure of a PIH-N domain/TEL2 phosphopeptide complex reveals a highly specific phosphopeptide recognition mechanism in which Lys57 and 64 in PIH1D1, along with a conserved DpSDD phosphopeptide motif within TEL2, are essential and sufficient for binding. Proteomic analysis of PIH1D1 interactors identified R2TP complex substrates that are recruited by the PIH-N domain in a sequence-specific and phosphorylation-dependent manner suggestive of a common mechanism of substrate recognition. We propose that protein complexes assembled by the R2TP complex are defined by phosphorylation of a specific motif and recognition by the PIH1D1 subunit.

  1. p21-activated kinase has substrate specificity similar to Acanthamoeba myosin I heavy chain kinase and activates Acanthamoeba myosin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, H; Knaus, U G; Wang, Z Y; Bokoch, G M; Korn, E D

    1997-02-18

    Acanthamoeba class I myosins are unconventional, single-headed myosins that express actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase and in vitro motility activities only when a single serine or threonine in the heavy chain is phosphorylated by myosin I heavy chain kinase (MIHCK). Some other, but not most, class I myosins have the same consensus phosphorylation site sequence, and the two known class VI myosins have a phosphorylatable residue in the homologous position, where most myosins have an aspartate or glutamate residue. Recently, we found that the catalytic domain of Acanthamoeba MIHCK has extensive sequence similarity to the p21-activated kinase (PAK)/STE20 family of kinases from mammals and yeast, which are activated by small GTP-binding proteins. The physiological substrates of the PAK/STE20 kinases are not well characterized. In this paper we show that PAK1 has similar substrate specificity as MIHCK when assayed against synthetic substrates and that PAK1 phosphorylates the heavy chain (1 mol of P(i) per mol) and activates Acanthamoeba myosin I as MIHCK does. These results, together with the known involvement of Acanthamoeba myosin I, yeast myosin I, STE20, PAK, and small GTP-binding proteins in membrane- and cytoskeleton-associated morphogenetic transformations and activities, suggest that myosins may be physiological substrates for the PAK/STE20 family and thus mediators of these events.

  2. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingham, Seetha V; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L; Laerdahl, Jon K; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+)/Mn(2+). Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  3. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetha V Balasingham

    Full Text Available XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB, a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+/Mn(2+. Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  4. An amino acid at position 142 in nitrilase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 33278 determines the substrate specificity for aliphatic and aromatic nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, Dong-Eun; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2008-11-01

    Nitrilase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 33278 hydrolyses both aliphatic and aromatic nitriles. Replacing Tyr-142 in the wild-type enzyme with the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine did not alter specificity for either substrate. However, the mutants containing non-polar aliphatic amino acids (alanine, valine and leucine) at position 142 were specific only for aromatic substrates such as benzonitrile, m-tolunitrile and 2-cyanopyridine, and not for aliphatic substrates. These results suggest that the hydrolysis of substrates probably involves the conjugated pi-electron system of the aromatic ring of substrate or Tyr-142 as an electron acceptor. Moreover, the mutants containing charged amino acids such as aspartate, glutamate, arginine and asparagine at position 142 displayed no activity towards any nitrile, possibly owing to the disruption of hydrophobic interactions with substrates. Thus aromaticity of substrate or amino acid at position 142 in R. rhodochrous nitrilase is required for enzyme activity.

  5. The Structure of Allophanate Hydrolase from Granulibacter bethesdensis Provides Insights into Substrate Specificity in the Amidase Signature Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Maurice, Martin [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Allophanate hydrolase (AH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of allophanate, an intermediate in atrazine degradation and urea catabolism pathways, to NH3 and CO2. AH belongs to the amidase signature family, which is characterized by a conserved block of 130 amino acids rich in Gly and Ser and a Ser-cis-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. In this study, the first structures of AH fromGranulibacter bethesdensis were determined, with and without the substrate analogue malonate, to 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures confirm the identity of the catalytic triad residues and reveal an altered dimerization interface that is not conserved in the amidase signature family. The structures also provide insights into previously unrecognized substrate specificity determinants in AH. Two residues, Tyr299 and Arg307, are within hydrogen bonding distance of a carboxylate moiety of malonate. Both Tyr299 and Arg307 were mutated, and the resulting modified enzymes revealed >3 order of magnitude reductions in both catalytic efficiency and substrate stringency. It is proposed that Tyr299 and Arg307 serve to anchor and orient the substrate for attack by the catalytic nucleophile, Ser172. The structure further suggests the presence of a unique C-terminal domain in AH. While this domain is conserved, it does not contribute to catalysis or to the structural integrity of the core domain, suggesting that it may play a role in mediating transient and specific interactions with the urea carboxylase component of urea amidolyase. Analysis of the AH active site architecture offers new insights into common determinants of catalysis and specificity among divergent members of the amidase signature family.

  6. Comparative analysis of the substrate specificity of trans- versus cis-acyltransferases of assembly line polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Briana J; Watts, Katharine R; Robbins, Thomas; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-06-17

    Due to their pivotal role in extender unit selection during polyketide biosynthesis, acyltransferase (AT) domains are important engineering targets. A subset of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) are serviced by discrete, trans-acting ATs. Theoretically, these trans-ATs can complement an inactivated cis-AT, promoting introduction of a noncognate extender unit. This approach requires a better understanding of the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of naturally occurring trans-ATs. We kinetically analyzed trans-ATs from the disorazole and kirromycin synthases and compared them to a representative cis-AT from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). During transacylation, the disorazole AT favored malonyl-CoA over methylmalonyl-CoA by >40000-fold, whereas the kirromycin AT favored ethylmalonyl-CoA over methylmalonyl-CoA by 20-fold. Conversely, the disorazole AT had broader specificity than its kirromycin counterpart for acyl carrier protein (ACP) substrates. The presence of the ACP had little effect on the specificity (k(cat)/K(M)) of the cis-AT domain for carboxyacyl-CoA substrates but had a marked influence on the corresponding specificity parameters for the trans-ATs, suggesting that these enzymes do not act strictly by a canonical ping-pong mechanism. To investigate the relevance of the kinetic analysis of isolated ATs in the context of intact PKSs, we complemented an in vitro AT-null DEBS assembly line with either trans-AT. Whereas the disorazole AT efficiently complemented the mutant PKS at substoichiometric protein ratios, the kirromycin AT was considerably less effective. Our findings suggest that knowledge of both carboxyacyl-CoA and ACP specificity is critical to the choice of a trans-AT in combination with a mutant PKS to generate novel polyketides.

  7. Pre-steady-state kinetics of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase catalyzed reactions and thermodynamic aspects of its substrate specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramitsu, Seiki; Hiromi, Keitaro; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Morino, Yoshimasa; Kagamiyama, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The four half-transamination reactions [the pyridoxal form of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) with aspartate or glutamate and the pyridoxamine form of the enzyme with oxalacetate or 2-oxoglutarate] were followed in a stopped-flow spectrometer by monitoring the absorbance change at either 333 or 358 nm. The reaction progress curves in all cases gave fits to a monophasic exponential process. Kinetic analyses of these reactions showed that each half-reaction is composed of the following three processes: (1) the rapid binding of an amino acid substrate to the pyridoxal form of the enzyme; (2) the rapid binding of the corresponding keto acid to the pyridoxamine form of the enzyme; (3) the rate-determining interconversion between the two complexes. This mechanism was supported by the findings that the equilibrium constants for half- and overall-transamination reactions and the steady-state kinetic constants agreed well with the predicted values on the basis of the above mechanism using pre-steady-state kinetic parameters. The significant primary kinetic isotope effect observed in the reaction with deuterated amino acid suggests that the withdrawal of the α-proton of the substrates is rate determining. The pyridoxal form of E. coli AspAT reacted with a variety of amino acids as substrates. The substrate specificity of the E. coli enzyme was much broader than that of pig isoenzymes, reflecting some subtle but distinct difference in microenvironment accommodating the side chain of the substrate between e. coli and mammalian AspATs

  8. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (-)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (-)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (-)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (-)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization of nitrilase production from Alcaligenes faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3): effect of inducers on substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageshwar, Y V D; Sheelu, Gurrala; Shambhu, Rekha Rao; Muluka, Hemalatha; Mehdi, Nooreen; Malik, M Shaheer; Kamal, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Microbial nitrilases are biocatalysts of interest and the enzyme produced using various inducers exhibits altered substrate specificity, which is of great interest in bioprocess development. The aim of the present study is to investigate the nitrilase-producing Alcaligenes faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) for its ability to transform various nitriles in the presence of different inducers after optimization of various parameters for maximum enzyme production and activity. The production of A. faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) nitrilase was optimum with glucose (1.0%), acrylonitrile (0.1%) at pH 7.0. The nitrilase activity of A. faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) was optimum at 35 °C, pH 8.0 and the enzyme was stable up to 6 h at 50 °C. The nitrilase enzyme produced using different inducers was investigated for substrate specificity. The enzyme hydrolyzed aliphatic, heterocyclic and aromatic nitriles with different substitutions. Acrylonitrile was the most preferred substrate (~40 U) as well as inducer. Benzonitrile was hydrolyzed with almost twofold higher relative activity than acrylonitrile when it was used as an inducer. The versatile nitrilase-producing A. faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) exhibits efficient conversion of both aliphatic and aromatic nitriles. The aromatic nitriles, which show not much or no affinity towards nitrilase from A. faecalis, are hydrolyzed effectively with this nitrilase-producing organism. Studies are in progress to exploit this organism for synthesis of industrially important compounds.

  10. Substrate specificity screening of oat (Avena sativa) seeds aminopeptidase demonstrate unusually broad tolerance in S1 pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Anna D; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Drag, Marcin

    2012-05-01

    Aminopeptidases are proteolytic enzymes that remove one amino acid at a time from N-terminus of peptidic substrates. In plants, inhibitors of aminopeptidases can find potential applications in agriculture as herbicides. In this report we have used a library of fluorogenic derivatives of natural and unnatural amino acids for substrate specificity profiling of oat (Avena sativa) aminopeptidase. Interestingly, we have found that this enzyme recognizes effectively among the natural amino acids basic residues like Arg and Lys, hydrophobic Phe, Leu and Met, but also to some extent acidic residues Asp and Glu. In the case of unnatural amino acids hydrophobic residues (hPhe and hCha) and basic hArg were preferentially recognized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Substrate specificity of the OqxAB multidrug resistance pump in Escherichia coli and selected enteric bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Sørensen, Heidi Iskou

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: A plasmid-encoded multidrug eff lux pump, OqxAB, identified in Escherichia coli of porcine origin, was tested for substrate specificity against selected antibiotics, detergents and disinfectants. The ability of horizontal transfer to food-borne pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family......, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera sp. and Enterobacter aerogrenes was investigated. The effect of the presence of the OqxAB pump on susceptibility for selected compounds was investigated using broth dilution assays. Results: The OqxAB pump conferred antimicrobial resistance or reduced susceptibility towards...... a variety of substrates in E. coli. These included animal growth promoters, antimicrobials, disinfectants and detergents. pOLA52 could readily be transferred to enterobacterial pathogens. Transconjugants showed reduced susceptibility towards chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and olaquindox. Conclusions...

  12. A chlorogenic acid esterase with a unique substrate specificity from Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Popper, Lutz; Berger, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    An extracellular chlorogenic acid esterase from Ustilago maydis (UmChlE) was purified to homogeneity by using three separation steps, including anion-exchange chromatography on a Q Sepharose FF column, preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), and, finally, a combination of affinity chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on polyamide. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested a monomeric protein of ∼71 kDa. The purified enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and at 37°C and was active over a wide pH range (3.5 to 9.5). Previously described chlorogenic acid esterases exhibited a comparable affinity for chlorogenic acid, but the enzyme from Ustilago was also active on typical feruloyl esterase substrates. Kinetic constants for chlorogenic acid, methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl ferulate were as follows: Km values of 19.6 μM, 64.1 μM, 72.5 μM, and 101.8 μM, respectively, and kcat/Km values of 25.83 mM(-1) s(-1), 7.63 mM(-1) s(-1), 3.83 mM(-1) s(-1) and 3.75 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. UmChlE released ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids from natural substrates such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB) and coffee pulp (CP), confirming activity on complex plant biomass. The full-length gene encoding UmChlE consisted of 1,758 bp, corresponding to a protein of 585 amino acids, and was functionally produced in Pichia pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments with annotated chlorogenic acid and feruloyl esterases underlined the uniqueness of this enzyme. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Activation of c-Src and Fyn kinases by protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is substrate-specific and compatible with lipid raft localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vacaresse, Nathalie; Møller, Bente; Danielsen, Erik Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases of the Src family (SFKs) function in multiple signaling pathways, raising the question of how appropriate regulation and substrate choice are achieved. SFK activity is modulated by several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), among which RPTPa and SHP2 are the best established. We...... studied how RPTPa affects substrate specificity and regulation of c-Src and Fyn in response to EGF and PDGF. We find that RPTPa, in a growth factor-specific manner, directs the specificity of these kinases towards a specific subset of SFK substrates, particularly the focal adhesion protein Paxillin...

  14. Elucidation of substrate specificity in Aspergillus nidulans UDP-galactose-4-epimerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A Dalrymple

    Full Text Available The frequency of invasive fungal infections has rapidly increased in recent years. Current clinical treatments are experiencing decreased potency due to severe host toxicity and the emergence of fungal drug resistance. As such, new targets and their corresponding synthetic pathways need to be explored for drug development purposes. In this context, galactofuranose residues, which are employed in fungal cell wall construction, but are notably absent in animals, represent an appealing target. Herein we present the structural and biochemical characterization of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase from Aspergillus nidulans which produces the precursor UDP-galactopyranose required for galactofuranose synthesis. Examination of the structural model revealed both NAD(+ and UDP-glucopyranose were bound within the active site cleft in a near identical fashion to that found in the Human epimerase. Mutational studies on the conserved catalytic motif support a similar mechanism to that established for the Human counterpart is likely operational within the A. nidulans epimerase. While the K m and k cat for the enzyme were determined to be 0.11 mM and 12.8 s(-1, respectively, a single point mutation, namely L320C, activated the enzyme towards larger N-acetylated substrates. Docking studies designed to probe active site affinity corroborate the experimentally determined activity profiles and support the kinetic inhibition results.

  15. Steady state kinetic analysis of substrate specificity of glycoside hydrolases from families 13 and 38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Willum

    and lysosomes of glycans originating from e.g. terminally misfolded proteins. A divalent metal ion typically resides in the active site, and is essential for enzyme activity. Recently, the α-mannosidase II from Sulfolobus solfataricus (ManA) was purified and characterized as a Zn2+-containing enzyme, but also...... displayed metal ion promiscuity. The present thesis (Manuscript 1) describes the steady state kinetics of ManA in complex with various activating divalent metal ions and substrates. The Co2+-enzyme was superior on both para-nitrophenyl-α-Dmannoside and on 1,2-, 1,3-, 1,4- and 1,6-α-mannobiose. On para......-nitrophenyl-α-Dmannoside the Co2+ substituted ManA displayed a 6-fold higher kcat/KM compared to ManA substituted with Cd2+ and Zn2+. On the α-mannobioses the difference was even more pronounced, with the Co2+substituted ManA being the only metal ion enzyme complex, which allowed the determination of individual KM and kcat...

  16. Phenoloxidase from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus: cDNA cloning, expression and substrate specificity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingwei; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Sun, Hongjuan; Chen, Zhong; Yang, Aifu; Gao, Shan; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Bei; Guan, Xiaoyan

    2014-02-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) is a crucial component of the immune system of echinoderms. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of PO (AjPO) was cloned from coelomocytes of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus using 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR method, which is 2508 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2040 bp encoding 679 amino acids. AjPO contains a transmembrane domain, and three Cu-oxidase domains with copper binding centers formed by 10 histidines, one cysteine and one methionine respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AjPO was clustered with laccase-type POs of invertebrates. Using the isolated membrane proteins as crude AjPO, the enzyme could catalyze the substrates catechol, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine and hydroquinone, but failed to oxidize tyrosine. The results described above collectively proved that AjPO was a membrane-binding laccase-type PO. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that AjPO mRNA was expressed in muscle, body wall, coelomocytes, tube feet, respiratory tree and intestine with the highest expression level in coelomocytes. AjPO could be significantly induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), Zymosan A and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C), suggesting AjPO is closely involved in the defense against the infection of bacteria, fungi and double-stranded RNA viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A glucose transporter can mediate ribose uptake: definition of residues that confer substrate specificity in a sugar transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naula, Christina M; Logan, Flora J; Logan, Flora M; Wong, Pui Ee; Barrett, Michael P; Burchmore, Richard J

    2010-09-24

    Sugars, the major energy source for many organisms, must be transported across biological membranes. Glucose is the most abundant sugar in human plasma and in many other biological systems and has been the primary focus of sugar transporter studies in eukaryotes. We have previously cloned and characterized a family of glucose transporter genes from the protozoan parasite Leishmania. These transporters, called LmGT1, LmGT2, and LmGT3, are homologous to the well characterized glucose transporter (GLUT) family of mammalian glucose transporters. We have demonstrated that LmGT proteins are important for parasite viability. Here we show that one of these transporters, LmGT2, is a more effective carrier of the pentose sugar d-ribose than LmGT3, which has a 6-fold lower relative specificity (V(max)/K(m)) for ribose. A pair of threonine residues, located in the putative extracellular loops joining transmembrane helices 3 to 4 and 7 to 8, define a filter that limits ribose approaching the exofacial substrate binding pocket in LmGT3. When these threonines are substituted by alanine residues, as found in LmGT2, the LmGT3 permease acquires ribose permease activity that is similar to that of LmGT2. The location of these residues in hydrophilic loops supports recent suggestions that substrate recognition is separated from substrate binding and translocation in this important group of transporters.

  18. Construction of a multifunctional coating consisting of phospholipids and endothelial progenitor cell-specific peptides on titanium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huiqing; Li, Xiaojing [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhao, Yuancong, E-mail: zhaoyc7320@163.com [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Li, Jingan; Chen, Jiang [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Yang, Ping, E-mail: yangping8@263.net [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials Dresden, Leibniz of Polymer Research Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Huang, Nan [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: The phospholipid groups of PMMDP can inhibit platele adhesion, and the EPCs-specific peptide of the PMMDP showed special recognition and capture for EPCs. The catechol groups of PMMDP play a critical role as molecular anchor for balancing the binding between the coating and the substrate. - Highlights: • The uniform coating of PMMDP can be constructed on titanium surface successfully through the catechol groups. • The phospholipid groups of PMMDP can inhibit platele adhesion, fibrinogen denaturation and improve the hydrophilicity of substrate. • The EPCs-specific peptide of the PMMDP showed special recognition and capture for EPCs. - Abstract: A phospholipid/peptide polymer (PMMDP) with phosphorylcholine groups, endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-specific peptides and catechol groups was anchored onto a titanium (Ti) surface to fabricate a biomimetic multifunctional surface. The PMMDP coating was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The amount of PMMDP coating on the Ti surface was quantified by using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Interactions between blood components and the coated and bare Ti substrates were evaluated by platelet adhesion and activation assays and fibrinogen denaturation test using platelet rich plasma (PRP). The results revealed that the PMMDP-modified surface inhibited fibrinogen denaturation and reduced platelet adhesion and activation. EPC cell culture on the PMMDP-modified surface showed increased adhesion and proliferation of EPCs when compared to the cells cultured on untreated Ti surface. The inhibition of fibrinogen denaturation and platelet adhesion and support of EPCs attachment and proliferation indicated that this coating might be beneficial for future applications in blood-contacting implants, such as vascular stents.

  19. Substrate specificity and catalysis by the editing active site of alanyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasman, Zvi; Robey-Bond, Susan; Mirando, Adam C.; Smith, Gregory J.; Lague, Astrid; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) enhance the fidelity of protein synthesis through multiple mechanisms, including hydrolysis of the adenylate and cleavage of misacylated tRNA. Alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) limits misacylation with glycine and serine by use of a dedicated editing domain, and a mutation in this activity has been genetically linked to a mouse model of a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Using the free standing P. horikoshii AlaX editing domain complexed with serine as a model and both Ser-tRNAAla and Ala-tRNAAla as substrates, the deacylation activities of the wild type and five different E. coli AlaRS editing site substitution mutants were characterized. The wild type AlaRS editing domain deacylated Ser-tRNAAla with a kcat/KM of 6.6 × 105 M−1 s−1, equivalent to a rate enhancement of 6000 over the rate of enzyme-independent deacylation, but only 12.2-fold greater than the rate with Ala-tRNAAla. While the E664A and T567G substitutions only minimally decreased kcat/KM, Q584H, I667E, and C666A AlaRS were more compromised in activity, with decreases in kcat/KM in the range of 6-, 7.3-, and 15-fold. C666A AlaRS was 1.4-fold more active on Ala-tRNAAla relative to Ser-tRNAAla, providing the only example of a true reversal of substrate specificity and highlighting a potential role of the coordinated zinc in editing substrate specificity. Along with the potentially serious physiological consequences of serine mis-incorporation, the relatively modest specificity of the AlaRS editing domain may provide a rationale for the widespread phylogenetic distribution of AlaX free standing editing domains, thereby contributing a further mechanism to lower concentrations of misacylated tRNAAla. PMID:21241052

  20. Substrate specific stimulation of NEIL1 by WRN but not the other human RecQ helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    NEIL1, the mammalian homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, is a DNA glycosylase that repairs ring-fragmented purines, saturated pyrimidines and several oxidative lesions like 5-hydroxyuracil, 5-hydroxycytosine, etc. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that Werner Syndrome...... protein (WRN), one of the five human RecQ helicases, stimulates NEIL1 DNA glycosylase activity on oxidative DNA lesions. The goal of this study was to extend this observation and analyze the interaction between NEIL1 and all five human RecQ helicases. The DNA substrate specificity of the interaction...

  1. Dual substrate feedback control of specific growth-rate in vaccine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeleman, R.; Beuvery, E.C.; Vries, D.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Unexpectedly, primary concern of bio-pharmaceutical industry is not optimisation of product yield or cost reduction, but consistency in production and product quality. This paper describes the methodology and experimental results of specific growth-rate control for vaccine production. The

  2. Mosquito has a single multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase characterized by unique substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Petersen, G.E.; Sandrini, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In mammals four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, with a relatively restricted specificity, catalyze the phosphorylation of the four natural deoxyribonucleosides. When cultured mosquito cells, originating from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, were examined for deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities......, only a single enzyme was isolated. Subsequently, the corresponding gene was cloned and over-expressed. While the mosquito kinase (Ag-dNK) phosphorylated all four natural deoxyribonucleosides, it displayed an unexpectedly higher relative efficiency for the phosphorylation of purine versus pyrimidine...... of multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases and their diversity among insects remains unclear, the observed variation provides a whole range of applications, as species specific and highly selective targets for insecticides, they have a potential to be used in the enzymatic production of various (di...

  3. Biochemical and Computational Analysis of the Substrate Specificities of Cfr and RlmN Methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Ntokou

    Full Text Available Cfr and RlmN methyltransferases both modify adenine 2503 in 23S rRNA (Escherichia coli numbering. RlmN methylates position C2 of adenine while Cfr methylates position C8, and to a lesser extent C2, conferring antibiotic resistance to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Cfr and RlmN show high sequence homology and may be evolutionarily linked to a common ancestor. To explore their individual specificity and similarity we performed two sets of experiments. We created a homology model of Cfr and explored the C2/C8 specificity using docking and binding energy calculations on the Cfr homology model and an X-ray structure of RlmN. We used a trinucleotide as target sequence and assessed its positioning at the active site for methylation. The calculations are in accordance with different poses of the trinucleotide in the two enzymes indicating major evolutionary changes to shift the C2/C8 specificities. To explore interchangeability between Cfr and RlmN we constructed various combinations of their genes. The function of the mixed genes was investigated by RNA primer extension analysis to reveal methylation at 23S rRNA position A2503 and by MIC analysis to reveal antibiotic resistance. The catalytic site is expected to be responsible for the C2/C8 specificity and most of the combinations involve interchanging segments at this site. Almost all replacements showed no function in the primer extension assay, apart from a few that had a weak effect. Thus Cfr and RlmN appear to be much less similar than expected from their sequence similarity and common target.

  4. Detection of chitinolytic enzymes with different substrate specificity in tissues of intact sundew (Drosera rotundifolia L.): chitinases in sundew tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libantová, Jana; Kämäräinen, Terttu; Moravcíková, Jana; Matusíková, Ildikó; Salaj, Jan

    2009-05-01

    The round-leaf sundew (Drosera rotundifolia L.) is a carnivorous plant expressing a wide range of chitinolytic enzymes playing role in many different processes. In this study the intact plants were analyzed for the presence of chitinase transcripts and chitinolytic activities in different organs. In situ hybridization with chitnase fragment as a probe has revealed the presence of chitinases in the mesophyll cells of leaves and vascular elements of stems of healthy, non-stressed plants. More pronounced expression was observed in cortex and stele cells of roots as well as in ovules and anthers of reproductive organs. Similarly, higher chitinase enzyme activity was typical for flowers and roots suggesting a more specific role of chitinases in these tissues. In addition to endochitinases of different substrate specificities, chitobiosidases contributed to overall chitinolytic activity of tissue extracts. The activity of chitobiosidases was again typical for flowers and roots, while their role in plant physiology remains to be elucidated.

  5. Comparison of human glutamate carboxypeptidases II and III reveals their divergent substrate specificities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Michal; Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Pachl, Petr; Navrátil, Václav; Rokob, T. A.; Hlouchová, Klára; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Konvalinka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 13 (2016), s. 2528-2545 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : arene-binding site * GCPIII * prostate-specific membrane antigen * QM/MM calculations * beta-citryl-L-glutamate Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2016

  6. Localisation and substrate specificities of transglycanases in charophyte algae relate to development and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herburger, Klaus; Ryan, Louise M; Popper, Zoë A; Holzinger, Andreas

    2018-01-29

    Cell wall-modifying enzymes have been previously investigated in charophyte green algae (CGA) in cultures of uniform age, giving limited insight into their roles. Therefore, we investigated the in situ localisation and specificity of enzymes acting on hemicelluloses in CGA genera of different morphologies and developmental stages. In vivo transglycosylation between xyloglucan and an endogenous donor in filamentous Klebsormidium and Zygnema was observed in longitudinal cell walls of young (1 month) but not old cells (1 year), suggesting that it has a role in cell growth. By contrast, in parenchymatous Chara , transglycanase action occurred in all cell planes. In Klebsormidium and Zygnema , the location of enzyme action mainly occurred in regions where xyloglucans and mannans, and to a lesser extent mixed-linkage β-glucan (MLG), were present, indicating predominantly xyloglucan:xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity. Novel transglycosylation activities between xyloglucan and xylan, and xyloglucan and galactomannan were identified in vitro in both genera. Our results show that several cell wall-modifying enzymes are present in CGA, and that differences in morphology and cell age are related to enzyme localisation and specificity. This indicates an evolutionary significance of cell wall modifications, as similar changes are known in their immediate descendants, the land plants. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Catalytic domain of restriction endonuclease BmrI as a cleavage module for engineering endonucleases with novel substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-hong; Bao, Yongming; Ciszak, Ewa; Laget, Sophie; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    Creating endonucleases with novel sequence specificities provides more possibilities to manipulate DNA. We have created a chimeric endonuclease (CH-endonuclease) consisting of the DNA cleavage domain of BmrI restriction endonuclease and C.BclI, a controller protein of the BclI restriction-modification system. The purified chimeric endonuclease, BmrI198-C.BclI, cleaves DNA at specific sites in the vicinity of the recognition sequence of C.BclI. Double-strand (ds) breaks were observed at two sites: 8 bp upstream and 18 bp within the C-box sequence. Using DNA substrates with deletions of C-box sequence, we show that the chimeric endonuclease requires the 5' half of the C box only for specific cleavage. A schematic model is proposed for the mode of protein-DNA binding and DNA cleavage. The present study demonstrates that the BmrI cleavage domain can be used to create combinatorial endonucleases that cleave DNA at specific sequences dictated by the DNA-binding partner. The resulting endonucleases will be useful in vitro and in vivo to create ds breaks at specific sites and generate deletions.

  8. Biochemical and Computational Analysis of the Substrate Specificities of Cfr and RlmN Methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntokou, Eleni; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    -ray structure of RlmN. We used a trinucleotide as target sequence and assessed its positioning at the active site for methylation. The calculations are in accordance with different poses of the trinucleotide in the two enzymes indicating major evolutionary changes to shift the C2/C8 specificities. To explore......Cfr and RlmN methyltransferases both modify adenine 2503 in 23S rRNA (Escherichia coli numbering). RlmN methylates position C2 of adenine while Cfr methylates position C8, and to a lesser extent C2, conferring antibiotic resistance to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Cfr and RlmN show high sequence...... interchangeability between Cfr and RlmN we constructed various combinations of their genes. The function of the mixed genes was investigated by RNA primer extension analysis to reveal methylation at 23S rRNA position A2503 and by MIC analysis to reveal antibiotic resistance. The catalytic site is expected...

  9. Substrate specificity of flavin-dependent vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum.Evidence for the production of 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols from 4-allylphenols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Veeger, Cees; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1995-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum was investigated. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase catalyzes besides the oxidation of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohols, the oxidative deamination of 4-hydroxybenzylamines and the oxidative demethylation of

  10. Polymer Concentration-Controlled Substrate Specificity in Solvolysis of p-Nitrophenyl Alkanoates Catalyzed by 4-(Dialkylamino)pyridine- Functionalized Polymer in Aqueous Methanol Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Guang-Jia

    1996-01-01

    The substrate specificity in solvolysis reactions of p-nitrophenyl alkanoates 2 (n=2-18) catalyzed by 4-(dialkylamino)pyridine-functionalized polymer 1 can be controlled by the concentration of 1 in 1...

  11. Specific Neuron Placement on Gold and Silicon Nitride-Patterned Substrates through a Two-Step Functionalization Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescola, Andrea; Canale, Claudio; Prato, Mirko; Diaspro, Alberto; Berdondini, Luca; Maccione, Alessandro; Dante, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    considered a good starting point to develop alternatives to the traditional chip coatings to provide selective and specific neuron-substrate adhesion.

  12. Structural and mutational analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB provides insight into substrate specificity and DNA damage searching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG iron(II dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG and 3-methylthymine (3-meT at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a "searching" mode and "repair" mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  13. Membrane topology and identification of key residues of EaDAcT, a plant MBOAT with unusual substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tam N T; Shelton, Jennifer; Brown, Susan; Durrett, Timothy P

    2017-10-01

    Euonymus alatus diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the sn-3 position of diacylglycerol to form 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (acetyl-TAG). EaDAcT belongs to a small, plant-specific subfamily of the membrane bound O-acyltransferases (MBOAT) that acylate different lipid substrates. Sucrose gradient density centrifugation revealed that EaDAcT colocalizes to the same fractions as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-specific marker. By mapping the membrane topology of EaDAcT, we obtained an experimentally determined topology model for a plant MBOAT. The EaDAcT model contains four transmembrane domains (TMDs), with both the N- and C-termini orientated toward the lumen of the ER. In addition, there is a large cytoplasmic loop between the first and second TMDs, with the MBOAT signature region of the protein embedded in the third TMD close to the interface between the membrane and the cytoplasm. During topology mapping, we discovered two cysteine residues (C187 and C293) located on opposite sides of the membrane that are important for enzyme activity. In order to identify additional amino acid residues important for acetyltransferase activity, we isolated and characterized acetyltransferases from other acetyl-TAG-producing plants. Among them, the acetyltransferase from Euonymus fortunei possessed the highest activity in vivo and in vitro. Mutagenesis of conserved amino acids revealed that S253, H257, D258 and V263 are essential for EaDAcT activity. Alteration of residues unique to the acetyltransferases did not alter the unique acyl donor specificity of EaDAcT, suggesting that multiple amino acids are important for substrate recognition. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Neural substrates of defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Hilbert, Kevin; Stolyar, Veronika; Maslowski, Nina I; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Depending on threat proximity, different defensive behaviours are mediated by a descending neural network involving forebrain (distal threat) vs midbrain areas (proximal threat). Compared to healthy subjects, it can be assumed that phobics are characterized by shortened defensive distances on a behavioural and neural level. This study aimed at characterizing defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia [snake (SP) and dental phobics (DP)]. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), n = 39 subjects (13 healthy controls, HC; 13 SP; 13 DP) underwent an event-related fMRI task employing an anticipation (5-10 s) and immediate perception phase (phobic pictures and matched neutral stimuli; 1250 ms) to modulate defensive distance. Although no differential brain activity in any comparisons was observed in DP, areas associated with defensive behaviours (e.g. amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain) were activated in SP. Decreasing defensive distance in SP was characterized by a shift to midbrain activity. Present findings substantiate differences between phobia types in their physiological and neural organization that can be expanded to early stages of defensive behaviours. Findings may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamic organization of defensive reactivity in different types of phobic fear. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Excimer laser texturing of natural composite polymer surfaces for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinca, V., E-mail: dincavalentina@yahoo.com [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Alloncle, P.; Delaporte, P. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 Laboratory, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Ion, V. [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Rusen, L.; Filipescu, M. [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mustaciosu, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering – IFIN HH, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M. [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Roughness gradients are obtained in one step by applying single laser pulses and sample tilting. • BSA protein and cell dependence behavior onto gradient characteristics was studied. • The degradation of the samples by lysozyme was correlated to its ability to access the textured area. - Abstract: Surface modifications of biocompatible materials are among the main factors used for enhancing and promoting specific cellular activities (e.g. spreading, adhesion, migration, and differentiation) for various types of medical applications such as implants, microfluidic devices, or tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work an excimer laser at 193 nm was used to fabricate chitosan–collagen roughness gradients. The roughness gradients were obtained in one step by applying single laser pulses and sample tilting. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and spectro-ellipsometry (SE) were used for sample characterization. The goal is to determine the optimal morpho-chemical characteristics of these structures for in vitro tailoring of protein adsorption and cell behavior. The response induced by the roughness gradient onto various cell lines (i.e. L 929 fibroblasts, HEP G2 hepatocytes, OLN 93 oligodendrocytes, M63 osteoblasts) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein absorption was investigated.

  16. Active transport, substrate specificity, and methylation of Hg(II) in anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jeffra K.; Rocks, Sara S.; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Morel, François M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of methylmercury (MeHg), which is biomagnified in aquatic food chains and poses a risk to human health, is effected by some iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB) in anaerobic environments. However, very little is known regarding the mechanism of uptake of inorganic Hg by these organisms, in part because of the inherent difficulty in measuring the intracellular Hg concentration. By using the FeRB Geobacter sulfurreducens and the SRB Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as model organisms, we demonstrate that Hg(II) uptake occurs by active transport. We also establish that Hg(II) uptake by G. sulfurreducens is highly dependent on the characteristics of the thiols that bind Hg(II) in the external medium, with some thiols promoting uptake and methylation and others inhibiting both. The Hg(II) uptake system of D. desulfuricans has a higher affinity than that of G. sulfurreducens and promotes Hg methylation in the presence of stronger complexing thiols. We observed a tight coupling between Hg methylation and MeHg export from the cell, suggesting that these two processes may serve to avoid the build up and toxicity of cellular Hg. Our results bring up the question of whether cellular Hg uptake is specific for Hg(II) or accidental, occurring via some essential metal importer. Our data also point at Hg(II) complexation by thiols as an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anaerobic environments. PMID:21555571

  17. A Fungal α-Galactosidase from Tricholoma matsutake with Broad Substrate Specificity and Good Hydrolytic Activity on Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueran Geng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An acidic α-galactosidase designated as TMG was purified from the fruiting bodies The purification protocol entailed ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and of Tricholoma matsutake with 136-fold purification and a specific activity of 909 units/mg. Mono-Q and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. TMG is a monomeric protein exhibiting a molecular mass of 47 kDa in SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The purified enzyme was identified by LC-MS/MS and three inner amino acid sequences were obtained. The optimum pH and temperature for TMG with pNPGal as substrate were pH 4.5 and 55 °C, respectively. The α-galactosidase activity was strongly inhibited by K+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Ag+ and Zn2+ ions. The enzyme activity was inhibited by the chemical modification agent N-bromosuccinimide (NBS, indicating the importance of tryptophan residue(s at or near the active site. Besides hydrolyzing pNPGal, TMG also efficaciously catalyzed the degradation of natural substrates such as stachyose, raffinose, and melibiose. Thus TMG can be exploited commercially for improving the nutritional value of soy milk by degradation of indigestible oligosaccharides.

  18. Germline-specific MATH-BTB substrate adaptor MAB1 regulates spindle length and nuclei identity in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranič, Martina; Srilunchang, Kanok-orn; Krohn, Nádia Graciele; Leljak-Levanic, Dunja; Sprunck, Stefanie; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Germline and early embryo development constitute ideal model systems to study the establishment of polarity, cell identity, and asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) in plants. We describe here the function of the MATH-BTB domain protein MAB1 that is exclusively expressed in the germ lineages and the zygote of maize (Zea mays). mab1 (RNA interference [RNAi]) mutant plants display chromosome segregation defects and short spindles during meiosis that cause insufficient separation and migration of nuclei. After the meiosis-to-mitosis transition, two attached nuclei of similar identity are formed in mab1 (RNAi) mutants leading to an arrest of further germline development. Transient expression studies of MAB1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells revealed a cell cycle-dependent nuclear localization pattern but no direct colocalization with the spindle apparatus. MAB1 is able to form homodimers and interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase component Cullin 3a (CUL3a) in the cytoplasm, likely as a substrate-specific adapter protein. The microtubule-severing subunit p60 of katanin was identified as a candidate substrate for MAB1, suggesting that MAB1 resembles the animal key ACD regulator Maternal Effect Lethal 26 (MEL-26). In summary, our findings provide further evidence for the importance of posttranslational regulation for asymmetric divisions and germline progression in plants and identified an unstable key protein that seems to be involved in regulating the stability of a spindle apparatus regulator(s).

  19. Germline-Specific MATH-BTB Substrate Adaptor MAB1 Regulates Spindle Length and Nuclei Identity in Maize[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranić, Martina; Srilunchang, Kanok-orn; Krohn, Nádia Graciele; Leljak-Levanić, Dunja; Sprunck, Stefanie; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Germline and early embryo development constitute ideal model systems to study the establishment of polarity, cell identity, and asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) in plants. We describe here the function of the MATH-BTB domain protein MAB1 that is exclusively expressed in the germ lineages and the zygote of maize (Zea mays). mab1 (RNA interference [RNAi]) mutant plants display chromosome segregation defects and short spindles during meiosis that cause insufficient separation and migration of nuclei. After the meiosis-to-mitosis transition, two attached nuclei of similar identity are formed in mab1 (RNAi) mutants leading to an arrest of further germline development. Transient expression studies of MAB1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells revealed a cell cycle–dependent nuclear localization pattern but no direct colocalization with the spindle apparatus. MAB1 is able to form homodimers and interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase component Cullin 3a (CUL3a) in the cytoplasm, likely as a substrate-specific adapter protein. The microtubule-severing subunit p60 of katanin was identified as a candidate substrate for MAB1, suggesting that MAB1 resembles the animal key ACD regulator Maternal Effect Lethal 26 (MEL-26). In summary, our findings provide further evidence for the importance of posttranslational regulation for asymmetric divisions and germline progression in plants and identified an unstable key protein that seems to be involved in regulating the stability of a spindle apparatus regulator(s). PMID:23250449

  20. Evolution, substrate specificity and subfamily classification of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspeborg Henrik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large Glycoside Hydrolase family 5 (GH5 groups together a wide range of enzymes acting on β-linked oligo- and polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates from a large spectrum of organisms. The long and complex evolution of this family of enzymes and its broad sequence diversity limits functional prediction. With the objective of improving the differentiation of enzyme specificities in a knowledge-based context, and to obtain new evolutionary insights, we present here a new, robust subfamily classification of family GH5. Results About 80% of the current sequences were assigned into 51 subfamilies in a global analysis of all publicly available GH5 sequences and associated biochemical data. Examination of subfamilies with catalytically-active members revealed that one third are monospecific (containing a single enzyme activity, although new functions may be discovered with biochemical characterization in the future. Furthermore, twenty subfamilies presently have no characterization whatsoever and many others have only limited structural and biochemical data. Mapping of functional knowledge onto the GH5 phylogenetic tree revealed that the sequence space of this historical and industrially important family is far from well dispersed, highlighting targets in need of further study. The analysis also uncovered a number of GH5 proteins which have lost their catalytic machinery, indicating evolution towards novel functions. Conclusion Overall, the subfamily division of GH5 provides an actively curated resource for large-scale protein sequence annotation for glycogenomics; the subfamily assignments are openly accessible via the Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme database at http://www.cazy.org/GH5.html.

  1. Bringing nitrilase sequences from databases to life: the search for novel substrate specificities with a focus on dinitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselá, Alicja B; Rucká, Lenka; Kaplan, Ondřej; Pelantová, Helena; Nešvera, Jan; Pátek, Miroslav; Martínková, Ludmila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to discover new nitrilases with useful activities, especially towards dinitriles that are precursors of high-value cyano acids. Genes coding for putative nitrilases of different origins (fungal, plant, or bacterial) with moderate similarities to known nitrilases were selected by mining the GenBank database, synthesized artificially and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes were purified, examined for their substrate specificities, and classified into subtypes (aromatic nitrilase, arylacetonitrilase, aliphatic nitrilase, cyanide hydratase) which were largely in accordance with those predicted from bioinformatic analysis. The catalytic potential of the nitrilases for dinitriles was examined with cyanophenyl acetonitriles, phenylenediacetonitriles, and fumaronitrile. The nitrilase activities and selectivities for dinitriles and the reaction products (cyano acid, cyano amide, diacid) depended on the enzyme subtype. At a preparative scale, all the examined dinitriles were hydrolyzed into cyano acids and fumaronitrile was converted to cyano amide using E. coli cells producing arylacetonitrilases and an aromatic nitrilase, respectively.

  2. Variant c-type cytochromes as probes of the substrate specificity of the E. coli cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James W A; Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Ginger, Michael L; Barker, Paul D; Ferguson, Stuart J

    2009-04-01

    c-type cytochromes are normally characterized by covalent attachment of the iron cofactor haem to protein through two thioether bonds between the vinyl groups of the haem and the thiol groups of a CXXCH (Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-His) motif. In cells, the haem attachment is an enzyme-catalysed post-translational modification. We have previously shown that co-expression of a variant of Escherichia coli cytochrome b(562) containing a CXXCH haem-binding motif with the E. coli Ccm (cytochrome c maturation) proteins resulted in homogeneous maturation of a correctly formed c-type cytochrome. In contrast, in the absence of the Ccm apparatus, the product holocytochrome was heterogeneous, the main species having haem inverted and attached through only one thioether bond. In the present study we use further variants of cytochrome b(562) to investigate the substrate specificity of the E. coli Ccm apparatus. The system can mature c-type cytochromes with CCXXCH, CCXCH, CXCCH and CXXCHC motifs, even though these are not found naturally and the extra cysteine residue might, in principle, disrupt the biogenesis proteins which must interact intricately with disulfide-bond oxidizing and reducing proteins in the E. coli periplasm. The Ccm proteins can also attach haem to motifs of the type CX(n)CH where n ranges from 2 to 6. For n=3 and 4, the haem attachment was correct and homogeneous, but for higher values of n the holocytochromes displayed oxidative addition of sulfur and/or oxygen atoms associated with the covalent haem-attachment process. The implications of our observations for the haem-attachment reaction, for genome analyses and for the substrate specificity of the Ccm system, are discussed.

  3. Biochemical characterization and substrate specificity of jojoba fatty acyl-CoA reductase and jojoba wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    Wax esters are used in industry for production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The only natural source of wax esters is jojoba oil. A much wider variety of industrial wax esters-containing oils can be generated through genetic engineering. Biotechnological production of tailor-made wax esters requires, however, a detailed substrate specificity of fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) and wax synthases (WS), the two enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis. In this study we have successfully characterized the substrate specificity of jojoba FAR and jojoba WS. The genes encoding both enzymes were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the activity of tested enzymes was confirmed by in vivo studies and in vitro assays using microsomal preparations from transgenic yeast. Jojoba FAR exhibited the highest in vitro activity toward 18:0-CoA followed by 20:1-CoA and 22:1-CoA. The activity toward other 11 tested acyl-CoAs was low or undetectable as with 18:2-CoA and 18:3-CoA. In assays characterizing jojoba WS combinations of 17 fatty alcohols with 14 acyl-CoAs were tested. The enzyme displayed the highest activity toward 14:0-CoA and 16:0-CoA in combination with C16-C20 alcohols as well as toward C18 acyl-CoAs in combination with C12-C16 alcohols. 20:1-CoA was efficiently utilized in combination with most of the tested alcohols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural Insights into the Substrate Specificity of Streptococcus pneumoniae β(1,3)-Galactosidase BgaC*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wang; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Chu, Jun; Li, Qiong; Yu, Ge; Liang, Qiu-Ling; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing

    2012-01-01

    The surface-exposed β-galactosidase BgaC from Streptococcus pneumoniae was reported to be a virulence factor because of its specific hydrolysis activity toward the β(1,3)-linked galactose and N-acetylglucosamine (Galβ(1,3)NAG) moiety of oligosaccharides on the host molecules. Here we report the crystal structure of BgaC at 1.8 Å and its complex with galactose at 1.95 Å. At pH 5.5–8.0, BgaC exists as a stable homodimer, each subunit of which consists of three distinct domains: a catalytic domain of a classic (β/α)8 TIM barrel, followed by two all-β domains (ABDs) of unknown function. The side walls of the TIM β-barrel and a loop extended from the first ABD constitute the active site. Superposition of the galactose-complexed structure to the apo-form revealed significant conformational changes of residues Trp-243 and Tyr-455. Simulation of a putative substrate entrance tunnel and modeling of a complex structure with Galβ(1,3)NAG enabled us to assign three key residues to the specific catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis in combination with activity assays further proved that residues Trp-240 and Tyr-455 contribute to stabilizing the N-acetylglucosamine moiety, whereas Trp-243 is critical for fixing the galactose ring. Moreover, we propose that BgaC and other galactosidases in the GH-35 family share a common domain organization and a conserved substrate-determinant aromatic residue protruding from the second domain. PMID:22593580

  5. Dynamic changes in the secondary structure of ECE-1 and XCE account for their different substrate specificities

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    Ul-Haq Zaheer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-converting enzyme (XCE involved in nervous control of respiration, is a member of the M13 family of zinc peptidases, for which no natural substrate has been identified yet. In contrast, it’s well characterized homologue endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1 showed broad substrate specificity and acts as endopeptidase as well as dipeptidase. To explore the structural differences between XCE and ECE-1, homology model of XCE was built using the complex structure of ECE-1 with phosphoramidon (pdb-id: 3DWB as template. Phosphoramidon was docked into the binding site of XCE whereas phosphate oxygen of the inhibitor was used as water molecule to design the apo forms of both enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulation of both enzymes was performed to analyze the dynamic nature of their active site residues in the absence and presence of the inhibitor. Results Homology model of XCE explained the role of non-conserved residues of its S2’ subsite. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations identified the flexible transitions of F149/I150, N566/N571, W714/W719, and R145/R723 residues of ECE-1/XCE for the strong binding of the inhibitor. Secondary structure calculations using DSSP method reveals the folding of R145/R723 residue of ECE-1/XCE into β-sheet structure while unfolding of the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 and sustained compact folding of that of aXCE. The results evaluated are in good agreement with available experimental data, thus providing detailed molecular models which can explain the structural and specificities differences between both zinc peptidases. Conclusions Secondary structure changes of both enzymes during the simulation time revealed the importance of β-sheet structure of R145/R723 for its binding with the terminal carboxylate group of the inhibitor. Unfolding of the α-helix comprising the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 correlate well with its endopeptidase activity while their compact folding in aXCE may

  6. On the substrate specificity of human CYP27A1: implications for bile acid and cholestanol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlin, Maria; von Bahr, Sara; Bjorkhem, Ingemar; Wikvall, Kjell

    2003-08-01

    The mitochondrial sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) is required for degradation of the C27-sterol side chain in bile acid biosynthesis. CYP27A1 seems, however, to have roles beyond this, as illustrated by patients with a deficient sterol 27-hydroxylase due to mutations of the CYP27A1 gene [cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX)]. These subjects have symptoms ranging from accumulation of bile alcohols and cholestanol to accelerated atherosclerosis and progressive neurologic impairment. The present work describes a detailed investigation on the substrate specificity of recombinant human CYP27A1. In accordance with some previous work with rat liver mitochondria, the activity in general increased with the polarity of the substrate. An obvious example was the finding that cholesterol was 27-hydroxylated more efficiently than cholesterol oleate but less efficiently than cholesterol sulfate. The oxysterols 24S-hydroxycholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol were 27-hydroxylated less efficiently than cholesterol, possibly due to steric hindrance. Surprisingly, sterols with a 3-oxo-Delta4 structure were found to be hydroxylated at a much higher rate than the corresponding sterols with a 3beta-hydroxy-Delta5 structure. The rates of hydroxylation of the sterols were: 7alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one>4-cholesten-3-one>7alpha-hydroxycholesterol>24-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one> cholesterol>25-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one>24-hydroxycholesterol>or=25-hydroxycholesterol. The possibility is discussed that the findings may have implications for oxysterol-mediated regulation of gene expression. The very high activity of CYP27A1 towards the cholestanol precursor 4-cholesten-3-one may be of importance in connection with the accumulation of cholestanol in patients with CTX.

  7. The zebrafish genome encodes the largest vertebrate repertoire of functional aquaporins with dual paralogy and substrate specificities similar to mammals

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    Chauvigné François

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aquaporins are integral membrane proteins that facilitate the transport of water and small solutes across cell membranes. These proteins are vital for maintaining water homeostasis in living organisms. In mammals, thirteen aquaporins (AQP0-12 have been characterized, but in lower vertebrates, such as fish, the diversity, structure and substrate specificity of these membrane channel proteins are largely unknown. Results The screening and isolation of transcripts from the zebrafish (Danio rerio genome revealed eighteen sequences structurally related to the four subfamilies of tetrapod aquaporins, i.e., aquaporins (AQP0, -1 and -4, water and glycerol transporters or aquaglyceroporins (Glps; AQP3 and AQP7-10, a water and urea transporter (AQP8, and two unorthodox aquaporins (AQP11 and -12. Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences demonstrated dual paralogy between teleost and human aquaporins. Three of the duplicated zebrafish isoforms have unlinked loci, two have linked loci, while DrAqp8 was found in triplicate across two chromosomes. Genomic sequencing, structural analysis, and maximum likelihood reconstruction, further revealed the presence of a putative pseudogene that displays hybrid exons similar to tetrapod AQP5 and -1. Ectopic expression of the cloned transcripts in Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that zebrafish aquaporins and Glps transport water or water, glycerol and urea, respectively, whereas DrAqp11b and -12 were not functional in oocytes. Contrary to humans and some rodents, intrachromosomal duplicates of zebrafish AQP8 were water and urea permeable, while the genomic duplicate only transported water. All aquaporin transcripts were expressed in adult tissues and found to have divergent expression patterns. In some tissues, however, redundant expression of transcripts encoding two duplicated paralogs seems to occur. Conclusion The zebrafish genome encodes the largest repertoire of

  8. Pre-steady-state Kinetics Reveal the Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of Halide Oxidation of Truncated Human Peroxidasin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Katz, Romy-Sophie; Bellei, Marzia; Schwartz, Irene; Edenhofer, Eva; Sevcnikar, Benjamin; Soudi, Monika; Hofbauer, Stefan; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2017-03-17

    Human peroxidasin 1 is a homotrimeric multidomain peroxidase that is secreted to the extracellular matrix. The heme enzyme was shown to release hypobromous acid that mediates the formation of specific covalent sulfilimine bonds to reinforce collagen IV in basement membranes. Maturation by proteolytic cleavage is known to activate the enzyme. Here, we present the first multimixing stopped-flow study on a fully functional truncated variant of human peroxidasin 1 comprising four immunoglobulin-like domains and the catalytically active peroxidase domain. The kinetic data unravel the so far unknown substrate specificity and mechanism of halide oxidation of human peroxidasin 1. The heme enzyme is shown to follow the halogenation cycle that is induced by the rapid H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation of the ferric enzyme to the redox intermediate compound I. We demonstrate that chloride cannot act as a two-electron donor of compound I, whereas thiocyanate, iodide, and bromide efficiently restore the ferric resting state. We present all relevant apparent bimolecular rate constants, the spectral signatures of the redox intermediates, and the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple, and we demonstrate that the prosthetic heme group is post-translationally modified and cross-linked with the protein. These structural features provide the basis of human peroxidasin 1 to act as an effective generator of hypobromous acid, which mediates the formation of covalent cross-links in collagen IV. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Stringent cost management and preservation of safety culture, a contradiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Klaus; Pamme, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Competition in the deregulated electricity market does not leave nuclear power plants unaffected. Hence the question is to answer, whether the safety is going to suffer under the cost pressure on the market. Therefore the target of NPP operator's cost management is to run plants at maximum availability and with optimized cost structures that lead to minimized specific generating costs. The c osts of safety , with their fixed-cost character, are elements of this cost structure. The process of economic optimization of the cost structure does not permit cost minimization on its own sake in the area of operation cost and fuel cost (front and back end). The basis of economical assessment rather must be the minimization of potential risks which could entail losses of availability. However, many investments like plant modifications or preventive maintenance efforts made in order to avoid losses of availability to a large extent also imply at least a preservation or even higher levels of safety. Thus, economic efficiency and safety are closely correlated. Public opinion is very sensible as soon as the high level of plant safety seems to be touched by economic pressure. But realizing that German NPP are endowed with mature design and safety features, improvements of safety standards can only marginally be increased by further technical optimizations. Therefore plant management, man-machine-interface and the individual behaviour of the employees are targets for improvement of nuclear safety and economic efficiency by increasing the efficiency of processes. An even more efficient use of scarce funds and a tolerable political environment should allow the safety level of NPP to be upheld, and safety culture could be maintained and even be improved. (author)

  10. Classification of the adenylation and acyl-transferase activity of NRPS and PKS systems using ensembles of substrate specific hidden Markov models.

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    Barzan I Khayatt

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in the Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs and polyketide synthases (PKSs of microbes, fungi and plants because they can produce bioactive peptides such as antibiotics. The ability to identify the substrate specificity of the enzyme's adenylation (A and acyl-transferase (AT domains is essential to rationally deduce or engineer new products. We here report on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM-based ensemble method to predict the substrate specificity at high quality. We collected a new reference set of experimentally validated sequences. An initial classification based on alignment and Neighbor Joining was performed in line with most of the previously published prediction methods. We then created and tested single substrate specific HMMs and found that their use improved the correct identification significantly for A as well as for AT domains. A major advantage of the use of HMMs is that it abolishes the dependency on multiple sequence alignment and residue selection that is hampering the alignment-based clustering methods. Using our models we obtained a high prediction quality for the substrate specificity of the A domains similar to two recently published tools that make use of HMMs or Support Vector Machines (NRPSsp and NRPS predictor2, respectively. Moreover, replacement of the single substrate specific HMMs by ensembles of models caused a clear increase in prediction quality. We argue that the superiority of the ensemble over the single model is caused by the way substrate specificity evolves for the studied systems. It is likely that this also holds true for other protein domains. The ensemble predictor has been implemented in a simple web-based tool that is available at http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/NRPS-PKS-substrate-predictor/.

  11. Structural basis for non-genuine phenolic acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase CloQ from the ABBA/PT-barrel superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya-Cloutier, Carla; Martens, Bianca; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Leipoldt, Franziska; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase SrCloQ was investigated using different non-genuine phenolic compounds. RP-UHPLC-UV-MSn was used for the tentative annotation and quantification of the prenylated products. Flavonoids, isoflavonoids and stilbenoids with different types of substitution were prenylated by SrCloQ, although with less efficiency than the genuine substrate 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. The isoflavan equol, followed by the flavone 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone, were the best non-genuine acceptor substrates. B-ring C-prenylation was in general preferred over A-ring C-prenylation (ratio 5:1). Docking studies of non-genuine acceptor substrates with the B-ring oriented towards the donor substrate dimethylallyl pyrophosphate, showed that the carbonyl group of the C-ring was able to make stabilizing interactions with the residue Arg160, which might determine the preference observed for B-ring prenylation. No reaction products were formed when the acceptor substrate had no phenolic hydroxyl groups. This preference can be explained by the essential hydrogen bond needed between a phenolic hydroxyl group and the residue Glu281. Acceptor substrates with an additional hydroxyl group at the C3' position (B-ring), were mainly O3'-prenylated (> 80% of the reaction products). This can be explained by the proximity of the C3' hydroxyl group to the donor substrate at the catalytic site. Flavones were preferred over isoflavones by SrCloQ. Docking studies suggested that the orientation of the B-ring and of the phenolic hydroxyl group at position C7 (A-ring) of flavones towards the residue Tyr233 plays an important role in this observed preference. Finally, the insights obtained on acceptor substrate specificity and regioselectivity for SrCloQ were extended to other prenyltransferases from the CloQ/NhpB family.

  12. Milestone Report for High NA Optics Development International Sematech Project L1TH 112 Milestone4a: Specification Package for the Polished Mirror Substrate M1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.S.; Hale, L.

    1999-01-01

    The key task in initiating the fabrication of mirror substrates for the new High NA Camera is in preparing the specification package that details the substrate geometry and the specifications for the optical surface. This specification package has been completed for substrate M1, and the vendor has begun optical fabrication. In addition, mounting hardware has been designed and fabricated, and substrates have been bonded to the kinematic mounts. The design of the secondary substrate, M2, is underway, but will depend upon details of the PO Box actuation system and space constraints. Sufficient details of the M2 design to enable the vendor to procure material will be determined during October, while the final details of the mounting surfaces will be completed prior to the end of Q4 1999. The geometry of the Ml substrate is compatible with our planned approach for fixturing the optic within the PO Box and within metrology tools. The completion of this specification package required detailed consideration of: the mounting approach within the PO Box, degrees of actuation required for PO Box alignment, space constraints imposed by the vendor's metrology, requirements for LLNL metrology, and datum definitions needed for mechanical assembly of the PO Box. In addition, each of the degrees of freedom of the substrate has been properly constrained, and shown to be sufficiently insensitive to disturbance forces for minimizing deformation. An approach to fixturing has been adopted that extends beyond the approach taken for the Engineering Test Stand (ETS). For the ETS, each substrate, including spares, has dedicated mounting hardware that is used exclusively for each element. In exchange for a reduced risk of mounting-induced deformation, this incurred substantial expense and precluded optics from using interchangeable tooling. For the current High NA camera, we have adopted an approach that employs interchangeable mounting hardware that can be used for any of the substrates

  13. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase from the Cold Adapted Microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: A Low Temperature Active Enzyme with Broad Substrate Specificity

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    Stefano Pascarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  14. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  15. Phosphatase active antigens in sea urchin eggs and embryos. I. Substrate specificity, pH-optima and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, M

    1975-06-01

    Phosphatase activity in sea urchin embryonic antigens was investigated by histochemical staining of immunoprecipitates separated by two-dimensional (crossed) immunoelectrophoresis. Unfertilized eggs were homogenized in a hypotonic medium which solubilized cytoplasmic antigens. Antigens integrated in membranes or enclosed in particles were solubilized by detergent treatment of the residual pellet. Two different phosphatase activities were discerned in the unfertilized eggs, nucleoside diphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.6.) and acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2.). Nucleoside diphosphatase activity was obtained in both the water soluble and detergent extracted protein fractions. This activity was confined to one antigen. Acid phosphatase acitivity on the other hand was almost exclusively obtained in the detergent extracted fraction and about ten distinct antigens displayed this activity. The nucleoside diphosphatase active antigen preferentially hydrolyzed purine nucleoside diphosphates and to a lesser degree triphosphates of these nucleosides. The acid phosphatase active antigens had a broader substrate specificity and hydrolyzed equally well beta-glycerophosphate and nucleotides. Both activities were essentially inactive at neutral or alkaline pH values. The activities were inhibited by p-choloromercuribenzoate and accordingly stimulated by cysteine. Tartrate and sodium fluoride, however, inhibited the acid phosphatase activity while nucleoside diphosphatase activity was either stimulated or not affected at all by these agents.

  16. Characterization of an α-amino-ɛ-caprolactam racemase with broad substrate specificity from Citreicella sp. SE45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payoungkiattikun, Wisarut; Okazaki, Seiji; Ina, Atsutoshi; H-Kittikun, Aran; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    α-Amino-ε-caprolactam (ACL) racemizing activity was detected in a putative dialkylglycine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.64) from Citreicella sp. SE45. The encoding gene of the enzyme was cloned and transformed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The molecular mass of the enzyme was shown to be 47.4 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzymatic properties including pH and thermal optimum and stabilities were determined. This enzyme acted on a broad range of amino acid amides, particularly unbranched amino acid amides including L-alanine amide and L-serine amide with a specific activity of 17.5 and 21.6 U/mg, respectively. The K m and V max values for D- and L-ACL were 5.3 and 2.17 mM, and 769 and 558 μmol/min.mg protein, respectively. Moreover, the turn over number (K cat ) and catalytic efficiency (K cat /K m ) of purified ACL racemase from Citreicella sp. SE45 using L-ACL as a substrate were 465 S -1 and 214 S -1 mM -1 , respectively. The new ACL racemase from Citreicella sp. SE45 has a potential to be used as the biocatalytic application.

  17. Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity

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    Wu Shih-Lu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endonuclease G (EndoG, a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific ββα-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG. Methods To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies. Results Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251 and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271 of human EndoG were identified. Conclusion Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena.

  18. Glycosynthase Mutants of Endoglycosidase S2 Show Potent Transglycosylation Activity and Remarkably Relaxed Substrate Specificity for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiezheng; Tong, Xin; Yang, Qiang; Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation can exert a profound impact on the structures and biological functions of antibodies. Glycosylation remodeling using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed deglycosylation and transglycosylation approach is emerging as a promising platform to produce homogeneous glycoforms of antibodies, but the broad application of this method will require the availability of highly efficient glycosynthase mutants. We describe in this paper a systematic site-directed mutagenesis of an endoglycosidase from Streptococcus pyogenes of serotype M49 (Endo-S2) and the evaluation of the resulting mutants for their hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities. We found that mutations at the Asp-184 residue gave mutants that demonstrated significantly different properties, some possessed potent transglycosylation activity with diminished hydrolysis activity but others did not, which would be otherwise difficult to predict without the comparative study. In contrast to the previously reported Endo-S mutants that are limited to action on complex type N-glycans, the Endo-S2 glycosynthases described here, including D184M and D184Q, were found to have remarkably relaxed substrate specificity and were capable of transferring three major types (complex, high-mannose, and hybrid type) of N-glycans for antibody glycosylation remodeling. In addition, the Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants were found to be much more active in general than the Endo-S mutants for transglycosylation. The usefulness of these Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants was exemplified by an efficient glycosylation remodeling of two therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and trastuzumab (Herceptin). PMID:27288408

  19. Read-across of ready biodegradability based on the substrate specificity of N-alkyl polypropylene polyamine-degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, R; van Ginkel, C G; Plugge, C M

    2017-04-01

    The biodegradation of N-alkyl polypropylene polyamines (NAPPs) was studied using pure and mixed cultures to enable read-across of ready biodegradability test results. Two Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from activated sludge with N-oleyl alkyl propylene diamine and N-coco alkyl dipropylene triamine, respectively. Both strains utilized all NAPPs tested as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy for growth. Mineralization of NAPPs was independent of the alkyl chain length and the size of the polyamine moiety. NAPPs degraded in closed bottle tests (CBTs) using both river water and activated sludge. However, ready biodegradability of NAPPs with alkyl chain lengths of 16-18 carbon atoms and polyamine moieties with three and four nitrogen atoms could not be demonstrated. Biodegradation in the CBT was hampered by their limited bioavailability, making assessment of the true ready biodegradability of these highly adsorptive surfactants impossible. All NAPPs are therefore classified as readily biodegradable through read-across. Read-across is justified by the broad substrate specificity of NAPP-degrading microorganisms, their omnipresence and the mineralization of NAPPs.

  20. Air Quality and Health Benefits of China's Recent Stringent Environmental Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Xue, T.; Zhang, Q.; Geng, G.; He, K.

    2016-12-01

    Aggressive emission control measures were taken by China's central and local governments after the promulgation of the "Air Pollution Prevention and Control Action Plan" in 2013. We evaluated the air quality and health benefits of this ever most stringent air pollution control policy during 2013-2015 by utilizing a two-stage data fusion model and newly-developed cause-specific integrated exposure-response functions (IER) developed for the Global Burden of Disease (GBD). The two-stage data fusion model predicts spatiotemporal continuous PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm) concentrations by integrating satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements, PM2.5 concentrations from measurement and air quality model, and other ancillary information. During the years of analysis, PM2.5 concentration dropped significantly on national average and over heavily polluted regions as identified by Mann-Kendall analysis. The national PM2.5-attributable mortality decreased by 72.8 (95% CI: 59.4, 85.2) thousand (6%) from 1.23 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.39) million in 2013 to 1.15 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.31) million in 2015 due to considerable reduction (i.e. 18%) of population-weighted PM2.5 from 61.4 to 50.5 µg/m3. Meteorological variations between 2013 and 2015 were estimated to raise the PM2.5 levels by 0.24 µg/m3 and national mortality by 2.1 (95% CI: 1.6, 2.6) thousand through sensitivity tests, which implies the dominant role of anthropogenic impacts on PM2.5 abatement and attributable mortality reduction. Our study affirms the effectiveness of China's recent air quality policy, however, due to the possible supralinear shape of C-R functions, health benefits induced by air quality improvement in these years are limited. We therefore appeal for continuous implementation of current policies and further stringent measures from both air quality improvement and public health protection perspectives.

  1. Differential substrate specificities of human ABCD1 and ABCD2 in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roermund, Carlo W T; Visser, Wouter F; Ijlst, Lodewijk; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2011-03-01

    The gene mutated in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) codes for the HsABCD1 protein, also named ALDP, which is a member of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and required for fatty acid transport across the peroxisomal membrane. Although a defective HsABCD1 results in the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma of X-ALD patients, there is still no direct biochemical evidence that HsABCD1 actually transports very long-chain fatty acids. We used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the transport of fatty acids across the peroxisomal membrane. Our earlier work showed that in yeast the uptake of fatty acids into peroxisomes may occur via two routes, either as (1.) free fatty acid or as (2.) acyl-CoA ester. The latter route involves the two peroxisomal half-ABC transporters, Pxa1p and Pxa2p, which form a heterodimeric complex in the peroxisomal membrane. We here report that the phenotype of the pxa1/pxa2Δ yeast mutant, i.e. impaired growth on oleate containing medium and deficient oxidation of oleic acid, cannot only be partially rescued by human ABCD1, but also by human ABCD2 (ALDRP), which indicates that HsABCD1 and HsABCD2 can both function as homodimers. Fatty acid oxidation studies in the pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant transformed with either HsABCD1 or HsABCD2 revealed clear differences suggesting that HsABCD1 and HsABCD2 have distinct substrate specificities. Indeed, full rescue of beta-oxidation activity in cells expressing human ABCD2 was observed with C22:0 and different unsaturated very long-chain fatty acids including C24:6 and especially C22:6 whereas in cells expressing HsABCD1 rescue of beta-oxidation activity was best with C24:0 and C26:0 as substrates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Stringent Response Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Dissemination by Regulating Integron Integrase Expression in Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Strugeon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Class 1 integrons are genetic systems that enable bacteria to capture and express gene cassettes. These integrons, when isolated in clinical contexts, most often carry antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. They play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. The key element of integrons is the integrase, which allows gene cassettes to be acquired and shuffled. Planktonic culture experiments have shown that integrase expression is regulated by the bacterial SOS response. In natural settings, however, bacteria generally live in biofilms, which are characterized by strong antibiotic resilience and by increased expression of stress-related genes. Here, we report that under biofilm conditions, the stringent response, which is induced upon starvation, (i increases basal integrase and SOS regulon gene expression via induction of the SOS response and (ii exerts biofilm-specific regulation of the integrase via the Lon protease. This indicates that biofilm environments favor integron-mediated acquisition of antibiotic resistance and other adaptive functions encoded by gene cassettes.

  3. The crystal structure of a xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase from Geotrichum sp. M128 xyloglucanase reveals a key amino acid residue for substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Kondo, Hidemasa; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Noro, Natsuko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Sakae; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2009-09-01

    Geotrichum sp. M128 possesses two xyloglucan-specific glycoside hydrolases belonging to family 74, xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (XEG) and oligoxyloglucan reducing-end-specific cellobiohydrolase (OXG-RCBH). Despite their similar amino acid sequences (48% identity), their modes of action and substrate specificities are distinct. XEG catalyzes the hydrolysis of xyloglucan polysaccharides in endo mode, while OXG-RCBH acts on xyloglucan oligosaccharides at the reducing end in exo mode. Here, we determined the crystal structure of XEG at 2.5 A resolution, and compared it to a previously determined structure of OXG-RCBH. For the most part, the amino acid residues that interact with substrate are conserved between the two enzymes. However, there are notable differences at subsite positions -1 and +2. OXG-RCBH has a loop around the +2 site that blocks one end of the active site cleft, which accounts for its exo mode of action. In contrast, XEG lacks a corresponding loop at this site, thereby allowing binding to the middle of the main chain of the substrate. At the -1 site in OXG-RCBH, Asn488 interacts with the xylose side chain of the substrate, whereas the -1 site is occupied by Tyr457 in XEG. To confirm the contribution of this residue to substrate specificity, Tyr457 was substituted by Gly in XEG. The wild-type XEG cleaved the oligoxyloglucan at a specific site; the Y457G variant cleaved the same substrate, but at various sites. Together, the absence of a loop in the cleft and the presence of bulky Tyr457 determine the substrate specificity of XEG.

  4. Novel α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 and its substrate-specificity analysis with the aid of computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Zhang, Lujia; Guo, Mingrong; Sun, Jiaqi; Matsukawa, Shingo; Xie, Jingli; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-04-15

    In the process of gene mining for novel α-L-arabinofuranosidases (AFs), the gene Celf_3321 from Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 encodes an AF, termed as AbfCelf, with potent activity, 19.4 U/mg under the optimum condition, pH 6.0 and 40 °C. AbfCelf can hydrolyze α-1,5-linked oligosaccharides, sugar beet arabinan, linear 1,5-α-arabinan, and wheat flour arabinoxylan, which is partly different from some previously well-characterized GH 51 AFs. The traditional substrate-specificity analysis for AFs is labor-consuming and money costing, because the substrates include over 30 kinds of various 4-nitrophenol (PNP)-glycosides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides. Hence, a preliminary structure and mechanism based method was applied for substrate-specificity analysis. The binding energy (ΔG, kcal/mol) obtained by docking suggested the reaction possibility and coincided with the experimental results. AbfA crystal 1QW9 was used to test the rationality of docking method in simulating the interaction between enzyme and substrate, as well the credibility of the substrate-specificity analysis method in silico.

  5. Engineering substrate specificity of succinic semialdehyde reductase (AKR7A5) for efficient conversion of levulinic acid to 4-hydroxyvaleric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Young Joo; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Yoo, Young Je

    2015-09-20

    Engineering enzyme substrate specificity is a promising approach that can expand the applicability of enzymes for the biocatalytic production of industrial chemicals and fuels. In this study, succinic semialdehyde reductase (AKR7A5) was engineered for the conversion of levulinic acid to 4-hydroxyvaleric acid. Levulinic acid is a derivative of cellulosic biomass, and 4-hydroxyvaleric acid is a potential precursor to bio-polymers and fuels. Therefore, the enzymatic conversion of levulinic acid to 4-hydroxyvaleric acid is of special significance in that this conversion could provide a meaningful basis for the bio-production of useful chemicals from cellulosic biomass. In engineering the substrate specificity of the AKR7A5, a rational design approach with the aid of enzyme-substrate interatomic contact analysis was applied. The Met13 residue was selected as a key mutation site, and substitutions of the residue with six hydrophobic amino acids were applied. As a result, four mutants with enhanced catalytic activity toward levulinic acid were obtained, and the most improved mutant, Met13Trp, exhibited a 7.0-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the structural effects of the positive mutations were investigated to analyze the structural basis for the enzyme substrate specificity with the target substrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg{sup -1} protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg{sup -1} protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg{sup -1} protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg{sup -1} protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg{sup -1} protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions.

  7. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar

    2009-01-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg -1 protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg -1 protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg -1 protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg -1 protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg -1 protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions

  8. Enzymatic properties of an ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase from Legionella pneumophila: substrate specificity and requirement for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, Fiona M; Riedmaier, Patrice; Newton, Hayley J; Dunstone, Michelle A; Müller, Christa E; Stephan, Holger; Byres, Emma; Beddoe, Travis; Rossjohn, Jamie; Cowan, Peter J; d'Apice, Anthony J F; Robson, Simon C; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2008-05-09

    Legionella pneumophila is the predominant cause of Legionnaires disease, a severe and potentially fatal form of pneumonia. Recently, we identified an ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) from L. pneumophila, termed Lpg1905, which enhances intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in eukaryotic cells. Lpg1905 is the first prokaryotic member of the CD39/NTPDase1 family of enzymes, which are characterized by the presence of five apyrase conserved regions and the ability to hydrolyze nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. Here we examined the substrate specificity of Lpg1905 and showed that apart from ATP and ADP, the enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of GTP and GDP but had limited activity against CTP, CDP, UTP, and UDP. Based on amino acid residues conserved in the apyrase conserved regions of eukaryotic NTPDases, we generated five site-directed mutants, Lpg1905E159A, R122A, N168A, Q193A, and W384A. Although the mutations E159A, R122A, Q193A, and W384A abrogated activity completely, N168A resulted in decreased activity caused by reduced affinity for nucleotides. When introduced into the lpg1905 mutant strain of L. pneumophila, only N168A partially restored the ability of L. pneumophila to replicate in THP-1 macrophages. Following intratracheal inoculation of A/J mice, none of the Lpg1905 mutants was able to restore virulence to an lpg1905 mutant during lung infection, thereby demonstrating the importance of NTPDase activity to L. pneumophila infection. Overall, the kinetic studies undertaken here demonstrated important differences to mammalian NTPDases and different sensitivities to NTPDase inhibitors that may reflect underlying structural variations.

  9. Substrate specificity and reaction mechanism of purified alkane hydroxylase from the hydrocarbonoclastus bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis (AbAlkB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Swe-Htet; Parvez, Saba; Pender-Cudlip, Marilla; Groves, John T.

    2013-01-01

    An alkane hydroxylase from the marine organism Alcanivorax borkumensis (AbAlkB) was purified. The purified protein retained high activity in an assay with purified rubredoxin (AlkG), purified maize ferridoxin reductase, NADPH, and selected substrates. The reaction mechanism of the purified protein was probed using the radical clock substrates bicyclo[4.1.0]heptane (norcarane), bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane (bicyclohexane), methylphenylcyclopropane and deuterated and non-deuterated cyclohexane. The distribution of products from the radical clock substrates supports the hypothesis that purified AbAlkB hydroxylates substrates by forming a substrate radical. Experiments with deuterated cyclohexane indicate that the rate-determining step has significant C-H bond breaking character. The products formed from a number of differently shaped and sized substrates were characterized to determine the active site constraints of this AlkB. AbAlkB can catalyze the hydroxylation of a large number of aromatic compounds and linear and cyclic alkanes. It does not catalyze the hydroxylation of alkanes with a chain length longer than 15 carbons, nor does it hydroxylate sterically hindered C-H bonds. PMID:23337786

  10. DbPTM 3.0: an informative resource for investigating substrate site specificity and functional association of protein post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Chang, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification is an extremely important post-translational regulation that adjusts the physical and chemical properties, conformation, stability and activity of a protein; thus altering protein function. Due to the high throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods in identifying site-specific post-translational modifications (PTMs), dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) is updated to integrate experimental PTMs obtained from public resources as well as manually curated MS/MS peptides associated with PTMs from research articles. Version 3.0 of dbPTM aims to be an informative resource for investigating the substrate specificity of PTM sites and functional association of PTMs between substrates and their interacting proteins. In order to investigate the substrate specificity for modification sites, a newly developed statistical method has been applied to identify the significant substrate motifs for each type of PTMs containing sufficient experimental data. According to the data statistics in dbPTM, >60% of PTM sites are located in the functional domains of proteins. It is known that most PTMs can create binding sites for specific protein-interaction domains that work together for cellular function. Thus, this update integrates protein-protein interaction and domain-domain interaction to determine the functional association of PTM sites located in protein-interacting domains. Additionally, the information of structural topologies on transmembrane (TM) proteins is integrated in dbPTM in order to delineate the structural correlation between the reported PTM sites and TM topologies. To facilitate the investigation of PTMs on TM proteins, the PTM substrate sites and the structural topology are graphically represented. Also, literature information related to PTMs, orthologous conservations and substrate motifs of PTMs are also provided in the resource. Finally, this version features an improved web interface to facilitate convenient access to the resource.

  11. Structural insights into enzymatic activity and substrate specificity determination by a single amino acid in nitrilase from Syechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lujia; Yin, Bo; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Shuiqin; Wang, Hualei; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Nitrilases are enzymes widely expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that utilize a Cys–Glu–Lys catalytic triad to hydrolyze non-peptide carbon–nitrogen bonds. Nitrilase from Syechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803 (Nit6803) shows hydrolysis activity towards a broad substrate spectrum, ranging from mononitriles to dinitriles and from aromatic nitriles to aliphatic nitriles. Yet, the structural principle of the substrate specificity of this nitrilase is still unknown. We report the crystal structure of Nit6803 at 3.1 Å resolution and propose a structural mechanism of substrate selection. Our mutagenesis data exhibited that the aromaticity of the amino acid at position 146 of Nit6803 is absolutely required for its nitrilase activity towards any substrates tested. Moreover, molecular docking and dynamic simulation analysis indicated that the distance between the sulfhydryl group of the catalytic cysteine residue and the cyano carbon of the substrate plays a crucial role in determining the nitrilase catalytic activity of Nit6803 and its mutants towards different nitrile substrates.

  12. Substrate specificity of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA is controlled by alternative activators: TkmA and SalA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderahmane Derouiche

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases are known to regulate different aspects of bacterial physiology, by phosphorylating cellular protein substrates. Physiological cues that trigger BY-kinases activity are largely unexplored. In Proteobacteria, BY-kinases contain a cytosol-exposed catalytic domain and a transmembrane activator domain in a single polypeptide chain. In Firmicutes, the BY-kinase catalytic domain and the transmembrane activator domain exist as separate polypeptides. We have previously speculated that this architecture might enable the Firmicutes BY-kinases to interact with alternative activators, and thus account for the observed ability of these kinases to phosphorylate several distinct classes of protein substrates. Here we present experimental evidence that supports this hypothesis. We focus on the model Firmicute-type BY-kinase PtkA from Bacillus subtilis, known to phosphorylate several different protein substrates. We demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator SalA, hitherto known as a substrate of PtkA, can also act as a PtkA activator. In doing so, SalA competes with the canonical PtkA activator, TkmA. Our results suggest that the respective interactions of SalA and TkmA with PtkA favor phosphorylation of different protein substrates in vivo and in vitro. This observation may contribute to explaining how specificity is established in the seemingly promiscuous interactions of BY-kinases with their cellular substrates.

  13. Structural basis for non-genuine phenolic Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase CloQ from the ABBA/PT-barrel superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Cloutier, Carla; Martens, Bianca; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Leipoldt, Franziska; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase SrCloQ was investigated using different non-genuine phenolic compounds. RP-UHPLC-UV-MSn was used for the tentative annotation and quantification of the prenylated products. Flavonoids, isoflavonoids and stilbenoids

  14. Structural basis for non-genuine phenolic acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase CloQ from the ABBA/PT-barrel superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Cloutier, C.; Martens, B.; Schaftenaar, G.; Leipoldt, F.; Gruppen, H.; Vincken, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase SrCloQ was investigated using different non-genuine phenolic compounds. RP-UHPLC-UV-MSn was used for the tentative annotation and quantification of the prenylated products. Flavonoids, isoflavonoids and stilbenoids

  15. Substrate Specificity, Inhibitor Selectivity and Structure-Function Relationships of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B15: A Novel Human Retinaldehyde Reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Giménez-Dejoz

    Full Text Available Human aldo-keto reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15 is a newly discovered enzyme which shares 92% amino acid sequence identity with AKR1B10. While AKR1B10 is a well characterized enzyme with high retinaldehyde reductase activity, involved in the development of several cancer types, the enzymatic activity and physiological role of AKR1B15 are still poorly known. Here, the purified recombinant enzyme has been subjected to substrate specificity characterization, kinetic analysis and inhibitor screening, combined with structural modeling. AKR1B15 is active towards a variety of carbonyl substrates, including retinoids, with lower kcat and Km values than AKR1B10. In contrast to AKR1B10, which strongly prefers all-trans-retinaldehyde, AKR1B15 exhibits superior catalytic efficiency with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, the best substrate found for this enzyme. With ketone and dicarbonyl substrates, AKR1B15 also shows higher catalytic activity than AKR1B10. Several typical AKR inhibitors do not significantly affect AKR1B15 activity. Amino acid substitutions clustered in loops A and C result in a smaller, more hydrophobic and more rigid active site in AKR1B15 compared with the AKR1B10 pocket, consistent with distinct substrate specificity and narrower inhibitor selectivity for AKR1B15.

  16. Rapid Curtailing of the Stringent Response by Toxin-Antitoxin Encoded mRNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Chengzhe; Roghanian, Mohammad; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli regulates its metabolism to adapt to changes in the environment, in particular to stressful downshifts in nutrient quality. Such shifts elicit the so-called stringent response coordinated by the alarmone guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp]. At sudden amino-acid (aa......RNase-encoding TA modules present in the wt strain. This observation suggested that toxins are part of the negative feedback to control the (p)ppGpp level during early stringent response. We built a ribosome trafficking model to evaluate the fold of increase in the RelA activity just after the onset of aa...... %. IMPORTANCE: The early stringent response elicited by amino-acid starvation is controlled by a sharp increase of the cellular (p)ppGpp level. Toxin-antitoxin encoded mRNases are activated by (p)ppGpp through enhanced degradation of antitoxins. The present work shows that this activation happens at a very...

  17. Plant performance on Mediterranean green roofs: interaction of species-specific hydraulic strategies and substrate water relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Fabio; Trifilò, Patrizia; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Andri, Sergio; Savi, Tadeja; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-01-20

    Recent studies have highlighted the ecological, economic and social benefits assured by green roof technology to urban areas. However, green roofs are very hostile environments for plant growth because of shallow substrate depths, high temperatures and irradiance and wind exposure. This study provides experimental evidence for the importance of accurate selection of plant species and substrates for implementing green roofs in hot and arid regions, like the Mediterranean area. Experiments were performed on two shrub species (Arbutus unedo L. and Salvia officinalis L.) grown in green roof experimental modules with two substrates slightly differing in their water retention properties, as derived from moisture release curves. Physiological measurements were performed on both well-watered and drought-stressed plants. Gas exchange, leaf and xylem water potential and also plant hydraulic conductance were measured at different time intervals following the last irrigation. The substrate type significantly affected water status. Arbutus unedo and S. officinalis showed different hydraulic responses to drought stress, with the former species being substantially isohydric and the latter one anisohydric. Both A. unedo and S. officinalis were found to be suitable species for green roofs in the Mediterranean area. However, our data suggest that appropriate choice of substrate is key to the success of green roof installations in arid environments, especially if anisohydric species are employed. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  18. Kinetic Analysis of Autotaxin Reveals Substrate-specific Catalytic Pathways and a Mechanism for Lysophosphatidic Acid Distribution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Lauren P.; Cao, Wenxiang; Chang, William C.; Albright, Ronald A.; Braddock, Demetrios T.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2011-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), initiating signaling cascades leading to cancer metastasis, wound healing, and angiogenesis. Knowledge of the pathway and kinetics of LPA synthesis by ATX is critical for developing quantitative physiological models of LPA signaling. We measured the individual rate constants and pathway of the LPA synthase cycle of ATX using the fluorescent lipid substrates FS-3 and 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl))-LPC. FS-3 binds rapidly (k1 ≥500 μm−1 s−1) and is hydrolyzed slowly (k2 = 0.024 s−1). Release of the first hydrolysis product is random and rapid (≥1 s−1), whereas release of the second is slow and rate-limiting (0.005–0.007 s−1). Substrate binding and hydrolysis are slow and rate-limiting with LPC. Product release is sequential with choline preceding LPA. The catalytic pathway and kinetics depend strongly on the substrate, suggesting that ATX kinetics could vary for the various in vivo substrates. Slow catalysis with LPC reveals the potential for LPA signaling to spread to cells distal to the site of LPC substrate binding by ATX. An ATX mutant in which catalytic threonine at position 210 is replaced with alanine binds substrate weakly, favoring a role for Thr-210 in binding as well as catalysis. FTY720P, the bioactive form of a drug currently used to treat multiple sclerosis, inhibits ATX in an uncompetitive manner and slows the hydrolysis reaction, suggesting that ATX inhibition plays a significant role in lymphocyte immobilization in FTY720P-based therapeutics. PMID:21719699

  19. Adaptation to fluctuating temperatures in an RNA virus is driven by the most stringent selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Arribas

    Full Text Available The frequency of change in the selective pressures is one of the main factors driving evolution. It is generally accepted that constant environments select specialist organisms whereas changing environments favour generalists. The particular outcome achieved in either case also depends on the relative strength of the selective pressures and on the fitness costs of mutations across environments. RNA viruses are characterized by their high genetic diversity, which provides fast adaptation to environmental changes and helps them evade most antiviral treatments. Therefore, the study of the adaptive possibilities of RNA viruses is highly relevant for both basic and applied research. In this study we have evolved an RNA virus, the bacteriophage Qβ, under three different temperatures that either were kept constant or alternated periodically. The populations obtained were analyzed at the phenotypic and the genotypic level to characterize the evolutionary process followed by the virus in each case and the amount of convergent genetic changes attained. Finally, we also investigated the influence of the pre-existent genetic diversity on adaptation to high temperature. The main conclusions that arise from our results are: i under periodically changing temperature conditions, evolution of bacteriophage Qβ is driven by the most stringent selective pressure, ii there is a high degree of evolutionary convergence between replicated populations and also among populations evolved at different temperatures, iii there are mutations specific of a particular condition, and iv adaptation to high temperatures in populations differing in their pre-existent genetic diversity takes place through the selection of a common set of mutations.

  20. Characterization of a novel nitrilase, BGC4, from Paraburkholderia graminis showing wide-spectrum substrate specificity, a potential versatile biocatalyst for the degradation of nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haiyang; Chen, Lifeng; Sun, Huihui; Wang, Hualei; Liu, Qinghai; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the biodegradation of nitriles via the nitrilase-mediated pathway. A novel nitrilase, BGC4, was identified from proteobacteria Paraburkholderia graminis CD41M and its potential for use in biodegradation of toxic nitriles in industrial effluents was studied. BGC4 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the recombinant protein was purified and its enzymatic properties analysed. Maximum activity of BGC4 nitrilase was at 30 °C and pH 7.6. BGC4 has a broad substrate activity towards aliphatic, heterocyclic, and aromatic nitriles, as well as arylacetonitriles. Iminodiacetonitrile, an aliphatic nitrile, was the optimal substrate but comparable activities were also observed with phenylacetonitrile and indole-3-acetonitrile. BGC4-expressing cells degraded industrial nitriles, such as acrylonitrile, adiponitrile, benzonitrile, mandelonitrile, and 3-cyanopyridine, showing good tolerance and conversion rates. BGC4 nitrilase has wide-spectrum substrate specificity and is suitable for efficient biodegradation of toxic nitriles.

  1. Vertical phase separation in spin-coated films of a low bandgap polyfluorene/PCBM blend-Effects of specific substrate interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerstroem, Cecilia M.; Nilsson, Svante; Bernasik, Andrzej; Budkowski, Andrzej; Andersson, Mats; Magnusson, Kjell O.; Moons, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    We report on the effect of the substrate on the vertical phase separation in spin-coated thin films of poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-5,5-4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2', 1',3'-benzothiadiazole] (APFO-3) blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Compositional depth profiles of the films are measured by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). We found that changing the substrate from silicon to gold affects the composition profile near the substrate interface. This is caused by a specific interaction between the polymer (APFO-3) and the gold surface, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The composition profile in the area away from the substrate interface, as well as the enrichment of the free surface with APFO-3, remain however unaffected by the choice of substrate. The vertical composition was also analysed for APFO-3:PCBM films spin-coated on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated with a thin layer of (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)

  2. The stringent response regulates adaptation to darkness in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Rachel D; Higgins, Sean A; Flamholz, Avi; Nichols, Robert J; Savage, David F

    2016-08-16

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus relies upon photosynthesis to drive metabolism and growth. During darkness, Synechococcus stops growing, derives energy from its glycogen stores, and greatly decreases rates of macromolecular synthesis via unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that the stringent response, a stress response pathway whose genes are conserved across bacteria and plant plastids, contributes to this dark adaptation. Levels of the stringent response alarmone guanosine 3'-diphosphate 5'-diphosphate (ppGpp) rise after a shift from light to dark, indicating that darkness triggers the same response in cyanobacteria as starvation in heterotrophic bacteria. High levels of ppGpp are sufficient to stop growth and dramatically alter many aspects of cellular physiology, including levels of photosynthetic pigments and polyphosphate, DNA content, and the rate of translation. Cells unable to synthesize ppGpp display pronounced growth defects after exposure to darkness. The stringent response regulates expression of a number of genes in Synechococcus, including ribosomal hibernation promoting factor (hpf), which causes ribosomes to dimerize in the dark and may contribute to decreased translation. Although the metabolism of Synechococcus differentiates it from other model bacterial systems, the logic of the stringent response remains remarkably conserved, while at the same time having adapted to the unique stresses of the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  3. Structural characterization of the stringent response related exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase protein family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Laurberg, Martin; Liljas, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Exopolyphosphatase/guanosine pentaphosphate phosphohydrolase (PPX/GPPA) enzymes play central roles in the bacterial stringent response induced by starvation. The high-resolution crystal structure of the putative Aquifex aeolicus PPX/GPPA phosphatase from the actin-like ATPase domain superfamily h...

  4. Initial-rate kinetics of human NMN-adenylyltransferases: substrate and metal ion specificity, inhibition by products and multisubstrate analogues, and isozyme contributions to NAD+ biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorci, Leonardo; Cimadamore, Flavio; Scotti, Stefania; Petrelli, Riccardo; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio

    2007-04-24

    Initial-rate and product inhibition studies revealed distinctive ordered ternary complex kinetic mechanisms, substrate specificities, and metal ion preferences for the three isozymes of human nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl-transferase (NMNAT, EC 2.7.7.1). ATP binds before NMN with nuclear isozyme NMNAT1 and Golgi apparatus NMNAT2, but the opposite order is observed with the mitochondrial isozyme NMNAT3. Only the latter utilizes ITP efficiently in place of ATP, and while NMNH conversion to NADH by NMNAT1 and NMNAT3 occurs at similar rates, conversion by NMNAT2 is much slower. These isozymes can also be discriminated by their action on tiazofurin monophosphate (TrMP), a metabolite of the antineoplastic prodrug tiazofurin. Our finding that TrMP is only a substrate with NMNAT1 and NMNAT3 reveals for the first time an organelle selectivity in the metabolism of this important drug. In search of additional ways to discriminate these isozymes, we synthesized and tested the P1-(nicotinamide/nicotinate-riboside-5')-Pn-(adenosine-5') dinucleotides Np3AD, Np4AD, and Nap4AD. In addition to being highly effective inhibitors, these multisubstrate geometric inhibitors gave inhibition patterns that are consistent with the aforementioned isozyme differences in substrate binding order. Distinctive differences in their substrate specificity and metal ion selectivity also permitted us to quantify individual isozyme contributions to NAD+ formation in human cell extracts.

  5. Discovery and characterization of a highly efficient enantioselective mandelonitrile hydrolase from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 by phylogeny-based enzymatic substrate specificity prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A nitrilase-mediated pathway has significant advantages in the production of optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid. However, unwanted byproduct, low enantioselectivity, and specific activity reduce its value in practical applications. An ideal nitrilase that can efficiently hydrolyze mandelonitrile to optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid without the unwanted byproduct is needed. Results A novel nitrilase (BCJ2315) was discovered from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 through phylogeny-based enzymatic substrate specificity prediction (PESSP). This nitrilase is a mandelonitrile hydrolase that could efficiently hydrolyze mandelonitrile to (R)-(−)-mandelic acid, with a high enantiomeric excess of 98.4%. No byproduct was observed in this hydrolysis process. BCJ2315 showed the highest identity of 71% compared with other nitrilases in the amino acid sequence. BCJ2315 possessed the highest activity toward mandelonitrile and took mandelonitrile as the optimal substrate based on the analysis of substrate specificity. The kinetic parameters Vmax, Km, Kcat, and Kcat/Km toward mandelonitrile were 45.4 μmol/min/mg, 0.14 mM, 15.4 s-1, and 1.1×105 M-1s-1, respectively. The recombinant Escherichia coli M15/BCJ2315 had a strong substrate tolerance and could completely hydrolyze mandelonitrile (100 mM) with fewer amounts of wet cells (10 mg/ml) within 1 h. Conclusions PESSP is an efficient method for discovering an ideal mandelonitrile hydrolase. BCJ2315 has high affinity and catalytic efficiency toward mandelonitrile. This nitrilase has great advantages in the production of optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid because of its high activity and enantioselectivity, strong substrate tolerance, and having no unwanted byproduct. Thus, BCJ2315 has great potential in the practical production of optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid in the industry. PMID:23414071

  6. Structural basis for substrate specificity in phosphate binding (beta/alpha)8-barrels: D-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kui K; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2008-09-09

    Enzymes that share the (beta/alpha) 8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal (beta/alpha) 2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth beta-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, DeltaT196, DeltaS197 and DeltaG198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in k cat/ K m are dominated by changes in k cat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE

  7. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (β/α)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kui K.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the (β/α)8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal (β/α)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates D-ribulose 5-phosphate and D-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493–2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of D-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates D-allulose 6-phosphate and D-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for D-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other’s substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with D-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with D-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth β-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ΔT196, ΔS197 and ΔG198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that D-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the phosphate group

  8. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal ({beta}/a)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth {beta}-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ?T196, ?S197 and ?G198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the

  9. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ (UCR)

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  10. Substrate specificity of flavin-dependent vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum.Evidence for the production of 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols from 4-allylphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Veeger, Cees; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1995-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum was investigated. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase catalyzes besides the oxidation of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohols, the oxidative deamination of 4-hydroxybenzylamines and the oxidative demethylation of 4-(methoxymethyl)phenols. During the conversion of vanillylamine to vanillin, a transient intermediate, most probably vanillylimine, is observed. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase weakly interacts with 4-hydroxyph...

  11. The v-Src and c-Src tyrosine kinases immunoprecipitated from Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells display different peptide substrate specificities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtěchová, Martina; Tuháčková, Zdena; Hlaváček, Jan; Velek, Jiří; Sovová, Vlasta

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 421, č. 2 (2004), s. 277-282 ISSN 0003-9861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA301/00/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905; CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : Src kinase, in vitro phosphorylation, peptide substrate specificity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.657, year: 2004

  12. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2'-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation

  13. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Mironov, A. S. [State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Betzel, C. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2′-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation.

  14. Differences in substrate specificity of C(5)-substituted or C(5)-unsubstituted pyrimidine nucleotides by DNA polymerases from thermophilic bacteria, archaea, and phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Junichi; Kuwahara, Msayasu; Kitagata, Rina; Tamura, Takehiro; Matsui, Ikuo

    2007-09-01

    The pyrimidine bases of RNA are uracil (U) and cytosine (C), while thymine (T) and C are used for DNA. The C(5) position of C and U is unsubstituted, whereas the C(5) of T is substituted with a Me group. Miller et al. hypothesized that various C(5)-substituted uracil derivatives were formed during chemical evolution, and that C(5)-substituted U derivatives may have played important roles in the transition from an 'RNA world' to a 'DNA-RNA-protein world'. Hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea are considered to be primitive organisms that are evolutionarily close to the universal ancestor of all life on earth. Thus, we examined the substrate specificity of several C(5)-substituted or C(5)-unsubstituted dUTP and dCTP analogs for several DNA polymerases from hyperthermophilic bacteria, hyperthermophilic archaea, and viruses during PCR or primer extension reaction. The substrate specificity of the C(5)-substituted or C(5)-unsubstituted pyrimidine nucleotides varied greatly depending on the type of DNA polymerase. The significance of this difference in substrate specificity in terms of the origin and evolution of the DNA replication system is discussed briefly.

  15. Crystal structure and identification of a key amino acid for glucose tolerance, substrate specificity, and transglycosylation activity of metagenomic β-glucosidase Td2F2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Jo, Toshinori; Uchiyama, Taku; Manninen, Jenny A; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Fushinobu, Shinya; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-06-01

    β-Glucosidase Td2F2 isolated from a compost metagenome has high glucose tolerance and transglycosylation activity. In this study, we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of Td2F2. It has a unique structure at the -1 subsite that is important for substrate specificity but not for glucose tolerance. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of glucose tolerance, we isolated a glucose-sensitive Td2F2 mutant using random mutagenesis. In this mutant, Asn223 residue located between subsites +1 and +2 was mutated. The Asn223 mutation resulted in reduced glucose tolerance and transglycosylation activity, and drastically changed substrate specificity. These results indicate that the structure between subsites +1 and +2 is critical for the glucose tolerance and substrate specificity of Td2F2. Our findings shed light on the glucose tolerance and transglycosylation activity mechanisms of glycoside hydrolase family 1 β-glucosidases. The atomic coordinates and structure factors (codes 3WH5, 3WH6, 3WH8, 3WH7, 5AYB, and 5AYI) have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (http://wwpdb.org/). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Insights into the substrate specificity of plant peptide deformylase, an essential enzyme with potential for the development of novel biotechnology applications in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Lynnette M A; Schmidt, Jack J; Cai, Yiying; Barnes, Jonathan C; Hanger, Katherine M; Nayak, Nihar R; Williams, Mark A; Grossman, Robert B; Houtz, Robert L; Rodgers, David W

    2008-08-01

    The crystal structure of AtPDF1B [Arabidopsis thaliana PDF (peptide deformylase) 1B; EC 3.5.1.88], a plant specific deformylase, has been determined at a resolution of 2.4 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The overall fold of AtPDF1B is similar to other peptide deformylases that have been reported. Evidence from the crystal structure and gel filtration chromatography indicates that AtPDF1B exists as a symmetric dimer. PDF1B is essential in plants and has a preferred substrate specificity towards the PS II (photosystem II) D1 polypeptide. Comparative analysis of AtPDF1B, AtPDF1A, and the type 1B deformylase from Escherichia coli, identifies a number of differences in substrate binding subsites that might account for variations in sequence preference. A model of the N-terminal five amino acids from the D1 polypeptide bound in the active site of AtPDF1B suggests an influence of Tyr(178) as a structural determinant for polypeptide substrate specificity through hydrogen bonding with Thr(2) in the D1 sequence. Kinetic analyses using a polypeptide mimic of the D1 N-terminus was performed on AtPDF1B mutated at Tyr(178) to alanine, phenylalanine or arginine (equivalent residue in AtPDF1A). The results suggest that, whereas Tyr(178) can influence catalytic activity, other residues contribute to the overall preference for the D1 polypeptide.

  17. Crystal Structure of the LasA Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of M23 Metallopeptidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James; Murphy, Loretta M.; Conners, Rebecca; Sessions, Richard B.; Gamblin, Steven J. (Wales); (Bristol Med Sci); (NIMR)

    2010-09-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunist Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections in immunocompromized individuals and is a leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. A number of secreted virulence factors, including various proteolytic enzymes, contribute to the establishment and maintenance of Pseudomonas infection. One such is LasA, an M23 metallopeptidase related to autolytic glycylglycine endopeptidases such as Staphylococcus aureus lysostaphin and LytM, and to DD-endopeptidases involved in entry of bacteriophage to host bacteria. LasA is implicated in a range of processes related to Pseudomonas virulence, including stimulating ectodomain shedding of the cell surface heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-1 and elastin degradation in connective tissue. Here we present crystal structures of active LasA as a complex with tartrate and in the uncomplexed form. While the overall fold resembles that of the other M23 family members, the LasA active site is less constricted and utilizes a different set of metal ligands. The active site of uncomplexed LasA contains a five-coordinate zinc ion with trigonal bipyramidal geometry and two metal-bound water molecules. Using these structures as a starting point, we propose a model for substrate binding by LasA that explains its activity against a wider range of substrates than those used by related lytic enzymes, and offer a catalytic mechanism for M23 metallopeptidases consistent with available structural and mutagenesis data. Our results highlight how LasA is a structurally distinct member of this endopeptidase family, consistent with its activity against a wider range of substrates and with its multiple roles in Pseudomonas virulence.

  18. Substrate and Inhibitor-Specific Conformational Changes in the Human Serotonin Transporter Revealed by Voltage-Clamp Fluorometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderhielm, Pella C; Andersen, Jacob; Munro, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    of TM6, Ala419 in the interface between TM8 and extracellular loop (EL) 4, and Leu481 in EL5. The reporter positions were used for time-resolved measurement of conformational changes during 5-HT transport and binding of cocaine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and escitalopram....... At all reporter positions, fluorescence changes observed upon substrate application were distinctly different from those observed upon inhibitor application, with respect to relative amplitude or direction. Furthermore, escitalopram, fluoxetine, and cocaine induced a very similar pattern of fluorescent...

  19. Structure and specificity of a new class of Ca2+-independent housekeeping sortase fromStreptomyces avermitilisprovide insights into its non-canonical substrate preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sreetama; Pawale, Vijaykumar S; Dadireddy, Venkatareddy; Singh, Avinash Kumar; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Roy, Rajendra P

    2017-04-28

    Surface proteins in Gram-positive bacteria are incorporated into the cell wall through a peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by transpeptidase sortase. Six main classes (A-F) of sortase have been identified of which class A sortase is meant for housekeeping functions. The prototypic housekeeping sortase A (SaSrtA) from Staphylococcus aureus cleaves LP X TG-containing proteins at the scissile T-G peptide bond and ligates protein-LP X T to the terminal Gly residue of the nascent cross-bridge of peptidoglycan lipid II precursor. Sortase-mediated ligation ("sortagging") of LP X TG-containing substrates and Gly-terminated nucleophiles occurs in vitro as well as in cellulo in the presence of Ca 2+ and has been applied extensively for protein conjugations. Although the majority of applications emanate from SaSrtA, low catalytic efficiency, LP X TG specificity restriction, and Ca 2+ requirement (particularly for in cellulo applications) remain a drawback. Given that Gram-positive bacteria genomes encode a variety of sortases, natural sortase mining can be a viable complementary approach akin to engineering of wild-type SaSrtA. Here, we describe the structure and specificity of a new class E sortase (SavSrtE) annotated to perform housekeeping roles in Streptomyces avermitilis Biochemical experiments define the attributes of an optimum peptide substrate, demonstrate Ca 2+ -independent activity, and provide insights about contrasting functional characteristics of SavSrtE and SaSrtA. Crystal structure, substrate docking, and mutagenesis experiments have identified a critical residue that dictates the preference for a non-canonical LA X TG recognition motif over LP X TG. These results have implications for rational tailoring of substrate tolerance in sortases. Besides, Ca 2+ -independent orthogonal specificity of SavSrtE is likely to expand the sortagging toolkit. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to define the specific interactions of the phospholipase A2 superfamily with lipid substrates, inhibitors, and membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Burke, John E; Dennis, Edward A

    2013-01-18

    The phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) superfamily consists of 16 groups and many subgroups and constitutes a diverse set of enzymes that have a common catalytic activity due to convergent evolution. However, different PLA(2) types have unique three-dimensional structures and catalytic residues as well as specific tissue localization and distinct biological functions. Understanding how the different PLA(2) enzymes associate with phospholipid membranes, specific phospholipid substrate molecules, and inhibitors on a molecular basis has advanced in recent years due to the introduction of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Its theory, practical considerations, and application to understanding PLA(2)/membrane interactions are addressed.

  1. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Define the Specific Interactions of the Phospholipase A2 Superfamily with Lipid Substrates, Inhibitors, and Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Burke, John E.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily consists of 16 groups and many subgroups and constitutes a diverse set of enzymes that have a common catalytic activity due to convergent evolution. However, different PLA2 types have unique three-dimensional structures and catalytic residues as well as specific tissue localization and distinct biological functions. Understanding how the different PLA2 enzymes associate with phospholipid membranes, specific phospholipid substrate molecules, and inhibitors on a molecular basis has advanced in recent years due to the introduction of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Its theory, practical considerations, and application to understanding PLA2/membrane interactions are addressed. PMID:23209293

  2. Stringently Defined Otitis Prone Children Demonstrate Deficient Naturally Induced Mucosal Antibody Response to Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat is a prominent mucosal pathogen causing acute otitis media (AOM. We studied Mcat nasopharyngeal (NP colonization, AOM frequency and mucosal antibody responses to four vaccine candidate Mcat proteins: outer membrane protein (OMP CD, oligopeptide permease (Opp A, hemagglutinin (Hag, and Pilin A clade 2 (PilA2 from stringently defined otitis prone (sOP children, who experience the greatest burden of disease, compared to non-otitis prone (NOP children. sOP children had higher NP colonization of Mcat (30 vs. 22%, P = 0.0003 and Mcat-caused AOM rates (49 vs. 24%, P < 0.0001 than NOP children. Natural acquisition of mucosal antibodies to Mcat proteins OMP CD (IgG, P < 0.0001, OppA (IgG, P = 0.018, Hag (IgG and IgA, both P < 0.0001, and PilA2 (IgA, P < 0.0001 was lower in sOP than NOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to Hag (P = 0.039 and PilA2 (P = 0.0076, and IgA to OMP CD (P = 0.010, OppA (P = 0.030, and PilA2 (P = 0.043 were associated with lower carriage of Mcat in NOP but not sOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to OMP CD (P = 0.0070 and Hag (P = 0.0003, and IgA to Hag (P = 0.0067 at asymptomatic colonization than those at onset of AOM were associated with significantly lower rate of Mcat NP colonization progressing to AOM in NOP compared to sOP children (3 vs. 26%, P < 0.0001. In conclusion, sOP children had a diminished mucosal antibody response to Mcat proteins, which was associated with higher frequencies of asymptomatic NP colonization and NP colonization progressing to Mcat-caused AOM. Enhancing Mcat antigen-specific mucosal immune responses to levels higher than achieved by natural exposure will be necessary to prevent AOM in sOP children.

  3. The zinc form of carnosine dipeptidase 2 (CN2) has dipeptidase activity but its substrate specificity is different from that of the manganese form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Nobuaki; Takao, Toshifumi

    2017-12-16

    Carnosine dipeptidase II (CN2), a metallopeptidase present in the cytosol of various vertebrate tissues, catalyzes the hydrolysis of carnosine and several other dipeptides in the presence of Mn 2+ . Although the metal-binding center of mouse CN2 is also able to associate with Zn 2+ in vitro, it was not known whether the zinc form of CN2 has any enzymatic activity. In the present study, we show that Zn 2+ has a higher affinity for binding to CN2 than Mn 2+ , as evidenced by native mass spectrometry. The issue of whether the zinc form of CN2 has enzymatic activity was also examined using various dipeptides as substrates. The findings indicate that the zinc form of CN2 catalyzes the hydrolysis of several different dipeptides including Leu-His, Met-His and Ala-His at a reaction rate comparable to that for its manganese form. On the other hand, the zinc form of CN2 did not catalyze the hydrolysis of carnosine and several other dipeptides that are hydrolyzed by the manganese form of CN2. Substrate specificity was also examined in HEK293T cells expressing CN2, and the findings indicate that Leu-His, Met-His, but not carnosine, were hydrolyzed in the cell culture. These results suggest that the zinc form of CN2 is an active enzyme, but with a different substrate specificity from that of the manganese form. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure of a bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 63 enzyme in complex with its glycosynthase product, and insights into the substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Ichikawa, Megumi; Yokoi, Gaku; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Mori, Haruhide; Kitano, Yoshikazu; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Proteins belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 63 (GH63) are found in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Although the eukaryotic GH63 proteins have been identified as processing α-glucosidase I, the substrate specificities of the bacterial and archaeal GH63 proteins are not clear. Here, we converted a bacterial GH63 enzyme, Escherichia coli YgjK, to a glycosynthase to probe its substrate specificity. Two mutants of YgjK (E727A and D324N) were constructed, and both mutants showed glycosynthase activity. The reactions of E727A with β-D-glucosyl fluoride and monosaccharides showed that the largest amount of glycosynthase product accumulated when galactose was employed as an acceptor molecule. The crystal structure of E727A complexed with the reaction product indicated that the disaccharide bound at the active site was 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-galactopyranose (Glc12Gal). A comparison of the structures of E727A-Glc12Gal and D324N-melibiose showed that there were two main types of conformation: the open and closed forms. The structure of YgjK adopted the closed form when subsite -1 was occupied by glucose. These results suggest that sugars containing the Glc12Gal structure are the most likely candidates for natural substrates of YgjK. © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Investigation of specificity determinants in bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase reveals queuine, the substrate of its eucaryotic counterpart, as inhibitor.

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    Inna Biela

    Full Text Available Bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (Tgt catalyses the exchange of the genetically encoded guanine at the wobble position of tRNAs(His,Tyr,Asp,Asn by the premodified base preQ1, which is further converted to queuine at the tRNA level. As eucaryotes are not able to synthesise queuine de novo but acquire it through their diet, eucaryotic Tgt directly inserts the hypermodified base into the wobble position of the tRNAs mentioned above. Bacterial Tgt is required for the efficient pathogenicity of Shigella sp, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery and, hence, it constitutes a putative target for the rational design of anti-Shigellosis compounds. Since mammalian Tgt is known to be indirectly essential to the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine, it is necessary to create substances which only inhibit bacterial but not eucaryotic Tgt. Therefore, it seems of utmost importance to study selectivity-determining features within both types of proteins. Homology models of Caenorhabditis elegans Tgt and human Tgt suggest that the replacement of Cys158 and Val233 in bacterial Tgt (Zymomonas mobilis Tgt numbering by valine and accordingly glycine in eucaryotic Tgt largely accounts for the different substrate specificities. In the present study we have created mutated variants of Z. mobilis Tgt in order to investigate the impact of a Cys158Val and a Val233Gly exchange on catalytic activity and substrate specificity. Using enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography, we gained evidence that the Cys158Val mutation reduces the affinity to preQ1 while leaving the affinity to guanine unaffected. The Val233Gly exchange leads to an enlarged substrate binding pocket, that is necessary to accommodate queuine in a conformation compatible with the intermediately covalently bound tRNA molecule. Contrary to our expectations, we found that a priori queuine is recognised by the binding pocket of bacterial Tgt without, however, being used as a substrate.

  6. Divergence of substrate specificity and function in the Escherichia coli hotdog-fold thioesterase paralogs YdiI and YbdB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, John A; Chen, Danqi; Allen, Karen N; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2014-07-29

    The work described in this paper, and its companion paper (Wu, R., Latham, J. A., Chen, D., Farelli, J., Zhao, H., Matthews, K. Allen, K. N., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2014) Structure and Catalysis in the Escherichia coli Hotdog-fold Thioesterase Paralogs YdiI and YbdB. Biochemistry, DOI: 10.1021/bi500334v), focuses on the evolution of a pair of paralogous hotdog-fold superfamily thioesterases of E. coli, YbdB and YdiI, which share a high level of sequence identity but perform different biological functions (viz., proofreader of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-holoEntB in the enterobactin biosynthetic pathway and catalyst of the 1,4-dihydoxynapthoyl-CoA hydrolysis step in the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway, respectively). In vitro substrate activity screening of a library of thioester metabolites showed that YbdB displays high activity with benzoyl-holoEntB and benzoyl-CoA substrates, marginal activity with acyl-CoA thioesters, and no activity with 1,4-dihydoxynapthoyl-CoA. YdiI, on the other hand, showed a high level of activity with its physiological substrate, significant activity toward a wide range of acyl-CoA thioesters, and minimal activity toward benzoyl-holoEntB. These results were interpreted as evidence for substrate promiscuity that facilitates YbdB and YdiI evolvability, and divergence in substrate preference, which correlates with their assumed biological function. YdiI support of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway was confirmed by demonstrating reduced anaerobic growth of the E. coli ydiI-knockout mutant (vs wild-type E. coli) on glucose in the presence of the electron acceptor fumarate. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that a small biological range exists for YbdB orthologs (i.e., limited to Enterobacteriales) relative to that of YdiI orthologs. The divergence in YbdB and YdiI substrate specificity detailed in this paper set the stage for their structural analyses reported in the companion paper.

  7. The intrinsically disordered tails of PTEN and PTEN-L have distinct roles in regulating substrate specificity and membrane activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Glenn R.; Perisic, Olga; Burke, John E.; Williams, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid and protein phosphatase, and both activities are necessary for its role as a tumour suppressor. PTEN activity is controlled by phosphorylation of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal tail. A recently discovered variant of PTEN, PTEN-long (PTEN-L), has a 173-residue N-terminal extension that causes PTEN-L to exhibit unique behaviour, such as movement from one cell to another. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX–MS) and biophysical assays, we show that both the N-terminal extension of PTEN-L and C-terminal tail of PTEN affect the phosphatase activity using unique mechanisms. Phosphorylation of six residues in the C-terminal tail of PTEN results in auto-inhibitory interactions with the phosphatase and C2 domains, effectively blocking both the active site and the membrane-binding interface of PTEN. Partially dephosphorylating PTEN on pThr366/pSer370 results in sufficient exposure of the active site to allow a selective activation for soluble substrates. Using HDX–MS, we identified a membrane-binding element in the N-terminal extension of PTEN-L, termed the membrane-binding helix (MBH). The MBH radically alters the membrane binding mechanism of PTEN-L compared with PTEN, switching PTEN-L to a ‘scooting’ mode of catalysis from the ‘hopping’ mode that is characteristic of PTEN. PMID:26527737

  8. Substrate specificity of flavin-dependent vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum. Evidence for the production of 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols from 4-allylphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraaije, M W; Veeger, C; van Berkel, W J

    1995-11-15

    The substrate specificity of the flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum was investigated. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase catalyzes besides the oxidation of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohols, the oxidative deamination of 4-hydroxybenzylamines and the oxidative demethylation of 4-(methoxymethyl)phenols. During the conversion of vanillylamine to vanillin, a transient intermediate, most probably vanillylimine, is observed. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase weakly interacts with 4-hydroxyphenylglycols and a series of catecholamines. These compounds are converted to the corresponding ketones. Both enantiomers of (nor)epinephrine are substrates for vanillyl-alcohol oxidase, but the R isomer is preferred. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase is most active with chavicol and eugenol. These 4-allylphenols are converted to coumaryl alcohol and coniferyl alcohol, respectively. Isotopic labeling experiments show that the oxygen atom inserted at the C gamma atom of the side chain is derived from water. The 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol products and the substrate analog isoeugenol are competitive inhibitors of vanillyl alcohol oxidation. The binding of isoeugenol to the oxidized enzyme perturbs the optical spectrum of protein-bound FAD. pH-dependent binding studies suggest that vanillyl-alcohol oxidase preferentially binds the phenolate form of isoeugenol (pKa < 6, 25 degrees C). From this and the high pH optimum for turnover, a hydride transfer mechanism involving a p-quinone methide intermediate is proposed for the vanillyl-alcohol-oxidase-catalyzed conversion of 4-allylphenols.

  9. Structure and specificity of the bacterial cysteine methyltransferase effector NleE suggests a novel substrate in human DNA repair pathway.

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    Qing Yao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC and related enterobacteria rely on a type III secretion system (T3SS effector NleE to block host NF-κB signaling. NleE is a first in class, novel S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM-dependent methyltransferase that methylates a zinc-coordinating cysteine in the Npl4-like Zinc Finger (NZF domains in TAB2/3 adaptors in the NF-κB pathway, but its mechanism of action and other human substrates are unknown. Here we solve crystal structure of NleE-SAM complex, which reveals a methyltransferase fold different from those of known ones. The SAM, cradled snugly at the bottom of a deep and narrow cavity, adopts a unique conformation ready for nucleophilic attack by the methyl acceptor. The substrate NZF domain can be well docked into the cavity, and molecular dynamic simulation indicates that Cys673 in TAB2-NZF is spatially and energetically favorable for attacking the SAM. We further identify a new NleE substrate, ZRANB3, that functions in PCNA binding and remodeling of stalled replication forks at the DNA damage sites. Specific inactivation of the NZF domain in ZRANB3 by NleE offers a unique opportunity to suggest that ZRANB3-NZF domain functions in DNA repair processes other than ZRANB3 recruitment to DNA damage sites. Our analyses suggest a novel and unexpected link between EPEC infection, virulence proteins and genome integrity.

  10. α--AMYLASES OF Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae AND Bacillus subtilis: THE SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY AND RESISTANCE TO A NUMBER OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES

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    K. V. Avdiyuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae 80428 and Bacillus subtilis 147 α-amylases to split different carbohydrate-containing substrates, such as maltose, sucrose, trehalose, dextrin, α- and β-cyclodextrin, amylose, amylopectin, glycogen, pullulan, soluble starch, insoluble starch, corn starch, wheat starch, dextran 500 has been studied. It was shown that investigated enzymes differ by substrate specificity. α-Amylase of A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 rapidly hydrolysed soluble potato and wheat starch, while the α-amylase of B. subtilis 147 — only wheat starch. Both enzymes don’t cleave maltose, α-cyclodextrin and dextran 500. A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 α-amylase display very small ability to hydrolyze pullulan, while α-amylase of B. subtilis 147 it does not act in general. The lowest values of Michaelis constant for both enzymes at splitting of glycogen have been obtained, indicating that enzymes have the greatest affinity to this substrate. The studies of influence of chemically active substances on activity of A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 and B. subtilis 147 ?-amylases show there are resistant to urea, deoxycholic acid, Tween-80, Triton X-100 and hydrogen peroxide. It’s indicate the enzymes tested may be competitive in compare with earlier described in literature enzymes. The obtained results give a possibility to propose in future usage these enzymes in different fields of industry, foremost in detergent industry.

  11. Proton transfer in methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase from Propionibacterium shermanii. Studies with specifically tritiated (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadlay, P F; Fuller, J Q

    1983-01-01

    (2R)-Methyl[2-3H]malonyl-CoA was used as the substrate for methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase from Propionibacterium shermanii, under conditions where the (2S)-methylmalonyl-CoA product was removed enzymically as fast as it was formed, and the fate of the label was monitored at different extents of reaction. Very little, if any, tritium is found attached to the C-2 position in the (2S)-epimer product (isolated as propionyl-CoA). Evidently, the hydrogen atom of the new C-H bond in the product is essentially solvent-derived. The rate of tritium release into the solvent is lower than the rate of product formation, and shows a primary kinetic tritium-isotope effect on kcat./Km of 2.3 +/- 0.1. The specific radioactivity of the remaining substrate rises slowly during the epimerase-catalysed reaction, and this provides an independent estimate of the primary kinetic tritium-isotope effect on kcat./Km of 1.6 +/- 0.5. These results, taken together, indicate that the mechanistic pathway of the epimerase-catalysed reaction resembles that established for proline racemase [Cardinale & Abeles, (1968) Biochemistry 7, 3970-3978], in which two enzyme bases are involved in catalysis. One base removes the proton from the substrate, the second provides the new proton, and there is no fast isotopic exchange between enzyme-bound intermediates and solvent protons. PMID:6311169

  12. Specific fluorogenic substrates for neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase, EC 3.4.24.11 which are highly resistant to serine- and metalloproteases

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    M.A.S. Medeiros

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Two intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic peptides containing o-aminobenzoyl (Abz and ethylenediamine 2,4-dinitrophenyl (EDDnp groups at amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues, Abz-DArg-Arg-Leu-EDDnp (Abz-DRRL-EDDnp and Abz-DArg-Arg-Phe-EDDnp (Abz-DRRF-EDDnp, were selectively hydrolyzed by neutral endopeptidase (NEP, enkephalinase, neprilysin, EC 3.4.24.11 at the Arg-Leu and Arg-Phe bonds, respectively. The kinetic parameters for the NEP-catalyzed hydrolysis of Abz-DRRL-EDDnp and Abz-DRRF-EDDnp were Km = 2.8 µM, kcat = 5.3 min-1, kcat/Km = 2 min-1 µM-1 and Km = 5.0 µM, kcat = 7.0 min-1, kcat/Km = 1.4 min-1 µM-1, respectively. The high specificity of these substrates was demonstrated by their resistance to hydrolysis by metalloproteases [thermolysin (EC 3.4.24.2, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.24.15], serineproteases [trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4, a-chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1] and proteases present in tissue homogenates from kidney, lung, brain and testis. The blocked amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acids protected these substrates against the action of aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and ACE. Furthermore, DR amino acids ensured total protection of Abz-DRRL-EDDnp and Abz-DRRF-EDDnp against the action of thermolysin and trypsin. Leu-EDDnp and Phe-EDDnp were resistant to hydrolysis by a-chymotrypsin. The high specifity of these substrates suggests their use for specific NEP assays in crude enzyme preparations

  13. The substrate specificity, enantioselectivity and structure of the (R)-selective amine : pyruvate transaminase from Nectria haematococca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Christopher; Martinez-Torres, Ruben J; Richter, Nina; Isupov, Michail N; Hailes, Helen C; Littlechild, Jennifer A; Ward, John M

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade the use of transaminases for the production of pharmaceutical and fine chemical intermediates has attracted a great deal of attention. Transaminases are versatile biocatalysts for the efficient production of amine intermediates and many have (S)-enantiospecificity. Transaminases with (R)-specificity are needed to expand the applications of these enzymes in biocatalysis. In this work we have identified a fungal putative (R)-specific transaminase from the Eurotiomycetes Nectria haematococca, cloned a synthetic version of this gene, demonstrated (R)-selective deamination of several substrates including (R)-α-methylbenzylamine, as well as production of (R)-amines, and determined its crystal structure. The crystal structures of the holoenzyme and the complex with an inhibitor gabaculine offer the first detailed insight into the structural basis for substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of the industrially important class of (R)-selective amine : pyruvate transaminases. Database The atomic coordinates and structure factors for the Nectria TAm in holoenzyme and gabaculine-bound forms have been deposited in the PDB as entries 4cmd and 4cmf respectively. Structured digital abstract • TAm and TAm bind by x-ray crystallography (View interaction) PMID:24618038

  14. Short-term starvation is a strategy to unravel the cellular capacity of oxidizing specific exogenous/endogenous substrates in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Julianna D; Fernandes-Siqueira, Lorena O; Carvalho, Ana S; Cararo-Lopes, Eduardo; Dias, Matheus H; Ketzer, Luisa A; Galina, Antonio; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2017-08-25

    Mitochondrial oxidation of nutrients is tightly regulated in response to the cellular environment and changes in energy demands. In vitro studies evaluating the mitochondrial capacity of oxidizing different substrates are important for understanding metabolic shifts in physiological adaptations and pathological conditions, but may be influenced by the nutrients present in the culture medium or by the utilization of endogenous stores. One such influence is exemplified by the Crabtree effect (the glucose-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration) as most in vitro experiments are performed in glucose-containing media. Here, using high-resolution respirometry, we evaluated the oxidation of endogenous or exogenous substrates by cell lines harboring different metabolic profiles. We found that a 1-h deprivation of the main energetic nutrients is an appropriate strategy to abolish interference of endogenous or undesirable exogenous substrates with the cellular capacity of oxidizing specific substrates, namely glutamine, pyruvate, glucose, or palmitate, in mitochondria. This approach primed mitochondria to immediately increase their oxygen consumption after the addition of the exogenous nutrients. All starved cells could oxidize exogenous glutamine, whereas the capacity for oxidizing palmitate was limited to human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 cells and to C2C12 mouse myoblasts that differentiated into myotubes. In the presence of exogenous glucose, starvation decreased the Crabtree effect in Huh7 and C2C12 cells and abrogated it in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells. Interestingly, the fact that the Crabtree effect was observed only for mitochondrial basal respiration but not for the maximum respiratory capacity suggests it is not caused by a direct effect on the electron transport system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  16. Human Alpha Galactosidases Transiently Produced in Nicotiana benthamiana Leaves: New Insights in Substrate Specificities with Relevance for Fabry Disease

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    Kassiani Kytidou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-GAL causes Fabry disease (FD, an X-linked storage disease of the glycosphingolipid globtriaosylcerammide (Gb3 in lysosomes of various cells and elevated plasma globotriaosylsphingosine (Lyso-Gb3 toxic for podocytes and nociceptive neurons. Enzyme replacement therapy is used to treat the disease, but clinical efficacy is limited in many male FD patients due to development of neutralizing antibodies (Ab. Therapeutic use of modified lysosomal α-N-acetyl-galactosaminidase (α-NAGAL with increased α-galactosidase activity (α-NAGALEL has therefore been suggested. We transiently produced in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves functional α-GAL, α-NAGAL, and α-NAGALEL enzymes for research purposes. All enzymes could be visualized with activity-based probes covalently binding in their catalytic pocket. Characterization of purified proteins indicated that α-NAGALEL is improved in activity toward artificial 4MU-α-galactopyranoside. Recombinant α-NAGALEL and α-NAGAL are not neutralized by Ab-positive FD serum tested and are more stable in human plasma than α-GAL. Both enzymes hydrolyze the lipid substrates Gb3 and Lyso-Gb3 accumulating in Fabry patients. The addition to FD sera of α-NAGALEL, and to a lesser extent that of α-NAGAL, results in a reduction of the toxic Lyso-Gb3. In conclusion, our study suggests that modified α-NAGALEL might reduce excessive Lyso-Gb3 in FD serum. This neo-enzyme can be produced in Nicotiana benthamiana and might be further developed for the treatment of FD aiming at reduction of circulating Lyso-Gb3.

  17. The Stringent Response Induced by Phosphate Limitation Promotes Purine Salvage in Agrobacterium fabrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapragasam, Smitha; Deochand, Dinesh K; Meariman, Jacob K; Grove, Anne

    2017-10-31

    Agrobacterium fabrum induces tumor growth in susceptible plant species. The upregulation of virulence genes that occurs when the bacterium senses plant-derived compounds is enhanced by acidic pH and limiting inorganic phosphate. Nutrient starvation may also trigger the stringent response, and purine salvage is among the pathways expected to be favored under such conditions. We show here that phosphate limitation induces the stringent response, as evidenced by production of (p)ppGpp, and that the xdhCSML operon encoding the purine salvage enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase is upregulated ∼15-fold. The xdhCSML operon is under control of the TetR family transcription factor XdhR; direct binding of ppGpp to XdhR attenuates DNA binding, and the enhanced xdhCSML expression correlates with increased cellular levels of (p)ppGpp. Xanthine dehydrogenase may also divert purines away from salvage pathways to form urate, the ligand for the transcription factor PecS, which in the plant pathogen Dickeya dadantii is a key regulator of virulence gene expression. However, urate levels remain low under conditions that produce increased levels of xdhCSML expression, and neither acidic pH nor limiting phosphate results in induction of genes under control of PecS. Instead, expression of such genes is induced only by externally supplemented urate. Taken together, our data indicate that purine salvage is favored during the stringent response induced by phosphate starvation, suggesting that control of this pathway may constitute a novel approach to modulating virulence. Because bacterial purine catabolism appears to be unaffected, as evidenced by the absence of urate accumulation, we further propose that the PecS regulon is induced by only host-derived urate.

  18. FS laser processing of bio-polymer thin films for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalova, A., E-mail: a_daskalova@code.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nathala, Chandra S.R. [Institute of General Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/134, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Spectra-Physics Vienna, Fernkorngasse 10, 1100 Wien (Austria); Kavatzikidou, P.; Ranella, A. [Institute for Electronic Structure and Lasers-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Szoszkiewicz, R. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 141 Woloska Str., 02-507 Warsaw, Poland (Poland); Husinsky, W. [Institute of General Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/134, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Fotakis, C. [Institute for Electronic Structure and Lasers-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Systematic research in the field of fs laser interaction with biopolymers for application in tissue engineering. • Utilizing a new biopolymer blend of collagen/elastin material for studying the interaction process in the fs domain. • Obtaining of improved, circularly shaped, interconnected nanopores, with high reproducibility from collagen/elastin layer. • Observation of randomly arranged pattern outside modification zone due to formation of an impact wave over biofilm surface. • NIH/3T3 cell-interface interaction reveal a preferable cell migration on fs laser-modified surface array. - Abstract: The use of ultra-short pulses for nanoengineering of biomaterials opens up possibilities for biological, medical and tissue engineering applications. Structuring the surface of a biomaterial into arrays with micro- and nanoscale features and architectures, defines new roadmaps to innovative engineering of materials. Thin films of novel collagen/elastin composite and gelatin were irradiated by Ti:sapphire fs laser in air at central wavelength 800 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 30 fs. The size and shape as well as morphological forms occurring in the resulted areas of interaction were analyzed as a function of irradiation fluence and number of pulses by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fs interaction regime allows generation of well defined micro porous surface arrays. In this study we examined a novel composite consisting of collagen and elastin in order to create a biodegradable matrix to serve as a biomimetic surface for cell attachment. Confocal microscopy images of modified zones reveal formation of surface fringe patterns with orientation direction alongside the area of interaction. Outside the crater rim a wave-like topography pattern is observed. Structured, on a nanometer scale, surface array is employed for cell-culture experiments for testing cell’s responses to substrate morphology. Mice fibroblasts migration was monitored

  19. Crystal Structure of the Homo sapiens Kynureninase-3-Hydroxyhippuric Acid Inhibitor Complex: Insights into the Molecular Basis Of Kynureninase Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima,Santiago; Kumar,Sunil; Gawandi,Vijay; Momany,Cory; Phillips,Robert S.; (Georgia)

    2009-02-23

    Homo sapiens kynureninase is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of 3-hydroxykynurenine to yield 3-hydroxyanthranilate and L-alanine as part of the tryptophan catabolic pathway leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +}. This pathway results in quinolinate, an excitotoxin that is an NMDA receptor agonist. High levels of quinolinate have been correlated with the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as AIDS-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease. We have synthesized a novel kynureninase inhibitor, 3-hydroxyhippurate, cocrystallized it with human kynureninase, and solved the atomic structure. On the basis of an analysis of the complex, we designed a series of His-102, Ser-332, and Asn-333 mutants. The H102W/N333T and H102W/S332G/N333T mutants showed complete reversal of substrate specificity between 3-hydroxykynurenine and L-kynurenine, thus defining the primary residues contributing to substrate specificity in kynureninases.

  20. Regulation of AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 and Thr308 by endoplasmic reticulum stress modulates substrate specificity in a severity dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wa Yung

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a common factor in the pathophysiology of diverse human diseases that are characterised by contrasting cellular behaviours, from proliferation in cancer to apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders. Coincidently, dysregulation of AKT/PKB activity, which is the central regulator of cell growth, proliferation and survival, is often associated with the same diseases. Here, we demonstrate that ER stress modulates AKT substrate specificity in a severity-dependent manner, as shown by phospho-specific antibodies against known AKT targets. ER stress also reduces both total and phosphorylated AKT in a severity-dependent manner, without affecting activity of the upstream kinase PDK1. Normalisation to total AKT revealed that under ER stress phosphorylation of Thr308 is suppressed while that of Ser473 is increased. ER stress induces GRP78, and siRNA-mediated knock-down of GRP78 enhances phosphorylation at Ser473 by 3.6 fold, but not at Thr308. Substrate specificity is again altered. An in-situ proximity ligation assay revealed a physical interaction between GRP78 and AKT at the plasma membrane of cells following induction of ER stress. Staining was weak in cells with normal nuclear morphology but stronger in those displaying rounded, condensed nuclei. Co-immunoprecipitation of GRP78 and P-AKT(Ser473 confirmed the immuno-complex consists of non-phosphorylated AKT (Ser473 and Thr308. The interaction is likely specific as AKT did not bind to all molecular chaperones, and GRP78 did not bind to p70 S6 kinase. These findings provide one mechanistic explanation for how ER stress contributes to human pathologies demonstrating contrasting cell fates via modulation of AKT signalling.

  1. An eleven amino acid residue deletion expands the substrate specificity of acetyl xylan esterase II (AXE II) from Penicillium purpurogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombres, Marcela; Garate, José A.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Araya-Secchi, Raúl; Norambuena, Patricia; Quiroz, Soledad; Larrondo, Luis; Pérez-Acle, Tomas; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The soft-rot fungus Penicillium purpurogenum secretes to the culture medium a variety of enzymes related to xylan biodegradation, among them three acetyl xylan esterases (AXE I, II and III). AXE II has 207 amino acids; it belongs to family 5 of the carbohydrate esterases and its structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 0.9 Å resolution (PDB 1G66). The enzyme possesses the α/β hydrolase fold and the catalytic triad typical of serine esterases (Ser90, His187 and Asp175). AXE II can hydrolyze esters of a large variety of alcohols, but it is restricted to short chain fatty acids. An analysis of its three-dimensional structure shows that a loop that covers the active site may be responsible for this strict specificity. Cutinase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes esters of long chain fatty acids and shows a structure similar to AXE II, lacks this loop. In order to generate an AXE II with this broader specificity, the preparation of a mutant lacking residues involving this loop (Gly104 to Ala114) was proposed. A set of molecular simulation experiments based on a comparative model of the mutant enzyme predicted a stable structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the loop's residues have been eliminated from the AXE II cDNA. The mutant protein has been expressed in Aspergillus nidulans A722 and Pichia pastoris, and it is active towards a range of fatty acid esters of up to at least 14 carbons. The availability of an esterase with broader specificity may have biotechnological applications for the synthesis of sugar esters.

  2. Clarification of the Mechanism of Acylation Reaction and Origin of Substrate Specificity of the Serine-Carboxyl Peptidase Sedolisin through QM/MM Free Energy Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qin [ORNL; Yao, Jianzhuang [ORNL; Wiodawer, Alexander [SAIC-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD; Guo, Hong [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations are applied for understanding the mechanism of the acylation reaction catalyzed by sedolisin, a representative serine-carboxyl peptidase, leading to the acyl-enzyme (AE) and first product from the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. One of the interesting questions to be addressed in this work is the origin of the substrate specificity of sedolisin that shows a relatively high activity on the substrates with Glu at P1 site. It is shown that the bond making and breaking events of the acylation reaction involving a peptide substrate (LLE*FL) seem to be accompanied by local conformational changes, proton transfers as well as the formation of alternative hydrogen bonds. The results of the simulations indicate that the conformational change of Glu at P1 site and its formation of a low barrier hydrogen bond with Asp-170 (along with the transient proton transfer) during the acylation reaction might play a role in the relatively high specificity for the substrate with Glu at P1 site. The role of some key residues in the catalysis is confirmed through free energy simulations. Glu-80 is found to act as a general base to accept a proton from Ser-287 during the nucleophilic attack and then as a general acid to protonate the leaving group (N H of P1 -Phe) during the cleavage of the scissile peptide bond. Another acidic residue, Asp-170, acts as a general acid catalyst to protonate the carbonyl of P1-Glu during the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and as a general base for the formation of the acyl-enzyme. The energetic results from the free energy simulations support the importance of proton transfer from Asp-170 to the carbonyl of P1-Glu in the stabilization of the tetrahedral intermediate and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of P1-Glu and Asp-170 in the lowering of the free energy barrier for the cleavage of the peptide bond. Detailed analyses of the proton transfers

  3. Conserved Molecular Mechanism of TyrA Dehydrogenase Substrate Specificity Underlying Alternative Tyrosine Biosynthetic Pathways in Plants and Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Schenck

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available L-Tyrosine (Tyr is an aromatic amino acid synthesized de novo in plants and microbes. In animals, Tyr must be obtained through their diet or synthesized from L-phenylalanine. In addition to protein synthesis, Tyr serves as the precursor of neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine and epinephrine in animals and of numerous plant natural products, which serve essential functions in both plants and humans (e.g., vitamin E and morphine. Tyr is synthesized via two alternative routes mediated by a TyrA family enzyme, prephenate, or arogenate dehydrogenase (PDH/TyrAp or ADH/TyrAa, typically found in microbes and plants, respectively. Although ADH activity is also found in some bacteria, the origin of arogenate-specific TyrAa enzymes is unknown. We recently identified an acidic Asp222 residue that confers ADH activity in plant TyrAs. In this study, structure-guided phylogenetic analyses identified bacterial homologs, closely-related to plant TyrAs, that also have an acidic 222 residue and ADH activity. A more distant archaeon TyrA that preferred PDH activity had a non-acidic Gln, whose substitution to Glu introduced ADH activity. These results indicate that the conserved molecular mechanism operated during the evolution of arogenate-specific TyrAa in both plants and microbes.

  4. Detection of substrate binding of a collagen-specific molecular chaperone HSP47 in solution using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Akira; Ishida, Yoshihito; Kubota, Hiroshi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Homma, Takayuki; Ito, Shinya; Araki, Kazutaka; Kinjo, Masataka; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-26

    Heat shock protein 47 kDa (HSP47), an ER-resident and collagen-specific molecular chaperone, recognizes collagenous hydrophobic amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) and assists in secretion of correctly folded collagen. Elevated collagen production is correlated with HSP47 expression in various diseases, including fibrosis and keloid. HSP47 knockdown ameliorates liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen secretion, and inhibition of the interaction of HSP47 with procollagen also prevents collagen secretion. Therefore, a high-throughput system for screening of drugs capable of inhibiting the interaction between HSP47 and collagen would aid the development of novel therapies for fibrotic diseases. In this study, we established a straightforward method for rapidly and quantitatively measuring the interaction between HSP47 and collagen in solution using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The diffusion rate of HSP47 labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (HSP47-AF), a green fluorescent dye, decreased upon addition of type I or III collagen, whereas that of dye-labeled protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not, indicating that specific binding of HSP47 to collagen could be detected using FCS. Using this method, we calculated the dissociation constant of the interaction between HSP47 and collagen. The binding ratio between HSP47-AF and collagen did not change in the presence of sodium chloride, confirming that the interaction was hydrophobic in nature. In addition, we observed dissociation of collagen from HSP47 at low pH and re-association after recovery to neutral pH. These observations indicate that this system is appropriate for detecting the interaction between HSP47 and collagen, and could be applied to high-throughput screening for drugs capable of suppressing and/or curing fibrosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational docking, molecular dynamics simulation and subsite structure analysis of a maltogenic amylase from Bacillus lehensis G1 provide insights into substrate and product specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manas, Nor Hasmaliana Abdul; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Illias, Rosli Md

    2016-06-01

    Maltogenic amylase (MAG1) from Bacillus lehensis G1 displayed the highest hydrolysis activity on β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to produce maltose as a main product and exhibited high transglycosylation activity on malto-oligosaccharides with polymerization degree of three and above. These substrate and product specificities of MAG1 were elucidated from structural point of view in this study. A three-dimensional structure of MAG1 was constructed using homology modeling. Docking of β-CD and malto-oligosaccharides was then performed in the MAG1 active site. An aromatic platform in the active site was identified which is responsible in substrate recognition especially in determining the enzyme's preference toward β-CD. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed MAG1 structure is most stable when docked with β-CD and least stable when docked with maltose. The docking analysis and MD simulation showed that the main subsites for substrate stabilization in the active site are -2, -1, +1 and +2. A bulky residue, Trp359 at the +2 subsite was identified to cause steric interference to the bound linear malto-oligosaccharides thus prevented it to occupy subsite +3, which can only be reached by a highly bent glucose molecule such as β-CD. The resulted modes of binding from docking simulation show a good correlation with the experimentally determined hydrolysis pattern. The subsite structure generated from this study led to a possible mode of action that revealed how maltose was mainly produced during hydrolysis. Furthermore, maltose only occupies subsite +1 and +2, therefore could not be hydrolyzed or transglycosylated by the enzyme. This important knowledge has paved the way for a novel structure-based molecular design for modulation of its catalytic activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The unique functional role of the C-HS hydrogen bond in the substrate specificity and enzyme catalysis of type 1 methionine aminopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Pal, Debnath; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2016-07-19

    It is intriguing how nature attains recognition specificity between molecular interfaces where there is no apparent scope for classical hydrogen bonding or polar interactions. Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) is one such enzyme where this fascinating conundrum is at play. In this study, we demonstrate that a unique C-HS hydrogen bond exists between the enzyme methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) and its N-terminal-methionine polypeptide substrate, which allows specific interaction between apparent apolar interfaces, imposing a strict substrate recognition specificity and efficient catalysis, a feature replicated in Type I MetAPs across all kingdoms of life. We evidence this evolutionarily conserved C-HS hydrogen bond through enzyme assays on wild-type and mutant MetAP proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that show a drastic difference in catalytic efficiency. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the methionine bound protein revealed a conserved water bridge and short contacts involving the Met side-chain, a feature also observed in MetAPs from other organisms. Thermal shift assays showed a remarkable 3.3 °C increase in melting temperature for methionine bound protein compared to its norleucine homolog, where C-HS interaction is absent. The presence of C-HS hydrogen bonding was also corroborated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy through a change in chemical shift. Computational chemistry studies revealed the unique role of the electrostatic environment in facilitating the C-HS interaction. The significance of this atypical hydrogen bond is underscored by the fact that the function of MetAP is essential for any living cell.

  7. Site-Specific Measurement of Water Dynamics in the Substrate Pocket of Ketosteroid Isomerase Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Santosh Kumar; Ji, Minbiao; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the reorganization capacity of water molecules at the active sites of enzymes and how this couples to the catalytic reaction. Here, we study the dynamics of water molecules at the active site of a highly proficient enzyme, Δ5-3-ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), during a light-activated mimic of its catalytic cycle. Photo-excitation of a nitrile containing photo-acid, coumarin183 (C183), mimics the change in charge density that occurs at the active site of KSI during the first step of the catalytic reaction. The nitrile of C183 is exposed to water when bound to the KSI active site, and we used time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy as a site-specific probe to study the solvation dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of the nitrile. We observed that water molecules at the active site of KSI are highly rigid, during the light-activated catalytic cycle, compared to the solvation dynamics observed in bulk water. Based upon this result we hypothesize that rigid water dipoles at the active site might help in the maintenance of the pre-organized electrostatic environment required for efficient catalysis. The results also demonstrate the utility of nitrile probes in measuring the dynamics of local (H-bonded) water molecules in contrast to the commonly used fluorescence methods which measure the average behavior of primary and subsequent spheres of solvation. PMID:22931297

  8. Insights into the substrate specificity of the MutT pyrophosphohydrolase using structural analogues of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine nucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michelle L; McFadden, Emily J; Ghio, Michael; Lindell, Maria A M; Gerien, Kenneth S; O'Handley, Suzanne F

    2016-04-15

    The bacterial repair enzyme MutT hydrolyzes the damaged nucleotide OdGTP (the 5'-triphosphate derivative of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine; OdG), which is a known mutagen and has been linked to antibacterial action. Previous work has indicated important roles for the C8-oxygen, N7-hydrogen, and C2-exocyclic amine during OdGTP recognition by MutT. In order to gain a more nuanced understanding of the contribution of these three sites to the overall activity of MutT, we determined the reaction parameters for dGTP, OdGTP, and nine of their analogues using steady state kinetics. Our results indicate that overall high reaction efficiencies can be achieved despite altering any one of these sites. However, altering two or more sites leads to a significant decrease in efficiency. The data also suggest that, similar to another bacterial OdG repair enzyme, MutM, a specific carbonyl in the enzyme can not only promote activity by forming an active site hydrogen bond with the N7-hydrogen of OdGTP, but can also hinder activity through electrostatic repulsion with the N7-lone pair of dGTP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification, Heterologous Expression, and Functional Characterization of Bacillus subtilis YutF, a HAD Superfamily 5'-Nucleotidase with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia P Zakataeva

    Full Text Available 5'-nucleotidases (EC 3.1.3.5 catalyze the hydrolytic dephosphorylation of 5'-ribonucleotides and 5'-deoxyribonucleotides as well as complex nucleotides, such as uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, to their corresponding nucleosides plus phosphate. These enzymes have been found in diverse species in intracellular and membrane-bound, surface-localized forms. Soluble forms of 5'-nucleotidases belong to the ubiquitous haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of nucleotide, nucleoside and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ pools. Despite the important role of 5'-nucleotidases in cellular metabolism, only a few of these enzymes have been characterized in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the workhorse industrial microorganism included in the Food and Drug Administration's GRAS (generally regarded as safe list. In the present study, we report the identification of a novel 5'-nucleotidase gene from B. subtilis, yutF, which comprises 771 bp encoding a 256-amino-acid protein belonging to the IIA subfamily of the HADSF. The gene product is responsible for the major p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity in B. subtilis. The yutF gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product fused to a polyhistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized as a soluble 5'-nucleotidase with broad substrate specificity. The recombinant YutF protein was found to hydrolyze various purine and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotides, showing preference for 5'-nucleoside monophosphates and, specifically, 5'-XMP. Recombinant YutF also exhibited phosphohydrolase activity toward nucleotide precursors, ribose-5-phosphate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme revealed a low substrate specificity (Km values in the mM concentration range and modest catalytic efficiencies with respect to

  10. Identification, Heterologous Expression, and Functional Characterization of Bacillus subtilis YutF, a HAD Superfamily 5'-Nucleotidase with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakataeva, Natalia P; Romanenkov, Dmitriy V; Yusupova, Yuliya R; Skripnikova, Victoria S; Asahara, Takayuki; Gronskiy, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    5'-nucleotidases (EC 3.1.3.5) catalyze the hydrolytic dephosphorylation of 5'-ribonucleotides and 5'-deoxyribonucleotides as well as complex nucleotides, such as uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, to their corresponding nucleosides plus phosphate. These enzymes have been found in diverse species in intracellular and membrane-bound, surface-localized forms. Soluble forms of 5'-nucleotidases belong to the ubiquitous haloacid dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of nucleotide, nucleoside and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pools. Despite the important role of 5'-nucleotidases in cellular metabolism, only a few of these enzymes have been characterized in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the workhorse industrial microorganism included in the Food and Drug Administration's GRAS (generally regarded as safe) list. In the present study, we report the identification of a novel 5'-nucleotidase gene from B. subtilis, yutF, which comprises 771 bp encoding a 256-amino-acid protein belonging to the IIA subfamily of the HADSF. The gene product is responsible for the major p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity in B. subtilis. The yutF gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product fused to a polyhistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized as a soluble 5'-nucleotidase with broad substrate specificity. The recombinant YutF protein was found to hydrolyze various purine and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotides, showing preference for 5'-nucleoside monophosphates and, specifically, 5'-XMP. Recombinant YutF also exhibited phosphohydrolase activity toward nucleotide precursors, ribose-5-phosphate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme revealed a low substrate specificity (Km values in the mM concentration range) and modest catalytic efficiencies with respect to substrates. An

  11. Multi-genome identification and characterization of chlamydiae-specific type III secretion substrates: the Inc proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Guangming

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that multiply in a vacuolar compartment, the inclusion. Several chlamydial proteins containing a bilobal hydrophobic domain are translocated by a type III secretion (TTS mechanism into the inclusion membrane. They form the family of Inc proteins, which is specific to this phylum. Based on their localization, Inc proteins likely play important roles in the interactions between the microbe and the host. In this paper we sought to identify and analyze, using bioinformatics tools, all putative Inc proteins in published chlamydial genomes, including an environmental species. Results Inc proteins contain at least one bilobal hydrophobic domain made of two transmembrane helices separated by a loop of less than 30 amino acids. Using bioinformatics tools we identified 537 putative Inc proteins across seven chlamydial proteomes. The amino-terminal segment of the putative Inc proteins was recognized as a functional TTS signal in 90% of the C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae sequences tested, validating the data obtained in silico. We identified a macro domain in several putative Inc proteins, and observed that Inc proteins are enriched in segments predicted to form coiled coils. A surprisingly large proportion of the putative Inc proteins are not constitutively translocated to the inclusion membrane in culture conditions. Conclusions The Inc proteins represent 7 to 10% of each proteome and show a great degree of sequence diversity between species. The abundance of segments with a high probability for coiled coil conformation in Inc proteins support the hypothesis that they interact with host proteins. While the large majority of Inc proteins possess a functional TTS signal, less than half may be constitutively translocated to the inclusion surface in some species. This suggests the novel finding that translocation of Inc proteins may be regulated by as-yet undetermined mechanisms.

  12. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  13. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  14. PI-273, a Substrate-Competitive, Specific Small-Molecule Inhibitor of PI4KIIα, Inhibits the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangmei; Gao, Zhen; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Lunfeng; Qiao, Xinhua; Zhao, Yingying; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Panpan; Lu, Junyan; Liu, Jia; Jiang, Hualiang; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Chang

    2017-11-15

    While phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4KIIα) has been identified as a potential target for antitumor therapy, the clinical applications of PI4KIIα are limited by a lack of specific inhibitors. Here we report the first small-molecule inhibitor (SMI) of human PI4KIIα. Docking-based and ligand-based virtual screening strategies were first employed to identify promising hits, followed by two rounds of kinase activity inhibition validation. 2-(3-(4-Chlorobenzoyl)thioureido)-4-ethyl-5-methylthiophene-3-carboxamide (PI-273) exhibited the greatest inhibitory effect on PI4KIIα kinase activity (IC 50 = 0.47 μmol/L) and suppressed cell proliferation. Surface plasmon resonance and thermal shift assays indicated that PI-273 interacted directly with PI4KIIα. Kinetic analysis identified PI-273 as a reversible competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate phosphatidylinositol (PI), which contrasted with most other PI kinase inhibitors that bind the ATP binding site. PI-273 reduced PI4P content, cell viability, and AKT signaling in wild-type MCF-7 cells, but not in PI4KIIα knockout MCF-7 cells, indicating that PI-273 is highly selective for PI4KIIα. Mutant analysis revealed a role of palmitoylation insertion in the selectivity of PI-273 for PI4KIIα. In addition, PI-273 treatment retarded cell proliferation by blocking cells in G 2 -M, inducing cell apoptosis and suppressing colony-forming ability. Importantly, PI-273 significantly inhibited MCF-7 cell-induced breast tumor growth without toxicity. PI-273 is the first substrate-competitive, subtype-specific inhibitor of PI4KIIα, the use of which will facilitate evaluations of PI4KIIα as a cancer therapeutic target. Cancer Res; 77(22); 6253-66. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. The evolution of substrate specificity-associated residues and Ca(2+) -binding motifs in EF-hand-containing type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Meng-Shu; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2016-07-01

    Most eukaryotic organisms, except some animal clades, have mitochondrial alternative electron transport enzymes that allow respiration to bypass the energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation. The energy bypass enzymes in plants include the external type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (DHs) of the NDB family, which are characterized by an EF-hand domain for Ca(2+) binding. Here we investigate these plant enzymes by combining molecular modeling with evolutionary analysis. Molecular modeling of the Arabidopsis thaliana AtNDB1 with the yeast ScNDI1 as template revealed distinct similarities in the core catalytic parts, and highlighted the interaction between the pyridine nucleotide and residues correlating with NAD(P)H substrate specificity. The EF-hand domain of AtNDB1 has no counterpart in ScNDI1, and was instead modeled with Ca(2+) -binding signal transducer proteins. Combined models displayed a proximity of the AtNDB1 EF-hand domain to the substrate entrance side of the catalytic part. Evolutionary analysis of the eukaryotic NDB-type proteins revealed ancient and recent reversions between the motif observed in proteins specific for NADH (acidic type) and NADPH (non-acidic type), and that the clade of enzymes with acidic motifs in angiosperms derives from non-acidic-motif NDB-type proteins present in basal plants, fungi and protists. The results suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent external NADPH oxidation is an ancient process, indicating that it has a fundamental importance for eukaryotic cellular redox metabolism. In contrast, the external NADH DHs in plants are products of a recent expansion, mirroring the expansion of the alternative oxidase family. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  17. NleB/SseK effectors fromCitrobacter rodentium,Escherichia coli, andSalmonella entericadisplay distinct differences in host substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Qaidi, Samir; Chen, Kangming; Halim, Adnan; Siukstaite, Lina; Rueter, Christian; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Clausen, Henrik; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2017-07-07

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use a syringe-like apparatus called a type III secretion system to inject virulence factors into host cells. Some of these effectors are enzymes that modify host proteins to subvert their normal functions. NleB is a glycosyltransferase that modifies host proteins with N -acetyl-d-glucosamine to inhibit antibacterial and inflammatory host responses. NleB is conserved among the attaching/effacing pathogens enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium Moreover, Salmonella enterica strains encode up to three NleB orthologs named SseK1, SseK2, and SseK3. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the activities and host protein targets among the NleB/SseK orthologs. Therefore, here we performed in vitro glycosylation assays and cell culture experiments to compare the activities and substrate specificities of these effectors. SseK1, SseK3, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1, and C rodentium NleB blocked TNF-mediated NF-κB pathway activation, whereas SseK2 and NleB2 did not. C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, and SseK1 glycosylated host GAPDH. C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1, and SseK2 glycosylated the FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein). SseK3 and NleB2 were not active against either substrate. We also found that EHEC NleB1 glycosylated two GAPDH arginine residues, Arg 197 and Arg 200 , and that these two residues were essential for GAPDH-mediated activation of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 ubiquitination. These results provide evidence that members of this highly conserved family of bacterial virulence effectors target different host protein substrates and exhibit distinct cellular modes of action to suppress host responses. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Substrate specificity overlap and interaction between adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP/ABCD1) and adrenoleukodystrophy-related protein (ALDRP/ABCD2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Emmanuelle C; Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine; Athias, Anne; Gambert, Philippe; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2011-03-11

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily D called ALDP. ALDP is supposed to function as a homodimer allowing the entry of CoA-esters of very-long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome, the unique site of their β-oxidation. ALDP deficiency can be corrected by overexpression of ALDRP, its closest homolog. However, the exact nature of the substrates transported by ALDRP and its relationships with ALDP still remain unclear. To gain insight into the function of ALDRP, we used cell models allowing the induction in a dose-dependent manner of a wild type or a mutated non-functional ALDRP-EGFP fusion protein. We explored the consequences of the changes of ALDRP expression levels on the fatty acid content (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids) in phospholipids as well as on the levels of β-oxidation of 3 suspected substrates: C26:0, C24:0, and C22:6n-3 (DHA). We found an inverse correlation between the fatty acid content of saturated (C26:0, C24:0) and monounsaturated (C26:1, C24:1) VLCFA and the expression level of ALDRP. Interestingly, we obtained a transdominant-negative effect of the inactive ALDRP-EGFP on ALDP function. This effect is due to a physical interaction between ALDRP and ALDP that we evidenced by proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation. Finally, the β-oxidation assays demonstrate a role of ALDRP in the metabolism of saturated VLCFA (redundant with that of ALDP) but also a specific involvement of ALDRP in the metabolism of DHA.

  19. Substrate specificity of 2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA dehydratase from Clostridium symbiosum: toward a bio-based production of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Anutthaman; Pierik, Antonio J; Kahnt, Jörg; Zelder, Oskar; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2011-05-03

    Expression of six genes from two glutamate fermenting clostridia converted Escherichia coli into a producer of glutaconate from 2-oxoglutarate of the general metabolism (Djurdjevic, I. et al. 2010, Appl. Environ. Microbiol.77, 320-322). The present work examines whether this pathway can also be used to reduce 2-oxoadipate to (R)-2-hydroxyadipic acid and dehydrate its CoA thioester to 2-hexenedioic acid, an unsaturated precursor of the biotechnologically valuable adipic acid (hexanedioic acid). 2-Hydroxyglutaryl-CoA dehydratase from Clostridium symbiosum, the key enzyme of this pathway and a potential radical enzyme, catalyzes the reversible dehydration of (R)-2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA to (E)-glutaconyl-CoA. Using a spectrophotometric assay and mass spectrometry, it was found that (R)-2-hydroxyadipoyl-CoA, oxalocrotonyl-CoA, muconyl-CoA, and butynedioyl-CoA, but not 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA, served as alternative substrates. Hydration of butynedioyl-CoA most likely led to 2-oxosuccinyl-CoA, which spontaneously hydrolyzed to oxaloacetate and CoASH. The dehydratase is not specific for the CoA-moiety because (R)-2-hydroxyglutaryl-thioesters of N-acetylcysteamine and pantetheine served as almost equal substrates. Whereas the related 2-hydroxyisocaproyl-CoA dehydratase generated the stable and inhibitory 2,4-pentadienoyl-CoA radical, the analogous allylic ketyl radical could not be detected with muconyl-CoA and 2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA dehydratase. With the exception of (R)-2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA, all mono-CoA-thioesters of dicarboxylates used in this study were synthesized with glutaconate CoA-transferase from Acidaminococcus fermentans. The now possible conversion of (R)-2-hydroxyadipate via (R)-2-hydroxyadipoyl-CoA and 2-hexenedioyl-CoA to 2-hexenedioate paves the road for a bio-based production of adipic acid.

  20. RNA-Seq approach for genetic improvement of meat quality in pig and evolutionary insight into the substrate specificity of animal carbonyl reductases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Yong Jung

    Full Text Available Changes in meat quality traits are strongly associated with alterations in postmortem metabolism which depend on genetic variations, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs having critical effects on protein structure and function. To selectively identify metabolism-related nsSNVs, next-generation transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq was carried out using RNAs from porcine liver, which contains a diverse range of metabolic enzymes. The multiplex SNV genotyping analysis showed that various metabolism-related genes had different nsSNV alleles. Moreover, many nsSNVs were significantly associated with multiple meat quality traits. Particularly, ch7:g.22112616A>G SNV was identified to create a single amino acid change (Thr/Ala at the 145th residue of H1.3-like protein, very close to the putative 147th threonine phosphorylation site, suggesting that the nsSNV may affect multiple meat quality traits by affecting the epigenetic regulation of postmortem metabolism-related gene expression. Besides, one nonsynonymous variation, probably generated by gene duplication, led to a stop signal in porcine testicular carbonyl reductase (PTCR, resulting in a C-terminal (E281-A288 deletion. Molecular docking and energy minimization calculations indicated that the binding affinity of wild-type PTCR to 5α-DHT, a C(21-steroid, was superior to that of C-terminal-deleted PTCR or human carbonyl reductase, which was very consistent with experimental data, reported previously. Furthermore, P284 was identified as an important residue mediating the specific interaction between PTCR and 5α-DHT, and phylogenetic analysis showed that P284 is an evolutionarily conserved residue among animal carbonyl reductases, which suggests that the C-terminal tails of these reductases may have evolved under evolutionary pressure to increase the substrate specificity for C(21-steroids and facilitate metabolic adaptation. Altogether, our RNA-Seq revealed that selective ns

  1. The diadenosine hexaphosphate hydrolases from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are homologues of the human diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase. Overlapping substrate specificities in a MutT-type protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrany, S T; Ingram, S W; Cartwright, J L; Falck, J R; McLennan, A G; Barnes, L D; Shears, S B

    1999-07-30

    Aps1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Ingram, S. W., Stratemann, S. A. , and Barnes, L. D. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 3649-3655) and YOR163w from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Cartwright, J. L., and McLennan, A. G. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 8604-8610) have both previously been characterized as MutT family hydrolases with high specificity for diadenosine hexa- and pentaphosphates (Ap(6)A and Ap(5)A). Using purified recombinant preparations of these enzymes, we have now discovered that they have an important additional function, namely, the efficient hydrolysis of diphosphorylated inositol polyphosphates. This overlapping specificity of an enzyme for two completely different classes of substrate is not only of enzymological significance, but in addition, this finding provides important new information pertinent to the structure, function, and evolution of the MutT motif. Moreover, we report that the human protein previously characterized as a diphosphorylated inositol phosphate phosphohydrolase represents the first example, in any animal, of an enzyme that degrades Ap(6)A and Ap(5)A, in preference to other diadenosine polyphosphates. The emergence of Ap(6)A and Ap(5)A as extracellular effectors and intracellular ion-channel ligands points not only to diphosphorylated inositol phosphate phosphohydrolase as a candidate for regulating signaling by diadenosine polyphosphates, but also suggests that diphosphorylated inositol phosphates may competitively inhibit this process.

  2. Does dishonesty really invite third-party punishment? Results of a more stringent test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Naoki; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke

    2015-05-01

    Many experiments have demonstrated that people are willing to incur cost to punish norm violators even when they are not directly harmed by the violation. Such altruistic third-party punishment is often considered an evolutionary underpinning of large-scale human cooperation. However, some scholars argue that previously demonstrated altruistic third-party punishment against fairness-norm violations may be an experimental artefact. For example, envy-driven retaliatory behaviour (i.e. spite) towards better-off unfair game players may be misidentified as altruistic punishment. Indeed, a recent experiment demonstrated that participants ceased to inflict third-party punishment against an unfair player once a series of key methodological problems were systematically controlled for. Noticing that a previous finding regarding apparently altruistic third-party punishment against honesty-norm violations may have been subject to methodological issues, we used a different and what we consider to be a more sound design to evaluate these findings. Third-party punishment against dishonest players withstood this more stringent test. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Emission reductions in transition economies: A result of output contraction or more stringent environmental policy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugravu, N.; Millock, K. [University Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne (France); Duchene, G. [University Paris 12, Creteil (France)

    2007-07-01

    Countries in Central and Eastern Europe significantly reduced their CO{sub 2} emissions between 1996 and 2001. Was this emission reduction just the fortuitous result of the major economic transformation undergone by those countries in the transition away from a centralized plan economy? Or is the emission reduction rather a result of more stringent environmental policy? The objective of the article is to answer this question through a model of the relation between environmental quality and enforcement, on the one hand, and environmental quality and economic growth, on the other hand. The authors develop structural equations for the demand (emissions) and supply (environmental stringency) of pollution. The supply equation takes into account the institutional quality of the country (control of corruption and political stability) as well as consumer preferences for environmental quality, as proxied by per capita revenue and unemployment. The system is estimated by three stage least squares on a sample of three groups of countries for comparative analysis: Central and Eastern European countries, Western European countries, and emerging economies. The results indicate that, all else equal, the scale effect on its own would have increased industrial CO{sub 2} emissions in the Central and Eastern European countries in the sample by 44.6% between 1996 and 2001. The composition effect accounted for a corresponding reduction in emissions by 16%. The technique effect had the largest marginal impact, corresponding to a 37.4% reduction in emissions.

  4. Bulk development and stringent selection of microsatellite markers in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Jun; Li, Ze-Min; Wang, Ze-Hua; Zhu, Liang; Gong, Ya-Jun; Chen, Min; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-05-20

    Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigation of microsatellites on a genome-wide scale. Faced with a huge amount of candidates, the use of appropriate marker selection criteria is crucial. Here, we used the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis for an empirical microsatellite survey and validation; 132,251 candidate microsatellites were identified, 92,102 of which were perfect. Dinucleotides were the most abundant category, while (AG)n was the most abundant motif. Sixty primer pairs were designed and validated in two natural populations, of which 30 loci were polymorphic, stable, and repeatable, but not all in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage equilibrium. Four marker panels were constructed to understand effect of marker selection on population genetic analyses: (i) only accept loci with single nucleotide insertions (SNI); (ii) only accept the most polymorphic loci (MP); (iii) only accept loci that did not deviate from HWE, did not show SNIs, and had unambiguous peaks (SS) and (iv) all developed markers (ALL). Although the MP panel resulted in microsatellites of highest genetic diversity followed by the SNI, the SS performed best in individual assignment. Our study proposes stringent criteria for selection of microsatellites from a large-scale number of genomic candidates for population genetic studies.

  5. Human xanthine oxidase changes its substrate specificity to aldehyde oxidase type upon mutation of amino acid residues in the active site: roles of active site residues in binding and activation of purine substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuichiro; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2007-04-01

    Xanthine oxidase (oxidoreductase; XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO) are similar in protein structure and prosthetic group composition, but differ in substrate preference. Here we show that mutation of two amino acid residues in the active site of human XOR for purine substrates results in conversion of the substrate preference to AO type. Human XOR and its Glu803-to-valine (E803V) and Arg881-to-methionine (R881M) mutants were expressed in an Escherichia coli system. The E803V mutation almost completely abrogated the activity towards hypoxanthine as a substrate, but very weak activity towards xanthine remained. On the other hand, the R881M mutant lacked activity towards xanthine, but retained slight activity towards hypoxanthine. Both mutants, however, exhibited significant aldehyde oxidase activity. The crystal structure of E803V mutant of human XOR was determined at 2.6 A resolution. The overall molybdopterin domain structure of this mutant closely resembles that of bovine milk XOR; amino acid residues in the active centre pocket are situated at very similar positions and in similar orientations, except that Glu803 was replaced by valine, indicating that the decrease in activity towards purine substrate is not due to large conformational change in the mutant enzyme. Unlike wild-type XOR, the mutants were not subject to time-dependent inhibition by allopurinol.

  6. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Spoerry

    Full Text Available Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  7. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J.; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use. PMID:27749921

  8. 2-Nitrobenzoate 2-Nitroreductase (NbaA) Switches Its Substrate Specificity from 2-Nitrobenzoic Acid to 2,4-Dinitrobenzoic Acid under Oxidizing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Seok; Go, Hayoung; Cha, Chang-Jun; Lee, Cheolju; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2013-01-01

    2-Nitrobenzoate 2-nitroreductase (NbaA) of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KU-7 is a unique enzyme, transforming 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-NBA) and 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid (2,4-DNBA) to the 2-hydroxylamine compounds. Sequence comparison reveals that NbaA contains a conserved cysteine residue at position 141 and two variable regions at amino acids 65 to 74 and 193 to 216. The truncated mutant Δ65-74 exhibited markedly reduced activity toward 2,4-DNBA, but its 2-NBA reduction activity was unaffected; however, both activities were abolished in the Δ193-216 mutant, suggesting that these regions are necessary for the catalysis and specificity of NbaA. NbaA showed different lag times for the reduction of 2-NBA and 2,4-DNBA with NADPH, and the reduction of 2,4-DNBA, but not 2-NBA, failed in the presence of 1 mM dithiothreitol or under anaerobic conditions, indicating oxidative modification of the enzyme for 2,4-DNBA. The enzyme was irreversibly inhibited by 5,5′-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and ZnCl2, which bind to reactive thiol/thiolate groups, and was eventually inactivated during the formation of higher-order oligomers at high pH, high temperature, or in the presence of H2O2. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry revealed the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds by involvement of the two cysteines at positions 141 and 194. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the cysteines at positions 39, 103, 141, and 194 played a role in changing the enzyme activity and specificity toward 2-NBA and 2,4-DNBA. This study suggests that oxidative modifications of NbaA are responsible for the differential specificity for the two substrates and further enzyme inactivation through the formation of disulfide bonds under oxidizing conditions. PMID:23123905

  9. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A. (Sungkyunkwan); (UTSMC)

    2010-08-26

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  10. Tyrosine 105 and threonine 212 at outermost substrate binding subsites -6 and +4 control substrate specificity, oligosaccharide cleavage patterns, and multiple binding modes of barley alpha-amylase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, K.S.; André, G.; Gottschalk, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    The role in activity of outer regions in the substrate binding cleft in alpha-amylases is illustrated by mutational analysis of Tyr(105) and Thr(212) localized at subsites - 6 and +4 ( substrate cleavage occurs between subsites -1 and +1) in barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1). Tyr(105) is conserved...... in plant alpha-amylases whereas Thr(212) varies in these and related enzymes. Compared with wild-type AMY1, the subsite -6 mutant Y105A has 140, 15, and

  11. Stringently Defined Otitis Prone Children Demonstrate Deficient Naturally Induced Mucosal Antibody Response toMoraxella catarrhalisProteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dabin; Murphy, Timothy F; Lafontaine, Eric R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis ( Mcat ) is a prominent mucosal pathogen causing acute otitis media (AOM). We studied Mcat nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization, AOM frequency and mucosal antibody responses to four vaccine candidate Mcat proteins: outer membrane protein (OMP) CD, oligopeptide permease (Opp) A, hemagglutinin (Hag), and Pilin A clade 2 (PilA2) from stringently defined otitis prone (sOP) children, who experience the greatest burden of disease, compared to non-otitis prone (NOP) children. sOP children had higher NP colonization of Mcat (30 vs. 22%, P  = 0.0003) and Mcat -caused AOM rates (49 vs. 24%, P  P  P  = 0.018), Hag (IgG and IgA, both P  P  P  = 0.039) and PilA2 ( P  = 0.0076), and IgA to OMP CD ( P  = 0.010), OppA ( P  = 0.030), and PilA2 ( P  = 0.043) were associated with lower carriage of Mcat in NOP but not sOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to OMP CD ( P  = 0.0070) and Hag ( P  = 0.0003), and IgA to Hag ( P  = 0.0067) at asymptomatic colonization than those at onset of AOM were associated with significantly lower rate of Mcat NP colonization progressing to AOM in NOP compared to sOP children (3 vs. 26%, P  NP colonization and NP colonization progressing to Mcat -caused AOM. Enhancing Mcat antigen-specific mucosal immune responses to levels higher than achieved by natural exposure will be necessary to prevent AOM in sOP children.

  12. Substrate specificity of the Escherichia coli Fpg protein (Formamidopyrimidine - DNA glycosylase): Excision of purine lesions in DNA produced by ionizing radiation or photosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.; Laval, J.; Gajewski, E.; Dizdaroglu, M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the excision of a variety of modified bases from DNA by the Escherichia coli Fpg protein (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase). DNA used as a substrate was modified either by exposure to ionizing radiation or by photosensitization using visible light in the presence of methylene blue (MB). The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, which can unambiguously identify and quantitate pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA, was used for analysis of hydrolyzed and derivatized DNA samples. Thirteen products resulting from pyrimidines and purines were detected in γ-irradiated DNA, whereas only the formation of 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua) and 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-Gua) was observed in visible light/MB-treated DNA. Analysis of γ-irradiated DNA after incubation with the Fpg protein followed by precipitation revealed that the Fpg protein significantly excised 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde), FapyGua, and 8-OH-Gua. The excision of a small but detectable amount of 8-hydroxyadenine was also observed. The results suggest that one of the biological roles of the Fpg protein, which is present in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells, is the repair of DNA damage caused by free radicals or by other oxygen-derived species such as singlet oxygen. The Fpg protein appears to be specific for recognition of imidazole ring opened purines and 8-hydroxypurines in DNA and may complement pyrimidine-specific enzymes in repair of DNA damage in vivo

  13. Structural basis of regulation and substrate specificity of protein kinase CK2 deduced from the modeling of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan N

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Kinase Casein Kinase 2 (PKCK2 is an ubiquitous Ser/Thr kinase expressed in all eukaryotes. It phosphorylates a number of proteins involved in various cellular processes. PKCK2 holoenzyme is catalytically active tetramer, composed of two homologous or identical and constitutively active catalytic (α and two identical regulatory (β subunits. The tetramer cannot phosphorylate some substrates that can be phosphorylated by PKCK2α in isolation. The present work explores the structural basis of this feature using computational analysis and modeling. Results We have initially built a model of PKCK2α bound to a substrate peptide with a conformation identical to that of the substrates in the available crystal structures of other kinases complexed with the substrates/ pseudosubstrates. In this model however, the fourth acidic residue in the consensus pattern of the substrate, S/T-X-X-D/E where S/T is the phosphorylation site, did not result in interaction with the active form of PKCK2α and is highly solvent exposed. Interaction of the acidic residue is observed if the substrate peptide adopts conformations as seen in β turn, α helix, or 310 helices. This type of conformation is observed and accommodated well by PKCK2α in calmodulin where the phosphorylation site is at the central helix. PP2A carries sequence patterns for PKCK2α phosphorylation. While the possibility of PP2A being phosphorylated by PKCK2 has been raised in the literature we use the model of PP2A to generate a model of PP2A-PKCK2α complex. PKCK2β undergoes phosphorylation by holoenzyme at the N-terminal region, and is accommodated very well in the limited space available at the substrate-binding site of the holoenzyme while the space is insufficient to accommodate the binding of PP2A or calmodulin in the holoenzyme. Conclusion Charge and shape complimentarity seems to play a role in substrate recognition and binding to PKCK2α, along with the consensus

  14. Role of the Stringent Stress Response in the Antibiotic Resistance Phenotype of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Tomasz, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(MRSA) requires the presence of an acquired genetic determinant,mecAormecC, which encode penicillin-binding protein PBP2A or PBP2A', respectively. Although all MRSA strains share a mechanism of resistance, the phenotypic expression of beta-lactam resistance shows considerable strain-to-strain variation. The stringent stress response, a stress response that results from nutrient limitation, was shown to play a key role in determining the resistance level of an MRSA strain. In the present study, we validated the impact of the stringent stress response on transcription and translation ofmecAin the MRSA clinical isolate strain N315, which also carries known regulatory genes (mecI/mecR1/mecR2andblaI/blaR1) formecAtranscription. We showed that the impact of the stringent stress response on the resistance level may be restricted to beta-lactam resistance based on a "foreign" determinant such asmecA, as opposed to resistance based on mutations in the nativeS. aureusdeterminantpbpB(encoding PBP2). Our observations demonstrate that high-level resistance mediated by the stringent stress response follows the current model of beta-lactam resistance in which the native PBP2 protein is also essential for expression of the resistance phenotype. We also show that theStaphylococcus sciuri pbpDgene (also calledmecAI), the putative evolutionary precursor ofmecA, confers oxacillin resistance in anS. aureusstrain, generating a heterogeneous phenotype that can be converted to high and homogenous resistance by induction of the stringent stress response in the bacteria. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Germacrene A synthase in yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is an enzyme with mixed substrate specificity: gene cloning, functional characterization and expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pazouki, Leila; Memari, Hamid R.; Kännaste, Astrid; Bichele, Rudolf; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5) residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focuse...

  16. Catalytic-site conformational equilibrium in nerve-agent adducts of acetylcholinesterase: possible implications for the HI-6 antidote substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artursson, Elisabet; Andersson, Per Ola; Akfur, Christine; Linusson, Anna; Börjegren, Susanne; Ekström, Fredrik

    2013-05-01

    Nerve agents such as tabun, cyclosarin and Russian VX inhibit the essential enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by organophosphorylating the catalytic serine residue. Nucleophiles, such as oximes, are used as antidotes as they can reactivate and restore the function of the inhibited enzyme. The oxime HI-6 shows a notably low activity on tabun adducts but can effectively reactivate adducts of cyclosarin and Russian VX. To examine the structural basis for the pronounced substrate specificity of HI-6, we determined the binary crystal structures of Mus musculus AChE (mAChE) conjugated by cyclosarin and Russian VX and found a conformational mobility of the side chains of Phe338 and His447. The interaction between HI-6 and tabun-adducts of AChE were subsequently investigated using a combination of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Our findings show that HI-6 binds to tabun inhibited Homo sapiens AChE (hAChE) with an IC50 value of 300μM and suggest that the reactive nucleophilic moiety of HI-6 is excluded from the phosphorus atom of tabun. We propose that a conformational mobility of the side-chains of Phe338 and His447 is a common feature in nerve-agent adducts of AChE. We also suggest that the conformational mobility allow HI-6 to reactivate conjugates of cyclosarin and Russian VX while a reduced mobility in tabun conjugated AChE results in steric hindrance that prevents efficient reactivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  18. Evaluation of organ-specific glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice as a model of insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chao; Nakamura, Akinobu; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shinoda, Kazuaki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Terauchi, Yasuo; Inoue, Tomio; Goto, Atsuhi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which the body produces insulin but does not result in a sufficient biological effect. Insulin resistance is usually asymptomatic but is associated with health problems and is a factor in the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to clarify organ-specific insulin resistance in normal daily conditions using [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). The biodistribution of [ 18 F]-FDG was examined in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice, an animal model of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice with and without insulin loading. Mice received 0.5 MBq of [ 18 F]-FDG injected into the tail vein, immediately followed by nothing (control cohorts) or an intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 mU/g body weight of human insulin as an insulin loading test. Blood glucose concentrations for all of the experimental animals were assessed at 0, 20, 40, and 60 min post-injection. The mice were subsequently killed, and tissue was collected for evaluation of [ 18 F]-FDG biodistribution. The radioactivity of each organ was measured using a gamma counter. In the absence of insulin, the blood glucose concentrations of wild-type mice (132±26 mg/dl) and IRS-1 knockout mice (134±18 mg/dl) were not significantly different. Blood glucose concentrations decreased following insulin administration, with lower concentrations in wild-type mice than in knockout mice at 20, 40, and 60 min. A statistically significant difference in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake between wild-type mice and IRS-1 knockout mice was confirmed in the heart, abdominal muscle, and femoral muscle. With insulin loading, [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart, back muscle, and abdominal muscle was significantly increased compared to without insulin loading in both wild-type mice and knockout mice. Our results showed that IR significantly affected [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart in normal daily conditions. IR was associated with

  19. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...... to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has...... not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (Gal...

  20. Direct-to-physician and direct-to-consumer advertising: Time to have stringent regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, S; Gowri, S; Tyagi, V; Kohli, S; Jain, R; Kapil, P; Bhardwaj, A

    2015-01-01

    the opinion regarding DTCA, 69.9% physicians had a patient discussing DTCA that was clinically inappropriate. One hundred (64.5%) out of 155 physicians opined that DTCA encourage patients to attend physicians regarding preventive healthcare. On the contrary, 82/155 (52.9%) physicians felt that DTCA would damage the same. Similarly, 69 out of the total 100 patients felt that drug advertisements aid them to have better discussions with their treating physicians. Surprisingly, a large majority (91/100) were of the opinion that only safe drugs are allowed to be advertised. To conclude, from the findings of this study both the physicians and patients should be cautious and not overzealous while dealing with drug advertisements or promotional literature. More stringent scrutiny and issue of WLs or blacklisting of indulging pharmaceutical companies are mandatory by the regulatory agency to contain the same.

  1. Substrate Specificity of the Bacillus subtilis BY-Kinase PtkA Is Controlled by Alternative Activators: TkmA and SalA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Kalantari, Aida

    2016-01-01

    with alternative activators, and thus account for the observed ability of these kinases to phosphorylate several distinct classes of protein substrates. Here, we present experimental evidence that supports this hypothesis. We focus on the model Firmicute-type BY-kinase PtkA from Bacillus subtilis, known...

  2. Synthetic Peptides to Target Stringent Response-Controlled Virulence in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Murine Cutaneous Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pletzer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms continuously monitor their surroundings and adaptively respond to environmental cues. One way to cope with various stress-related situations is through the activation of the stringent stress response pathway. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa this pathway is controlled and coordinated by the activity of the RelA and SpoT enzymes that metabolize the small nucleotide secondary messenger molecule (pppGpp. Intracellular ppGpp concentrations are crucial in mediating adaptive responses and virulence. Targeting this cellular stress response has recently been the focus of an alternative approach to fight antibiotic resistant bacteria. Here, we examined the role of the stringent response in the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the Liverpool epidemic strain LESB58. A ΔrelA/ΔspoT double mutant showed decreased cytotoxicity toward human epithelial cells, exhibited reduced hemolytic activity, and caused down-regulation of the expression of the alkaline protease aprA gene in stringent response mutants grown on blood agar plates. Promoter fusions of relA or spoT to a bioluminescence reporter gene revealed that both genes were expressed during the formation of cutaneous abscesses in mice. Intriguingly, virulence was attenuated in vivo by the ΔrelA/ΔspoT double mutant, but not the relA mutant nor the ΔrelA/ΔspoT complemented with either gene. Treatment of a cutaneous P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection with anti-biofilm peptides increased animal welfare, decreased dermonecrotic lesion sizes, and reduced bacterial numbers recovered from abscesses, resembling the phenotype of the ΔrelA/ΔspoT infection. It was previously demonstrated by our lab that ppGpp could be targeted by synthetic peptides; here we demonstrated that spoT promoter activity was suppressed during cutaneous abscess formation by treatment with peptides DJK-5 and 1018, and that a peptide-treated relA complemented stringent response double mutant strain exhibited reduced peptide

  3. Achieving stringent climate targets. An analysis of the role of transport and variable renewable energies using energy-economy-climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietzcker, Robert Carl

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is threatening the welfare of mankind. Accordingly, policy makers have repeatedly stated the goal of slowing climate change and limiting the increase of global mean temperature to less than 2 C above pre-industrial times (the so-called ''two degree target''). Stabilizing the temperature requires drastic reductions of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to nearly zero. As the global system of energy supply currently relies on fossil fuels, reducing GHG emissions can only be achieved through a full-scale transformation of the energy system. This thesis investigates the economic requirements and implications of different scenarios that achieve stringent climate mitigation targets. It starts with the analysis of characteristic decarbonization patterns and identifies two particularly relevant aspects of mitigation scenarios: deployment of variable renewable energies (VRE) and decarbonization of the transport sector. After investigating these fields in detail, we turned towards one of the most relevant questions for policy makers and analyzed the trade-off between the stringency of a climate target and its economic requirements and implications. All analyses are based on the improvement, application, comparison, and discussion of large-scale IAMs. The novel ''mitigation share'' metric allowed us to identify the relevance of specific technology groups for mitigation and to improve our understanding of the decarbonization patterns of different energy subsectors. It turned out that the power sector is decarbonized first and reaches lowest emissions, while the transport sector is slowest to decarbonize. For the power sector, non-biomass renewable energies contribute most to emission reductions, while the transport sector strongly relies on liquid fuels and therefore requires biomass in combination with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) to reduce emissions. An in-depth investigation of the solar power

  4. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Witz

    Full Text Available Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  6. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  7. Structure-Function Relationship of a Plant NCS1 Member – Homology Modeling and Mutagenesis Identified Residues Critical for Substrate Specificity of PLUTO, a Nucleobase Transporter from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M. Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. PMID:24621654

  8. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  9. The All-Alpha Domains of Coupling Proteins from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB/VirD4 and Enterococcus faecalis pCF10-Encoded Type IV Secretion Systems Confer Specificity to Binding of Cognate DNA Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Neal; Chen, Yuqing; Jakubowski, Simon J; Sarkar, Mayukh K; Li, Feng; Christie, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) bind and mediate the delivery of DNA substrates through associated type IV secretion systems (T4SSs). T4CPs consist of a transmembrane domain, a conserved nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), and a sequence-variable helical bundle called the all-alpha domain (AAD). In the T4CP structural prototype, plasmid R388-encoded TrwB, the NBD assembles as a homohexamer resembling RecA and DNA ring helicases, and the AAD, which sits at the channel entrance of the homohexamer, is structurally similar to N-terminal domain 1 of recombinase XerD. Here, we defined the contributions of AADs from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirD4 and Enterococcus faecalis PcfC T4CPs to DNA substrate binding. AAD deletions abolished DNA transfer, whereas production of the AAD in otherwise wild-type donor strains diminished the transfer of cognate but not heterologous substrates. Reciprocal swaps of AADs between PcfC and VirD4 abolished the transfer of cognate DNA substrates, although strikingly, the VirD4-AADPcfC chimera (VirD4 with the PcfC AAD) supported the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid. Purified AADs from both T4CPs bound DNA substrates without sequence preference but specifically bound cognate processing proteins required for cleavage at origin-of-transfer sequences. The soluble domains of VirD4 and PcfC lacking their AADs neither exerted negative dominance in vivo nor specifically bound cognate processing proteins in vitro. Our findings support a model in which the T4CP AADs contribute to DNA substrate selection through binding of associated processing proteins. Furthermore, MOBQ plasmids have evolved a docking mechanism that bypasses the AAD substrate discrimination checkpoint, which might account for their capacity to promiscuously transfer through many different T4SSs. For conjugative transfer of mobile DNA elements, members of the VirD4/TraG/TrwB receptor superfamily bind cognate DNA substrates through mechanisms that are largely undefined. Here

  10. Revisiting the Nucleotide and Aminoglycoside Substrate Specificity of the Bifunctional Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (kcat/Km = 105-107 m−1 s−1). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:23115238

  11. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (β/α)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12†

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Kui K.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the (β/α)8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal (β/α)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates D-ribulose 5-phosphate and D-xylulose 5-phosphate in the ...

  12. Stringent factor and proteolysis control of sigma factor RpoS expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Philipp; Tutz, Sarah; Mutsam, Beatrice; Vorkapic, Dina; Heyne, Barbara; Grabner, Claudia; Kleewein, Katharina; Halscheidt, Anja; Schild, Stefan; Reidl, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae can colonize the gastrointestinal track of humans and cause the disease cholera. During colonization, the alternative sigma factor, RpoS, controls a process known as "mucosal escape response," defining a specific spatial and temporal response and effecting chemotaxis and motility. In this report, the expression and proteolytic control of RpoS in V. cholerae was characterized. To date, aspects of proteolysis control, the involved components, and proteolysis regulation have not been addressed for RpoS in V. cholerae. Similar to Escherichia coli, we find that the RpoS protein is subjected to regulated intracellular proteolysis, which is mediated by homologues of the proteolysis-targeting factor RssB and the protease complex ClpXP. As demonstrated, RpoS expression transiently peaks after cells are shifted from rich to minimal growth medium. This peak level is dependent on (p)ppGpp-activated rpoS transcription and controlled RpoS proteolysis. The RpoS peak level also correlates with induction of a chemotaxis gene, encoding a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, earlier identified to belong to the mucosal escape response pathway. These results suggest that the RpoS expression peak is linked to (p)ppGpp alarmone increase, leading to enhanced motility and chemotaxis, and possibly contributing to the mucosal escape response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. A rapid response air quality analysis system for use in projects having stringent quality assurance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to solve air quality problems which frequently occur during iterations of the baseline change process. From a schedule standpoint, it is desirable to perform this evaluation in as short a time as possible while budgetary pressures limit the size of the staff available to do the work. Without a method in place to deal with baseline change proposal requests the environment analysts may not be able to produce the analysis results in the time frame expected. Using a concept called the Rapid Response Air Quality Analysis System (RAAS), the problems of timing and cost become tractable. The system could be adapted to assess other atmospheric pathway impacts, e.g., acoustics or visibility. The air quality analysis system used to perform the EA analysis (EA) for the Salt Repository Project (part of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program), and later to evaluate the consequences of proposed baseline changes, consists of three components: Emission source data files; Emission rates contained in spreadsheets; Impact assessment model codes. The spreadsheets contain user-written codes (macros) that calculate emission rates from (1) emission source data (e.g., numbers and locations of sources, detailed operating schedules, and source specifications including horsepower, load factor, and duty cycle); (2) emission factors such as those published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) control efficiencies

  14. A stringently controlled expression system for analysing lateral gene transfer between bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenecke, S; de Lorenzo, V; Timmis, K N; Díaz, E

    1996-07-01

    The lateral transfer of genetic information among microorganisms is a major force driving the outstanding adaptability of microbial communities to environmental changes. Until now little information has been obtained on gene transfer in natural ecosystems. We present here a genetic circuit for detecting and quantifying horizontal gene transfer from a defined donor microorganism to recipient organisms in the absence of selection for a recipient-specific phenotype. The system consists of an engineered lacZ (encoding beta-galactosidase) reporter gene whose expression is controlled by a synthetic regulatory element based on a fusion between the Pr promoter-operator from lambda bacteriophage and the 5' non-coding leader region of the inp gene encoding the IS 10 transposase function. Expression of this reporter cassette in the recombinant microorganism is completely shut down by two chromosomally encoded trans-acting repressors working at the level of transcription (the Cl-EK117 protein from the lambda phage), and at the level of translation (the antisense RNA-OUT of the IS 10 element). When the reporter element is transferred to a different host by any mechanism, it escapes repression and becomes expressed. The system was validated with Pseudo-monas putida, and conjugational transfer frequencies of the reporter element as low as 10(-6) were detected. The modular design and broad host range of the genetic circuit, in combination with biomarkers which permit real-time in situ detection, will facilitate the monitor-ing of gene flow in a non-disruptive manner within the environment.

  15. NleB/SseK effectors from Citrobacter rodentium, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica display distinct differences in host substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Qaidi, Samir; Chen, Kangming; Halim, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    factor (TNF) Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) ubiquitination. These results provide evidence that members of this highly conserved family of bacterial virulence effectors target different host protein substrates and exhibit distinct cellular modes of action to suppress host responses.......Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use a syringe-like apparatus called a type III secretion system to inject virulence factors into host cells. Some of these effectors are enzymes that modify host proteins to subvert their normal functions. NleB is a glycosyltransferase that modifies host...... proteins with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to inhibit antibacterial and inflammatory host responses. NleB is conserved among the attaching/effacing pathogens enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium. Moreover, Salmonella enterica strains encode up to three Nle...

  16. The implementation of modern digital technology in x-ray medical diagnosis in Republic of Moldova - a stringent necessity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    The study includes analyses of current technical state of radiodiagnostic equipment from the Public Medico-Sanitary Institution of Ministry of Health of Republic of Moldova (IMSP MS RM). The traditional radiodiagnostic apparatuses were morally and physically outrun at 96,6% (in regional MSPI - 93,5%), inclusive the dental one - 92,0% (in raional MSPI - 97,2%), X-Ray exam -100%, mobile - 84,1% etc. The exploitation of the traditional radiodiagnostic apparatuses with high degree of physical and moral wear essentially diminished the quality of profile investigation, creates premises for diagnostic error perpetrating, increase the collective ionizing irradiation of population etc. In recent years the subvention of MSPI HM RM with digital radiodiagnostic equipment was started. This process is very hard unfold because of grave socio-economic crises in Republic of Moldova. Despite these obstacles the subvention of MSPI HM RM with digital equipment represents a stringent necessity and a time request.

  17. Conversion of recombinant hirudin to the natural form by in vitro tyrosine sulfation. Differential substrate specificities of leech and bovine tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehrs, C; Huttner, W B; Carvallo, D; Degryse, E

    1990-06-05

    Hirudin, a tyrosine-sulfated protein secreted by the leech Hirudo medicinalis, is one of the most potent anticoagulants known. The hirudin cDNA has previously been cloned and has been expressed in yeast, but the resulting recombinant protein was found to be produced in the unsulfated form, which is known to have an at least 10 times lower affinity for thrombin than the naturally occurring tyrosine-sulfated hirudin. Here we describe the in vitro tyrosine sulfation of recombinant hirudin by leech and bovine tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). With both enzymes, in vitro sulfation of recombinant hirudin occurred at the physiological site (Tyr-63) and rendered the protein biochemically and biologically indistinguishable from natural hirudin. However, leech TPST had an over 20-fold lower apparent Km value for recombinant hirudin than bovine TPST. Further differences in the catalytic properties of leech and bovine TPSTs were observed when synthetic peptides were tested as substrates. Moreover, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 9 carboxyl-terminal residues of hirudin (which include Tyr-63) was sulfated by leech TPST with a similar apparent Km value as full length hirudin, indicating that structural determinants residing in the immediate vicinity of Tyr-63 are sufficient for sulfation to occur.

  18. Comparison of multilabel and single-label classification applied to the prediction of the isoform specificity of cytochrome p450 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielan, Lisa; Terfloth, Lothar; Gasteiger, Johann; Moro, Stefano

    2009-11-01

    Each drug can potentially be metabolized by different CYP450 isoforms. In the development of new drugs, the prediction of the metabolic fate is important to prevent drug-drug interactions. In the present study, a collection of 580 CYP450 substrates is deeply analyzed by applying multi- and single-label classification strategies, after the computation and selection of suitable molecular descriptors. Cross-training with support vector machine, multilabel k-nearest-neighbor and counterpropagation neural network modeling methods were used in the multilabel approach, which allows one to classify the compounds simultaneously in multiple classes. In the single-label models, automatic variable selection was combined with various cross-validation experiments and modeling techniques. Moreover, the reliability of both multi- and single-label models was assessed by the prediction of an external test set. Finally, the predicted results of the best models were compared to show that, even if the models present similar performances, the multilabel approach more coherently reflects the real metabolism information.

  19. UDP-Glucosyltransferases from Rice, Brachypodium, and Barley: Substrate Specificities and Synthesis of Type A and B Trichothecene-3-O-β-d-glucosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlmayr, Herbert; Varga, Elisabeth; Malachová, Alexandra; Fruhmann, Philipp; Piątkowska, Marta; Hametner, Christian; Šofrová, Jana; Jaunecker, Günther; Häubl, Georg; Lemmens, Marc; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard

    2018-03-06

    Trichothecene toxins are confirmed or suspected virulence factors of various plant-pathogenic Fusarium species. Plants can detoxify these to a variable extent by glucosylation, a reaction catalyzed by UDP-glucosyltransferases (UGTs). Due to the unavailability of analytical standards for many trichothecene-glucoconjugates, information on such compounds is limited. Here, the previously identified deoxynivalenol-conjugating UGTs HvUGT13248 (barley), OsUGT79 (rice) and Bradi5g03300 ( Brachypodium ), were expressed in E. coli , affinity purified, and characterized towards their abilities to glucosylate the most relevant type A and B trichothecenes. HvUGT13248, which prefers nivalenol over deoxynivalenol, is also able to conjugate C-4 acetylated trichothecenes (e.g., T-2 toxin) to some degree while OsUGT79 and Bradi5g03300 are completely inactive with C-4 acetylated derivatives. The type A trichothecenes HT-2 toxin and T-2 triol are the kinetically preferred substrates in the case of HvUGT13248 and Bradi5g03300. We glucosylated several trichothecenes with OsUGT79 (HT-2 toxin, T-2 triol) and HvUGT13248 (T-2 toxin, neosolaniol, 4,15-diacetoxyscirpenol, fusarenon X) in the preparative scale. NMR analysis of the purified glucosides showed that exclusively β-D-glucosides were formed regio-selectively at position C-3-OH of the trichothecenes. These synthesized standards can be used to investigate the occurrence and toxicological properties of these modified mycotoxins.

  20. The mechanism of heterogeneous beta-lactam resistance in MRSA: key role of the stringent stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonkeun Kim

    Full Text Available All methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA strains carry an acquired genetic determinant--mecA or mecC--which encode for a low affinity penicillin binding protein -PBP2A or PBP2A'--that can continue the catalysis of peptidoglycan transpeptidation in the presence of high concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics which would inhibit the native PBPs normally involved with the synthesis of staphylococcal cell wall peptidoglycan. In contrast to this common genetic and biochemical mechanism carried by all MRSA strains, the level of beta-lactam antibiotic resistance shows a very wide strain to strain variation, the mechanism of which has remained poorly understood. The overwhelming majority of MRSA strains produce a unique--heterogeneous--phenotype in which the great majority of the bacteria exhibit very poor resistance often close to the MIC value of susceptible S. aureus strains. However, cultures of such heterogeneously resistant MRSA strains also contain subpopulations of bacteria with extremely high beta-lactam MIC values and the resistance level and frequency of the highly resistant cells in such strain is a characteristic of the particular MRSA clone. In the study described in this communication, we used a variety of experimental models to understand the mechanism of heterogeneous beta-lactam resistance. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA that received the mecA determinant in the laboratory either on a plasmid or in the form of a chromosomal SCCmec cassette, generated heterogeneously resistant cultures and the highly resistant subpopulations that emerged in these models had increased levels of PBP2A and were composed of bacteria in which the stringent stress response was induced. Each of the major heterogeneously resistant clones of MRSA clinical isolates could be converted to express high level and homogeneous resistance if the growth medium contained an inducer of the stringent stress response.

  1. Global energy scenarios meeting stringent CO2 constraints - cost-effective fuel choices in the transportation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar, Christian; Lindgren, Kristian; Andersson, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess fuel choices in the transportation sector under stringent global carbon constraints. Three key questions are asked: (i) when is it cost-effective to carry out the transition away from gasoline/diesel; (ii) to which fuel is it cost-effective to shift; and (iii) in which sector is biomass most cost-effectively used? These questions are analyzed using a global energy systems model (GET 1.0), with a transportation module, where vehicle costs (fuel cell, reformer and storage tank), infrastructure and primary energy availability are treated explicitly. The model is run under the assumption that atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 should be stabilized at 400 ppm. Three main results emerge: (i) despite the stringent CO 2 constraints, oil-based fuels remain dominant in the transportation sector over the next 50 years; and (ii) once a transition towards alternative fuels takes place, the preferred choice of fuel is hydrogen, even if we assume that hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are substantially more costly than methanol fuel cell vehicles. There may, under some circumstances, be a transient period of several decades with a significant share of methanol in the transportation sector. (iii) Biomass is most cost-effectively used in the heat and process heat sectors. If carbon sequestration from biomass is allowed, biomass is primarily used for hydrogen generation since small-scale heat applications are not suitable for carbon sequestration. Detailed sensitivity analyses show that these results are robust with respect to several parameters. Some policy conclusions are drawn

  2. Nuclear controls are stringent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnekus, D.

    1983-01-01

    The peace-time application of nuclear power in South Africa, the organisations concerned and certain provisions laid down by the Act on Nuclear Energy, aimed at safeguarding the general public, are discussed

  3. Substrate specificity of the electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A (SLC4A4, variant A) from humans and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Ki; Boron, Walter F; Parker, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    In the basolateral membrane of proximal-tubule cells, NBCe1-A (SLC4A4, variant A), operating with an apparent Na(+):HCO(3)(-) stoichiometry of 1:3, contributes to the reclamation of HCO(3)(-) from the glomerular filtrate, thereby preventing whole body acidosis. Others have reported that NBCe1-like activity in human, rabbit, and rat renal preparations is substantially influenced by lithium, sulfite, oxalate, and harmaline. These data were taken as evidence for the presence of distinct Na(+) and CO(3)(2-) binding sites in NBCe1-A, favoring a model of 1 Na(+):1 HCO(3)(-):1 CO(3)(2-). Here, we reexamine these findings by expressing human or rabbit NBCe1-A clones in Xenopus oocytes. In oocytes, NBCe1-A exhibits a 1:2 stoichiometry and could operate in one of five thermodynamically equivalent transport modes: 1) cotransport of Na(+) + 2 HCO(3)(-), 2) cotransport of Na(+) + CO(3)(2-), 3) transport of NaCO(3)(-), 4) exchange of Na(+) + HCO(3)(-) for H(+), or 5) HCO(3)(-)-activated exchange of Na(+) for 2 H(+). In contrast to the behavior of NBCe1-like activity in renal preparations, we find that cloned NBCe1-A is only slightly stimulated by Li(+), not at all influenced by sulfite or oxalate, and only weakly inhibited by harmaline. These negative data do not uniquely support any of the five models above. In addition, we find that NBCe1-A mediates a small amount of Na(+)-independent NO(3)(-) transport and that NBCe1-A is somewhat inhibited by extracellular benzamil. We suggest that the features of NBCe1-like activity in renal preparations are influenced by yet-to-be-identified renal factors. Thus the actual ionic substrates of NBCe1 remain to be identified.

  4. Substrate specificity, metal binding properties, and spectroscopic characterization of the DapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase from Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenue, David L; Gilner, Danuta M; Davis, Ryan S; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2003-09-16

    The catalytic and structural properties of divalent metal ion cofactor binding sites in the dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (DapE) from Haemophilus influenzae were investigated. Co(II)-substituted DapE enzyme was 25% more active than the Zn(II)-loaded form of the enzyme. Interestingly, Mn(II) can activate DapE, but only to approximately 20% of the Zn(II)-loaded enzyme. The order of the observed k(cat) values are Co(II) > Zn(II) > Cd(II) > Mn(II) >Ni(II) approximately equal Cu(II) approximately equal Mg(II). DapE was shown to only hydrolyze L,L-N-succinyl-diaminopimelic acid (L,L-SDAP) and was inactive toward D,L-, L,D-, and D,D-SDAP. DapE was also inactive toward several acetylated amino acids as well as D,L-succinyl aminopimelate, which differs from the natural substrate, L,L-SDAP, by the absence of the amine group on the amino acid side chain. These data imply that the carboxylate of the succinyl moiety and the amine form important interactions with the active site of DapE. The affinity of DapE for one versus two Zn(II) ions differs by nearly 2.2 x 10(3) times (K(d1) = 0.14 microM vs K(d2) = 300 microM). In addition, an Arrhenius plot was constructed from k(cat) values measured between 16 and 35 degrees C and was linear over this temperature range. The activation energy for [ZnZn(DapE)] was found to be 31 kJ/mol with the remaining thermodynamic parameters calculated at 25 degrees C being DeltaG(++) = 64 kJ/mol, DeltaH(++) = 28.5 kJ/mol, and DeltaS(++) = -119 J mol(-1) K(-1). Electronic absorption and EPR spectra of [Co_(DapE)] and [CoCo(DapE)] indicate that the first Co(II) binding site is five-coordinate, while the second site is octahedral. In addition, any spin-spin interaction between the two Co(II) ions in [CoCo(DapE)] is very weak. The kinetic and spectroscopic data presented herein suggest that the DapE from H. influenzae has similar divalent metal binding properties to the aminopeptidase from Aeromonas proteolytica (AAP), and

  5. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate.

  6. Chemical genetics reveals a specific requirement for Cdk2 activity in the DNA damage response and identifies Nbs1 as a Cdk2 substrate in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Wohlbold

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs that promote cell-cycle progression are targets for negative regulation by signals from damaged or unreplicated DNA, but also play active roles in response to DNA lesions. The requirement for activity in the face of DNA damage implies that there are mechanisms to insulate certain CDKs from checkpoint inhibition. It remains difficult, however, to assign precise functions to specific CDKs in protecting genomic integrity. In mammals, Cdk2 is active throughout S and G2 phases, but Cdk2 protein is dispensable for survival, owing to compensation by other CDKs. That plasticity obscured a requirement for Cdk2 activity in proliferation of human cells, which we uncovered by replacement of wild-type Cdk2 with a mutant version sensitized to inhibition by bulky adenine analogs. Here we show that transient, selective inhibition of analog-sensitive (AS Cdk2 after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR enhances cell-killing. In extracts supplemented with an ATP analog used preferentially by AS kinases, Cdk2(as phosphorylated the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome gene product Nbs1-a component of the conserved Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex required for normal DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling-dependent on a consensus CDK recognition site at Ser432. In vivo, selective inhibition of Cdk2 delayed and diminished Nbs1-Ser432 phosphorylation during S phase, and mutation of Ser432 to Ala or Asp increased IR-sensitivity. Therefore, by chemical genetics, we uncovered both a non-redundant requirement for Cdk2 activity in response to DNA damage and a specific target of Cdk2 within the DNA repair machinery.

  7. Kinetic characterization of recombinant Bacillus coagulans FDP-activated l-lactate dehydrogenase expressed in Escherichia coli and its substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Xu, Yanbing; Sun, Xiucheng; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ouyang, Jia

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a homofermentative, acid-tolerant and thermophilic sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, which is capable of producing high yields of optically pure lactic acid. The l-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH) from B. coagulans is considered as an ideal biocatalyst for industrial production. In this study, the gene ldhL encoding a thermostable l-LDH was amplified from B. coagulans NL01 genomic DNA and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and its enzymatic properties were characterized. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the l-LDH was a fructose 1,6-diphosphate-activated NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH). Its molecular weight was approximately 34-36kDa. The Km and Vmax values of the purified l-nLDH for pyruvate were 1.91±0.28mM and 2613.57±6.43μmol(minmg)(-1), respectively. The biochemical properties of l-nLDH showed that the specific activity were up to 2323.29U/mg with optimum temperature of 55°C and pH of 6.5 in the pyruvate reduction and 351.01U/mg with temperature of 55°C and pH of 11.5 in the lactate oxidation. The enzyme also showed some activity in the absence of FDP, with a pH optimum of 4.0. Compared to other lactic acid bacterial l-nLDHs, the enzyme was found to be relatively stable at 50°C. Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions had activated effects on the enzyme activity, and the enzyme was greatly inhibited by Ni(2+) ion. Besides these, l-nLDH showed the higher specificity towards pyruvate esters, such as methyl pyruvate and ethyl pyruvate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Are Dutch residents ready for a more stringent policy to enhance the energy performance of their homes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middelkoop, Manon van; Vringer, Kees; Visser, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Investments in the energy performance of houses offer good prospects for reducing energy consumption and CO 2 emissions. However, people are not easily convinced of the need to take measures to improve the energy performance of their houses, even when financial benefits outweigh the costs. This article analyses the factors that influence the decision for improving the energy performance of existing homes, including policy instruments. Subsequently, the article provides policy suggestions on how to stimulate energy performance improvements. Both owners and tenants (50–70%) support government policy on energy performance improvements to existing homes. Nevertheless, people also have strong feelings of autonomy regarding their homes. Our results underline the importance of well-informed and competent decision-makers. Introducing the use of Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) into the tax system for energy and residential buildings might therefore be an effective way to increase the interest of owners in the EPC, improve the use and effect of this informative instrument, and make the first step towards bridging the tension between autonomy and more stringent instruments.

  9. Pre-induced Lac Operon Effect on Non Specific Sugars: Pre-culture Effect is Dependent on Strength of Induction, Exponential Phase and Substrate Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    The source and history of the cell plays an important role in influencing the phenotypic properties of the organism in a particular environmental condition. Pre-induced lac operon provides benefit on lactose environment. During metabolism lactose is broken down into glucose and galactose. The fate of cells with pre-induced lac operon on glucose and galactose milieu is not known. The influence of nutritional status of the medium, level of pre-induction and growth phase on pre-culture effect is not investigated. Effect of pre-induced lac operon on non specific sugars along with the factors that influence this effect was enumerated in the present study. Results of this present study indicate that pre-induced lac operon provide benefit in terms of growth on galactose milieu. This study also suggests that Pre induced lac operon effect depends on the (i) strength of induction in the pre-culture, (ii) nutritional content of the environment and (iii) exponential growth phase of the organism. The above study will help in the better characterization of the pre culture effect. It will also help in the better understanding of the relation between gene expression and growth physiology.

  10. The Histone-H3K4-Specific Demethylase KDM5B Binds to Its Substrate and Product through Distinct PHD Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna J. Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The histone lysine demethylase KDM5B regulates gene transcription and cell differentiation and is implicated in carcinogenesis. It contains multiple conserved chromatin-associated domains, including three PHD fingers of unknown function. Here, we show that the first and third, but not the second, PHD fingers of KDM5B possess histone binding activities. The PHD1 finger is highly specific for unmodified histone H3 (H3K4me0, whereas the PHD3 finger shows preference for the trimethylated histone mark H3K4me3. RNA-seq analysis indicates that KDM5B functions as a transcriptional repressor for genes involved in inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. Biochemical analysis reveals that KDM5B associates with components of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD complex and may cooperate with the histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 in gene repression. KDM5B is downregulated in triple-negative breast cancer relative to estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Overexpression of KDM5B in the MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasion, and the PHD1-H3K4me0 interaction is essential for inhibiting migration. These findings highlight tumor-suppressive functions of KDM5B in triple-negative breast cancer cells and suggest a multivalent mechanism for KDM5B-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  11. Protease activity of PprI facilitates DNA damage response: Mn2+-dependence and substrate sequence-specificity of the proteolytic reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Wang

    Full Text Available The extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extraordinary resistance to ionizing radiation. Previous studies established that a protein named PprI, which exists only in the Deinococcus-Thermus family, acts as a general switch to orchestrate the expression of a number of DNA damage response (DDR proteins involved in cellular radio-resistance. Here we show that the regulatory mechanism of PprI depends on its Mn(2+-dependent protease activity toward DdrO, a transcription factor that suppresses DDR genes' expression. Recognition sequence-specificity around the PprI cleavage site is essential for DNA damage repair in vivo. PprI and DdrO mediate a novel DNA damage response pathway differing from the classic LexA-mediated SOS response system found in radiation-sensitive bacterium Escherichia coli. This PprI-mediated pathway in D. radiodurans is indispensable for its extreme radio-resistance and therefore its elucidation significantly advances our understanding of the DNA damage repair mechanism in this amazing organism.

  12. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  13. Stringent constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section from subhalo searches with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The dark matter halo of the Milky Way is predicted to contain a very large number of smaller subhalos. As a result of the dark matter annihilations taking place within such objects, the most nearby and massive subhalos could appear as point-like or spatially extended gamma-ray sources, without observable counterparts at other wavelengths. In this paper, we use the results of the Aquarius simulation to predict the distribution of nearby subhalos, and compare this to the characteristics of the unidentified gamma-ray sources observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Focusing on the brightest high latitude sources, we use this comparison to derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section. For dark matter particles lighter than ~200 GeV, the resulting limits are the strongest obtained to date, being modestly more stringent than those derived from observations of dwarf galaxies or the Galactic Center. We also derive independent limits based on the lack of unidentified gamma-ray sources with discernible spatial extension, but these limits are a factor of ~2-10 weaker than those based on point-like subhalos. Lastly, we note that four of the ten brightest high-latitude sources exhibit a similar spectral shape, consistent with 30-60 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to b quarks with an annihilation cross section on the order of sigma v ~ (5-10) x 10^-27 cm^3/s, or 8-10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to taus with sigma v ~ (2.0-2.5) x 10^-27 cm^3/s.

  14. Viral vaccines and their manufacturing cell substrates: New trends and designs in modern vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana F; Soares, Hugo R; Guerreiro, Miguel R; Alves, Paula M; Coroadinha, Ana S

    2015-09-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective interventions in global health. The worldwide vaccination programs significantly reduced the number of deaths caused by infectious agents. A successful example was the eradication of smallpox in 1979 after two centuries of vaccination campaigns. Since the first variolation administrations until today, the knowledge on immunology has increased substantially. This knowledge combined with the introduction of cell culture and DNA recombinant technologies revolutionized vaccine design. This review will focus on vaccines against human viral pathogens, recent developments on vaccine design and cell substrates used for their manufacture. While the production of attenuated and inactivated vaccines requires the use of the respective permissible cell substrates, the production of recombinant antigens, virus-like particles, vectored vaccines and chimeric vaccines requires the use - and often the development - of specific cell lines. Indeed, the development of novel modern viral vaccine designs combined with, the stringent safety requirements for manufacture, and the better understanding on animal cell metabolism and physiology are increasing the awareness on the importance of cell line development and engineering areas. A new era of modern vaccinology is arriving, offering an extensive toolbox to materialize novel and creative ideas in vaccine design and its manufacture. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Hepatitis C virus NS5A is a direct substrate of casein kinase I-alpha, a cellular kinase identified by inhibitor affinity chromatography using specific NS5A hyperphosphorylation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, Manuela; Sambucini, Sonia; Summa, Vincenzo; Orsatti, Laura; Talamo, Fabio; De Francesco, Raffaele; Neddermann, Petra

    2007-02-23

    The hepatitis C virus encodes a single polyprotein that is processed by host and viral proteases to yield at least 10 mature viral proteins. The nonstructural (NS) protein 5A is a phosphoprotein, and experimental data indicate that the phosphorylation state of NS5A is important for the outcome of viral RNA replication. We were able to identify kinase inhibitors that specifically inhibit the formation of the hyperphosphorylated form of NS5A (p58) in cells. These kinase inhibitors were used for inhibitor affinity chromatography in order to identify the cellular targets of these compounds. The kinases casein kinase I (CKI), p38 MAPK, CIT (Citron Rho-interacting kinase), GAK, JNK2, PKA, RSK1/2, and RIPK2 were identified in the high affinity binding fractions of two NS5A hyperphosphorylation inhibitors (NS5A-p58-i). Even though these kinases are targets of the NS5A-p58-i, the only kinase showing an effect on NS5A hyperphosphorylation was confirmed to be CKI-alpha. Although this finding does not exclude the possibility that other kinase(s) might be involved in basal or regulatory phosphorylation of NS5A, we show here that NS5A is a direct substrate of CKI-alpha. Moreover, in vitro phosphorylation of NS5A by CKI-alpha resulted for the first time in the production of basal and hyperphosphorylated forms resembling those produced in cells. In vitro kinase reactions performed with NS5A peptides show that Ser-2204 is a preferred substrate residue for CKI-alpha after pre-phosphorylation of Ser-2201.

  16. Global gene expression during stringent response in Corynebacterium glutamicum in presence and absence of the rel gene encoding (pppGpp synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski Jörn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The stringent response is the initial reaction of microorganisms to nutritional stress. During stringent response the small nucleotides (pppGpp act as global regulators and reprogram bacterial transcription. In this work, the genetic network controlled by the stringent response was characterized in the amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results The transcriptome of a C. glutamicum rel gene deletion mutant, unable to synthesize (pppGpp and to induce the stringent response, was compared with that of its rel-proficient parent strain by microarray analysis. A total of 357 genes were found to be transcribed differentially in the rel-deficient mutant strain. In a second experiment, the stringent response was induced by addition of DL-serine hydroxamate (SHX in early exponential growth phase. The time point of the maximal effect on transcription was determined by real-time RT-PCR using the histidine and serine biosynthetic genes. Transcription of all of these genes reached a maximum at 10 minutes after SHX addition. Microarray experiments were performed comparing the transcriptomes of SHX-induced cultures of the rel-proficient strain and the rel mutant. The differentially expressed genes were grouped into three classes. Class A comprises genes which are differentially regulated only in the presence of an intact rel gene. This class includes the non-essential sigma factor gene sigB which was upregulated and a large number of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism which were downregulated. Class B comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX in both strains, independent of the rel gene. A large number of genes encoding ribosomal proteins fall into this class, all being downregulated. Class C comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX only in the rel mutant. This class includes genes encoding putative stress proteins and global transcriptional regulators that might be

  17. The Penicillium chrysogenum aclA gene encodes a broad-substrate-specificity acyl-coenzyme A ligase involved in activation of adipic acid, a side-chain precursor for cephem antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Gombert, Andreas K; Fekken, Susan; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van den Berg, Marco A; Kiel, Jan A K W; Jekel, Peter A; Janssen, Dick B; Pronk, Jack T; van der Klei, Ida J; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the cephalosporin side-chain precursor to the corresponding CoA-thioester is an essential step for its incorporation into the beta-lactam backbone. To identify an acyl-CoA ligase involved in activation of adipate, we searched in the genome database of Penicillium chrysogenum for putative structural genes encoding acyl-CoA ligases. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis was used to identify the one presenting the highest expression level when cells were grown in the presence of adipate. Deletion of the gene renamed aclA, led to a 32% decreased specific rate of adipate consumption and a threefold reduction of adipoyl-6-aminopenicillanic acid levels, but did not affect penicillin V production. After overexpression in Escherichia coli, the purified protein was shown to have a broad substrate range including adipate. Finally, protein-fusion with cyan-fluorescent protein showed co-localization with microbody-borne acyl-transferase. Identification and functional characterization of aclA may aid in developing future metabolic engineering strategies for improving the production of different cephalosporins.

  18. The activation loop of PIP5K functions as a membrane sensor essential for lipid substrate processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aizhuo; Sui, Dexin; Wu, Dianqing; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K), a representative member of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) family, is a major enzyme that biosynthesizes the signaling molecule PI(4,5)P2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) in eukaryotic cells. The stringent specificity toward lipid substrates and the high sensitivity to the membrane environment strongly suggest a membrane-sensing mechanism, but the underlying structural basis is still largely unknown. We present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on a peptide commensurate with a PIP5K’s activation loop, which has been reported to be a determinant of lipid substrate specificity and subcellular localization of PIP5K. Although the activation loop is severely disordered in the crystal structure of PIP5K, the NMR experiments showed that the largely unstructured peptide folded into an amphipathic helix upon its association with the 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) micellar surface. Systematic mutagenesis and functional assays further demonstrated the crucial roles of the amphipathic helix and its hydrophobic surface in kinase activity and membrane-sensing function, supporting a working model in which the activation loop is a critical structural module conferring a membrane-sensing mechanism on PIP5K. The activation loop, surprisingly functioning as a membrane sensor, represents a new paradigm of kinase regulation by the activation loop through protein-membrane interaction, which also lays a foundation on the regulation of PIP5K (and other PIPKs) by membrane lipids for future studies. PMID:28138522

  19. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.; Sishtla, K.; Glucksman, M. J.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Chicago Medical School

    2005-05-05

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobic is the scissile bond.

  20. Dual Regulation of Bacillus subtilis kinB Gene Encoding a Sporulation Trigger by SinR through Transcription Repression and Positive Stringent Transcription Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutaro Fujita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that transcription of kinB encoding a trigger for Bacillus subtilis sporulation is under repression by SinR, a master repressor of biofilm formation, and under positive stringent transcription control depending on the adenine species at the transcription initiation nucleotide (nt. Deletion and base substitution analyses of the kinB promoter (PkinB region using lacZ fusions indicated that either a 5-nt deletion (Δ5, nt -61/-57, +1 is the transcription initiation nt or the substitution of G at nt -45 with A (G-45A relieved kinB repression. Thus, we found a pair of SinR-binding consensus sequences (GTTCTYT; Y is T or C in an inverted orientation (SinR-1 between nt -57/-42, which is most likely a SinR-binding site for kinB repression. This relief from SinR repression likely requires SinI, an antagonist of SinR. Surprisingly, we found that SinR is essential for positive stringent transcription control of PkinB. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA analysis indicated that SinR bound not only to SinR-1 but also to SinR-2 (nt -29/-8 consisting of another pair of SinR consensus sequences in a tandem repeat arrangement; the two sequences partially overlap the ‘-35’ and ‘-10’ regions of PkinB. Introduction of base substitutions (T-27C C-26T in the upstream consensus sequence of SinR-2 affected positive stringent transcription control of PkinB, suggesting that SinR binding to SinR-2 likely causes this positive control. EMSA also implied that RNA polymerase and SinR are possibly bound together to SinR-2 to form a transcription initiation complex for kinB transcription. Thus, it was suggested in this work that derepression of kinB from SinR repression by SinI induced by Spo0A∼P and occurrence of SinR-dependent positive stringent transcription control of kinB might induce effective sporulation cooperatively, implying an intimate interplay by stringent response, sporulation, and biofilm formation.

  1. Substrate Specificity of the Bacillus licheniformis Lyxose Isomerase YdaE and Its Application in In Vitro Catalysis for Bioproduction of Lyxose and Glucose by Two-Step Isomerization ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan H.; Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Seong-Gene; Lee, Dae-Seok; Song, Youn-ho; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic processes are useful for industrially important sugar production, and in vitro two-step isomerization has proven to be an efficient process in utilizing readily available sugar sources. A hypothetical uncharacterized protein encoded by ydaE of Bacillus licheniformis was found to have broad substrate specificities and has shown high catalytic efficiency on d-lyxose, suggesting that the enzyme is d-lyxose isomerase. Escherichia coli BL21 expressing the recombinant protein, of 19.5 kDa, showed higher activity at 40 to 45°C and pH 7.5 to 8.0 in the presence of 1.0 mM Mn2+. The apparent Km values for d-lyxose and d-mannose were 30.4 ± 0.7 mM and 26 ± 0.8 mM, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for lyxose (3.2 ± 0.1 mM−1 s−1) was higher than that for d-mannose (1.6 mM−1 s−1). The purified protein was applied to the bioproduction of d-lyxose and d-glucose from d-xylose and d-mannose, respectively, along with the thermostable xylose isomerase of Thermus thermophilus HB08. From an initial concentration of 10 mM d-lyxose and d-mannose, 3.7 mM and 3.8 mM d-lyxose and d-glucose, respectively, were produced by two-step isomerization. This two-step isomerization is an easy method for in vitro catalysis and can be applied to industrial production. PMID:21421786

  2. Substrate specificity of the Bacillus licheniformis lyxose isomerase YdaE and its application in in vitro catalysis for bioproduction of lyxose and glucose by two-step isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan H; Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Seong-Gene; Lee, Dae-Seok; Song, Youn-ho; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Enzymatic processes are useful for industrially important sugar production, and in vitro two-step isomerization has proven to be an efficient process in utilizing readily available sugar sources. A hypothetical uncharacterized protein encoded by ydaE of Bacillus licheniformis was found to have broad substrate specificities and has shown high catalytic efficiency on D-lyxose, suggesting that the enzyme is D-lyxose isomerase. Escherichia coli BL21 expressing the recombinant protein, of 19.5 kDa, showed higher activity at 40 to 45°C and pH 7.5 to 8.0 in the presence of 1.0 mM Mn²+. The apparent K(m) values for D-lyxose and D-mannose were 30.4 ± 0.7 mM and 26 ± 0.8 mM, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for lyxose (3.2 ± 0.1 mM⁻¹ s⁻¹) was higher than that for D-mannose (1.6 mM⁻¹ s⁻¹). The purified protein was applied to the bioproduction of D-lyxose and D-glucose from d-xylose and D-mannose, respectively, along with the thermostable xylose isomerase of Thermus thermophilus HB08. From an initial concentration of 10 mM D-lyxose and D-mannose, 3.7 mM and 3.8 mM D-lyxose and D-glucose, respectively, were produced by two-step isomerization. This two-step isomerization is an easy method for in vitro catalysis and can be applied to industrial production.

  3. Ketone Bodies as Brain Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Paula Sofia Valente da

    2015-01-01

    SILVA, Paula Sofia Valente da - Ketone Bodies as Brain Substrates. Coimbra : [s.n.], 2015. Dissertação de Mestrado em Bioquimica. Since their discovery as a marker for diabetic ketoacidosis, ketone bodies have become known for their therapeutic role as effective agents in refractory epilepsy and a diet specifically designed to increase ketone bodies’ levels in circulation has been often prescribed as treatment. In the classical ketogenic diet, intake of even small additional amounts of car...

  4. Fluorogenic substrate [Ala-Pro](2)-cresyl violet but not Ala-Pro-rhodamine 110 is cleaved specifically by DPPIV activity: A study in living Jurkat cells and CD26/DPPIV-transfected Jurkat cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, Emil; Elferink, Sjoerd; Bardai, Abdennasser; Fleischer, Bernard; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorogenic substrates [Ala-Pro](2)-cresyl violet and Ala-Pro-rhodamine 110 have been tested for microscopic detection of protease activity of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) in living cells. DPPIV activity is one of the many functions of the multifunctional or moonlighting protein CD26/DPPIV. As a

  5. Membrane-bound dd-carboxypeptidases from Bacillus megaterium KM. General properties, substrate specificity and sensitivity to penicillins, cephalosporins and peptide inhibitors of the activity at pH5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Mauriño, Teresa; Nieto, Manuel; Perkins, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    1. The membrane from Bacillus megaterium KM contained a dd-carboxypeptidase with optimum activity under the following conditions: pH5.2, bivalent cation, 3mm; ionic strength, 40mm; temperature, 35°C. It was inactivated by treatment with p-chloromercuribenzoate but was fairly insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol. 2. The enzyme was inhibited by penicillins and cephalosporins. The inhibition of this enzyme was partially reversed on dialysis but 0.2m-2-mercaptoethanol could neither prevent nor reverse the inhibition. 3. The enzyme was extremely sensitive to changes in the configuration and size of the side chain of the C-terminal dipeptide of the substrate. An aliphatic side chain of a well-defined length and polarity was required in the residue that precedes the C-terminal dipeptide. 4. The enzyme was inhibited by a wide range of analogues of the peptidic portion of the natural substrate. PMID:4218954

  6. Sensor Substrate Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Novel substrates, such as aerogels and porous, low density ceramics may increase the sensitivities of chemical reaction-based sensors for toxic vapors. These sensors...

  7. Historic and future trends of vehicle emissions in Beijing, 1998-2020: A policy assessment for the most stringent vehicle emission control program in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Wu, Xiaomeng; Li, Mengliang; Ge, Yunshan; Liang, Bin; Xu, Yueyun; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Huan; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2014-06-01

    As a pioneer in controlling vehicle emissions within China, Beijing released the Clean Air Action Plan 2013-2017 document in August 2013 to improve its urban air quality. It has put forward this plan containing the most stringent emission control policies and strategies to be adopted for on-road vehicles of Beijing. This paper estimates the historic and future trends and uncertainties in vehicle emissions of Beijing from 1998 to 2020 by applying a new emission factor model for the Beijing vehicle fleet (EMBEV). Our updated results show that total emissions of CO, THC, NOx and PM2.5 from the Beijing vehicle fleet are 507 (395-819) kt, 59.1 (41.2-90.5) kt, 74.7 (54.9-103.9) kt and 2.69 (1.91-4.17) kt, respectively, at a 95% confidence level. This represents significant reductions of 58%, 59%, 31% and 62%, respectively, relative to the total vehicle emissions in 1998. The past trends clearly posed a challenge to NOx emission mitigation for the Beijing vehicle fleet, especially in light of those increasing NOx emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) which have partly offset the reduction benefit from light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs). Because of recently announced vehicle emission controls to be adopted in Beijing, including tighter emissions standards, limitations on vehicle growth by more stringent license control, promotion of alternative fuel technologies (e.g., natural gas) and the scrappage of older vehicles, estimated vehicle emissions in Beijing will continue to be mitigated by 74% of CO, 68% of THC, 56% of NOx and 72% of PM2.5 in 2020 compared to 2010 levels. Considering that many of the megacities in China are facing tremendous pressures to mitigate emissions from on-road vehicles, our assessment will provide a timely case study of significance for policy-makers in China.

  8. Decoding P4-ATPase substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Bartholomew P; Graham, Todd R

    Cellular membranes display a diversity of functions that are conferred by the unique composition and organization of their proteins and lipids. One important aspect of lipid organization is the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids (PLs) across the plasma membrane. The unequal distribution of key PLs between the cytofacial and exofacial leaflets of the bilayer creates physical surface tension that can be used to bend the membrane; and like Ca 2+ , a chemical gradient that can be used to transduce biochemical signals. PL flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase (P4-ATPase) family are the principle transporters used to set and repair this PL gradient and the asymmetric organization of these membranes are encoded by the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of P4-ATPase substrate specificity will help reveal their role in membrane organization and cell biology. Further, decoding the structural determinants of substrate specificity provides investigators the opportunity to mutationally tune this specificity to explore the role of particular PL substrates in P4-ATPase cellular functions. This work reviews the role of P4-ATPases in membrane biology, presents our current understanding of P4-ATPase substrate specificity, and discusses how these fundamental aspects of P4-ATPase enzymology may be used to enhance our knowledge of cellular membrane biology.

  9. Growth of lettuce seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Rodrigues Peres

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the growth of lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Veronica cultivated under greenhouse conditions, using polystyrene trays with 128 cells and three different commercial substrates: Golden Mix, Plantmax and Plugmix. The statistical design was in the form of randomized blocks, with eight (8 replications. Fifteen days after sowing the seeds, samples (five in total of plants were taken to evaluate the height, number of leaves, leaf area, leaf specific area, leaf specific weight, absolute and relative growth rates and net assimilation rates. The evaluated growth indexes showed that seedlings produced with the Plantmax and Plugmix substrates could be planted 25 days after sowing, since they have at least four definitive leaves. The Plantmax substrate showed, at the end of the evaluation, the best results in height, dry weight, leaf specific area, absolute growth rates and net assimilation rates.

  10. Coating of substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.A.; Nelson, R.L.; Woodhead, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The process is concerned with providing substrates with coatings obtainable from sols, for example to protect the substrate (such as in nuclear reactors or hydrocarbon cracking plant) or to provide a carrier for catalytically active material. Hitherto, coatings obtained from sols have had a high porosity and high surface area so that they have not been entirely satisfactory for the above applications. In the process described, dense, low-porosity coatings are provided by contacting the substrate with a sol of refractory material (e.g. CeO 2 or SiO 2 ) convertible to a gel of density at least 40% of the theoretical density of the refractory material, and converting the sol to the gel. Optionally, the gel may be converted to a ceramic coating by firing. (author)

  11. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    not on the amount of ligand for adhesion receptors, but on its spatial distribution [1]. New protocols for the preparation of soft elastic substrates were essential to show that adhesion structures and cytoskeleton of adherent cells strongly adapt to substrate stiffness [2], with dramatic effects for cellular decision making. For example, it has been shown recently that differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is strongly influenced by substrate stiffness [3]. Thus, physical factors appear to be equally important as biochemical ones in determining the cellular response to its substrate [4]. The introduction of novel physical techniques not only opened up completely new perspectives regarding biological function, it also introduced a new quantitative element into this field. For example, the availability of soft elastic substrates with controlled stiffness allows us to reconstruct cellular traction forces and to correlate them with other cellular features. This development enables modeling approaches to work in close contact with experimental data, thus opening up the perspective that the field of cell-substrate interactions will become a quantitative and predictive science in the future. Because physical research into cell-substrate interactions has become one of the fastest growing research areas in cellular biophysics and materials science, we believe that it is very timely that this special issue gathers some of the on-going research effort in this field. In contrast to the non-living world, cellular systems usually interact with their environment through specific adhesion, mainly based on adhesion receptors from the integrin family. During recent years, force spectroscopy has emerged as one of the main methods to study the physics of specific adhesion. In this special issue, single cell force spectroscopy is used by Boettiger and Wehrle-Haller to characterize the strength of cell-matrix adhesion and how it is modulated by the glycocalyx [5], while Chirasatitsin

  12. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a key issue for the applications of plasmonic substrates such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, enhanced optical biosensing, optical and optoelectronic plasmonic nanosensors and others. A novel approach for the fabrication of robust plasmonic...... substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...

  13. Transferring substrates to the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Seeger, Michael; Gordon, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is not only involved in the recycling of amino acids from damaged or misfolded proteins but also represents an essential and deftly controlled mechanism for modulating the levels of key regulatory proteins. Chains of ubiquitin conjugated to a substrate...... protein specifically target it for degradation by the 26S proteasome, a huge multi-subunit protein complex found in all eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have clarified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the transfer of ubiquitinated substrates from the ubiquitination machinery to the proteasome....... This novel substrate transportation step in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway seems to occur either directly or indirectly via certain substrate-recruiting proteins and appears to involve chaperones....

  14. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  15. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  16. WARM JUPITERS NEED CLOSE ''FRIENDS'' FOR HIGH-ECCENTRICITY MIGRATION—A STRINGENT UPPER LIMIT ON THE PERTURBER'S SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Subo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Dr., Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We propose a stringent observational test on the formation of warm Jupiters (gas-giant planets with 10 days ≲ P ≲ 100 days) by high-eccentricity (high-e) migration mechanisms. Unlike hot Jupiters, the majority of observed warm Jupiters have pericenter distances too large to allow efficient tidal dissipation to induce migration. To access the close pericenter required for migration during a Kozai-Lidov cycle, they must be accompanied by a strong enough perturber to overcome the precession caused by general relativity, placing a strong upper limit on the perturber's separation. For a warm Jupiter at a ∼ 0.2 AU, a Jupiter-mass (solar-mass) perturber is required to be ≲ 3 AU (≲ 30 AU) and can be identified observationally. Among warm Jupiters detected by radial velocities (RVs), ≳ 50% (5 out of 9) with large eccentricities (e ≳ 0.4) have known Jovian companions satisfying this necessary condition for high-e migration. In contrast, ≲ 20% (3 out of 17) of the low-e (e ≲ 0.2) warm Jupiters have detected additional Jovian companions, suggesting that high-e migration with planetary perturbers may not be the dominant formation channel. Complete, long-term RV follow-ups of the warm-Jupiter population will allow a firm upper limit to be put on the fraction of these planets formed by high-e migration. Transiting warm Jupiters showing spin-orbit misalignments will be interesting to apply our test. If the misalignments are solely due to high-e migration as commonly suggested, we expect that the majority of warm Jupiters with low-e (e ≲ 0.2) are not misaligned, in contrast with low-e hot Jupiters.

  17. Inducible Expression of Agrobacterium Virulence Gene VirE2 for Stringent Regulation of T-DNA Transfer in Plant Transient Expression Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkovskienė, Erna; Paškevičius, Šarūnas; Werner, Stefan; Gleba, Yuri; Ražanskienė, Aušra

    2015-11-01

    Agrotransfection with viral vectors is an effective solution for the transient production of valuable proteins in plants grown in contained facilities. Transfection methods suitable for field applications are desirable for the production of high-volume products and for the transient molecular reprogramming of plants. The use of genetically modified (GM) Agrobacterium strains for plant transfections faces substantial biosafety issues. The environmental biosafety of GM Agrobacterium strains could be improved by regulating their T-DNA transfer via chemically inducible expression of virE2, one of the essential Agrobacterium virulence genes. In order to identify strong and stringently regulated promoters in Agrobacterium strains, we evaluated isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside-inducible promoters Plac, Ptac, PT7/lacO, and PT5/lacOlacO and cumic acid-inducible promoters PlacUV5/CuO, Ptac/CuO, PT5/CuO, and PvirE/CuO. Nicotiana benthamiana plants were transfected with a virE2-deficient A. tumefaciens strain containing transient expression vectors harboring inducible virE2 expression cassettes and containing a marker green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in their T-DNA region. Evaluation of T-DNA transfer was achieved by counting GFP expression foci on plant leaves. The virE2 expression from cumic acid-induced promoters resulted in 47 to 72% of wild-type T-DNA transfer. Here, we present efficient and tightly regulated promoters for gene expression in A. tumefaciens and a novel approach to address environmental biosafety concerns in agrobiotechnology.

  18. Cortical substrates for the perception of face actions: an fMRI study of the specificity of activation for seen speech and for meaningless lower-face acts (gurning).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R; MacSweeney, M; Surguladze, S; Calvert, G; McGuire, P; Suckling, J; Brammer, M J; David, A S

    2001-10-01

    Can the cortical substrates for the perception of face actions be distinguished when the superficial visual qualities of these actions are very similar? Two fMRI experiments are reported. Compared with watching the face at rest, observing silent speech was associated with bilateral activation in a number of temporal cortical regions, including the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Watching face movements of similar extent and duration, but which could not be construed as speech (gurning; Experiment 1b) was not associated with activation of superior temporal cortex to the same extent, especially in the left hemisphere. Instead, the peak focus of the largest cluster of activation was in the posterior part of the inferior temporal gyrus (right, BA 37). Observing silent speech, but not gurning faces, was also associated with bilateral activation of inferior frontal cortex (BA 44 and 45). In a second study, speechreading and observing gurning faces were compared within a single experiment, using stimuli which comprised the speaker's face and torso (and hence a much smaller image of the speaker's face and facial actions). There was again differential engagement of superior temporal cortex which followed the pattern of Experiment 1. These findings suggest that superior temporal gyrus and neighbouring regions are activated bilaterally when subjects view face actions--at different scales--that can be interpreted as speech. This circuitry is not accessed to the same extent by visually similar, but linguistically meaningless actions. However, some temporal regions, such as the posterior part of the right superior temporal sulcus, appear to be common processing sites for processing both seen speech and gurns.

  19. Species specific inhibition of viral replication using dicer substrate siRNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting the viral nucleoprotein of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohle, Harry; Lorenzen, Niels; Schyth, Brian Dall

    2011-01-01

    Gene knock down by the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is widely used as a method for reducing the expression of specific genes in eukaryotic cells via the RNA interference pathway. But, the effectivity of siRNA induced gene knock down in cells from fish has in several studies been questio...

  20. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  1. Modification of chitin as substrates for chitinase | Herdyastuti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymes are able to bind to their substrates specifically at the active site. The proximity and orientation of the substrates strongly increase the likelihood that productive E–S complexes will arise. Treated chitin (powder or flake) is more efficient than crystalline chitin. This is because the latter is less active due to its insolubility ...

  2. Identification of secreted proteins of Aspergillus oryzae associated with growth on solid cereal substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Boussier, A.; Biezen, de N.; Hondel, van den C.; Punt, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Filamentous growth of Aspergillus oryzae on solid cereal substrates involves secretion of substrate converting enzymes and a solid substrate specific polarised hyphal growth phenotype. To identify proteins produced under these specific conditions, the extracts of A. oryzae grown on wheat-based media

  3. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orza, Anamaria I; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K; Biris, Alexandru S; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues. (paper)

  4. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  5. Rhizobium leguminosarum has a second general amino acid permease with unusually broad substrate specificity and high similarity to branched-chain amino acid transporters (Bra/LIV) of the ABC family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosie, A H F; Allaway, D; Galloway, C S; Dunsby, H A; Poole, P S

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid uptake by Rhizobium leguminosarum is dominated by two ABC transporters, the general amino acid permease (Aap) and the branched-chain amino acid permease (Bra(Rl)). Characterization of the solute specificity of Bra(Rl) shows it to be the second general amino acid permease of R. leguminosarum. Although Bra(Rl) has high sequence identity to members of the family of hydrophobic amino acid transporters (HAAT), it transports a broad range of solutes, including acidic and basic polar amino acids (L-glutamate, L-arginine, and L-histidine), in addition to neutral amino acids (L-alanine and L-leucine). While amino and carboxyl groups are required for transport, solutes do not have to be alpha-amino acids. Consistent with this, Bra(Rl) is the first ABC transporter to be shown to transport gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). All previously identified bacterial GABA transporters are secondary carriers of the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily. Also, transport by Bra(Rl) does not appear to be stereospecific as D amino acids cause significant inhibition of uptake of L-glutamate and L-leucine. Unlike all other solutes tested, L-alanine uptake is not dependent on solute binding protein BraC(Rl). Therefore, a second, unidentified solute binding protein may interact with the BraDEFG(Rl) membrane complex during L-alanine uptake. Overall, the data indicate that Bra(Rl) is a general amino acid permease of the HAAT family. Furthermore, Bra(Rl) has the broadest solute specificity of any characterized bacterial amino acid transporter.

  6. A novel low specific on-resistance double-gate LDMOS with multiple buried p-layers in the drift region based on the Silicon-On-Insulator substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinhui; Hu, Shengdong; Cheng, Kun; Jiang, YuYu; Luo, Jun; Wang, Jian'an; Tang, Fang; Zhou, Xichuan; Zhou, Jianlin; Gan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A novel double-gate SOI LDMOS with multiple buried p-layers in the drift region (MBP SOI LDMOS) is proposed in this paper. MBP SOI LDMOS has two gates, the planar gate and the trench gate. The big feature of MBP LDMOS is the multiple buried p-layers with intervals in the drift region which is an arithmetic progression and decreases successively. Firstly, double gates of the structure form dual current conduction channels, leading to a low specific on-resistance (Ron,sp). Secondly, the multiple buried p-layers form a more significant triple RESURF effect, which not only increases the drift doping concentration but also modulates the electric field of the drift region, resulting in a low Ron,sp and a high breakdown voltage (BV). MBP SOI LDMOS is thus owning a reduced Ron,sp and an improved BV. The effects of structure parameters on the device performances are investigated. Compared with the conventional SOI LDMOS, the Ron,sp of MBP SOI LDMOS is reduced by 52.5% with BV increasing by 36.4% at the same 16-μm-drift region.

  7. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  8. Rapamycin combined with anti-CD45RB mAb and IL-10 or with G-CSF induces tolerance in a stringent mouse model of islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gagliani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large pool of preexisting alloreactive effector T cells can cause allogeneic graft rejection following transplantation. However, it is possible to induce transplant tolerance by altering the balance between effector and regulatory T (Treg cells. Among the various Treg-cell types, Foxp3(+Treg and IL-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells have frequently been associated with tolerance following transplantation in both mice and humans. Previously, we demonstrated that rapamycin+IL-10 promotes Tr1-cell-associated tolerance in Balb/c mice transplanted with C57BL/6 pancreatic islets. However, this same treatment was unsuccessful in C57BL/6 mice transplanted with Balb/c islets (classified as a stringent transplant model. We accordingly designed a protocol that would be effective in the latter transplant model by simultaneously depleting effector T cells and fostering production of Treg cells. We additionally developed and tested a clinically translatable protocol that used no depleting agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diabetic C57BL/6 mice were transplanted with Balb/c pancreatic islets. Recipient mice transiently treated with anti-CD45RB mAb+rapamycin+IL-10 developed antigen-specific tolerance. During treatment, Foxp3(+Treg cells were momentarily enriched in the blood, followed by accumulation in the graft and draining lymph node, whereas CD4(+IL-10(+IL-4(- T (i.e., Tr1 cells localized in the spleen. In long-term tolerant mice, only CD4(+IL-10(+IL-4(- T cells remained enriched in the spleen and IL-10 was key in the maintenance of tolerance. Alternatively, recipient mice were treated with two compounds routinely used in the clinic (namely, rapamycin and G-CSF; this drug combination promoted tolerance associated with CD4(+IL-10(+IL-4(- T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The anti-CD45RB mAb+rapamycin+IL-10 combined protocol promotes a state of tolerance that is IL-10 dependent. Moreover, the combination of rapamycin+G-CSF induces

  9. SERS substrate and a method of providing a SERS substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2011116089A A substrate primarily for SERS determination, the substrate has a number of elongate elements with a density of at least 1x108 elongate elements per cm2 and having metal coated tips. When the elements may be made to lean toward each other, such as by providing a drop...

  10. Evidence for Substrate Influence on Artificial Substrate Invertebrate Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Iain D; Prestie, Kate S

    2017-08-01

    Cobble baskets are frequently used as a tool to measure differences in benthic macroinvertebrate communities between waterbodies; however, underlying differences in substrate type may influence the resultant colonization of baskets, misrepresenting communities. This study tests the hypothesis that cobble basket placement influences the resulting benthic macroinvertebrate community. Cobble basket arrays (n = 4) were deployed in Dog Lake, Saskatchewan, in 2011 (97 d) and 2012 (95 d) on cobble habitats and soft or sandy substrates ∼100 m apart. Baskets placed on cobble substrate had significantly higher Shannon-Weaver diversity relative to those placed on soft substrate in both years, and higher % EPT (Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera) in 2011, but total density was not significantly different. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed that the community was different between both treatments, characterized by higher densities of Gammarus lacustris Sars in baskets placed on soft sediment in both years, higher densities of Aeshna sp. and Mystacides sp. on cobble substrate in 2011, and higher densities of Helobdella stagnalis (L.) and Glossophinia complanata (L.) on cobble substrate in 2012. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that baskets placed on cobble substrate versus soft substrate will result in differing community colonization. The resulting recommendation for monitoring and assessment using cobble baskets in lakes is that baskets be placed on comparable substrate type when comparing between lakes, and that cobble beds be chosen as a more appropriate substrate for deployment, as the added habitat complexity of baskets on soft sediment may act as an attractant and not reflect the true community composition of that habitat. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Friction and shear strength at the nanowire-substrate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Qin, Qingquan; Gu, Yi; Wang, Zhonglin

    2009-11-28

    The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW)-substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09-0.12 and 0.10-0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134-139 MPa and 78.9-95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW-substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  12. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  13. Substrate reduction therapy for glycosphingolipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, R H; Platt, F M

    2001-03-01

    Substrate reduction therapy is a novel approach to treating glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage disorders. These diseases are caused by mutations in the genes coding for enzymes involved in GSL catabolism and are characterised by the accumulation of GSL substrates within the lysosomes of cells. The aim of substrate reduction therapy is to inhibit the rate of synthesis of GSLs to levels where the residual activity of the mutant catabolic enzyme is sufficient to prevent pathological storage. In this review we discuss the development of N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), an imino sugar that inhibits the ceramide-specific glucosyltransferase which catalyses the first committed step of GSL synthesis. This agent has been shown to slow accumulation of stored glycolipid in an in vitro model of Gaucher's disease and in knockout mouse models of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. Furthermore, administration of NB-DNJ to Sandhoff mice delays the onset of neurological disease and also slows its progression. We discuss safety and efficacy data from the clinical trial of substrate reduction with NB-DNJ which has been undertaken in patients with Type 1 Gaucher's disease. This trial provides a proof-of-principle for the use of this approach in a wide range of GSL lysosomal storage diseases.

  14. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on a substrate comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle ...

  15. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekkanat, Bora; Bolstad, James J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the pesent invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process.

  16. Microbial transglutaminase displays broad acyl-acceptor substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Gundersen, Maria; Keillor, Jeffrey W.; Pelletier, Joelle N.

    2013-01-01

    The great importance of amide bonds in industrial synthesis has encouraged the search for efficient catalysts of amide bond formation. Microbial transglutaminase (MTG) is heavily utilized in crosslinking proteins in the food and textile industries, where the side chain of a glutamine reacts with ...

  17. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about How an Enzyme Interacts with a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-substrate interactions are a fundamental concept of biochemistry that is built upon throughout multiple biochemistry courses. Central to understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is specific knowledge of exactly how an enzyme and substrate interact. Within this narrower topic, students must understand the various binding sites on an…

  18. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2015-08-01

    OLED lighting has immense potential as aesthetically pleasing, energy-efficient general illumination. Unlike other light sources, such as incandescents, fluorescents, and inorganic LEDs, OLEDs naturally emit over a large-area surface. They are glare free, do not need to be shaded, and are cool to the touch, requiring no heatsink. The best efficiencies and lifetimes reported are on par with or better than current forms of illumination. However, the cost for OLED lighting remains high – so much so that these products are not market competitive and there is very low consumer demand. We believe that flexible, plastic-based devices will highlight the advantages of aesthetically-pleasing OLED lighting systems while paving the way for lowering both materials and manufacturing costs. These flexible devices require new development in substrate and support technology, which was the focus of the work reported here. The project team, led by Sinovia Technologies, has developed integrated plastic substrates to serve as supports for flexible OLED lighting. The substrates created in this project would enable large-area, flexible devices and are specified to perform three functions. They include a barrier to protect the OLED from moisture and oxygen-related degradation, a smooth, highly conductive transparent electrode to enable large-area device operation, and a light scattering layer to improve emission efficiency. Through the course of this project, integrated substrates were fabricated, characterized, evaluated for manufacturing feasibility and cost, and used in white OLED demonstrations to test their impact on flexible OLED lighting. Our integrated substrates meet or exceed the DOE specifications for barrier performance in water vapor and oxygen transport rates, as well as the transparency and conductivity of the anode film. We find that these integrated substrates can be manufactured in a completely roll-to-roll, high throughput process and have developed and demonstrated

  19. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  20. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Paquin, R.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  1. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  2. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  3. Identification of lysine acetyltransferase substrates using bioorthogonal chemical proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Markus; Hang, Howard C

    2013-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical proteomics is a valuable method to identify enzyme-specific substrates, a challenging task by traditional biochemical standards. The addition of recombinant enzyme and alkynyl chemical reporter to complex protein mixtures, such as cell lysates, allows the detection and identification of modified substrates. Proteins that have been modified with the chemical reporter can be selectively labeled with fluorescent dyes for detection or affinity tags for biochemical enrichment and subsequent identification by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe the detection and identification of substrates of the lysine acetyltransferase p300 in nuclear extracts using the chemical reporter 4-pentynoyl-CoA.

  4. Cell In Situ Zymography: Imaging Enzyme-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Aastha; Rani, Vibha

    2017-01-01

    Zymography has long been used for the detection of substrate-specific enzyme activity. In situ zymography (ISZ), an adaptation from the conventional substrate zymography, is a widely employed technique useful for the detection, localization, and estimation of enzyme-substrate interactions in tissues. Here, we describe a protocol to detect 'in position' matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in cells utilizing H9c2 cardiomyoblasts as a model. This technique is primarily adopted from the method used for histological sections and is termed as 'Cell in situ Zymography'. It is a simple, sensitive, and quantifiable methodology to assess the functional activity of an enzyme 'on site/in position' in cell culture.

  5. Coated substrate apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhenan; Diao, Ying; Mannsfeld, Stefan Christian Bernhardt; Tee, Chee-Keong; Becerril-Garcia, Hector A.; Zhou, Yan

    2018-01-09

    A coated substrate is formed with aligned objects such as small molecules, macromolecules and nanoscale particulates, such as inorganic, organic or inorganic/organic hybrid materials. In accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus or method involves an applicator having at least one surface patterned with protruded or indented features, and a coated substrate including a solution-based layer of objects having features and morphology attributes arranged as a function of the protruded or indented features.

  6. Substrate integrated Lead-Carbon hybrid ultracapacitor with flooded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pb-C HUCs comprise substrate-integrated PbO2 (SI-PbO2) as positive electrodes and high surface-area carbon with graphite-sheet substrate as negative ... The specific capacitance values for 2 V Pb-C HUCs are found to be 166 F/g, 102 F/g and 152 F/g with a faradaic efficiency of 98%, 92% and 88% for flooded, AGM and ...

  7. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  8. New insights into the regulatory pathways associated with the activation of the stringent response in bacterial resistance to the PBP2-targeted antibiotics, mecillinam and OP0595/RG6080.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumith, M; Mushtaq, S; Livermore, D M; Woodford, N

    2016-10-01

    The diazabicyclooctane β-lactamase inhibitor OP0595 (RG6080) also acts as an antibiotic, targeting PBP2 in Enterobacteriaceae, but this activity is vulnerable to mutational resistance. We used WGS to investigate the basis of this resistance. Twenty OP0595-selected mutants, comprising four derived from each of five different Escherichia coli strains, were sequenced on Illumina HiSeq. Reads from each mutant were mapped to the assembled genome of the corresponding parent. A variant-calling file generated with Samtools was parsed to determine genetic alterations. Besides OP0595, the mutants consistently showed decreased susceptibility to mecillinam, which likewise targets PBP2, and grew as stable round forms in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of OP0595. Among the 20 mutants, 18 had alterations in genes encoding tRNA synthase and modification functions liable to induce expression of the RpoS sigma factor through activation of the stringent response or had mutations suppressing inactivators of RpoS or the stringent response signal-degrading enzyme, SpoT. TolB was inactivated in one mutant: this activates RcsBC regulation and was previously associated with mecillinam resistance. The mechanism of resistance remained unidentified in one mutant. Both the RpoS and RcsBC systems regulate genes of cell division, including ftsAQZ that can compensate for loss or inhibition of PBP2, allowing survival of the challenged bacteria as stable round forms, as seen. WGS identified the global stringent response signal, entailing induction of RpoS, as the main mediator of mutational resistance to OP0595 in E. coli. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Technical specifications for PWR secondary water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1977-08-01

    The bases for establishing Technical Specifications for PWR secondary water chemistry are reviewed. Whereas extremely stringent control of secondary water needs to be maintained to prevent denting in some units, sound bases for establishing limits that will prevent stress corrosion, wastage, and denting do not exist at the present time. This area is being examined very thoroughly by industry-sponsored research programs. Based on the evidence available to date, short term control limits are suggested; establishment of these or other limits as Technical Specifications is not recommended until the results of the research programs have been obtained and evaluated

  10. Enzyme-substrate complexes of allosteric citrate synthase: evidence for a novel intermediate in substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Harry W; Nguyen, Nham T; Gao, Yin; Donald, Lynda J; Maurus, Robert; Ayed, Ayeda; Bruneau, Brigitte; Brayer, Gary D

    2013-12-01

    The citrate synthase (CS) of Escherichia coli is an allosteric hexameric enzyme specifically inhibited by NADH. The crystal structure of wild type (WT) E. coli CS, determined by us previously, has no substrates bound, and part of the active site is in a highly mobile region that is shifted from the position needed for catalysis. The CS of Acetobacter aceti has a similar structure, but has been successfully crystallized with bound substrates: both oxaloacetic acid (OAA) and an analog of acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA). We engineered a variant of E. coli CS wherein five amino acids in the mobile region have been replaced by those in the A. aceti sequence. The purified enzyme shows unusual kinetics with a low affinity for both substrates. Although the crystal structure without ligands is very similar to that of the WT enzyme (except in the mutated region), complexes are formed with both substrates and the allosteric inhibitor NADH. The complex with OAA in the active site identifies a novel OAA-binding residue, Arg306, which has no functional counterpart in other known CS-OAA complexes. This structure may represent an intermediate in a multi-step substrate binding process where Arg306 changes roles from OAA binding to AcCoA binding. The second complex has the substrate analog, S-carboxymethyl-coenzyme A, in the allosteric NADH-binding site and the AcCoA site is not formed. Additional CS variants unable to bind adenylates at the allosteric site show that this second complex is not a factor in positive allosteric activation of AcCoA binding. © 2013.

  11. Phosphorus sorption capacities and physicochemical properties of nine substrate materials for constructed wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, L.H.; Zhu, X.Z.; Ma, M.; Ouyang, Y.; Dong, M.; Zhu, W.L.; Luo, S.M. [South China Agricultural University, Guangdong (China)

    2008-08-15

    Constructed wetland (CW) is a promising technique for removal of pollutants from wastewater and agricultural runoff. The performance of a CW to remove pollutants, however, hinges on the use of suitable substrate materials. This study examined the physicochemical properties and phosphorus (P) sorption capacities of nine different CW substrate materials using both batch experiments and the Freundlich as well as the Langmuir isotherm. The nine substrate materials used in this study were turf, topsoil, gravel, midsized sand (MSS), blast furnace slag (BFS), coal burn slag (CBS), blast furnace artificial slag (BFAS), coal burn artificial slag (CBAS), and midsized artificial sand (MSAS). Experimental data showed that sorption of P increased with initial solution P concentrations for all nine substrate materials. The maximum P sorption capacity of the substrate materials estimated by Langmuir isotherm was in the following order: turf (4243 mg/kg substrate) > BFAS (2116 mg/kg substrate) > BFS (1598 mg/kg substrate) > CBS (1449 mg/kg substrate) > top soil (1396 mg/kg substrate) > CBAS (1194 mg/kg substrate) > MSAS (519 mg/kg substrate) > gravel (494 mg/kg substrate) > MSS (403 mg/kg substrate). The specific gravity of eight substrate materials (except gravel) had very significant negative correlations with the P sorption, whereas the particle diameter of D-60 and uniformity coefficient (K-60) had positive correlations with the P sorption. The cation exchange capacity, organic matter, available ferrous, and exchangeable aluminum of the eight substrate materials also had very significant positive correlations with the P sorption, while the pH of the substrate materials showed a very significant negative correlation with the P sorption. Our study further suggests that turf and CBAS are the two relatively ideal substrate materials suitable for removal of P from a CW system.

  12. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  13. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  14. Methods of etching a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmo, J.J.; Gambino, R.J.; Harper, J.M.E.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of etching a substrate. The substrate is located opposite a target electrode in a vacuum chamber, and the surface of the target electrode is bombarded with energetic particles of atomic dimensions. The target electrode is an intermetallic composition (compound, alloy or finely divided homogeneous mixture) of two metals A and B such that upon bombardment the electrode emits negative ions of metal B which have sufficient energy to produce etching of the substrate. Many target materials are exemplified. Typically the metal A has an electronegativity XA and metal B has an electronegativity XB such that Xb - Xa is greater than about 2.55 electron volts, with the exception of combinations of metals having a fractional ionicity Q less than about 0.314. The source of the energetic particles may be an ionised gas in the vacuum chamber. The apparatus and its mode of operation are described in detail. (U.K.)

  15. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2018-04-03

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  16. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  17. Substrate Handbook for Biogas Production; Substrathandbok foer biogasproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My; Uldal, Martina (AnoxKaldnes AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Today, co-digestion plants in Sweden treat a broad range of different substrates, of which some have not previously been used for anaerobic digestion. The major part of this organic waste derives from households, restaurants, food industries and farms. When evaluating a new substrate as feed for anaerobic digestion, several different aspects need to be taken into consideration, such as anaerobic degradability, TS/VS content, nutrient composition and risk for mechanical problems. Consequently, there is a need for practical guidelines on how to evaluate new substrates as raw materials for biogas production, including not only gas yield but also what practical and microbiological problems that may arise when the specific substrate is treated together with other substrates in the plant. The aim with this handbook is to provide a basis on how to evaluate new substrates as feed for anaerobic digestion. The intention is that this material will save time and effort for the personnel at the plant when they come in contact with new types of waste. Also, the aim is to facilitate the process of identifying new substrates within the ABP-regulation (1774/2002) and what requirements are then demanded on handling. The work with the handbook has been divided in three different parts; (1) an extensive literature study and a compilation of the achieved results, (2) interviews with personnel at most of the Swedish co-digestion plants to identify substrates and problems of interest, and (3) lab tests of selected substrates. The lab tests included Bio Methane Potential (BMP) tests as well as a simple characterization of each substrate based on fat/protein/carbohydrate content. All data origins from anaerobic digestion within the mesophilic temperature range, but the results and discussion are applicable also for thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The result of this work is a written report together with an Excel file which are to be directly used by the biogas plants as a basis in the

  18. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  19. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  20. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tens of microns and it is important to understand how their spreading depends on the properties of the substrate onto which they are printed. Experimental work on such mesoscopic drops is difficult and expensive because of the length and time scales involved. Therefore there is a need for numerical modelling both to ...

  1. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  2. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results:

  3. Imparting Icephobicity with Substrate Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzius, Thomas; Vasileiou, Thomas; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-11-01

    Ice accumulation poses serious safety and performance issues for modern infrastructure. Rationally designed superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated potential as a passive means to mitigate ice accretion; however, further studies on solutions that reduce impalement and contact time for impacting supercooled droplets are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate the collaborative effect of substrate flexibility and surface texture on enhancing icephobicity and repelling viscous droplets. We first investigate the influence of increased viscosity on impalement resistance and droplet-substrate contact time. Then we examine the effect of droplet partial solidification on recoil by impacting supercooled water droplets onto surfaces containing ice nucleation promoters. We demonstrate a passive method for shedding partially solidified droplets that does not rely on the classic recoil mechanism. Using an energy-based model, we identify a previously unexplored mechanism whereby the substrate oscillation governs the rebound process by efficiently absorbing the droplet kinetic energy and rectifying it back, allowing for droplet recoil. This mechanism applies for a range of droplet viscosities and ice slurries, which do not rebound from rigid superhydrophobic substrates. Partial support of the Swiss National Science Foundation under Grant No. 162565 and the European Research Council under Advanced Grant No. 669908 (INTICE) is acknowledged.

  4. Sensor Technologies on Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    NASA Ames has developed sensor technologies on flexible substrates integrated into textiles for personalized environment monitoring and human performance evaluation. Current technologies include chemical sensing for gas leak and event monitoring and biological sensors for human health and performance monitoring. Targeted integration include next generation EVA suits and flexible habitats.

  5. Cleavage of mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates by numerous restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Mark T; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The utility of restriction endonucleases as a tool in molecular biology is in large part due to the high degree of specificity with which they cleave well-characterized DNA recognition sequences. The specificity of restriction endonucleases is not absolute, yet many commonly used assays of biological phenomena and contemporary molecular biology techniques rely on the premise that restriction enzymes will cleave only perfect cognate recognition sites. In vitro, mispaired heteroduplex DNAs are commonly formed, especially subsequent to polymerase chain reaction amplification. We investigated a panel of restriction endonucleases to determine their ability to cleave mispaired heteroduplex DNA substrates. Two straightforward, non-radioactive assays are used to evaluate mispaired heteroduplex DNA cleavage: a PCR amplification method and an oligonucleotide-based assay. These assays demonstrated that most restriction endonucleases are capable of site-specific double-strand cleavage with heteroduplex mispaired DNA substrates, however, certain mispaired substrates do effectively abrogate cleavage to undetectable levels. These data are consistent with mispaired substrate cleavage previously reported for Eco RI and, importantly, extend our knowledge of mispaired heteroduplex substrate cleavage to 13 additional enzymes.

  6. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algasaier, Sana I.; Exell, Jack C.; Bennet, Ian A.; Thompson, Mark J.; Gotham, Victoria J. B.; Shaw, Steven J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Finger, L. David; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5′-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5′-termini in vivo. Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5′-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5′-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr40, Asp181, and Arg100 and a reacting duplex 5′-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5′-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage. PMID:26884332

  7. Sensitivity and Specificity of Proposed DSM-5 Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Marianne L.; Robins, Diana L.; Jashar, Dasal; Brennan, Laura; Fein, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis is based on behavioral presentation; changes in conceptual models or defining behaviors may significantly impact diagnosis and uptake of ASD-specific interventions. The literature examining impact of DSM-5 criteria is equivocal. Toddlers may be especially vulnerable to the stringent requirements of…

  8. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  9. Microplate Bioassay for Determining Substrate Selectivity of "Candida rugosa" Lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-zhen; Fang, Bai-shan

    2012-01-01

    Substrate selectivity of "Candida rugosa" lipase was tested using "p"-nitrophenyl esters of increasing chain length (C[subscript 1], C[subscript 7], C[subscript 15]) using the high-throughput screening method. A fast and easy 96-well microplate bioassay was developed to help students learn and practice biotechnological specificity screen. The…

  10. Neural substrates of sublexical processing for spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Andrew T; Wilson, Stephen M; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2017-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In search of natural substrates and inhibitors of MDR pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K

    2001-04-01

    The function of microbial MDRs remains a hotly debated subject. Given the very broad substrate specificities of some MDRs, like the RND pumps that can extrude all classes of amphipathic compounds (cationic, neutral, and anionic), it seems difficult to develop a rationale for pinpointing possible natural substrates of these translocases. At the same time, several clues can be used to guide our search for natural MDR substrates. One is the fact that amphipathic cations appear to be the preferred substrates of MDRs. These substances are extruded by MDRs of all 5 known families and are the almost exclusive substrates of SMR and MF family MDRs. The universal nature of amphipathic cations as MDR substrates suggests that these were the substances that fueled the evolution of MDR pumps. Two factors apparently favored this particular class of molecules for the role of original MDR substrates--need and opportunity. Unlike other substances, amphipathic cations accumulate in the cell driven by the membrane potential, which makes cations potentially the most dangerous toxins. At the same time, amphipathic cations are highly hydrated and do not permeate the membrane as readily as neutral compounds, making it feasible to design a defense based on an efflux pump. The paucity of known cationic (non-basic) antimicrobials might be a result of using MDR-expressing microbial cells for antibiotic discovery. Plant amphipathic cations, the berberine alkaloids, are good MDR substrates. The Berberis plants produce 5'-methoxyhydnocarpin-D, an MDR inhibitor that potentiates the action of berberine. It is suggested that the further evolution of MDR pumps was determined largely by the barrier function of the membrane they reside in. Thus Gram negative bacteria have an outer membrane barrier that slows the penetration of virtually all amphipathic molecules, and transenvelope MDRs of the RND and EmrAB-type extrude their substrates across this barrier. A low permeability of the cytoplasmic

  12. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  13. Millimeter-Waves Structures on Benzocyclobutene Dielectric Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Di Massa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The need of low-loss substrate materials with stable dielectric performances is a strong requirement when working at millimeter frequencies, where standard dielectrics exhibit prohibitive losses. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a polymer material, the benzocyclobutene (BCB, having a low dielectric constant and a low loss tangent, with a stable behavior up to THz frequencies. A specific in-house manufacture technology is described to realize millimeter-wave structures on a BCB dielectric substrate. Experimental validations on BCB-based circuits and antennas prototypes are discussed.

  14. Verfahren zum Herstellen einer Beschichtung eines Substrats

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke, Martin; Töpper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The method involves applying coating material (7) on surface (2) of recess (3) formed in substrate (1). A liquid auxiliary agent (6) is applied on substrate surface, such that recess is filled with auxiliary agent. The coating material is subsequently applied to auxiliary agent on substrate. A coating material portion in auxiliary agent is transported by coating material diffusion. The agent is subsequently separated from coating material, such that coating material on substrate surface is le...

  15. Förpackning av keramiska substrat

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Detta examensarbete handlar om forpackning av keramiska substrat. Canning ar det universella namnet pa forpackning av keramiska substrat. Keramiska substrat kan vara katalysatorer eller partikelfilter som anvands som ett efterbehandlingssystem i bensin och Diesel applikationer. Examensarbetet genomfordes hos Scania CV AB. I installationsprocessen sveps en keramisk fibermatta runt det keramiska substratet. Substratet inkapslas sedan med ett metalholje. Rapporten inleds med att beskriva olika i...

  16. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Indicators for suicide substrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jatinder

    The usual trend is to apply QSSA to a system with high substrate concentration. But, QSSA, i.e., steadiness in intermediate concentration, may even be achieved at high and even comparable enzyme-substrate ratio. Whether a system will attain a steady state depends not only on the high substrate concentration, but also on ...

  17. Method for coating substrates and mask holder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, Frederik; Yakshin, Andrey; Louis, Eric; Kessels, M.J.H.; Maas, Edward Lambertus Gerardus; Bruineman, Caspar

    2004-01-01

    When coating substrates it is frequently desired that the layer thickness should be a certain function of the position on the substrate to be coated. To control the layer thickness a mask is conventionally arranged between the coating particle source and the substrate. This leads to undesirable

  18. Peptidomics methods for the identification of peptidase-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Anna Mari; Kim, Yun-Gon; Saghatelian, Alan

    2013-02-01

    Peptidases have important roles in controlling physiological signaling through their regulation of bioactive peptides. Understanding and controlling bioactive peptide regulation is of great biomedical interest and approaches that elucidate the interplay between peptidases and their substrates are vital for achieving this goal. Here, we highlight the utility of recent peptidomics approaches in identifying endogenous substrates of peptidases. These approaches reveal bioactive substrates and help characterize the biochemical functions of the enzyme. Most recently, peptidomics approaches have been applied to address the challenging question of identifying the peptidases responsible for regulating specific bioactive peptides. Since peptidases are of great biomedical interest, these approaches will begin to impact our ability to identify new drug targets that regulate important bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Computational study of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase from Talaromyces flavus, a glycosidase with high substrate flexibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulik, Natallia; Slámová, Kristýna; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Křen, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, JAN (2015), s. 28 ISSN 1471-2105 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0629; GA ČR GP13-06818P Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : molecular docking * substrate specificity * unnatural substrates * phylogenetic analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.435, year: 2015

  20. Method For Producing Mechanically Flexible Silicon Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-08-28

    A method for making a mechanically flexible silicon substrate is disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes providing a silicon substrate. The method further includes forming a first etch stop layer in the silicon substrate and forming a second etch stop layer in the silicon substrate. The method also includes forming one or more trenches over the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer. The method further includes removing the silicon substrate between the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer.

  1. Crystal structure of substrate free form of glycerol dehydratase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Dotson, Garry; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Reiss, Lisa; Emptage, Mark (Du Pont)

    2010-03-08

    Glycerol dehydratase (GDH) and diol dehydratase (DDH) are highly homologous isofunctional enzymes that catalyze the elimination of water from glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to the corresponding aldehyde via a coenzyme B{sub 12}-dependent radical mechanism. The crystal structure of substrate free form of GDH in complex with cobalamin and K{sup +} has been determined at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Its overall fold and the subunit assembly closely resemble those of DDH. Comparison of this structure and the DDH structure, available only in substrate bound form, shows the expected change of the coordination of the essential K{sup +} from hexacoordinate to heptacoordinate with the displacement of a single coordinated water by the substrate diol. In addition, there appears to be an increase in the rigidity of the K{sup +} coordination (as measured by lower B values) upon the binding of the substrate. Structural analysis of the locations of conserved residues among various GDH and DDH sequences has aided in identification of residues potentially important for substrate preference or specificity of protein-protein interactions.

  2. The influence of substrate material on ascidian larval settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Anna L; Dijkstra, Jennifer A; Harris, Larry G

    2016-05-15

    Submerged man-made structures present novel habitat for marine organisms and often host communities that differ from those on natural substrates. Although many factors are known to contribute to these differences, few studies have directly examined the influence of substrate material on organism settlement. We quantified larval substrate preferences of two species of ascidians, Ciona intestinalis (cryptogenic, formerly C. intestinalis type B) and Botrylloides violaceus (non-native), on commonly occurring natural (granite) and man-made (concrete, high-density polyethylene, PVC) marine materials in laboratory trials. Larvae exhibited species-specific settlement preferences, but generally settled more often than expected by chance on concrete and HDPE. Variation in settlement between materials may reflect preferences for rougher substrates, or may result from the influence of leached chemicals on ascidian settlement. These findings indicate that an experimental plate material can influence larval behavior and may help us understand how substrate features may contribute to differences in settlement in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical monitoring systems for thermal spray processes: droplets behavior and substrate pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Tanaka, J.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-11-01

    Thermal spray is a technique to form molten droplets using either plasma- or combustion-heating, which impinge upon substrates to form coating layers for various purposes, such as anti-corrosion and anti-wear layers. Although it is an established technique having a history of more than a century, operations of spray guns together with preparing suitable substrate surfaces for obtaining good coating layers still rely on experienced technicians. Because of the necessity of meeting more and more stringent requirements for coating quality and cost from customers, there has been a strong need to try to monitor spray processes, so as to obtain the best possible spray coating layers. The basic requirements for such monitoring systems are *reasonably cheap, *easy operation for laypersons, *easy access to targets to be investigated, and *an in-situ capability. The purpose of the present work is to provide suitable optical monitoring systems for (1) droplets behavior and (2) substrate pre-treatments. For the former (1), the first result was already presented at the 17th laser-aided plasma diagnostics meeting (LAPD17) in 2015 in Sapporo, and the results of its subsequent applications into real spray environments are shown in this article in order to validate the previous proposal. Topic (2) is new in the research program, and the proof-of-principle experiment for the proposed method yielded a favorable result. Based on this positive result, an overall strategy is being planned to fulfill the final objective of the optical monitoring of substrate pre-treatments. Details of these two programs (1) and (2) together with the present status are described.

  4. Substrate heater for thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Steve R.

    1996-01-01

    A substrate heater for thin film deposition of metallic oxides upon a target substrate configured as a disk including means for supporting in a predetermined location a target substrate configured as a disk, means for rotating the target substrate within the support means, means for heating the target substrate within the support means, the heating means about the support means and including a pair of heating elements with one heater element situated on each side of the predetermined location for the target substrate, with one heater element defining an opening through which desired coating material can enter for thin film deposition and with the heating means including an opening slot through which the target substrate can be entered into the support means, and, optionally a means for thermal shielding of the heating means from surrounding environment is disclosed.

  5. A proteomic approach for comprehensively screening substrates of protein kinases such as Rho-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuki Amano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are major components of signal transduction pathways in multiple cellular processes. Kinases directly interact with and phosphorylate downstream substrates, thus modulating their functions. Despite the importance of identifying substrates in order to more fully understand the signaling network of respective kinases, efficient methods to search for substrates remain poorly explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined mass spectrometry and affinity column chromatography of the catalytic domain of protein kinases to screen potential substrates. Using the active catalytic fragment of Rho-kinase/ROCK/ROK as the model bait, we obtained about 300 interacting proteins from the rat brain cytosol fraction, which included the proteins previously reported as Rho-kinase substrates. Several novel interacting proteins, including doublecortin, were phosphorylated by Rho-kinase both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method would enable identification of novel specific substrates for kinases such as Rho-kinase with high sensitivity.

  6. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  7. Divergent evolution of feeding substrate preferences in a phylogenetically young species flock of pupfish ( Cyprinodon spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, Joachim; Plath, Martin

    2008-12-01

    A fundamental question in sympatric speciation is how trophic divergence is achieved. We used an extremely young (Cyprinodon spp.) from Laguna Chichancanab in south-eastern Mexico to examine divergent evolution of preferences for different feeding substrates. In a test aquarium, we presented four feeding substrates (sand, gravel, a plastic plant, and blank bottom), but no actual food was offered. The four feeding substrates were chosen to mirror the most common substrate types in Laguna Chichancanab. Previous studies demonstrated that benthic food items prevail in the diet of most Cyprinodon species. C. beltrani preferred sand, whereas C. labiosus preferred gravel. F1 hybrids of both species showed intermediate preferences. C. maya searched for food equally at all substrates. As the test fish were reared under identical laboratory conditions (i.e., in the absence of feeding substrates), the species-specific preferences appear to be genetically fixed, suggesting rapid divergent evolution of feeding behaviors.

  8. Bacterial protease uses distinct thermodynamic signatures for substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Cornaciu, Irina; Fedosyuk, Sofiya; Hoffmann, Guillaume; Round, Adam; Márquez, José A; Nemoto, Takayuki K; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2017-06-06

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis are im